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Sample records for net plankton diatoms

  1. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lazarus

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18O (climate and carbon cycle records (∂(13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2. Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all p<.001, but only weakly over the earlier Cenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  2. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18)O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂(13)C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p.9, detrended r>.6, all pCenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  3. Cenozoic planktonic marine diatom diversity and correlation to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, David; Barron, John; Renaudie, Johan; Diver, Patrick; Türke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂18O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂13C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p2 were only moderately higher than today. Diversity is strongly correlated to both ∂13C and pCO2 over the last 15 my (for both: r>.9, detrended r>.6, all pwarm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

  4. Arctic Diatoms - Diversity, Plankton Interactions and Poulation Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tammilehto, Anna

    Oceans produce nearly half of the global net primary production annually. Most productive marine areas are found along coasts and, contrary to the terrestrial ecosystems, at high latitudes. In these areas most primary production is done by phytoplankton. In the Arctic, phytoplankton communities...... are often dominated by diatoms. They are single-celled, eukaryotic algae, which play an essential role in ocean carbon and silica cycles. Many species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia Peragallo produce a neurotoxin, domoic acid (DA), which can be transferred to higher levels in food webs causing amnesic...... that blooming behavior may be beneficial for F. cylindrus. High genetic diversity found in F. cylindrus coupled with high ecophysiological variability (i.e. variation among the strains and phenotypic plasticity) with regard to projected increase in temperature and decrease in pH due to climate change suggests...

  5. Lake warming favours small-sized planktonic diatom species

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monika Winder; John E Reuter; S. Geoffrey Schladow

    2009-01-01

    ... were not responsible for the change. The increase in small-celled species was sufficient to decrease the average diatom size and thus sinking velocity, which strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling...

  6. [Comparative analysis between diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun-ge; Wang, Cheng-bao; Li, Xing-biao; Fan, Yan-yan; Feng, Xiang-ping

    2013-10-01

    To compare and explore the application value of diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method for drowning identification. Forty drowning cases from 2010 to 2011 were collected from Department of Forensic Medicine of Wenzhou Medical University. Samples including lung, kidney, liver and field water from each case were tested with diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method, respectively. The Diatom nitric acid digestion method and plankton 16S rDNA PCR method required 20 g and 2 g of each organ, and 15 mL and 1.5 mL of field water, respectively. The inspection time and detection rate were compared between the two methods. Diatom nitric acid digestion method mainly detected two species of diatoms, Centriae and Pennatae, while plankton 16S rDNA PCR method amplified a length of 162 bp band. The average inspection time of each case of the Diatom nitric acid digestion method was (95.30 +/- 2.78) min less than (325.33 +/- 14.18) min of plankton 16S rDNA PCR method (P plankton 16S rDNA PCR method was both 80%, higher than 40% and 30% of diatom nitric acid digestion method (P plankton 16S rDNA PCR method has practice values with such advantages as less quantity of samples, huge information and high specificity.

  7. UV sensitivity of planktonic net community production in ocean surface waters

    OpenAIRE

    Regaudie de Gioux, Aurore; Agustí, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    The net plankton community metabolism of oceanic surface waters is particularly important as it more directly affects the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters and thus the air-sea fluxes of CO2. Plankton communities in surface waters are exposed to high irradiance that includes significant ultraviolet blue (UVB, 280-315 nm) radiation. UVB radiation affects both photosynthetic and respiration rates, increase plankton mortality rates, and other metabolic and chemical processes. Here we tes...

  8. UV sensitivity of planktonic net community production in ocean surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaudie-de-Gioux, Aurore; Agustí, Susana; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2014-05-01

    The net plankton community metabolism of oceanic surface waters is particularly important as it more directly affects the partial pressure of CO2 in surface waters and thus the air-sea fluxes of CO2. Plankton communities in surface waters are exposed to high irradiance that includes significant ultraviolet blue (UVB, 280-315 nm) radiation. UVB radiation affects both photosynthetic and respiration rates, increase plankton mortality rates, and other metabolic and chemical processes. Here we test the sensitivity of net community production (NCP) to UVB of planktonic communities in surface waters across contrasting regions of the ocean. We observed here that UVB radiation affects net plankton community production at the ocean surface, imposing a shift in NCP by, on average, 50% relative to the values measured when excluding partly UVB. Our results show that under full solar radiation, the metabolic balance shows the prevalence of net heterotrophic community production. The demonstration of an important effect of UVB radiation on NCP in surface waters presented here is of particular relevance in relation to the increased UVB radiation derived from the erosion of the stratospheric ozone layer. Our results encourage design future research to further our understanding of UVB effects on the metabolic balance of plankton communities.

  9. Competitive advantage and higher fitness in native populations of genetically structured planktonic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildever, Sirje; Sefbom, Josefin; Lips, Inga; Godhe, Anna

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that the planktonic diatom Skeletonema from neighbouring areas are genetically differentiated despite absence of physical dispersal barriers. We revisited two sites, Mariager Fjord and Kattegat, NE Atlantic, and isolated new strains. Microsatellite genotyping and F-statistics revealed that the populations were genetically differentiated. An experiment was designed to investigate if populations are locally adapted and have a native competitive advantage. Ten strains from each location were grown individually in native and foreign water to investigate differences in produced biomass. Additionally, we mixed six pairs, one strain from each site, and let them grow together in native and foreign water. Strains from Mariager Fjord and Kattegat produced higher biomass in native water. In the competition experiment, strains from both sites displayed higher relative abundance and demonstrated competitive advantage in their native water. The cause of the differentiated growth is unknown, but could possibly be attributed to differences in silica concentration or viruses in the two water types. Our data show that dispersal potential does not influence the genetic structure of the populations. We conclude that genetic adaptation has not been overruled by gene flow, but instead the responses to different selection conditions are enforcing the observed genetic structure. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Finding a partner in the ocean: molecular and evolutionary bases of the response to sexual cues in a planktonic diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Swaraj; Patil, Shrikant; Mapleson, Daniel; Russo, Monia Teresa; Vitale, Laura; Fevola, Cristina; Maumus, Florian; Casotti, Raffaella; Mock, Thomas; Caccamo, Mario; Montresor, Marina; Sanges, Remo; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2017-07-01

    Microalgae play a major role as primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Cell signalling regulates their interactions with the environment and other organisms, yet this process in phytoplankton is poorly defined. Using the marine planktonic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata, we investigated the cell response to cues released during sexual reproduction, an event that demands strong regulatory mechanisms and impacts on population dynamics. We sequenced the genome of P. multistriata and performed phylogenomic and transcriptomic analyses, which allowed the definition of gene gains and losses, horizontal gene transfers, conservation and evolutionary rate of sex-related genes. We also identified a small number of conserved noncoding elements. Sexual reproduction impacted on cell cycle progression and induced an asymmetric response of the opposite mating types. G protein-coupled receptors and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are implicated in the response to sexual cues, which overall entails a modulation of cell cycle, meiosis-related and nutrient transporter genes, suggesting a fine control of nutrient uptake even under nutrient-replete conditions. The controllable life cycle and the genome sequence of P. multistriata allow the reconstruction of changes occurring in diatoms in a key phase of their life cycle, providing hints on the evolution and putative function of their genes and empowering studies on sexual reproduction. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. The diatom-produced polyunsaturated aldehydes can induce trophic cascades in the planktonic food web in productive coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzè, G.; Stoecker, D. K.; Pierson, J. J.; Lavrentyev, P.

    2016-02-01

    Allelopathy is wide spread among marine phytoplankton, including diatoms that produce cytotoxic secondary metabolites such as polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA). Most published PUA studies focused on the reproduction and development of specific marine invertebrates under laboratory conditions. In this study, we examined the effect of PUA on the trophic interactions between the copepod Acartia tonsa and natural microplankton collected from the Chesapeake Bay and the Virginia coastal waters. A set of bottle incubation experiments was conducted using the environmentally realistic concentrations of dissolved 2E, 4E-heptadienal and 2E, 4E-octadienal. Although PUA did not change phytoplankton growth, microzooplankton growth was affected at the species-specific level and their community herbivory rates declined. At the same time, the rates of copepod herbivory and predation on ciliates increased in the PUA treatments. These preliminary results suggest that production of cytotoxic compounds by diatoms may be a defense mechanism primarily against microzooplankton. The cascading effects induced by PUA can alter the composition and dynamics of microbial plankton communities, which in turn could have strong implication for the carbon cycling in productive coastal ecosystems.

  12. The ecology of the planktonic diatom Cyclotella and its implications for global environmental change studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saros, J E; Anderson, N J

    2015-05-01

    The fossil record of diatoms in lake sediments can be used to assess the effects of climate variability on lake ecosystems if ecological relationships between diatom community structure and environmental parameters are well understood. Cyclotella sensu lato taxa are a key group of diatoms that are frequently dominant members of phytoplankton communities in low- to moderate-productivity lakes. Their relative abundances have fluctuated significantly in palaeolimnological records spanning over a century in arctic, alpine, boreal and temperate lakes. This suggests that these species are sensitive to environmental change and may serve as early indicators of ecosystem effects of global change. Yet patterns of change in Cyclotella species are not synchronous or unidirectional across, or even within, regions, raising the question of how to interpret these widespread changes in diatom community structure. We suggest that the path forward in resolving seemingly disparate records is to identify clearly the autecology of Cyclotella species, notably the role of nutrients, dissolved organic carbon and light, coupled with better consideration of both the mechanisms controlling lake thermal stratification processes and the resulting effects of changing lake thermal regimes on light and nutrients. Here we begin by reviewing the literature on the resource requirements of common Cyclotella taxa, illustrating that many studies reveal the importance of light, nitrogen, phosphorus, and interactions among these resources in controlling relative abundances. We then discuss how these resource requirements can be linked to shifts in limnological processes driven by environmental change, including climate-driven change in lakewater temperature, thermal stratification and nutrient loading, as well as acidification-driven shifts in nutrients and water clarity. We examine three case studies, each involving two lakes from the same region that have disparate trends in the relative abundances of

  13. A non-diatom plankton bloom controlled by copepod grazing and amphipod predation: Preliminary results from the LOHAFEX iron-fertilisation experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazzocchi, M.G.; Gonzalez, H.E.; Vandromme, P.; Borrione, I.; deAlcala, M.R.; Gauns, M.; Assmy, P.; Fuchs, B.; Klaas, C.; Martin, P.; Montresor, M.; Ramaiah, N.; Naqvi, S.W.A.; Smetacek, V.

    INTERNATIONAL NEWSLETTER OCTOBER 2009 3 GLOBEC INTERNATIONAL NEWSLETTER OCTOBER 2009 A non-diatom plankton bloom controlled by copepod grazing and amphipod predation: Preliminary results from the LOHAFEX iron-fertilisation experiment Maria Grazia Mazzocchi 1... and corroborated with counts made with an inverted microscope as high as > 15 x 10 6 cells L - 1 . A significant fraction of the larger flagellates (~ 5 µm) were Phaeocystis solitary cells that started making numerous colonies in the second week, so we were...

  14. Effects of temperature on growth and lipid synthesis of diatom Chaetoceros Curvisetus and the Northern Adriatic (Mediteranean) plankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Tihana; Gašparović, Blaženka; Godrijan, Jelena; Maric, Daniela; Djakovac, Tamara; Mlakar, Marina

    2017-04-01

    Phytoplankton is the major primary producer in the world. Marine phytoplankton lives in a rather changing environment, with variations in temperature, light, salinity, nutrient availability, etc. In such changing environment phytoplankton should live, grow and reproduce, and, in order to achieve that, they fix carbon and nutrients to produce biomolecules (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates). Lipids are a good indicator of organic matter (OM) processes in the seas and oceans, also good bioindicators for OM origin, and phytoplankton adaptations to environmental stress. Marine lipids are produced by organisms, mostly in phototrophic part of the seas and oceans, and their crucial producer is phytoplankton. We were interested to see how the increasing temperature and different nutrient availability affect quantitative and qualitative lipid and lipid classes production by plankton community. To test how marine phytoplankton would respond to predicted increasing temperature we conducted monoculture batch experiments in laboratory on model diatom Chaetoceros curvisetus at five different temperatures from 10 to 30C. Also we conducted experiments in phosphorous replete and deplete conditions mimicking eutrophic and oligotrophic marine conditions. We have chosen Chaetoceros curvisetus as a model culture since it is a major component of Northern Adriatic (NA) phytoplankton, but also Chaetoceros genus of diatoms is most abundant in wide range of marine ecosystems. We also conducted annual sampling of the NA particulate matter that covers the same temperature range as for the batch experiments. NA samples were taken on two stations with different nutrient supply that were characterized as oligotrophic and mesotrophic stations. Samples were taken from 2013 to 2014 on a monthly basis. Lipid classes were characterized with thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection. Data are supported by particulate organic carbon (POC), chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations and

  15. Composition of diatom communities and their contribution to plankton biomass in the naturally iron-fertilized region of Kerguelen in the Southern Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasbleiz, Marine; Leblanc, Karine; Armand, Leanne K; Christaki, Urania; Georges, Clément; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Quéguiner, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    In the naturally iron-fertilized surface waters of the northern Kerguelen Plateau region, the early spring diatom community composition and contribution to plankton carbon biomass were investigated and compared with the high nutrient, low chlorophyll (HNLC) surrounding waters. The large iron-induced blooms were dominated by small diatom species belonging to the genera Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) and Thalassiosira, which rapidly responded to the onset of favorable light-conditions in the meander of the Polar Front. In comparison, the iron-limited HNLC area was typically characterized by autotrophic nanoeukaryote-dominated communities and by larger and more heavily silicified diatom species (e.g. Fragilariopsis spp.). Our results support the hypothesis that diatoms are valuable vectors of carbon export to depth in naturally iron-fertilized systems of the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our results corroborate observations of the exported diatom assemblage from a sediment trap deployed in the iron-fertilized area, whereby the dominant Chaetoceros (Hyalochaete) cells were less efficiently exported than the less abundant, yet heavily silicified, cells of Thalassionema nitzschioides and Fragilariopsis kerguelensis Our observations emphasize the strong influence of species-specific diatom cell properties combined with trophic interactions on matter export efficiency, and illustrate the tight link between the specific composition of phytoplankton communities and the biogeochemical properties characterizing the study area. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Diatom-inferred depth models in 8 Canadian boreal lakes: inferred changes in the benthic:planktonic depth boundary and implications for assessment of past droughts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Kathleen R.; Kingsbury, Melanie V.; Lewis, C. F. Michael; Cumming, Brian F.

    2011-05-01

    Assessment of past drought in boreal regions, a region predicted to be strongly affected by climate warming, can provide insights into future availability of water. However, limited instrumental data and paleoclimatic data are available for this assessment. To address this lack of data in the boreal region of northwest Ontario, a regional study of lakes in the Winnipeg River Drainage Basin was initiated. Diatom-inferred (D-I) depth models were developed based on surface samples collected along a depth gradient within 8 small boreal lakes. Weighted-averaging and modern analog approaches provided robust within-lake depth models for each of the study lakes, with bootstrapped r2 values ranging from 0.90 to 0.98, and root-mean-squared-errors of prediction (RMSEP) between 1.1 and 2.5 m. Large differences in the estimated depth optima for three representative, but common diatom species across our 8 study lakes suggested that within-lake calibration datasets are more appropriate for inferring past drought based in depth models than a regional multi-lake calibration dataset, and that light and related variables are controlling factors governing the maximum depth of benthic taxa. A down-core application of the D-I depth models on a near-shore core from Meekin Lake, retrieved near the present-day ecotone between the benthic and planktonic diatom assemblages indicated highly similar trends in inferred depth ( r = 0.96). The models have significant correlations with other metrics of changes in depth including diatom species richness ( r = 0.74-0.78) and evenness ( r = 0.76-0.8), thereby allowing a check on the strength and direction of the depth inferences down-core. Near-shore cores located near the benthic:planktonic transition is a sensitive region that can provide estimates of past droughts in lakes where such inferences have been difficult to estimate.

  17. Climatic and oceanic forcing of new, net, and diatom production in the North Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jean-Eric; Gratton, Yves; Fauchot, Juliette; Price, Neil M.

    New, net, and diatom production in the North Water were estimated during May to July 1998 from in vitro measurements of nitrate uptake and mesoscale temporal changes in the inventories of nitrate, silicate, oxygen, and inorganic carbon (DIC). Sampling stations were divided into two domains according to the position of the dominant water types: the silicate-rich Arctic water (SRAW) and Baffin Bay Water (BBW). BBW dominated in the southeast and was associated with relatively shallow upper mixed layers (UMLs) and weak horizontal advection. A phytoplankton bloom started in late April in BBW and grew slowly over 7 weeks, during which time the build-up of particulate organic nitrogen and carbon accounted for ca. 80% of the nitrate and DIC deficit, respectively. Over half of the new production (1.37 g C m -2 d -1) during this period was attributed to wind-driven replenishment of nitrate in the euphotic zone. The bloom culminated when seasonally declining winds and rising temperatures severed the UML from the deep nutrient reservoir. The same change in weather induced ice melt, stratification, and bloom development in northern SRAW, which had previously been characterized by deep UMLs. Collectively, the results imply that the timing and magnitude of blooms in the North Water are controlled by a succession of oceanic and climatic forcings. New C production in the North Water during April to July (1.11 g C m -2 d -1) was an order of magnitude higher than in adjacent waters and up to 8 times higher than in the Northeast Water polynya. As much as 80% of this production was mediated by diatoms >5 μm, suggesting potentially high and efficient C transfer to the herbivorous food web and deep waters.

  18. Plankton data collected using net casts from the FRANCISCO DE ULLOA in the North Pacific Ocean from 15 July 1998 to 30 July 1998 (NODC Accession 0000911)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton data were collected using net casts in the North Pacific Ocean from FRANCISCO DE ULLOA. Data were collected from 15 July 1998 to 30 July 1998. Data were...

  19. Plankton data collected from instrumented tower and net casts in the Greenland Sea from the POLARSTERN from 09 June 1991 to 16 June 1991 (NODC Accession 0000772)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton data were collected using instrumented tower and net casts from the POLARSTERN in the Greenland Sea. Data were collected from 09 June 1991 to 16 June 1991....

  20. Plankton and nutrients data collected using net and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from OSHORO MARU from 02 April 1986 to 06 September 1991 (NODC Accession 0000783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton and nutrients data were collected using net and CTD casts from the OSHORO MARU in the Bering Sea. Data were collected from 02 April 1986 to 06 September...

  1. Copper and zinc in estuarine water: Chemical speciation in relation to bioavailability to the marine planktonic diatom Ditylum Brightwellii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijstenbil, J.W.; Poortvliet, T.C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Availability of toxic trace metals in relation to phytoplankton growth was studied in water of the polluted Westerschelde (southwestern Netherlands). The prominent estuarine diatom Ditylum brightwellii was grown in bioassays with estuarine water (14%o salinity). Selective removal of Cu and Zn, and

  2. Assessment of oxidative stress in the planktonic diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in response to UVA and UVB radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijstenbil, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    Induction of oxidative stress by UVA and UVB in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana was experimentally studied. Cells, pre-grown in a light-limited continuous culture, were incubated for 4 h at 175 µmol m-2s-1photosynthetically active radiation, with optional supplementary UVA at an unweighted dose

  3. Selectivity of plankton nets over mesozooplankton taxa: implications for abundance, biomass and diversity estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta RICCARDI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the smaller copepod species is often underestimated as a result of the use of standard 200 μm mesh size nets, even though the small copepods probably represent the dominant component of the mesozooplankton community. Although the inadequacy of relatively coarse nets in providing reliable descriptions of the mesozooplankton assemblage is increasingly welldocumented, such nets continue to be commonly used. A major reason for this unwillingness to break with tradition is the belief that samples remain comparable even though the absolute values are biased. A one-year study of the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton collected in the Venice Lagoon using an 80 μm mesh size net showed an overwhelming abundance of small taxa. These data were used to derive estimates of the mesh selection effects of standard WP-2 nets on zooplankton abundance and biomass. Only 11% of numbers and 54% of biomass of lagoon zooplankton are likely to be caught with standard WP-2 nets. A comparison of seasonal changes in diversity, estimated from the fine and coarse datasets, confirmed that retention efficiency is seasonally dependent, which results in serious implications when extrapolating temporal patterns in community structure from WP-2 mesozooplankton counts.

  4. Temperature profile and plankton data collected using net and CTD casts from the OSHORO MARU and other platform in the Bering Sea from 02 September 1981 to 07 September 1987 (NODC Accession 0000865)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and plankton data were collected using net and CTD casts in the Bering Sea, Gulf of Alaska, and North Pacific Ocean from OSHORO MARU and HOKUSEI...

  5. Physical and chemical data from secchi disk, bathythermograph (BT and XBT), plankton net, and CTD casts in the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean from 1950-01-01 to 1994-12-31 (NODC Accession 9800187)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using secchi disk, bathythermograph (BT and XBT), plankton net, and CTD casts from the RYOFU MARU, KEIFU MARU, KOFU MARU,...

  6. Chemical, temperature, zooplankton count and other data from bottle and plankton net casts in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea and Kara Sea from 1913-08-30 to 1999-09-08 (NODC Accession 0000283)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, temperature, zooplankton count, and other data were collected using bottle and plankton net casts from multiple ships in the Arctic Ocean, Barents Sea, and...

  7. Plankton and nutrients data collected using net and CTD casts from the OSHORO MARU in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from 07 June 1997 to 31 July 1999 (NODC Accession 0000803)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton and nutrients data were collected using net and CTD casts in the Bering Sea and North Pacific Ocean from the OSHORO MARU. Data were collected from 07 June...

  8. Plankton and other data collected from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 1976-04-26 to 1976-05-31 (NCEI Accession 7700419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Plankton and other data were collected using net casts in the Gulf of Alaska and Bering Sea from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 26 April 1976 to 31 May 1976. Data...

  9. Spatial distribution of plankton in Riau islands province, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu, I. P.; Pratiwi, N. T. M.; Iswantari, A.; Hariyadi, S.; Mulyawati, D.; Subhan, B.; Arafat, D.; Santoso, P.; Sastria, M.

    2017-01-01

    Riau Islands which is located at 4ºLU - 1ºLS and 104ºBT - 107ºBT, consist of around 3200 islands. It has high marine biodiversity, especially micro-plankton. Biodiversity of marine phytoplankton is usually dominated by diatom and zooplankton by micro-crustacean and early stage of marine biota. Nowadays, biodiversity of micro-plankton is an important study to identify their origin and potential as alien and invasive species. The aim of this research was to determine the biodiversity of marine micro-plankton in Riau Islands. This research was conducted in 14 small islands (Karanggerih, Pemping, Panjang, Melur, Palantuah, Dendun, Mantang, Bunut, Kelong, Mercusuar, Tokong Hiu Kecil, Tokong Hiu Besar, Karimun, Penyengat) in Riau Islands Province. Samples of micro-plankton were collected from surface water using plankton net. Samples were observed under light microscope and identified morphologically. Biodiversity index was calculated. There were found 20-34 taxa of phytoplankton and 10-17 taxa of zooplankton in all sites. Phytoplankton was dominated by Bacillariophyceae group and zooplankton by Crustacean and Protozoa groups. This result is expected for biodiversity bank information and further research.

  10. In situ filtering rate variability in egg and larval surveys off the Pacific coast of Japan: Do plankton nets clog or over-filter in the sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasuka, Akinori; Tadokoro, Kazuaki; Okazaki, Yuji; Ichikawa, Tadafumi; Sugisaki, Hiroya; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Oozeki, Yoshioki

    2017-02-01

    In situ filtering rate variability was examined for vertical tows of plankton nets in egg and larval surveys off the Pacific coast of Japan, based on a data set pooled over large spatial and temporal scales (76,444 sampling tows from 1978 to 2013). The filtering rate showed unimodal distributions and was highly variable for the four net types: Long NORPAC (LNP), NORPAC (NOR), Maru-toku B (MTB), and Maru-naka (MNK). Despite the high variability at the individual tow level, the median values of the filtering rate for the overall data approximated the theoretical value of 1.0, in particular, for LNP, although the median values differed among the net types. For LNP, the differences in the median values among the 26 years, the 12 months, and the 4 regions were small relative to the overall variability at the individual level. The present study quantified the extent of underestimation/overestimation when the theoretical value of 1.0 is used due to the lack of the actual filtering rate data. The filtering rate was almost on a balance of resistance effect of net and cod-end, clogging effect of collected organisms, and over-inflow effect of currents over large scales. The present analysis implies that the filtering rate is mainly influenced by small-scale transient variability of ocean conditions such as wind speed, current intensity, rolling, turbulence, and mixing rather than large-scale variability related to climate regime, seasonality, or water masses. The results will allow the utilization of historical data lacking flow-meter data for large-scale comparative analyses.

  11. Colloquium on diatom-copepod interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paffenhofer, G.A.; Ianora, A.; Miralto, A.

    2005-01-01

    From 3 to 6 November 2002, a colloquium was convened at the Benthos Laboratory of the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn on Ischia, Italy, with the goal of evaluating the present status of the effects of diatoms on their main consumers, planktonic copepods, and to develop future research strategies...... to enhance our understanding of such interactions. These included (1) toxic effects of diatom metabolites on copepods, particularly reproduction, and (2) nutritional effects of diatoms on juvenile to adult copepods. Key issues involved in the impact of diatoms on the dynamics of natural plankton communities...... in situ were also addressed. During the plenary session, the most recent advances on this topic were presented. The plenary session was followed by 3 working groups on (1) production of aldehydes by phytoplankton, (2) toxic and nutritional effects of diatoms on zooplankton, and (3) the chemistry of diatom...

  12. Relationship between diatom communities and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The relationship between diatom species and measured environmental variables was explored at different sites of Honghe wetland region located in northeastern China. Planktonic and epiphytic diatom assemblages in the wetland were identified from May to October of 2007 and 2008. Their relationships with ...

  13. Distribution of non-marine diatoms in surface sediments of streams in Socotra Island, Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelfattah A. Zalat; Mohammed A. Al-Wosabi

    2011-01-01

    Abundance and species composition of non-marine benthic diatom assemblages were studied from surface sediments samples of 11 streams distributed in Socotra Island, located in the northwest Indian Ocean. A total of 145 diatom species, representing 44 genera, were identified. The overall diatom communities appear to be the first recorded off the island. Pennales and non-planktonic taxa were most dominant over centrales and planktonic forms, both in diversity of genera and species. The majority ...

  14. The Diatoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Agharkar Research. Institute. She is studying the biogeography of freshwater diatoms in. Western Ghats for her thesis. (right) Balasubramanian. Karthick is Scientist with. Biodiversity and. Paleobiology group of. Agharkar Research. Institute. His interests include diatom taxonomy and ecology, microbial biogeography, and ...

  15. Diatoms from a peat bog on the Pešter plateau (southwestern Serbia: New records for diatom flora of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidaković Danijela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of diatoms was studied in three types of diatom communities (epiphytes, benthos and plankton of a peat bog on the Pešter plateau. The observed diatom flora inhabited all investigated communities, comprising in total 250 taxa in 53 genera. Among them, 45 taxa were new records for the Serbian diatom flora. Identified taxa belonged to different groups of algae, however alkaliphile diatoms were dominant. New ecological data for Encyonopsis minuta, Pinnularia isostauron and P. marchica are presented here. All the diatoms were documented by light micrographs, and brief notes on their morphology, distribution and ecology are provided. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 037009

  16. Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, pressure, plankton, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and primary productivity data collected using CTD, bottle, and plankton net from the R/V Italica in the Ross Sea and Magellan Strait during 10th Italian Antarctic Expedition from 1994-11-13 to 1995-04-02 (NCEI Accession 0068289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, salinity, transmissivity, pressure, plankton, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll, and primary productivity data collected using CTD, bottle, and plankton...

  17. The Diatoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 10. The Diatoms: Big Significance of Tiny Glass Houses. Aditi Kale Balasubramanian Karthick. General Article Volume 20 Issue 10 October 2015 pp 919-930. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Densities and Diel Vertical Migration of Mysis relicta in Lake Superior: A Comparison of Optical Plankton Encounter and Net-based Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we used data from an OPC, and LOPC, and vertical net tows to estimate densities and describe the day/night vertical distribution of Mysis at a series of stations distributed throughout Lake Superior, and to evaluate the efficacy of using (L)OPC for examining DVM of...

  19. Marine planktonic microbes survived climatic instabilities in the past

    OpenAIRE

    Cermeño, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    In the geological past, changes in climate and tectonic activity are thought to have spurred the tempo of evolutionary change among major taxonomic groups of plants and animals. However, the extent to which these historical contingencies increased the risk of extinction of microbial plankton species remains largely unknown. Here, I analyse fossil records of marine planktonic diatoms and calcareous nannoplankton over the past 65 million years from the world oceans and show that the probability...

  20. Fast Regulation of Photosynthesis in Diatoms: Mechanisms, Evolution and Ecophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Lavaud, Johann

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae, Heterokontophytes) are essential aquatic eukaryotes. Their role in the structure and ecology of most of the aquatic ecosystems is crucial. Especially, their photosynthetic activity is responsible for about a quarter of the Earth's primary productivity as large as the most productive terrestrial ecosystems, even though they represent only few percents of the total plant biomass on the planet. Both planktonic and benthic diatoms tend to domina...

  1. VARIASI SPESIES DIATOM PADA TIPE PERAIRAN BERBEDA UNTUK KEPENTINGAN FORENSIK SEBAGAI PETUNJUK KEMATIAN AKIBAT TENGGELAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina Arifiani Purnomo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine diatom species in Unda River, BadungRiver, Lake Beratan, estuarine and marine waters of Padang Galak, that can be used to indicatedeath scene caused by drowning. Waters collected to 50 liters by using plankton net and carriedin a 25 ml glass bottle. The results of the research found that there were 60 species diatom from26 genera, 23 families, 2 orders, and 1 class. Among the 60 species in this research, can beindicate as 12 species are typical species of Unda River, 5 species are typical species of BadungRiver, 1 species is typical of Lake Beratan, 9 species are typical of Padang Galak Estuary, and 19species are typical to Padang Galak Sea. Among the typical species in every research site, thereare one species that has higher number: Fragilaria sp. 1 in Unda River, Gomphonema sp. 3 inBadung River. Cymbella sp. 3 in Lake Beratan, Cyclotella sp., in Padang Galak Estuarine, andCocconeis sp. 2 in Padang Galak Sea.Keywords: forensic, diatom, river, lake, sea

  2. Oxylipin Diversity in the Diatom Family Leptocylindraceae Reveals DHA Derivatives in Marine Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Nanjappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine planktonic organisms, such as diatoms, are prospective sources of novel bioactive metabolites. Oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids, generally referred to as oxylipins, in diatoms comprise a highly diverse and complex family of secondary metabolites. These molecules have recently been implicated in several biological processes including intra- and inter-cellular signaling as well as in defense against biotic stressors and grazers. Here, we analyze the production and diversity of C20 and C22 non-volatile oxylipins in five species of the family Leptocylindraceae, which constitute a basal clade in the diatom phylogeny. We report the presence of species-specific lipoxygenase activity and oxylipin patterns, providing the first demonstration of enzymatic production of docosahexaenoic acid derivatives in marine diatoms. The differences observed in lipoxygenase pathways among the species investigated broadly reflected the relationships observed with phylogenetic markers, thus providing functional support to the taxonomic diversity of the individual species.

  3. Page 1 Seasonal Distribution of the Plankton of the Trivandrum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seasonal Distribution of the Plankton of the Trivandrum Coast 37. Diatoms. Genus Asterionella Hassal -. 24. A. japonica Cleve. 25. A. bleakleyi W. Smith. Genus Thalassiothrix Cleve & Grunov. 26. T. nitzschioides Grun. * * # *. 27. T. frauenfeldii (Grun.) Cleve & Grun. Genus Climacodium Grun. 28. C. frauenfeldianum Grun.

  4. Kelimpahan dan Keanekaragaman Plankton di Perairan Selat Bali (Plankton Abundance and Diversity in the Bali Strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruly Isfatul Khasanah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fitoplankton mempunyai peran sangat penting dalam suatu perairan, selain berada pada dasar rantai makanan sedangkan zooplankton merupakan herbivor pemangsanya. Penelitian mengenai kelimpahan dan keanekaragaman plankton di perairan Selat Bali dilakukan pada musim peralihan II (Nopember 2012 dan musim barat (Pebruari 2013. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mengamati perbedaan kelimpahan dan keanekaragaman plankton pada dua musim angin muson. Sampel air diambil dengan menggunakan water sampler sedangkan sampel plankton diambil secara horisontal dan vertikal  pada kedalaman 1 m dan 20 m dengan jaring plankton Kitahara bermata jaring 20 µm. Hasil pengukuran nutrien pada musim peralihan II memiliki kadar fosfat, nitrat, bahan organik, silikat dan klorofil-a lebih tinggi dibandingkan pada musim barat. Informasi tersebut memperkuat indikasi adanya perpindahan massa air dari lapisan yang lebih dalam ke lapisan yang lebih dangkal. Nutrien fosfat dan nitrat diperlukan untuk mempertahankan fungsi membran sel dan silikia dibutuhkan untuk pembentukan dinding sel terutama pada diatom. Hasil penelitian juga menunjukkan bahwa kelas diatom (Bacillariophyceae mencapai 95,9 % dari total jenis dan kelimpahan fitoplankton seluruh stasiun penelitian, sisanya berasal dari genus Dinophyceae. Kelimpahan fitoplankton tertinggi terjadi pada musim peralihan II dengan Rhizosolenia stolterfothii sebesar 51.405 sel.L-1 (80,1%, sedangkan pada musim barat copepoda ditemukan melimpah sebesar 8.178 ind.L-1 (88,3 %. Hasil ini mengindikasikan bahwa dengan kelimpahan plankton yang ditemukan perairan Selat Bali dinilai cukup potensial untuk mendukung kehidupan biota laut pelagis. Kata kunci: plankton, selat Bali, rhizosolenia stolterfothii, muson   Abstract Phytoplankton has important role as primary producer in the sea and act as base of food chain while zooplankton act as herbivore prey on them. Research on abundance and diversity of plankton at Bali Strait was performed during

  5. Plankton composition and environmental factors contribute to Vibrio seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeffrey W; Good, Brooks; Cole, Dana; Lipp, Erin K

    2009-09-01

    Plankton represent a nutrient-rich reservoir capable of enriching Vibrio species, which can include human pathogens, at higher densities than the surrounding water column. To better understand the relationship between vibrios and plankton, the partitioning of culturable vibrios, on TCBS, between free living and plankton associated (63-200- and >200-microm-size fractions) was monitored over a 1-year period in coastal waters of Georgia, USA. Seasonal changes in the total Vibrio concentration were then compared with changes in environmental parameters as well as changes in the relative composition of the plankton community. Using univariate analyses, Vibrio concentrations were strongly associated with temperature, especially when those vibrios were plankton associated (R(2)=0.69 and 0.88 for the water and both plankton fractions; respectively) (Pplankton fractions were also correlated to shifts in the relative abundance of specific plankton taxa. In the 63-200-micro fraction, Vibrio concentrations were inversely associated with copepods, cyanobacteria and diatoms. In the >200-micro fraction, Vibrio concentrations were positively associated with copepods and negatively associated with decapod larvae. Our results confirm the role of temperature in Vibrio seasonality and highlight an important and independent role for plankton composition in explaining seasonal changes in Vibrio concentration.

  6. Diatoms of the concrete embankment of the Zegrze Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Borzyńska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that conditions for the development of diatoms on a concrete embankment are favourable. Beside organisms permanently or periodically connected with the solid substrate, typical planktons also occurred. The following species were most numerous: Cymbella affinis, Nitzschia kützingiana, Amphora ovalis var. pediculus and Navicula gracilis. The most intensive development of diatoms was observed in April, May, July and October. The total number of organisms depended on pollution of water in the Żerań Canal, increased water temperature in autumn in the section between the Canal and Białobrzegi and intensity of waves.

  7. Plankton the Delightful Drifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Jack

    1978-01-01

    Presents an introduction to plankton, describing the various plants and animals that make up this group of living things. Suggests that plankton can be an important introduction to marine biology and an intriguing study to stimulate the curiosity of students. (BB)

  8. Growth form defines physiological photoprotective capacity in intertidal benthic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alexandre; Méléder, Vona; Blommaert, Lander; Lepetit, Bernard; Gaudin, Pierre; Vyverman, Wim; Sabbe, Koen; Dupuy, Christine; Lavaud, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In intertidal marine sediments, characterized by rapidly fluctuating and often extreme light conditions, primary production is frequently dominated by diatoms. We performed a comparative analysis of photophysiological traits in 15 marine benthic diatom species belonging to the four major morphological growth forms (epipelon (EPL), motile epipsammon (EPM-M) and non-motile epipsammon (EPM-NM) and tychoplankton (TYCHO)) found in these sediments. Our analyses revealed a clear relationship between growth form and photoprotective capacity, and identified fast regulatory physiological photoprotective traits (that is, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the xanthophyll cycle (XC)) as key traits defining the functional light response of these diatoms. EPM-NM and motile EPL showed the highest and lowest NPQ, respectively, with EPM-M showing intermediate values. Like EPL, TYCHO had low NPQ, irrespective of whether they were grown in benthic or planktonic conditions, reflecting an adaptation to a low light environment. Our results thus provide the first experimental evidence for the existence of a trade-off between behavioural (motility) and physiological photoprotective mechanisms (NPQ and the XC) in the four major intertidal benthic diatoms growth forms using unialgal cultures. Remarkably, although motility is restricted to the raphid pennate diatom clade, raphid pennate species, which have adopted a non-motile epipsammic or a tychoplanktonic life style, display the physiological photoprotective response typical of these growth forms. This observation underscores the importance of growth form and not phylogenetic relatedness as the prime determinant shaping the physiological photoprotective capacity of benthic diatoms.

  9. Seasonal changes of diatom species in the Hooghly estuary, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, P. K.

    2013-12-01

    The Hooghly estuary is considered as one of the most important fishing ground of north-east India which is mainly because presence of large shallow parts of Bays, which provide extensive growths for benthic and planktonic community and also makes it a highly productive area .Anthropogenic effects induce intensive pressure to this ecosystem ;and consequently results in the eutrophication followed by rapid plankton growth, sometimes even bloom. Diatom comprises one of the most diverse and significant part of the biota of aquatic habitats. Ecologically they are of immense importance since they constitute the podium of food chain and are at pinnacle of the biomass pyramid. The present study was based on the diversity of most dominant diatom species found in the brackish waters of Hooghly estuarine region in three locations of Sagar islands - Gangasagar, Chemaguri and Kachuberia. In this study diatom distribution from post monsoon - pre monsoon period was studied on the specific assemblages of them.. There was wide diversity of diatom species in different locations and in different seasons. Maximum number of diatom species was found in post-monsoon period in Gangasagar and Chemaguri, while in Kachuberia maximum number was found in pre-monsoon period. In Gangasagar, Navicula socialis, Coscinodiscus spp. and Biddulphia spp. were the predominant species in early, mid and late post monsoon period respectively and Biddulphia spp. also continues as the predominant diatom in pre-monsoon period. In Chemaguri, Amphora ostrearia, Coscinodiscus perforatus and Nitzschia acuminate were the predominant species in early, mid and late post monsoon period respectively while Coscinodiscus radiates was the stable predominant diatom species in pre-monsoon period while Thalassionema spp., Ditylum spp., Proboscia spp. and Biddulphia spp. were also found in significantly increased numbers at different times of pre-monsoon period. In Kachuberia area although a wide range of diatoms are present

  10. Factors affecting diatom dynamics in the alpine lakes of Colbricon (Northern Italy: a 10-year survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea SQUARTINI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic diatom fluctuations, their diversity and relationships with environmental variables were analyzed for ten consecutive years in Colbricon Superiore and Inferiore, two small high-mountain lakes located in the Paneveggio-Pale di S. Martino Natural Park (Trento, Italy offering the rare opportunity to study two lakes differing only by area and volume and being in this respect in a ratio of 2:1 and 3:1 respectively. The lakes were monitored and sampled monthly, during ten ice-free periods, from 1998 to 2007, to correlate water chemical and physical characteristics with the recorded diversity and abundance of planktonic diatoms. 55 taxa of Bacillariophyceae were found, among which Cyclotella spp., Tabellaria flocculosa and Fragilaria spp. were dominant. Both chemical data and diatom community composition are consistent with well buffered mesotrophic lakes. We found statistical evidence that the development of diatoms was strongly related to the variation of water temperature. Furthermore, several different signatures of the diatom-enviroment relationships arose between the two lakes as e.g., a negative correlation between diatom development and water transparency was occurring in the larger lake only. As a result, the average diatom density recorded over the 10 years period were 1.17 fold higher than in the lower lake which corresponds to a 1.65 fold higher biomass. A size-dependent tighter response of the phytoplankton to chemical parameters appears to operate in the smaller waterbody compared to the larger one.

  11. Distribution of non-marine diatoms in surface sediments of streams in Socotra Island, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelfattah A. Zalat

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abundance and species composition of non-marine benthic diatom assemblages were studied from surface sediments samples of 11 streams distributed in Socotra Island, located in the northwest Indian Ocean. A total of 145 diatom species, representing 44 genera, were identified. The overall diatom communities appear to be the first recorded off the island. Pennales and non-planktonic taxa were most dominant over centrales and planktonic forms, both in diversity of genera and species. The majority of recognized diatoms are of cosmopolitan distribution. The predominant diatom flora in the surface sediment samples follow: Synedra ulna, Synedra longissima, Encyonema caespitosum, Encyonema silesiacum, Encyonemopsis microcephala, Mastogloia braunii, Mastogloia dansei, Mastogloia elliptica, Navicula cryptocephala, Navicula cryptotenella, Navicula rhynchocephala, Navicula cincta, Nitzschia amphibian, Nitzschia frustulum, Nitzschia perminuta, Cocconeis placentula, Pleurosira laevis and Staurosirella pinnata. These are found in addition to the common occurrence of Amphora coffeaeformis, Amphora Montana, Anomoeoneis sphaerophora, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Cymbella affinis, Diploneis elliptica, Encyonema mesianum, Diploneis smithii, Gomphonema gracile, Gomphonema parvulum, Kobayasia subtilissima, Mastogloia smithii, Navicula minuscule, Navicula notha, Navicula tenelloides, Nitzschia obtuse, Nitzschia palea, Nitzschia scalaris, Synedra nana, Tryblionella acuminate, Tryblionella granulate and Tryblionella punctata. Multivariate statistical techniques including detrended correspondence and cluster analyses were used to summarize changes in the diatom assemblages present in the examined streams. The results indicated six major diatom assemblages with a variation in dominant species. Each assemblage reflects distinctive environmental conditions based on salinity preference of the recognized and dominant.

  12. Diatom Stratigraphy of FA-1 Core, Qarun Lake, Records of Holocene Environmental and Climatic Change in Faiyum Oasis, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalat Abdelfattah A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates changes in the environmental and climatic conditions in the Faiyum Oasis during the Holocene based on diatom analyses of the sediment FA-1 core from the southern seashore of the Qarun Lake. The studied FA-1 core was 26 m long and covered the time span ca. 9.000 cal. yrs BP. Diatom taxa were abundant and moderately to well-preserved throughout the core sediments. Planktonic taxa were most abundant than the benthic and epiphytic forms, which were very rare and sparsely distributed. The most dominant planktonic genera were Aulacoseira and Stephanodiscus followed by frequently distribution of Cyclostephanos and Cyclotella species. The stratigraphic distribution patterns of the recorded diatoms through the Holocene sediments explained five ecological diatom groups. These groups represent distinctive environmental conditions, which were mainly related to climatic changes through the early and middle Holocene, in addition to anthropogenic activity during the late Holocene. Comparison of diatom assemblages in the studied sediment core suggests that considerable changes occurred in water level as well as salinity. There were several high stands of the freshwater lake level during humid, warmer-wet climatic phases marked by dominance of planktonic, oligohalobous and alkaliphilous diatoms alternated with lowering of the lake level and slight increases in salinity and alkalinity during warm arid conditions evident by prevalence of brackish water diatoms.

  13. The Abundance and Spatial Distribution of Plankton Communities in Banggai Islands Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Thoha, Hikmah; Rachman, Arief

    2013-01-01

    Banggai Islands waters are mixing area between Banda Sea and Makassar Sea, thus resulting in the existence of many unique marine ecosystems. This conditon might also lead to the occurrence of unique and specific plankton community in the oceanic ecosystem of Banggai Islands. This research was conducted in 26 June to 8 July using Baruna VIII research vessel. Phytoplankton and zooplankton samples were collected in 14 stations using Kitahara and NORPAC plankton net. The plankton data in this res...

  14. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bowler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  15. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-14

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  16. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  17. Cyclotella paleo-ocellata, a new centric diatom (Bacillariophyta) from lake Kinneret (Israel)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossel, Hannah; Reed, Jane M.; Houk, Václav; Cvetkoska, Aleksandra; Van De Vijver, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Large, subfossil populations of an unknown centric, planktonic diatom were observed in a lake sediment core from Lake Kinneret (Israel), which is here described as Cyclotella paleo–ocellata sp. nov. The new taxon, which belongs to the Cyclotella ocellata species complex, is described and separated

  18. Metabarcoding and metabolome analyses of copepod grazing reveal feeding preference and linkage to metabolite classes in dynamic microbial plankton communities

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Jessica L.; Althammer, Julia; Skaar, Katrine S; Simonelli, Paolo; Larsen, Aud; Stoecker, Diane; Sazhin, Andrey; Umer Z. Ijaz; Quince, Christopher; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Frischer, Marc; Pohnert, Georg; Troedsson, Christofer

    2016-01-01

    In order to characterize copepod feeding in relation to microbial plankton community dynamics, we combined metabarcoding and metabolome analyses during a 22-day seawater mesocosm experiment. Nutrient amendment of mesocosms promoted the development of haptophyte (Phaeocystis pouchetii)- and diatom (Skeletonema marinoi)-dominated plankton communities in mesocosms, in which Calanus sp. copepods were incubated for 24 h in flow-through chambers to allow access to prey particles (

  19. Diatomées

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact environnemental et évaluation de la qualité des eaux par des méthodes chimiques et biologiques « Diatomées » ... possèdent un caractère alcaliphyle prononcé avec une abondance des espèces résistantes à la pollution organique. Mots clés : Diatomées, qualité de l'eau, bio-indicateur, IDL, IPO, Merja Fouarat.

  20. Biodiversity and abundance of fish and plankton of Dan-Zaria Dam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of fish and plankton biodiversity and abundance of Dan-Zaria Dam were carried out over a period of one year. Sampling of fish and plankton was conducted monthly. Five (5) sampling stations were randomly established based on their importance to the dam. Fish sampling was conducted using cast net, ...

  1. Temperature, salinity, species identification, nutrient profiles and meteorological data collected by bottle, CTD, and plankton net on multiple cruises in the Pacific Ocean and South China Sea from 10/15/1970 - 02/13/1987 (NODC Accession 0000088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, species identification, and other data were collected from XIANG YANG HONG 14 and other platforms using net, bottle, and CTD casts in the Pacific Ocean...

  2. A global diatom database - abundance, biovolume and biomass in the world ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, K.; Arístegui, J.; Armand, L.; Assmy, P.; Beker, B.; Bode, A.; Breton, E.; Cornet, V.; Gibson, J.; Gosselin, M.-P.; Kopczynska, E.; Marshall, H.; Peloquin, J.; Piontkovski, S.; Poulton, A. J.; Quéguiner, B.; Schiebel, R.; Shipe, R.; Stefels, J.; van Leeuwe, M. A.; Varela, M.; Widdicombe, C.; Yallop, M.

    2012-11-01

    Phytoplankton identification and abundance data are now commonly feeding plankton distribution databases worldwide. This study is a first attempt to compile the largest possible body of data available from different databases as well as from individual published or unpublished datasets regarding diatom distribution in the world ocean. The data obtained originate from time series studies as well as spatial studies. This effort is supported by the Marine Ecosystem Model Inter-Comparison Project (MAREMIP), which aims at building consistent datasets for the main plankton functional types (PFTs) in order to help validate biogeochemical ocean models by using carbon (C) biomass derived from abundance data. In this study we collected over 293 000 individual geo-referenced data points with diatom abundances from bottle and net sampling. Sampling site distribution was not homogeneous, with 58% of data in the Atlantic, 20% in the Arctic, 12% in the Pacific, 8% in the Indian and 1% in the Southern Ocean. A total of 136 different genera and 607 different species were identified after spell checking and name correction. Only a small fraction of these data were also documented for biovolumes and an even smaller fraction was converted to C biomass. As it is virtually impossible to reconstruct everyone's method for biovolume calculation, which is usually not indicated in the datasets, we decided to undertake the effort to document, for every distinct species, the minimum and maximum cell dimensions, and to convert all the available abundance data into biovolumes and C biomass using a single standardized method. Statistical correction of the database was also adopted to exclude potential outliers and suspicious data points. The final database contains 90 648 data points with converted C biomass. Diatom C biomass calculated from cell sizes spans over eight orders of magnitude. The mean diatom biomass for individual locations, dates and depths is 141.19 μg C l-1, while the median

  3. A global diatom database – abundance, biovolume and biomass in the world ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leblanc

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton identification and abundance data are now commonly feeding plankton distribution databases worldwide. This study is a first attempt to compile the largest possible body of data available from different databases as well as from individual published or unpublished datasets regarding diatom distribution in the world ocean. The data obtained originate from time series studies as well as spatial studies. This effort is supported by the Marine Ecosystem Model Inter-Comparison Project (MAREMIP, which aims at building consistent datasets for the main plankton functional types (PFTs in order to help validate biogeochemical ocean models by using carbon (C biomass derived from abundance data. In this study we collected over 293 000 individual geo-referenced data points with diatom abundances from bottle and net sampling. Sampling site distribution was not homogeneous, with 58% of data in the Atlantic, 20% in the Arctic, 12% in the Pacific, 8% in the Indian and 1% in the Southern Ocean. A total of 136 different genera and 607 different species were identified after spell checking and name correction. Only a small fraction of these data were also documented for biovolumes and an even smaller fraction was converted to C biomass. As it is virtually impossible to reconstruct everyone's method for biovolume calculation, which is usually not indicated in the datasets, we decided to undertake the effort to document, for every distinct species, the minimum and maximum cell dimensions, and to convert all the available abundance data into biovolumes and C biomass using a single standardized method. Statistical correction of the database was also adopted to exclude potential outliers and suspicious data points. The final database contains 90 648 data points with converted C biomass. Diatom C biomass calculated from cell sizes spans over eight orders of magnitude. The mean diatom biomass for individual locations, dates and depths is 141.19 μg C l

  4. Quantifying the Cenozoic marine diatom deposition history: links to the C and Si cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaudie, Johan

    2016-11-01

    Marine planktonic diatoms are, today, among the world's main primary producers as well as the main organic carbon exporter to the deep sea despite the fact that they were a very minor component of the plankton at the beginning of the Cenozoic. They are also the main silica exporter to the deep sea, thus balancing global chemical weathering. This study reviews their global Cenozoic depositional pattern in order to understand the modality and the context of their rise to dominance, but also to understand how diatom evolution affected the Cenozoic functioning of the ocean's biological pump. After two short-lived major abundance peaks near the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and in the late Oligocene, diatom abundance in sediments shifted in the middle Miocene to globally higher values which have largely persisted to the modern day. These quantitative findings provide support for the hypothesis according to which diatoms, through their ecological role in the ocean's biological carbon pump, have contributed to the Cenozoic changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide pressure and consequently to changes in the global climate state. Additionally, correlations between diatom abundance peaks and shifts in seawater strontium and osmium isotopic composition hint at a strong control of the silicate weathering on diatom deposition.

  5. Plankton, temperature and other measurements found in dataset OSD taken from the BONDY, BAP EXPLORADOR and other platforms in the Coastal S Pacific, South Pacific and other locations from 1961 to 1965 (NODC Accession 0001140)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, nutrients, and plankton data were collected using plankton net and bottle casts in the South Pacific Ocean from 01 August 1961 to 09 September 1965. Data...

  6. Dynamics of Dissolved and Particulate Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in Mesocosms Inoculated with Different Densities of the Diatom Skeletonema marinoi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Pohnert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the production of polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA of manipulated plankton communities is presented here. PUA are phytoplankton-derived metabolites that are proposed to play an important role in chemically mediated plankton interactions. Blooms of different intensities of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi were generated in eight mesocosms filled with water from the surrounding fjord by adding different amounts of a starting culture and nutrients. This set-up allowed us to follow PUA production of the plankton community over the entire induced bloom development, and to compare it with the natural levels of PUA. We found that S. marinoi is a major source for the particulate PUA 2,4-heptadienal and 2,4-octadienal (defined as PUA released upon wounding of the diatom cells during the entire bloom development. Just before, and during, the decline of the induced diatom blooms, these PUA were also detected in up to 1 nM concentrations dissolved in the water. In addition, we detected high levels of the PUA 2,4-decadienal that was not produced by the diatom S. marinoi. Particulate decadienal correlated well with the cell counts of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis sp. that also developed in the fertilized mesocosms. Particulate decadienal levels were often even higher than those of diatom-derived PUA, indicating that PUA sources other than diatoms should be considered when it comes to the evaluation of the impact of these metabolites.

  7. The predictive skill of species distribution models for plankton in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, Philipp Georg; Kiørboe, Thomas; Licandro, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Statistical species distribution models (SDMs) are increasingly used to project spatial relocations of marine taxa under future climate change scenarios. However, tests of their predictive skill in the real-world are rare. Here, we use data from the Continuous Plankton Recorder program, one...... of the longest running and most extensive marine biological monitoring programs, to investigate the reliability of predicted plankton distributions. We apply three commonly used SDMs to 20 representative plankton species, including copepods, diatoms, and dinoflagellates, all found in the North Atlantic....... Plankton may be particularly challenging to model, due to its short life span and the dispersive effects of constant water movements on all spatial scales, however there are few other studies against which to compare these results. We conclude that rigorous model validation, including comparison against...

  8. Control of plankton seasonal succession by adaptive grazing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariani, Patrizio; Andersen, Ken Haste; Visser, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The ecological succession of phytoplankton communities in temperate seas is characterized by the dominance of nonmotile diatoms during spring and motile flagellates during summer, a pattern often linked to the seasonal variation in the physical environment and nutrient availability. We focus...... on the effects of adaptive zooplankton grazing behavior on the seasonal succession of temperate plankton communities in an idealized community model consisting of a zooplankton grazer and two phytoplankton species, one motile and the other nonmotile. The grazer can switch between ambush feeding on motile cells...... behavior that optimizes its fitness. The adaptive grazing model predicts essential features of the seasonal plankton succession reported from temperate seas, including the vertical distribution and seasonal variation in the relative abundance of motile and nonmotile phytoplankton and the seasonal variation...

  9. The Microscopic World of Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultany, Molly; Bixby, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    For students in biology, chemistry, or environmental science, diatoms offer excellent insight into watershed health and human impact on the environment. Diatoms are found globally in virtually every habitat that has sunlight and moisture, including polar seas, tropical streams, and on moist soils and mosses. Studying diatoms as biological…

  10. Ubiquitous healthy diatoms in the deep sea confirms deep carbon injection by the biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí, Susana; González-Gordillo, Jose I.; Vaqué, Dolors; Estrada, Marta; Cerezo, Maria I.; Salazar, Guillem; Gasol, Josep M.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    The role of the ocean as a sink for CO2 is partially dependent on the downward transport of phytoplankton cells packaged within fast-sinking particles. However, whether such fast-sinking mechanisms deliver fresh organic carbon down to the deep bathypelagic sea and whether this mechanism is prevalent across the ocean awaits confirmation. Photosynthetic plankton, directly responsible for trapping CO2 in organic form in the surface layer, are a key constituent of the flux of sinking particles and are assumed to die and become detritus upon leaving the photic layer. Research in the 1960-70's reported the occasional presence of well-preserved phytoplankton cells in the deep ocean, but these observations, which could signal at rapid sinking rates, were considered anecdotal. Using new developments we tested the presence of healthy phytoplankton cells in the deep sea (2000 to 4000 m depth) along the Malaspina 2010 Circumnavigation Expedition, a global expedition sampling the bathypelagic zone of the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans. In particular, we used a new microplankton sampling device, the Bottle-Net, 16S rDNA sequences, flow cytometric counts, vital stains and experiments to explore the abundance and health status of photosynthetic plankton cells between 2,000 and 4,000 m depth along the Circumnavigation track. We described the community of microplankton (> 20μm) found at the deep ocean (2000-4000 m depth), surprisingly dominated by phytoplankton, and within this, by diatoms. Moreover, we report the ubiquitous presence of healthy photosynthetic cells, dominated by diatoms, down to 4,000 m in the deep dark sea. Decay experiments with surface phytoplankton suggested that the large proportion (18%) of healthy photosynthetic cells observed, on average, in the dark ocean, requires transport times from few days to few weeks, corresponding to sinking rates of 124 to 732 m d-1, comparable to those of fast sinking aggregates and faecal pellets. These results confirm the

  11. Diatoms: A Novel Source for the Neurotoxin BMAA in Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Sandra; Jonasson, Sara; Shams, Shiva; Mehine, Martin; Ilag, Leopold L.; Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease is a neurological disorder linked to environmental exposure to a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA). The only organisms reported to be BMAA-producing, are cyanobacteria – prokaryotic organisms. In this study, we demonstrate that diatoms – eukaryotic organisms – also produce BMAA. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry revealed the occurrence of BMAA in six investigated axenic diatom cultures. BMAA was also detected in planktonic field samples collected on the Swedish west coast that display an overrepresentation of diatoms relative to cyanobacteria. Given the ubiquity of diatoms in aquatic environments and their central role as primary producers and the main food items of zooplankton, the use of filter and suspension feeders as livestock fodder dramatically increases the risk of human exposure to BMAA-contaminated food. PMID:24392143

  12. Allelopathic effects of diatom filtrates on the toxic benthic dinoflagellate Ostreopsis cf. ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Salvatore; Accoroni, Stefano; Pezzolesi, Laura; Guerrini, Franca; Romagnoli, Tiziana; Pistocchi, Rossella; Totti, Cecilia

    2017-10-01

    Ostreopsis blooms regularly occur in many Mediterranean coastal areas in late summer-autumn. In the northern Adriatic Sea, Ostreopsis blooms affect diatom-dominated microphytobenthic communities. In this study, the effects of the filtrates of some diatom species, both benthic (Tabularia affinis, Proschkinia complanatoides and Navicula sp.) and planktonic (Thalassiosira sp. and Skeletonema marinoi) on cell morphology, cytological features and growth of O. cf. ovata were investigated. Our results showed a marked decrease of O. cf. ovata growth when cells were exposed to all diatom filtrates tested. The highest inhibitions were observed for exposures to P. complanatoides and Navicula sp. filtrates (92.5% and 80%, respectively) and increased with the age of diatom culture. Moreover, a clear DNA degradation and abnormal forms of O. cf. ovata cells (83.8% of the total) were found at the highest concentrations using Navicula sp. filtrate after 10 days of the inoculum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. PEUBAH KUALITAS AIR YANG BERPENGARUH TERHADAP PLANKTON DI TAMBAK TANAH SULFAT MASAM KABUPATEN LUWU UTARA PROVINSI SULAWESI SELATAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Marsambuana Pirzan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Studi telah dilakukan pada tambak-tambak tanah sulfat masam di Kabupaten Luwu Utara Provinsi Sulawesi Selatan yang bertujuan menelaah peubah kualitas air yang berpengaruh terhadap jumlah individu dan genus plankton. Contoh plankton dan air diambil dari lokasi yang dianggap merepresentasikan kondisi kualitas air tambak tanah sulfat masam. Plankton dikoleksi menggunakan plankton net nomor 25, kemudian diawetkan dengan larutan Lugol (1%. Identifikasi plankton menggunakan mikroskop yang berpedoman pada buku identifikasi plankton dan penghitungannya menggunakan Sedwick Rafter Counting Cell. Hasil studi menunjukkan bahwa jumlah individu plankton berkisar 60—1.110 ind./L dan jumlah genus berkisar dari 2—17 genera. Analisis regresi berganda menunjukkan bahwa suhu air, pH, kandungan amonium, dan silikat berpengaruh terhadap jumlah individu, sedangkan suhu, potensial redoks, kandungan amonium, bahan organik total dan oksigen terlarut berpengaruh terhadap jumlah genus. The study was conducted in acid sulfate soil-affected brackishwater ponds of North Luwu Regency, South Sulawesi Province with the primary aim of investigating the effects of pond water quality on the individual number and genera of plankton. Plankton and water samples were taken at sites that represented water quality conditions influenced by acid sulfate soils in the aquaculture ponds. Plankton was sampled using a plankton net (number 5 and samples were preserved with 1% Lugol’s solution. Plankton was identified to genus level using standard identification keys for plankton. Plankton density was calculated using the counting cell method. The results showed that the number of plankton individuals ranged from 60 to 1,110 ind./L in 2 to 17 genera.  Multiple regression analysis showed that water temperature, pH, ammonium, and silicate affected the individual number, while water temperature, redox potential, ammonium, total organic matter and dissolved oxygen affected the number of genera.

  14. Limnological record inferred from diatoms in sediments of Lake Skaliska (north-eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sienkiewicz Elwira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Subfossil diatoms analysis was employed to reconstruct past environmental changes in Lake Skaliska. This lake, presently a palaeolake, is located on a wide plain called the Skaliska Basin (northern part of Mazury Lake District, north-eastern Poland. Changes in terrestrial vegetation suggest that the initial phase of the lake was in the early Holocene. In the sediments a total of 176 diatom species belonging to 35 genera were identified. The majority of diatoms are alkaliphilous and alkalibiontic, occurring mainly in meso-eutrophic water. Diatom flora development suggests that the best conditions for diatom growth prevailed throughout the Boreal and in the early Atlantic, a suggestion supported by the increased frequency of planktonic diatoms living in nutrient-rich water. A water pH reconstruction (DIpH based on diatoms points to alkalinity during the lake’s existence. Since roughly the mid-Atlantic the lake was shallowing, and at the beginning of the Subboreal peat sedimentation led to complete overgrowth of the lake.

  15. Studies on the small invertebrate plankton of the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Ruth

    1982-09-01

    During the German Eel Expedition in Spring 1979, the horizontal and vertical distribution of the invertebrate plankton was studied in the epipelagic zone of the western central Sargasso Sea, based on 55 µm and 100 µm mesh net samples. In the isothermal waters north of the thermal front, plankton biomass was on average 2-3 times higher than in the warmer stratified waters south of the front. With regard to the fraction of small invertebrates (nauplii and microcopepods) the differences in numerical abundance between the two areas were similar to those reported in the literature for other size ranges of organisms. No divergency was obvious in the plankton composition in terms of major taxonomic groups and size classes. In both parts of the area, organisms smaller than 400 µm, which form a fraction not quantitatively sampled by the conventional 200 µm or 300 µm mesh nets, accounted for 71-92 % of the total number of organisms in the 55 µm net samples and for more than 50 % in the 100 µm net samples. Average concentrations of the potential food supply for early larval fish stages in the upper 100 m appear to be comparable with values reported in the literature for areas well known for larval fish development, such as the California Current.

  16. Insights into global diatom distribution and diversity in the world’s ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Malviya, Shruti

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyta) constitute one of the most diverse and ecologically important groups of phytoplankton. They are considered to be particularly important in nutrient-rich coastal ecosystems and at high latitudes, but considerably less so in the oligotrophic open ocean. The Tara Oceans circumnavigation collected samples from a wide range of oceanic regions using a standardized sampling procedure. Here, a total of ∼12 million diatom V9-18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) ribotypes, derived from 293 sizefractionated plankton communities collected at 46 sampling sites across the global ocean euphotic zone, have been analyzed to explore diatom global diversity and community composition. We provide a new estimate of diversity of marine planktonic diatoms at 4,748 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Based on the total assigned ribotypes, Chaetoceros was the most abundant and diverse genus, followed by Fragilariopsis, Thalassiosira, and Corethron. We found only a few cosmopolitan ribotypes displaying an even distribution across stations and high abundance, many of which could not be assigned with confidence to any known genus. Three distinct communities from South Pacific, Mediterranean, and Southern Ocean waters were identified that share a substantial percentage of ribotypes within them. Sudden drops in diversity were observed at Cape Agulhas, which separates the Indian and Atlantic Oceans, and across the Drake Passage between the Atlantic and Southern Oceans, indicating the importance of these ocean circulation choke points in constraining diatom distribution and diversity. We also observed high diatom diversity in the open ocean, suggesting that diatoms may be more relevant in these oceanic systems than generally considered.

  17. Ocean plankton. Eukaryotic plankton diversity in the sunlit ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vargas, Colomban; Audic, Stéphane; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Mahé, Frédéric; Logares, Ramiro; Lara, Enrique; Berney, Cédric; Le Bescot, Noan; Probert, Ian; Carmichael, Margaux; Poulain, Julie; Romac, Sarah; Colin, Sébastien; Aury, Jean-Marc; Bittner, Lucie; Chaffron, Samuel; Dunthorn, Micah; Engelen, Stefan; Flegontova, Olga; Guidi, Lionel; Horák, Aleš; Jaillon, Olivier; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Lukeš, Julius; Malviya, Shruti; Morard, Raphael; Mulot, Matthieu; Scalco, Eleonora; Siano, Raffaele; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel; Grimsley, Nigel; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Raes, Jeroen; Sieracki, Michael E; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric

    2015-05-22

    Marine plankton support global biological and geochemical processes. Surveys of their biodiversity have hitherto been geographically restricted and have not accounted for the full range of plankton size. We assessed eukaryotic diversity from 334 size-fractionated photic-zone plankton communities collected across tropical and temperate oceans during the circumglobal Tara Oceans expedition. We analyzed 18S ribosomal DNA sequences across the intermediate plankton-size spectrum from the smallest unicellular eukaryotes (protists, >0.8 micrometers) to small animals of a few millimeters. Eukaryotic ribosomal diversity saturated at ~150,000 operational taxonomic units, about one-third of which could not be assigned to known eukaryotic groups. Diversity emerged at all taxonomic levels, both within the groups comprising the ~11,200 cataloged morphospecies of eukaryotic plankton and among twice as many other deep-branching lineages of unappreciated importance in plankton ecology studies. Most eukaryotic plankton biodiversity belonged to heterotrophic protistan groups, particularly those known to be parasites or symbiotic hosts. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  18. Oceanic nitrogen reservoir regulated by plankton diversity and ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas; Deutsch, Curtis

    2012-09-20

    The average nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio of marine phytoplankton (16N:1P) is closely matched to the nutrient content of mean ocean waters (14.3N:1P). This condition is thought to arise from biological control over the ocean's nitrogen budget, in which removal of bioavailable nitrogen by denitrifying bacteria ensures widespread selection for diazotrophic phytoplankton that replenish this essential nutrient when it limits the growth of other species. Here we show that in the context of a realistic ocean circulation model, and a uniform N:P ratio of plankton biomass, this feedback mechanism yields an oceanic nitrate deficit more than double its observed value. The critical missing phenomenon is diversity in the metabolic N:P requirement of phytoplankton, which has recently been shown to exhibit large-scale patterns associated with species composition. When we model these variations, such that diazotrophs compete with high N:P communities in subtropical regions, the ocean nitrogen inventory rises and may even exceed the average N:P ratio of plankton. The latter condition, previously considered impossible, is prevented in the modern ocean by shallow circulations that communicate stoichiometric signals from remote biomes dominated by diatoms with low N:P ratios. Large-scale patterns of plankton diversity and the circulation pathways connecting them are thus key factors determining the availability of fixed nitrogen in the ocean.

  19. Metabolomics and proteomics reveal impacts of chemically mediated competition on marine plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulson-Ellestad, Kelsey L.; Jones, Christina M.; Roy, Jessie; Viant, Mark R.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Kubanek, Julia; Nunn, Brook L.

    2014-01-01

    Competition is a major force structuring marine planktonic communities. The release of compounds that inhibit competitors, a process known as allelopathy, may play a role in the maintenance of large blooms of the red-tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces potent neurotoxins that negatively impact coastal marine ecosystems. K. brevis is variably allelopathic to multiple competitors, typically causing sublethal suppression of growth. We used metabolomic and proteomic analyses to investigate the role of chemically mediated ecological interactions between K. brevis and two diatom competitors, Asterionellopsis glacialis and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The impact of K. brevis allelopathy on competitor physiology was reflected in the metabolomes and expressed proteomes of both diatoms, although the diatom that co-occurs with K. brevis blooms (A. glacialis) exhibited more robust metabolism in response to K. brevis. The observed partial resistance of A. glacialis to allelopathy may be a result of its frequent exposure to K. brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. For the more sensitive diatom, T. pseudonana, which may not have had opportunity to evolve resistance to K. brevis, allelopathy disrupted energy metabolism and impeded cellular protection mechanisms including altered cell membrane components, inhibited osmoregulation, and increased oxidative stress. Allelopathic compounds appear to target multiple physiological pathways in sensitive competitors, demonstrating that chemical cues in the plankton have the potential to alter large-scale ecosystem processes including primary production and nutrient cycling. PMID:24889616

  20. Mismatch between marine plankton range movements and the velocity of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, William J.; Walne, Anthony W.; Hays, Graeme C.

    2017-02-01

    The response of marine plankton to climate change is of critical importance to the oceanic food web and fish stocks. We use a 60-year ocean basin-wide data set comprising >148,000 samples to reveal huge differences in range changes associated with climate change across 35 plankton taxa. While the range of dinoflagellates and copepods tended to closely track the velocity of climate change (the rate of isotherm movement), the range of the diatoms moved much more slowly. Differences in range shifts were up to 900 km in a recent warming period, with average velocities of range movement between 7 km per decade northwards for taxa exhibiting niche plasticity and 99 km per decade for taxa exhibiting niche conservatism. The differing responses of taxa to global warming will cause spatial restructuring of the plankton ecosystem with likely consequences for grazing pressures on phytoplankton and hence for biogeochemical cycling, higher trophic levels and biodiversity.

  1. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karas, Bogumil J; Diner, Rachel E; Lefebvre, Stephane C; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P R; Noddings, Chari M; Brunson, John K; Valas, Ruben E; Deerinck, Thomas J; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T F; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H; Glass, John I; Hutchison, 3rd, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana...

  2. Hidden diversity in diatoms of Kenyan Lake Naivasha: a genetic approach detects temporal variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof-Leichsenring, Kathleen R; Epp, Laura S; Trauth, Martin H; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    This study provides insights into the morphological and genetic diversity in diatoms occurring in core sediments from tropical lakes in Kenya. We developed a genetic survey technique specific for diatoms utilizing a short region (76-67 bp) of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase large subunit (rbcL) gene as genetic barcode. Our analyses (i) validated the use of rbcL as a barcoding marker for diatoms, applied to sediment samples, (ii) showed a significant correlation between the results obtained by morphological and molecular data and (iii) indicated temporal variation in diatom assemblages on the inter- and intra-specific level. Diatom assemblages from a short core from Lake Naivasha show a drastic shift over the last 200 years, as littoral species (e.g. Navicula) are replaced by more planktonic ones (e.g. Aulacoseira). Within that same period, we detected periodic changes in the respective frequencies of distinct haplotype groups of Navicula, which coincide with wet and dry periods of Lake Naivasha between 1820 and 1938 AD. Our genetic analyses on historical lake sediments revealed inter- and intra-specific variation in diatoms, which is partially hidden behind single morphotypes. The occurrence of particular genetic lineages is probably correlated with environmental factors. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. PUFAs and PUAs production in three benthic diatoms from the northern Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzolesi, Laura; Pichierri, Salvatore; Samorì, Chiara; Totti, Cecilia; Pistocchi, Rossella

    2017-10-01

    The production of polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) has been reported by many planktonic diatoms, where they have been implicated in deleterious effects on copepod reproduction and growth of closeby microbes or suggested as infochemicals in shaping plankton interactions. This study investigates the production of PUAs by diatoms commonly occurring in the microphytobenthic communities in temperate regions: Tabularia affinis, Proschkinia complanatoides and Navicula sp. Results highlight the production of PUAs by the three benthic diatoms during stationary and decline phases, with intracellular concentrations from 1.8 to 154.4 fmol cell -1 , which are within the range observed for planktonic species. The existence of a large family of PUAs, including some with four unsaturations, such as decatetraenal, undecatetraenal and tridecatetraenal, was observed. Since particulate and dissolved PUAs were positively correlated, together with cell lysis, equivalent concentrations may be released during late growth stages, which may affect benthic invertebrates grazing on them and other microalgae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  5. Interactions between diatoms and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shady A; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans.

  6. Controlling dynamics in diatomic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Iterative method; optimal control theory; diatomic systems; quantum control. Abstract. Controlling molecular energetics using laser pulses is exemplified for nuclear motion in two different diatomic systems. The problem of finding the optimized field for maximizing a desired quantum dynamical target is formulated ...

  7. Ecological Stoichiometry of Ocean Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Allison R; Martiny, Adam C

    2018-01-03

    Marine plankton elemental stoichiometric ratios can deviate from the Redfield ratio (106C:16N:1P); here, we examine physiological and biogeochemical mechanisms that lead to the observed variation across lineages, regions, and seasons. Many models of ecological stoichiometry blend together acclimative and adaptive responses to environmental conditions. These two pathways can have unique molecular mechanisms and stoichiometric outcomes, and we attempt to disentangle the two processes. We find that interactions between environmental conditions and cellular growth are key to understanding stoichiometric regulation, but the growth rates of most marine plankton populations are poorly constrained. We propose that specific physiological mechanisms have a strong impact on plankton and community stoichiometry in nutrient-rich environments, whereas biogeochemical interactions are important for the stoichiometry of the oligotrophic gyres. Finally, we outline key areas with missing information that is needed to advance understanding of the present and future ecological stoichiometry of ocean plankton.

  8. Cryptic carbon and sulfur cycling between surface ocean plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Bryndan P.; Sharma, Shalabh; Luo, Haiwei; Smith, Christa B.; Amin, Shady A.; Bender, Sara J.; Dearth, Stephen P.; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Campagna, Shawn R.; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.; Armbrust, E. Virginia; Moran, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    About half the carbon fixed by phytoplankton in the ocean is taken up and metabolized by marine bacteria, a transfer that is mediated through the seawater dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. The chemical complexity of marine DOC, along with a poor understanding of which compounds form the basis of trophic interactions between bacteria and phytoplankton, have impeded efforts to identify key currencies of this carbon cycle link. Here, we used transcriptional patterns in a bacterial-diatom model system based on vitamin B12 auxotrophy as a sensitive assay for metabolite exchange between marine plankton. The most highly up-regulated genes (up to 374-fold) by a marine Roseobacter clade bacterium when cocultured with the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana were those encoding the transport and catabolism of 2,3-dihydroxypropane-1-sulfonate (DHPS). This compound has no currently recognized role in the marine microbial food web. As the genes for DHPS catabolism have limited distribution among bacterial taxa, T. pseudonana may use this sulfonate for targeted feeding of beneficial associates. Indeed, DHPS was both a major component of the T. pseudonana cytosol and an abundant microbial metabolite in a diatom bloom in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Moreover, transcript analysis of the North Pacific samples provided evidence of DHPS catabolism by Roseobacter populations. Other such biogeochemically important metabolites may be common in the ocean but difficult to discriminate against the complex chemical background of seawater. Bacterial transformation of this diatom-derived sulfonate represents a previously unidentified and likely sizeable link in both the marine carbon and sulfur cycles. PMID:25548163

  9. Cryptic carbon and sulfur cycling between surface ocean plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Bryndan P; Sharma, Shalabh; Luo, Haiwei; Smith, Christa B; Amin, Shady A; Bender, Sara J; Dearth, Stephen P; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Campagna, Shawn R; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B; Armbrust, E Virginia; Moran, Mary Ann

    2015-01-13

    About half the carbon fixed by phytoplankton in the ocean is taken up and metabolized by marine bacteria, a transfer that is mediated through the seawater dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool. The chemical complexity of marine DOC, along with a poor understanding of which compounds form the basis of trophic interactions between bacteria and phytoplankton, have impeded efforts to identify key currencies of this carbon cycle link. Here, we used transcriptional patterns in a bacterial-diatom model system based on vitamin B12 auxotrophy as a sensitive assay for metabolite exchange between marine plankton. The most highly up-regulated genes (up to 374-fold) by a marine Roseobacter clade bacterium when cocultured with the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana were those encoding the transport and catabolism of 2,3-dihydroxypropane-1-sulfonate (DHPS). This compound has no currently recognized role in the marine microbial food web. As the genes for DHPS catabolism have limited distribution among bacterial taxa, T. pseudonana may use this sulfonate for targeted feeding of beneficial associates. Indeed, DHPS was both a major component of the T. pseudonana cytosol and an abundant microbial metabolite in a diatom bloom in the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Moreover, transcript analysis of the North Pacific samples provided evidence of DHPS catabolism by Roseobacter populations. Other such biogeochemically important metabolites may be common in the ocean but difficult to discriminate against the complex chemical background of seawater. Bacterial transformation of this diatom-derived sulfonate represents a previously unidentified and likely sizeable link in both the marine carbon and sulfur cycles.

  10. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JinJoo Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world’s oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45–50 nm in diameter that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90–250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively.

  11. Origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    Marine planktonic cyanobacteria contributed to the widespread oxygenation of the oceans towards the end of the Pre-Cambrian and their evolutionary origin represents a key transition in the geochemical evolution of the Earth surface. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events that led to the appearance of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. I present here phylogenomic (135 proteins and two ribosomal RNAs), Bayesian relaxed molecular clock (18 proteins, SSU and LSU) and Bayesian stochastic character mapping analyses from 131 cyanobacteria genomes with the aim to unravel key evolutionary steps involved in the origin of marine planktonic cyanobacteria. While filamentous cell types evolved early on at around 2,600-2,300 Mya and likely dominated microbial mats in benthic environments for most of the Proterozoic (2,500-542 Mya), marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved towards the end of the Proterozoic and early Phanerozoic. Crown groups of modern terrestrial and/or benthic coastal cyanobacteria appeared during the late Paleoproterozoic to early Mesoproterozoic. Decrease in cell diameter and loss of filamentous forms contributed to the evolution of unicellular planktonic lineages during the middle of the Mesoproterozoic (1,600-1,000 Mya) in freshwater environments. This study shows that marine planktonic cyanobacteria evolved from benthic marine and some diverged from freshwater ancestors during the Neoproterozoic (1,000-542 Mya).

  12. Plankton distribution and ocean dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Margaret Anne; Woodson, C Brock

    2012-03-15

    Plankton are small organisms that dwell in oceans, seas and bodies of fresh water. In this review, we discuss life in the plankton, which involves a balance between the behavioral capabilities of the organism and the characteristics and movement of the water that surrounds it. In order to consider this balance, we discuss how plankton interact with their environment across a range of scales - from the smallest viruses and bacteria to larger phytoplankton and zooplankton. We find that the larger scale distributions of plankton, observed in coastal waters, along continental shelves and in ocean basins, are highly dependent upon the smaller scale interactions between the individual organism and its environment. Further, we discuss how larger scale organism distributions may affect the transport and/or retention of plankton in the ocean environment. The research reviewed here provides a mechanistic understanding of how organism behavior in response to the physical environment produces planktonic aggregations, which has a direct impact on the way marine ecosystems function.

  13. Modern diatom, cladocera, chironomid, and chrysophyte cyst assemblages as quantitative indicators for the reconstruction of past environmental conditions in the Alps. I. Climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotter, A.F.; Birks, H.J.B.; Hofmann, W.; Marchetto, A.

    1997-01-01

    Diatom, chrysophyte cyst, benthic cladocera, planktonic cladocera, and chironomid assemblages were studied in the surface sediments of 68 small lakes along an altitudinal gradient from 300 to 2350 m in Switzerland. In addition, 43 environmental variables relating to the physical limnology,

  14. Assessing the effects of climate and volcanism on diatom and chironomid assemblages in an Andean lake near Quito, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Michelutti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical Andes are undergoing climate changes that rival those occurring anywhere else on the planet, and are likely to have profound consequences for ecosystems. Paleolimnological investigations of remote mountain lakes can provide details of past environmental change, especially where monitoring data are absent. Here, we reconstruct fossil diatom and chironomid communities spanning the last several hundred years from an Andean lake located in an ecological reserve near Quito, Ecuador. Both diatoms and chironomids recorded assemblage shifts reflective of changing climate conditions. The diatoms are likely responding primarily to temperature-related limnological changes, recording an increase in the number of planktonic taxa in the most recent sediments. This change is consistent with warmer conditions that result in enhanced periods of thermal stratification, allowing planktonic species to proliferate. The chironomids appear to respond mainly to a change in precipitation regime, recording a greater number of terrestrial and semi-terrestrial taxa that have been transported to the lake. A thick tephra deposit at the base of the sediment core affected both diatom and chironomid assemblages. The diatoms registered a change in species composition highlighting the ability of certain taxa to rapidly colonize new environments. In contrast, the chironomids showed a marked drop in abundance immediately following the tephra, but no change in species composition. In both cases the ecological response was short-lived, illustrating the resiliency of the lake to return to baseline conditions following volcanic inputs.

  15. Stuart R. Stidolph diatom atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidolph, S.R.; Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Smith, K.E.L.; Kraberg, A.

    2012-01-01

    The "Stuart R. Stidolph Diatom Atlas" is a comprehensive volume of diatom taxa identified and micrographed by Stuart R. Stidoph during the 1980s and 1990s. The samples were collected from marine coasts of various geographic regions within tropical and subtropical climates. The plates included within this report have never been published and are being published by the USGS as an online reference so that others may have access to this incredible collection.

  16. Composition and Dynamics of the Black Sea Benthopelagic Plankton and Its Contribution to the Near-Shore Plankton Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereshchaka, Alexander L.; Anokhina, Ludmila L.

    2014-01-01

    At a shallow (7 m) near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996–2001; 2006–2007) whilst for 1999–2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34′31.04″ N, 37°58′45.11″ E) in 1996–2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass) and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities. PMID:24945680

  17. Composition and dynamics of the Black Sea benthopelagic plankton and its contribution to the near-shore plankton communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L Vereshchaka

    Full Text Available At a shallow (7 m near-shore sampling site in the Black Sea we analyzed composition, abundance, and biomass of benthopelagic organisms and the contribution these animals make to the total plankton. The site was monitored across several years (1996-2001; 2006-2007 whilst for 1999-2000 the seasonal variations were analysed. A total of 321 samples from Golubaja Bay near Novorossiysk (44°34'31.04″ N, 37°58'45.11″ E in 1996-2007 were taken with a Judey net. The benthopelagic fauna was represented by 69 taxa, a diversity comparable to similar shelf areas. The benthopelagic component played an important role in near-shore plankton communities in the Black Sea accounting for 50% of the total zooplankton biomass at night during all seasons. Abundance and biomass of the benthopelagic animals showed seasonal fluctuations, the highest biomass being recorded during winter (>75% of the total zooplankton biomass and early spring due to large amphipods, whilst the highest abundances occur during late summer because of numerous young stages of various taxa. Amphipods, mysids, and decapods are the main contributors to the plankton biomass and abundances. Both night and daytime samples are strongly recommended for the adequate description of the near-shore plankton communities.

  18. Towards a representative periphytic diatom sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The need to acquire a representative periphytic diatom sample for river water quality monitoring has been recognised in the development of existing diatom indices, important in the development and employment of diatom monitoring tools for the Water Framework Directive. In this study, a nested design with replication is employed to investigate the magnitude of variation in diatom biomass, composition and Trophic Diatom Index at varying scales within a small chalk river. The study shows that the use of artificial substrates may not result in diatom communities that are typical of the surrounding natural substrates. Periphytic diatom biomass and composition varies between artificial and natural substrates, riffles and glides and between two stretches of the river channel. The study also highlights the existence of high variation in diatom frustule frequency and biovolume at the individual replicate scale which may have implications for the use of diatoms in routine monitoring.

  19. Eukaryotic plankton diversity in the sunlit ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Vargas, C; Audic, S; Henry, N; Decelle, J; Mahe, F; Logares, R; Lara, E; Berney, C; Le Bescot, N; Probert, I; Carmichael, M; Poulain, J; Romac, S; Colin, S; Aury, J.-M; Bittner, L; Chaffron, S; Dunthorn, M; Engelen, S; Flegontova, O; Guidi, L; Horak, A; Jaillon, O; Lima-Mendez, G; Luke , J; Malviya, S; Morard, R; Mulot, M; Scalco, E; Siano, R; Vincent, F; Zingone, A; Dimier, C; Picheral, M; Searson, S; Kandels-Lewis, S; Acinas, S. G; Bork, P; Bowler, C; Gorsky, G; Grimsley, N; Hingamp, P; Iudicone, D; Not, F; Ogata, H; Pesant, S; Raes, J; Sieracki, M. E; Speich, S; Stemmann, L; Sunagawa, S; Weissenbach, J; Wincker, P; Karsenti, E; Boss, E; Follows, M; Karp-Boss, L; Krzic, U; Reynaud, E. G; Sardet, C; Sullivan, M. B; Velayoudon, D

    2015-01-01

      Marine plankton support global biological and geochemical processes. Surveys of their biodiversity have hitherto been geographically restricted and have not accounted for the full range of plankton size...

  20. Eukaryotic plankton diversity in the sunlit ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Colomban de; Audic, Stéphane; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Mahé, Frédéric; Logares, Ramiro; Lara, Enrique; Berney, Cédric; Le Bescot, Noan; Probert, Ian; Carmichael, Margaux; Poulain, Julie; Romac, Sarah; Colin, Sébastien; Aury, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Marine plankton support global biological and geochemical processes. Surveys of their biodiversity have hitherto been geographically restricted and have not accounted for the full range of plankton size. We assessed eukaryotic diversity from 334 size-fractionated photic-zone plankton communities collected across tropical and temperate oceans during the circumglobal Tara Oceans expedition. We analyzed 18S ribosomal DNA sequences across the intermediate plankton-size spectrum from the smallest ...

  1. Drivers of Change in a 7300-Year Holocene Diatom Record from the Hemi-Boreal Region of Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen K Beck

    Full Text Available A Holocene lake sediment record spanning the past 7300 years from Wishart Lake in the Turkey Lakes Watershed in the Hemi-Boreal of central Ontario, Canada, was used to evaluate the potential drivers of long-term change in diatom assemblages at this site. An analysis of diatom assemblages found that benthic and epiphytic taxa dominated the mid-Holocene (7300-4000 cal yr BP, indicating shallow, oligotrophic, circum-neutral conditions, with macrophytes present. A significant shift in diatom assemblages towards more planktonic species (mainly Cyclotella sensu lato, but also several species of Aulacoseira, and Tabellaria flocculosa occurred ~4000 cal yr BP. This change likely reflects an increase in lake level, coincident with the onset of a more strongly positive moisture balance following the drier climates of the middle Holocene, established by numerous regional paleoclimate records. Pollen-inferred regional changes in vegetation around 4000 yrs BP, including an increase in Betula and other mesic taxa, may have also promoted changes in diatom assemblages through watershed processes mediated by the chemistry of runoff. A more recent significant change in limnological conditions is marked by further increases in Cyclotella sensu lato beginning in the late 19th century, synchronous with the Ambrosia pollen rise and increases in sediment bulk density, signaling regional and local land clearance at the time of Euro-Canadian settlement (1880 AD. In contrast to the mid-Holocene increase in planktonic diatoms, the modern increase in Cyclotella sensu lato likely indicates a response to land use and vegetation change, and erosion from the watershed, rather than a further increase in water level. The results from Wishart Lake illustrate the close connection between paleoclimate change, regional vegetation, watershed processes, and diatom assemblages and also provides insight into the controls on abundance of Cyclotella sensu lato, a diatom taxonomic group

  2. Effect of hydrological variability on diatom distribution in Poyang Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kuimei; Liu, Xia; Chen, Yuwei

    2017-01-01

    Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, and it has a seasonal flooding cycle that significantly changes the water level every year. The aim of this paper was to explain how these hydrological changes influence diatom populations in Poyang Lake. The yearly hydrological cycle can be divided into 4 phases: low water-level phase, increasing water-level phase, high water-level phase and decreasing water-level phase. Variations in the abundance of planktonic diatoms were studied using quarterly monitoring data collected from January 2009 to October 2013. Generally, diatoms were dominant in Poyang Lake and accounted for more than 50% of the total phytoplankton biomass except in July 2009 (26%) and January 2012 (35%). Aulacoseira granulata and Surirella robusta were the predominant species in all four phases, and they accounted for 25.02% to 56.89% and 5.07% to 14.78% of the total phytoplankton biomass, respectively. A redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that changes in physico-chemical parameter were related to the water level, and changes in diatom biomass were related to nitrite levels and pH. These results indicate that changes in environmental parameters related to both seasonal variations and water-level fluctuations caused variations in diatom biomass and community composition in Poyang Lake. Furthermore, extreme hydrological events can have different influences on the diatom community composition in the main channel and lentic regions. This research provides data on the diatom variations in Poyang Lake and will be useful for establishing biological indicators of environmental change and protecting Poyang Lake in the future.

  3. Simulated Sampling of Estuary Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer

    2009-01-01

    To find out about the microscopic life in the valuable estuary environment, it is usually necessary to be near the water. This dry lab offers an alternative, using authentic data and a simulation of plankton sampling. From the types of organisms found in the sample, middle school students can infer relationships in the biological and physical…

  4. Diatom genomics: genetic acquisitions and mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, R Ellen R; Kilian, Oliver; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2004-12-29

    Diatom algae arose by two-step endosymbiosis. The complete genome of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has now been sequenced, allowing us to reconstruct the remarkable intracellular gene transfers that occurred during this convoluted cellular evolution.

  5. Plankton community composition and vertical migration during polar night in Kongsfjorden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grenvald, Julie Cornelius; Callesen, Trine Abraham; Daase, Malin

    2016-01-01

    characterize the plankton community composition during the polar night using water samplers and zooplankton net samples (50, 64, 200, 1500 lm), supplemented by acoustics (ADCPs, 300 kHz), to address a previously unresolved question–which species of zooplankton perform diel vertical migration during the polar...

  6. Estimates of zooplankton abundance and size distribution with the Optical Plankton Counter (OPC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieland, Kai; Petersen, D.; Schnack, D.

    1997-01-01

    The capability of the Optical Plankton Count er (OPC) to examine the abundance and size distribution of zooplankton was tested in Storfjorden, Norway, in June 1993. Selected material obtained from net sampling was measured with a laboratory version of the OPC and compared with microscope analysis...

  7. Diatoms and drowning--once more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foged, N

    1983-01-01

    The content of diatoms in 5 samples: lung-, kidney- and liver-tissue plus columna- and femur-marrow from each of four drowned and four non-drowned persons has been investigated. Diatom valves were found in all the samples. It seems, however, impossible to point out any characteristic differences between the composition of the diatom 'flora' in drowned and non-drowned persons. Consequently it will not be possible by means of diatoms to prove that a person died by drowning.

  8. Nutrient supply, surface currents, and plankton dynamics predict zooplankton hotspots in coastal upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messié, Monique; Chavez, Francisco P.

    2017-09-01

    A simple combination of wind-driven nutrient upwelling, surface currents, and plankton growth/grazing equations generates zooplankton patchiness and hotspots in coastal upwelling regions. Starting with an initial input of nitrate from coastal upwelling, growth and grazing equations evolve phytoplankton and zooplankton over time and space following surface currents. The model simulates the transition from coastal (large phytoplankton, e.g., diatoms) to offshore (picophytoplankton and microzooplankton) communities, and in between generates a large zooplankton maximum. The method was applied to four major upwelling systems (California, Peru, Northwest Africa, and Benguela) using latitudinal estimates of wind-driven nitrate supply and satellite-based surface currents. The resulting zooplankton simulations are patchy in nature; areas of high concentrations coincide with previously documented copepod and krill hotspots. The exercise highlights the importance of the upwelling process and surface currents in shaping plankton communities.

  9. On the age of fossil diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siemińska Jadwiga

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The finding of fossil freshwater diatoms in late Cretaceous chert in Mexico suggests - together with all the discoveries of fossil freshwater diatoms known from positions older than the Cretaceous - that the extinct marine Cretaceous diatom taxa cannot be considered to be the oldest.

  10. Diatomic interaction potential theory applications

    CERN Document Server

    Goodisman, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Diatomic Interaction Potential Theory, Volume 2: Applications discusses the variety of applicable theoretical material and approaches in the calculations for diatomic systems in their ground states. The volume covers the descriptions and illustrations of modern calculations. Chapter I discusses the calculation of the interaction potential for large and small values of the internuclear distance R (separated and united atom limits). Chapter II covers the methods used for intermediate values of R, which in principle means any values of R. The Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction schemes des

  11. Communities structure of the planktonic halophiles in the solar saltern of Sfax, Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elloumi, Jannet; Carrias, Jean-François; Ayadi, Habib; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore; Bouaïn, Abderrahmen

    2009-01-01

    The composition and distribution of the main planktonic halophilic micro-organisms (heterotrophic and autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, phytoplankton, ciliates) and metazooplankton were investigated in six ponds of increasing salinity in the solar salt works of Sfax, Tunisia, from January to December 2003. Marked changes in the composition and biomass of the communities were found along the salinity gradient, especially at salinities of 150 and 350. Autotrophic picoplankton, nanoplankton, diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates characterized the less salted ponds. Planktonic biomass was the highest at intermediate salinity as a consequence of a bloom of Ochromonas. Species richness of phytoplankton, ciliates and zooplankton greatly decrease above a salinity of 150 and typical halophiles ( Dunaliella salina, cyanobacteria, Fabrea salina and Artemia salina) were found between 150 and 350 salinity. In this environment, F. salina appeared more adapted than the brine shrimp to survive during phytoplankton blooms. The halophilic plankton was however almost entirely composed of heterotrophic prokaryotes in the crystallizers. We thus observed a progressive disappearance of the autotrophic planktonic communities along the salinity gradient. Multivariate analysis of the communities provides evidence that ponds represent discrete aquatic ecosystems within this salt works.

  12. Iron fertilization and the structure of planktonic communities in high nutrient regions of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéguiner, Bernard

    2013-06-01

    In this review article, plankton community structure observations are analyzed both for artificial iron fertilization experiments and also for experiments dedicated to the study of naturally iron-fertilized systems in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific sectors of the Southern Ocean in the POOZ (Permanently Open Ocean Zone) and the PFZ (Polar Frontal Zone). Observations made in natural systems are combined with those from artificially perturbed systems, in order to evaluate the seasonal evolution of pelagic communities, taking into account controlling factors related to the life cycles and the ecophysiology of dominant organisms. The analysis considers several types of planktonic communities, including both autotrophs and heterotrophs. These communities are spatially segregated owing to different life strategies. A conceptual general scheme is proposed to account for these observations and their variability, regardless of experiment type. Diatoms can be separated into 2 groups: Group 1 has slightly silicified fast growing cells that are homogeneously distributed in the surface mixed layer, and Group 2 has strongly silicified slowly growing cells within discrete layers. During the growth season, Group 1 diatoms show a typical seasonal succession of dominant species, within time windows of development that are conditioned by physical factors (light and temperature) as well as endogenous specific rhythms (internal clock), and biomass accumulation is controlled by the availability of nutrients. Group 1 diatoms are not directly grazed by mesozooplankton which is fed by protozooplankton, linking the microbial food web to higher trophic levels. Instead, successive dominant species of Group 1 are degraded via bacterial activity at the end of their growth season. Organic detritus fragments feed protozooplankton and mesozooplankton. The effective silicon pump leads to the progressive disappearance of silicic acid in surface waters. In contrast, Group 2 is resistant to grazing

  13. Trophic strategies of unicellular plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2017-01-01

    Unicellular plankton employ trophic strategies ranging from pure photoautotrophs over mixotrophy to obligate heterotrophs (phagotrophs), with cell sizes from 10-8 to 1 μg C. A full understanding of how trophic strategy and cell size depend on resource environment and predation is lacking. To this......Unicellular plankton employ trophic strategies ranging from pure photoautotrophs over mixotrophy to obligate heterotrophs (phagotrophs), with cell sizes from 10-8 to 1 μg C. A full understanding of how trophic strategy and cell size depend on resource environment and predation is lacking...... unicellulars are colimited by organic carbon and nutrients, and only large photoautotrophs and smaller mixotrophs are nutrient limited; (2) trophic strategy is bottom-up selected by the environment, while optimal size is top-down selected by predation. The focus on cell size and trophic strategies facilitates...

  14. Mixotrophy in the Marine Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David A.; Mitra, Aditee

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhizaria, are mixotrophic owing to their retention of functional algal organelles or maintenance of algal endosymbionts. Phototrophy among the microzooplankton may increase gross growth efficiency and carbon transfer through the microzooplankton to higher trophic levels. Characteristic assemblages of mixotrophs are associated with warm, temperate, and cold seas and with stratification, fronts, and upwelling zones. Modeling has indicated that mixotrophy has a profound impact on marine planktonic ecosystems and may enhance primary production, biomass transfer to higher trophic levels, and the functioning of the biological carbon pump.

  15. Mixotrophy in the marine plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotroph....... Modeling has indicated that mixotrophy has a profound impact on marine planktonic ecosystems and may enhance primary production, biomass transfer to higher trophic levels, and the functioning of the biological carbon pump....

  16. Dynamic diatom response to changing climate 0–1.2 Ma at Lake El'gygytgyn, Far East Russian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Snyder

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Lake El'gygytgyn sediment record contains an abundant diatom flora through most intervals of the lake's history, providing a means to create and test hypotheses concerning the lake's response to changing climates. The 0–1.2 Ma core interval is characterized by shifts in the dominant planktonic genera and events of exceptional concentration and diversity. Warm interglacial intervals have enhanced concentration and diversity of the plankton. This response is most extreme during exceptional events corresponding to marine isotope stages (MIS 11 and 31. Diatom concentration and diversity also increase during some cold intervals (e.g., MIS 2, suggesting conditions of lake circulation and nutrient cycling promoting diatom production during these events. Short intervals of low plankton concentration accompanied by shifts in the dominant genus of the lake suggest conditions during certain cold events generate a severe impact on plankton production. The absence of these events during extended intervals of low summer insolation variability suggests a muted cold-event response of the lake system linked to regional climate.

  17. (Ln=La-Lu) Diatom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LnSi diatoms is carried out taking relativistic effect into account. In order to reveal the unusual properties of the rare earth Ln and silicon clusters, the main objective of this research, therefore, is to provide a detailed investigation of equilibrium geometries, charge-transfer properties, ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinitie ...

  18. Automated measurement of diatom size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Sarah A.; Jewson, David H.; Bixby, Rebecca J.; Nelson, Harry; McKnight, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Size analysis of diatom populations has not been widely considered, but it is a potentially powerful tool for understanding diatom life histories, population dynamics, and phylogenetic relationships. However, measuring cell dimensions on a light microscope is a time-consuming process. An alternative technique has been developed using digital flow cytometry on a FlowCAM® (Fluid Imaging Technologies) to capture hundreds, or even thousands, of images of a chosen taxon from a single sample in a matter of minutes. Up to 30 morphological measures may be quantified through post-processing of the high resolution images. We evaluated FlowCAM size measurements, comparing them against measurements from a light microscope. We found good agreement between measurement of apical cell length in species with elongated, straight valves, including small Achnanthidium minutissimum (11-21 µm) and largeDidymosphenia geminata (87–137 µm) forms. However, a taxon with curved cells, Hannaea baicalensis (37–96 µm), showed differences of ~ 4 µm between the two methods. Discrepancies appear to be influenced by the choice of feret or geodesic measurement for asymmetric cells. We describe the operating conditions necessary for analysis of size distributions and present suggestions for optimal instrument conditions for size analysis of diatom samples using the FlowCAM. The increased speed of data acquisition through use of imaging flow cytometers like the FlowCAM is an essential step for advancing studies of diatom populations.

  19. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  20. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  1. Diatoms confirm coseismic uplift and subsidence along the eastern Alaska-Aleutian megathrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dura, T.; Briggs, R. W.; Engelhart, S. E.; Nelson, A. R.; Horton, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone is the source of a series of Mw 8-9.2 20th century ruptures, including the second largest historical earthquake ever recorded in 1964. Paleoseismic studies, employing coastal stratigraphic sequences, have been successfully applied at sites within the 1964 rupture zone, but geologic records are unstudied west of the 1964 rupture. Understanding the behavior of the megathrust is important because a tsunamigenic rupture could damage the west coast of the United States. Investigations in the tidal marshes of Sitkinak Island, off the southwest coast of Kodiak Island, have uncovered stratigraphic evidence of five apparent coseismic land-level changes. Radiocarbon, 210Pb, and 137Cs dating indicate this record may include the 1964 and 1788 earthquakes and some predecessors. Here, we present new paleoecological evidence that independently confirms the inference that at least four of the abrupt lithologic changes in the stratigraphy of Sitkinak Island record coseismic land-level changes. Sudden and lasting changes in fossil diatom assemblages spanning tidal lithologic contacts reveal both coseismic subsidence (mud over peat) and coseismic uplift (peat over mud) during the last 1000 years. Across the contact that may mark the 1964 earthquake, a shift from a brackish, low-marsh diatom assemblage dominated by Diploneis interrupta and Navicula cincta to a tidal flat assemblage containing Actinocyclus normanii and Synedra tabulata indicates a sudden rise in relative sea-level, which we infer to record coseismic subsidence. In contrast, diatoms show evidence of coseismic uplift across the probable 1788 contact. An abrupt transition from a fully marine assemblage containing coastal planktonic and tychoplanktonic taxa to a freshwater marsh assemblage dominated by the salt-intolerant benthic diatom Eunotia fallax is consistent with a sudden and lasting relative sea-level fall. Abrupt changes in lithology across a contact dated about ~575 cal yr

  2. Growth phase of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi influences the metabolic profile of the cells and the selective feeding of the copepod Calanus spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barofsky, A.; Simonelli, P.; Vidoudez, V.

    2010-01-01

    Copepods dominate the biomass of marine zooplankton and through their prey selection they act as top-down regulators of planktonic communities. We investigated feeding preference of copepods in the presence of the diatom Skeletonema marinoi at different time points throughout the development...... in both laboratory and field settings. In parallel, we monitored cellular metabolites of the diatom using a metabolomic approach. Complex changes in the metabolic profile occur during development of a culture. Since no obvious effect of nutrient quality and cell size was involved, we suggest that changes...

  3. Proteomics studies on stress responses in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhseen, Ziyad Tariq; Xiong, Qian; Chen, Zhuo; Ge, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a highly diverse group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that are distributed throughout marine and freshwater environments and are believed to be responsible for approximately 40% of the total marine primary productivity. The ecological success of diatoms suggests that they have developed a range of strategies to cope with various biotic and abiotic stress factors. It is of great interest to understand the adaptive responses of diatoms to different stresses in the marine environment. Proteomic technologies have been applied to the adaptive responses of marine diatoms under different growth conditions in recent years such as nitrogen starvation, iron limitation and phosphorus deficiency. These studies have provided clues to elucidate the sophisticated sensing mechanisms that control their adaptive responses. Although only a very limited number of proteomic studies were conducted in diatoms, the obtained data have led to a better understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success. This review presents the current status of proteomic studies of diatom stress responses and discusses the novel developments and applications for the analysis of protein post-translational modification in diatoms. The potential future application of proteomics could contribute to a better understanding of the physiological mechanisms underlying diatom acclimation to a given stress and the acquisition of an enhanced diatom stress tolerance. Future challenges and research opportunities in the proteomics studies of diatoms are also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Chemical ecology of marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Emily R; Poulin, Remington X; Mojib, Nazia; Kubanek, Julia

    2016-07-28

    Covering: January 2013 to online publication December 2014This review summarizes recent research in the chemical ecology of marine pelagic ecosystems, and aims to provide a comprehensive overview of advances in the field in the time period covered. In order to highlight the role of chemical cues and toxins in plankton ecology this review has been organized by ecological interaction types starting with intraspecific interactions, then interspecific interactions (including facilitation and mutualism, host-parasite, allelopathy, and predator-prey), and finally community and ecosystem-wide interactions.

  5. Trends in marine plankton composition and export production in a CCSM-BEC hindcast (1960-2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufkoetter, Charlotte; Vogt, Meike; Gruber, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Climate-driven changes in marine plankton distribution are assumed to influence primary production, export production and export efficiency. We analyse trends in marine primary and particle export production and their relation to marine phytoplankton community composition using a hindcast simulation of the Biogeochemical Elemental Cycling Model (BEC) coupled to the Community Climate System Model over the period 1960-2006. The BEC models one generic zooplankton type and three phytoplankton types, diatoms, diazotrophs and small phytoplankton. In our simulation, small phytoplankton biomass, diatom biomass and zooplankton biomass decrease by 8%, 3% and 5%, respectively over the last 50 years. This decrease in plankton biomass is followed by a decrease in global primary and export production by 6% and 7%. Primary and export production decrease strongest in the Western Pacific (-18% and -23% respectively), where increased stratification leads to a decrease in total phytoplankton (-10%) and a decrease in diatom fraction (-12x%). The effect is a decrease in zooplankton biomass (-14%) and a lower export efficiency (-5%). Strong phytoplankton composition changes occur in the Southern Ocean and North Atlantic, where increased wind stress leads to stronger mixing, which reduces the biomass of small phytoplankton (-5% in the North Atlantic, -28% in the Southern Ocean), while diatoms profit from higher nutrient inputs and lower grazing pressure (+40% in the North Atlantic, + 22% in the Southern Ocean). The export efficiency and the relative fraction of diatoms are positively correlated (r=0.8) in most areas except the Northern Pacific and Antarctic Circumpolar Current, where the correlation is negative (r=-0.5). In areas where the correlation between diatom fraction and export efficiency is negative, small phytoplankton are simulated to consist of a high fraction of calcifiers, which are parameterized to produce faster sinking particles than diatoms in our model

  6. The biogeography of marine plankton traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Andrew D; Pershing, Andrew J; Litchman, Elena; Record, Nicholas R; Edwards, Kyle F; Finkel, Zoe V; Kiørboe, Thomas; Ward, Ben A

    2013-04-01

    Changes in marine plankton communities driven by environmental variability impact the marine food web and global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and other elements. To predict and assess these community shifts and their consequences, ecologists are increasingly investigating how the functional traits of plankton determine their relative fitness along environmental and biological gradients. Laboratory, field and modelling studies are adopting this trait-based approach to map the biogeography of plankton traits that underlies variations in plankton communities. Here, we review progress towards understanding the regulatory roles of several key plankton functional traits, including cell size, N2 -fixation and mixotrophy among phytoplankton, and body size, ontogeny and feeding behaviour for zooplankton. The trait biogeographical approach sheds light on what structures plankton communities in the current ocean, as well as under climate change scenarios, and also allows for finer resolution of community function because community trait composition determines the rates of significant processes, including carbon export. Although understanding of trait biogeography is growing, uncertainties remain that stem, in part, from the paucity of observations describing plankton functional traits. Thus, in addition to recommending widespread adoption of the trait-based approach, we advocate for enhanced collection, standardisation and dissemination of plankton functional trait data. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  7. Determining Microeukaryotic Plankton Community around Xiamen Island, Southeast China, Using Illumina MiSeq and PCR-DGGE Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingyu; Zhang, Wenjing; Liu, Lemian; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Microeukaryotic plankton are important components of aquatic environments and play key roles in marine microbial food webs; however, little is known about their genetic diversity in subtropical offshore areas. Here we examined the community composition and genetic diversity of the microeukaryotic plankton in Xiamen offshore water by PCR-DGGE (polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis), clone-based sequencing and Illumina based sequencing. The Illumina MiSeq sequencing revealed a much (approximately two orders of magnitude) higher species richness of the microeukaryotic community than DGGE, but there were no significant difference in species richness and diversity among the northern, eastern, southern or western stations based on both methods. In this study, Copepoda, Ciliophora, Chlorophyta, Dinophyceae, Cryptophyta and Bacillariophyta (diatoms) were the dominant groups even though diatoms were not detected by DGGE. Our Illumina based results indicated that two northern communities (sites N2 and N3) were significantly different from others in having more protozoa and fewer diatoms. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that both temperature and salinity were the significant environmental factors influencing dominant species communities, whereas the full microeukaryotic community appeared to be affected by a complex of environmental factors. Our results suggested that extensive sampling combined with more deep sequencing are needed to obtain the complete diversity of the microeukaryotic community, and different diversity patterns for both abundant and rare taxa may be important in evaluating the marine ecosystem health.

  8. Diatom-Based Material Production Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    The vast majority of these researchers have little or no experience in diatom cultivation or cell wall purification. Ready availability of a wider...there is a little bit of a ‘chicken and egg’ phenomena in that limited availability of diatom cell walls constrains the research on GAI Final...based on application of these unique materials. Such a project would not only advance current research on diatom cell wall applications, but could be

  9. Mercury methylation rates of biofilm and plankton microorganisms from a hydroelectric reservoir in French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, L; Castelle, S; Schäfer, J; Blanc, G; Maury-Brachet, R; Reynouard, C; Jorand, F

    2010-02-15

    The Petit-Saut ecosystem is a hydroelectric reservoir covering 365km(2) of flooded tropical forest. This reservoir and the Sinnamary Estuary downstream of the dam are subject to significant mercury methylation. The mercury methylation potential of plankton and biofilm microorganisms/components from different depths in the anoxic reservoir water column and from two different sites along the estuary was assessed. For this, reservoir water and samples of epiphytic biofilms from the trunk of a submerged tree in the anoxic water column and from submerged branches in the estuary were batch-incubated from 1h to 3 months with a nominal 1000ng/L spike of Hg(II) chloride enriched in (199)Hg. Methylation rates were determined for different reservoir and estuarine communities under natural nutrient (reservoir water, estuary freshwater) and artificial nutrient (culture medium) conditions. Methylation rates in reservoir water incubations were the highest with plankton microorganisms sampled at -9.5m depth (0.5%/d) without addition of biofilm components. Mercury methylation rates of incubated biofilm components were strongly enhanced by nutrient addition. The results suggested that plankton microorganisms strongly contribute to the total Hg methylation in the Petit-Saut reservoir and in the Sinnamary Estuary. Moreover, specific methylation efficiencies (%Me(199)Hg(net)/cell) suggested that plankton microorganisms could be more efficient methylating actors than biofilm consortia and that their methylation efficiency may be reduced in the presence of biofilm components. Extrapolation to the reservoir scale of the experimentally determined preliminary methylation efficiencies suggested that plankton microorganisms in the anoxic water column could produce up to 27mol MeHg/year. Taking into account that (i) demethylation probably occurs in the reservoir and (ii) that the presence of biofilm components may limit the methylation efficiency of plankton microorganisms, this result is

  10. Diatom-inspired templates for 3D replication: natural diatoms versus laser written artificial diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belegratis, M R; Schmidt, V; Nees, D; Stadlober, B; Hartmann, P

    2014-03-01

    The diatoms are ubiquitous, exist in large numbers and show a great diversity of features on their porous silica structures. Therefore, they inspire the fabrication of nanostructured templates for nanoimprint processes (NIL), where large structured areas with nanometer precision are required. In this study, two approaches regarding the respective challenges and potential exploitations are followed and discussed: the first one takes advantage of a template that is directly made of natural occurring diatoms. Here, two replication steps via soft lithography are needed to obtain a template which is subsequently used for NIL. The second approach exploits the technical capabilities of the precise 3D laser lithography (3DLL) based on two-photon polymerization of organic materials. This method enables the fabrication of arbitrary artificial diatom-inspired micro- and nanostructures and the design of an inverse structure. Therefore, only one replication step is needed to obtain a template for NIL. In both approaches, a replication technique for true 3D structures is shown.

  11. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  12. Effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Leu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ocean acidification on the fatty acid composition of a natural plankton community in the Arctic was studied in a large-scale mesocosm experiment, carried out in Kongsfjorden (Svalbard, Norway at 79° N. Nine mesocosms of ~50 m3 each were exposed to 8 different pCO2 levels (from natural background conditions to ~1420 μatm, yielding pH values (on the total scale from ~8.3 to 7.5. Inorganic nutrients were added on day 13. The phytoplankton development during this 30-day experiment passed three distinct phases: (1 prior to the addition of inorganic nutrients, (2 first bloom after nutrient addition, and (3 second bloom after nutrient addition. The fatty acid composition of the natural plankton community was analysed and showed, in general, high percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs: 44–60% of total fatty acids. Positive correlations with pCO2 were found for most PUFAs during phases 2 and/or 3, with the exception of 20:5n3 (eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA, an important diatom marker. These correlations are probably linked to changes in taxonomic composition in response to pCO2. While diatoms (together with prasinophytes and haptophytes increased during phase 3 mainly in the low and intermediate pCO2 treatments, dinoflagellates were favoured by high CO2 concentrations during the same time period. This is reflected in the development of group-specific fatty acid trophic markers. No indications were found for a generally detrimental effect of ocean acidification on the planktonic food quality in terms of essential fatty acids.

  13. Comparison of benthos and plankton for Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern, Illinois, and Burns Harbor-Port of Indiana non-Area of Concern, Indiana, in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikenberry, Barbara C. Scudder; Olds, Hayley T.; Burns, Daniel J.; Dobrowolski, Edward G.; Schmude, Kurt L.

    2017-06-06

    During two seasonal sampling events in spring (June) and fall (August) of 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey collected benthos (benthic invertebrates) and plankton (zooplankton and phytoplankton) at three sites each in the Waukegan Harbor Area of Concern (AOC) in Illinois and in Burns Harbor-Port of Indiana, a non-AOC comparison site in Indiana. The study was done in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. Samples were collected concurrently for physical and chemical parameters (specific conductance, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll-a, total and volatile suspended solids in water samples; particle size and volatile-on-ignition solids of sediment in dredge samples). The purpose of the study was to assess whether or not aquatic communities at the AOC were degraded in comparison to communities at the non-AOC, which was presumed to be less impaired than the AOC. Benthos were collected by using Hester-Dendy artificial substrate samplers and a Ponar® dredge sampler to collect composited grabs of bottom sediment; zooplankton were collected by using tows from depth to the surface with a 63-micrometer mesh plankton net; phytoplankton were collected by using whole water samples composited from set depth intervals. Aquatic communities at the AOC and the non-AOC were compared by use of univariate statistical analyses with metrics such as taxa richness (number of unique taxa), diversity, and a multimetric Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI, for artificial-substrate samples only) as well as by use of multivariate statistical analyses of taxa relative abundances.Although benthos communities at Waukegan Harbor AOC were not rated as degraded in comparison to the non-AOC, metrics for zooplankton and phytoplankton communities did show some impairment for the 2015 sampling. Across seasons, benthos richness and diversity were significantly higher and rated as less degraded at the AOC compared to the non

  14. Diatom Assemblages Preserved During Intervals of Peak Warmth Inferred in Sediment Cores from Lake El’gygytgyn, Siberia: Implications for Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions from the Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. A.; Cherapanova, M.; Brigham-Grette, J.; Melles, M.

    2009-12-01

    Sediment cores recovered from Lake El’gygytgyn in 1998 and 2003, extending to approximately 250 ka and 340 ka, contain abundant, well-preserved diatoms in most core intervals. Previous research has shown the dominance of the planktonic Cyclotella ocellata-complex through most of the records, suggesting that this diatom is capable of adapting to a variety of ice-conditions in the lake. In contrast, the periphytic diatoms, although lower in abundance, are both highly diverse and variable through time. The core Lz1024 (2003) contains an interval of peak diatom abundance near the base of the core, preliminarily correlated to isotope stage 9, allowing comparison among multiple intervals of peak warmth inferred from other core proxies. These intervals are enhanced in both quantity and genus-level diversity of periphytic diatoms, particularly small species within the families Achnanthaceae and Cymbellaceae. In addition, low-magnification scans of larger diatoms (greater than 75 μm, e.g. particular species of the genera Surirella, Stauroneis, Pinnularia, and Neidium) show similar trends. Although these diatoms are less abundant on traditional high-magnification transect counts, their size and robust valves suggest their comparable importance in the lake system. Interpretation of species-level down-core variations is complicated by the appearance of individual species in abundance only during individual warm intervals. Observed changes in the periphytic diatom assemblages during peak-warmth intervals suggest an enhancement of shallow, near-shore diatoms habitats, most easily explained by more extended ice-free conditions along the margins of the lake.

  15. Temporal and spatial variability in export production in the SE Pacific Ocean: evidence from siliceous plankton fluxes and surface sediment assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Oscar E.; Hebbeln, Dierk; Wefer, Gerold

    2001-12-01

    Flux of siliceous plankton and taxonomic composition of diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages were determined from sediment trap samples collected in coastal upwelling-influenced waters off northern Chile (30°S, CH site) under "normal" or non-El Niño (1993-94) and El Niño conditions (1997-98). In addition, concentration of biogenic opal and siliceous plankton, and diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages preserved in surface sediments are provided for a wide area between 27° and 43°S off Chile. Regardless of the year, winter upwelling determines the maximum production pattern of siliceous microorganisms, with diatoms numerically dominating the biogenic opal flux. During the El Niño year the export is markedly lower: on an annual basis, total mass flux diminished by 60%, and diatom and silicoflagellate export by 75%. Major components of the diatom flora maintain much of their regular seasonal cycle of flux maxima and minima during both sampling periods. Neritic resting spores (RS) of Chaetoceros dominate the diatom flux, mirroring the influence of coastal-upwelled waters at the CH trap site. Occurrence of pelagic diatoms species Fragilariopsis doliolus, members of the Rhizosoleniaceae, Azpeitia spp. and Nitzschia interruptestriata, secondary components of the assemblage, reflects the intermingling of warmer waters of the Subtropical Gyre. Dictyocha messanensis dominates the silicoflagellate association almost year-around, but Distephanus pulchra delivers ca. 60% of its annual production in less than three weeks during the winter peak. The siliceous thanatocoenosis is largely dominated by diatoms, whose assemblage shows significant qualitative and quantitative variations from north to south. Between 27° and 35°S, the dominance of RS Chaetoceros, Thalassionema nitzschioides var. nitzschioides and Skeletonema costatum reflects strong export production associated with occurrence of coastal upwelling. Both highest biogenic opal content and diatom concentration

  16. Keragaman Plankton dan Kondisi Perairan Tambak Intensif dan Tradisional di Probolinggo Jawa Timur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utojo Utojo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to estimate the wealth and stability of traditional and intensive brackishwater pond waters through biological index calculation (diversity, uniformity and dominance of plankton in traditional and intensive brackishwater pond waters of Probolinggo Regency, East Java Province. Sampling plankton and water from the site, considered to represent the diversity of plankton and water stability of traditional and intensive brackishwater pond. Plankton was collected using a plankton net no. 25, then preserved using 1% lugol solution. Measurement of water quality variables include temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH, whereas the laboratory analyzes that Total Organic Matter (TOM, NO2, NO3, NH3, PO4, Total Suspended Solids (TSS, and Fe. Plankton identification using microscope and calculation with cell counting method. The results of analysis of plankton in intensive brackishwater pond waters are obtained as much as 23 genera consisting of 16 genera of phytoplankton were included into three classes, namely Bacillariophyceae as much as 5 genera, Cyanophyceae 3 genera, Dinophyceae and Chlorophyceae, each of the four genera, whereas zooplankton consisting of 7 genera are included into two classes, namely Crustaceae 6 genera and Rotatoria 1 genus. In traditional brackishwater pond earned as much as 13 genera consisting of 8 genera of phytoplankton were included into Bacillariophyceae 5 genera, Cyanophyceae 2 genera, and Dinophyceae 3 genera, whereas zooplankton consisting of three genera are included into class Crustaceae 2 genera and Rotatoria 1 genus. Plankton abundance in intensive brackishwater pond ranges 702 - 4269 ind./L, diversity index of 0.26 -2.38, uniformity index of 0.10 - 1.5, and dominance index of 0.02 - 0.68. In traditional brackishwater pond have an abundance of plankton range 134 - 776 ind./L, diversity index of 0.10 - 1.97, uniformity index of 0.08 - 1.0, and dominance index of 0.01 - 0.75. Traditional and

  17. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2017-07-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics of such communities, researchers need accurate and rapid techniques for detecting plankton species. We evaluated the diversity of eukaryotic plankton over a salinity gradient by applying a metagenomics tool at the Nakdong River estuary in Korea. Environmental samples were collected on three dates during summer and autumn of 2011 at the Eulsukdo Bridge at the mouth of that river. Amplifying the 18S rDNA allowed us to analyze 456 clones and 122 phylotypes. Metagenomic sequences revealed various taxonomic groups and cryptic genetic variations at the intra- and inter-specific levels. By analyzing the same station at each sampling date, we observed that the phylotypes presented a salinity-related pattern of diversity in assemblages. The variety of species within freshwater samples reflected the rapid environmental changes caused by freshwater inputs. Dinophyceae phylotypes accounted for the highest proportion of overall diversity in the seawater samples. Euryhaline diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed in the freshwater, brackish and seawater samples. The biological data for species composition demonstrate the transitional state between freshwater and seawater. Therefore, this metagenomics information can serve as a biological indicator for tracking changes in aquatic environments.

  18. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Professor of. Computer Science and. Automation at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His research interests are broadly in the areas of stochastic modeling and scheduling methodologies for future factories; and object oriented modeling. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Petri Nets. 1. Overview and Foundations.

  19. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Petri Nets - Overview and Foundations. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department ot Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  20. Planktonic diatoms of the Zuari estuary, Goa (west coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Redekar, P.D.; Wagh, A.B.

    ). The Zuari estuary on the west coast (Goa) of India is a highly dynamic and variable environment with considerable tidal influence. The perennial connection of this estuary with the Arabian sea results in rhythmic ingress and egress of marine and estuarine...

  1. DDD: Dynamic Database for Diatomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenke, David

    2004-01-01

    We have developed as web-based database containing spectra of diatomic moiecuies. All data is computed from first principles, and if a user requests data for a molecule/ion that is not in the database, new calculations are automatically carried out on that species. Rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions are included. Different levels of accuracy can be selected from qualitatively correct to the best calculations that can be carried out. The user can view and modify spectroscopic constants, view potential energy curves, download detailed high temperature linelists, or view synthetic spectra.

  2. Automatic segmentation of diatom images for classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalba, Andrei C.; Wilkinson, Michael H.F.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    A general framework for automatic segmentation of diatom images is presented. This segmentation is a critical first step in contour-based methods for automatic identification of diatoms by computerized image analysis. We review existing results, adapt popular segmentation methods to this difficult

  3. Thermodynamics properties of diatomic molecules with general ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AKPAN N IKOT

    2018-01-10

    Jan 10, 2018 ... S and vibrational specific heat capacity C. These thermodynamic functions are studied for the electronic state X1 + g of K2 diatomic molecules. Keywords. Asymptotic iteration method; diatomic molecules; general molecular potential; partition function. PACS Nos 03.65.Ge; 03.65.Ca. 1. Introduction.

  4. Plankton distribution and diversity: a case study of earthen fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our knowledge of the consumption of plankton by fish is still fragmentary. Trophic links between fish and plankton are often loose because plankton is a changing assemblage of pelagic organisms of valuable nutritional value. The objectives of the study were to determine the distribution and diversity of planktons in the fish ...

  5. Metals emitted by the young submarine volcano Tagoro (El Hierro, Canary Islands): quantification in seawater and plankton and their potential impact

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterbaan, M. (Marijn)

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of twenty metal elements in seawater and in plankton around the recently erupted submarine volcano Tagoro just South of the island El Hierro (Canary Islands, Spain) were investigated in order to assess their potential hazard to the marine environment. Samples of the seawater and the plankton were collected from 2013 to 2016 during the Vulcano and Vulcana monitoring cruises, using a rosette with Niskin bottles and a WP2 net (200 m mesh size). Significantly ...

  6. Localised mixing and heterogeneity in the plankton food web in a frontal region of the Sargasso Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Joøgen; Christensen, Jens Tang

    2014-01-01

    the diatom communities at 10 m and > 100 m (in the deep chlorophyll maximum, DCM) than in other parts of the frontal region. Thorpe displacements supported the hypothesis of elevated mixing intensities around these stations, as did vertical mixing rates inferred from stratification and vertical current shear...... influence the plankton food web, as indicated by elevated values/concentrations of (1) primary production, (2) variable fluorescence (F-v/F-m) and (3) total seston. In addition, the fraction of the total biomass of both copepods and nauplii found closest to the DCM in the frontal region correlated...

  7. Post-cryopreservation viability of the benthic freshwater diatom Planothidium frequentissimum depends on light levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhmann, Matthias T; Day, John G; Kroth, Peter G

    2013-08-01

    Over recent years, several planktonic and benthic freshwater diatom taxa have been established as laboratory model strains. In common with most freshwater diatoms the pennate diatom Planothidium frequentissimum suffers irreversible cell shrinkage on prolonged maintenance by serial transfers, without induction of the sexual cycle. Therefore, alternative strategies are required for the long-term maintenance of this strain. Conventional colligative cryopreservation approaches have previously proven unsuccessful with no regrowth. However, in this study using 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), controlled cooling at 1 °C min(-1), automated ice seeding and cooling to -40 °C with a final plunge into liquid nitrogen, viability levels were enhanced from 0.3 ± 0.4% to 80 ± 3%, by incorporating a 48 h dark-recovery phase after rewarming. Omission, or reduction, of this recovery step resulted in obvious cell damage with photo-bleaching of pigments, indicative of oxidative-stress induced cell damage, with subsequent deterioration of cellular architecture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis and modeling of scale-invariance in plankton abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Pelletier, J D

    1996-01-01

    The power spectrum, $S$, of horizontal transects of plankton abundance are often observed to have a power-law dependence on wavenumber, $k$, with exponent close to $-2$: $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ over a wide range of scales. I present power spectral analyses of aircraft lidar measurements of phytoplankton abundance from scales of 1 to 100 km. A power spectrum $S(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ is obtained. As a model for this observation, I consider a stochastic growth equation where the rate of change of plankton abundance is determined by turbulent mixing, modeled as a diffusion process in two dimensions, and exponential growth with a stochastically variable net growth rate representing a fluctuating environment. The model predicts a lognormal distribution of abundance and a power spectrum of horizontal transects $S(k)\\propto k^{-1.8}$, close to the observed spectrum. The model equation predicts that the power spectrum of variations in abundance in time at a point in space is $S(f)\\propto f^{-1.5}$ (where $f$ is the frequency...

  9. Multi-year assessment of coastal planktonic fungi reveals environmental drivers of diversity and abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joe D; Cunliffe, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Mycoplankton have so far been a neglected component of pelagic marine ecosystems, having been poorly studied relative to other plankton groups. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of how mycoplankton diversity changes through time, and the identity of controlling environmental drivers. Using Fungi-specific high-throughput sequencing and quantitative PCR analysis of plankton DNA samples collected over 6 years from the coastal biodiversity time series site Station L4 situated off Plymouth (UK), we have assessed changes in the temporal variability of mycoplankton diversity and abundance in relation to co-occurring environmental variables. Mycoplankton diversity at Station L4 was dominated by Ascomycota, Basidiomycota and Chytridiomycota, with several orders within these phyla frequently abundant and dominant in multiple years. Repeating interannual mycoplankton blooms were linked to potential controlling environmental drivers, including nitrogen availability and temperature. Specific relationships between mycoplankton and other plankton groups were also identified, with seasonal chytrid blooms matching diatom blooms in consecutive years. Mycoplankton α-diversity was greatest during periods of reduced salinity at Station L4, indicative of riverine input to the ecosystem. Mycoplankton abundance also increased during periods of reduced salinity, and when potential substrate availability was increased, including particulate organic matter. This study has identified possible controlling environmental drivers of mycoplankton diversity and abundance in a coastal sea ecosystem, and therefore sheds new light on the biology and ecology of an enigmatic marine plankton group. Mycoplankton have several potential functional roles, including saprotrophs and parasites, that should now be considered within the consensus view of pelagic ecosystem functioning and services.

  10. Community- and population-level changes in diatom size structure in a subarctic lake over the last two centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Kerrigan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Climate change over the last two centuries has been associated with significant shifts in diatom community structure in lakes from the high arctic to temperate latitudes. To test the hypotheses that recent climate warming selects for species of smaller size within communities and a decrease in the average size of species within populations, we quantified the size of individual diatom valves from 10 depths in a sediment core covering the last ∼200 years from a pristine subarctic lake. Over the last ∼200 years, changes in the relative abundance of species of different average size and changes in the average valve size of populations of species contribute equally to the changes in community size structure, but are often opposite in sign, compensating for one another and moderating temporal changes in community size structure. In the surface sediments that correspond to the recent decades when air temperatures have warmed, the mean size of valves in the diatom community has significantly decreased due to an increase in the proportion of smaller-sized planktonic diatom species.

  11. Beyond the Plankton Ecology Group (PEG) Model: Mechanisms Driving Plankton Succession

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, U.; Adrian, R.; De Senerpont Domis, L.N.; Elser, J.J.; Gaedke, U.; Ibelings, B.W.; Jeppesen, E.; Lürling, M.; Molinero, J.C.; Mooij, W.M.; Van Donk, E.; Winder, M.

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal succession of plankton is an annually repeated process of community assembly during which all major external factors and internal interactions shaping communities can be studied. A quarter of a century ago, the state of this understanding was described by the verbal plankton ecology

  12. Comprehensive model of annual plankton succession based on the whole-plankton time series approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Legendre, Louis; Guidi, Lionel; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Jamet, Dominique; Mousseau, Laure; Pedrotti, Maria-Luiza; Picheral, Marc; Gorsky, Gabriel; Sardet, Christian; Stemmann, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Ecological succession provides a widely accepted description of seasonal changes in phytoplankton and mesozooplankton assemblages in the natural environment, but concurrent changes in smaller (i.e. microbes) and larger (i.e. macroplankton) organisms are not included in the model because plankton ranging from bacteria to jellies are seldom sampled and analyzed simultaneously. Here we studied, for the first time in the aquatic literature, the succession of marine plankton in the whole-plankton assemblage that spanned 5 orders of magnitude in size from microbes to macroplankton predators (not including fish or fish larvae, for which no consistent data were available). Samples were collected in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Villefranche) weekly during 10 months. Simultaneously collected samples were analyzed by flow cytometry, inverse microscopy, FlowCam, and ZooScan. The whole-plankton assemblage underwent sharp reorganizations that corresponded to bottom-up events of vertical mixing in the water-column, and its development was top-down controlled by large gelatinous filter feeders and predators. Based on the results provided by our novel whole-plankton assemblage approach, we propose a new comprehensive conceptual model of the annual plankton succession (i.e. whole plankton model) characterized by both stepwise stacking of four broad trophic communities from early spring through summer, which is a new concept, and progressive replacement of ecological plankton categories within the different trophic communities, as recognised traditionally.

  13. Characterization of marine diatom-infecting virus promoters in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    OpenAIRE

    Kadono, Takashi; Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kira, Nozomu; Tomaru, Yuji; Okami, Takuma; Yoshimatsu, Takamichi; Hou, Liyuan; Ohama, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Kazunari; Okauchi, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Haruo; Ohnishi, Kohei; Falciatore, Angela; Adachi, Masao

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Viruses are considered key players in phytoplankton population control in oceans. However, mechanisms that control viral gene expression in prominent microalgae such as diatoms remain largely unknown. In this study, potential promoter regions isolated from several marine diatom-infecting viruses (DIVs) were linked to the egfp reporter gene and transformed into the Pennales diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. We analysed their activity in cells grown under different condi...

  14. Accumulation of Perfluoroalkylated Substances in Oceanic Plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Paulo; González-Gaya, Belén; Zhang, Yifeng; Reardon, Anthony J F; Martin, Jonathan W; Jiménez, Begoña; Dachs, Jordi

    2017-03-07

    The bioaccumulation of perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs) in plankton has previously been evaluated only in freshwater and regional seas, but not for the large oligotrophic global oceans. Plankton samples from the tropical and subtropical Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans were collected during the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation expedition, and analyzed for 14 ionizable PFASs, including perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and their respective linear and branched isomers. PFOA and PFOS concentrations in plankton ranged from 0.1 to 43 ng gdw(-1) and from 0.5 to 6.7 ng gdw(-1), respectively. The relative abundance of branched PFOA in the northern hemisphere was correlated with distance to North America, consistent with the historical production and coherent with previously reported patterns in seawater. The plankton samples showing the highest PFOS concentrations also presented the largest relative abundances of branched PFOS, suggesting a selective cycling/fractionation of branched PFOS in the surface ocean mediated by plankton. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) for plankton were calculated for six PFASs, including short chain PFASs. PFASs Log BAFs (wet weight) ranged from 2.6 ± 0.8 for perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS), to 4.4 ± 0.6 for perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA). The vertical transport of PFASs due to the settling of organic matter bound PFAS (biological pump) was estimated from an organic matter settling fluxes climatology and the PFAS concentrations in plankton. The global average sinking fluxes were 0.8 ± 1.3 ng m(-2)d(-1) for PFOA, and 1.1 ± 2.1 ng m(-2)d(-1) for PFOS. The residence times of PFAS in the surface ocean, assuming the biological pump as the unique sink, showed a wide range of variability, from few years to millennia, depending on the sampling site and individual compound. Further process-based studies are needed to constrain the oceanic sink of PFAS.

  15. Ocean plankton. Environmental characteristics of Agulhas rings affect interocean plankton transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Emilie; Farrant, Gregory K; Follows, Michael; Garczarek, Laurence; Speich, Sabrina; Audic, Stéphane; Bittner, Lucie; Blanke, Bruno; Brum, Jennifer R; Brunet, Christophe; Casotti, Raffaella; Chase, Alison; Dolan, John R; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Grima, Nicolas; Guidi, Lionel; Hill, Christopher N; Jahn, Oliver; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Le Goff, Hervé; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Malviya, Shruti; Pelletier, Eric; Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Roux, Simon; Santini, Sébastien; Scalco, Eleonora; Schwenck, Sarah M; Tanaka, Atsuko; Testor, Pierre; Vannier, Thomas; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Boss, Emmanuel; de Vargas, Colomban; Gorsky, Gabriel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stéphane; Sullivan, Matthew B; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele

    2015-05-22

    Agulhas rings provide the principal route for ocean waters to circulate from the Indo-Pacific to the Atlantic basin. Their influence on global ocean circulation is well known, but their role in plankton transport is largely unexplored. We show that, although the coarse taxonomic structure of plankton communities is continuous across the Agulhas choke point, South Atlantic plankton diversity is altered compared with Indian Ocean source populations. Modeling and in situ sampling of a young Agulhas ring indicate that strong vertical mixing drives complex nitrogen cycling, shaping community metabolism and biogeochemical signatures as the ring and associated plankton transit westward. The peculiar local environment inside Agulhas rings may provide a selective mechanism contributing to the limited dispersal of Indian Ocean plankton populations into the Atlantic. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Diatoms as paleoecological indicators of environmental change in the Lake Czechowskie catchments ecosystem (Northern Tuchola Pinewoods, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Zawiska, Izabela; Noryśkiewicz, Agnieszka Maria; Obremska, Milena; Ott, Florian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Słowiński, Michał; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated four cores of biogenic sediments from the lakes located in close vicinity. Three cores are situated along a transect in the Lake Czechowskie basin from its deepest point towards a former lake bay. The fourth sediment core was retrieved from the nearby Trzechowskie paleolake. Lake Czechowskie is located in the northern part of the Tuchola Pinewoods District (Northern Poland) in a young glacial landscape. At present, the majority of the area is forested or used for agriculture. The main focus was of the study was Late Glacial and early Holocene period. We performed diatom, Cladocera and pollen analyses, the chronology was established by varve counting, confirmed by AMS 14C dating and Laacher See Tephra (Wulf et. all 2013). In this study we focused on the results of diatom analyses. Diatom assemblages are integrated indicators of environmental change because their distributions are closely linked to water quality parameters including such as nutrient availability. At the beginning of Allerød there are more eutrophic diatom taxa such as Staurosira construens, Pseudostaurosira brevistriata, Staurosira pinnata. These species are widely distributed in the littoral mainly freshwater, many of which are species of epiphytic, preferring water rich in nutrients. At the end of the Allerød we observe significant changes within diatom assemblages. The increase of planktonic Cyclotella comensis together with the decrease of benthic Stauroseria construens indicate the shortening of time with ice cove on the lake and longer time with summer stratification. In the Younger Dryas cooling we can see the increase of the abundance of diatom Staurosira construens which indicate cold spring and late ice-out (Bradbury et al., 2002). At the early Holocene planktonic diatoms increase in particular Cyclotella comensis, Punciculata radiosa and Cyclotella praetermissa. Some of Aulacoseira species at the end of Younger Dryas. The Holocene sediments showed no

  17. Digitisation of the South African diatom collection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Molen, J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This presentation gives the background of the Diatom collection as well as an overview of the collection content. The two phases of the digitisation process are described in detail...

  18. Oceanographic and Biogeochemical Insights from Diatom Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Chris; Vardi, Assaf; Allen, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    Diatoms are the most successful group of eukaryotic phytoplankton in the modern ocean and have risen to dominance relatively quickly over the last 100 million years. Recently completed whole genome sequences from two species of diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, have revealed a wealth of information about the evolutionary origins and metabolic adaptations that have led to their ecological success. A major finding is that they have incorporated genes both from their endosymbiotic ancestors and by horizontal gene transfer from marine bacteria. This unique melting pot of genes encodes novel capacities for metabolic management, for example, allowing the integration of a urea cycle into a photosynthetic cell. In this review we show how genome-enabled approaches are being leveraged to explore major phenomena of oceanographic and biogeochemical relevance, such as nutrient assimilation and life histories in diatoms. We also discuss how diatoms may be affected by climate change-induced alterations in ocean processes.

  19. Amino Acid Biosynthesis Pathways in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz A. Bromke

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acids are not only building blocks for proteins but serve as precursors for the synthesis of many metabolites with multiple functions in growth and other biological processes of a living organism. The biosynthesis of amino acids is tightly connected with central carbon, nitrogen and sulfur metabolism. Recent publication of genome sequences for two diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum created an opportunity for extensive studies on the structure of these metabolic pathways. Based on sequence homology found in the analyzed diatomal genes, the biosynthesis of amino acids in diatoms seems to be similar to higher plants. However, one of the most striking differences between the pathways in plants and in diatomas is that the latter possess and utilize the urea cycle. It serves as an important anaplerotic pathway for carbon fixation into amino acids and other N-containing compounds, which are essential for diatom growth and contribute to their high productivity.

  20. Selective silicate-directed motility in diatoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondoc, Karen Grace V.; Heuschele, Jan; Gillard, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are highly abundant unicellular algae that often dominate pelagic as well as benthic primary production in the oceans and inland waters. Being strictly dependent on silica to build their biomineralized cell walls, marine diatoms precipitate 240 × 10(12) mol Si per year, which makes them...... the major sink in the global Si cycle. Dissolved silicic acid (dSi) availability frequently limits diatom productivity and influences species composition of communities. We show that benthic diatoms selectively perceive and behaviourally react to gradients of dSi. Cell speed increases under d......Si-limited conditions in a chemokinetic response and, if gradients of this resource are present, increased directionality of cell movement promotes chemotaxis. The ability to exploit local and short-lived dSi hotspots using a specific search behaviour likely contributes to micro-scale patch dynamics in biofilm...

  1. Species Diversity of Plankton in Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Samut Songkhram Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppadon Chamchoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of phytoplankton and zooplankton in Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Samut Songkram Campus by collecting the samples following the seasons: the cool season (December, 2012, the hot season (March, 2013 and the rainy season (June, 2013. The plankton samples were collected from 5 stations by using 70 micrometers mesh size of plankton net and examined the water quality. The results showed that, in total, there are plankton in 48 genera, 77 species which consist of 36 genera, 58 species of the phytoplankton, and 12 genera, 19 species of the zooplankton. The phytoplankton: Class Bacillariophyceae was the dominant group and the most diverse was the genus Chaetoceros (8 species. The zooplankton: Phylum Sarcomastigophora had the most species diversity and most diverse zooplankton was the genus Ceratium (5 species. The cool season was the season when the greatest species diversity of the plankton could be found and the water temperature average was 27.79 ° C. The pH average was 7.82. The dissolved oxygen average was 6.21 mg/l. The salinity average was 24 ppt. These conditions are the appropriate environment for these living aquatic organisms.

  2. Benthos and plankton community data for selected rivers and harbors along Wisconsin's Lake Michigan shoreline, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C.; Bell, Amanda H.; Burns, Daniel J.; Templar, Hayley A.

    2014-01-01

    Four river systems on the Wisconsin shoreline of Lake Michigan are designated Areas of Concern (AOCs) because of severe environmental degradation: the Lower Menominee River, Lower Green Bay and Fox River, Sheboygan River, and Milwaukee Estuary. Each AOC has one or more Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) that form the basis of the AOC designation and that must be remediated or otherwise addressed before the AOC designation can be removed. All four of these AOCs have BUIs for benthos (bottom-dwelling or benthic invertebrates), and all but the Menominee River have a BUI for plankton (free-floating algae and invertebrates, or phytoplankton and zooplankton, respectively). The U.S. Geological Survey collected samples in 2012 at these four AOCs and at six non-AOCs to support the evaluation of the status of aquatic communities in the benthos and plankton at the AOCs. Samples were collected during three periods representing spring, summer, and fall. Benthos samples were collected using a dredge grab sampler and artificial substrates; plankton samples were collected using a tow net for zooplankton and a vertical water sampler for phytoplankton. Benthos and plankton were identified to the lowest possible taxonomic category and counted; samples for documenting water temperature, pH, and specific conductance, as well as sediment particle size and organic carbon were also collected during biological sampling.

  3. The evolution of silicon transporters in diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Colleen A; Koester, Julie A; Bender, Sara J; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2016-10-01

    Diatoms are highly productive single-celled algae that form an intricately patterned silica cell wall after every cell division. They take up and utilize silicic acid from seawater via silicon transporter (SIT) proteins. This study examined the evolution of the SIT gene family to identify potential genetic adaptations that enable diatoms to thrive in the modern ocean. By searching for sequence homologs in available databases, the diversity of organisms found to encode SITs increased substantially and included all major diatom lineages and other algal protists. A bacterial-encoded gene with homology to SIT sequences was also identified, suggesting that a lateral gene transfer event occurred between bacterial and protist lineages. In diatoms, the SIT genes diverged and diversified to produce five distinct clades. The most basal SIT clades were widely distributed across diatom lineages, while the more derived clades were lineage-specific, which together produced a distinct repertoire of SIT types among major diatom lineages. Differences in the predicted protein functional domains encoded among SIT clades suggest that the divergence of clades resulted in functional diversification among SITs. Both laboratory cultures and natural communities changed transcription of each SIT clade in response to experimental or environmental growth conditions, with distinct transcriptional patterns observed among clades. Together, these data suggest that the diversification of SITs within diatoms led to specialized adaptations among diatoms lineages, and perhaps their dominant ability to take up silicic acid from seawater in diverse environmental conditions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Phycology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Phycological Society of America.

  4. Shift in the species composition of the diatom community in the eutrophic Mauritanian coastal upwelling: Results from a multi-year sediment trap experiment (2003-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Oscar E.; Fischer, Gerhard

    2017-12-01

    A multiannual, continuous sediment trap experiment was conducted at the mooring site CBeu (Cape Blanc eutrophic, ca. 20 °N, ca. 18 °W; trap depth = 1256-1296 m) in the high-productive Mauritanian coastal upwelling. Here we present fluxes and the species-specific composition of the diatom assemblage, and fluxes of biogenic silica (BSi, opal) and total organic carbon (TOC) for the time interval June 2003-Feb 2010. Flux ranges of studied parameters are (i) total diatoms = 1.2 ∗ 108-4.7 ∗ 104 valves m-2 d-1 (average = 5.9 × 106 valves ± 1.4 × 107); (ii) BSi = 296-0.5 mg m-2 d-1 (average = 41.1 ± 53.5 mg m-2 d-1), and (iii) TOC = 97-1 mg m-2 d-1 (average = 20.5 ± 17.8 mg m-2 d-1). Throughout the experiment, the overall good match of total diatom, BSi and TOC fluxes is reasonably consistent and reflects well the temporal occurrence of the main Mauritanian upwelling season. Spring and summer are the most favorable seasons for diatom production and sedimentation: out of the recorded 14 diatom maxima of different magnitude, six occurred in spring and four in summer. The diverse diatom community at site CBeu is composed of four main assemblages: benthic, coastal upwelling, coastal planktonic and open-ocean diatoms, reflecting different productivity conditions and water masses. A striking feature of the temporal variability of the diatom populations is the persistent pattern of seasonal groups' contribution: benthic and coastal upwelling taxa dominated during the main upwelling season in spring, while open-ocean diatoms were more abundant in fall and winter, when the upper water column becomes stratified, upwelling relaxes and productivity decreases. The relative abundance of benthic diatoms strongly increased after 2006, yet their spring-summer contribution remained high until the end of the trap experiment. The occurrence of large populations of benthic diatoms at the hemipelagic CBeu site is interpreted to indicate transport from shallow waters via nepheloid

  5. [Mechanisms responsible for the development of periphyton community structure during seasonal succession: the role of interspecies competition and plankton sedimentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, V B

    2003-01-01

    The development of periphyton community structure by exchange of organisms between substratum and water column (noninteractive mechanism) and by interspecific competition for surface (interactive mechanism) was studied during seasonal succession in Akulovsky water supply channel (the Upper Volga basin). The influence of exchange was assumed by similarity between the species composition of plankton and periphyton. At early stages of succession when the diatoms dominated in periphyton the community was formed mainly by phytoplankton sedimentation, while the competition for substratum didn't result in decrease of species diversity because the poor competitors were partly displaced by new colonists from the water column. Later when the green filamentous algae abundantly developed in periphyton, their numbers were probably controlled by factors not related to exchange of propagules. At the same time, the species structure of secondary periphyton cover developing on the thallus of filamentous algae depended mainly on the plankton sedimentation. At the last stages of seasonal succession when periphyton was represented by colonies of cyanobacteria and diatoms closely covering the substratum, the exchange of organisms between substratum and water column was not so important as interspecific competition for surface. As one could suppose, increase in biomass in this period resulted in the decrease of specificity as it was predicted by hypothesis of interactive community. In such a way, both mechanisms (interactive and noninteractive ones) took part in development of periphyton structure. Their relative influence changed in the course of seasonal succession.

  6. Direct versus indirect climate controls on Holocene diatom assemblages in a sub-tropical deep, alpine lake (Lugu Hu, Yunnan, SW China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yang, Xiangdong; Anderson, Nicholas John; Dong, Xuhui

    2016-07-01

    The reconstruction of Holocene environmental changes in lakes on the plateau region of southwest China provides an understanding of how these ecosystems may respond to climate change. Fossil diatom assemblages were investigated from an 11,000-year lake sediment core from a deep, alpine lake (Lugu Hu) in southwest China, an area strongly influenced by the southwest (or the Indian) summer monsoon. Changes in diatom assemblage composition, notably the abundance of the two dominant planktonic species, Cyclotella rhomboideo-elliptica and Cyclostephanos dubius, reflect the effects of climate variability on nutrient dynamics, mediated via thermal stratification (internal nutrient cycling) and catchment-vegetation processes. Statistical analyses of the climate-diatom interactions highlight the strong effect of changing orbitally-induced solar radiation during the Holocene, presumably via its effect on the lake's thermal budget. In a partial redundancy analysis, climate (solar insolation) and proxies reflecting catchment process (pollen percentages, C/N ratio) were the most important drivers of diatom ecological change, showing the strong effects of climate-catchment-vegetation interactions on lake functioning. This diatom record reflects long-term ontogeny of the lake-catchment ecosystem and suggests that climatic changes (both temperature and precipitation) impact lake ecology indirectly through shifts in thermal stratification and catchment nutrient exports.

  7. Conditions for patchiness in plankton models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rossa, Fabio; Fasani, Stefano; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2013-02-01

    Plankton patchiness in homogeneous physical environments is studied in this paper assuming that all involved populations disperse diffusively. A recent but powerful sufficient condition for the emergence of spatial patterns in models with any number of species is systematically applied to all food chain and food web plankton models and the result is rather sharp: all models explicitly containing phytoplankton, zooplankton and planktivorous fish suggest zooplankton patchiness, while models not containing phytoplankton or fish populations do not. The results are in agreement with many previous but particular theoretical studies on plankton patchiness and Turing instability, and a testable prediction of the models satisfying the sufficient predictions is that zooplankton should be more patchy than phytoplankton, a property that is often seen in natural settings. An application to a complex model with five compartments (nutrient, phytoplankton, zooplankton, planktivorous fish, carnivorous fish) highlights the predictive power of the method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental assessment of cumulative temperature and UV-B radiation effects on Mediterranean plankton metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara S. eGarcia-Corral

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Mediterranean Sea is a vulnerable region for climate change, warming at higher rates compare to the global ocean. Warming leads to increased stratification of the water column and enhanced the oligotrophic nature of the Mediterranean Sea. The oligotrophic waters are already highly transparent, however, exposure of Mediterranean plankton to ultraviolet radiation (UV-B and UV-A may increase further if the waters become more oligotrophic, thereby, allowing a deeper UV radiation penetration and likely enhancing impacts to biota.Here we experimentally elucidate the cumulative effects of warming and natural UV-B radiation on the net community production (NCP of plankton communities. We conducted five experiments at monthly intervals, from June to October 2013, and evaluated the responses of NCP to ambient UV-B radiation and warming (+3ºC, alone and in combination, in a coastal area of the northwest Mediterranean Sea. UV-B radiation and warming lead to reduced net community production and resulted in a heterotrophic (NCP<0 metabolic balance. Both UV-B radiation and temperature, showed a significant individual effect in NCP across treatments and time. However, their joint effect showed to be synergistic as the interaction between them (UV x Temp was statistically significant in most of the experiments performed. Our results showed that both drivers, would affect the gas exchange of CO2-O2 from and to the atmosphere and the role of plankton communities in the Mediterranean carbon cycle

  9. Responses of marine plankton to pollutant stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Morten

    The thesis analyses effects of pollutants on natural plankton communities on the basis of three independent mesocosm experiments and a series of laboratory experiments performed in Denmark and Greenland. The work focus on integrating functional and structural measures of community responses to re...... with examples of work done on natural communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton. Abiotic conditions such as UV light and nutrient concentrations are shown to influence pollutant effects.......The thesis analyses effects of pollutants on natural plankton communities on the basis of three independent mesocosm experiments and a series of laboratory experiments performed in Denmark and Greenland. The work focus on integrating functional and structural measures of community responses...

  10. Modelling emergent trophic strategies in plankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Aksnes, Dag L.; Berge, Terje

    2015-01-01

    Plankton are typically divided into phytoplankton and zooplankton in marine ecosystem models. Yet, most protists in the photic zone engage in some degree of phagotrophy, and it has been suggested that trophic strategy is really a continuum between pure phototrophs (phytoplankton) and pure...... a general trait-based model of a unicellular planktonic organism where size is a central trait and where nutrient uptake, photosynthesis and phagotrophy are determined by investments into these functions and by the physical constraints imposed by organism size. This framework provides simple predictions...

  11. Methylmercury Bioaccumulation, Transformation, and Trophic Transfer in Marine Plankton Assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. S.; Fisher, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have quantified the bioconcentration of methylmercury (MeHg) in marine phytoplankton from seawater, even though this is by far the largest bioaccumulation step in aquatic organisms. Aquatic animals acquire MeHg mainly from dietary exposure and it is important to evaluate the bioaccumulation of this compound in planktonic organisms that form the base of marine food webs. We used a gamma-emitting radioisotope, 203Hg, to assess the rate and extent of MeHg uptake in marine diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, cryptophytes chlorophytes, and cyanobacteria held in unialgal cultures under varying temperature, light and nutrient conditions. For experimental conditions in which cells were exposed to MeHg at 300 pM, the uptake rates in all species ranged from 0.001 to 0.034 atto-mol MeHg µm-2 cell surface h-1 and reached steady state within 2 d. Volume concentration factors (VCFs) ranged from 0.3 to 40 x 105 for the different species. Temperature, light and nutrient conditions had no direct effect on cellular MeHg uptake but ultimately affected growth of the cells, resulting in greater suspended particulate matter and associated MeHg. VCFs strongly correlated with cell surface area to volume ratios in all species. Nearly 40 % of the MeHg was released into the air from coccolithophore cultures within 4 d, but cultures. Assimilation efficiencies of MeHg from different phytoplankton diets in a marine copepod (Acartia tonsa) ranged from 74 to 92%, directly proportional to the cytoplasmic partitioning of MeHg in the phytoplankton cells. MeHg uptake in copepods from the aqueous phase was low and modeling shows that nearly all the MeHg acquired by this zooplankter is from diet. Herbivorous zooplankton can be an important link from phytoplankton at the base of the food web to fish higher in the food chain.

  12. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  13. SEAMAP Spring 2016 Plankton Survey (R21601, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2016 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  14. SEAMAP Fall 2014 Plankton Survey (GU1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2014 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  15. SEAMAP Spring 2015 Plankton Survey (GU1501, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Spring Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  16. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  17. SEAMAP 2015 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1504, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  18. Seasonal patterns in Arctic planktonic metabolism (Fram Strait - Svalbard region)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquer-Sunyer, R.; Duarte, C. M.; Holding, J.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; García-Corral, L. S.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.

    2012-06-01

    The metabolism of the Arctic Ocean is marked by extreme pronounced seasonality and spatial heterogeneity associated with light conditions, ice cover, water masses and nutrient availability. Here we report the marine planktonic metabolic rates (Net Community Production, Gross Primary Production and Community Respiration) along three different seasons of the year for a total of eight cruises along the western sector of the European Arctic (Fram Strait - Svalbard region) in the Arctic Ocean margin: one at the end of 2006 (fall/winter), two in 2007 (early spring and summer), two in 2008 (early spring and summer), one in 2009 (late spring-early summer) and one in 2010 (spring). The results show that metabolisms of the western sector of the European Arctic varies throughout the year, depending mostly on the stage of bloom, which is mainly determined by availability of light and nutrients. Here we report metabolic rates for the different periods, including the spring bloom, summer and the dark period, increasing considerably the empirical basis on metabolic rates in the Artic Ocean, and especially in the European Arctic corridor. We also report a rough annual metabolic balance for this area of the Arctic Ocean, resulting in a Net Community Production of 108 g C m-2 yr-1.

  19. Diatom-Specific Oligosaccharide and Polysaccharide Structures Help to Unravel Biosynthetic Capabilities in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gügi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are marine organisms that represent one of the most important sources of biomass in the ocean, accounting for about 40% of marine primary production, and in the biosphere, contributing up to 20% of global CO2 fixation. There has been a recent surge in developing the use of diatoms as a source of bioactive compounds in the food and cosmetic industries. In addition, the potential of diatoms such as Phaeodactylum tricornutum as cell factories for the production of biopharmaceuticals is currently under evaluation. These biotechnological applications require a comprehensive understanding of the sugar biosynthesis pathways that operate in diatoms. Here, we review diatom glycan and polysaccharide structures, thus revealing their sugar biosynthesis capabilities.

  20. The Glass Menagerie: diatoms for novel applications in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard; Losic, Dusan; Tiffany, Mary Ann; Nagy, Stephen S; Sterrenburg, Frithjof A S

    2009-02-01

    Diatoms are unicellular, eukaryotic, photosynthetic algae that are found in aquatic environments. Diatoms have enormous ecological importance on this planet and display a diversity of patterns and structures at the nano- to millimetre scale. Diatom nanotechnology, a new interdisciplinary area, has spawned collaborations in biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, physics, chemistry, material science and engineering. We survey diatom nanotechnology since 2005, emphasizing recent advances in diatom biomineralization, biophotonics, photoluminescence, microfluidics, compustat domestication, multiscale porosity, silica sequestering of proteins, detection of trace gases, controlled drug delivery and computer design. Diatoms might become the first organisms for which the gap in our knowledge of the relationship between genotype and phenotype is closed.

  1. Environmental change and its effects on inter-decadal variations of diatom production, species composition and frustule dissolution in a coastal marginal sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Rediat; Gao, Yahui; Chen, Changping; Liang, Junrong; Chen, Weifang; Sun, Lin; Kifile, Demeke

    2017-11-01

    The implications of climate change during the second half of the 20th century have been reported throughout the world. Although marginal seas are sensitive to climate change and anthropogenic impacts, relatively little attention has been given to the South East Asian marginal seas. Thus, to bridge this gap in knowledge, a sediment core was collected from the coastal areas of the Leizhou Peninsula in the South China Sea (SCS) to study the inter-decadal climate change and its consequences using diatom species composition as a proxy record. Diatom absolute abundance varied from 2300 to 68000 and averaged 16000 valves per gram of dry weight (v/gdw). The fractional dissolution index ( F i) was usually below 0.5, which indicates low to moderate preservation of diatom valves at coastal area of the SCS. At the inter-decadal time scale, total diatom abundance was high for the period after 1972, which coincided with 1) increased percentage of planktonic diatom abundance and F i; 2) emergence and dominance of high productivity indicative cosmopolitan species such as Thalassionema nitzschioides and Paralia sulcata (their relative abundance increased from 7% for the period before and after 1972, respectively); 3) decreased relative abundance of the small-sized eutrophication indicative species, Cyclotella striata, from 70% to 40%. This study reveals that variations in the abundance of diatoms preserved in the sediment was a function of both production and dissolution/preservation of diatom valves, which in turn was intimately connected to the prevailing environmental/climatic conditions. In conclusion, these data reveal the existence of substantial changes in the coastal SCS in response to the 1970s climate shift that was recorded in different parts of the world.

  2. Plankton, fisheries and climate change - insights into ocean ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, PC

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines long term changes in the plankton of the North Atlantic and northwest European shelf seas and discusses the forcing mechanisms behind some observed interannual, decadal and spatial patterns of variability with a focus on climate change. Evidence from the Continuous Plankton Records suggests that the plankton integrates hydrometeorological signals and may be used as a possible index of climate change. Changes evident in the plankton are likely to have important effects on t...

  3. Planktonic interactions and chaotic advection in Langmuir circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bees, Martin Alan; Mezic, I.; McGlade, J.

    1998-01-01

    The role of unsteady laminar flows for planktonic communities is investigated. Langmuir circulation is used, as a typical medium-scale structure, to illustrate mechanisms for the generation of plankton patches. Two behaviours are evident: chaotic regions that help to spread plankton and locally...

  4. Composition of planktonic organisms and its associated physico ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composition of plankton communities in two ponds at African Regional Agriculture Centre (ARAC) Aluu, Port Harcourt was undertaken between May and June 2004, to assess the composition, relative abundance and distribution of plankton. The diversity of plankton was poor. Twenty-eight taxa representing four (4) families ...

  5. Plankton composition, biomass, phylogeny and toxin genes in Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plankton composition, biomass, phylogeny and toxin genes in Lake Big Momela, Tanzania. ... cyanobacteria during the whole year. In general, our data illustrate the presence of rich planktonic communities, including some unique and potentially endemic cyanobacteria. Keywords: cyanotoxin, limnology, plankton diversity, ...

  6. Plankton Abundance in Gilimanuk Bay of National Park Ecosystem, West Bali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmah Thoha

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available An observation of plankton condition in Gilimanuk Bay of National Park, West Bali was conducted during March 2006. This study aimed to observ the environmental quality of Gilimanuk Bay water. The parameters observed were focused on the phytoplankton and zooplankton communities. Ten points of observation was done. Plankton abundance varied with location group from 4428 to 1716224 sel/m3 and 23938 individu/m3 (67.73 % for microplankton and macroplankton, respectively. Microplankton community structure was dominated by the group of diatoms, such as Coscinodiscus, Chaetoceros, Guinardia, Navicula. Pseudonitzshia. The genus Ceratium (the group of dinoflagellates was found in relatively abundant, but still normal condition. The structure of macroplankton was dominated by copepods 23938 individu/m3 (67.73 %. The other hand, information about mangrove, sea grass and coral reef and asssosiation with fauna in these ecosystem of Gilimanuk Bay very rarely. We need observed this subject for base line data to improving management of marine resources development.

  7. Diatom-based reconstruction of the Lake Czechowskie trophy status in the last 2000 years (Tuchola Forest, Northern Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzodkiewicz, Monika; Hübener, Thomas; Ott, Florian; Kramkowski, Mateusz; Obremska, Milena; Słowiński, Michał; Zawiska, Izabela; Błaszkiewicz, Mirosław; Brauer, Achim

    2015-04-01

    Lakes ecosystems are very sensitive to climate and environment fluctuation. In lake sediments there are preserved remains of plant and animals that lived in the lake and its surroundings in the past. In paleolimnological research we analyse the species composition of the assemblages preserved in the sediments and on this base reconstruct past environment changes (climate changes). One of the most commonly used bio-proxy for reconstruction of lake development are subfossil diatoms. Diatoms are commonly used to reconstruct such environment parameters as: pH, nutrient status, salinity or temperature. In our study we analysed the sediments of Lake Czechowskie, which is located in the northern part of the Tuchola Forest region (Northern Poland). Lacustrine sediments of this lake are laminated and therefore are unique archive to reconstruct climate and environmental changes in Northern Polish Lowland. In this research we focused on the last 2000 years and with high resolution analyzed diatoms, pollen and sediment geochemistry. The core chronology is based varve counting, 14C AMS dating of terrestrial macro remains, 137Cs activity measurement. Diatoms communities during the last 2000 years were rich and mostly very well preserved. A characteristic feature of those communities is the dominance of typically planktonic species of the spring phytoplankton, as the oligo to mesotraphent Cyclotella comensis but also the eutraphent Stephanodiscus parvus. We also aimed at quantitative reconstruction of the pH and eutrophication(TP) using diatom-based transfer functions in order to identify reference conditions for the Lake Czechowskie. Transfer function are based on the assumption that the modern biological proxies, which ecological requirements are known, can be used to quantitative reconstructions of the past changes. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute ICLEA (Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution Analysis) funded by the Helmholtz Association. The research

  8. The Relevance of Marine Chemical Ecology to Plankton and Ecosystem Function: An Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianora, Adrianna; Bentley, Matthew G.; Caldwell, Gary S.; Casotti, Raffaella; Cembella, Allan D.; Engström-Öst, Jonna; Halsband, Claudia; Sonnenschein, Eva; Legrand, Catherine; Llewellyn, Carole A.; Paldavičienë, Aistë; Pilkaityte, Renata; Pohnert, Georg; Razinkovas, Arturas; Romano, Giovanna; Tillmann, Urban; Vaiciute, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Marine chemical ecology comprises the study of the production and interaction of bioactive molecules affecting organism behavior and function. Here we focus on bioactive compounds and interactions associated with phytoplankton, particularly bloom-forming diatoms, prymnesiophytes and dinoflagellates. Planktonic bioactive metabolites are structurally and functionally diverse and some may have multiple simultaneous functions including roles in chemical defense (antipredator, allelopathic and antibacterial compounds), and/or cell-to-cell signaling (e.g., polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) of diatoms). Among inducible chemical defenses in response to grazing, there is high species-specific variability in the effects on grazers, ranging from severe physical incapacitation and/or death to no apparent physiological response, depending on predator susceptibility and detoxification capability. Most bioactive compounds are present in very low concentrations, in both the producing organism and the surrounding aqueous medium. Furthermore, bioactivity may be subject to synergistic interactions with other natural and anthropogenic environmental toxicants. Most, if not all phycotoxins are classic secondary metabolites, but many other bioactive metabolites are simple molecules derived from primary metabolism (e.g., PUAs in diatoms, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in prymnesiophytes). Producing cells do not seem to suffer physiological impact due to their synthesis. Functional genome sequence data and gene expression analysis will provide insights into regulatory and metabolic pathways in producer organisms, as well as identification of mechanisms of action in target organisms. Understanding chemical ecological responses to environmental triggers and chemically-mediated species interactions will help define crucial chemical and molecular processes that help maintain biodiversity and ecosystem functionality. PMID:22131962

  9. The Relevance of Marine Chemical Ecology to Plankton and Ecosystem Function: An Emerging Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urban Tillmann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine chemical ecology comprises the study of the production and interaction of bioactive molecules affecting organism behavior and function. Here we focus on bioactive compounds and interactions associated with phytoplankton, particularly bloom-forming diatoms, prymnesiophytes and dinoflagellates. Planktonic bioactive metabolites are structurally and functionally diverse and some may have multiple simultaneous functions including roles in chemical defense (antipredator, allelopathic and antibacterial compounds, and/or cell-to-cell signaling (e.g., polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs of diatoms. Among inducible chemical defenses in response to grazing, there is high species-specific variability in the effects on grazers, ranging from severe physical incapacitation and/or death to no apparent physiological response, depending on predator susceptibility and detoxification capability. Most bioactive compounds are present in very low concentrations, in both the producing organism and the surrounding aqueous medium. Furthermore, bioactivity may be subject to synergistic interactions with other natural and anthropogenic environmental toxicants. Most, if not all phycotoxins are classic secondary metabolites, but many other bioactive metabolites are simple molecules derived from primary metabolism (e.g., PUAs in diatoms, dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP in prymnesiophytes. Producing cells do not seem to suffer physiological impact due to their synthesis. Functional genome sequence data and gene expression analysis will provide insights into regulatory and metabolic pathways in producer organisms, as well as identification of mechanisms of action in target organisms. Understanding chemical ecological responses to environmental triggers and chemically-mediated species interactions will help define crucial chemical and molecular processes that help maintain biodiversity and ecosystem functionality.

  10. Land-ocean gradient in haline stratification and its effects on plankton dynamics and trophic carbon fluxes in Chilean Patagonian fjords (47-50°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, H. E.; Castro, L. R.; Daneri, G.; Iriarte, J. L.; Silva, N.; Tapia, F.; Teca, E.; Vargas, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Patagonian fjord systems, and in particular the fjords and channels associated with the Baker/Pascua Rivers, are currently under conspicuous natural and anthropogenic perturbations. These systems display very high variability, where limnetic and oceanic features overlap generating strong vertical and horizontal physicochemical gradients. The CIMAR 14-Fiordos cruise was conducted in the Chilean fjords located between 47° and 50°S during the spring (October-November) of 2008. The main objectives were to study vertical and horizontal gradients in physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water column, and to assess plankton dynamics and trophic carbon fluxes in the fjords and channels of central-south Patagonia. The water column was strongly stratified, with a pycnocline at ca. 20 m depth separating a surface layer of silicic acid-rich freshwater discharged by rivers, from the underlying nitrate- and orthophosphate-rich Subantarctic waters. The outflows from the Baker and Pascua Rivers, which range annually between 500 and 1500 m3 s-1, generate the strong land-ocean gradient in salinity (1-32 psu) and inorganic nutrient concentrations (2-8 and 2-24 μM in nitrate and silicic-acid, respectively) we observed along the Baker Fjord. The POC:chl-a ratio fluctuated from 1087 near the fjord’s head to 175 at its oceanic end in the Penas Gulf. This change was mainly due to an increase in diatom dominance and a concurrent decrease in allochthonous POC towards the ocean. Depth-integrated net primary production (NPP) and bacterial secondary production (BSP) fluctuated between 49 and 1215 and 36 and 150 mg C m-2 d-1, respectively, with higher rates in oceanic waters. At a time series station located close to the Baker River mouth, the average NPP was lower (average 360 mg C m-2 d-1) than at more oceanic stations (average 1063 mg C m-2 d-1), and numerically dominated (45%) by the picoplankton (flux (234 mg m-2 d-1) and high export production (65% of the NPP

  11. Factors affecting egg ratios in planktonic rotifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarma, S.S.S.; Gulati, R.D.; Nandini, S.

    2005-01-01

    Edmondson’s egg ratio (number of amictic eggs per female) is an important life history variable, which has been in wide use to understand and predict patterns of population growth in planktonic rotifers under field conditions. It is also useful as an indicator of the health of rotifers under culture

  12. Planktonic rotifers from Lake Cerknica (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schöll, K.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The basic hydrobiological conditions as well as the planktonic Rotifer assemblages of the Lake Cerknica (Slovenia were investigated first time in 2004-2005. 16 taxa were found, most of them are frequent in Central Europe. The preliminary results suggest a pressing need for further research.

  13. Micro- and nanotechnologies in plankton research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Javeed Shaikh

    2015-05-01

    A better understanding of the vast range of plankton and their interactions with the marine environment would allow prediction of their large-scale impact on the marine ecosystem, and provide in-depth knowledge on pollution and climate change. Numerous technologies, especially lab-on-a-chip microsystems, are being used to this end. Marine biofouling is a global issue with significant economic consequences. Ecofriendly polymer nanotechnologies are being developed to combat marine biofouling. Furthermore, nanomaterials hold great potential for bioremediation and biofuel production. Excellent reviews covering focused topics in plankton research exist, with only a handful discussing both micro- and nanotechnologies. This work reviews both micro- and nanotechnologies applied to broad-ranging plankton research topics including flow cytometry, chemotaxis/toxicity assays, biofilm formation, marine antifouling/fouling-release surfaces and coatings, green energy, green nanomaterials, microalgae immobilization, and bioremediation. It is anticipated that developments in plankton research will see engineered exploitation of micro- and nanotechnologies. The current review is therefore intended to promote micro-/nanotechnology researchers to team up with limnologists/oceanographers, and develop novel strategies for understanding and green exploitation of the complex marine ecosystem.

  14. Environmental Variability and Plankton Community Dynamics in the English Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, A.; Gonzalez, F.; Atkinson, A.; Stock, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Temporal environmental variation plays a key role in shaping plankton community structure and dynamics. In some cases, these ecological changes may be abrupt and long-lived, and constitute a significant change in overall ecosystem structure and function. The "Double Integration Hypothesis", posed recently by Di Lorenzo and Ohman to help explain these complex biophysical linkages, holds that atmospheric variability is filtered first through the ocean surface before secondarily imprinting on plankton communities. In this perspective, physical properties of the surface ocean, such as sea surface temperature (SST), integrate atmospheric white noise, resulting in a time series that is smoother and has more low than high frequency variability (red noise). Secondarily, long-lived zooplankton integrate over oceanographic conditions and further redden the power spectra. We test the generality of this hypothesis with extensive environmental and ecological data from the L4 station in the Western English Channel (1988-present), calculating power spectral slopes from anomaly time series for atmospheric forcing (wind stress and net heat fluxes), surface ocean conditions (SST and macronutrients), and the biomasses of well over 100 phytoplankton and zooplankton taxa. As expected, we find that SST and macronutrient concentrations are redder in character than white noise atmospheric forcing. However, we find that power spectral slopes for phytoplankton and zooplankton are generally not significantly less than found for oceanographic conditions. Moreover, we find a considerable range in power spectral slopes within the phytoplankton and zooplankton, reflecting the diversity of body sizes, traits, life histories, and predator-prey interactions. We interpret these findings using an idealized trait-based model with a single phytoplankton prey and zooplankton predator, configured to capture essential oceanographic properties at the L4 station, and discuss how changes in power spectral

  15. Extremophile Diatoms: Implications to the Drake Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrenburg, Frithjof A. S.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular Eukaryotes that (as a group and phylogenetically) are not strictly regarded as extremophiles , since the vast majority of diatoms are mesophilic photoautotrophs. However, among the terrestrial Eukaryotes, diatoms are by far the single group of organisms with the ability to inhabit the greatest range of hostile environments on Earth. They are the dominant eukaryotes in the polar regions; in fumaroles, hot springs and geysers; and in hypersaline and hyperalkaline lakes and pools. Cryophilic species such as Fragilaria sublinearis and Chaetoceras fragilis are able to carry out respiration at extremely low rates at low temperatures in darkness. The Drake Equation refers to the likelihood of there being intelligent life at the technological level of electromagnetic communication. However, consideration of the range of conditions suitable for the habitability of eukaryotic diatoms and prokaryotic extremophiles, the likelihood that life exists elsewhere in the cosmos becomes many orders of magnitude greater than that predicted by the classical Drake Equation. In this paper we review the characteristics of diatoms as eukaryotic extremophiles and consider the implications to adjustments needed to the Drake Equation to assess the possibility that life exists elsewhere in the Universe.

  16. A case study of the planktonic communities in two hydrologically different oxbow lakes, Vistula River, Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa A. Dembowska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Floodplain lakes are important elements of landscapes with large rivers. In this study we compared planktonic communities of two oxbow lakes of the Vistula River. We investigated how the inflow of the river's water affected their physicochemical and biological conditions including water temperature, water transparency, oxygen concentration, and macrophyte coverage of the bottom. These parameters in turn affected plankton community. The average phytoplankton abundance in the isolated lake was over two times lower than in the lake connected to the river. Cryptophyta dominated in the phytoplankton community in the isolated lake and diatoms – in the lake supplied with water from the river. The average abundance of zooplankton in the isolated lake was more than twice as high as that in the lake which was connected to the river. The first lake proved to be more attractive for zooplankton due to its stable living conditions (similar to the conditions observed in ponds, higher temperature in summer, and nutrient availability due to the high abundance of small phytoplankton. The results of our research indicate that species composition, plankton abundance, and Chl-a concentration depended on whether there was water exchange between the particular lake and the Vistula River. Hydrological conditions shaped the relationships between the components of the biota.

  17. N2-fixation, ammonium release and N-transfer to the microbial and classical food web within a plankton community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Birgit; Klawonn, Isabell; Svedén, Jennie B; Bergkvist, Johanna; Nahar, Nurun; Walve, Jakob; Littmann, Sten; Whitehouse, Martin J; Lavik, Gaute; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Ploug, Helle

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the role of N2-fixation by the colony-forming cyanobacterium, Aphanizomenon spp., for the plankton community and N-budget of the N-limited Baltic Sea during summer by using stable isotope tracers combined with novel secondary ion mass spectrometry, conventional mass spectrometry and nutrient analysis. When incubated with (15)N2, Aphanizomenon spp. showed a strong (15)N-enrichment implying substantial (15)N2-fixation. Intriguingly, Aphanizomenon did not assimilate tracers of (15)NH4(+) from the surrounding water. These findings are in line with model calculations that confirmed a negligible N-source by diffusion-limited NH4(+) fluxes to Aphanizomenon colonies at low bulk concentrations (plankton forming the basis of the food web in the plankton community. Transfer of newly fixed nitrogen to diatoms and copepods furthermore implies a fast export to shallow sediments via fast-sinking fecal pellets and aggregates. Hence, N2-fixing colony-forming cyanobacteria can have profound impact on ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical processes at shorter time scales (hours to days) than previously thought.

  18. Effect of ageing on survival of benthic diatom propagules

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Mitbavkar, S.; DeSilva, M.S.; Hegde, S.; DeCosta, P.M.; Meher, S.S.; Banerjee, D.

    A comparison of viable benthic diatom propagules based on the observations recorded immediately and after 5 years of ageing at 5oC is presented. The number of viable benthic diatom propagules decreased with ageing. However, they exhibited...

  19. Quantification of diatoms in biofilms: Standardisation of methods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    of the difficulty in sampling and enumeration. Scraping or brushing are the traditional methods used for removal of diatoms from biofilms developed on solid substrata. The method of removal is the most critical step in enumerating the biofilm diatom community...

  20. Characterization of marine diatom-infecting virus promoters in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadono, Takashi; Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kira, Nozomu; Tomaru, Yuji; Okami, Takuma; Yoshimatsu, Takamichi; Hou, Liyuan; Ohama, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Kazunari; Okauchi, Masanori; Yamaguchi, Haruo; Ohnishi, Kohei; Falciatore, Angela; Adachi, Masao

    2015-12-22

    Viruses are considered key players in phytoplankton population control in oceans. However, mechanisms that control viral gene expression in prominent microalgae such as diatoms remain largely unknown. In this study, potential promoter regions isolated from several marine diatom-infecting viruses (DIVs) were linked to the egfp reporter gene and transformed into the Pennales diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. We analysed their activity in cells grown under different conditions. Compared to diatom endogenous promoters, novel DIV promoter (ClP1) mediated a significantly higher degree of reporter transcription and translation. Stable expression levels were observed in transformants grown under both light and dark conditions, and high levels of expression were reported in cells in the stationary phase compared to the exponential phase of growth. Conserved motifs in the sequence of DIV promoters were also found. These results allow the identification of novel regulatory regions that drive DIV gene expression and further examinations of the mechanisms that control virus-mediated bloom control in diatoms. Moreover, the identified ClP1 promoter can serve as a novel tool for metabolic engineering of diatoms. This is the first report describing a promoter of DIVs that may be of use in basic and applied diatom research.

  1. Diatoms: a fossil fuel of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Orly; Dinamarca, Jorge; Hochman, Gal; Falkowski, Paul G

    2014-03-01

    Long-term global climate change, caused by burning petroleum and other fossil fuels, has motivated an urgent need to develop renewable, carbon-neutral, economically viable alternatives to displace petroleum using existing infrastructure. Algal feedstocks are promising candidate replacements as a 'drop-in' fuel. Here, we focus on a specific algal taxon, diatoms, to become the fossil fuel of the future. We summarize past attempts to obtain suitable diatom strains, propose future directions for their genetic manipulation, and offer biotechnological pathways to improve yield. We calculate that the yields obtained by using diatoms as a production platform are theoretically sufficient to satisfy the total oil consumption of the US, using between 3 and 5% of its land area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Designer diatom episomes delivered by bacterial conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karas, Bogumil J; Diner, Rachel E; Lefebvre, Stephane C; McQuaid, Jeff; Phillips, Alex P R; Noddings, Chari M; Brunson, John K; Valas, Ruben E; Deerinck, Thomas J; Jablanovic, Jelena; Gillard, Jeroen T F; Beeri, Karen; Ellisman, Mark H; Glass, John I; Hutchison, Clyde A; Smith, Hamilton O; Venter, J Craig; Allen, Andrew E; Dupont, Christopher L; Weyman, Philip D

    2015-04-21

    Eukaryotic microalgae hold great promise for the bioproduction of fuels and higher value chemicals. However, compared with model genetic organisms such as Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, characterization of the complex biology and biochemistry of algae and strain improvement has been hampered by the inefficient genetic tools. To date, many algal species are transformable only via particle bombardment, and the introduced DNA is integrated randomly into the nuclear genome. Here we describe the first nuclear episomal vector for diatoms and a plasmid delivery method via conjugation from Escherichia coli to the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. We identify a yeast-derived sequence that enables stable episome replication in these diatoms even in the absence of antibiotic selection and show that episomes are maintained as closed circles at copy number equivalent to native chromosomes. This highly efficient genetic system facilitates high-throughput functional characterization of algal genes and accelerates molecular phytoplankton research.

  3. Periphytic diatom communities in tributaries around Lake Ichkeul ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diatoms were stressed mostly by the influence of temperature and salinity, which drove species composition and increased mortality. Further research is required on the ecology of diatoms in Ichkeul thermal springs. The use of diatoms as indicators of ecosystem health in the Ichkeul area requires additional knowledge of ...

  4. Isolation of diatom Navicula cryptocephala and characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over the past decade diatoms are screened for high lipid content. Geologists claim that much of crude oil comes from diatoms. In this study diatom Navicula cryptocephala, isolated from fresh water source was grown on suitable media for extracting and characterizing the oil for biodiesel production. Three methods namely ...

  5. Antibacterial constituents of the diatom Navicula delognei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, J A; Patil, A D

    1984-01-01

    The novel ester (E)-phytol (5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z,17Z)-eicosapentaenoate++ + (1); (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-hexadecatetraenoic acid; (6Z,9Z,12Z,15Z)-octadecatetraenoic acid; and (6Z,9Z,12Z)-hexadecatrienoic acid isolated from the diatom Navicula delognei f. elliptica, show significant antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Salmonella typhimurium, and Proteus vulgaris. beta-Carotene, alpha-cryptoxanthin, fucoxanthin, lutein, trans-phytol, and plastoquinone-9 were also isolated from this diatom.

  6. Specificity of lipoxygenase pathways supports species delineation in the marine diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Lamari

    Full Text Available Oxylipins are low-molecular weight secondary metabolites derived from the incorporation of oxygen into the carbon chains of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs. Oxylipins are produced in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages where they are involved in a broad spectrum of actions spanning from stress and defense responses, regulation of growth and development, signaling, and innate immunity. We explored the diversity in oxylipin patterns in the marine planktonic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia. This genus includes several species only distinguishable with the aid of molecular markers. Oxylipin profiles of cultured strains were obtained by reverse phase column on a liquid chromatograph equipped with UV photodiode detector and q-ToF mass spectrometer. Lipoxygenase compounds were mapped on phylogenies of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia inferred from the nuclear encoded hyper-variable region of the LSU rDNA and the plastid encoded rbcL. Results showed that the genus Pseudo-nitzschia exhibits a rich and varied lipoxygenase metabolism of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, with a high level of specificity for oxylipin markers that generally corroborated the genotypic delineation, even among genetically closely related cryptic species. These results suggest that oxylipin profiles constitute additional identification tools for Pseudo-nitzschia species providing a functional support to species delineation obtained with molecular markers and morphological traits. The exploration of the diversity, patterns and plasticity of oxylipin production across diatom species and genera will also provide insights on the ecological functions of these secondary metabolites and on the selective pressures driving their diversification.

  7. Environmental changes induced by human activities in the Northern Curonian Lagoon (Eastern Baltic: diatoms and stable isotope data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedrė Vaikutienė

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A sediment core collected from the northwestern part of the Curonian Lagoon, which was deposited approximately during 1800-2002, was analysed for several proxy records. Changes in diatom assemblages and carbon, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N and δ18O revealed two periods, which are characterized by differences in the sedimentation rate, sediment type and trophic state of the northern part of the Curonian Lagoon. Low δ15N values in organics and prevailing fresh-brackish benthic diatoms indicate low enrichment in the shallow, freshwater lagoon during the period 1800-1955. The eutrophic conditions in this shallow lagoon are reflected by a high abundance of planktonic diatoms common in nutrient-rich basins and increased d15N values in organics of the sediments since 1955. Starting approximately in the 1960s, decreased freshwater run-off and increased brackish-water inflow into the lagoon were observed. These changes were likely caused by the construction of the hydropower station (and a reservoir near the Nemunas River and the artificial deepening of the Klaipėda Strait during 1960-1962 and later, also by the rising sea level in the SE Baltic. The changed river run-off and the artificially deepened strait significantly influenced the fresh-brackish water circulation and environmental conditions in the northern part of the Curonian Lagoon in the last decades.

  8. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Wolfram

    Full Text Available Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways.

  9. Environmental and Spatial Influences on Biogeography and Community Structure of Benthic Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, C.; Hill-Spanik, K.; Lowry, J.

    2016-02-01

    Several theoretical and practical reasons suggest that benthic microalgae could be useful bioindicators. For instance, an ideal indicator species or community would be associated with a given habitat due to local physical conditions or biotic interactions (i.e., `environmental filtering'), not due to dispersal limitation. Due to their small size, immense abundances, and reliance on passive dispersal, the popular notion about micro-organisms is that `Everything is everywhere, but, the environment selects' (Baas-Becking 1934). Although much recent research concerning planktonic bacteria and dispersal limitation has been conducted, very little in this regard is known about microeukaryotes, especially benthic microbes. The purpose of our study was to identify and compare spatial and environmental influences on benthic diatom community structure and biogeography. In summer 2015, sediment was sampled at various spatial scales from four barrier island beaches in South Carolina, USA, and high-throughput (Ion Torrent) DNA sequencing was used to characterize diatom assemblages. ANOSIM and principal coordinates analysis revealed that communities were statistically distinct on the four islands. Community dissimilarity was compared to both spatial distance and environmental differences to determine potential influences of these variables on community structure. We found that geographic distance had the strongest correlation with community similarity, with and without one anomalous location, while differences in temperature (air, water, and sediment), nutrients, organic matter, and turbidity also had significant but weaker relationships with community structure. Surprisingly, air temperature, which changes on very short time scales, appeared to be the environmental factor most strongly related to diatom species composition, potentially implicating some unmeasured variable (e.g., cloud cover). However, we also found that temperature and geographic distance were strongly

  10. [Competition of two marine diatom algae for urea and nitrate nitrogen under three levels of irradiance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'iash, L V; Zapara, E V

    2006-01-01

    Biomass dynamics of the plankton diatoms Thalassiosira weissflogii and Pseudo-nitzschia delicatissima were analyzed in batch mono- and mixed cultures grown on media with urea or nitrate as the sources of nitrogen, under irradiance 13, 38, and 115 microE/(m(2) x s). At the initial enrichment, nitrogen concentration was 0.18 mmol, and the nitrogen : phosphorus ratio was 5 : 1. The mechanisms of competition for the limiting resource satisfactorily described the interactions between the algae grown on urea. Competitive ability of algae was characterised according to the value of competitive eddect (CE), which was calculated as the ratio of growth rate and accumulated biomass decrease in mixed culture to that in monoculture CE of algae grown on urea increased with the increasing of irradiance and was lower than that of algae grown on nitrate. CE of P. delicatissima was higher than that T. weissflogii, independently of the source of nigrogen and the level of irradiance. At 38 and 115 microE/(m(2) x s) the growth of T. weissflogii ceased earlier than that of P. delicatissima, independently of the source o nitrogen. At 13 microE/(m(2) x s) the growth of P. delicatissima ceased earlier than of T. weissflogii in on cultures grown urea, but the growth of T. weissflogii was the first to cease on nitrate. The competition revealed in experimental communities for the nitrogen of urea between plankton algae gives reasons to suggest that in natural communities plankton algae also compere under inorganic nitrogen deficiency and organic nitrogen abundance.

  11. Epibiotic Diatoms Are Universally Present on All Sea Turtle Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nathan J; Majewska, Roksana; Lazo-Wasem, Eric A; Nel, Ronel; Paladino, Frank V; Rojas, Lourdes; Zardus, John D; Pinou, Theodora

    2016-01-01

    The macro-epibiotic communities of sea turtles have been subject to growing interest in recent years, yet their micro-epibiotic counterparts are almost entirely unknown. Here, we provide the first evidence that diatoms are epibionts for all seven extant species of sea turtle. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy, we inspected superficial carapace or skin samples from a single representative of each turtle species. We distinguished 18 diatom taxa from these seven individuals, with each sea turtle species hosting at least two diatom taxa. We recommend that future research is undertaken to confirm whether diatom communities vary between sea turtle species and whether these diatom taxa are facultative or obligate commensals.

  12. Research highlights: impacts of microplastics on plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Vivian S

    2016-02-01

    Each year, millions of metric tons of the plastic produced for food packaging, personal care products, fishing gear, and other human activities end up in lakes, rivers, and the ocean. The breakdown of these primary plastics in the environment results in microplastics, small fragments of plastic typically less than 1-5 mm in size. These synthetic particles have been detected in all of the world's oceans and also in many freshwater systems, accumulating in sediment, on shorelines, suspended in surface waters, and being ingested by plankton, fish, birds, and marine mammals. While the occurrence of plastics in surface waters has been surveyed in a number of studies, the impacts of microplastics on marine organisms are still being elucidated. This highlight features three recent publications that explore the interactions of microplastics with planktonic organisms to clarify the effects of these pollutants on some of the ocean's smallest and most important inhabitants.

  13. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead......Many planktonic organisms have motility patterns with correlation run lengths (distances traversed before direction changes) of the same order as their reaction distances regarding prey, mates and predators (distances at which these organisms are remotely detected). At these scales, the relative...... measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...

  14. Climate-mediated dance of the plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.

    2014-10-01

    Climate change will unquestionably influence global ocean plankton because it directly impacts both the availability of growth-limiting resources and the ecological processes governing biomass distributions and annual cycles. Forecasting this change demands recognition of the vital, yet counterintuitive, attributes of the plankton world. The biomass of photosynthetic phytoplankton, for example, is not proportional to their division rate. Perhaps more surprising, physical processes (such as deep vertical mixing) can actually trigger an accumulation in phytoplankton while simultaneously decreasing their division rates. These behaviours emerge because changes in phytoplankton division rates are paralleled by proportional changes in grazing, viral attack and other loss rates. Here I discuss this trophic dance between predators and prey, how it dictates when phytoplankton biomass remains constant or achieves massive blooms, and how it can determine even the sign of change in ocean ecosystems under a warming climate.

  15. Intracellular metabolic pathway distribution in diatoms and tools for genome-enabled experimental diatom research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ansgar; Kroth, Peter G

    2017-09-05

    Diatoms are important primary producers in the oceans and can also dominate other aquatic habitats. One reason for the success of this phylogenetically relatively young group of unicellular organisms could be the impressive redundancy and diversity of metabolic isoenzymes in diatoms. This redundancy is a result of the evolutionary origin of diatom plastids by a eukaryote-eukaryote endosymbiosis, a process that implies temporary redundancy of functionally complete eukaryotic genomes. During the establishment of the plastids, this redundancy was partially reduced via gene losses, and was partially retained via gene transfer to the nucleus of the respective host cell. These gene transfers required re-assignment of intracellular targeting signals, a process that simultaneously altered the intracellular distribution of metabolic enzymes compared with the ancestral cells. Genome annotation, the correct assignment of the gene products and the prediction of putative function, strongly depends on the correct prediction of the intracellular targeting of a gene product. Here again diatoms are very peculiar, because the targeting systems for organelle import are partially different to those in land plants. In this review, we describe methods of predicting intracellular enzyme locations, highlight findings of metabolic peculiarities in diatoms and present genome-enabled approaches to study their metabolism.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Phytoplankton and littoral epilithic diatoms in high mountain lakes of the Adamello-Brenta Regional Park (Trentino, Italy and their relation to trophic status and acidification risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica TOLOTTI

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available A survey of phytoplankton and littoral epilithic diatom communities was carried out on 16 high mountain lakes in the Adamello- Brenta Regional Park (NE Italy as part of a wider research project aimed to the limnological characterisation of the seldom-studied lakes in this Alpine Region. The regional study was supplemented by the analysis of seasonal variations in two representative lakes. The principal goals of this paper are 1 to identify the most important environmental variables regulating patterns in the species composition of both phytoplankton and littoral diatoms, 2 to evaluate whether these algal communities can be used to improve trophic classification and 3 whether they can facilitate monitoring of diffuse human impacts (e.g. airborne pollution on high altitude lakes. The relevance to monitoring is based on the acid sensitivity of all lakes studied, as indicated by the very low average alkalinity values (4-97 μeq l-1 recorded during the investigation period. Chlorophyll-a concentrations and phytoplankton biovolume recorded in the lakes were very low, with maxima in the deep-water layers and in late summer. Phytoplankton communities were dominated by flagellated algae (Chrysophyceae and Dinophyceae. Several coccal green algae were present, while planktonic diatoms were almost completely absent. Littoral diatom communities were dominated by alpine and acidophilous taxa (mainly belonging to the genera Achnanthes and Eunotia. Trophic classification based on phytoplankton and littoral diatoms, respectively, ascribed all lakes to the oligotrophic range. In both algal communities species indicative of acidified conditions were found. Multivariate analyses indicated that both the regional distribution and seasonal variation of phytoplankton are mainly driven by nutrient concentration. Diatoms are predominantly affected by geochemical characteristics including pH and mineralization level.

  17. Storms and plankton: the forgotten link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.

    2009-09-01

    The physico-chemical fields of the pelagic environment are constantly fluctuating at different spatial and temporal scales. Storms are extreme events of such fluctuations that cascade down to small scales to alter nutrient availability to microscopic algae or swimming and mating behaviour of motile plankton. In coastal ecosystems, storms represent dissolved nutrient injections via run-off and resuspension that trigger planktonic succession events. Storms may also have a role in the development and/or mitigation of harmful algal blooms, events with health consequences that are of growing societal concern. Mediterranean storms are also responsible for the transport of micro and macronutrients from Saharan origin. The effects of the deposition of such nutrients over the ocean may range from small to significant depending on the local conditions. Overall, albeit it is hard to envision catastrophic consequences, storms affect, directly or indirectly, the dynamics of plankton and hence ecosystem production. The full potential of such relationships will be evidenced once biological time series match the resolution and spatial coverage of meteorological and oceanic data. As the frequency and intensity of storms is subject to global change, future oceanic ecosystem production and diversity scenarios will be affected as well.

  18. Complex Analyses of Plankton Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl E. Havens

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically evaluates some complex methods that have been used to characterize the structure and function of freshwater plankton communities. The focus is on methods related to plankton size structure and carbon transfer. The specific methods reviewed are 1 size spectrum analysis, 2 size-fractionated phytoplankton productivity, 3 size-fractionated zooplankton grazing, 4 plankton ecological transfer efficiency, and 5 grazer effects on phytoplankton community structure. Taken together, these methods can provide information on community ecological properties that are directly related to practical issues including water quality and fisheries productivity. However, caution is warranted since application without a complete understanding of assumptions and context of the manipulations could lead to erroneous conclusions. As an example, experimental studies involving the addition or removal of zooplankton, especially when coupled with nutrient addition treatments, could provide information on the degree of consumer vs. resource control of phytoplankton. Resource managers subsequently could use this information in developing effective measures for controlling nuisance algal biomass. However, the experiments must be done critically and with sufficient safeguards and other measurements to ensure that treatments (e.g., zooplankton exclosure by screening of water actually are successful and do not introduce other changes in the community (e.g., removal of large algae. In all of the methods described here, the investigator must take care when generalizing results and, in particular, carry out a sufficient number of replications to encompass both the major seasonal and spatial variation that occurs in the ecosystem.

  19. Seasonal variations in planktonic community structure and production in an Atlantic coastal pond: the importance of nanoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, C; Ryckaert, M; Le Gall, S; Hartmann, H J

    2007-05-01

    The structure and summertime production of planktonic communities and the role of nondiatom planktonic cells were studied in coastal ponds, which are areas traditionally used for fattening and greening table-sized oysters. The abundance and biomass of nano-microplanktonic protists were determined at weekly intervals between February 1998 and February 1999 in a coastal pond without oysters in the French Atlantic coast near La Rochelle. The production of these microbiotas was determined in the summer period. The structure of plankton communities revealed the following observations: (1) microphytoplanktonic cells were mostly diatoms and dinoflagellates, (2) microzooplanktonic cells were mainly ciliates, and (3) nanoplanktonic cells were represented by pigmented (80-90% of the nanoplankton biomass) and colorless nanoflagellates. Diatoms were dominated by Naviculiineae. Dinoflagellates were dominated by Peridiniales. Oligotrichida were predominant in the ciliate community. Protist biomass levels were nine times higher from April to August (summer period 1033 microg C L(-1)) than from September to March (winter period 114 microg C L(-1)). Whatever the season, nanoflagellates were dominant in the water column (66 and 53% of the entire protist biomass in the summer and winter periods, respectively). Nanoflagellates represented the highest production of nano-microplanktonic communities (76% of carbon protist production) in the coastal pond in summer and showed the shortest generation time (7.1 h). Dinoflagellates came after nanoflagellates in production (19.5% of carbon protist production). Diatoms represented only a supplementary carbon resource available for higher trophic levels, whereas, until now, they were considered as the principal food of oysters in coastal ponds. Ciliates were a small source of carbon, but their growth rate was high. We suggest, first, that nanoflagellates represented the primary resource available in the pond and could constitute an important

  20. Experimental assessment of cumulative temperature and UV-B radiation effects on Mediterranean plankton metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.

    2015-07-07

    The Mediterranean Sea is a vulnerable region for climate change, warming at higher rates compare to the global ocean. Warming leads to increased stratification of the water column and enhanced the oligotrophic nature of the Mediterranean Sea. The oligotrophic waters are already highly transparent, however, exposure of Mediterranean plankton to ultraviolet radiation (UV-B and UV-A) may increase further if the waters become more oligotrophic, thereby, allowing a deeper UV radiation penetration and likely enhancing impacts to biota. Here we experimentally elucidate the cumulative effects of warming and natural UV-B radiation on the net community production (NCP) of plankton communities. We conducted five experiments at monthly intervals, from June to October 2013, and evaluated the responses of NCP to ambient UV-B radiation and warming (+3°C), alone and in combination, in a coastal area of the northwest Mediterranean Sea. UV-B radiation and warming lead to reduced NCP and resulted in a heterotrophic (NCP < 0) metabolic balance. Both UV-B radiation and temperature, showed a significant individual effect in NCP across treatments and time. However, their joint effect showed to be synergistic as the interaction between them (UV × Temp) was statistically significant in most of the experiments performed. Our results showed that both drivers, would affect the gas exchange of CO2−O2 from and to the atmosphere and the role of plankton communities in the Mediterranean carbon cycle.

  1. Benthic Epiphytic Diatoms in Deep-sea Southern Ocean Sediments as a New Tool for Reconstructing Antarctic Paleoclimatic and Paleoceanographic History: Implications of Floating 'Macroalgal Biotic Oases'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, D. M.; Porter, N.; OConnell, S.

    2014-12-01

    A new paleobiological proxy for Antarctic paleoclimate history provides insight into past extent of open marine shelves on Wilkes Land margin, and calls for reassessment of IRD interpretations in the deep-sea. Marine, epiphytic benthic diatoms that grow attached to macroalgae (seaweed) are recovered in Miocene sediment from DSDP Site 269. They suggest periodic presence of floating rafts or 'biotic oases' in the Southern Ocean comprising buoyant macroalgae, attached benthic diatoms, and biota associated with this displaced coastal community. Macroalgae attach to the substrate with a holdfast, a multi-fingered structure that serves as an anchor. Uprooted holdfasts attached to buoyant macroalgae can raft sedimentary particles, some large (>50 kg), into the deep-sea. In addition, a rich biota of associated invertebrates live in cavities within the holdfast, the dispersal of which may explain the biogeographic distribution of organisms on Subantarctic islands. The stratigraphic occurrence of large, benthic epiphytic diatoms of genera Arachnoidiscus, Isthmia, Rhabdonema, Gephyra, Trigonium, and smaller Achnanthes, Cocconeis, Grammatophora, and Rhaphoneis in sediment cores from DSDP Site 269 reflect a rich, productive epiphytic diatom flora that maintained its position in the photic zone attached to their buoyant seaweed hosts. Amphipods and other herbivores grazed the benthic diatoms and produced diatom-rich fecal pellets that were delivered to the sea-floor. The discontinuous stratigraphic occurrence of the epiphytic diatoms, amongst the background of planktonic diatoms in Core 9 of DSDP Site 269, suggests environmental changes induced by either warm or cold events may have controlled the production and/or release of the macroalgae into the deep-sea. Warm events led to increased shelf areas, and cold events led to formation of ice on the macroalgae to increase their buoyancy and lift-off. Complicating the distinction between warm and cold events is the potential for the

  2. Planktonic foraminiferal biogeography in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean: Contribution from CPR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilland, Julie; Fabri-Ruiz, Salomé; Koubbi, Philippe; Monaco, Claire Lo; Cotte, Cédric; Hosie, Graham W.; Sanchez, Sophie; Howa, Hélène

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) Southern Ocean-Continuous Plankton Recorder (SO-CPR) Survey, the oceanic regions around Crozet and Kerguelen Islands were investigated in February-March 2013. Living planktonic Foraminifera (LPF) were collected in the upper mixed layer with a CPR along a 2160 nautical mile sea transect that crossed main hydrological fronts in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. In the SO-CPR database, mean total abundances of Foraminifera occurring during late austral summer are highly variable at an inter-annual scale, from 10 to 250 ind.m-3, representing 10-40% of the total zooplankton abundance, respectively. In the Southern Ocean, major inter-annual changes in zooplankton community structure were already reported. In this study, we describe the large scale distributional pattern of individual planktonic foraminiferal species living in near-surface waters of the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, and we attempt to explain why major spatial variability in relative species abundances occurs during a late austral summer. In February-March 2013, LPF total abundances recorded between 42.86°S and 56.42°S ranged from 0 to a maximum of 258 ind.m-3. In the Open Ocean Zone, the LPF community was composed of four major species (Globigerinita uvula, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, Neogloboquadrina incompta, Globigerina bulloides). Generally, LPF total abundances are supposed to mirror primary production induced by hydrological fronts or induced by topography near Crozet and Kerguelen Islands. However, during late austral summer 2013, high foraminiferal abundances in the upper mixed layer did not always match the pattern of near-surface primary production (high Chl-a concentration areas delineated from satellite imagery). Low LPF standing stocks in late austral summer in the Southern Ocean contrasted with the presence of high densities of heavily silicified diatoms. This suggests that the late bloom

  3. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded DNA virus infecting the marine diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11 isolated from western Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Kimura

    Full Text Available Diatoms are significant organisms for primary production in the earth's aquatic environment. Hence, their dynamics are an important focus area in current studies. Viruses are a great concern as potential factors of diatom mortality, along with other physical, chemical, and biological factors. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Csp07DNAV that lyses the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11. This paper examines the physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics of Csp07DNAV. The virus was isolated from a surface water sample that was collected at Hiroshima Bay, Japan. It was icosahedral, had a diameter of 34 nm, and accumulated in the nuclei of host cells. Rod-shaped virus particles also coexisted in the host nuclei. The latent period and burst size were estimated to be <12 h and 29 infectious units per host cell, respectively. Csp07DNAV had a closed circular single-stranded DNA genome (5,552 nucleotides, which included a double-stranded region and 3 open reading frames. The monophyly of Csp07DNAV and other Bacilladnavirus group single-stranded DNA viruses was supported by phylogenetic analysis that was based on the amino acid sequence of each virus protein. On the basis of these results, we considered Csp07DNAV to be a new member of the genus Bacilladnavirus.

  4. Taxonomic and Environmental Variability in the Elemental Composition and Stoichiometry of Individual Dinoflagellate and Diatom Cells from the NW Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariona Segura-Noguera

    Full Text Available Here we present, for the first time, the elemental concentration, including C, N and O, of single phytoplankton cells collected from the sea. Plankton elemental concentration and stoichiometry are key variables in phytoplankton ecophysiology and ocean biogeochemistry, and are used to link cells and ecosystems. However, most field studies rely on bulk techniques that overestimate carbon and nitrogen because the samples include organic matter other than plankton organisms. Here we used X-ray microanalysis (XRMA, a technique that, unlike bulk analyses, gives simultaneous quotas of C, N, O, Mg, Si, P, and S, in single-cell organisms that can be collected directly from the sea. We analysed the elemental composition of dinoflagellates and diatoms (largely Chaetoceros spp. collected from different sites of the Catalan coast (NW Mediterranean Sea. As expected, a lower C content is found in our cells compared to historical values of cultured cells. Our results indicate that, except for Si and O in diatoms, the mass of all elements is not a constant fraction of cell volume but rather decreases with increasing cell volume. Also, diatoms are significantly less dense in all the measured elements, except Si, compared to dinoflagellates. The N:P ratio of both groups is higher than the Redfield ratio, as it is the N:P nutrient ratio in deep NW Mediterranean Sea waters (N:P = 20-23. The results suggest that the P requirement is highest for bacterioplankton, followed by dinoflagellates, and lowest for diatoms, giving them a clear ecological advantage in P-limited environments like the Mediterranean Sea. Finally, the P concentration of cells of the same genera but growing under different nutrient conditions was the same, suggesting that the P quota of these cells is at a critical level. Our results indicate that XRMA is an accurate technique to determine single cell elemental quotas and derived conversion factors used to understand and model ocean biogeochemical

  5. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  6. Plankton in the open Mediterranean Sea: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Siokou-Frangou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of the plankton studies conducted during the last 25 years in the epipelagic offshore waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This quasi-enclosed sea is characterized by a rich and complex physical dynamics with distinctive traits, especially in regard to the thermohaline circulation. Recent investigations have basically confirmed the long-recognised oligotrophic nature of this sea, which increases along both the west-east and the north-south directions. Nutrient availability is low, especially for phosphorous (N:P up to 60, though this limitation may be buffered by inputs from highly populated coasts and from the atmosphere. Phytoplankton biomass, as chl a, generally displays low values (less than 0.2 μg chl a l−1 over large areas, with a modest late winter increase. A large bloom (up to 3 μg l−1 is observed throughout the late winter and spring exclusively in the NW area. Relatively high biomass values are recorded in fronts and cyclonic gyres. A deep chlorophyll maximum is a permanent feature for the whole basin, except during the late winter mixing. It is found at increasingly greater depths ranging from 30 m in the Alboran Sea to 120 m in the easternmost Levantine basin. Primary production reveals a west-east decreasing trend and ranges between 59 and 150 g C m−2 y−1 (in situ measurements. Overall, the basin is largely dominated by small autotrophs, microheterotrophs and egg-carrying copepod species. The microorganisms (phytoplankton, viruses, bacteria, flagellates and ciliates and zooplankton components reveal a considerable diversity and variability over spatial and temporal scales, although the latter is poorly studied. Examples are the wide diversity of dinoflagellates and coccolithophores, the multifarious role of diatoms or picoeukaryotes, and the distinct seasonal or spatial patterns of the species-rich copepod genera or families which dominate the

  7. Estimation of the Potential Detection of Diatom Assemblages Based on Ocean Color Radiance Anomalies in the North Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Hélène Rêve-Lamarche

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years, a large number of new approaches in the domain of ocean-color have been developed, leading to a variety of innovative descriptors for phytoplankton communities. One of these methods, named PHYSAT, currently allows for the qualitative detection of five main phytoplankton groups from ocean-color measurements. Even though PHYSAT products are widely used in various applications and projects, the approach is limited by the fact it identifies only dominant phytoplankton groups. This current limitation is due to the use of biomarker pigment ratios for establishing empirical relationships between in-situ information and specific ocean-color radiance anomalies in open ocean waters. However, theoretical explanations of PHYSAT suggests that it could be possible to detect more than dominance cases but move more toward phytoplanktonic assemblage detection. Thus, to evaluate the potential of PHYSAT for the detection of phytoplankton assemblages, we took advantage of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR survey, collected in both the English Channel and the North Sea. The available CPR dataset contains information on diatom abundance in two large areas of the North Sea for the period 1998-2010. Using this unique dataset, recurrent diatom assemblages were retrieved based on classification of CPR samples. Six diatom assemblages were identified in-situ, each having indicators taxa or species. Once this first step was completed, the in-situ analysis was used to empirically associate the diatom assemblages with specific PHYSAT spectral anomalies. This step was facilitated by the use of previous classifications of regional radiance anomalies in terms of shape and amplitude, coupled with phenological tools. Through a matchup exercise, three CPR assemblages were associated with specific radiance anomalies. The maps of detection of these specific radiances anomalies are in close agreement with current in-situ ecological knowledge.

  8. COPEPOD: The Coastal & Oceanic Plankton Ecology, Production, & Observation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coastal & Oceanic Plankton Ecology, Production, & Observation Database (COPEPOD) provides NMFS scientists with quality-controlled, globally distributed...

  9. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rosener, B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host ``na-net.ornl.gov`` at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message ``send index`` to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user`s perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  10. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rosener, B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host na-net.ornl.gov'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message send index'' to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user's perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  11. [Research advances in heavy metals pollution ecology of diatom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Teng-Da; Ni, Wan-Min; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2012-03-01

    Diatom, due to its high sensitivity to environmental change, is one of the bio-indicators of aquatic ecosystem health, and some typical diatom species have been applied to indicate the heavy metals pollution of water body. With the focus on the surface water heavy metals pollution, this paper reviewed the research advances in the toxic effect of heavy metals pollution on diatom, biosorption and bioaccumulation of heavy metals by diatom, ecological adaptation mechanisms of diatom to heavy metals pollution, and roles of diatom as bio-indicator and in ecological restoration of heavy metals pollution. The growth tendency of diatom and the morphological change of frustule under heavy metals pollution as well as the differences in heavy metals biosorption and bioaccumulation by diatom, the ecological adaptation mechanisms of diatom on heavy metals surface complexation and ion exchange, and the roles of diatom as bio-indicator and in ecological restoration of heavy metals polluted water body were also discussed. This review could provide scientific evidences for the prevention of aquatic ecosystems heavy metals pollution and related early warning techniques.

  12. Addressed immobilization of biofunctionalized diatoms on electrodes by gold electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, S; Garibo, D; Fernández-Tejedor, M; O'Sullivan, C K; Campàs, M

    2017-03-23

    Diatoms are single cell microalgae with a silica shell (frustule), which possess a micro/nanoporous pattern of unparalleled diversity far beyond the possibilities of current micro- and nanofabrication techniques. To explore diatoms as natural three-dimensional nanostructured supports in sensing and biosensing devices, a simple, rapid and stable method to immobilize diatoms via gold electrodeposition is described. In this process, gold microstructures are formed, immobilizing diatoms by entrapment or crossing their nanopores. Varying the applied potential, time and HAuCl 4 concentration, gold deposits of different morphologies and roughness are obtained, thereby determining the diatom immobilization process. Optical and scanning electron microscopy have been used to characterize diatom immobilization yields, the morphology of the gold microstructures, and the morphological integrity of diatoms. Cyclic voltammetry has been performed to characterize the gold deposits and to demonstrate the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the gold-diatom electrodes. Electro-addressed immobilization of different diatoms on specific bands of interdigitated electrode arrays has been achieved, highlighting the potential application of diatoms for site-specific immobilization on microarrays. The feasibility to combine tailored immobilization with diatom biofunctionalization has also been demonstrated. Antibody-functionalized diatoms were immobilized on electrodes retaining their ability to detect its cognate antigen. The reported method exploits the natural three-dimensional nanostructures of diatoms together with their easy modification with biomolecules and the simplicity of gold electrodeposition to produce micro/nanostructured and highly electrocatalytic electrodes, providing low-cost and eco-friendly platforms and arrays with potential application in biosensing devices.

  13. Bulk Sediment and Diatom Silica Carbon Isotope Composition from Coastal Marine Sediments off East Antarctica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, S.; Leng, M.J.; Kendrick, C.P.; Cremer, H.; Wagner, B.

    2013-01-01

    Organic carbon occluded in diatom silica is assumed to be protected from degradation in the sediment. δ13C from diatom carbon (δ13C(diatom)) therefore potentially provides a signal of conditions during diatom growth. However, there have been few studies based on δ13C(diatom). Numerous variables can

  14. Diatoms of the Mystery Lake, Taiwan (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiunn-Tzong Wu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the last part of study about the diatom flora found in the Mystery Lake, a slightly acidic lake situated within a hardwood nature preserve in northeastern Taiwan. In this article, we reported 17 species, belonging to 4 genera, 4 families, and 2 orders, based on scanning electron microscopic observations. The species described here, 9 are newly recorded in Taiwan. They are: Navicula cryptotenella, Navicula ingrata, Navicula subfasciata, Pinnularia borealis var. rectangularis, Pinnularia interrupta, Pinnularia maior, Sellaphora laevissima, S. vitabunda, and Nitzschia perminuta. In total, we found 76 diatom species in the surface sediments of this lake. Among them, 33 (43% are newly recorded to Taiwan. The present study indicates that this lake is characterized by high species diversity and high species richness, which are related to the oligotrophic and non-polluted environmental conditions.

  15. Morse basis expansion applied to diatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Emanuel F. de, E-mail: eflima@rc.unesp.br [Departamento de Estatística, Matemática Aplicada e Computação, Instituto de Geociências e Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, Rio Claro, São Paulo 13506-900 (Brazil)

    2012-02-20

    This work explores the use of the eigenfunctions of the Morse potential with a infinite barrier at long range to solve the radial Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Analytical formulas are obtained for the kinetic energy operator matrix elements in the Morse basis. The Morse basis expansion is applied to find the vibrational–rotational levels of the sodium molecule in the electronic ground state. -- Highlights: ► The Morse potential basis is invoked to find the rovibrational levels of diatomic molecules. ► Analytical formulas for the kinetic energy operator in the Morse basis are obtained. ► The results of the Morse basis expansion show good agreement with the Fourier Grid technique.

  16. Distribution patterns of Recent planktonic foraminifera in surface sediments of the western continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naidu, P.D.

    Study of Recent plankton foraminifera from the surface sediment samples of western continental margin of India reveals the ecological preferences of the different planktonic foraminifera species in the area. Higher absolute abundance of planktonic...

  17. Molecular Dynamics and Spectra. II. Diatomic Raman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    a degeneracy factor g is introduced which depends on the symmetry of the molecule For our IT- homonuclear diatomic, z is gj, the nuclear spin...classi~a mechanical viewpoint. with some caveats for features In which anharmonicity is important, such as the de- tailed shape of Q branches. it is...to compute the Spectra of coa- plex molecular systems, for example of large molecules , clusters, liquids, solutions, and solids. Second, this

  18. Silicon diatom frustules as nanostructured photoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Soundarrajan; Sweetman, Martin J; Kant, Krishna; Skinner, William; Losic, Dusan; Nann, Thomas; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2014-09-18

    In the quest for solutions to meeting future energy demands, solar fuels play an important role. A particularly promising example is photocatalysis since even incremental improvements in performance in this process are bound to translate into significant cost benefits. Here, we report that semiconducting and high surface area 3D silicon replicas prepared from abundantly available diatom fossils sustain photocurrents and enable solar energy conversion.

  19. Benthic diatom response to changing environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibic, Tamara; Comici, Cinzia; Bussani, Andrea; Del Negro, Paola

    2012-12-01

    In the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea, Italy) the benthic diatom community dynamics has been studied for seven years (1999-2005) at two sublittoral stations and related to variations of temperature, salinity, nutrient concentrations, freshwater inflow and mucilage. Bin-averaged temperature versus abundance of the main genera revealed that Nitzschia and Navicula presented a positive stepped trend with increasing temperature. An increase of ca. 860 ± 150 cells per cm3 per °C was calculated for Navicula and up to 590 ± 170 cells per cm3 per °C for Nitzschia. The genus Pleurosigma revealed a negative trend with increasing temperature, with a calculated decrease of ca. 140 ± 60 cells per cm3 per °C. A negative relation between Diploneis and temperature was found only in the shallower site. A peak of the tychopelagic genus Cylindrotheca was observed in correspondence with high salinity, but no significant results between bin-averaged salinity and benthic diatom abundance were found. Significant negative relations were obtained between bin-averaged abundance of Pleurosigma and H4SiO4 and NO3- at the deeper station and between the bin-averaged abundance of Gyrosigma and NH4+ at the coastal station. In this site the abundance of Gyrosigma showed a significant increasing trend over the study period. Navicula and Nitzschia seemed to suffer from the presence of mucilage events occurred in summer 2000 and 2004 whereas Diploneis occupied the ecological niche which remained temporarily uncovered by Navicula and Nitzschia. An exceptional freshwater plume with extremely high terrigenous input in November 2000 completely covered the benthic diatom community, causing a remarkable decrease in its total abundance in late autumn and winter 2000-01. The Gulf of Trieste may be considered a natural megacosm due to its geomorphologic characteristics and therefore the benthic diatom response to changing environmental conditions observed in this site could be extended beyond the

  20. Environmental conditions and plankton of the Omu Creek, Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The blue-green algae recorded one species. Diatoms accounted for 98% (centric – 86.7% and pennate diatoms –13.3%) of the total phytoplankton. Zooplankton diversity consisted of adult copepods, rotifers and juveniles stages from 10 species and 10 genera were recorded. Crustaceans were made up of 7 species from 7 ...

  1. Seasonal patterns in plankton communities in a pluriannual time series at a coastal Mediterranean site (Gulf of Naples: an attempt to discern recurrences and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ribera d'Alcalà

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The annual cycle of plankton was studied over 14 years from 1984 to 2000 at a coastal station in the Gulf of Naples, with the aim of assessing seasonal patterns and interannual trends. Phytoplankton biomass started increasing over the water column in February-early March, and generally achieved peak values in the upper layers in late spring. Another peak was often recorded in autumn. Diatoms and phytoflagellates dominated for the largest part of the year. Ciliates showed their main peaks in phase with phytoplankton and were mainly represented by small (< 30 mm naked choreotrichs. Mesozooplankton increased in March-April, reaching maximum concentrations in summer. Copepods were always the most abundant group, followed by cladocerans in summer. At the interannual scale, a high variability and a decreasing trend were recorded over the sampling period for autotrophic biomass. Mesozooplankton biomass showed a less marked interannual variability. From 1995 onwards, phytoplankton populations increased in cell number but decreased in cell size, with intense blooms of small diatoms and undetermined coccoid species frequently observed in recent years. In spite of those interannual variations, the different phases of the annual cycle and the occurrence of several plankton species were remarkably regular.

  2. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  3. Influence of illumination on settlement of diatom Navicula sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shan; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2011-11-01

    Diatoms are responsible for biofouling, which causes many problems in various marine industries. This study examined the effects of different light conditions (intensity, incident direction, time of illumination) on the settling behavior of the marine diatom Navicula sp. on glass surfaces. The density of this diatom's settlement on glass was strongly influenced by light conditions. Moreover, very weak light emitted on the bottom of the culture dish could also rapidly inhibit diatom settlement. These phenomena were explained by spatial interference between chloroplast and holdfast-like structures inside the thecae. The holdfast-like structure is observed to be responsible for diatom locomotion and hence the settlement behavior. It was proposed that the interrelation of illumination and attachment of diatoms allowed them to better adapt to the habitat with higher efficiency of attachment and successive reproduction.

  4. Plankton biomass in secondary ponds treating piggery waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Barthel

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at analyzing the plankton biomass found in a piggery waste treatment system, composed of a high rate algal pond (HRAP, two maturation ponds (MP1, MP2 (System A and a water hyacinth pond (WHP (System B. The ponds were disposed in series and the study was performed for 32 weeks. The physicochemical variables monitored were: pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, soluble chemical oxygen demand, nitrogen compounds and total phosphorus. The plankton biomass was identified at genus level and the ecology index was calculated so as to describe its development in the ponds. Results showed lower specific richness, which was associated to the mono-specific Chlorella sp population. The protozoa density was conversely proportional to the green algae density. The higher species diversity occurred in the WHP and MP2. The green algae presented high relative density (>97 %. The Jaccard index reached 100% if Chlorella sp and sometimes diatoms were found in the system's inlet and outlet. The productivity of algal biomass was lower than 10 gTSS/m²/d in the maturation ponds, which was maintained in the HRAP. The green algae coefficient of variation (CV varied from 0 to 1.5 in the HRAP and WHP, but was constant at 0.9 to the 10th week in MP1 and around 0.5 during all the experimental period for MP2. For the chlorophyll a, this coefficient varied in all the ponds.Este trabalho teve como objetivo estudar a biomassa do plâncton encontrado em um sistema de tratamento de dejetos suínos, formado por uma série de lagoas. Foram monitoradas 1 lagoa de alta taxa (LAT, 2 lagoas de maturação (LM1, LM2 (sistema A e 1 lagoa de aguapés (LAG (sistema B, durante 32 semanas, por meio de variáveis físico-químicas tais como pH, temperatura, oxigênio dissolvido, demanda química de oxigênio, compostos nitrogenados e fósforo total. Igualmente, foram feitas identificações da biomassa planctônica, a nível de gênero, e calculados índices ecológicos que

  5. Applications of Diatoms as Potential Microalgae in Nanobiotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Jamali, Ali Akbar; Akbari, Fariba; Ghorakhlu, Mohamad Moradi; de la Guardia, Miguel; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae, which present in nearly every water habitat make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications such as oil explora­tion, forensic examination, environmental indication, biosilica pattern generation, toxicity testing and eutrophication of aqueous ecosystems. Methods: Essential information on diatoms were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of diatoms on biosynthesis and bioremediation. Results: In this review, we present the ...

  6. Vitamin B1 and B12 uptake and cycling by plankton communities in coastal ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eKoch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While vitamin B12 has recently been shown to co-limit the growth of coastal phytoplankton assemblages, the cycling of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems is poorly understood as planktonic uptake rates of vitamins B1 and B12 have never been quantified in tandem in any aquatic ecosystem. The goal of this study was to establish the relationships between plankton community composition, carbon fixation, and B-vitamin assimilation in two contrasting estuarine systems. We show that, although B-vitamin concentrations were low (pM, vitamin concentrations and uptake rates were higher within a more eutrophic estuary and that vitamin B12 uptake rates were significantly correlated with rates of primary production. Eutrophic sites hosted larger bacterial and picoplankton abundances with larger carbon normalized vitamin uptake rates. Although the >2 µm phytoplankton biomass was often dominated by groups with a high incidence of vitamin auxotrophy (dinoflagellates and diatoms, picoplankton (< 2 µm were always responsible for the majority of B12-vitamin uptake. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that heterotrophic bacteria were the primary users of vitamins among the picoplankton during this study. Nutrient/vitamin amendment experiments demonstrated that, in the Summer and Fall, vitamin B12 occasionally limited or co-limited the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass together with nitrogen. Combined with prior studies, these findings suggest that picoplankton are the primary producers and users of B-vitamins in coastal ecosystems and that rapid uptake of B-vitamins by heterotrophic bacteria may sometimes deprive larger phytoplankton of these micronutrients and thus influence phytoplankton species succession.

  7. The impact of silver nanoparticles on marine plankton dynamics: Dependence on coating, size and concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiola, Anastasia; Pitta, Paraskevi; Callol, Agnès Junyer; Kagiorgi, Margarita; Kalantzi, Ioanna; Mylona, Kyriaki; Santi, Ioulia; Toncelli, Claudio; Pergantis, Spyros; Tsapakis, Manolis

    2017-12-01

    During this study, three microcosm experiments were carried out with natural coastal seawater, collected in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, in order to assess the effect of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) exposure to natural plankton communities. The impact of coating (branched-polyethyleneimine: BPEI vs. poly-vinylpyrrolidone: PVP), size (40 vs. 60nm), concentration (200, 500, 2000, 5000 and 10,000ng Ag L -1 ) and silver form (dissolved Ag + vs. AgNPs) were tested. The results of chlorophyll a concentration revealed that PVP AgNPs caused a higher toxicity than BPEI AgNPs, and this was possibly related to the measured higher dissolution rate. Additionally, toxicity of BPEI AgNPs was size-dependent, with 40 being more toxic than 60 nm AgNPs, which was nevertheless not seen clearly for PVP AgNPs. Interestingly, community composition altered in response to AgNP exposure: cyanobacterial abundance was negatively affected at concentrations ≥200ng Ag L -1 , and dinoflagellate abundance and composition were altered at a 2000ng Ag L -1 concentration. Specifically, dinoflagellate (Gymnodinium, Prorocentrum and Gyrodinium) and diatom (Nitzschia, Navicula and Climacosphenia) genera either increased or decreased, highlighting taxa-specific effects, with some of them being able to tolerate, compensate or even benefit from AgNPs. Silver in either form (dissolved Ag + or in NPs) caused almost identical results in the plankton community, further indicating that Ag + release is the primary cause of AgNP toxicity. This study employed for the first time environmentally relevant AgNP concentrations (minimum 200ng Ag L -1 ) in natural seawater without pre-filtration steps and showed that community changes were driven by the exposure but were largely dependent on ambient physico-chemical characteristics and should be further investigated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diatom flora in subterranean ecosystems: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Falasco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In scarcity of light and primary producers, subterranean ecosystems are generally extremely oligotrophic habitats, receiving poor supplies of degradable organic matter from the surface. Human direct impacts on cave ecosystems mainly derive from intensive tourism and recreational caving, causing important alterations to the whole subterranean environment. In particular, artificial lighting systems in show caves support the growth of autotrophic organisms (the so-called lampenflora, mainly composed of cyanobacteria, diatoms, chlorophytes, mosses and ferns producing exocellular polymeric substances (EPSs made of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. This anionic EPSs matrix mediates to the intercellular communications and participates to the chemical exchanges with the substratum, inducing the adsorption of cations and dissolved organic molecules from the cave formations (speleothems. Coupled with the metabolic activities of heterotrophic microorganisms colonising such layer (biofilm, this phenomenon may lead to the corrosion of the mineral surfaces. In this review, we investigate the formation of biofilms, especially of diatom-dominated ones, as a consequence of artificial lighting and its impacts on speleothems. Whenever light reaches the subterranean habitat (both artificially and naturally a relative high number of species of diatoms may indeed colonise it. Cave entrances, artificially illuminated walls and speleothems inside the cave are generally the preferred substrates. This review focuses on the diatom flora colonising subterranean habitats, summarizing the information contained in all the scientific papers published from 1900 up to date. In this review we provide a complete checklist of the diatom taxa recorded in subterranean habitats, including a total of 363 taxa, belonging to 82 genera. The most frequent and abundant species recorded in caves and other low light subterranean habitats are generally aerophilic and

  9. Water quality assessments: A case study of plankton and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspects of physico-chemical characteristics, plankton and macro invertebrates of Porto-Novo and Gulf of Guinea were studied in September 2012 with a view to determine the quality of water using plankton indices. Standard methods were used to determine the physico-chemical parameters. The mean water quality ...

  10. Planktonic Biodiversity and Physico-Chemical Parameters of Awba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awba reservoir is a major source of water for the University of Ibadan. This study determines the physcio-chemical parameters as well as the biodiversity of the planktons in relation to these parameters. Water samples were collected twice in a week for physico-chemical parameters determination and estimation of planktons ...

  11. Predictability of plankton communities in an unpredictable world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.; Senerpont Domis, de L.N.

    2013-01-01

    1.Plankton ecology contributes significantly to ecological theory building, because plankton organisms are relatively easy to manipulate and have short generation times and a relatively small set of traits making them an ideal experimental model system for addressing both general ecological

  12. Plankton dynamics under different climatic conditions in space and time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Senerpont Domis, de L.N.; Elser, J.J.; Huszar, V.L.M.; Ibelings, B.W.; Jeppesen, E.; Kosten, S.; Mooij, W.M.; Roland, F.; Sommer, U.; Donk, van E.; Winder, M.; Lurling, M.

    2013-01-01

    1.Different components of the climate system have been shown to affect temporal dynamics in natural plankton communities on scales varying from days to years. The seasonal dynamics in temperate lake plankton communities, with emphasis on both physical and biological forcing factors, were captured in

  13. Rona Awal Plankton di Perairan Tapak Pltn Muria

    OpenAIRE

    Afiati, Norma; Budi Susilo, Yarianto Sugeng; Tobing, Mauritz L; Susiati, Heni

    2006-01-01

    RONA AWAL PLANKTON DI PERAIRAN TAPAK PLTN MURIA. Rencana pembangunan PLTN diperkirakan mempunyai potensi menimbulkan dampak negatif terhadap ekosistem perairan. Dampak tersebut bersumber dari tahap kegiatan konstruksi dan operasi. Besaran dampak akan sangat tergantung pada kondisi rona awai dibandingkan dengan kondisi setelah terjadi Perubahan lingkungan akibat kegiatan proyek. Plankton merupakan organisme yang penting dalam rantai makanan, dan merupakan organisme yang sensitif terhadap Perub...

  14. Page 1 Arabian Sea planktonic processes and organic flux 137 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arabian Sea planktonic processes and organic flux 137. DCM, and in traps with the benthic assemblage (s), where also differential dissolution of frustules ... plankton pigment concentrations, especially during the NE monsoon in the north. (areas 4b, 4c and Banse and English 1994b), marked interannual variability of animal.

  15. Adhesion Forces and Composition of Planktonic and Adhering Oral Microbiomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, S. W.; Chen, Y.; Maitra, A.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Slomp, A. M.; Busscher, H. J.; van der Mei, H. C.

    The oral microbiome consists of a planktonic microbiome residing in saliva and an adhering microbiome (the biofilm adhering to oral hard and soft tissues). Here we hypothesized that possible differences in microbial composition of the planktonic and adhering oral microbiome on teeth can be related

  16. Plankton dynamics associated with the convergence zone of a shear ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estuarine frontal systems are thought to play an important role in plankton accumulations in estuaries. However, knowledge surrounding these estuarine circulation patterns is not clear, and consensus regarding the importance of fronts has yet to be reached. A full appraisal of the plankton in frontal systems in the estuary ...

  17. Rhyme and reason: plankton changes in the North Sea ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alvarez Fernandez, S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The North Sea planktonic system is one of the most studied cases of sudden community changes in the marine environment. Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) data provided insight into the long-term trends and seasonal patterns of both phytoplankton and zooplankton and their relationships with

  18. Preservation potential of ancient plankton DNA in Pleistocene marine sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boere, A.C.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; de Lange, G.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Coolen, M.J.L.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Coolen, M.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that ancient plankton DNA can be recovered from Holocene lacustrine and marine sediments, including from species that do not leave diagnostic microscopic fossils in the sediment record. Therefore, the analysis of this so-called fossil plankton DNA is a promising approach

  19. Seasonal variations in fouling diatom communities on the Yantai coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cuiyun; Wang, Jianhua; Yu, Yang; Liu, Sujing; Xia, Chuanhai

    2015-03-01

    Fouling diatoms are a main component of biofilm, and play an important role in marine biofouling formation. We investigated seasonal variations in fouling diatom communities that developed on glass slides immersed in seawater, on the Yantai coast, northern Yellow Sea, China, using microscopy and molecular techniques. Studies were conducted during 2012 and 2013 over 3, 7, 14, and 21 days in each season. The abundance of attached diatoms and extracellular polymeric substances increased with exposure time of the slides to seawater. The lowest diatom density appeared in winter and the highest species richness and diversity were found in summer and autumn. Seasonal variation was observed in the structure of fouling diatom communities. Pennate diatoms Cylindrotheca, Nitzschia, Navicula, Amphora, Gomphonema, and Licmophora were the main fouling groups. Cylindrotheca sp. dominated in the spring. Under laboratory culture conditions, we found that Cylindrotheca grew very fast, which might account for the highest density of this diatom in spring. The lower densities in summer and autumn might result from the emergence of fouling animals and environmental factors. The Cylindrotheca sp. was identified as Cylindrotheca closterium using18S rDNA sequencing. The colonization process of fouling diatoms and significant seasonal variation in this study depended on environmental and biological factors. Understanding the basis of fouling diatoms is essential and important for developing new antifouling techniques.

  20. Net heterotrophy in Faroe Islands clear-water lakes: causes and consequences for bacterioplankton and phytoplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pålsson, C.; Kritzberg, E. S.; Christoffersen, K.

    2005-01-01

    ) and measured the grazing pressure exerted by common mixotrophic species on bacteria. 2. High respiration to primary production (6.6-33.2) and supersaturation of CO2 (830-2140 µatm) implied that the lakes were net heterotrophic and that the pelagic heterotrophic plankton were subsidised by allochthonous organic...... conditions and hence low primary production in combination with an input of allochthonous C with a relatively high availability. 4. Mixotrophic phytoplankton (Cryptomonas spp., Dinobryon spp. and flagellates cf. Ochromonas spp.) constituted a large percentage of the plankton community (17-83%), possibly...... carbon. However, in spite of the apparent high level of net heterotrophy, primary production exceeded bacterial production and the food base for higher trophic levels appeared to be mainly autotrophic. 3. We suggest that the observed net heterotrophy in these lakes was a result of the oligotrophic...

  1. Detection of cyprinid herpesvirus-3 DNA in lake plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Honjo, Mie N; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itayama, Tomoaki; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2011-06-01

    The disease caused by cyprinid herpesvirus-3 (CyHV-3) severely impacts the natural freshwater ecosystem and damages carp and koi farming, however, the pathway of CyHV-3 transmission remains unclear. It is possible that the virus adheres to plankton, which then facilitate viral movement and transmission, and therefore, it is hypothesised that plankton are involved in the disease dynamics. In this study, plankton were collected at eight sites in the Iba-naiko lagoon; we detected and quantified CyHV-3 DNA from plankton samples. The results of the correlation analysis showed a significant positive correlation between CyHV-3 copies and the number of Rotifera, suggesting that CyHV-3 binds to and/or is concentrated by Rotifera. Our results suggest that plankton affect viral ecology in the natural environment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Climate variance influence on the non-stationary plankton dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinero, Juan Carlos; Reygondeau, Gabriel; Bonnet, Delphine

    2013-08-01

    We examined plankton responses to climate variance by using high temporal resolution data from 1988 to 2007 in the Western English Channel. Climate variability modified both the magnitude and length of the seasonal signal of sea surface temperature, as well as the timing and depth of the thermocline. These changes permeated the pelagic system yielding conspicuous modifications in the phenology of autotroph communities and zooplankton. The climate variance envelope, thus far little considered in climate-plankton studies, is closely coupled with the non-stationary dynamics of plankton, and sheds light on impending ecological shifts and plankton structural changes. Our study calls for the integration of the non-stationary relationship between climate and plankton in prognostic models on the productivity of marine ecosystems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Professional Enterprise NET

    CERN Document Server

    Arking, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive coverage to help experienced .NET developers create flexible, extensible enterprise application code If you're an experienced Microsoft .NET developer, you'll find in this book a road map to the latest enterprise development methodologies. It covers the tools you will use in addition to Visual Studio, including Spring.NET and nUnit, and applies to development with ASP.NET, C#, VB, Office (VBA), and database. You will find comprehensive coverage of the tools and practices that professional .NET developers need to master in order to build enterprise more flexible, testable, and ext

  4. Paleolimnological assessment of nutrient enrichment on diatom assemblages in a priori defined nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited lakes downwind of the Athabasca Oil Sands, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen R. Laird

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As the industrial footprint of the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR continues to expand, concern about the potential impacts of pollutants on the surrounding terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems need to be assessed. An emerging issue is whether recent increases in lake production downwind of the development can be linked to AOSR activities, and/or whether changing climatic conditions are influencing lake nutrient status. To decipher the importance of pollutants, particularly atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr, and the effects of climate change as potential sources of increasing lake production, lakes from both within and outside of the nitrogen deposition zone were analyzed for historical changes in diatom assemblages. Lake sediment cores were collected from a priori defined nitrogen (N - and phosphorus (P - limited lakes within and outside the N plume associated with the AOSR. Diatom assemblages were quantified at sub-decadal resolution since ca. 1890 to compare conditions prior to oil sands expansion and regional climate warming, to the more recent conditions in each group of lakes (Reference and Impacted, N- and P-limited lakes. Analyses of changes in assemblage similarity and species turnover indicates that changes in diatom assemblages were minimal both within and across all lake groups.  Small changes in percent composition of planktonic taxa, particularly small centric taxa (Discostella and Cyclotella species and pennate taxa, such as Asterionella formosa and Fragilaria crotonensis, occurred in some of the lakes. While these changes were consistent with potential climate effects on algal growth, water column stability and other factors; the timing and direction of biotic changes were variable among sites suggesting that any apparent response to climate was lake dependent. The absence of a consistent pattern of diatom changes associated with receipt of reactive nitrogen or intrinsic nutrient-limitation status of the lake

  5. High Resolution Time Series of Plankton Communities: From Early Warning of Harmful Blooms to Sentinels of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosik, H. M.; Campbell, L.; Olson, R. J.

    2016-02-01

    The combination of ocean observatory infrastructure and automated submersible flow cytometry provides an unprecedented capability for sustained high resolution time series of plankton, including taxa that are harmful or early indicators of ecosystem response to environmental change. On-going time series produced with the FlowCytobot series of instruments document important ways this challenge is already being met for phytoplankton and microzooplankton. FlowCytobot and Imaging FlowCytobot use a combination of laser-based scattering and fluorescence measurements and video imaging of individual particles to enumerate and characterize cells ranging from picocyanobacteria to large chaining-forming diatoms. Over a decade of observations at the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO), a cabled facility on the New England Shelf, have been compiled from repeated instrument deployments, typically 6 months or longer in duration. These multi-year high resolution (hourly to daily) time series are providing new insights into dynamics of community structure such as blooms, seasonality, and multi-year trends linked to regional climate-related variables. Similar observations in Texas coastal waters at the Texas Observatory for Algal Succession Time series (TOAST) have repeatedly provided early warning of harmful algal bloom events that threaten human and ecosystem health. As coastal ocean observing systems mature and expand, the continued integration of these type of detailed observations of the plankton will provide unparalleled information about variability and patterns of change at the base of the marine food webs, with direct implications for informed ecosystem-based management.

  6. Climate Variability Drives Plankton Community Composition Changes: the 2010-2011 El Nino to La Nina Transition Around Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Peter A.; Bonham, Pru; Thomson, Paul; Rochester, Wayne; Doblin, Martina A.; Waite, Anya M.; Richardson, Anthony; Rousseaux, Cecile S.

    2015-01-01

    The strong La Nina of 2010-2011 provided an opportunity to investigate the ecological impacts of El Nino-Southern Oscillation on coastal plankton communities using the nine national reference stations around Australia. Based on remote sensing and across the entire Australian region 2011 (La Nina) was only modestly different from 2010 (El Nino) with the average temperature declining 0.2 percent surface chlorophyll a up 3 percent and modelled primary production down 14 percent. Other changes included a poleward shift in Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Along the east coast, there was a reduction in salinity, increase in nutrients, Chlorophytes and Prasinophytes (taxa with chlorophyll b, neoxanthin and prasinoxanthin). The southwest region had a rise in the proportion of 19-hexoyloxyfucoxanthin; possibly coccolithophorids in eddies of the Leeuwin Current and along the sub-tropical front. Pennate diatoms increased, Ceratium spp. decreased and Scrippsiella spp. increased in 2011. Zooplankton biomass declined significantly in 2011. There was a reduction in the abundance of Calocalanus pavo and Temora turbinata and increases in Clausocalanus farrani, Oncaea scottodicarloi and Macrosetella gracilis in 2011. The changes in the plankton community during the strong La Nina of 2011 suggest that this climatic oscillation exacerbates the tropicalization of Australia.

  7. Influence of diatom exopolymers and biofilms on metamorphosis in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    Natural biofilms constitute a complex network of microorganisms (bacteria, diatoms, protozoa, fungi) and their extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which influence settlement inbenthic invertebrates. The influence of diatom (Bacillariophyceae...

  8. Spring plankton communities in the southern Patagonian shelf: Hydrography, mesozooplankton patterns and trophic relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, M. E.; Akselman, R.; Reta, R.; Negri, R. M.; Lutz, V. A.; Silva, R. I.; Segura, V.; Gil, M. N.; Santinelli, N. H.; Sastre, A. V.; Daponte, M. C.; Antacli, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    A strong interest in the southern Patagonian shelf has emerged in recent years, along with the increasing recognition of its high biological productivity. Knowledge of the pelagic food web structure that supports the richness of this system is still developing, but there are indications that mesozooplankton occupy a pivotal position, as consumers of smaller plankton and as vital prey for fish and squid. All plankton communities in the size 2 μm-20 mm, total and size-fractioned chlorophyll a (Chl a), nutrients and hydrology were surveyed simultaneously in October 2005 between 47°S-55°S. Picoplankton, nanoplankton and microplankton were taxonomically and functionally (autotrophs, heterotrophs) sorted within each size fraction. Plankton data and trophic relationships were examined through multivariate statistics. At that time fairly homogeneous thermal conditions prevailed over most of the shelf but weak saline horizontal gradients were evident. N/P ratios indicated no N or P limitation for phytoplankton. Surface concentrations of total Chl a were particularly high in the Grande Bay area at ca. 51°S near shore (28.6 mg m- 3) and at ca. 47°S on the shelf-break (7.7 mg m- 3). At both locations the contribution of the Chl a > 5 μm fraction was remarkably high. The dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum (10 · 106 cells L- 1) and the diatom Thalassiosira cf. oceanica (1.3 · 106 cells L- 1) were respectively blooming at these sites. Otherwise 200 μm fraction. Three mesozooplankton assemblages typical of the inner, middle, and outer shelf were identified. The inner and middle shelf assemblages overlapped slightly but were spatially separated from the outer shelf community. Adults and late copepodids of Drepanopus forcipatus were typical of the inner shelf assemblage. Middle-shelf species included the copepod Ctenocalanus vanus, the amphipod Themisto gaudichaudii and the chaetognath Sagitta tasmanica, while an assortment of taxa characterized the outer sector

  9. SyPRID sampler: A large-volume, high-resolution, autonomous, deep-ocean precision plankton sampling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Andrew; Kaiser, Carl; Young, Craig M.; Hiebert, Laurel S.; Cole, Eli; Wagner, Jamie K. S.; Van Dover, Cindy Lee

    2017-03-01

    The current standard for large-volume (thousands of cubic meters) zooplankton sampling in the deep sea is the MOCNESS, a system of multiple opening-closing nets, typically lowered to within 50 m of the seabed and towed obliquely to the surface to obtain low-spatial-resolution samples that integrate across 10 s of meters of water depth. The SyPRID (Sentry Precision Robotic Impeller Driven) sampler is an innovative, deep-rated (6000 m) plankton sampler that partners with the Sentry Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) to obtain paired, large-volume plankton samples at specified depths and survey lines to within 1.5 m of the seabed and with simultaneous collection of sensor data. SyPRID uses a perforated Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight (UHMW) plastic tube to support a fine mesh net within an outer carbon composite tube (tube-within-a-tube design), with an axial flow pump located aft of the capture filter. The pump facilitates flow through the system and reduces or possibly eliminates the bow wave at the mouth opening. The cod end, a hollow truncated cone, is also made of UHMW plastic and includes a collection volume designed to provide an area where zooplankton can collect, out of the high flow region. SyPRID attaches as a saddle-pack to the Sentry vehicle. Sentry itself is configured with a flight control system that enables autonomous survey paths to low altitudes. In its verification deployment at the Blake Ridge Seep (2160 m) on the US Atlantic Margin, SyPRID was operated for 6 h at an altitude of 5 m. It recovered plankton samples, including delicate living larvae, from the near-bottom stratum that is seldom sampled by a typical MOCNESS tow. The prototype SyPRID and its next generations will enable studies of plankton or other particulate distributions associated with localized physico-chemical strata in the water column or above patchy habitats on the seafloor.

  10. Future climate scenarios for a coastal productive planktonic food web resulting in microplankton phenology changes and decreased trophic transfer efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbet, Albert; Sazhin, Andrey F; Nejstgaard, Jens C; Berger, Stella A; Tait, Zachary S; Olmos, Lorena; Sousoni, Despoina; Isari, Stamatina; Martínez, Rodrigo A; Bouquet, Jean-Marie; Thompson, Eric M; Båmstedt, Ulf; Jakobsen, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effects of future climate change scenarios on plankton communities of a Norwegian fjord using a mesocosm approach. After the spring bloom, natural plankton were enclosed and treated in duplicates with inorganic nutrients elevated to pre-bloom conditions (N, P, Si; eutrophication), lowering of 0.4 pH units (acidification), and rising 3°C temperature (warming). All nutrient-amended treatments resulted in phytoplankton blooms dominated by chain-forming diatoms, and reached 13-16 μg chlorophyll (chl) a l-1. In the control mesocosms, chl a remained below 1 μg l-1. Acidification and warming had contrasting effects on the phenology and bloom-dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic microplankton. Bacillariophyceae, prymnesiophyceae, cryptophyta, and Protoperidinium spp. peaked earlier at higher temperature and lower pH. Chlorophyta showed lower peak abundances with acidification, but higher peak abundances with increased temperature. The peak magnitude of autotrophic dinophyceae and ciliates was, on the other hand, lowered with combined warming and acidification. Over time, the plankton communities shifted from autotrophic phytoplankton blooms to a more heterotrophic system in all mesocosms, especially in the control unaltered mesocosms. The development of mass balance and proportion of heterotrophic/autotrophic biomass predict a shift towards a more autotrophic community and less-efficient food web transfer when temperature, nutrients and acidification are combined in a future climate-change scenario. We suggest that this result may be related to a lower food quality for microzooplankton under acidification and warming scenarios and to an increase of catabolic processes compared to anabolic ones at higher temperatures.

  11. Using flow cytometry for counting natural planktonic bacteria and understanding the structure of planktonic bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Gasol

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometry is rapidly becoming a routine methodology in aquatic microbial ecology. The combination of simple to use bench-top flow cytometers and highly fluorescent nucleic acid stains allows fast and easy determination of microbe abundance in the plankton of lakes and oceans. The different dyes and protocols used to stain and count planktonic bacteria as well as the equipment in use are reviewed, with special attention to some of the problems encountered in daily routine practice such as fixation, staining and absolute counting. One of the main advantages of flow cytometry over epifluorescence microscopy is the ability to obtain cell-specific measurements in large numbers of cells with limited effort. We discuss how this characteristic has been used for differentiating photosynthetic from non-photosynthetic prokaryotes, for measuring bacterial cell size and nucleic acid content, and for estimating the relative activity and physiological state of each cell. We also describe how some of the flow cytometrically obtained data can be used to characterize the role of microbes on carbon cycling in the aquatic environment and we prospect the likely avenues of progress in the study of planktonic prokaryotes through the use of flow cytometry.

  12. Periodic Traveling Waves in Diatomic Granular Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Matthew; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2013-10-01

    We study bifurcations of periodic traveling waves in diatomic granular chains from the anti-continuum limit, when the mass ratio between the light and heavy beads is zero. We show that every limiting periodic wave is uniquely continued with respect to the mass ratio parameter, and the periodic waves with a wavelength larger than a certain critical value are spectrally stable. Numerical computations are developed to study how this solution family is continued to the limit of equal mass ratio between the beads, where periodic traveling waves of homogeneous granular chains exist.

  13. Diatom-based water quality monitoring in southern Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Much work still needs to be carried out on diatom tolerances, ecological preferences and ecophysiology. It is recommended that past research pertaining to African diatom taxonomy should be made readily accessible to all through electronic media for use as a reference point. Moreover, following the same approach as for ...

  14. A contribution to the epipsammic diatom flora of Estonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the modern epipsammic diatom flora in Lake Karujärv, Saaremaa Island, Estonia revealed seventy-one taxa representing thirty-one genera. The identity of all taxa is documented with light micrographs. Most abundant taxa of the epipsammic diatom community were Achnanthidium minutissimum

  15. Preparation and method of study of fossil diatoms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    to be exercised during the preparation of the samples A method for the preparation of strewn slides is then explained A detailed procedure for the study of diatom-strewn slides under the microscope, using the "England finder", is described, and a note on diatom...

  16. Records of Diatoms and Physicochemical Parameters of Seasonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of diatoms species composition, associated with four ponds in Zaria, Northern Nigeria was carried out between November 2005–January 2006 and June–August 2006. Twenty three taxa of diatoms were recorded in the study. Multivariate analysis showed that there were significant positive and negative ...

  17. Interference patterns and extinction ratio of the diatom Coscinodiscus granii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maibohm, Christian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Ellegaard, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical verification of the nature and position of multiple interference points of visible light transmitted through the valve of the centric diatom species Coscinodiscus granii. Furthermore, by coupling the transmitted light into an optical fiber and moving the dia...... the diatom valve between constructive and destructive interference points, an extinction ratio of 20 dB is shown...

  18. Spatial And Temporal Distribution Of Epiphytic Diatoms On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The important components in the flora of the epiphytic diatoms were belonging to the genera: Achnanthes, Achnanthidium, Fragilaria, Gyrosigma, Licmophora, Navicula, Pleurosigma, Synedra and Tabellaria. The rest recorded epiphytic diatoms were considered rare and of no significance in defining the epiphytic flora on ...

  19. The Central Carbon and Energy Metabolism of Marine Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Nunes-Nesi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are heterokont algae derived from a secondary symbiotic event in which a eukaryotic host cell acquired an eukaryotic red alga as plastid. The multiple endosymbiosis and horizontal gene transfer processes provide diatoms unusual opportunities for gene mixing to establish distinctive biosynthetic pathways and metabolic control structures. Diatoms are also known to have significant impact on global ecosystems as one of the most dominant phytoplankton species in the contemporary ocean. As such their metabolism and growth regulating factors have been of particular interest for many years. The publication of the genomic sequences of two independent species of diatoms and the advent of an enhanced experimental toolbox for molecular biological investigations have afforded far greater opportunities than were previously apparent for these species and re-invigorated studies regarding the central carbon metabolism of diatoms. In this review we discuss distinctive features of the central carbon metabolism of diatoms and its response to forthcoming environmental changes and recent advances facilitating the possibility of industrial use of diatoms for oil production. Although the operation and importance of several key pathways of diatom metabolism have already been demonstrated and determined, we will also highlight other potentially important pathways wherein this has yet to be achieved.

  20. Effect of aquatic plants upon planktonic and periphytic organisms: a microcosm-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Kurbatova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic plants have a major influence upon other aquatic organisms, by altering both water chemistry and spatial structure of the habitat in shallow water bodies. Some of them, such as Stratiotes aloides L., may suppress algal growth. But how aquatic plants would ultimately influence the heterotrophic community and the aquatic ecosystem as a whole is far from clear. Our microcosm-based study demonstrated that even a modest density of S. aloides caused a decline in phytoplankton chlorophyll concentration and periphytic algae abundance, including cyanobacteria, whereas diatoms appeared to be immune to the plant influence. Photosynthetic rate remained unaltered despite decreased chlorophyll concentration. While bacterial counts remained largely unchanged, more bacteria were observed forming microcolonies as well as associating with particulate organic matter. Numbers of periphytic heterotrophic organisms did not differ significantly between the planted and plant-free control microcosms. Zooplankton diversity increased and cladocerans assumed a more prominent position within the microcosms with macrophytes. We assume that the presence of plant’s leads to increased importance of bacteria and protists in the functioning of the food webs. Therefore, decreasing of algal abundance does not involve reducing the number of heterotrophic planktonic and periphytic organisms.

  1. Response of plankton communities in freshwater pond and stream mesocosms to the herbicide metazachlor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, S. [Umweltbundesamt, Schichauweg 58, 12307 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: silvia.mohr@uba.de; Feibicke, M.; Berghahn, R.; Schmiediche, R.; Schmidt, R. [Umweltbundesamt, Schichauweg 58, 12307 Berlin (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    Metazachlor is a frequently used herbicide with concentrations in surface waters up to 100 {mu}g L{sup -1}. A long-term mesocosm study was performed in order to investigate effects on stream and pond communities also regarding recovery. Single metazachlor doses of 5, 20, 80, 200, and 500 {mu}g L{sup -1} were given and the aquatic communities monitored for 140 days. In this paper, special attention is paid to the plankton response and the results of the entire study are summarised. Metazachlor strongly affected the stream and pond mesocosm communities at concentrations higher than 5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. Direct negative effects were most prominent for chlorophytes whereas diatoms and cryptophytes seemed insensitive. The effects on zooplankton were caused by changes in habitat structure due to the strong decline of macrophytes. The slow degradation of metazachlor combined with the absence of recovery in both chlorophytes and macrophytes is likely to cause long-lasting effects on aquatic ecosystems. - Metazachlor at levels >5 {mu}g L{sup -1} is likely to cause long-lasting effects in macrophyte dominated aquatic communities.

  2. The marine diatom and diazotroph under future climate: Role of Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefeng; Fonseca-batista, Debany; Brouwers, Julie; Roevros, Nathalie; Dehairs, Frank; Chou, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Diatoms constitute a major group of phytoplankton, accounting for one quarter of the world's net primary productivity. Diazotrophs provide the largest input of new nitrogen (N) to the ocean and control the marine N budgets. It has been shown that iron (Fe) can be the limiting factor for diatom growth, in particular, in the HNLC (High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll) regions. This trace element can also govern the development of marine diazotrophs due to the high Fe demand necessary for biological N2 fixation. Iron plays thus an essential role in governing the marine primary productivity and the efficiency of biological carbon pump. Ocean systems are undergoing continuous modifications at varying rates and magnitudes as a result of changing climate. The objectives of our research is to evaluate 1) how climate change (dust deposition, ocean warming and acidification) can affect Fe biogeochemistry and the growth of diatoms and diazotrophs, and 2) the role of Fe in the control of biological N2 fixation under future climate scenarios. Laboratory culture experiments using Chaetoceros socialis were examined at two temperatures (13°C and 18°C) and two CO2 conditions (400 μatm and 800 μatm). The present study demonstrates clearly the influence of ocean acidification on the release of Fe upon dust deposition. It also shows that dust particles could provide a readily utilizable source of Fe and other macronutrients (dissolved phosphate and silicate) for phytoplankton growth. Elevated pCO2 concentrations may have adverse impact on the diatom growth; seawater warming may cause poleward shifts in the biogeographic distribution of diatoms. The impact of Fe on the natural N2 fixation was tested via field incubation experiments using natureal phytoplankton assemblage in the Bay of Biscay and along the Iberian Margin. N2 fixation rates in oligotrophic waters were greatly stimulated through the addition of dissolved Fe compared to the control, demonstrating the limitation of N2 fixation

  3. WaveNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User-Interface ( GUI ) data management tool developed for Corps coastal...generates tabular and graphical information for project planning and design documents. The WaveNet is a web-based GUI designed to provide users with a...data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran, Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for USACE applications

  4. Applications of diatoms as potential microalgae in nanobiotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Ali Akbar; Akbari, Fariba; Ghorakhlu, Mohamad Moradi; de la Guardia, Miguel; Yari Khosroushahi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae, which present in nearly every water habitat make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications such as oil explora-tion, forensic examination, environmental indication, biosilica pattern generation, toxicity testing and eutrophication of aqueous ecosystems. Essential information on diatoms were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of diatoms on biosynthesis and bioremediation. In this review, we present the recent progress in this century on the application of diatoms in waste degradation, synthesis of biomaterial, biomineraliza-tion, toxicity and toxic effects of mineral elements evaluations. Diatoms can be considered as metal toxicity bioindicators and they can be applied for biomineralization, synthesis of biomaterials, and degradation of wastes.

  5. Applications of Diatoms as Potential Microalgae in Nanobiotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Yari Khosroushahi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae, which present in nearly every water habitat make them ideal tools for a wide range of applications such as oil explora­tion, forensic examination, environmental indication, biosilica pattern generation, toxicity testing and eutrophication of aqueous ecosystems. Methods: Essential information on diatoms were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of diatoms on biosynthesis and bioremediation. Results: In this review, we present the recent progress in this century on the application of diatoms in waste degradation, synthesis of biomaterial, biomineraliza­tion, toxicity and toxic effects of mineral elements evaluations. Conclusion: Diatoms can be considered as metal toxicity bioindicators and they can be applied for biomineralization, synthesis of biomaterials, and degradation of wastes.

  6. Contribution to the Themed Section: Scaling from individual plankton to marine ecosystems HORIZONS Small bugs with a big impact: linking plankton ecology with ecosystem processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    As an introduction to the following Themed Section on the significance of planktonic organisms to the functioning of marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles we discuss the ramifications size imparts on the biology of plankton. We provide examples of how the characteristics...... of these microscopic organisms shape plankton population dynamics, distributions, and ecosystem functions. Key features of the marine environment place constraints on the ecology and evolution of plankton. Understanding these constraints is critical in developing a mechanistic understanding and predictive capacity...... of how planktonic ecosystems function, render their capacities in terms of biogeochemical cycling and trophic transfer, and how planktonic communities might respond to changing climate conditions....

  7. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes how Coloured Petri Nets (CP-nets) have been developed — from being a promising theoretical model to being a full-fledged language for the design, specification, simulation, validation and implementation of large software systems (and other systems in which human beings and...... use of CP-nets — because it means that the function representation and the translations (which are a bit mathematically complex) no longer are parts of the basic definition of CP-nets. Instead they are parts of the invariant method (which anyway demands considerable mathematical skills...

  8. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  9. Programming NET Web Services

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Web services are poised to become a key technology for a wide range of Internet-enabled applications, spanning everything from straight B2B systems to mobile devices and proprietary in-house software. While there are several tools and platforms that can be used for building web services, developers are finding a powerful tool in Microsoft's .NET Framework and Visual Studio .NET. Designed from scratch to support the development of web services, the .NET Framework simplifies the process--programmers find that tasks that took an hour using the SOAP Toolkit take just minutes. Programming .NET

  10. Annotating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Bo; Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    -net. An example of such auxiliary information is a counter which is associated with a token to be able to do performance analysis. Modifying colour sets and arc inscriptions in a CP-net to support a specific use may lead to creation of several slightly different CP-nets – only to support the different uses...... a method which makes it possible to associate auxiliary information, called annotations, with tokens without modifying the colour sets of the CP-net. Annotations are pieces of information that are not essential for determining the behaviour of the system being modelled, but are rather added to support...

  11. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  12. Seasonal plankton dynamics along a cross-shelf gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenseth, Nils Chr; Llope, Marcos; Anadón, Ricardo; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Chan, Kung-Sik; Hjermann, Dag Ø; Bagøien, Espen; Ottersen, Geir

    2006-01-01

    Much interest has recently been devoted to reconstructing the dynamic structure of ecological systems on the basis of time-series data. Using 10 years of monthly data on phyto- and zooplankton abundance from the Bay of Biscay (coastal to shelf-break sites), we demonstrate that the interaction between these two plankton components is approximately linear, whereas the effects of environmental factors (nutrients, temperature, upwelling and photoperiod) on these two plankton population growth rates are nonlinear. With the inclusion of the environmental factors, the main observed seasonal and inter-annual dynamic patterns within the studied plankton assemblage also indicate the prevalence of bottom-up regulatory control. PMID:17015313

  13. Detection of Bioactive Compounds in the Mucus Nets of Dendropoma maxima, Sowerby 1825 (Prosobranch Gastropod Vermetidae, Mollusca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Klöppel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The sessile suspension-feeding wormsnail Dendropoma maxima, Sowerby 1825 (Vermetidae secretes a mucus net to capture planktonic prey. The nets are spread out over the corals and often have remarkable deleterious effects on them like changes in growth form and pigmentation shifts not uncommonly resulting in tissue necrosis. Until now, there is no explanation for this phenomenon although the indication as well as theories about its genesis is mentioned in several publications. Vermetids are well studied concerning the intraspecific competition with neighboring individuals but not in their interaction with other taxa like corals or fish. We did extensive in situ video recording and observed that fish avoided the plankton-load nets although several specialized taxa are known to be molluscivores, mucivores, and/or feed on plankton. As many molluscs use chemical weapons to combat feeding pressure and to defend themselves against predators, we screened empty and plankton-load mucus nets for potential bioactive metabolites. Bioactivity testing was performed with a recently developed system based on a chromatographic separation (high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC and a bioassay with luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. Thus, we found at least two active compounds exclusively accumulated by the wormsnails themselves. This is the first record of bioactive properties in the whole family of Vermetidae.

  14. Variation partitioning of diatom species data matrices: Understanding the influence of multiple factors on benthic diatom communities in tropical streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bere, Taurai, E-mail: tbere2015@gmail.com; Mangadze, Tinotenda; Mwedzi, Tongai

    2016-10-01

    Elucidating the confounding influence of multiple environmental factors on benthic diatom communities is important in developing water quality predictive models for better guidance of stream management efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relative impact of metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations in, addition to nutrient enrichment and organic pollution, on diatom taxonomic composition with the view to improve stream diatom-based water quality inference models. Samples were collected twice at 20 sampling stations in the tropical Manyame Catchment, Zimbabwe. Diatom, macroinvertebrate communities and environmental factors were sampled and analysed. The variations in diatom community composition explained by different categories of environmental factors were analysed using canonical correspondence analysis using variance partitioning (partial CCA). The following variations were explained by the different predictor matrices: nutrient levels and organic pollution - 10.4%, metal pollution - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. Thus, factors other than nutrient levels and organic pollution explain additional significant variation in these diatom communities. Development of diatom-based stream water quality inference models that incorporate metal pollution and hydromorphological alterations, where these are key issues, is thus deemed necessary. - Highlights: • Confounding influences of multiple environmental factors on diatom communities are elucidated. • Variation explained: nutrients + organic pollution - 10.4%, metals - 8.3% and hydromorphological factors - 7.9%. • Calibration of existing or development of new indices may be necessary.

  15. Holocene environments and climate in the Mongolian Altai reconstructed from the Hoton-Nur pollen and diatom records: a step towards better understanding climate dynamics in Central Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudaya, Natalia; Tarasov, Pavel; Dorofeyuk, Nadezhda; Solovieva, Nadia; Kalugin, Ivan; Andreev, Andrei; Daryin, Andrei; Diekmann, Bernhard; Riedel, Frank; Tserendash, Narantsetseg; Wagner, Mayke

    2009-03-01

    This study presents the results of the palynological and diatom analyses of the sediment core recovered in Hoton-Nur Lake (48°37'18″N, 88°20'45″E, 2083 m) in 2004. Quantitative reconstruction of the Holocene vegetation and climate dynamics in the semiarid Mongolian Altai suggests that boreal woodland replaced the primarily open landscape of northwestern Mongolia at about 10 kyr BP (1 kyr = 1000 cal yr) in response to a noticeable increase in precipitation from 200-250 mm/yr to 450-550 mm/yr. A decline of the forest vegetation and a return to a predominance of open vegetation types occurred after 5 kyr BP when precipitation sums decreased to 250-300 mm/yr. Prior to 11.5 kyr BP diatom concentrations are relatively low and the lake is dominated by planktonic Cyclotella and small Fragilariaceae, suggesting the existence of a relatively deep and oligotrophic/mesotrophic lake. The great abundance of Staurosirella pinnata from the beginning of the record until 10.7 kyr BP might imply intensified erosion processes in the catchment and this is fully consistent with the presence of scarce and dry vegetation and the generally arid climate during this period. From about 10.7 kyr BP, more planktonic diatom taxa appeared and increased in abundance, indicating that the lake became more productive as diatom concentration increased. This change correlates well with the development of boreal woodland in the catchment. Decrease in precipitation and changes in the vegetation towards steppe are reflected by the rapid increase in Aulacoseira distans from about 5 kyr BP. The Holocene pollen and diatom records do not indicate soil and vegetation cover disturbances by the anthropogenic activities, implying that the main transformations of the regional vegetation occurred as a result of the natural climate change. Our reconstruction is in agreement with the paleomonsoon records from China, demonstrating an abrupt strengthening of the summer monsoon at 12 kyr BP and an associated

  16. Importance of sampling frequency when collecting diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Naicheng; Faber, Claas; Sun, Xiuming; Qu, Yueming; Wang, Chao; Ivetic, Snjezana; Riis, Tenna; Ulrich, Uta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-11-01

    There has been increasing interest in diatom-based bio-assessment but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of how to capture diatoms’ temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency (ASF). To cover this research gap, we collected and analyzed daily riverine diatom samples over a 1-year period (25 April 2013-30 April 2014) at the outlet of a German lowland river. The samples were classified into five clusters (1-5) by a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method based on similarity between species compositions over time. ASFs were determined to be 25 days at Cluster 2 (June-July 2013) and 13 days at Cluster 5 (February-April 2014), whereas no specific ASFs were found at Cluster 1 (April-May 2013), 3 (August-November 2013) (>30 days) and Cluster 4 (December 2013 - January 2014) (<1 day). ASFs showed dramatic seasonality and were negatively related to hydrological wetness conditions, suggesting that sampling interval should be reduced with increasing catchment wetness. A key implication of our findings for freshwater management is that long-term bio-monitoring protocols should be developed with the knowledge of tracking algal temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency.

  17. Diatom Milking: A Review and New Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayak, Vandana; Manoylov, Kalina M.; Gateau, Hélène; Blanckaert, Vincent; Hérault, Josiane; Pencréac’h, Gaëlle; Marchand, Justine; Gordon, Richard; Schoefs, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    The rise of human populations and the growth of cities contribute to the depletion of natural resources, increase their cost, and create potential climatic changes. To overcome difficulties in supplying populations and reducing the resource cost, a search for alternative pharmaceutical, nanotechnology, and energy sources has begun. Among the alternative sources, microalgae are the most promising because they use carbon dioxide (CO2) to produce biomass and/or valuable compounds. Once produced, the biomass is ordinarily harvested and processed (downstream program). Drying, grinding, and extraction steps are destructive to the microalgal biomass that then needs to be renewed. The extraction and purification processes generate organic wastes and require substantial energy inputs. Altogether, it is urgent to develop alternative downstream processes. Among the possibilities, milking invokes the concept that the extraction should not kill the algal cells. Therefore, it does not require growing the algae anew. In this review, we discuss research on milking of diatoms. The main themes are (a) development of alternative methods to extract and harvest high added value compounds; (b) design of photobioreactors; (c) biodiversity and (d) stress physiology, illustrated with original results dealing with oleaginous diatoms. PMID:25939034

  18. Importance of sampling frequency when collecting diatoms

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Naicheng

    2016-11-14

    There has been increasing interest in diatom-based bio-assessment but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of how to capture diatoms’ temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency (ASF). To cover this research gap, we collected and analyzed daily riverine diatom samples over a 1-year period (25 April 2013–30 April 2014) at the outlet of a German lowland river. The samples were classified into five clusters (1–5) by a Kohonen Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method based on similarity between species compositions over time. ASFs were determined to be 25 days at Cluster 2 (June-July 2013) and 13 days at Cluster 5 (February-April 2014), whereas no specific ASFs were found at Cluster 1 (April-May 2013), 3 (August-November 2013) (>30 days) and Cluster 4 (December 2013 - January 2014) (<1 day). ASFs showed dramatic seasonality and were negatively related to hydrological wetness conditions, suggesting that sampling interval should be reduced with increasing catchment wetness. A key implication of our findings for freshwater management is that long-term bio-monitoring protocols should be developed with the knowledge of tracking algal temporal dynamics with an appropriate sampling frequency.

  19. Diatom Milking: A Review and New Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Vinayak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of human populations and the growth of cities contribute to the depletion of natural resources, increase their cost, and create potential climatic changes. To overcome difficulties in supplying populations and reducing the resource cost, a search for alternative pharmaceutical, nanotechnology, and energy sources has begun. Among the alternative sources, microalgae are the most promising because they use carbon dioxide (CO2 to produce biomass and/or valuable compounds. Once produced, the biomass is ordinarily harvested and processed (downstream program. Drying, grinding, and extraction steps are destructive to the microalgal biomass that then needs to be renewed. The extraction and purification processes generate organic wastes and require substantial energy inputs. Altogether, it is urgent to develop alternative downstream processes. Among the possibilities, milking invokes the concept that the extraction should not kill the algal cells. Therefore, it does not require growing the algae anew. In this review, we discuss research on milking of diatoms. The main themes are (a development of alternative methods to extract and harvest high added value compounds; (b design of photobioreactors; (c biodiversity and (d stress physiology, illustrated with original results dealing with oleaginous diatoms.

  20. Toxicity testing with the benthic diatom Navicula libonensis (Schoeman 1970): procedure optimisation and assessment of the species sensitivity to reference chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Tânia; Pereira, Joana Luísa; Abrantes, Nelson; Almeida, Salomé F P; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    Periphytic communities are good indicators of river quality due to their general sensitivity to several pollutants. The primary objective of this study was to develop and optimize an ecotoxicological testing methodology using the freshwater benthic diatom Navicula libonensis. This species was selected due to its ubiquity and suitability for use under laboratory conditions. In the most suitable test medium (Chu10) the diatom demonstrated comparable sensitivity to potassium dichromate and 3,5-dichlorophenol using growth rate as the reference parameter, with median effect concentrations (ErC50) in the same order of magnitude (0.119 and 0.799 mg L(-1)) respectively. Yield-based estimates did not confirm this pattern and potassium dichromate was one order of magnitude more toxic than 3,5-dichlorophenol. The sensitivity of N. libonensis to the reference chemicals was higher than that published in the literature for several standard planktonic microalgae. This advantage, as well as the ability to grow the species in the laboratory, supports further efforts towards the standardisation of a toxicity testing protocol. In addition, the functional role of benthic diatoms in lotic ecosystems justifies their inclusion in risk assessment test batteries to better cover an environmental compartment that has so far been neglected.

  1. Reconstruction of trophic pathways between plankton and the North Iberian sardine (Sardina pilchardus using stable isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Bode

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Feeding on phyto- and zooplankton by juvenile (< 1 year old and adult sardines (Sardina pilchardus was inferred from analyses of natural abundance of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes in samples from the northwestern Iberian Peninsula (Spain collected at the beginning of the upwelling season and peak spawning period of sardine. Plankton samples were fractionated through nets of 20, 200, 500, 1000 and 2000 ?m mesh-size and the muscle protein of individual sardines was isolated before isotopic determinations. Up to six planktonic components and two sardine feeding types were identified from the modes in the frequency distributions of isotope abundance values. Also, the most probable pathways for carbon and nitrogen flows between compartments were analysed. The resulting food web revealed a relatively large degree of omnivory, both in plankton and sardine components, which confirms that complex trophic interactions could also occur in pelagic upwelling ecosystems. Young sardines had isotope abundance values clustered around a single mode in the frequency distribution, while adult sardines displayed two main modes. These modes are interpreted as representative of two extreme feeding types: one related to the individual capture of zooplankton prey and the other to unselective filter-feeding. Although both types of feeding could include micro- (20-200 ?m and mesozooplankton (200-2000 ?m prey, phytoplankton appears to be ingested mainly by filter-feeding. However, even adult sardines must be mainly zoophagous to achieve the observed isotopic abundance values, taking into account current assumptions on stable isotope enrichment through trophic levels. From the differences in the resulting pathways using either carbon or nitrogen isotopes, we interpreted that sardines acquire most of the protein nitrogen from zooplankton while a substantial fraction of their carbon would derive from phytoplankton. These interpretations agree with the information

  2. Assessment of species diversity and distribution of an ancient diatom lineage using a DNA metabarcoding approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Nanjappa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuous efforts to estimate actual diversity and to trace the species distribution and ranges in the natural environments have gone in equal pace with advancements of the technologies in the study of microbial species diversity from microscopic observations to DNA-based barcoding. DNA metabarcoding based on Next Generation Sequencing (NGS constitutes the latest advancement in these efforts. Here we use NGS data from different sites to investigate the geographic range of six species of the diatom family Leptocylindraceae and to identify possible new taxa within the family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the V4 and V9 regions of the nuclear-encoded SSU rDNA gene region in the NGS database of the European ERA-Biodiversa project BioMarKs, collected in plankton and sediments at six coastal sites in European coastal waters, as well as environmental sequences from the NCBI database. All species known in the family Leptocylindraceae were detected in both datasets, but the much larger Illumina V9 dataset showed a higher species coverage at the various sites than the 454 V4 dataset. Sequences identical or similar to the references of Leptocylindrus aporus, L. convexus, L. danicus/hargravesii and Tenuicylindrus belgicus were found in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic Ocean and Black Sea as well as at locations outside Europe. Instead, sequences identical or close to that of L. minimus were found in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Black Sea but not in the Mediterranean Sea, while sequences belonging to a yet undescribed taxon were encountered only in Oslo Fjord and Baffin Bay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of Leptocylindraceae species in NGS datasets has expanded our knowledge of the species biogeographic distribution and of the overall diversity of this diatom family. Individual species appear to be widespread, but not all of them are found everywhere. Despite the sequencing depth allowed by NGS and the wide

  3. Net zero water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lindeque, M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to develop a building that uses a net zero amount of water? In recent years it has become evident that it is possible to have buildings that use a net zero amount of electricity. This is possible when the building is taken off...

  4. SolNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Vajen, Klaus; Bales, Chris

    2014-01-01

    SolNet, founded in 2006, is the first coordinated International PhD education program on Solar Thermal Engineering. The SolNet network is coordinated by the Institute of Thermal Engineering at Kassel University, Germany. The network offers PhD courses on solar heating and cooling, conference...

  5. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  6. Large-scale ocean connectivity and planktonic body size

    KAUST Repository

    Villarino, Ernesto

    2018-01-04

    Global patterns of planktonic diversity are mainly determined by the dispersal of propagules with ocean currents. However, the role that abundance and body size play in determining spatial patterns of diversity remains unclear. Here we analyse spatial community structure - β-diversity - for several planktonic and nektonic organisms from prokaryotes to small mesopelagic fishes collected during the Malaspina 2010 Expedition. β-diversity was compared to surface ocean transit times derived from a global circulation model, revealing a significant negative relationship that is stronger than environmental differences. Estimated dispersal scales for different groups show a negative correlation with body size, where less abundant large-bodied communities have significantly shorter dispersal scales and larger species spatial turnover rates than more abundant small-bodied plankton. Our results confirm that the dispersal scale of planktonic and micro-nektonic organisms is determined by local abundance, which scales with body size, ultimately setting global spatial patterns of diversity.

  7. Hydrographic and Plankton Data, 1960-1965 (NODC Accession 7101194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During 1952/63 the Institute of Oceanography undertook an extensive seasonal survey of hydrography and plankton in the south-west Indian Ocean as part of the...

  8. Recent planktonic foraminifera from the sediment off Karwar and Mangalore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A; Guptha, M.V.S

    Eleven samples collected from the shelf-slope regions off Karwar and mangalore transects of the Arabian Sea, yielded fifteen planktonic foraminiferal species, which are identified and described. There is a progressive increase in the percentage...

  9. GLOBEC NEP MOCNESS Plankton (MOC1) Data, 2000-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) California Current Program MOCNESS Plankton (MOC1) Data The MOCNESS is based on the Tucker Trawl...

  10. Temperature dependence of planktonic metabolism in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regaudie-De-Gioux, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    Standard metabolic theory predicts that both respiration and photosynthesis should increase with increasing temperature, albeit at different rates. However, test of this prediction for ocean planktonic communities is limited, despite the broad consequences of this prediction in the present context of global ocean warming. We compiled a large data set on volumetric planktonic metabolism in the open ocean and tested the relationship between specific metabolic rates and water temperature. The relationships derived are consistent with predictions derived from metabolic theory of ecology, yielding activation energy for planktonic metabolism consistent with predictions from the metabolic theory. These relationships can be used to predict the effect of warming on ocean metabolism and, thus, the role of planktonic communities in the flow of carbon in the global ocean.

  11. Living planktonic foraminifera of the Wadge bank, Northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Panikkar, B.M.; Kutty, M.K.

    Twenty three species of living planktonic Foraminifera belonging to 11 genera have been studied from the Wadge Bank area off southern tip of the Indian peninsula. The fauna is characterized by species such as Globigerinoides conglobatus, G...

  12. Delay-driven irregular spatiotemporal patterns in a plankton system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Canrong; Zhang, Lai

    2013-07-01

    An inhomogeneous distribution of species density over physical space is a widely observed scenario in plankton systems. Understanding the mechanisms resulting in these spatial patterns is a central topic in plankton ecology. In this paper we explore the impact of time delay on spatiotemporal patterns in a prey-predator plankton system. We find that time delay can trigger the emergence of irregular spatial patterns via a Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, a phase transition from a regular spiral pattern to an irregular one was observed and the latter gradually replaced the former and persisted indefinitely. The characteristic length of the emergent spatial pattern is consistent with the scale of plankton patterns observed in field studies.

  13. THE PARADOX OF THE PLANKTON: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE PROMOTES BLOOMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABSTRACT: The 'paradox of the plankton' refers to commensalism as well as symbiosis, predation, and impacts of non equilibrium conditions between two planktoniccompetitors. In regards to commensalism, phytoplankton can release organic carbon that enhances growth of its ba...

  14. GLOBEC NEP Vertical Plankton Tow (VPT) Data, 1997-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GLOBEC (GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics) NEP (Northeast Pacific) California Current Program Vertical Plankton Tow (VPT) Data For more information, see...

  15. Diatoms as indicators of water quality in the Jukskei-Crocodile river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has a long legacy of diatom research. The eminent diatomist Dr BJ Cholnoky spent much of his working life examining and enumerating diatom communities found in Southern Africa. Most if not all of Cholnoky's collected diatom material in the form of mounted material on glass slides accompanied by diatom ...

  16. PLANKTON OF UST-KURA REGION OF THE CASPIAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Dzhalilov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Plankton of Ust-Kura region of the Caspian Sea is studied in 2009–2011. Forty-eight species of planktonic ciliates, 17 species of Cladocera, 3 species of rotifers and 2 species of copepods are registered during the studies. Species diversity of all groups strongly influences the Kura River defining seawater desalination this site. The vast majority of species of plankton community refers to freshwater representatives or eurybiontic species able to exist in a wide range of salinity.Methods.Collected samples for evaluation were examined diatomaceous plankton partially invivo, and then fixed with 4% formalin with addition of dye "Benqalrose". Further processing of the samples was carried out under laboratory conditions.Results. During the study 43 species of ciliates, 3 species of rotifers, 17 species of Cladocera and 2 species of copepods and their larval stages was noted (Table 1 . As seen from Table 1, the distribution of planktonic ciliates to collection points was fairly even and ranged from a minimum number of species reported by Article 1 (22 species to a maximum at station 5 (31 species. It should also be noted that the vast majority mentioned in plankton ciliates are typical planktontam is distributed fairly evenly throughout the studied waters. Random plankton species, such as representatives of Condylostoma and Amphisiella were marked in shallow water stations 4 and 5. Apparently their presence in the samples is due to the temporary transfer of benthic plankton under the influence of the wave factor.

  17. Plankton introduction via ship ballast water : A review

    OpenAIRE

    大塚, 攻; 堀口, 健雄; ,; ,; 岩崎, 敬二

    2004-01-01

    Introduction of marine plankton via ship ballast water and cultured fish and shellfish has hitherto caused serious social problems, and has greatly influenced native ecosystems. The present paper briefly reviews previous data concerning newly introduced plankton. At least 25 marine benthic species have been introduced to Japan since the early 1900's, whereas alien plankters have never been confirmed in Japan. This may be partly due to the relatively a small volume of ballast water discharged ...

  18. Contribution to the Themed Section: Scaling from individual plankton to marine ecosystems HORIZONS Small bugs with a big impact: linking plankton ecology with ecosystem processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    of these microscopic organisms shape plankton population dynamics, distributions, and ecosystem functions. Key features of the marine environment place constraints on the ecology and evolution of plankton. Understanding these constraints is critical in developing a mechanistic understanding and predictive capacity...

  19. Diatom auxospore scales and early stages in diatom frustule morphogenesis: their potential for use in nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Incomplete, forming diatom cell wall components have potential uses in nanotechnology that differ from those of mature frustules. Diminutive, discoid auxospore scales, produced after sexual reproduction, could also be evaluated for their value. The structure of developing diatom valves and girdle bands is generally simple, since features such as cribra and other ornamentation have yet to be added. They are also more lightly silicified. Bullulae and honeycomb structures give strength to the final framework of some species using a minimal amount of silica. The morphogenesis of girdle bands is shown to be unidirectional in a marine centric species, forming open-ended cylinders, another potential shape for the arsenal of structures useful to nanotechnologists.

  20. Molecular Detection of a Potentially Toxic Diatom Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Chandra Dhar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A few diatom species produce toxins that affect human and animal health. Among these, members of the Pseudo-nitzschia genus were the first diatoms unambiguously identified as producer of domoic acid, a neurotoxin affecting molluscan shell-fish, birds, marine mammals, and humans. Evidence exists indicating the involvement of another diatom genus, Amphora, as a potential producer of domoic acid. We present a strategy for the detection of the diatom species Amphora coffeaeformis based on the development of species-specific oligonucleotide probes and their application in microarray hybridization experiments. This approach is based on the use of two marker genes highly conserved in all diatoms, but endowed with sufficient genetic divergence to discriminate diatoms at the species level. A region of approximately 450 bp of these previously unexplored marker genes, coding for elongation factor 1-a (eEF1-a and silicic acid transporter (SIT, was used to design oligonucleotide probes that were tested for specificity in combination with the corresponding fluorescently labeled DNA targets. The results presented in this work suggest a possible use of this DNA chip technology for the selective detection of A. coffeaeformis in environmental settings where the presence of this potential toxin producer may represent a threat to human and animal health. In addition, the same basic approach can be adapted to a wider range of diatoms for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms used as biomarkers of different water quality levels.

  1. Seasonal dynamics of autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton metabolism and PCO2 in a subarctic Greenland fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejr, Mikael K.; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Dalsgaard, Tage

    2014-01-01

    the role of terrestrial carbon, were investigated by relating surface-water partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2), NCP, GPP, and CR to physicochemical conditions, chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration, phytoplankton production, inventories of particulate (POC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and vertical flux...... of POC. The planktonic community was net heterotrophic in the photic zone in September (NCP = −21 ± 45 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) and February (NCP = −17 mmol O2 m−2 d−1) but net autotrophic during a developing spring bloom in May (NCP = 129 ± 102 mmol O2 m−2 d−1). In September, higher temperatures, shorter day...

  2. Benthos and plankton community data for selected rivers and harbors along the western Lake Michigan shoreline, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder Eikenberry, Barbara C.; Burns, Daniel J.; Olds, Hayley T.; Bell, Amanda H.; Mapel, Kassidy T.

    2016-06-15

    Benthos (benthic invertebrates) and plankton (zooplankton and phytoplankton) communities were sampled in 2014 at 10 Wisconsin rivers and harbors, including 4 sites in Great Lakes Areas of Concern and 6 less degraded comparison sites with similar physical and chemical characteristics, including climate, latitude, geology, and land use. Previous U.S. Geological Survey sampling was completed in 2012, but because of ongoing sediment remediation at three of the Areas of Concern (AOCs) and unusually hot and dry conditions in many areas during 2012, additional sampling was added in 2014. Comparable sampling methods were used in 2012 and 2014. Benthos were collected by using Hester-Dendy artificial substrate samplers and composite Ponar grab samples of bottom sediment; zooplankton were collected by using tows from depth to the surface with a 63-micrometer mesh plankton net; phytoplankton were collected by using whole water samples composited from set depth intervals. This report describes the study areas and field sampling methods for 2014, and it presents data on taxonomic identification and abundance of benthos and plankton that can serve as a basis for evaluation of related Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs) at the AOCs. Physical and chemical data were sampled concurrently (specific conductance, temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a, total and volatile suspended solids in water samples; particle size and volatile-on-ignition of sediment in benthic grab samples). The results of field quality assurance-quality control are also presented.

  3. Spatial paradigms of lotic diatom distribution: A landscape ecology perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passy, S.I.

    2001-01-01

    Spatial distributional patterns of benthic diatoms and their relation to current velocity were investigated in an unshaded cobble-bottom reach of White Creek (Washington County, NY). On 27 August 1999, diatoms were sampled and current velocity and depth were measured on a regular square sampling grid with a grain size of 0.01 m2, interval of 0.5 m, and extent of 16 m2. The relative abundance of the 18 common diatom species enumerated in the 81 samples was subjected to detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). The first axis (DCA1) explained 51% of the variance in diatom data and separated the samples according to current regimes. The spatial autocorrelation of DCA1 sample scores in deposition and erosion regions of White Creek was determined by Moran's I statistic to indicate patch size. In White Creek the patch length of all diatom communities was more than 3.1 m, whereas the patch width was 1 m in the deposition region and 0.5 m in the erosion region. There were 5 dominant diatom taxa, Achnanthes minutissima Ku??tz. et vars, Fragilaria capucina Dezmazie??res et vars, F. crotonensis Kitt., Diatoma vulgaris Bory, and Synedra ulna (Nitz.) Ehr. et vars. The patch length of the dominant species varied from 1 to more than 4.1 m, whereas the patch width, if defined, was 0.5 m. Achnanthes minutissima and F. capucina, the two diatom species with the highest relative abundance, displayed spatially structured patches of low abundance and comparatively random patches of high abundance, suggesting broad scale abiotic control of species performance in low abundance regions and finer scale biotic control of high abundance areas. Another objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that higher current velocities, which generally impede immigration, would increase randomness and complexity (i.e. homogeneity of diatom distributional patterns). The spatial complexity in low versus high velocity transects was determined by calculating the respective fractal dimension (D) of DCA

  4. Large Plankton Enhance Heterotrophy Under Experimental Warming in a Temperate Coastal Ecosystem

    KAUST Repository

    Huete-Stauffer, Tamara Megan

    2017-12-15

    Microbes are key players in oceanic carbon fluxes. Temperate ecosystems are seasonally variable and thus suitable for testing the effect of warming on microbial carbon fluxes at contrasting oceanographic conditions. In four experiments conducted in February, April, August and October 2013 in coastal NE Atlantic waters, we monitored microbial plankton stocks and daily rates of primary production, bacterial heterotrophic production and respiration at in situ temperature and at 2 and 4°C over ambient values during 4-day incubations. Ambient total primary production (TPP) exceeded total community respiration (< 200 µm, TR) in winter and fall but not in spring and summer. The bacterial contribution to ecosystem carbon fluxes was low, with bacterial production representing on average 6.9 ± 3.2% of TPP and bacterial respiration (between 0.8 and 0.2 µm) contributing on average 35 ± 7% to TR. Warming did not result in a uniform increase in the variables considered, and most significant effects were found only for the 4°C increase. In the summer and fall experiments, under warm and nutrient-deficient conditions, the net TPP/TR ratio decreased by 39 and 34% in the 4°C treatment, mainly due to the increase in respiration of large organisms rather than bacteria. Our results indicate that the interaction of temperature and substrate availability in determining microbial carbon fluxes has a strong seasonal component in temperate planktonic ecosystems, with temperature having a more pronounced effect and generating a shift toward net heterotrophy under more oligotrophic conditions as found in summer and early fall.

  5. Pro NET Best Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Pro .NET Best Practices is a practical reference to the best practices that you can apply to your .NET projects today. You will learn standards, techniques, and conventions that are sharply focused, realistic and helpful for achieving results, steering clear of unproven, idealistic, and impractical recommendations. Pro .NET Best Practices covers a broad range of practices and principles that development experts agree are the right ways to develop software, which includes continuous integration, automated testing, automated deployment, and code analysis. Whether the solution is from a free and

  6. Getting to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

  7. Instant Lucene.NET

    CERN Document Server

    Heydt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A step-by-step guide that helps you to index, search, and retrieve unstructured data with the help of Lucene.NET.Instant Lucene.NET How-to is essential for developers new to Lucene and Lucene.NET who are looking to get an immediate foundational understanding of how to use the library in their application. It's assumed you have programming experience in C# already, but not that you have experience with search techniques such as information retrieval theory (although there will be a l

  8. CO2-induced seawater acidification affects physiological performance of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Riebesell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2/pH perturbation experiments were carried out under two different pCO2 levels (39.3 and 101.3 Pa to evaluate effects of CO2-induced ocean acidification on the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. After acclimation (>20 generations to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions (with corresponding pH values of 8.15 and 7.80, respectively, growth and photosynthetic carbon fixation rates of high CO2 grown cells were enhanced by 5% and 12%, respectively, and dark respiration stimulated by 34% compared to cells grown at ambient CO2. The half saturation constant (Km for carbon fixation (dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC increased by 20% under the low pH and high CO2 condition, reflecting a decreased affinity for HCO3– or/and CO2 and down-regulated carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM. In the high CO2 grown cells, the electron transport rate from photosystem II (PSII was photoinhibited to a greater extent at high levels of photosynthetically active radiation, while non-photochemical quenching was reduced compared to low CO2 grown cells. This was probably due to the down-regulation of CCM, which serves as a sink for excessive energy. The balance between these positive and negative effects on diatom productivity will be a key factor in determining the net effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on ocean primary production.

  9. Using diatom assemblages and sulphur in sediments to uncover the effects of historical mining on Lake Arnoux (Quebec, Canada: A retrospective of economic benefits versus environmental debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brian Hamilton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring changes in environmental conditions is increasingly important as the Canadian economic infrastructure ramps up exploration and mining development in the more inaccessible northern regions of Canada. Governments are concurrently assessing effects from past mining activities and absorbing the economic cost to society with on-going remediation and monitoring initiatives. The abandoned Aldermac mine in northwestern Quebec, mined from 1932–1943, is an excellent case study for assessing the state of environmental and economic effects of past mining operations. A paleolimnological approach, using diatoms as environmental proxies, was used to evaluate the spatial and temporal impacts on aquatic receiving environments. Based on the inferences drawn from diatom assemblages in Lake Arnoux, prior to mining activity, lake water pH was similar to that of surrounding lakes (circumneutral to weakly acidic. After mining operations terminated, changes in pH and alkalinity in Lake Arnoux coincided with distinct increases in sediment sulphur content. Across a 30- to 40-year span (circa 1940 to 1970s a significant decline in phytoplankton flora coincided with lake acidification and increased clarity of the water column. This resulted in an increase in the benthic diatom population (>90%, replacing the planktonic diatoms. Observed shifts in environmental proxies are concurrent with one, and possibly two, reported tailings pond breaches at the abandoned mine site. Adverse effects of the abandoned Aldermac mine on nearby ecosystems, combined with pressure from local citizens and environmental groups, forced responsible accountability for site restoration led by the Quebec government. Based on the historical period of economic growth, the financial benefits of the Aldermac mine were significant and justify the current pay-it-backward costs for environmental remediation. However, it has now been documented that the pay-it-backward model is not sustainable in

  10. Some new and rare diatoms from South Africa 2. Diatoms from lake Sibayi and lake Nhlange in Tongaland (Natal)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archibald, REM

    1966-01-01

    Full Text Available ~-t~6SDI NOVA HEDWIGIA ZEITSCHRIFT FUR KRYPTOGAMENKUNDE HERAUSGEGEBEN VON J. GERLOFF, F. MATTICK & J. POELT (BERLIN-DANLEM) SONDERABDRUCK AUS BAND XII, 3+4 Some New and Rare Diatoms from South Africa 2 by R. B. M. ARCHIBALD QL1 j NC~ iii... verpfiichtet aum Bezug des gesamten Werkea. i I Some New and Rare Diatoms from South Africa 2. Diatoms from Lake Sibayi and Lake Nlilange in Tongalanri (Natal). By R. E. il. ARGIIEBALD?) With Plate 97(V In January, 1966, the Zoology Department of Rhodes...

  11. Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Bourrelle, Julien S.; Musall, Eike

    2010-01-01

    and identify possible renewable energy supply options which may be considered in calculations. Finally, the gap between the methodology proposed by each organisation and their respective national building code is assessed; providing an overview of the possible changes building codes will need to undergo......The international cooperation project IEA SHC Task 40 / ECBCS Annex 52 “Towards Net Zero Energy Solar Buildings”, attempts to develop a common understanding and to set up the basis for an international definition framework of Net Zero Energy Buildings (Net ZEBs). The understanding of such buildings...... parameters used in the calculations are discussed and the various renewable supply options considered in the methodologies are summarised graphically. Thus, the paper helps to understand different existing approaches to calculate energy balance in Net ZEBs, highlights the importance of variables selection...

  12. PhysioNet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The PhysioNet Resource is intended to stimulate current research and new investigations in the study of complex biomedical and physiologic signals. It offers free...

  13. NetSig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Heiko; Lawrence, Michael S; Chouinard, Candace R

    2018-01-01

    Methods that integrate molecular network information and tumor genome data could complement gene-based statistical tests to identify likely new cancer genes; but such approaches are challenging to validate at scale, and their predictive value remains unclear. We developed a robust statistic (Net......Sig) that integrates protein interaction networks with data from 4,742 tumor exomes. NetSig can accurately classify known driver genes in 60% of tested tumor types and predicts 62 new driver candidates. Using a quantitative experimental framework to determine in vivo tumorigenic potential in mice, we found that Net......Sig candidates induce tumors at rates that are comparable to those of known oncogenes and are ten-fold higher than those of random genes. By reanalyzing nine tumor-inducing NetSig candidates in 242 patients with oncogene-negative lung adenocarcinomas, we find that two (AKT2 and TFDP2) are significantly amplified...

  14. Factors controlling the depth habitat of planktonic foraminifera in the subtropical eastern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebotim, Andreia; Voelker, Antje H. L.; Jonkers, Lukas; Waniek, Joanna J.; Meggers, Helge; Schiebel, Ralf; Fraile, Igaratza; Schulz, Michael; Kucera, Michal

    2017-02-01

    Planktonic foraminifera preserved in marine sediments archive the physical and chemical conditions under which they built their shells. To interpret the paleoceanographic information contained in fossil foraminifera, the recorded proxy signals have to be attributed to the habitat and life cycle characteristics of individual species. Much of our knowledge on habitat depth is based on indirect methods, which reconstruct the depth at which the largest portion of the shell has been calcified. However, habitat depth can be best studied by direct observations in stratified plankton nets. Here we present a synthesis of living planktonic foraminifera abundance data in vertically resolved plankton net hauls taken in the eastern North Atlantic during 12 oceanographic campaigns between 1995 and 2012. Live (cytoplasm-bearing) specimens were counted for each depth interval and the vertical habitat at each station was expressed as average living depth (ALD). This allows us to differentiate species showing an ALD consistently in the upper 100 m (e.g., Globigerinoides ruber white and pink), indicating a shallow habitat; species occurring from the surface to the subsurface (e.g., Globigerina bulloides, Globorotalia inflata, Globorotalia truncatulinoides); and species inhabiting the subsurface (e.g., Globorotalia scitula and Globorotalia hirsuta). For 17 species with variable ALD, we assessed whether their depth habitat at a given station could be predicted by mixed layer (ML) depth, temperature in the ML and chlorophyll a concentration in the ML. The influence of seasonal and lunar cycle on the depth habitat was also tested using periodic regression. In 11 out of the 17 tested species, ALD variation appears to have a predictable component. All of the tested parameters were significant in at least one case, with both seasonal and lunar cyclicity as well as the environmental parameters explaining up to > 50 % of the variance. Thus, G. truncatulinoides, G. hirsuta and G. scitula

  15. TideNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    query tide data sources in a desired geographic region of USA and its territories (Figure 1). Users can select a tide data source through the Google Map ...select data sources according to the desired geographic region. It uses the Google Map interface to display data from different sources. Recent...Coastal Inlets Research Program TideNet The TideNet is a web-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that provides users with GIS mapping tools to

  16. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  17. Interaction Nets in Russian

    OpenAIRE

    Salikhmetov, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Draft translation to Russian of Chapter 7, Interaction-Based Models of Computation, from Models of Computation: An Introduction to Computability Theory by Maribel Fernandez. "In this chapter, we study interaction nets, a model of computation that can be seen as a representative of a class of models based on the notion of 'computation as interaction'. Interaction nets are a graphical model of computation devised by Yves Lafont in 1990 as a generalisation of the proof structures of linear logic...

  18. Programming NET 35

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    Bestselling author Jesse Liberty and industry expert Alex Horovitz uncover the common threads that unite the .NET 3.5 technologies, so you can benefit from the best practices and architectural patterns baked into the new Microsoft frameworks. The book offers a Grand Tour" of .NET 3.5 that describes how the principal technologies can be used together, with Ajax, to build modern n-tier and service-oriented applications. "

  19. Acidification counteracts negative effects of warming on diatom silicification

    KAUST Repository

    Coello-Camba, Alexandra

    2016-10-24

    Diatoms are a significant group contributing up to 40 % of annual primary production in the oceans. They have a special siliceous cell wall that, acting as a ballast, plays a key role in the sequestration of global carbon and silica. Diatoms dominate primary production in the Arctic Ocean, where global climate change is causing increases in water temperature and in the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Here we show that as water temperature increases diatoms become stressed, grow to smaller sizes, and decrease their silicification rates. But at higher pCO2, as the pH of seawater decreases, silica incorporation rates are increased. In a future warmer Arctic ocean diatoms may have a competitive advantage under increased ocean acidification, as increased pCO2 counteracts the adverse effects of increasing temperature on silicification and buffers its consequences in the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and silica.

  20. Diatoms - nature materials with great potential for bioapplications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medarević Đorđe P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are widespread unicellular photosynthetic algae that produce unique highly ordered siliceous cell wall, called frustule. Micro- to nanoporous structure with high surface area that can be easily modified, high mechanical resistance, unique optical features (light focusing and luminescence and biocompatibility make diatom frustule as a suitable raw material for the development of devices such as bio- and gas sensors, microfluidic particle sorting devices, supercapacitors, batteries, solar cells, electroluminescent devices and drug delivery systems. Their wide availability in the form of fossil remains (diatomite or diatomaceous earth as well as easy cultivation in the artificial conditions further supports use of diatoms in many different fields of application. This review focused on the recent achievements in the diatom bioapplications such as drug delivery, biomolecules immobilization, bio- and gas sensing, since great progress was made in this field over the last several years.

  1. Light Manipulation by Single Cells: The Case of Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo De Tommasi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous monocellular microalgae, responsible for about 20–25% of the global oxygen produced by photosynthesis. Living in environments where sunlight is not so easily accessible, evolution shaped diatoms in order to exploit light with high efficiency. In particular, diatoms are provided with an external, micro- and nanopatterned silica shell, the frustule, surprisingly similar to artificial photonic crystals and able to manipulate light in many different ways. The present paper reviews the most relevant studies on optical and photonic properties of diatoms that have been performed throughout the last years making use of SEM characterizations, transmittance measurements at different wavelengths, holographic microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and imaging, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and the predictive support of different numerical simulation algorithms.

  2. Modified Ribose Receptor Response in Isolated Diatom Frustules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbanks, Carly R.

    2011-08-26

    Diatoms are a distinctive group of microalgae with the unique ability to produce a highly-ordered biosilica matrix, known as the frustule. Diatoms hold significant potential in the biotechnology field as a silica scaffold for embedding proteins. In this study, we analyzed the funtionalization of biosilica with a receptor complex through genetic modification of the diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana. Through the use of Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), the receptor was shown to remain active in transformed frustules after the inner cellular contents were removed. In addition to protein functionality, growth conditions for T. pseudonana were optimized. Untransformed cultures receiving aeration grew more rapidly than stagnant untransformed cultures. Surprisingly, transformed cultures grew more quickly than untransformed cultures. This study demonstrates isolated diatom frustules provide an effective scaffold for embedded receptor complexes. Through this research, we provide the groundwork for the development of new biosensors for use in diagnostics and environmental remediation.

  3. Abundance of bacterial and diatom fouling on various surfaces

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi

    Abundance of bacterial and diatom fouling on aluminium, fibreglass and stainless steel were studied from Dona Paula waters of the Zuari Estuary. Both these forms were reversibly attached in large numbers to surfaces during the initial 24 hr...

  4. Evolution exacerbates the paradox of the plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoresh, Noam; Hegreness, Matthew; Kishony, Roy

    2008-08-26

    Can biodiversity evolve and persist in a uniform environment? This question is at the heart of the plankton paradox: in the natural world we observe many species sharing few resources, whereas the principle of competitive exclusion would lead us to expect that only a few species could coexist in such circumstances. To bridge the gap between theory and observation, previous studies have shown that the maximum number of species that can stably coexist is equal to the number of essential resources and that even more species can coexist out of equilibrium. These studies were viewed as a significant step toward a resolution of the paradox. Evolutionary dynamics, however, have been studied in this context only in limited cases, and it is largely unknown how mutations impact ecologically stable multispecies states, and whether large species consortia can spontaneously evolve. In the present study we introduce evolution to the standard ecological model of competition for essential resources. Combining numeric and analytic approaches, we find that ecologically stable species communities are severely destabilized by long-term evolutionary dynamics. Moreover, the number of species in spontaneously evolved consortia is much lower than the number of available resources. Contrary to expectations based on studies of two resources, these limits on biodiversity are not results of the occasional emergence of superspecies, superior to all competitors; nor are they alleviated by the inclusion of tradeoffs in resource utilization. Rather, we show that it is an accelerated depletion of limiting resources, combined with the essentiality of resources to all species, that leads invariably to catastrophic extinctions.

  5. Production of silver nanoparticles by the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishkerman, Asher; Arad (Malis), Shoshana

    2017-05-01

    Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) are the most species-rich group of algae, they are single-celled characterized by a silicified cell wall called a frustule. Diatoms are diverse in shape with many distinct features like raphe and fultoportulae. The diatom cell wall morphology and its hierarchy structure make it a unique unicellular organism for nanotechnology research and applications. Diatom cells are a promising system for green synthesis of nanomaterials like metallic nanoparticles (NPs), nanostructured polymers and other nanomaterials. The production of NPs is achieved today by using methods like attrition or pyrolysis. The cost and the toxic substances often used in these common methods of NPs synthesis limit their applications. Therefore, NPs biosynthesis by diatom cultures, which can be done at ambient CO2 concentrations, temperature and pressure, offers a sustainable alternative solution. In this work, we examined the formation of silver NPs (AgNPs) by the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum cultivated at 25°C for a period of 8 days. Using this approach, diatom cultures were either grown throughout the duration of the experiment in an artificial seawater (ASW)-f/2 medium enriched with 1 ppm Ag+ or grown in an ASW-f/2 medium where similar silver ion concentrations were added on experimental day 4. We found that 1 ppm Ag+ reduces the P. tricornutum growth by up to 50% as compared with the control. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in combination with Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) showed the presence of AgNPs nanoparticles with different sizes and chemical composition associated with the diatom frustules and extracellular polymeric substances.

  6. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan D Groussman

    Full Text Available Ferroproteins arose early in Earth's history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world's oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III permease; iron storage (ferritin; iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6 and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases. Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of

  7. Diatoms and Water Quality of Telaga Warna Dieng, Java Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnaningsih Soeprobowati, Tri; Widodo Agung Suedy, Sri; Hadiyanto

    2017-02-01

    Diatoms are popular name for Bacillariophyte, the microalgae with the specific characteristic of silicious cell walls that well preserved in the sediments. The different diatoms assemblage in the sediment layers indicate different environment at the time of the diatoms live and deposited. Telaga Warna is small lake in Dieng Plateau. Telaga means lake, Warna means colour. It is called Telaga Warna because previously have 4 colours i.e. red, white, blue, and yellow which was influenced by weather, time, and site of view. This study aims to analysis the diatoms communities and water quality of Telaga Warna Dieng, Java, Indonesia. Coring conducted at three different locations. Water sampling carried out on all three spots. Analysis of diatoms consist of three stages: digestion, preparation, and identification of diatoms. There were 59 diatoms species found in Telaga Warna Dieng that were belong to 9 groups diatoms of centric, arafid, eunotoid, birafid, monorafid, birafid, epitemid, nitzschioid, and surirelloid. Eunotia, Pinnularia, and Melosira were the dominant genus from Telaga Warna. The water quality parameters that exceeded Indonesia Water Quality Standard were pH (2.2 - 5.4), Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu. Based on the abundance of species Eunotia and Pinnularia in Telaga Warna Dieng indicates that water tends to be acidic. The dominance of Melosira indicates waters rich in nitrogen. Based on the total concentration of nitrogen and phosphorous, Telaga Warna was in an eutrophic - hipereutrophic conditions with total nitrogen concentration > 1.9 mg/L and total phosphorus concentration > 0.1 mg/L.

  8. Marine Polysaccharide Networks and Diatoms at the Nanometric Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Mišić Radić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite many advances in research on photosynthetic carbon fixation in marine diatoms, the biophysical and biochemical mechanisms of extracellular polysaccharide production remain significant challenges to be resolved at the molecular scale in order to proceed toward an understanding of their functions at the cellular level, as well as their interactions and fate in the ocean. This review covers studies of diatom extracellular polysaccharides using atomic force microscopy (AFM imaging and the quantification of physical forces. Following a brief summary of the basic principle of the AFM experiment and the first AFM studies of diatom extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, we focus on the detection of supramolecular structures in polysaccharide systems produced by marine diatoms. Extracellular polysaccharide fibrils, attached to the diatom cell wall or released into the surrounding seawater, form distinct supramolecular assemblies best described as gel networks. AFM makes characterization of the diatom polysaccharide networks at the micro and nanometric scales and a clear distinction between the self-assembly and self-organization of these complex systems in marine environments possible.

  9. Adsorption of diatoms at the oil-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathollahi, Niloofar; Sheng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Statistically robust experimental observations on 3D trajectory of diatoms approaching an oil-water interface is crucial for understanding sorption mechanisms of active particles, and interfacial rheology with over-arching implications in interfacial dynamics, droplet break and coalescence. Digital Holographic Cinematography is utilized to measure 3-D trajectories of diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudomona and T. weissflogii and simultaneously track the interface. Experiments are conducted in a 300 × 100 × 100 mm chamber containing 32 ppt artificial seawater. A stationary pendant drop is created on the tip of a needle located at the center of the chamber. Three oil samples, Louisiana crude, hexadecane, and mineral oil, are used. Diatoms are injected at a height above the drop with a negligible velocity, where Diatom precipitates freely on its excess weight. Holograms of diatom and drop are recorded at 5 fps with a magnification of 1.3X and are streamed in real time allowing for long-term study of sorption onto a slowly aging interface. A novel autofocus algorithm enables us to determine 3D locations within an uncertainty of 0.05 particle diameter. This allows us to perform super-resolution measurement to determine the effects of location and orientation of diatoms on the adsorption rate at the oil-water interface. Funded by GoMRI.

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBMERGED MACROPHYTES ON SEDIMENTARY DIATOM ASSEMBLAGES(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaire, Jesse C; Prairie, Yves T; Gregory-Eaves, Irene

    2011-12-01

    Submerged macrophytes are a central component of lake ecosystems; however, little is known regarding their long-term response to environmental change. We have examined the potential of diatoms as indicators of past macrophyte biomass. We first sampled periphyton to determine whether habitat was a predictor of diatom assemblage. We then sampled 41 lakes in Quebec, Canada, to evaluate whether whole-lake submerged macrophyte biomass (BiomEpiV) influenced surface sediment diatom assemblages. A multivariate regression tree (MRT) was used to construct a semiquantitative model to reconstruct past macrophyte biomass. We determined that periphytic diatom assemblages on macrophytes were significantly different from those on wood and rocks (ANOSIM R = 0.63, P macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV ≥525 μg · L(-1) ; total phosphorus [TP] macrophyte, nutrient-limited lakes (BiomEpiV eutrophic lakes (TP ≥35 μg · L(-1) ; six lakes). A semiquantitative model correctly predicted the MRT group of the lake 71% of the time (P macrophytes have a significant influence on diatom community structure and that sedimentary diatom assemblages can be used to infer past macrophyte abundance. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  11. Key drivers of seasonal plankton dynamics in cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies off East Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Laiolo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale eddies in the south west Pacific region are prominent ocean features that represent distinctive environments for phytoplankton. Here we examine the seasonal plankton dynamics associated with averaged cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies (CE and ACE, respectively off eastern Australia. We do this through building seasonal climatologies of mixed layer depth and surface chlorophyll-a for both CE and ACE by combining remotely sensed sea surface height (TOPEX/Poseidon, Envisat, Jason-1, and OSTM/Jason-2, remotely sensed ocean colour (GlobColour and in situ profiles of temperature, salinity and pressure from Argo floats. Using the CE and ACE seasonal climatologies, we assimilate the surface chlorophyll-a data into both a single (WOMBAT, and multi-phytoplankton class (EMS biogeochemical model to investigate the level of complexity required to simulate the phytoplankton chlorophyll-a. For the two eddy types, the data assimilation showed both biogeochemical models only needed one set of parameters to represent phytoplankton but needed different parameters for zooplankton. To assess the simulated phytoplankton behavior we compared EMS model simulations with a ship-based experiment that involved incubating a winter phytoplankton community sampled from below the mixed layer under ambient and two higher light intensities with and without nutrient enrichment. By the end of the 5-day field experiment, large diatom abundance was four times greater in all treatments compared to the initial community, with a corresponding decline in pico-cyanobacteria. The experimental results were consistent with the simulated behavior in CE and ACE, where the seasonal deepening of the mixed layer during winter produced a rapid increase in large phytoplankton. Our model simulations suggest that CE off East Australia are not only characterized by a higher chlorophyll-a concentration compared to ACE, but also by a higher concentration of large phytoplankton (i.e. diatoms due

  12. Oceanography promotes self-recruitment in a planktonic larval disperser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; van Sebille, Erik; Waters, Jonathan; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2016-09-30

    The application of high-resolution genetic data has revealed that oceanographic connectivity in marine species with planktonic larvae can be surprisingly limited, even in the absence of major barriers to dispersal. Australia's southern coast represents a particularly interesting system for studying planktonic larval dispersal, as the hydrodynamic regime of the wide continental shelf has potential to facilitate onshore retention of larvae. We used a seascape genetics approach (the joint analysis of genetic data and oceanographic connectivity simulations) to assess population genetic structure and self-recruitment in a broadcast-spawning marine gastropod that exists as a single meta-population throughout its temperate Australian range. Levels of self-recruitment were surprisingly high, and oceanographic connectivity simulations indicated that this was a result of low-velocity nearshore currents promoting the retention of planktonic larvae in the vicinity of natal sites. Even though the model applied here is comparatively simple and assumes that the dispersal of planktonic larvae is passive, we find that oceanography alone is sufficient to explain the high levels of genetic structure and self-recruitment. Our study contributes to growing evidence that sophisticated larval behaviour is not a prerequisite for larval retention in the nearshore region in planktonic-developing species.

  13. Responses of diatom communities to hydrological processes during rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Naicheng; Faber, Claas; Ulrich, Uta; Fohrer, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    The importance of diatoms as a tracer of hydrological processes has been recently recognized (Pfister et al. 2009, Pfister et al. 2011, Tauro et al. 2013). However, diatom variations in a short-term scale (e.g., sub-daily) during rainfall events have not been well documented yet. In this study, rainfall event-based diatom samples were taken at the outlet of the Kielstau catchment (50 km2), a lowland catchment in northern Germany. A total of nine rainfall events were caught from May 2013 to April 2014. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) revealed that diatom communities of different events were well separated along NMDS axis I and II, indicating a remarkable temporal variation. By correlating water level (a proxy of discharge) and different diatom indices, close relationships were found. For example, species richness, biovolume (μm3), Shannon diversity and moisture index01 (%, classified according to van Dam et al. 1994) were positively related with water level at the beginning phase of the rainfall (i.e. increasing limb of discharge peak). However, in contrast, during the recession limb of the discharge peak, diatom indices showed distinct responses to water level declines in different rainfall events. These preliminary results indicate that diatom indices are highly related to hydrological processes. The next steps will include finding out the possible mechanisms of the above phenomena, and exploring the contributions of abiotic variables (e.g., hydrologic indices, nutrients) to diatom community patterns. Based on this and ongoing studies (Wu et al. unpublished data), we will incorporate diatom data into End Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA) and select the tracer set that is best suited for separation of different runoff components in our study catchment. Keywords: Diatoms, Rainfall event, Non-metric multidimensional scaling, Hydrological process, Indices References: Pfister L, McDonnell JJ, Wrede S, Hlúbiková D, Matgen P, Fenicia F, Ector L, Hoffmann L

  14. Ocean plankton. Determinants of community structure in the global plankton interactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Faust, Karoline; Henry, Nicolas; Decelle, Johan; Colin, Sébastien; Carcillo, Fabrizio; Chaffron, Samuel; Ignacio-Espinosa, J Cesar; Roux, Simon; Vincent, Flora; Bittner, Lucie; Darzi, Youssef; Wang, Jun; Audic, Stéphane; Berline, Léo; Bontempi, Gianluca; Cabello, Ana M; Coppola, Laurent; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; d'Ovidio, Francesco; De Meester, Luc; Ferrera, Isabel; Garet-Delmas, Marie-José; Guidi, Lionel; Lara, Elena; Pesant, Stéphane; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Salazar, Guillem; Sánchez, Pablo; Sebastian, Marta; Souffreau, Caroline; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Gorsky, Gabriel; Not, Fabrice; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Speich, Sabrina; Stemmann, Lars; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer; Sullivan, Matthew B; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; de Vargas, Colomban; Raes, Jeroen

    2015-05-22

    Species interaction networks are shaped by abiotic and biotic factors. Here, as part of the Tara Oceans project, we studied the photic zone interactome using environmental factors and organismal abundance profiles and found that environmental factors are incomplete predictors of community structure. We found associations across plankton functional types and phylogenetic groups to be nonrandomly distributed on the network and driven by both local and global patterns. We identified interactions among grazers, primary producers, viruses, and (mainly parasitic) symbionts and validated network-generated hypotheses using microscopy to confirm symbiotic relationships. We have thus provided a resource to support further research on ocean food webs and integrating biological components into ocean models. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. The effects of a winter upwelling on biogeochemical and planktonic components in an area close to the Galician Upwelling Core: The Sound of Corcubión (NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Manuel; Álvarez-Ossorio, Ma Teresa; Bode, Antonio; Prego, Ricardo; Bernárdez, Patricia; Garcia-Soto, Carlos

    2010-10-01

    To study the biogeochemical response and the coupling plankton-benthos to an unusual winter upwelling event a cruise was carried out in February 2005 in the Sound of Corcubión, near Cape Finisterre (NW Iberian Peninsula), the Galician upwelling core. This area represents the northern boundary of the Eastern North Atlantic Upwelling System (ENAUS). The spatial distribution of plankton assemblages (phytoplankton and zooplankton), chlorophyll, physical and chemical parameters as well as diatom distribution in surface sediments, were studied in a total of 17 stations in the Sound. The upwelling processes caused an important accumulation of water in the inner Sound and near the Cape. This accumulation zone must be persistent through the upwelling events in the area, including those of summer, as indicated by the diatoms' distribution in the sediment. Unlike the summer upwelling events, the main effect of winter upwelling in the area is the increase in solar radiation due to the persistent clear skies. In this season nutrient supply is not critical due to water column mixing. The meteorological conditions were equivalent to those of early spring. As a result, both phyto- and zooplankton species assemblages were typical of spring blooms in Galician coasts. The bloom lasted for up to 6 days, as estimated from the availability and uptake of nitrogen forms. Winter blooms represented ca. 20% of total annual phytoplankton biomass, and 30% of the average biomass during summer upwelling, in the period 1997-2007, as estimated from the analysis of both, in situ and satellite derived chlorophyll.

  16. Planktonic foraminifera-derived environmental DNA extracted from abyssal sediments preserves patterns of plankton macroecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morard, Raphaël; Lejzerowicz, Franck; Darling, Kate F.; Lecroq-Bennet, Béatrice; Winther Pedersen, Mikkel; Orlando, Ludovic; Pawlowski, Jan; Mulitza, Stefan; de Vargas, Colomban; Kucera, Michal

    2017-06-01

    Deep-sea sediments constitute a unique archive of ocean change, fueled by a permanent rain of mineral and organic remains from the surface ocean. Until now, paleo-ecological analyses of this archive have been mostly based on information from taxa leaving fossils. In theory, environmental DNA (eDNA) in the sediment has the potential to provide information on non-fossilized taxa, allowing more comprehensive interpretations of the fossil record. Yet, the process controlling the transport and deposition of eDNA onto the sediment and the extent to which it preserves the features of past oceanic biota remains unknown. Planktonic foraminifera are the ideal taxa to allow an assessment of the eDNA signal modification during deposition because their fossils are well preserved in the sediment and their morphological taxonomy is documented by DNA barcodes. Specifically, we re-analyze foraminiferal-specific metabarcodes from 31 deep-sea sediment samples, which were shown to contain a small fraction of sequences from planktonic foraminifera. We confirm that the largest portion of the metabarcode originates from benthic bottom-dwelling foraminifera, representing the in situ community, but a small portion (DNA is preserved in a range of marine sediment types, the composition of the recovered eDNA metabarcode is replicable and that both the similarity structure and the diversity pattern are preserved. Our results suggest that sedimentary eDNA could preserve the ecological structure of the entire pelagic community, including non-fossilized taxa, thus opening new avenues for paleoceanographic and paleoecological studies.

  17. Identification of major planktonic sulfur oxidizers in stratified freshwater lake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisaya Kojima

    Full Text Available Planktonic sulfur oxidizers are important constituents of ecosystems in stratified water bodies, and contribute to sulfide detoxification. In contrast to marine environments, taxonomic identities of major planktonic sulfur oxidizers in freshwater lakes still remain largely unknown. Bacterioplankton community structure was analyzed in a stratified freshwater lake, Lake Mizugaki in Japan. In the clone libraries of 16S rRNA gene, clones very closely related to a sulfur oxidizer isolated from this lake, Sulfuritalea hydrogenivorans, were detected in deep anoxic water, and occupied up to 12.5% in each library of different water depth. Assemblages of planktonic sulfur oxidizers were specifically analyzed by constructing clone libraries of genes involved in sulfur oxidation, aprA, dsrA, soxB and sqr. In the libraries, clones related to betaproteobacteria were detected with high frequencies, including the close relatives of Sulfuritalea hydrogenivorans.

  18. Dynamics of plankton populations in upwelling areas. [by remote sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szekielda, K.

    1974-01-01

    Recent investigations of the upwelling area along the NW Coast of Africa which include studies with satellites are discussed. The detection of patchiness in temperature and plankton distribution in the upwelling area is of special interest because they can be investigated from space synoptically with repeated coverage. The recent satellite missions provide recordings in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum (EMR) as well as in the visible part. The information from those two parts of the EMR is useful for establishing the sea surface temperature and plankton distribution in upwelling areas. The temperature distribution as observed with infrared sensors and the patchiness in plankton patterns are discussed as observed with the most recent satellites, namely the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) and NOAA-2.

  19. Effects of sea surface warming on marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Boyce, Daniel G; Hofmann, Matthias; Matthiessen, Birte; Sommer, Ulrich; Worm, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Ocean warming has been implicated in the observed decline of oceanic phytoplankton biomass. Some studies suggest a physical pathway of warming via stratification and nutrient flux, and others a biological effect on plankton metabolic rates; yet the relative strength and possible interaction of these mechanisms remains unknown. Here, we implement projections from a global circulation model in a mesocosm experiment to examine both mechanisms in a multi-trophic plankton community. Warming treatments had positive direct effects on phytoplankton biomass, but these were overcompensated by the negative effects of decreased nutrient flux. Zooplankton switched from phytoplankton to grazing on ciliates. These results contrast with previous experiments under nutrient-replete conditions, where warming indirectly reduced phytoplankton biomass via increased zooplankton grazing. We conclude that the effect of ocean warming on marine plankton depends on the nutrient regime, and provide a mechanistic basis for understanding global change in marine ecosystems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  20. Forest die-back modified plankton recovery from acidic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Jaroslav; Kopáček, Jiří; Fott, Jan; Nedbalová, Linda

    2014-03-01

    We examined long-term data on water chemistry of Lake Rachelsee (Germany) following the changes in acidic depositions in central Europe since 1980s. Despite gradual chemical recovery of Rachelsee, its biological recovery was delayed. In 1999, lake recovery was abruptly reversed by a coincident forest die-back, which resulted in elevated terrestrial export of nitrate and ionic aluminum lasting ~5 years. This re-acidification episode provided unique opportunity to study plankton recovery in the rapidly recovering lake water after the abrupt decline in nitrate leaching from the catchment. There were sudden changes both in lake water chemistry and in plankton biomass structure, such as decreased bacterial filaments, increased phytoplankton biomass, and rotifer abundance. The shift from dominance of heterotrophic to autotrophic organisms suggested their substantial release from severe phosphorus stress. Such a rapid change in plankton structure in a lake recovering from acidity has, to the best of our knowledge, not been previously documented.

  1. Organochlorine Pesticide Residues in Plankton, Rangsit Agricultural Area, Central Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwong, W.; Thirakhupt, K.; Sitticharoenchai, D.; Borjan, M.; Robson, M.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated organochlorine pesticide residue content in freshwater plankton communities in Thailand. As a result, this study looks to examine the concentration of organochlorine pesticide residues in plankton collected from Khlong 7 (canal) at Rangsit agricultural area, central Thailand from June 2006 to February 2007. The results from this study show that plankton communities were composed of microphytoplankton, microzooplankton, and mesozooplankton. The average method recoveries varied from 84% to 103% with a relative standard deviation between 0.20% and 3.72%. The concentrations of organochlorine pesticide residues during a one-year-period were in the range of 0.10–3.65 ng/g wet wt and contained DDT and derivatives > Σ endosulfan > Σ HCH > Σ heptachlor > aldrin and dieldrin > endrin and endrin aldehyde > methoxychlor, respectively. Moreover, the residues of Σ HCH, DDT and derivatives, and methoxychlor were higher during wet season than dry season (t-test, p ≤ 0.05). PMID:18777151

  2. Preservation potential of ancient plankton DNA in Pleistocene marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boere, A C; Rijpstra, W I C; De Lange, G J; Sinninghe Damsté, J S; Coolen, M J L

    2011-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that ancient plankton DNA can be recovered from Holocene lacustrine and marine sediments, including from species that do not leave diagnostic microscopic fossils in the sediment record. Therefore, the analysis of this so-called fossil plankton DNA is a promising approach for refining paleoecological and paleoenvironmental information. However, further studies are needed to reveal whether DNA of past plankton is preserved beyond the Holocene. Here, we identified past eukaryotic plankton members based on 18S rRNA gene profiling in eastern Mediterranean Holocene and Pleistocene sapropels S1 (~9 ka), S3 (~80 ka), S4 (~105 ka), and S5 (~125 ka). The majority of preserved ~400- to 500-bp-long 18S rDNA fragments of microalgae that were studied in detail (i.e. from haptophyte algae and dinoflagellates) were found in the youngest sapropel S1, whereas their specific lipid biomarkers (long-chain alkenones and dinosterol) were also abundant in sediments deposited between 80 and 124 ka BP. The late-Pleistocene sediments mainly contained eukaryotic DNA of marine fungi and from terrestrial plants, which could have been introduced via the river Nile at the time of deposition and preserved in pollen grains. A parallel analysis of Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraethers (i.e. BIT index) showed that most of the organic matter in the eastern Mediterranean sediment record was of marine (e.g. pelagic) origin. Therefore, the predominance of terrestrial plant DNA over plankton DNA in older sapropels suggests a preferential degradation of marine plankton DNA. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Temporal changes of diatoms in marine biofilm developed on acrylic panels submerged in a tropical coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satheesh, Sathianeson; Wesley, Samuel Godwin

    2012-12-01

    The colonization of diatom groups on the acrylic panels submerged in Kudankulam coastal waters, east coast of India, was studied for one year from October 2004 to August 2005. Results showed temporal variability in the abundance of dominant diatom groups. Diatoms belonging to 19 genera colonized the panels. Navicula and Nitzschia were the dominant diatoms observed throughout the present study. The abundance of diatoms on test panels increased with the length of exposure. Significant variations in the abundance of Navicula and Nitzschia were observed between the sampling months. Temporal changes in biofilm diatom community composition in this study attain significance from the view point of macrofouling community recruitment on marine structures.

  4. La plataforma .NET

    OpenAIRE

    Fornas Estrada, Miquel

    2008-01-01

    L'aparició de la plataforma .NET Framework ha suposat un canvi molt important en la forma de crear i distribuir aplicacions, degut a que incorpora una sèrie d'innovacions tècniques i productives que simplifiquen molt les tasques necessàries per desenvolupar un projecte. La aparición de la plataforma. NET Framework ha supuesto un cambio muy importante en la forma de crear y distribuir aplicaciones, debido a que incorpora una serie de innovaciones técnicas y productivas que simplifican mucho...

  5. Biological Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Wingender, E

    2011-01-01

    It was suggested some years ago that Petri nets might be well suited to modeling metabolic networks, overcoming some of the limitations encountered by the use of systems employing ODEs (ordinary differential equations). Much work has been done since then which confirms this and demonstrates the usefulness of this concept for systems biology. Petri net technology is not only intuitively understood by scientists trained in the life sciences, it also has a robust mathematical foundation and provides the required degree of flexibility. As a result it appears to be a very promising approach to mode

  6. Synthesis of Ag nanoparticles using diatom cells for ammonia sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhi Chetia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Growth of silver nanoparticles through photo induced bioreduction mechanism on the surface of diatom cells, which is a kind of photosensitive fresh water organism containing hydrated amorphous silica structure, has been found to be a cost-effective, rapid, non-toxic, eco-friendly, photo-induced bottom-up process. This material shows broad absorbance in the visible light spectra. Light sensitive fucoxanthin pigment of diatoms that contain hydroxyl (−OH groups, play a vital role in the formation of silver cluster on the surface of diatom cells and its growth process. Involvement of the compounds and proteins of the diatoms which are responsible for reduction of metal ions and stabilization of the grown nanoparticles on diatom cells, are confirmed by FTIR analysis. Investigations are done to see if the synthesized samples acted as sensing material in the fabrication of a room temperature sensor of dissolved ammonia. With increase in ammonia concentration the visible light absorption peaks tend to higher intensity with blue shift due to the formation of [Ag(NH32]+ complexes causing repulsion between the Ag nanoparticles and consequently lead to the formation of smaller Ag nanoparticles. The intensity of absorption of the as-synthesized material is linearly correlated with the concentration of dissolved ammonia as observed from 0 to 100ppm. The use of naturally occurring diatoms for Ag nanoparticles synthesis has the benefits of amenability for large-scale easy production. Also the experimental findings indicate that the as-synthesized material can act as fast and reliable sensing material. Keywords: Diatoms, Fucoxanthin, Silver nanoparticles, Ammonia sensor

  7. Evolution of the plankton paleome in the Black Sea from the Deglacial to Anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Marco J L; Orsi, William D; Balkema, Cherel; Quince, Christopher; Harris, Keith; Sylva, Sean P; Filipova-Marinova, Mariana; Giosan, Liviu

    2013-05-21

    The complex interplay of climate shifts over Eurasia and global sea level changes modulates freshwater and saltwater inputs to the Black Sea. The dynamics of the hydrologic changes from the Late Glacial into the Holocene remain a matter of debate, and information on how these changes affected the ecology of the Black Sea is sparse. Here we used Roche 454 next-generation pyrosequencing of sedimentary 18S rRNA genes to reconstruct the plankton community structure in the Black Sea over the last ca. 11,400 y. We found that 150 of 2,710 species showed a statistically significant response to four environmental stages. Freshwater chlorophytes were the best indicator species for lacustrine conditions (>9.0 ka B.P.), although the copresence of previously unidentified marine taxa indicated that the Black Sea might have been influenced to some extent by the Marmara Sea since at least 9.6 ka calendar (cal) B.P. Dinoflagellates, cercozoa, eustigmatophytes, and haptophytes responded most dramatically to the gradual increase in salinity after the latest marine reconnection and during the warm and moist mid-Holocene climatic optimum. According to paired analysis of deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratios in fossil alkenones, salinity increased rapidly with the onset of the dry Subboreal after ~5.2 ka B.P., leading to an increase in marine fungi and the first occurrence of marine copepods. A gradual succession of dinoflagellates, diatoms, and chrysophytes occurred during the refreshening after ~2.5 ka cal B.P. with the onset of the cool and wet Subatlantic climate and recent anthropogenic perturbations.

  8. Petri Nets-Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 9. Petri Nets - Applications. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 9 September 1999 pp 44-52. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/09/0044-0052. Author Affiliations. Y Narahari ...

  9. Safety nets or straitjackets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Does regulation of working hours at national and sector level impose straitjackets, or offer safety nets to employees seeking working time flexibility? This article compares legislation and collective agreements in the metal industries of Denmark, Germany and the USA. The industry has historically...

  10. Coloured Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. This book introduces the constructs of the CPN modelling language and presents the related analysis methods. It provides a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN.

  11. Boom Booom Net Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Yong, Louisa; Dobie, Ian

    1999-01-01

    of an existing Internet radio station; Boom Booom Net Radio. Whilst necessity dictates some use of technology-related terminology, wherever possible we have endeavoured to keep such jargon to a minimum and to either explain it in the text or to provide further explanation in the appended glossary....

  12. Game Theory .net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Mikhael

    2003-01-01

    States making game theory relevant and accessible to students is challenging. Describes the primary goal of GameTheory.net is to provide interactive teaching tools. Indicates the site strives to unite educators from economics, political and computer science, and ecology by providing a repository of lecture notes and tests for courses using…

  13. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. The development of such systems is particularly challenging because of inherent intricacies like possible nondeterminism...

  14. Diatoms from the Colombian and Peruvian Amazon: the Genera Encyonema, Encyonopsis and Gomphonema (Cymbellales: Bacillariophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia A Vouilloud

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms from the Colombian and Peruvian Amazon: the Genera Encyonema, Encyonopsis and Gomphonema (Cymbellales, Bacillariophyceae. The diatom flora of the Colombian and Peruvian Amazon is far less studied than the flora of the Brazilian sector of the basin. Here we present results related to the genera Encyonema, Encyonopsis and Gomphonema. Plankton and periphyton samples were collected in lotic and lentic waterbodies from the Amazonian-Andean region, the Amazon River, Japurá River and Porvenir River basins during 1993, 1994, 2001 and 2003. At each sampling station pH, temperature, water transparency and conductivity were registered. Samples were analyzed with phase contrast microscope (LM and scanning electron microscope (SEM. Ten taxa are new records for the area; Encyonema for the Peruvian and Colombian Amazon and Encyonopsis for the Colombian Sector. Encyonema neogracile var. tenuipunctatum, E. vulgare, Encyonopsis frequentis, Gomphonema augur var. sphaerophorum and G. contraturris are recorded for the first time in Colombia; Encyonema venezolanum and G. neoapiculatum in Colombia and Peru and the latter also for Amazonia. E. angustecapitatum was mentioned in Colombia before at a pond located at 3000m asl. We describe a new species from Porvenir River, Amazonas, Colombia: Encyonema amazonianum. Rev. Biol. Trop. 58 (1: 45-62. Epub 2010 March 01.La flora diatomológica de la Amazonia Colombiana y Peruana está mucho menos estudiada que la flora del sector brasilero. Se presentan los resultados de los géneros Encyonema, Encyonopsis y Gomphonema. Muestras de plancton y perifiton fueron colectadas en ambientes lóticos y lénticos de la región amazónica-andina, en los ríos Amazonas, Japurá y Porvenir durante 1993, 1994, 2001 y 2003. En cada estación de muestreo se realizaron mediciones de pH, temperatura, transparencia del agua y conductividad. Las muestras fueron analizadas con microscopio óptico con contraste de fases y microscopio electr

  15. Progressive changes in the Western English Channel foster a reorganization in the plankton food web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reygondeau, Gabriel; Molinero, J.C.; Coombs, S.

    2015-01-01

    . (2013) drive a profound restructuration of the plankton community modifying the phenology and the dominance of key planktonic groups including fish larvae. Consequently, the slow but deep modifications detected in the plankton community highlight a climate driven ecosystem shift in the Western English...

  16. The evolution of diatoms and their biogeochemical functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoiston, Anne-Sophie; Ibarbalz, Federico M; Bittner, Lucie; Guidi, Lionel; Jahn, Oliver; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Bowler, Chris

    2017-09-05

    In contemporary oceans diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic phytoplankton that typically dominate in upwelling regions and at high latitudes. They also make significant contributions to sporadic blooms that often occur in springtime. Recent surveys have revealed global information about their abundance and diversity, as well as their contributions to biogeochemical cycles, both as primary producers of organic material and as conduits facilitating the export of carbon and silicon to the ocean interior. Sequencing of diatom genomes is revealing the evolutionary underpinnings of their ecological success by examination of their gene repertoires and the mechanisms they use to adapt to environmental changes. The rise of the diatoms over the last hundred million years is similarly being explored through analysis of microfossils and biomarkers that can be traced through geological time, as well as their contributions to seafloor sediments and fossil fuel reserves. The current review aims to synthesize current information about the evolution and biogeochemical functions of diatoms as they rose to prominence in the global ocean.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Modelling diatom life forms and ecological guilds for river biomonitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Rémy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomonitoring is central to the European Union's Water Framework Directive (WFD and to the French water and aquatic environmental law, but most diatom indices do not separate different anthropogenic impacts. To address this gap, the effect of water chemistry on diatom ecological guilds and life forms was assessed in order to indicate stream perturbations. Generalised additive models (GAMs were built on a large-scale data set of 1571 samples from the French monitoring network. The relationships between diatom ecological guild and life form metrics were investigated by Principal components analysis and the results predicted by GAMs. The models characterised eight chemical parameters that modified adaptive strategies (ecological guilds and growth morphology (life forms. Total phosphorus, conductivity, nitrate and pH are the main influencing factors, followed by temperature, dissolved oxygen and organic matter. The findings confirm three groups of diatoms with different adaptive strategies: 1 – fast moving species, 2 – species growing close to the substrate and 3 – species extending to the surface layers of the biofilm. Thirteen diatom metrics displayed a variety of responses to different ranges of the eight chemical parameters. These metrics could be used to help to identify and quantify which chemical alterations are caused by polluted effluents in rivers.

  18. Postglacial diatom stratigraphy of Kirchner Marsh, Minnesota*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugam, Richard B.

    1980-01-01

    Fossil diatom assemblages from a 12-m core from Kirchner Marsh were compared with modern surface assemblages from 159 Minnesota and labrador lakes using cluster analysis. The deepest levels of the core (spruce pollen zone 13,000 to 10,200 yr B.P.) resemble modern diatom assemblages from deep oligotrophic lakes of northeastern Minnesota. Diatom assemblages of the pine pollen zone (about 10,200 to 9500 yr B.P.) have few modern analogs. In the oak zone (9500 yr B.P. to present) after a brief pulse of diatom species indicative of eutrophication, the assemblages are dominated by species characteristic of shallow lakes, suggesting a drop in the lake water level during the prairie period (5500 to 7500 yr B.P.). Macrofossil data of W. A. Watts and T. C. Winter (1966, Geological Society of America Bulletin77, 1339-1360) show that this shift to shallow-water diatoms occurred when aquatic macrophytes appeared at the site in abundance.

  19. Plankton biodiversity of Dharamtar creek adjoining Mumbai harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, L.R.; Nair, V.R.

    , 6 dinoflagellates and 6 other algae. Variation in phytoplankton cell count was enormous (17-5980 x 10 sup(3) l sup(-1)) with an average cell count of 266 x 10 sup(3) l sup(-1). The phytoplankton community was dominated by diatoms (97.6%) followed...

  20. Arsenic Speciation and Seasonal Changes in Nutrient Availability and Micro-plankton Abundance in Southampton Water, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. G.; Comber, S. D. W.; Kifle, D.; Antai, E. E.; Purdie, D. A.

    1995-04-01

    The links between dissolved arsenic speciation, biological activity and the availabilities of the nitrogen and phosphorus plant nutrients have been investigated in a seasonal survey of Southampton Water (U.K.). Southampton Water (Hampshire, southern England) is an approximately 10 km long, and 2 km wide north-westerly extension of the Solent, receiving water from the rivers Test and Itchen. It is a partially mixed estuary bordered by broad intertidal mudflats with shingle and sand on the eastern side, and a salt marsh to the west. Two sites were chosen: NW Netley Buoy is in a sheltered high-salinity estuarine environment whilst Calshot Buoy lies just outside Southampton Water and in a more exposed location of less-variable salinity. The first evidence of arsenic(III) production at both sites occurred in the second half of April, during the decay of a major Skeletonema costatumdiatom bloom. Arsenic(III) levels rose as Skeletonemawas replaced by a numerically smaller but more chlorophyll-rich bloom of another diatom, Rhizosolenia delicatula. Rhizosoleniais therefore implicated as a possible source of arsenic(III). Methylated arsenic was absent whilst the water temperature was low and during the initial Skeletonemabloom, but a week later, during the growth phase of the succeeding bloom of the diatom R. delicatula, they became detectable. Methylated arsenic levels gradually increased through the spring to a broad maximum covering the mid-summer, when Mesodinium rubrum, Scrippsiella trochoideaand associated microflagellates also peaked. No subsequent single organism could be linked to the release of methylated arsenic into Southampton Water; organoarsenicals having been observed in the presence of flagellates, diatoms and ciliates. A large bacterial maximum was observed following blooms of S. trochoideaand M. rubrumbut laboratory culture experiments of natural bacteria from Netley failed to produce significant changes in the concentration of any arsenic species

  1. Growth inhibition of periphytic diatoms by methanol extracts of sponges and holothurians

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mokashe, S.S.; Garg, A; Anil, A; Wagh, A

    Crude methanol extracts of a holothurian Holothuria leucospilota, and two sponges Craniella sp. and Ircinia ramosa were tested for their inhibitory effects on the growth of two marine diatoms, Navicula subinflata and N. crucicula, by diatom plating...

  2. Diatoms of the microphytobenthic community: Population structure in a tropical intertidal sand flat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Anil, A.C

    Temporal and spatial variations were investigated in the viable diatom population of the microphytobenthic community from an intertidal sand flat of a tropical environment. The presence of diatoms to a sediment depth of 15 cm and their rejuvenation...

  3. Genotoxicity of cadmium in marine diatom Chaetoceros tenuissimus using the alkaline Comet assay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, S.R.; Verlecar, X.N.; Nagarajappa; Goswami

    of Cd increased growth of the diatom decreased. Alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) method, which is highly sensitive in detection of DNA damage in eukaryotic cells, was used to observe genomic changes in marine diatom cells. DNA...

  4. Fouling diatom community with reference to substratum variability in tropical marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mitbavkar, S.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Wagh, A.B.

    form encountered. The paper deals with the qualitative and quantitative aspects of diatom colonization, their community structure, and correlation between the prevailing diatom population in the environment and that in the fouling community...

  5. Palaeoecology of fossil diatoms (the thermometers of salinity) of lake Bonneville, Utah, USA

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Kolbe (1927) described diatoms as indicators of salinity hence the fossil diatoms can yield paleoecological information considerable importance to the geologist regarding the environment in which their enclosing sediments were deposited...

  6. Diatom diet selectivity by early post-larval abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta under hatchery conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyu; Gao, Yahui; Liang, Junrong; Chen, Changping; Zhao, Donghai; Li, Xuesong; Li, Yang; Wu, Wenzhong

    2010-11-01

    Benthic diatoms constitute the primary diet of abalone during their early stages of development. To evaluate the dietary preferences of early post-larval abalone, Haliotis diversicolor supertexta, we analyzed the gut contents of post-larvae that settled on diatom films. We compared the abundance and species diversity of diatom assemblages in the gut to those of the epiphytic diatom assemblages on the attachment films, and identified 40 benthic diatom species in the gut contents of post-larvae 12 to 24 d after settlement. The most abundant taxa in the gut contents were Navicula spp., Amphora copulate, and Amphora coffeaeformis. Navicula spp. accounted for 64.0% of the cell density. In the attachment films, we identified 110 diatom species belonging to 38 genera. Pennate diatoms were the dominant members including the species Amphiprora alata, Cocconeis placentula var. euglypta, Cylindrotheca closterium, Navicula sp. 2, and A. coffeaeformis. Nano-diatoms (Navicula and Amphora during the month after settlement.

  7. Planktonic algae and cyanoprokaryotes as indicators of ecosystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ecologically healthy Mooi River system is important for maintaining the quality of potable water of Potchefstroom and surrounding areas. However, this system is under constant threat from anthropogenic pollution arising from both agricultural and mining activities in its catchment. A survey of planktonic algal and ...

  8. Effect of rainfall cessation on the plankton abundance and diversity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The abundance, diversity and temporal variation of plankton at Ogudu Creek in relation to the hydroclimatic factors were investigated for six months (October 2005 - March 2006). The physico-chemical characteristics of the creek were influenced by the seasonal change in water chemistry. Surface water was characterized ...

  9. Global marine plankton functional type biomass distributions : Phaeocystis spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, M.; O'Brien, C.; Peloquin, J.; Schoemann, V.; Breton, E.; Estrada, M.; Gibson, J.; Karentz, D.; Van Leeuwe, M. A.; Stefels, J.; Widdicombe, C.; Peperzak, L.

    2012-01-01

    The planktonic haptophyte Phaeocystis has been suggested to play a fundamental role in the global biogeochemical cycling of carbon and sulphur, but little is known about its global biomass distribution. We have collected global microscopy data of the genus Phaeocystis and converted abundance data to

  10. Trophic interactions amongst the plankton in the temporarily open ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During winter the phytoplankton community was dominated by microphytoplankton (20–200 µm) and during summer by nano- and picophytoplankton. Among the heterotrophic components of the plankton, the nanoflagellates were identified as the most important consumers of bacteria and small <20 µm phytoplankton cells.

  11. Biophysical Modeling of Cross-Shore Plankton Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, A.; Reniers, A.; Paris, C. B.; Shanks, A.; MacMahan, J.; Morgan, S.

    2016-02-01

    Coastal ecosystems are influenced by cross-shore flows. Processes that create coastal plankton distributions are not well understood, even though possible mechanisms of plankton transport in the surf zone have been investigated. Our data from a rip-channeled beach show that concentrations of zooplankton and phytoplankton are higher in the surf zone than offshore. To examine how plankton are transported toward the shore, we used a coupled biophysical model, comprised of Delft3D wave/flow simulations and an individual-based model for tracking plankton. Model results indicate that onshore delivery of zooplankton is enhanced by Stokes drift, wave-driven bottom boundary streaming, alongshore topographic variability, and turbulence-dependent sinking behavior of zooplankton. Phytoplankton sinking may also be accelerated by turbulence, but the mechanism differs from that which affects zooplankton. Turbulence has the potential to increase phytoplankton growth rates. Therefore, the phytoplankton transport model includes turbulence-induced sinking velocity and growth rate, although the latter appears to have little influence on phytoplankton distributions. Modeled phytoplankton concentrations in the surf zone are much lower than expected, although the zooplankton transport model qualitatively reproduced our observations. Thus, there must be other possible factors influencing phytoplankton transport, some of which will be discussed.

  12. Ether lipids of planktonic archae in the marine water column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Hoefs, M.J.L.; Schouten, S.; King, L.L.; Wakeham, S.G.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1997-01-01

    Acyclic and cyclic biphytanes derived from the membrane ether lipids of archaea were found in water column particulate and sedimentary organic matter from several oxic and anoxic marine environments. Compound-specific isotope analyses of the carbon skeletons suggest that planktonic archaea utilize

  13. The effect of cow dung and poultry droppings on plankton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plankton abundance and growth of fingerlings of hybrid cross between Heterobranchus longifilis (male) and Clarias gariepinus (female) were monitored in six concrete ponds for fourteen weeks. The one hundred and twenty fingerlings were subjected to three treatments. Two replicated ponds were fertilized with poultry ...

  14. Plankton bioindicators of environmental conditions in coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemraj, Deevesh A.; Hossain, Md A.; Ye, Qifeng; Qin, Jian G.; Leterme, Sophie C.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are characterised by strong spatial gradient of environmental parameters, especially hypersalinity, and are prone to anthropogenic disturbance. The Coorong (South Australia) is an inverse estuarine coastal lagoon separated from the sea by sand dunes. It is exposed to extreme water quality changes that affect its aquatic communities. Here, we used plankton as indicators of extreme environmental fluctuations to monitor and manage the environmental health of such complex systems. We defined the relationship of different plankton communities with water quality fluctuations and determined plankton species suitable for monitoring the ecosystem health. Two distinct communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton were identified, with salinity and nutrients being the principal factors impacting species distribution. Thus, two sets of indicator species were selected based on the different communities observed. Polychaete and gastropod larvae were positive indicators, showing salinity range restriction of brackish to marine. The distribution Acartia cf. fancetti represented healthy hypersaline conditions (salinity 40-60), while Cyclophora sp. and Scrippsiella sp. were negative indicators, correlating with extreme salinity and ammonia levels. The implementation of planktonic organisms as environmental indicators provided a constructive tool for the management of ecosystem health of the Coorong and will be applicable to similar coastal lagoons.

  15. Planktonic Biodiversity of Bhoj Wetland, Bhopal, India | Neelam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biodiversity found on Earth today consists of many millions of distinct biological species, which is the product of nearly 3.5 billion years of evolution. This article deals with planktonic distribution of Bhoj Wetland, Bhopal, India . Bhoj Wetland comprises of two lakes i.e. Upper and Lower lakes of Bhopal. The Upper lake is ...

  16. The trophic position of planktonic ciliate populations in the food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most predaceous ciliates were haptorids, and consumed other ciliates or metazoa. Growth rate estimates for planktonic ciliate populations in East African lakes ranged from 0.18 to 6.56d–1. From these growth rates and biomass, the estimated production of ciliate populations ranged from 5.9 to 2 335µg carbon l–1 d–1 and ...

  17. Planktonic community regeneration in a post-herbicidal water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planktonic community regeneration in a post-herbicidal water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes Mart.) treated environment. ... Glyphosate-treated medium contained the richest phytoplanktonic assemblages (SDI = 5.14) while the terbutryn-treated medium had the least species diversity (SDI = 1.75). Except in the ...

  18. Response of plankton assemblage to nutrient and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal variations of nutrients and water quality parameters in relation to plankton abundance were investigated in Ogun coastal water, Ogun State, Nigeria from February to July, 2015 at three different stations of 5 km apart along the 15 km Ogun coastal stretch line. The study revealed that nutrient concentrations were ...

  19. Resistance of oxidative stress in biofilm and planktonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Jakubowski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the susceptibility of biofilm produced by E. coli to oxidative stress, and compared the components of free radicals defences: level of glutathione, catalase and dismutase activities in planktonic and biofilm located cells. Results showed the diversity of responses to oxidative stress in bacterial cells in log or stationary phases in both planktonic and biofilm forms. The bacteria were exposed to free-radical donors (H2O2, tBOOH, menadione, SIN-1 or peroxynitrite in a wide range of final concentrations, from 0.5 to 10mM. Different level of toxicity of individual donors, independence of cell type (planktonic forms or biofilm and phases of growth were observed. The highest oxidative stress resistance was observed for the cells in logarithmic phase of growth treated with H2O2, both in planktonic and biofilm forms, whereas for the cells in stationary phase, the highest resistance was observed for menadione. These results showed higher efficiency of agents based on superoxide anion donors in combating bacteria colonizing abiotic surfaces stainless steel (AISI 316L.

  20. Planktonic community regeneration in a post-herbicidal water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planktonic community regeneration in a post-herbicidal water hyacinth ( Eichhornia crassipes Mart.) treated environment. ... However, water hyacinth in the reference untreated control medium had healthy, bright green leaves and resilent stems. The phytoplanktonic flora observed in the culture media 28 DAT consisted of 8 ...

  1. Phenotypic plasticity of planktonic rotifers as a response to predator.

    OpenAIRE

    VAJDIAKOVÁ, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to assemble essential information about phenotypic plasticity of zooplankton, especially planktonic rotifers. More specifically, the thesis is focused on predator­induced morphological changes. I introduced different types of predators and their behavioral, physiological and morphological impacts on zooplankton. Moreover, I examined the effects of inducible morphological defences on the planctic rotifers.

  2. Cumulative impact of effluents on plankton dynamics in Awba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The assessment of changes in the biological community of water is a very sensitive measure of its quality. The plankton community structure of Awba reservoir in the University of Ibadan, Nigeria was monitored between April and October 1989 to determine the impact of natural eutrophication and effluent discharge on its ...

  3. Plankton Respiration from the Cellular to the Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C.; Garcia-Martin, E. E.; Hull, T.; Kitidis, V. A.; Ostle, C.; Serret, P.; Tilstone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Estimates of marine plankton respiration provide an important constraint on the magnitude of the biological carbon pump and global elemental nutrient cycles, yet respiration remains one of the least constrained terms in models of metabolism, gas exchange and carbon mass balance. This is due in part to the difficulty in measuring both total oceanic respiration and that attributable to specific plankton groups or size classes and the resulting lack of earth observation algorithms. Respiration in the surface layer of the ocean is usually estimated from either the consumption of dissolved oxygen in a contained sample volume or from enzymatic proxies such as INT, and is less frequently determined from mixed layer oxygen utilisation, allometric equations or biomass / abundance spectra.As part of a tracer release (SF6) experiment in the Mauritanian upwelling and a seasonal study of UK shelf sea biogeochemistry, we measured plankton respiration using a range of methods which span time and space scales from cells to the mixed layer and hours to years. This presentation will compare and contrast these concurrent measurements with a view to assessing the range of variability in respiration relative to that in primary production alongside measures of parameters such as plankton community structure and organic carbon availability which may lead to this variability. In addition, by comparing between systems and between seasons in the same system, and utilising the available global dataset, we aim to test predictive empirical models of respiration in an attempt to extrapolate to the basin scale.

  4. Holocene planktonic foraminifera from the shelf sediments off Kerala Coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    Twenty-two planktonic foraminifers were identified from a few samples collected aboard INS KISTNA at 9~'N and 76~'E, at 89 metres depth from the bottom sediment-water interface. A few of the more characteristic features of each are described. Some...

  5. Seasonal plankton variability in Chilean Patagonia fjords: Carbon flow through the pelagic food web of Aysen Fjord and plankton dynamics in the Moraleda Channel basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, H. E.; Castro, L.; Daneri, G.; Iriarte, J. L.; Silva, N.; Vargas, C. A.; Giesecke, R.; Sánchez, N.

    2011-03-01

    recognizable particles contributing to the particulate organic carbon flux. The topographic constriction sills partially modulated the exchange of oceanic waters (Subantarctic Surface Water) with freshwater river discharges along the Moraleda Channel. This exchange affects salinity and nutrient availability and, thus, the plankton structure. The north microbasin was dominated by a seasonal alternation of the classical (spring) and microbial (winter) food webs. However, in the south microbasin, productivity was low and the system was dominated year-round by large inputs of glacier-derived, silt-rich freshwater carrying predominantly small-sized diatoms ( Skeletonema spp) and bacteria. When superimposed upon this scenario, highly variable (seasonal) solar radiation and photoperiods could exacerbate north-south differences along Moraleda Channel.

  6. Sedimentation of phytoplankton during a diatom bloom : Rates and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hansen, J.L.S.; Alldredge, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    velocities, settling of cells attached to marine snow aggregates formed from discarded larvacean houses or pteropod feeding webs, and packaging of cells into rapidly falling zooplankton fecal pellets. We quantified the relative significance of these different mechanisms during a diatom bloom in a temperate...... recorded in the water column (by divers) nor in sediment traps. The low coagulation rates were due to a very low 'stickiness' of suspended particles. The dominant diatom, Thalassiosira mendiolana, that accounted for up to 75% of the phytoplankton biomass, was not sticky at al, and did not turn sticky upon...... nutrient depletion in culture experiments. The low particle stickiness recorded may be related to low formation rates by diatoms of transparent exopolymeric particles (TEP), that occurred in low concentrations throughout the study period. Zooplankton grazing rate did not respond to the development...

  7. Bioactive glass 45S5 from diatom biosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman A. Adams

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A major draw-back to large scale production of bioactive glasses is the high cost of the standard silica precursor, usually tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS. The current study describes a novel sol–gel preparation of 45S5 bioactive glass using diatom biosilica from cultured cells of the diatom, Aulacoseira granulata as substitute to TEOS. The glass formed was characterized using mechanical tester, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. Results showed that the glass possessed a compressive strength of 3.75 ± 0.18 and formed carbonated hydroxyapatite (HCA within 7 days in simulated body fluid (SBF, attributable to good surface chemistry. The performance of the glass was compared with that of those formed using TEOS. Diatom biosilica could be a potential economically friendly starting material for large scale fabrication of bioactive glasses.

  8. Genome engineering empowers the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daboussi, Fayza; Leduc, Sophie; Maréchal, Alan; Dubois, Gwendoline; Guyot, Valérie; Perez-Michaut, Christophe; Amato, Alberto; Falciatore, Angela; Juillerat, Alexandre; Beurdeley, Marine; Voytas, Daniel F; Cavarec, Laurent; Duchateau, Philippe

    2014-05-29

    Diatoms, a major group of photosynthetic microalgae, have a high biotechnological potential that has not been fully exploited because of the paucity of available genetic tools. Here we demonstrate targeted and stable modifications of the genome of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, using both meganucleases and TALE nucleases. When nuclease-encoding constructs are co-transformed with a selectable marker, high frequencies of genome modifications are readily attained with 56 and 27% of the colonies exhibiting targeted mutagenesis or targeted gene insertion, respectively. The generation of an enhanced lipid-producing strain (45-fold increase in triacylglycerol accumulation) through the disruption of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene exemplifies the power of genome engineering to harness diatoms for biofuel production.

  9. Circular random motion in diatom gliding under isotropic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Guerra, Andrés Jiménez; Maldonado, Ana Iris Peña; Rubio, Yadiralia Covarrubias; Meza, Jessica Viridiana García

    2014-11-13

    How cells migrate has been investigated primarily for the case of trajectories composed by joined straight segments. In contrast, little is known when cellular motion follows intrinsically curved paths. Here, we use time-lapse optical microscopy and automated trajectory tracking to investigate how individual cells of the diatom Nitzschia communis glide across surfaces under isotropic environmental conditions. We find a distinct kind of random motion, where trajectories are formed by circular arcs traveled at constant speed, alternated with random stoppages, direction reversals and changes in the orientation of the arcs. Analysis of experimental and computer-simulated trajectories show that the circular random motion of diatom gliding is not optimized for long-distance travel but rather for recurrent coverage of limited surface area. These results suggest that one main biological role for this type of diatom motility is to efficiently build the foundation of algal biofilms.

  10. Palaeoecological reconstruction of Komořany Lake in Late Glacial based on diatom analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Poštulková, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Diatom analysis of basal part of profile PK-1-L contributes to multi-proxy research of former Lake Komořany. At this part of profile radiocarbon dating (dates sediments into Late Glacial and Early Holocene) and LOI (loss on ignition) had been conducted before, of which results have been utilized to more accurate interpretation of diatom analysis conclusions. Apart from diatom valves, presence of stomatocysts of Chrysophyceae has been observed. Having separated diatom valves from 32 sediment s...

  11. Molecular fossils of diatoms: Applications in petroleum geochemistry and palaeoenvironmental studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rampen, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    Diatoms are one of the major groups of algae which originated relatively recently and evolved in the Late Jurassic/Cretaceous. This thesis presents the results of a comprehensive study of diatom lipids in cultures and in the environment and their applications in the age determination of petroleum and in palaeoenvironmental studies. Diatom DNA sequences were analyzed in order to relate the phylogenetic positions of diatoms to the lipid chemotaxonomy. Forty four different sterols were identifie...

  12. Increasing Water Temperature Triggers Dominance of Small Freshwater Plankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasconi, Serena; Gall, Andrea; Winter, Katharina; Kainz, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change scenarios predict that lake water temperatures will increase up to 4°C and rainfall events will become more intense and frequent by the end of this century. Concurrently, supply of humic substances from terrestrial runoff is expected to increase, resulting in darker watercolor (“brownification”) of aquatic ecosystems. Using a multi-seasonal, low trophic state mesocosm experiment, we investigated how higher water temperature and brownification affect plankton community composition, phenology, and functioning. We tested the hypothesis that higher water temperature (+3°C) and brownification will, a) cause plankton community composition to shift toward small sized phytoplankton and cyanobacteria, and, b) extend the length of the growing season entailing higher phytoplankton production later in the season. We demonstrate that the 3°C increase of water temperature favored the growth of heterotrophic bacteria and small sized autotrophic picophytoplankton cells with significantly higher primary production during warmer fall periods. However, 3X darker water (effect of brownification) caused no significant changes in the plankton community composition or functioning relative to control conditions. Our findings reveal that increased temperature change plankton community structure by favoring smaller sized species proliferation (autotrophic phytoplankton and small size cladocerans), and increase primary productivity and community turnover. Finally, results of this multi-seasonal experiment suggest that warming by 3°C in aquatic ecosystems of low trophic state may cause planktonic food web functioning to become more dominated by fast growing, r-trait species (i.e., small sizes and rapid development). PMID:26461029

  13. Diatom data from Bradley Lake, Oregon: downcore analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill-Haley, Eileen; Lewis, Roger C.

    2003-01-01

    Displaced marine diatoms provide biostratigraphic evidence for tsunami inundation at Bradley Lake, a small freshwater lake on the south-central Oregon coast. During the past 7,200 years, fine-grained lacustrine deposits in the deep axis of the lake were disturbed 17 times by the erosion and emplacement of coarse-grained gyttja and, in some cases, sand. By identifying diatoms in closely spaced core samples, we determined that 13 of the 17 events (termed idisturbance eventsi) record prehistoric tsunamis in Bradley Lake. We consider the evidence strong for 11 events, based on numbers and diversity of marine taxa: De1, De2, De4, De5, De6, De7, De8, De11, De12, De13, and De17. The evidence is less compelling for an additional 2 events (De9 and De10), although tsunami inundation is likely. Finally, we identified 4 events (De3, De14, De15 and De16) in which there were no marine diatoms to support tsunami inundation, although stratigraphic data shows that the lake bottom was disturbed. Freshwater diatoms dominate throughout the Bradley Lake record, showing that the lake has remained a freshwater habitat throughout its existence. However, anomalous occurrences of three species of brackish diatoms (Thalassiosira bramaputrae, Cyclotella meneghiniana, and Mastogloia smithii) may be evidence for short-lived periods of slightly elevated salinities in the lake following De16, De13, De12, De11, De9, De8, and De5. With the exception of De12, increased abundances of one or more of the brackish species is coincident with decreased numbers of freshwater diatoms. A temporary rise in salinity, as evidenced by short-lived increases in abundances of brackish species and decreases in abundances of freshwater species, is consistent with tsunami inundation into the lake.

  14. The trophic role and impact of plankton ciliates in the microbial web structure of a tropical polymictic lake dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Esquivel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent interest in the plankton structures and dynamics in tropical and subtropical lakes has revealed important trends that set these lakes apart from temperate lakes, and one of the main differences is the enhanced importance of the microbial food web with respect to net plankton. Ciliates are a key component of subtropical and tropical microbial webs because of their role as dominant picoplankton grazers and their ability to channel picoplankton production to the uppermost trophic levels. Plankton ciliates have been found to play a crucial role in the survival of fish larvae in lakes that share several features with Lake Catemaco, a eutrophic tropical Mexican lake. Therefore, the plankton ciliate composition, abundance, and biomass of Lake Catemaco were studied to assess their role in the microbial food web. The data were obtained from surface and bottom water samples collected at eleven points during three surveys in 2011 and an additional survey in 2013, with the surveys covering the local climatic seasons. The most abundant components of the plankton ciliate assemblages were small prostomatids (Urotricha spp., choreotrichs (Rimostrombidium spp., cyclotrichs (Mesodinium and Askenasia, and scuticociliates (Cyclidium, Cinetochilum, Pleuronema, and Uronema. Other important ciliates in terms of abundance and/or biomass were haptorids (Actinobolina, Belonophrya, Monodinium, Paradileptus, and Laginophrya, Halteria, oligotrichs (Limnostrombidium and Pelagostrombidium, Linostomella, Bursaridium, Cyrtolophosis, and Litonotus. The ciliate abundance averaged 57 cells mL-1 and ranged from 14 to 113 cells mL-1. The mean ciliate biomass was 71 µg C L-1 and ranged from 10 to 202 µg C L-1. Differences were not detected in ciliate abundance or biomass between the sampling points or sampling depths (surface to bottom; however, significant differences were observed between seasons for both variables. Nano-sized filamentous cyanobacteria were the most

  15. Factors influencing the distributions of polyunsaturated terpenoids in the diatom, Rhizosolenia setigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, S J; Allard, W G; Belt, S T; Massé, G; Robert, J M; Blackburn, S; Frampton, D; Revill, A T; Volkman, J K

    2001-11-01

    Polyunsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) hydrocarbon distributions of laboratory cultures of five strains of the planktonic diatom Rhizosolenia setigera (Brightwell) are shown herein to be highly variable. Some strains produced both haslenes with from three to five double bonds and rhizenes. The haslenes comprised not only Delta5 alkenes but also those with C7(20) unsaturation, including hasla-7(20),9E,Z, 23-trienes and hasla-7(20),9E,Z-13, 23-tetraenes. The rhizenes contained C7(25) unsaturation and the vinyl moiety common to all algal haslenes so far characterised. The effects of temperature and salinity on HBI composition, along with isotopic content, were determined in strain CS 389/A. Increase in growth temperature from 18 to 25 degrees C increased the degree of unsaturation in the haslenes and E to Z isomerisation in the triene. There was also an increase in unsaturation in the rhizenes at the highest growth temperature, with hexaenes dominant over the pentaenes but in the rhizenes, Z to E isomerisation increased. Increased salinity from 15 to 35 psu increased cell growth and rhizene production but decreased haslene production. Unsaturation in haslenes was not changed by increased salinity but unsaturation in the rhizenes decreased. These may reflect growth rate differences. The carbon isotopic compositions of the haslenes and rhizenes were similar to that of the major sterol at 18 degrees C, but the major HBI isomers were 3-4 per mil depleted relative to phytol released by saponification from chlorophyll a. This suggests biosynthesis of HBIs from a different isotopic pool of isopentenyl biphosphate to that from which phytol is biosynthesised. At 25 degrees C, further isotopic differences were observed. The variables controlling HBI distributions in R. setigera are still not fully understood and rationalisation of the environmental controls on the sedimentary distributions of the HBIs from R. setigera may only be possible once such factors are

  16. Food Safety Nets:

    OpenAIRE

    Haggblade, Steven; Diallo, Boubacar; Staatz, John; Theriault, Veronique; Traoré, Abdramane

    2013-01-01

    Food and social safety nets have a history as long as human civilization. In hunter gatherer societies, food sharing is pervasive. Group members who prove unlucky in the short run, hunting or foraging, receive food from other households in anticipation of reciprocal consideration at a later time (Smith 1988). With the emergence of the first large sedentary civilizations in the Middle East, administrative systems developed specifically around food storage and distribution. The ancient Egyptian...

  17. Net technical assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmann, David G.

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The present and near term military balance of power between the U.S. and the Soviet Union can be expressed in a variety of net assessments. One can examine the strategic nuclear balance, the conventional balance in Europe, the maritime balance, and many others. Such assessments are essential not only for policy making but for arms control purposes and future force structure planning. However, to project the future military balance, on...

  18. Methodological aspects of paleo-ecological diatom research in coastal areas of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, P.C.; Wolf, H. de

    2007-01-01

    A major problem in paleo-ecological research of diatoms in tidal environments is the distinction of autochthonous and allochthonous diatom valves. A new approach applying several diatom- and non-diatomrelated criteria is introduced in order to solve the autochthonous/allochthonous problem. A

  19. Moss-inhabiting diatom communities from Heard Island, sub-Antarctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandeVijver, B.; Beyens, L.; Vincke, S.; Gremmen, N.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we list 192 diatom taxa, collected from bryophyte samples from Heard Island (52degrees05'S, 73degrees30'E). The Heard Island diatom flora shows a marked similarity to those of the Crozet and Kerguelen archipelagos, and is quite dissimilar to the moss-dwelling diatom flora of Macquarie

  20. Parasitic chytrids could promote copepod survival by mediating material transfer from inedible diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagami, M.; Helmsing, N.R.; Van Donk, E.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms form large spring blooms in lakes and oceans, providing fuel for higher trophic levels at the start of the growing season. Some of the diatom blooms, however, are not grazed by filter-feeding zooplankton like Daphnia due to their large size. Several of these large diatoms are susceptible to

  1. Freshwater diatoms as environmental indicators: evaluating the effects of eutrophication using species morphology and biological indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmi, Annika; Karjalainen, Satu Maaria; Landeiro, Victor L; Heino, Jani

    2015-05-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication is a major form of perturbation in freshwaters, and several approaches aim to recognise its effects on lake ecosystems. We compared the responses of diatom species morphology, diversity indices and diatom indices to total phosphorus, total nitrogen and distance from a point stressor causing eutrophication in a large lake. We specifically examined the degree to which extent nutrients and distance to the stressor affect variation in the values of various biological indices and diatom valve size. In addition, special attention was given to the adequate repetition of diatom valve width measurements in the context of environmental assessment. Our results showed that diatom valve width was a better indicator of nutrient concentrations than any of the diatom and diversity indices examined. However, the results varied between the two study transects, suggesting that the diatom-based variables not only respond to nutrients but also to other environmental factors (e.g. shoreline morphology). We also found that when using the method based on diatom morphology, one should measure more valves than has been originally suggested to provide a more reliable picture of response to eutrophication. We argue that diatom morphology could be considered as an additional environmental assessment tool, because it may complement the information provided by the traditional diatom indices. Diatom valve width may also be more sensitive to early phases of the eutrophication process and its effects on freshwater ecosystems than various diatom indices that were developed in regional contexts with wide ranges in nutrient levels.

  2. Assessment of water quality based on diatom indices in a small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multivariate data analyses were performed on the diatom community dataset to specify the main gradients of floristic variation and to detect and visualize similarities in diatom samples in relation to land-use patterns within the catchment. One hundred and twelve (112) diatom species belonging to 36 genera were recorded ...

  3. Identification automatique des diatomées de la Merja fouarate : Une ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 sept. 2015 ... Université Ibn Tofail, Faculté des Sciences,. Laboratoire de Botanique et de Protection des Plantes, B. P. 133, Kénitra, Maroc. ... mathématique, Fouarate, Kenitra, Maroc. Automatic identification of Fouarate Merja diatoms: An ..... Human error and quality assurance in diatom analysis. In Automatic Diatom.

  4. Establishing an Historic Baseline of Diatom Diversity in Southern California

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Carina

    2004-01-01

    Diatoms are single-celled, microscopic algae with intricately built, often beautiful, silicon shells. As the sea’s primary producers, they provide food directly or indirectly for nearly all the sea’s fishes and marine mammals. They are the base of the marine food chain, and as such their abundance is a good indicator of the ocean’s productivity—the more diatoms, the greater the ocean’s productivity. Ocean productivity has profound implications for marine biodiversity and for commercial fisher...

  5. Planktonic food web structure at a coastal time-series site: II. Spatiotemporal variability of microbial trophic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Paige E.; Campbell, Victoria; Gellene, Alyssa G.; Hu, Sarah K.; Caron, David A.

    2017-03-01

    The grazing activities of phagotrophic protists on various microbial assemblages play key roles in determining the amount of carbon available for higher trophic levels and for export out of the photic zone. However, comparisons of the proportion of carbon consumed from the phytoplankton (cyanobacteria+photosynthetic eukaryotes) and heterotrophic bacteria (bacteria+archaea, excluding cyanobacteria) are rare. In this study, microbial community composition, phytoplankton growth and mortality rates (total chlorophyll a, Synechococcus, Prochlorococcus, and photosynthetic picoeukaryotes), and bacterial mortality rates were measured seasonally from 2012 to 2014 in the surface waters of three environmentally distinct sites in the San Pedro Channel, off the coast of southern CA, USA. Higher nutrient concentrations at the nearshore site supported community standing stocks that were 1.3-4.5x those found offshore, yet average growth and grazing rates of the phytoplankton and bacterial assemblages were generally similar between sites and across seasons. Thus, the amount of carbon consumed by the grazer assemblage was largely dictated by prey standing stocks. Heterotrophic bacteria constituted an important source of carbon for microbial consumers, particularly at the two offshore sites where bacterial carbon consumed was roughly equivalent to the amount of phytoplankton carbon consumed. Carbon removal by grazers at the nearshore station was predominantly from the diatoms, which were the primary component of the photosynthetic community at that site. This study highlights the significant contribution of protistan-bacterial trophic interactions to planktonic food webs and provides unique community composition and turnover data to inform biogeochemical models.

  6. Front-Eddy Influence on Water Column Properties, Phytoplankton Community Structure, and Cross-Shelf Exchange of Diatom Taxa in the Shelf-Slope Area off Concepción (˜36-37°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Carmen E.; Anabalón, Valeria; Bento, Joaquim P.; Hormazabal, Samuel; Cornejo, Marcela; Correa-Ramírez, Marco A.; Silva, Nelson

    2017-11-01

    In eastern boundary current systems (EBCSs), submesoscale to mesocale variability contributes to cross-shore exchanges of water properties, nutrients, and plankton. Data from a short-term summer survey and satellite time series (January-February 2014) were used to characterize submesoscale variability in oceanographic conditions and phytoplankton distribution across the coastal upwelling and coastal transition zones north of Punta Lavapié, and to explore cross-shelf exchanges of diatom taxa. A thermohaline front (FRN-1) flanked by a mesoscale anticyclonic intrathermocline eddy (ITE-1), or mode-water eddy, persisted during the time series and the survey was undertaken during a wind relaxation event. At the survey time, ITE-1 contributed to an onshore intrusion of warm oceanic waters (southern section) and an offshore advection of cold coastal waters (northern section), with the latter forming a cold, high chlorophyll-a filament. In situ phytoplankton and diatom biomasses were highest at the surface in FRN-1 and at the subsurface in ITE-1, whereas values in the coastal zone were lower and dominated by smaller cells. Diatom species typical of the coastal zone and species dominant in oceanic waters were both found in the FRN-1 and ITE-1 interaction area, suggesting that this mixture was the result of both offshore and onshore advection. Overall, front-eddy interactions in EBCSs could enhance cross-shelf exchanges of coastal and oceanic plankton, as well as sustain phytoplankton growth in the slope area through localized upward injections of nutrients in the frontal zone, combined with ITE-induced advection and vertical nutrient inputs to the surface layer.

  7. Using WordNet for Building WordNets

    CERN Document Server

    Farreres, X; Farreres, Xavier; Rodriguez, Horacio; Rigau, German

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarises a set of methodologies and techniques for the fast construction of multilingual WordNets. The English WordNet is used in this approach as a backbone for Catalan and Spanish WordNets and as a lexical knowledge resource for several subtasks.

  8. Diatomáceas indicadoras de paleoambientes do Quaternário de Dois Irmãos, Recife, PE, Brasil Diatoms as indicators of paleoenvironments during the Quaternary at Dois Irmãos, Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giane Soares de Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho apresenta o levantamento da diatomoflórula identificada em sedimentos do Quaternário da Lagoa das Diatomáceas (Dois Irmãos, Recife, baseado em um testemunho de sondagem com 4,5 m, tendo sido analisadas amostras com intervalos de 10 em 10 cm. Foram identificados 46 táxons, distribuídos em 19 gêneros, 40 espécies e seis variedades. A coluna estratigráfica esteve composta por gêneros epífitos (Actinella, Amphora, Cocconeis Eunotia, Fragilaria, Frustulia, Gomphonema e Rhopalodia, bentônicos (Navicula, Neidium, Nitzschia e Surirella e planctônicos (Aulacoseira, Cyclotella e Skeletonema. A maioria das espécies é oligoalóbia e litoral, destacando-se em termos de freqüência e abundância: Actinella brasiliensis, Anomoeoneis serians, Eunotia pectinalis, Frustulia rhomboides, sugerindo uma deposição de sedimentos em ambiente limnético. O predomínio de espécies epífitas em determinadas profundidades confirma a presença de macrófitas durante uma parte do período de deposição. Das espécies identificadas sete são consideradas de ambiente marinho: Cocconeis heteroidea, Cocconeis scutellum, Diploneis decipiens, Nitzschia scalaris, Nitzschia sigma, Skeletonema costatum e Surirella heideni as quais ocorreram de forma esporádica.A study of fossil diatoms from Lagoa das Diatomáceas (Dois Irmãos, Recife was carried out based on a 4.5-meter-long core sample. Samples were analyzed at 10 cm intervals. A total of 46 taxa were identified in 19 genera, 40 species and six varieties. The stratigraphic column was composed of epiphytic (Actinella, Amphora, Cocconeis Eunotia, Fragilaria, Frustulia, Gomphonema and Rhopalodia, benthic (Navicula, Neidium, Nitzschia, Surirella, and planktonic (Aulacoseira, Cyclotella and Skeletonema genera. Actinella brasiliensis, Anomoeoneis serians, Eunotia pectinalis and Frustulia rhomboides are oligohalobe, littoral species with high frequency and abundance, which suggests sediment deposition in a

  9. Sublethal Exposure to Diatomaceous Earth Increases Net Fecundity of Flour Beetles (Tribolium confusum) by Inhibiting Egg Cannibalism

    OpenAIRE

    Shostak, Allen W.

    2014-01-01

    Population regulation results from an interplay of numerous intrinsic and external factors, and for many insects cannibalism is such a factor. This study confirms a previously-reported observation that sublethal exposure to the fossilized remains of diatoms (i.e. diatomaceous earth) increases net fecundity (eggs produced minus eggs destroyed/day) of flour beetles, Tribolium confusum. The aim was to experimentally test two non-mutually-exclusive ecological mechanisms potentially responsible fo...

  10. Functional effects of parasites on food web properties during the spring diatom bloom in Lake Pavin: a linear inverse modeling analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutheina Grami

    Full Text Available This study is the first assessment of the quantitative impact of parasitic chytrids on a planktonic food web. We used a carbon-based food web model of Lake Pavin (Massif Central, France to investigate the effects of chytrids during the spring diatom bloom by developing models with and without chytrids. Linear inverse modelling procedures were employed to estimate undetermined flows in the lake. The Monte Carlo Markov chain linear inverse modelling procedure provided estimates of the ranges of model-derived fluxes. Model results support recent theories on the probable impact of parasites on food web function. In the lake, during spring, when 'inedible' algae (unexploited by planktonic herbivores were the dominant primary producers, the epidemic growth of chytrids significantly reduced the sedimentation loss of algal carbon to the detritus pool through the production of grazer-exploitable zoospores. We also review some theories about the potential influence of parasites on ecological network properties and argue that parasitism contributes to longer carbon path lengths, higher levels of activity and specialization, and lower recycling. Considering the "structural asymmetry" hypothesis as a stabilizing pattern, chytrids should contribute to the stability of aquatic food webs.

  11. Plankton food-webs: to what extent can they be simplified?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico D'Alelio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is a hugely diverse community including both unicellular and multicellular organisms, whose individual dimensions span over seven orders of magnitude. Plankton is a fundamental part of biogeochemical cycles and food-webs in aquatic systems. While knowledge has progressively accumulated at the level of single species and single trophic processes, the overwhelming biological diversity of plankton interactions is insufficiently known and a coherent and unifying trophic framework is virtually lacking. We performed an extensive review of the plankton literature to provide a compilation of data suitable for implementing food-web models including plankton trophic processes at high taxonomic resolution. We identified the components of the plankton community at the Long Term Ecological Research Station MareChiara in the Gulf of Naples. These components represented the sixty-three nodes of a plankton food-web. To each node we attributed biomass and vital rates, i.e. production, consumption, assimilation rates and ratio between autotrophy and heterotrophy in mixotrophic protists. Biomasses and rates values were defined for two opposite system’s conditions; relatively eutrophic and oligotrophic states. We finally identified 817 possible trophic links within the web and provided each of them with a relative weight, in order to define a diet-matrix, valid for both trophic states, which included all consumers, fromn anoflagellates to carnivorous plankton. Vital rates for plankton resulted, as expected, very wide; this strongly contrasts with the narrow ranges considered in plankton system models implemented so far. Moreover, the amount and variety of trophic links highlighted by our review is largely excluded by state-of-the-art biogeochemical and food-web models for aquatic systems. Plankton models could potentially benefit from the integration of the trophic diversity outlined in this paper: first, by using more realistic rates; second, by better

  12. R-Syst::diatom: an open-access and curated barcode database for diatoms and freshwater monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimet, Frédéric; Chaumeil, Philippe; Keck, François; Kermarrec, Lenaïg; Vasselon, Valentin; Kahlert, Maria; Franc, Alain; Bouchez, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are micro-algal indicators of freshwater pollution. Current standardized methodologies are based on microscopic determinations, which is time consuming and prone to identification uncertainties. The use of DNA-barcoding has been proposed as a way to avoid these flaws. Combining barcoding with next-generation sequencing enables collection of a large quantity of barcodes from natural samples. These barcodes are identified as certain diatom taxa by comparing the sequences to a reference barcoding library using algorithms. Proof of concept was recently demonstrated for synthetic and natural communities and underlined the importance of the quality of this reference library. We present an open-access and curated reference barcoding database for diatoms, called R-Syst::diatom, developed in the framework of R-Syst, the network of systematic supported by INRA (French National Institute for Agricultural Research), see http://www.rsyst.inra.fr/en. R-Syst::diatom links DNA-barcodes to their taxonomical identifications, and is dedicated to identify barcodes from natural samples. The data come from two sources, a culture collection of freshwater algae maintained in INRA in which new strains are regularly deposited and barcoded and from the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information) nucleotide database. Two kinds of barcodes were chosen to support the database: 18S (18S ribosomal RNA) and rbcL (Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase), because of their efficiency. Data are curated using innovative (Declic) and classical bioinformatic tools (Blast, classical phylogenies) and up-to-date taxonomy (Catalogues and peer reviewed papers). Every 6 months R-Syst::diatom is updated. The database is available through the R-Syst microalgae website (http://www.rsyst.inra.fr/) and a platform dedicated to next-generation sequencing data analysis, virtual_BiodiversityL@b (https://galaxy-pgtp.pierroton.inra.fr/). We present here the content of the library regarding the

  13. The Growth Response of Two Diatom Species to Atmospheric Dust from the Last Glacial Maximum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim M Conway

    Full Text Available Relief of iron (Fe limitation in the surface Southern Ocean has been suggested as one driver of the regular glacial-interglacial cycles in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2. The proposed cause is enhanced deposition of Fe-bearing atmospheric dust to the oceans during glacial intervals, with consequent effects on export production and the carbon cycle. However, understanding the role of enhanced atmospheric Fe supply in biogeochemical cycles is limited by knowledge of the fluxes and 'bioavailability' of atmospheric Fe during glacial intervals. Here, we assess the effect of Fe fertilization by dust, dry-extracted from the Last Glacial Maximum portion of the EPICA Dome C Antarctic ice core, on the Antarctic diatom species Eucampia antarctica and Proboscia inermis. Both species showed strong but differing reactions to dust addition. E. antarctica increased cell number (3880 vs. 786 cells mL-1, chlorophyll a (51 vs. 3.9 μg mL-1 and particulate organic carbon (POC; 1.68 vs. 0.28 μg mL-1 production in response to dust compared to controls. P. inermis did not increase cell number in response to dust, but chlorophyll a and POC per cell both strongly increased compared to controls (39 vs. 15 and 2.13 vs. 0.95 ng cell-1 respectively. The net result of both responses was a greater production of POC and chlorophyll a, as well as decreased Si:C and Si:N incorporation ratios within cells. However, E, antarctica decreased silicate uptake for the same nitrate and carbon uptake, while P. inermis increased carbon and nitrate uptake for the same silicate uptake. This suggests that nutrient utilization changes in response to Fe addition could be driven by different underlying mechanisms between different diatom species. Enhanced supply of atmospheric dust to the surface ocean during glacial intervals could therefore have driven nutrient-utilization changes which could permit greater carbon fixation for lower silica utilization. Additionally, both species responded

  14. Proof nets for lingusitic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moot, R.C.A.

    2002-01-01

    This book investigates the possible linguistic applications of proof nets, redundancy free representations of proofs, which were introduced by Girard for linear logic. We will adapt the notion of proof net to allow the formulation of a proof net calculus which is soundand complete for the

  15. Teaching Tennis for Net Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bryce

    1989-01-01

    A program for teaching tennis to beginners, NET (Net Easy Teaching) is described. The program addresses three common needs shared by tennis students: active involvement in hitting the ball, clearing the net, and positive reinforcement. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  16. Net4Care Ecosystem Website

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Rasmussen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    is a tele-monitoring scenario in which Net4Care clients are deployed in a gateway in private homes. Medical devices then connect to these gateways and transmit their observations to a Net4Care server. In turn the Net4Care server creates valid clinical HL7 documents, stores them in a national XDS repository...

  17. Prey switching behaviour in the planktonic copepod Acartia tonsa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Saiz, E.; Viitasalo, M.

    1996-01-01

    The copepod Acartia tonsa has 2 different prey encounter strategies. It can generate a feeding current to encounter and capture immobile prey (suspension feeding) or it can sink slowly and perceive motile prey by means of mechanoreceptors on the antennae (ambush feeding). We hypothesized that A...... (Strombidium sulcatum). Our data demonstrate prey switching in A. tonsa, both in terms of behaviour and in terms of feeding rates on the alternative prey. The time allocated to ambush and suspension feeding changed with the composition of the food, and clearance of diatoms was, accordingly, negatively related...... to the availability of ciliates. In contrast, clearing of ciliates was almost constant and independent of the availability of the alternative prey (diatoms), probably because this particular ciliate species (in contrast to most other microzooplankters) is unable to escape a feeding current and, thus, can also...

  18. Colonisation and community structure of benthic diatoms on artificial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A major flooding event that occurred during October–November 2012 caused major changes in the Kowie River hydromorphology and aquatic communities. The aim of our study was to identify the environmental variables that structure riverine benthic diatom communities at upstream and downstream locations 25 km apart ...

  19. Diatom as an alternative for biostratigraphy research in Karangsambung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridwan, Januar

    2018-02-01

    Paleogene stratigraphy of Karangsambung consists of Karangsambung and Totogan olistostrome deposit. The previous biostratigraphy research for those formations used the olistostrome matrix as the main sample. In fact, the olistostrome matrix is also a mixed material that might consist of the mixed material of the older and young sediment, making this sample unrepresentative for biostratigraphy analysis. The previous biostratigraphy research based on the matrix sample should be evaluated and should also consider new criteria for the representative sample. The most suitable biostratigraphy analysis sample from the olistostrome deposit is soft fraction sediment and laminated sediment which represent the suspension deposition phase in the part of olistostrome depositional process. On the other hand, diatom biostratigraphy could be applied in the representative sample related to the diatom living strategy in deep marine as lamination form and also their progressive spreading in Cenozoic. However, the application of diatom biostratigraphy in olistostrome deposit is still new and it lacks of reference, especially for diatom research in Indonesia. Though the application would be difficult to realize, it might open the chance for new research and discovery in Karangsambung biostratigraphy.

  20. Isolation of diatom Navicula cryptocephala and characterization of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sjce

    Full Length Research Paper. Isolation of diatom Navicula cryptocephala and characterization of oil extracted for biodiesel production. Sanjay K. R.*, Nagendra Prasad M. N., Anupama S.#, Yashaswi B. R.# and Deepak B.#. Department of Biotechnology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, Mysore- 570006, India ...

  1. Structure and dynamics of exopolymers in an intertidal diatom biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stal, L.J.; Défarge, C.

    2005-01-01

    Diatom biofilms growing at the surface of the intertidal mudflat of Marennes Oléron, France, were incubated for 48 h in the laboratory under simulated conditions of high- and low tide (immersed and emersed in seawater) and day and night (illuminated or dark conditions). The biofilms were

  2. Diatom centromeres suggest a mechanism for nuclear DNA acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Rachel E; Noddings, Chari M; Lian, Nathan C; Kang, Anthony K; McQuaid, Jeffrey B; Jablanovic, Jelena; Espinoza, Josh L; Nguyen, Ngocquynh A; Anzelmatti, Miguel A; Jansson, Jakob; Bielinski, Vincent A; Karas, Bogumil J; Dupont, Christopher L; Allen, Andrew E; Weyman, Philip D

    2017-07-18

    Centromeres are essential for cell division and growth in all eukaryotes, and knowledge of their sequence and structure guides the development of artificial chromosomes for functional cellular biology studies. Centromeric proteins are conserved among eukaryotes; however, centromeric DNA sequences are highly variable. We combined forward and reverse genetic approaches with chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify centromeres of the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum We observed 25 unique centromere sequences typically occurring once per chromosome, a finding that helps to resolve nuclear genome organization and indicates monocentric regional centromeres. Diatom centromere sequences contain low-GC content regions but lack repeats or other conserved sequence features. Native and foreign sequences with similar GC content to P. tricornutum centromeres can maintain episomes and recruit the diatom centromeric histone protein CENH3, suggesting nonnative sequences can also function as diatom centromeres. Thus, simple sequence requirements may enable DNA from foreign sources to persist in the nucleus as extrachromosomal episomes, revealing a potential mechanism for organellar and foreign DNA acquisition.

  3. Evolutionary genomics of the cold-adapted diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus

    KAUST Repository

    Mock, Thomas

    2017-01-17

    The Southern Ocean houses a diverse and productive community of organisms. Unicellular eukaryotic diatoms are the main primary producers in this environment, where photosynthesis is limited by low concentrations of dissolved iron and large seasonal fluctuations in light, temperature and the extent of sea ice. How diatoms have adapted to this extreme environment is largely unknown. Here we present insights into the genome evolution of a cold-adapted diatom from the Southern Ocean, Fragilariopsis cylindrus, based on a comparison with temperate diatoms. We find that approximately 24.7 per cent of the diploid F. cylindrus genome consists of genetic loci with alleles that are highly divergent (15.1 megabases of the total genome size of 61.1 megabases). These divergent alleles were differentially expressed across environmental conditions, including darkness, low iron, freezing, elevated temperature and increased CO2. Alleles with the largest ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions also show the most pronounced condition-dependent expression, suggesting a correlation between diversifying selection and allelic differentiation. Divergent alleles may be involved in adaptation to environmental fluctuations in the Southern Ocean.

  4. Light manipulation and photonics applications of diatom frustules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanyan

    their applications, manipulation or control of the nanostructure of frustules is desirable. The effect of different light spectra (six different wavelengths throughout the visible range at two light intensities) on the morphology of centric diatom Coscinodiscus granii has been investigated. It has been shown...

  5. Colonization of diatom aggregates by the dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiselius, P.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    . The attached N. scintillans were feeding on the diatoms in the aggregates, as revealed by food-vacuole content. In the particular environment studied, N, scintillans appeared not to depend on aggregate feeding since shipboard experiments showed that clearance rates (10-20 mu l h(-1)) on unaggregated cells were...

  6. Copepod reproduction is unaffected by diatom aldehydes or lipid composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutz, Jörg; Koski, Marja; Jonasdottir, Sigrun

    2008-01-01

    We investigated whether reduced reproductive success of copepods fed with diatoms was related to nutritional imbalances with regard to essential lipids or to the production of inhibitory aldehydes. In 10-d laboratory experiments, feeding, egg production, egg hatching success, and fecal pellet...

  7. Functionalized diatom silica microparticles for removal of mercury ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Addai-Mensah, Jonas; Losic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    Diatom silica microparticles were chemically modified with self-assembled monolayers of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS), 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTES) and n-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMS), and their application for the adsorption of mercury ions (Hg(II)) is demonstrated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the functional groups (–SH or –NH2) were successfully grafted onto the diatom silica surface. The kinetics and efficiency of Hg(II) adsorption were markedly improved by the chemical functionalization of diatom microparticles. The relationship among the type of functional groups, pH and adsorption efficiency of mercury ions was established. The Hg(II) adsorption reached equilibrium within 60 min with maximum adsorption capacities of 185.2, 131.7 and 169.5 mg g−1 for particles functionalized with MPTMS, APTES and AEAPTMS, respectively. The adsorption behavior followed a pseudo-second-order reaction model and Langmuirian isotherm. These results show that mercapto- or amino-functionalized diatom microparticles are promising natural, cost-effective and environmentally benign adsorbents suitable for the removal of mercury ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:27877475

  8. Functionalized diatom silica microparticles for removal of mercury ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu, Jonas Addai-Mensah and Dusan Losic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diatom silica microparticles were chemically modified with self-assembled monolayers of 3-mercaptopropyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS, 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTES and n-(2-aminoethyl-3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMS, and their application for the adsorption of mercury ions (Hg(II is demonstrated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that the functional groups (–SH or –NH2 were successfully grafted onto the diatom silica surface. The kinetics and efficiency of Hg(II adsorption were markedly improved by the chemical functionalization of diatom microparticles. The relationship among the type of functional groups, pH and adsorption efficiency of mercury ions was established. The Hg(II adsorption reached equilibrium within 60 min with maximum adsorption capacities of 185.2, 131.7 and 169.5 mg g-1 for particles functionalized with MPTMS, APTES and AEAPTMS, respectively. The adsorption behavior followed a pseudo-second-order reaction model and Langmuirian isotherm. These results show that mercapto- or amino-functionalized diatom microparticles are promising natural, cost-effective and environmentally benign adsorbents suitable for the removal of mercury ions from aqueous solutions.

  9. CHECKLIST OF DIATOMS FROM THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES

    Science.gov (United States)

    An updated diatom (Bacillariophyta) checklist for the Great Lakes has been completed (J. Great Lakes Res. 1999) and supplants the preliminary checklist (J. Great Lakes Res. 1978). The present list is effectively a 20-year update. The updated list is based upon: 1) the 1978 checkl...

  10. Four new freshwater diatom species (Bacillariophyceae) from Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zidarova, R.; Van de Vijver, B.; Mataloni, G.; Kopalová, K.; Nedbalová, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 4 (2009), s. 295-310 ISSN 0181-1568 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Antarctica * diatoms * James Ross Island Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.574, year: 2009

  11. A SYSTEMATIC ACCOUNT OF SOME SOUTH INDIAN DIATOMS*

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    THE number of papers dealing With systematic accounts of, Diatoins from the different parts of India has been so far very few. The first important account of the diatom flora of the Indian region was given by Grunow (1865) in a paper on the Diatomaceae and Desmidiaceae of the Island of Banka near. Singapore.

  12. The Kinker diatom collection: discovery – exploration – exploitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterrenburg, F.A.S.; Wolf, de H.

    2004-01-01

    Johannes Kinker (1823-1900) was a typical representative of the Victorian ‘amateur-savant’. As a wellto- do stockbroker he was able to invest considerable time and money into studies of nature, first entomology and subsequently diatoms. The latter subject flourished in the late 19th century and,

  13. Does sediment grain size affect diatom grazing by harpacticoid copepods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troch, Marleen; Houthoofd, Lieven; Chepurnov, Victor; Vanreusel, Ann

    2006-04-01

    Estuarine soft sediments support a diverse group of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms though the role of the sediment per se for the functioning of these organisms remains largely unknown. The present study aimed to test the effect of sediment grain size on the grazing activities of harpacticoid copepods. In controlled experiments, two common intertidal harpacticoid species (Paramphiascella fulvofasciata and Nitokra spinipes) were each offered a mix of two benthic diatom species (Navicula phyllepta and Seminavis robusta) in different sedimentary conditions. Several microcosms were created using a variety of sediment types, including fine silt (grained sands (125-250, 250-450, 100-300 microm), artificial 'sediments' of glass beads (250-500, 2000 microm) and even the absence of sediment was tested. The diatoms were enriched in the stable carbon (13)C to facilitate tracing in the harpacticoids. Both copepod species were able to graze on the diatoms with highest uptake when sediment was absent. In contrast, both harpacticoid species showed no uptake in silty conditions. In general, grazing was favoured when mean sediment grain size increased. The strong negative effect of fine grains on the grazer's efficiency can be explained by the resulting differences in the structure (and accessibility) of the diatom biofilm on the one hand and the mobility of the grazer on the other hand. In view of the subtle equilibrium between primary producers and grazers, these results might have important implications for the effect of siltation of tidal flats due to, e.g., human activities.

  14. Decay of delayed light with the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.; Swart, J.

    Intact cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum do not show a smooth afterglow decay curve. After a sharp decline (0–150 msec), a maximum may occur after 4 sec at 17° or after 22 sec at 2°. This maximum is present after excitation with far red light of low intensity, which is absorbed primarily

  15. Enhancement of the reactive iron pool by marine diatoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Fischer, Astrid C.; Kroon, Koos J.; Buma, Anita G. J.; Wolterbeek, Bert Th.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Short term (2 days) laboratory experiments were performed to study the change in irradiance induced production of Fe(II) in seawater in the presence of two open oceanic Southern Ocean diatom species, Thalassiosira sp. and Chaetoceros brevis. Three irradiance conditions were applied: 1) UVB+UVA+VIS,

  16. Determining the possible application value of diatoms as indicators ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    driniev

    of Van Dam et al. (1994), could not be transposed directly to South. African conditions. For this reason the current study investigates the potential use of another ...... WERNER D (ed.) (1977) The Biology of Diatoms.University of California. Press. Berkeley, CA. WILLEMSEN GD, GAST HF, FRANKEN ROG and CUPPEN JGM.

  17. Temperature affects the silicate morphology in a diatom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javaheri, N.; Dries, R; Burson, A.; Stal, L.J.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Silica deposition by diatoms, a common component of the phytoplankton, has attracted considerable interest given the importance in ecology and materials science. There has recently been a great deal of research into the biological control of biosilicifcation, yet the in vivo physical and chemical

  18. Temperature affects the silicate morphology in a diatom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Javaheri, N.; Dries, R.; Burson, A.; Stal, L.J.; Sloot, P.M.A.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Silica deposition by diatoms, a common component of the phytoplankton, has attracted considerable interest given the importance in ecology and materials science. There has recently been a great deal of research into the biological control of biosilicifcation, yet the in vivo physical and

  19. Freshwater diatoms as a source of lipids for biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James M; Graham, Linda E; Zulkifly, Shahrizim B; Pfleger, Brian F; Hoover, Spencer W; Yoshitani, Jun

    2012-03-01

    Until recently, biodiesel production has been derived from terrestrial plants such as soybean and canola, leading to competition between biodiesel production and agricultural production for source materials. Microalgae have the potential to synthesize 30 times more oil per hectare than terrestrial plants without competing for agricultural land. We examined four genera (Cyclotella, Aulacoseira, Fragilaria, Synedra) of common freshwater diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) for growth and lipid content in defined medium (sD11) that replicates hypereutrophic conditions in lakes and wastewater treatment plant effluents and optimized the medium for silicon content. Cyclotella and Aulacoseira produced the highest levels of total lipids, 60 and 43 μg total lipids/ml, respectively. Both diatoms are rich in fatty acids C14, C16, C16:1, C16:2,7,10, and C22:5n3. Of the diatoms examined, Cyclotella reached the highest population density (>2.5 × 10(6) cells/ml) in stationary phase when many of the cells appeared to be filled entirely with oil. Silicon enrichment studies indicated that for optimal utilization of phosphorus and nitrogen by diatoms growing in wastewater effluent, the amount of silicon present or added to the effluent should be 17.5 times the mass of phosphorus in the effluent. With high growth rates, high lipid contents, and rapid settling rates, Cyclotella and Aulacoseira are candidates for biodiesel production.

  20. Immunocytochemical evidence for acidic thylakoids in intact diatom cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, EG; Lee, RE

    2002-01-01

    Using the weak base 3-(2,4-dinitroanilino)-3'-amino-N-methyI propylamine (DAMP) in in situ probing experiments, ultrastructural evidence for the acidic nature of the thylakoids in whole cells has been obtained in three unicellular pennate diatom species, with special emphasis on Navicula salinarum.

  1. Master Robotic Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Lipunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19-20. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovae (including SNIa, search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System, and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes.

  2. Art/Net/Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik; Lindstrøm, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The seminar Art|Net|Work deals with two important changes in our culture. On one side, the network has become essential in the latest technological development. The Internet has entered a new phase, Web 2.0, including the occurrence of as ‘Wiki’s’, ‘Peer-2-Peer’ distribution, user controlled...... the praxis of the artist. We see different kinds of interventions and activism (including ‘hacktivism’) using the network as a way of questioning the invisible rules that govern public and semi-public spaces. Who ‘owns’ them? What kind of social relationships do they generate? On what principle...

  3. Effects of eutrophication on diatom abundance, biovolume and diversity in tropical coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joon Hai; Lee, Choon Weng

    2017-08-03

    Diatom abundance, biovolume and diversity were measured over a 2-year period along the Straits of Malacca at two stations with upper (Klang) and lower (Port Dickson) states of eutrophication. Diatom abundance, which ranged from 0.2 × 10 4 to 21.7 × 10 4  cells L -1 at Klang and 0.9 × 10 3 - 41.3 × 10 3  cells L -1 at Port Dickson, was influenced partly by nutrient concentrations. At Klang, the diatoms were generally smaller and less diverse (H' = 0.77 ± 0.48) and predominated by Skeletonema spp. (60 ± 32% of total diatom biomass). In contrast, diatoms were larger and more diverse (H' = 1.40 ± 0.67) at Port Dickson. Chaetoceros spp. were the most abundant diatoms at Port Dickson but attributed only 48 ± 30% of total diatom biomass. Comparison of both Klang and Port Dickson showed that their diatom community structure differed and that eutrophication reduced diatom diversity at Klang. We also observed how Si(OH) 4 affected the abundance of Skeletonema spp. which in turn influenced the temporal variation of diatom community at Klang. Our results highlighted how eutrophication affects diatom diversity and community structure.

  4. Diversity of planktonic fish larvae along a latitudinal gradient in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean estimated through DNA barcodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ardura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mid-trophic pelagic fish are essential components of marine ecosystems because they represent the link between plankton and higher predators. Moreover, they are the basis of the most important fisheries resources; for example, in African waters. In this study, we have sampled pelagic fish larvae in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean along a latitudinal gradient between 37°N and 2°S. We have employed Bongo nets for plankton sampling and sorted visually fish and fish larvae. Using the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI as a DNA barcode, we have identified 44 OTUs down to species level that correspond to 14 families, with Myctophidae being the most abundant. A few species were cosmopolitan and others latitude-specific, as was expected. The latitudinal pattern of diversity did not exhibit a temperate-tropical cline; instead, it was likely correlated with environmental conditions with a decline in low-oxygen zones. Importantly, gaps and inconsistencies in reference DNA databases impeded accurate identification to the species level of 49% of the individuals. Fish sampled from tropical latitudes and some orders, such as Perciformes, Myctophiformes and Stomiiformes, were largely unidentified due to incomplete references. Some larvae were identified based on morphology and COI analysis for comparing time and costs employed from each methodology. These results suggest the need of reinforcing DNA barcoding reference datasets of Atlantic bathypelagic tropical fish that, as main prey of top predators, are crucial for ecosystem-based management of fisheries resources.

  5. No detectable effect of ocean acidification on plankton metabolism in the NW oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea: Results from two mesocosm studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugendre, L.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Poulton, A. J.; Dellisanti, W.; Gaubert, M.; Guieu, C.; Gazeau, F.

    2017-02-01

    Oligotrophic areas account for about 30% of oceanic primary production and are projected to expand in a warm, high-CO2 world. Changes in primary production in these areas could have important impacts on future global carbon cycling. To assess the response of primary production and respiration of plankton communities to increasing partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) levels in Low Nutrient Low Chorophyll areas, two mesocosm experiments were conducted in the Bay of Calvi (Corsica, France) and in the Bay of Villefranche (France) in June-July 2012 and February-March 2013 under different trophic state, temperature and irradiance conditions. Nine mesocosms of 50 m3 were deployed for 20 and 12 days, respectively, and were subjected to seven pCO2 levels (3 control and 6 elevated levels). The metabolism of the community was studied using several methods based on in situ incubations (oxygen light-dark, 18O and 14C uptake). Increasing pCO2 had no significant effect on gross primary production, net community production, particulate and dissolved carbon production, as well as on community respiration. These two mesocosm experiments, the first performed under maintained low nutrient and low chlorophyll, suggest that in large areas of the ocean, increasing pCO2 levels may not lead to a significant change in plankton metabolic rates and sea surface biological carbon fixation.

  6. Proteorhodopsin lateral gene transfer between marine planktonic Bacteria and Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Martinez, Asuncion; Mincer, Tracy J

    2006-01-01

    's upper water column. The genomic context and phylogenetic relationships of the archaeal and proteobacterial proteorhodopsins indicate its probable lateral transfer between planktonic Bacteria and Archaea. About 10% of the euryarchaeotes in the photic zone contained the proteorhodopsin gene adjacent......Planktonic Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya reside and compete in the ocean's photic zone under the pervasive influence of light. Bacteria in this environment were recently shown to contain photoproteins called proteorhodopsins, thought to contribute to cellular energy metabolism by catalysing light...... to their small-subunit ribosomal RNA. The archaeal proteorhodopsins were also found in other genomic regions, in the same or in different microbial lineages. Although euryarchaeotes were distributed throughout the water column, their proteorhodopsins were found only in the photic zone. The cosmopolitan...

  7. Psd1 Effects on Candida albicans Planktonic Cells and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an important human pathogen, causing opportunistic infections. The adhesion of planktonic cells to a substrate is the first step for biofilm development. The antimicrobial peptide (AMP Psd1 is a defensin isolated from Pisum sativum seeds. We tested the effects of this AMP on C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, comparing its activity with amphotericin B and fluconazole. Three C. albicans variants were studied, one of them a mutant deficient in glucosylceramide synthase, conferring resistance to Psd1 antifungal action. Atomic force microscopy (AFM was used to assess morphological and biomechanical changes on fungal cells. Surface alterations, with membrane disruption and leakage of cellular contents, were observed. Cytometry assays and confocal microscopy imaging showed that Psd1 causes cell death, in a time and concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate Psd1 pleiotropic action against a relevant fungal human pathogen, suggesting its use as natural antimycotic agent.

  8. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matz, Carsten; Jurgens, K.

    2005-01-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated...... size revealed highest grazing losses for moderately motile bacteria with a cell size between 0.2 and 0.4 mum(3). Grazing mortality was lowest for cells of >0.5 mum(3) and small, highly motile bacteria. Survival efficiencies of >95% for the ultramicrobacterial isolate CP-1 (less than or equal to0.1 mum......(3), >50 mum s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing....

  9. Plankton networks driving carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Lionel; Chaffron, Samuel; Bittner, Lucie; Eveillard, Damien; Larhlimi, Abdelhalim; Roux, Simon; Darzi, Youssef; Audic, Stephane; Berline, Léo; Brum, Jennifer; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Espinoza, Julio Cesar Ignacio; Malviya, Shruti; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Dimier, Céline; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Picheral, Marc; Poulain, Julie; Searson, Sarah; Stemmann, Lars; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Speich, Sabrina; Follows, Mick; Karp-Boss, Lee; Boss, Emmanuel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stephane; Weissenbach, Jean; Wincker, Patrick; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; de Vargas, Colomban; Iudicone, Daniele; Sullivan, Matthew B; Raes, Jeroen; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Gorsky, Gabriel

    2016-04-28

    The biological carbon pump is the process by which CO2 is transformed to organic carbon via photosynthesis, exported through sinking particles, and finally sequestered in the deep ocean. While the intensity of the pump correlates with plankton community composition, the underlying ecosystem structure driving the process remains largely uncharacterized. Here we use environmental and metagenomic data gathered during the Tara Oceans expedition to improve our understanding of carbon export in the oligotrophic ocean. We show that specific plankton communities, from the surface and deep chlorophyll maximum, correlate with carbon export at 150 m and highlight unexpected taxa such as Radiolaria and alveolate parasites, as well as Synechococcus and their phages, as lineages most strongly associated with carbon export in the subtropical, nutrient-depleted, oligotrophic ocean. Additionally, we show that the relative abundance of a few bacterial and viral genes can predict a significant fraction of the variability in carbon export in these regions.

  10. Helminth.net: expansions to Nematode.net and an introduction to Trematode.net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce A.; Ozersky, Philip; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Bhonagiri-Palsikar, Veena; Tyagi, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Choi, Young-Jun; Gao, Xin; McNulty, Samantha N.; Brindley, Paul J.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Helminth.net (http://www.helminth.net) is the new moniker for a collection of databases: Nematode.net and Trematode.net. Within this collection we provide services and resources for parasitic roundworms (nematodes) and flatworms (trematodes), collectively known as helminths. For over a decade we have provided resources for studying nematodes via our veteran site Nematode.net (http://nematode.net). In this article, (i) we provide an update on the expansions of Nematode.net that hosts omics data from 84 species and provides advanced search tools to the broad scientific community so that data can be mined in a useful and user-friendly manner and (ii) we introduce Trematode.net, a site dedicated to the dissemination of data from flukes, flatworm parasites of the class Trematoda, phylum Platyhelminthes. Trematode.net is an independent component of Helminth.net and currently hosts data from 16 species, with information ranging from genomic, functional genomic data, enzymatic pathway utilization to microbiome changes associated with helminth infections. The databases’ interface, with a sophisticated query engine as a backbone, is intended to allow users to search for multi-factorial combinations of species’ omics properties. This report describes updates to Nematode.net since its last description in NAR, 2012, and also introduces and presents its new sibling site, Trematode.net. PMID:25392426

  11. NETS FOR PEACH PROTECTED CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of coloured nets used to protect a peach cultivation. The modifications of the solar spectral distribution, mainly in the R and FR wavelength band, influence plant photomorphogenesis by means of the phytochrome and cryptochrome. The phytochrome response is characterized in terms of radiation rate in the red wavelengths (R, 600-700 nm to that in the farred radiation (FR, 700-800 nm, i.e. the R/FR ratio. The effects of the blue radiation (B, 400-500 nm is investigated by the ratio between the blue radiation and the far-red radiation, i.e. the B/FR ratio. A BLUE net, a RED net, a YELLOW net, a PEARL net, a GREY net and a NEUTRAL net were tested in Bari (Italy, latitude 41° 05’ N. Peach trees were located in pots inside the greenhouses and in open field. The growth of the trees cultivated in open field was lower in comparison to the growth of the trees grown under the nets. The RED, PEARL, YELLOW and GREY nets increased the growth of the trees more than the other nets. The nets positively influenced the fruit characteristics, such as fruit weight and flesh firmness.

  12. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (paluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated aluminium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Diatoms and diatomaceous earth as novel poultry vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazmi, A; Hauck, R; Davis, A; Hildebrand, M; Corbeil, L B; Gallardo, R A

    2017-02-01

    Diatoms are single cell eukaryotic microalgae; their surface possesses a porous nanostructured silica cell wall or frustule. Diatomaceous earth (DE) or diatomite is a natural siliceous sediment of diatoms. Since silica has been proved to have adjuvant capabilities, we propose that diatoms and DE may provide an inexpensive and abundant source of adjuvant readily available to use in livestock vaccines.In a first experiment, the safety of diatoms used as an adjuvant for in-ovo vaccination was investigated. In a second experiment, we assessed the humoral immune response after one in-ovo vaccination with inactivated Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) and DE as adjuvant followed by 2 subcutaneous boosters on d 21 and 29 of age. In both experiments, results were compared to Freund's incomplete adjuvant and aluminum hydroxide.No detrimental effects on hatchability and chick quality were detected after in-ovo inoculation of diatoms and DE in experiments 1 and 2 respectively. In experiment 2 no humoral responses were detected after the in-ovo vaccination until 29 d of age. Seven d after the second subcutaneous booster an antibody response against NDV was detected in chickens that had received vaccines adjuvanted with Freund's incomplete adjuvant, aluminum hydroxide, and DE. These responses became significantly higher 10 d after the second booster. Finally, 15 d after the second booster, the humoral responses induced by the vaccine with Freund's incomplete adjuvant were statistically higher, followed by comparable responses induced by vaccines containing DE or aluminum hydroxide that were significantly higher than DE+PBS, PBS+INDV and PBS alone. From an applied perspective, we can propose that DE can serve as a potential adjuvant for vaccines against poultry diseases. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  14. Adaptation of marine plankton to environmental stress by glycolipid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašparović, Blaženka; Godrijan, Jelena; Frka, Sanja; Tomažić, Igor; Penezić, Abra; Marić, Daniela; Djakovac, Tamara; Ivančić, Ingrid; Paliaga, Paolo; Lyons, Daniel; Precali, Robert; Tepić, Nataša

    2013-12-01

    A systematic investigation of non-phosphorus containing glycolipids (GL) was conducted in the northern Adriatic Sea during two years at two stations with different nutrient loads. GL concentration varied both spatially and temporally, with values of 1.1-21.5 μg/L and 0.4-44.7 μg/L in the particulate and the dissolved fraction, respectively. The highest concentrations were measured during summer in surface waters and at the more oligotrophic station, where GL yields (% of total lipids) were often higher than 20% and 50% in the particulate and dissolved fractions, respectively. To obtain more insight into factors governing GL accumulation autotrophic plankton community structure (pico-, nano- and microplankton fractions), chlorophyll a, heterotrophic bacteria and nutrient concentrations were measured together with hydrographic parameters and sunlight intensity. During the investigated period smaller autotrophic plankton cells (pico- and followed by nanoplankton) prevailed in abundance over larger cells (microplankton), which were found in large numbers in freshened surface samples. Several major findings resulted from the study. Firstly, during PO4 limitation, particularly at the oligotrophic station, enhanced glycolipid instead of phospholipid accumulation takes place, representing an effective phosphate-conserving mechanism. Secondly, results suggest that at seawater temperatures >19 °C autotrophic plankton considerably accumulate GL, probably to achieve thermal stability. Thirdly, high sunlight intensities seem to influence increased GL accumulation; GL possibly plays a role in cell mechanisms that prevent/mitigate photooxidation. And finally, substantial accumulation of GL detected in the dissolved fraction could be related to the fact that GL do not contain biologically relevant elements, like phosphorus, which makes them an unattractive substrate for enzyme activity. Therefore, substantial portion of CO2 could be removed from the atmosphere in P

  15. Understanding amine catalyzed silica polymerization : diatoms as bioarchitects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoerke, Erik David; Aubry, Sylvie; Lane, Pamela; Robinson, David B; Bauer, Christina A.; Zendejas, Frank; Tran, Huu; Lane, Todd W.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

    2007-10-01

    Current state-of-the-art biomimetic methodologies employed worldwide for the realization of self-assembled nanomaterials are adequate for certain unique applications, but a major breakthrough is needed if these nanomaterials are to obtain their true promise and potential. These routes typically utilize a 'top-down' approach in terms of controlling the nucleation, growth, and deposition of structured nanomaterials. Most of these techniques are inherently limited to primarily 2D and simple 3D structures, and are therefore limited in their ultimate functionality and field of use. Zeolites, one of the best-known and understood synthetic silica structures, typically possess highly ordered silica domains over very small length scales. The development of truly organized and hierarchical zeolites over several length scales remains an intense area of research world wide. Zeolites typically require high-temperature and complex synthesis routes that negatively impact certain economic parameters and, therefore, the ultimate utility of these materials. Nonetheless, zeolite usage is in the tons per year worldwide and is quickly becoming ubiquitous in its applications. In addition to these more mature aspects of current practices in materials science, one of the most promising fields of nanotechnology lies in the advent and control of biologically self-assembled materials, especially those involved with silica and other ceramics such as hydroxyapatite. Nature has derived, through billions of years of evolutionary steps, numerous methods by which fault-tolerant and mechanically robust structures can be created with exquisite control and precision at relatively low temperature ranges and pressures. Diatoms are one of the best known examples that exhibit this degree of structure and control known that is involved with the biomineralization of silica. Diatoms are eukaryotic algae that are ubiquitous in marine and freshwater environments. They are a dominant form of

  16. Effect of Bacterial Microbiota on the Silica Uptake of the Marine Diatom, Odontella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, E. J.; Kempnich, M.; Sison-Mangus, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diatoms are the most prolific primary producers in the ocean and are known to dominate the phytoplankton community when nutrients become available. Diatoms require silica for growth in order to produce their silica wall frustules. Studies pertaining to silica uptake in diatoms have recently become possible with the use of PDMPO [2-(4-pyridyl)-5{[4-dimethylaminoethyl-aminocarbamoyl]-methoxy}phenyl]oxazole], a dye which selectively binds to free silica and can effectively be used to demonstrate silica uptake and deposition in diatoms. Many factors affect the growth of diatoms, including their bacterial associates or microbiome. Some members of their microbiota can increase diatom growth while others stunt their growth and eventually lyse them. Bacteria-free diatoms, on the other hand, have significantly lower growth than diatoms associating with bacteria. Here we ask if the silica uptake of Odontella sp. was influenced by co-culture with various types of bacteria. Silicification was measured using spectrophotometry to calculate PDMPO concentration as a proxy for silica uptake. We found that axenic cultures have the lowest silica uptake while non-axenic diatoms and diatoms co-cultured with the bacteria from Bacteroidetes (Cellulophaga), Firmicutes (Planococcus) and Gamma-proteobacteria (Vibrio) have varying effects on the silica uptake of the 3 diatoms. This study adds another piece of evidence that bacteria can play an important role on the growth and development of the diatoms. This work suggests that different types of bacteria can have a profound effect on the survival and ecological success of diatoms and bacterial associates should be considered when studying diatom's biology and ecology.

  17. When glaciers and ice sheets melt: consequences for planktonic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2016-01-01

    The current melting of glaciers and ice sheets is a consequence of climatic change and their turbid meltwaters are filling and enlarging many new proglacial and ice-contact lakes around the world, as well as affecting coastal areas. Paradoxically, very little is known on the ecology of turbid glacier-fed aquatic ecosystems even though they are at the origin of the most common type of lakes on Earth. Here, I discuss the consequences of those meltwaters for planktonic organisms. A remarkable characteristic of aquatic ecosystems receiving the discharge of meltwaters is their high content of mineral suspensoids, so-called glacial flour that poses a real challenge for filter-feeding planktonic taxa such as Daphnia and phagotrophic groups such as heterotrophic nanoflagellates. The planktonic food-web structure in highly turbid meltwater lakes seems to be truncated and microbially dominated. Low underwater light levels leads to unfavorable conditions for primary producers, but at the same time, cause less stress by UV radiation. Meltwaters are also a source of inorganic and organic nutrients that could stimulate secondary prokaryotic production and in some cases (e.g. in distal proglacial lakes) also phytoplankton primary production. How changes in turbidity and in other related environmental factors influence diversity, community composition and adaptation have only recently begun to be studied. Knowledge of the consequences of glacier retreat for glacier-fed lakes and coasts will be crucial to predict ecosystem trajectories regarding changes in biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles and function. PMID:26869738

  18. Experimentally determined temperature thresholds for Arctic plankton community metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Holding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate warming is especially severe in the Arctic, where the average temperature is increasing 0.4 °C per decade, two to three times higher than the global average rate. Furthermore, the Arctic has lost more than half of its summer ice extent since 1980 and predictions suggest that the Arctic will be ice free in the summer as early as 2050, which could increase the rate of warming. Predictions based on the metabolic theory of ecology assume that temperature increase will enhance metabolic rates and thus both the rate of primary production and respiration will increase. However, these predictions do not consider the specific metabolic balance of the communities. We tested, experimentally, the response of Arctic plankton communities to seawater temperature spanning from 1 °C to 10 °C. Two types of communities were tested, open-ocean Arctic communities from water collected in the Barents Sea and Atlantic influenced fjord communities from water collected in the Svalbard fjord system. Metabolic rates did indeed increase as suggested by metabolic theory, however these results suggest an experimental temperature threshold of 5 °C, beyond which the metabolism of plankton communities shifts from autotrophic to heterotrophic. This threshold is also validated by field measurements across a range of temperatures which suggested a temperature 5.4 °C beyond which Arctic plankton communities switch to heterotrophy. Barents Sea communities showed a much clearer threshold response to temperature manipulations than fjord communities.

  19. Massive consumption of gelatinous plankton by Mediterranean apex predators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Cardona

    Full Text Available Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus, little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus, spearfish (Tetrapturus belone and swordfish (Xiphias gladius. Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix, blue shark (Prionace glauca, leerfish (Lichia amia, bonito (Sarda sarda, striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga, amberjack (Seriola dumerili, blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola, bullet tuna (Auxis rochei, dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus, horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus, mackerel (Scomber scombrus and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish, most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing.

  20. [Research advances in ecological stoichiometry of marine plankton].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Chao-Lun

    2014-10-01

    Ecological stoichiometry can be simply defined as: The biology of elements from molecules to the biosphere, which spans all levels of the environment and of the life. It's a new idea to build a unified theory and becomes an inevitable trend to develop the ecological science. Marine ecosystems, which contribute to 50% of the biosphere biomass, are the important component of the global biogeochemical cycles. Marine zooplankton plays an important role in the material circulation and energy flow of marine ecosystems and serves as a connecting link between the preceding and the following in a more precise understanding of the key elemental cycles. However, research on ecological stoichiometry of marine plankton is fragmentary and rare. This article summarized the ecological phenomena and mechanisms of limiting elements affecting marine plankton, the response of biochemical substances to nutrition limitation, and the food chain transmission and feedback of nutrition limitation. Meanwhile, we also put forward some perspectives for future research of ecological stoichiometry of plankton in China' s seas.

  1. Massive consumption of gelatinous plankton by Mediterranean apex predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Luis; Álvarez de Quevedo, Irene; Borrell, Assumpció; Aguilar, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus), spearfish (Tetrapturus belone) and swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola) also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), blue shark (Prionace glauca), leerfish (Lichia amia), bonito (Sarda sarda), striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba) and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga), amberjack (Seriola dumerili), blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus) were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage) and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish), most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing.

  2. On some relationships between storms and plankton dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, F.

    2010-06-01

    The physico-chemical fields of the pelagic environment are constantly fluctuating at different spatial and temporal scales. Storms are extreme events of such fluctuations that cascade down to small scales to alter nutrient availability to microscopic algae or swimming and mating behaviour of motile plankton. Mediterranean storms sometimes are also responsible for the transport of micro and macronutrients from Saharan origin, albeit the significance for marine production is still under question. In coastal ecosystems, storms represent dissolved nutrient injections via run-off and resuspension that trigger planktonic succession events. Storms may also have a role in the development and mitigation of harmful algal blooms, events with economic and health consequences that are of growing societal concern. Based on laboratory experiments on the effects of turbulence on swimming behaviour and population growth of dinoflagellates, a conceptual sequence of events is proposed for bloom initiation. Overall, storms affect, directly or indirectly, the dynamics of plankton and hence ecosystem production and cannot be considered catastrophic or hazardous in this context. The full potential of such relationships will be evidenced once biological time series match the resolution and spatial coverage of meteorological and oceanic data. As the frequency and intensity of storms is subject to global change, future oceanic ecosystem production should be affected as well.

  3. Water quality and plankton populations in an earthen polyculture pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LH. Sipaúba-Tavares

    Full Text Available This work was carried out during one year in a fish pond to evaluate the effect of water quality in a plankton community according to the adopted management. High densities of Euglenophyceae, Chlorophyceae and Cyanobacteria were associated with high nitrate levels (1 to 210 mg.L-1. Cell densities of Cyanobacteria over 90 ind.m³ × 10³ (85.5% occurred when nitrate concentrations approximated 210 mg.L-1, total phosphorus less than 160 mg.L-1 and temperature above 25 °C. High density of Rotifera was associated with high density of Cyanobacteria (December. Only Trichocerca sp. among the Rotifera species was constant in all sampled sites, whereas Diaphanosoma birgei, ranging between 4 and 342 ind.L-1 (0.7 and 2.4% during the study period, was the most representative among the Cladocera species. Results show that water quality management in the fish pond had a direct influence on the plankton population due to the shallowness of the environment, large nutrient discharges through feed, fertilizing, fish waste. In fact, they contribute towards the appearance of undesirable plankton organisms.

  4. Planktonic Subsidies to Surf-Zone and Intertidal Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Steven G; Shanks, Alan L; MacMahan, Jamie H; Reniers, Ad J H M; Feddersen, Falk

    2018-01-03

    Plankton are transported onshore, providing subsidies of food and new recruits to surf-zone and intertidal communities. The transport of plankton to the surf zone is influenced by wind, wave, and tidal forcing, and whether they enter the surf zone depends on alongshore variation in surf-zone hydrodynamics caused by the interaction of breaking waves with coastal morphology. Areas with gently sloping shores and wide surf zones typically have orders-of-magnitude-higher concentrations of plankton in the surf zone and dense larval settlement in intertidal communities because of the presence of bathymetric rip currents, which are absent in areas with steep shores and narrow surf zones. These striking differences in subsidies have profound consequences; areas with greater subsidies support more productive surf-zone communities and possibly more productive rocky intertidal communities. Recognition of the importance of spatial subsidies for rocky community dynamics has recently advanced ecological theory, and incorporating surf-zone hydrodynamics would be an especially fruitful line of investigation.

  5. Massive Consumption of Gelatinous Plankton by Mediterranean Apex Predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Luis; Álvarez de Quevedo, Irene; Borrell, Assumpció; Aguilar, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to test the hypothesis that stomach content analysis has systematically overlooked the consumption of gelatinous zooplankton by pelagic mesopredators and apex predators. The results strongly supported a major role of gelatinous plankton in the diet of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus), little tunny (Euthynnus alletteratus), spearfish (Tetrapturus belone) and swordfish (Xiphias gladius). Loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the oceanic stage and ocean sunfish (Mola mola) also primarily relied on gelatinous zooplankton. In contrast, stable isotope ratios ruled out any relevant consumption of gelatinous plankton by bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix), blue shark (Prionace glauca), leerfish (Lichia amia), bonito (Sarda sarda), striped dolphin (Stenella caerueloalba) and loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the neritic stage, all of which primarily relied on fish and squid. Fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) were confirmed as crustacean consumers. The ratios of stable isotopes in albacore (Thunnus alalunga), amberjack (Seriola dumerili), blue butterfish (Stromaeus fiatola), bullet tuna (Auxis rochei), dolphinfish (Coryphaena hyppurus), horse mackerel (Trachurus trachurus), mackerel (Scomber scombrus) and pompano (Trachinotus ovatus) were consistent with mixed diets revealed by stomach content analysis, including nekton and crustaceans, but the consumption of gelatinous plankton could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion, the jellyvorous guild in the Mediterranean integrates two specialists (ocean sunfish and loggerhead sea turtles in the oceanic stage) and several opportunists (bluefin tuna, little tunny, spearfish, swordfish and, perhaps, blue butterfish), most of them with shrinking populations due to overfishing. PMID:22470416

  6. The structure and diversity of freshwater diatom assemblages from Franz Josef Land Archipelago: a northern outpost for freshwater diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi Pla-Rabés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined diatom assemblages from 18 stream and pond samples in the Franz Josef Land Archipelago (FJL, the most northern land of Eurasia. More than 216 taxa were observed, revealing a rich circumpolar diatom flora, including many undescribed taxa. Widely distributed taxa were the most abundant by cell densities, while circumpolar taxa were the most species rich. Stream and pond habitats hosted different assemblages, and varied along a pH gradient. Diatoma tenuis was the most abundant and ubiquitous taxon. However, several circumpolar taxa such as Chamaepinnularia gandrupii, Cymbella botellus, Psammothidium sp. and Humidophila laevissima were also found in relatively high abundances. Aerophilic taxa were an important component of FJL diatom assemblages (Humidophila spp., Caloneis spp. and Pinnularia spp., reflecting the large and extreme seasonal changes in Arctic conditions. We predict a decrease in the abundance of circumpolar taxa, an increase in local (α- freshwater diatom diversity, but a decrease in regional diversity (circumpolar homogenization as a result of current warming trends and to a lesser extent the increasing human footprint in the region.

  7. The influence of nitrogen inputs on biomass and trophic structure of ocean plankton: a study using biomass and stable isotope size-spectra

    KAUST Repository

    Mompeán, Carmen

    2016-08-18

    Large scale patterns in planktonic food web structure were studied by applying continuous size-scaled models of biomass and δ15N to plankton samples, collected at 145 stations during the Malaspina-2010 Expedition across three ocean basins and including major biomes. Carbon biomass and δ15N were determined in size-fractionated samples (40 to 5000 μm) collected by vertical hauls (0–200 m). Biomass-normalized size-spectra were constructed to summarize food web structure and spatial patterns in spectral parameters were analyzed using geographically-weighted regression analysis. Except in the northwestern Atlantic, size-spectra showed low variability, reflecting a homogeneity in nitrogen sources and food web structure for the central oceans. Estimated predator-to-prey mass ratios <104 and mean trophic transfer efficiency values between 16% (coastal biome) and >20% (Trades and Westerlies biomes) suggested that oceanic plankton food webs may support a larger number of trophic levels than current estimates based on high efficiency values. The largest changes in spectral parameters and nitrogen sources were related to inputs of atmospheric nitrogen, either from diazotrophic organisms or dust deposition. These results suggest geographic homogeneity in the net transfer of nitrogen up the food web.

  8. Plankton community structure: evaluation of analytical methods using model communities. Final report. [Effects of effluents on plankton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, W. B.

    1976-07-01

    The general purpose of this project was to provide information that might be of use to biologists who are investigating the effects of effluents on plankton. Although most applicable to non-persistent pollutants, such as thermal effluents, the methodology may be applied in some degree to nondegradable pollutants as well. The purpose of the present study was, therefore, to provide some information about the relative effectiveness of certain representative affinity tests, in circumstances that would be analogous to those encountered in an impact investigation on plankton. In such a study, real data cannot be used, if the purpose is to show the efficiency of a test at detecting groups with known characteristics; artificial data must be employed in which those characteristics are built in. For that reason, a distribution model was to generate the data for computer analysis.

  9. Inorganic carbon acquisition in potentially toxic and non-toxic diatoms: the effect of pH-induced changes in the seawater carbonate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trimborn, S; Lundholm, Nina; Thoms, S

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pH-induced changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on inorganic carbon (C-i) acquisition and domoic acid (DA) production were studied in two potentially toxic diatom species, Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Nitzschia navis-varingica, and the non-toxic Stellarima stellaris. In vivo......H. In terms of carbon source, all species took up both CO2 and HCO3-. K-1/2 values for inorganic carbon uptake decreased with increasing pH in two species, while in N. navis-varingica apparent affinities did not change. While the contribution of HCO3- to net fixation was more than 85% in S. stellaris...

  10. The equivalency between logic Petri workflow nets and workflow nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, ShuXia; Du, YuYue

    2015-01-01

    Logic Petri nets (LPNs) can describe and analyze batch processing functions and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems. Logic Petri workflow nets (LPWNs) are proposed based on LPNs in this paper. Process mining is regarded as an important bridge between modeling and analysis of data mining and business process. Workflow nets (WF-nets) are the extension to Petri nets (PNs), and have successfully been used to process mining. Some shortcomings cannot be avoided in process mining, such as duplicate tasks, invisible tasks, and the noise of logs. The online shop in electronic commerce in this paper is modeled to prove the equivalence between LPWNs and WF-nets, and advantages of LPWNs are presented.

  11. The planktonic communities of the Jamaican south-east coast; a comparison of harbor, shelf and oceanic areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Small

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have compared water quality and plankton along the eutrophication gradient from Kingston Harbour to oceanic waters around Jamaica. To compare the planktonic community along the expected nutrient gradient, we sampled every two weeks at four stations, from eutrophic Kingston Harbour to oceanic California Bank. Phytoplankton was assessed from whole water Niskin bottle casts and zooplankton by vertical hauls with plankton nets of three different mesh sizes: 64µm, 200µm, and 600µm. Total phytoplankton biomass declined sharply away from the harbour (1.0 μg L-1 at the Harbour Shoal Beacon to 0.2 μg L-1 at California Bank. Characteristic estuarine phytoplankton genera -such as Ceratium, Gonyaulax, Gyrodinium and Rhizosolenia- dominated harbour samples while genera characteristic of offshore locations -such as Asterionelliopsis, Navicula, Nitzschia, Rhizosolenia and Thalassionema- dominated California Bank. Highest phytoplankton densities (mean values of 34 174 cells L-1 were found at the harbor mouth. Mean zooplankton abundances ranged from maximum (5 858.5m-3 at Beacon to minimum (2 124.2 m-3 at California; 171 species of zooplankton were identified and copepods dominated with 76 species. Overall, 75 species of zooplankton were identified from Beacon, 107 from Port Royal Cays- South East Cay, 110 from the exposed shelf edge- Windward Edge, and 95 from the oceanic California Bank. Larval forms dominated; copepod nauplii, fish eggs and echinoderm larvae occurred at all sites. Lucifer faxoni and Penilia avirostris were indicative of harbor waters and Microsetella sp. and Farranula carinata of offshore waters. Some zooplankton taxa, like L. faxoni, Paracalanus parvus and copepod nauplii, despite showing gradual decline with distance from Beacon to the Edge, increased in abundance at the furthest station, California. California Bank clearly experiences enrichment which at times can be as high as near-shore areas, but the planktonic

  12. Oligocene planktonic foraminifera: an overview of the new atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia; Constandache, Monica; Wade, Bridget; Pearson, Paul N.; Olsson, Richard K.; Huber, Brian T.; Hemleben, Christoph; Leckie, Mark; Berggren, William A.; Coxall, Helen K.; Premec Fucek, Vlasta; Morana Hernitz Kucenjak, Morana; Premoli Silva, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    We, the Paleogene Planktonic Foraminifera Working Group, have recently completed a revision of the taxonomy, paleoecology, evolutionary relationships and stratigraphic distribution of planktonic foraminifera from the Oligocene Epoch for the forthcoming Atlas on Oligocene Planktonic Foramnifera. This will follow our two previous contributions that focused on Paleocene and Eocene planktonic foraminifera. As was the case in the previous two Atlases, we adopt a type-based taxonomy, focusing our investigations on scanning electron micrographs of the type specimens, where possible, and accompanied by extensive illustration of material from around the world. The resulting photographic plates demonstrate the range in morphological variability permitted to our refined taxa concepts throughout their geographic range and in material with differing preservation styles. The Atlas of Oligocene Planktonic Foraminifera is composed of 21 chapters in which all the species spanning the Oligocene and Early Miocene are documented. A total of 127 species, of which 15 are new, 26 genera, of which 3 are new, are described. Analysis of wall structures forms the basis of our higher classification, dividing the group into microperforate, spinose and nonspinose groups. A revised biostratigraphic zonation of the "O" zones has been developed in parallel with this work. Novel aspects of the taxonomy include for example: 1) Pore density and pore diameter have been used for the taxonomic identification of some genera, to distinguish among the several globular r-strategist taxa occurring in the Oligocene 2) Two new macroperforate and three microperforate wall texture types have been identified and described. 3) The phylogeny for the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene Globigerinoides is proposed, and 14 species have been identified 3 of which are new. 4) Globorotaloides suteri is revised and reintroduced as a valid species. The origin of the extant taxon Globorotalides hexagonus is traced to the

  13. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    studies that illustrate the practical use of CPN modelling and validation for design, specification, simulation, verification and implementation in various application domains. Their presentation primarily aims at readers interested in the practical use of CPN. Thus all concepts and constructs are first......Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. The development of such systems is particularly challenging because of inherent intricacies like possible nondeterminism...... and the immense number of possible execution sequences. In this textbook, Jensen and Kristensen introduce the constructs of the CPN modelling language and present the related analysis methods in detail. They also provide a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN by showcasing selected industrial case...

  14. Plankton communities and summertime declines in algal abundance associated with low dissolved oxygen in the Tualatin River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kurt D.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton populations in the Tualatin River in northwestern Oregon are an important component of the dissolved oxygen (DO) budget of the river and are critical for maintaining DO levels in summer. During the low-flow summer period, sufficient nutrients and a long residence time typically combine with ample sunshine and warm water to fuel blooms of cryptophyte algae, diatoms, green and blue-green algae in the low-gradient, slow-moving reservoir reach of the lower river. Algae in the Tualatin River generally drift with the water rather than attach to the river bottom as a result of moderate water depths, slightly elevated turbidity caused by suspended colloidal material, and dominance of silty substrates. Growth of algae occurs as if on a “conveyor belt” of streamflow, a dynamic system that is continually refreshed with inflowing water. Transit through the system can take as long as 2 weeks during the summer low-flow period. Photosynthetic production of DO during algal blooms is important in offsetting oxygen consumption at the sediment-water interface caused by the decomposition of organic matter from primarily terrestrial sources, and the absence of photosynthesis can lead to low DO concentrations that can harm aquatic life. The periods with the lowest DO concentrations in recent years (since 2003) typically occur in August following a decline in algal abundance and activity, when DO concentrations often decrease to less than State standards for extended periods (nearly 80 days). Since 2003, algal populations have tended to be smaller and algal blooms have terminated earlier compared to conditions in the 1990s, leading to more frequent declines in DO to levels that do not meet State standards. This study was developed to document the current abundance and species composition of phytoplankton in the Tualatin River, identify the possible causes of the general decline in algae, and evaluate hypotheses to explain why algal blooms diminish in midsummer. Plankton

  15. Kinetic control on Zn isotope signatures recorded in marine diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbberich, Michael; Vance, Derek

    2017-08-01

    Marine diatoms dominate the oceanic cycle of the essential micronutrient zinc (Zn). The stable isotopes of zinc and other metals are increasingly used to understand trace metal micronutrient cycling in the oceans. One clear feature of the early isotope data is the heavy Zn isotope signature of the average oceanic dissolved pool relative to the inputs, potentially driven by uptake of light isotopes into phytoplankton cells and export to sediments. However, despite the fact that diatoms strip Zn from surface waters across the Antarctic polar front in the Southern Ocean, the local upper ocean is not isotopically heavy. Here we use culturing experiments to quantify the extent of Zn isotope fractionation by diatoms and to elucidate the mechanisms driving it. We have cultured two different open-ocean diatom species (T. oceanica and Chaetoceros sp.) in a series of experiments at constant medium Zn concentration but at bioavailable medium Fe ranging from limiting to replete. We find that T. oceanica can maintain high growth rates and Zn uptake rates over the full range of bioavailable iron (Fe) investigated, and that the Zn taken up has a δ66Zn that is unfractionated relative to that of the bioavailable free Zn in the medium. The studied representative of the genus Chaetoceros, on the other hand, shows more significantly reduced Zn uptake rates at low Fe and records more variable biomass δ66Zn signatures, of up to 0.85‰ heavier than the medium. We interpret the preferential uptake of heavy isotopes at extremely low Zn uptake rates as potentially due to either of the following two mechanisms. First, the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), at low Fe levels, may preferentially scavenge heavy Zn isotopes. Second, the Zn uptake rate may be slow enough to establish pseudo-equilibrium conditions at the transporter site, with heavy Zn isotopes forming more stable surface complexes. Thus we find that, in our experiments, Fe-limitation exerts a key control that

  16. The species concept in a marine diatom: LSU rDNA–based phylogenetic differentiation in Skeletonema marinoi/dohrnii (Bacillariophyceae) is not reflected in morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Marianne; Godhe, Anna; Härnström, Karolina

    2008-01-01

    and Canada) included in the study showed differences in LSU rDNA sequence within the morphospecies, with differences seen even among clones established from a single plankton net sample. Morphologically, all clones were indistinguishable from each other and from the closely related species Skeletonema...... dohrnii. In the original description of these two species, they were differentiated by the structure of the girdle bands. However, the girdle band types of both species were found within single samples of almost all clones of S. marinoi in this study. The LSU-based phylogeny is consistent with the split...... and DNA sequence analysis, and such questions are addressed here....

  17. Using benthic diatom assemblages to assess human impacts on streams across a rural to urban gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Cao, Jin-Xiang; Pei, Guo-Feng; Liu, Guo-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Benthic diatom assemblages on the natural substrata were investigated at 21 sites of the Ganhe River watershed (China) once per season and in addition, early spring in 2013. A total of 487 diatom taxa from 36 genera were identified during five investigations. The assemblages were dominated by Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kützing) Czarnecki and Cocconeis placentula in the rural reach, whereas Navicula, Nitzschia, and Gomphonema species were characteristic of urbanized sites. Our results suggest that biodiversity was positively related to high nutrient levels and strongly negatively related to diatom-based indices. The periphyton biomass (expressed as chlorophyll a and ash-free dry mass) was not related to water quality. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) showed that the nutrient concentration gradient was the most important factor that affected the diatom assemblage composition and species distribution. The diatom-based indices (specific pollution sensitivity index (IPS), biological diatom index (IBD), and trophic diatom index (TDI)) were significantly positively correlated with water quality and are adequate for use in China. Slight changes in the biodiversity and diatom-based indices followed a temporal pattern. The species composition was less related to the season or hydrological characteristics of the river but more strongly related to differences in the trophic status. In this region, urbanization masked the impact of rural land use on benthic diatoms. The research will expand the understanding of using benthic diatom assemblages for water quality monitoring in urban streams and improve watershed-scale management and conservation efforts in the Ganhe River, China.

  18. Using diatom indices for water quality assessment in a subtropical river, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiang; Sheldon, Fran; Bunn, Stuart E; Zhang, Quanfa

    2013-06-01

    Diatoms have been regularly used as bioindicators to assess water quality of surface waters. However, diatom-based indices developed for a specific geographic region may not be appropriate elsewhere. We sampled benthic diatom assemblages in the upper Han River, a subtropical river in China, to evaluate applicability of 14 diatom-based indices used worldwide for water quality assessment. A total of 194 taxa from 31 genera were identified in the dry season and 139 taxa from 23 genera in the wet season. During the dry season, significant relationships were found for all but one of the diatom-based indices (Index Diatom Artois-Picardie) with one or more physical and chemical variables including nutrients and ion concentrations in river waters. The Biological Diatom Index (IBD) and diatom-based eutrophication/pollution index (EPI-D) were strongly related to trophic status and ionic content, while Watanabe's Index was related to organic pollution and conductivity. Yet, the diatom indices showed weak relationships with physical and chemical variables during the wet season. It suggests that diatom-based indices developed in Europe can be applied with confidence as bioindicators of water quality in subtropical rivers of China, at least during base-flow conditions.

  19. Mare Incognitum: A Glimpse into Future Plankton Diversity and Ecology Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chust, Guillem; Vallina, Sergio M.; Gaborit, Charlie; Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée

    2017-01-01

    With global climate change altering marine ecosystems, research on plankton ecology is likely to navigate uncharted seas. Yet, a staggering wealth of new plankton observations, integrated with recent advances in marine ecosystem modeling, may shed light on marine ecosystem structure and functioning. A EuroMarine foresight workshop on the “Impact of climate change on the distribution of plankton functional and phylogenetic diversity” (PlankDiv) identified five grand challenges for future plank...

  20. Planktonic communities and chaotic advection in dynamical models of Langmuir circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bees, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    A deterministic mechanism for the production of plankton patches within a typical medium scale oceanic structure is proposed and investigated. By direct numerical simulation of a simple model of Langmuir circulation we quantify the effects of unsteady flows on planktonic communities and demonstrate their importance. Two qualitatively different zones within the flow are identified: chaotic regions that help to spread plankton and locally coherent regions, that do not mix with the chaotic regio...