WorldWideScience

Sample records for net generation fuel

  1. Solar fuel generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S.; West, William C.

    2017-01-17

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  2. Solar Fuel Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  3. Teaching and Learning with the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kassandra; Marateo, Raymond C.; Ferris, S. Pixy

    2007-01-01

    As the Net Generation places increasingly greater demands on educators, students and teachers must jointly consider innovative ways of teaching and learning. In this, educators are supported by the fact that the Net Generation wants to learn. However, these same educators should not fail to realize that this generation learns differently from…

  4. Solar fuels generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.

    2016-10-25

    The solar fuels generator includes an ionically conductive separator between a gaseous first phase and a second phase. A photoanode uses one or more components of the first phase to generate cations during operation of the solar fuels generator. A cation conduit is positioned provides a pathway along which the cations travel from the photoanode to the separator. The separator conducts the cations. A second solid cation conduit conducts the cations from the separator to a photocathode.

  5. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  6. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  7. Educating College Students of the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Faculty and administrators of higher education today face a challenge with their student populations, many of whom are part of what is known as the net generation. As students become more technologically advanced, faculty must be technologically ready to meet the needs of students. Many college faculty and administrators are from earlier…

  8. Net Generation's Learning Styles in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Eleni; Kalokairinou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Numerous surveys have confirmed that emerging technologies and Web 2.0 tools have been a defining feature in the lives of current students, estimating that there is a fundamental shift in the way young people communicate, socialize and learn. Nursing students in higher education are characterized as digital literate with distinct traits which influence their learning styles. Millennials exhibit distinct learning preferences such as teamwork, experiential activities, structure, instant feedback and technology integration. Higher education institutions should be aware of the implications of the Net Generation coming to university and be prepared to meet their expectations and learning needs.

  9. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  10. Net Generation: Visions for their Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Davila

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the changes that are demanded in the conception and culture of the learning, focuses the attention on the effect that the new digital environments have cause on the person, the education and the society. The main reflection is over the digital culture that characterizes to the Net generation (people that had from zero to 20 years for the year 1999 and their requirements of knowing or knowledge and of how to learn that knowledge today and always. This research was carried out a bibliographical and documental revision. The information makes us meditate about the change of the traditional transmission learning to the interactive learning defendant in the digital environments; they involve a new culture of educational system, of teaching and learning, where this responsible the own individual, the family and the society. This will contribute with the understanding, acceptance, adaptation, use, development and life in an interconnected world, digital and communicated globally.

  11. Hydrogen Generation Via Fuel Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, John F.

    2003-07-01

    Reforming is the conversion of a hydrocarbon based fuel to a gas mixture that contains hydrogen. The H2 that is produced by reforming can then be used to produce electricity via fuel cells. The realization of H2-based power generation, via reforming, is facilitated by the existence of the liquid fuel and natural gas distribution infrastructures. Coupling these same infrastructures with more portable reforming technology facilitates the realization of fuel cell powered vehicles. The reformer is the first component in a fuel processor. Contaminants in the H2-enriched product stream, such as carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), can significantly degrade the performance of current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC's). Removal of such contaminants requires extensive processing of the H2-rich product stream prior to utilization by the fuel cell to generate electricity. The remaining components of the fuel processor remove the contaminants in the H2 product stream. For transportation applications the entire fuel processing system must be as small and lightweight as possible to achieve desirable performance requirements. Current efforts at Argonne National Laboratory are focused on catalyst development and reactor engineering of the autothermal processing train for transportation applications.

  12. Development of net energy ratio for quad-generation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kumar, Amit

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to four different outputs via gasification and catalytic methanation is a renewable technology that could reduce the use of fossil fuels and GHG emissions. This study investigates the energy aspects of producing electricity, heat, methanol and methane. The Gas Technology......-based power, heat, methanol and methane production pathway using GTI technology. Since more efficient alternatives exist for the generation of heat and electricity from biomass, it is argued that syngas is best used for methanol production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the energy performance...... Institute (GTI) gasifier and Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) technologies are used for this quad generation process. Three different biomass feedstocks are considered in this study. The net energy ratio for six different pathways having the range of between 1.3–9.3. The lowest limit corresponds to the straw...

  13. Maritime Fuel Cell Generator Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Fuel costs and emissions in maritime ports are an opportunity for transportation energy efficiency improvement and emissions reduction efforts. Ocean-going vessels, harbor craft, and cargo handling equipment are still major contributors to air pollution in and around ports. Diesel engine costs continually increase as tighter criteria pollutant regulations come into effect and will continue to do so with expected introduction of carbon emission regulations. Diesel fuel costs will also continue to rise as requirements for cleaner fuels are imposed. Both aspects will increase the cost of diesel-based power generation on the vessel and on shore. Although fuel cells have been used in many successful applications, they have not been technically or commercially validated in the port environment. One opportunity to do so was identified in Honolulu Harbor at the Young Brothers Ltd. wharf. At this facility, barges sail regularly to and from neighbor islands and containerized diesel generators provide power for the reefers while on the dock and on the barge during transport, nearly always at part load. Due to inherent efficiency characteristics of fuel cells and diesel generators, switching to a hydrogen fuel cell power generator was found to have potential emissions and cost savings.

  14. Power generation from solid fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Spliethoff, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Power Generation from Solid Fuels introduces the different technologies to produce heat and power from solid fossil (hard coal, brown coal) and renewable (biomass, waste) fuels, such as combustion and gasification, steam power plants and combined cycles etc. The book discusses technologies with regard to their efficiency, emissions, operational behavior, residues and costs. Besides proven state of the art processes, the focus is on the potential of new technologies currently under development or demonstration. The main motivation of the book is to explain the technical possibilities for reduci

  15. Marketing library services to the Net Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Haji azizi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine the role of marketing to new generations of library users. The paper reviews classical marketing texts and current user studies for applicability to library service. The paper finds that libraries can apply classic marketing principles to attract and better serve new generations of users. Although libraries no longer have a monopoly on information sources, libraries do offer value-added services. By understanding the users and their contexts, the paper proposes various strategies of value to market librarians and library resources.

  16. Getting Ready for the Net Generation Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, Kenneth W.

    2005-01-01

    Kenneth W. Dobbins, president of Southeast Missouri State University, discusses attending a June 2004 conference on "The Key to Competitiveness: Understanding the Next Generation Learner," sponsored by the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, EDUCAUSE, and Microsoft. The conference addressed what today's students, the…

  17. Renewable Generation Effect on Net Regional Energy Interchange: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakov, Victor; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas; Margolis, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Using production-cost model (PLEXOS), we simulate the Western Interchange (WECC) at several levels of the yearly renewable energy (RE) generation, between 13% and 40% of the total load for the year. We look at the overall energy exchange between a region and the rest of the system (net interchange, NI), and find it useful to examine separately (i) (time-)variable and (ii) year-average components of the NI. Both contribute to inter-regional energy exchange, and are affected by wind and PV generation in the system. We find that net load variability (in relatively large portions of WECC) is the leading factor affecting the variable component of inter-regional energy exchange, and the effect is quantifiable: higher regional net load correlation with the rest of the WECC lowers net interchange variability. Further, as the power mix significantly varies between WECC regions, effects of ‘flexibility import’ (regions ‘borrow’ ramping capability) are also observed.

  18. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Roswell J [Pittsburgh, PA; Basel, Richard A [Pittsburgh, PA; Zhang, Gong [Murrysville, PA

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  19. Gas fuels offshore generating facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breeze, Paul.

    1989-05-01

    Oil production at the BP Miller production platform is to start early in 1992. Power for the platform will be generated by three Cooper Rolls Coberra 6000 gas turbine generating sets. The gas turbines will burn sour gas from the oil field, with all remaining gas used to generate power at the Peterhead power station. (author).

  20. The Strategies of Academic Library to Serve Net-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Pratama Setiawan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The  fast  developments  in  information  and  communication  technology  have  rapidly  shaped  and created enormous changes in the way people live and use libraries. The generation who grow in this era is called net generation. Academic libraries, where the majority of the users are the net-generation,  have  started  to  implement  the  concept  of  hybrid  library  as  a  response  of  the technological  advances.  The  trend  of  digital  collections  usage  is  getting  increase,  on  the  other hand,  the  number  of  library  visitor  is  getting  lower  significantly.  The  condition  make  librarians afraid  of  being  abandoned  by  its  users,  whereas  libraries  still  have  many  physical  collections. This paper is written as a result of simple observation in some libraries where the needs of net-generation  has  accommodated.  The  concept  of library  as  place,  and  library  marketing  offer  the solutions to deal with the problem. Libraries can develop and provide some facilities that suitable with  the net-generation  characteristics.  In  addition,  libraries  can  create  some  events  to  promote their services even the collections to attract the users to visit library.

  1. Automatic Structure-Based Code Generation from Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Michael; Westergaard, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Automatic code generation based on Coloured Petri Net (CPN) models is challenging because CPNs allow for the construction of abstract models that intermix control flow and data processing, making translation into conventional programming constructs difficult. We introduce Process-Partitioned CPNs...... (PP-CPNs) which is a subclass of CPNs equipped with an explicit separation of process control flow, message passing, and access to shared and local data. We show how PP-CPNs caters for a four phase structure-based automatic code generation process directed by the control flow of processes....... The viability of our approach is demonstrated by applying it to automatically generate an Erlang implementation of the Dynamic MANET On-demand (DYMO) routing protocol specified by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)....

  2. The Strategies of Academic Library to Serve Net-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    candra pratama setiawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast developments in information and communication technology have rapidly shaped and created enormous changes in the way people live and use libraries. The generation who grow in this era is called net generation. Academic libraries, where the majority of the users are the netgeneration, have started to implement the concept of hybrid library as a response of the technological advances. The trend of digital collections usage is getting increase, on the other hand, the number of library visitor is getting lower significantly. The condition make librarians afraid of being abandoned by its users, whereas libraries still have many physical collections. This paper is written as a result of simple observation in some libraries where the needs of netgeneration has accomodated. The concept of library as place, and library marketing offer the solutions to deal with the problem. Libraries can develop and provide some facilities that suitable with the net-generation characteristics. In addition, libraries can create some events to promote their services even the collections to attract the users to visit library.

  3. Specification for dispersed fuel-cell generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, L. M.; Cohen, R.

    1981-11-01

    A general description and performance definition for a standard 11-mw fuel cell power plant designed for electric utility dispersed-generation applications are provided. Additional features available at the option of the purchaser are also described. The power plant can operate singly or grouped with other power plants to produce larger mutli-megawatt power stations. A 33-mw station is discussed as representative of multiple power plant installations. The power plant specification defines power rating, heat rate, fuels, operating modes, siting characteristics, and available options. A general description included in the attachments covers equipment, typical site arrangement, auxiliary subsystems, maintenance, fuel flexibility, and general fluid and electrical schematics.

  4. Development of net energy ratio and emission factor for quad-generation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kumar, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to four different outputs via gasification is a renewable technology that could reduce the use of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study investigates the energy aspects for a new concept of biomass based quad-generation plant producing power, heat......, methanol and methane. Circulating fluidized bed gasifier and the gas technology institute (GTI) gasifier technologies are used for this quad-generation process. Two different biomass feedstocks are considered in this study. The net energy ratio for six different pathways having the range of between 1.......3 and 7.2. The lowest limit corresponds to the wood chips-based power, heat, methanol and methane production pathway using GTI technology. Since more efficient alternatives exist for the generation of heat and electricity from biomass, it is argued that syngas is best used for methanol production. The aim...

  5. Fuel processor and method for generating hydrogen for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir [Naperville, IL; Lee, Sheldon H. D. [Willowbrook, IL; Carter, John David [Bolingbrook, IL; Krumpelt, Michael [Naperville, IL; Myers, Deborah J [Lisle, IL

    2009-07-21

    A method of producing a H.sub.2 rich gas stream includes supplying an O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel to an inner reforming zone of a fuel processor that includes a partial oxidation catalyst and a steam reforming catalyst or a combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst. The method also includes contacting the O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel with the partial oxidation catalyst and the steam reforming catalyst or the combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst in the inner reforming zone to generate a hot reformate stream. The method still further includes cooling the hot reformate stream in a cooling zone to produce a cooled reformate stream. Additionally, the method includes removing sulfur-containing compounds from the cooled reformate stream by contacting the cooled reformate stream with a sulfur removal agent. The method still further includes contacting the cooled reformate stream with a catalyst that converts water and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and H.sub.2 in a water-gas-shift zone to produce a final reformate stream in the fuel processor.

  6. Development of smart controller model for dual fuel generator systems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of dual fuel powered electric generators such as one of diesel and biogas has gained popularity locally both as emergency power supply units and in distributed power systems. Dual fuel generators use two fuel types simultaneously in their operations. This is however faced with challenges in control and fuel ...

  7. Segregated exhaust SOFC generator with high fuel utilization capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Robert; Veyo, Stephen E.; Kothmann, Richard E.

    2003-08-26

    A fuel cell generator contains a plurality of fuel cells (6) in a generator chamber (1) and also contains a depleted fuel reactor or a fuel depletion chamber (2) where oxidant (24,25) and fuel (81) is fed to the generator chamber (1) and the depleted fuel reactor chamber (2), where both fuel and oxidant react, and where all oxidant and fuel passages are separate and do not communicate with each other, so that fuel and oxidant in whatever form do not mix and where a depleted fuel exit (23) is provided for exiting a product gas (19) which consists essentially of carbon dioxide and water for further treatment so that carbon dioxide can be separated and is not vented to the atmosphere.

  8. Control of proton exchange membrane fuel cell system breathing based on maximum net power control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Zhixiang; Guo, Ai; Liu, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    In order to achieve the maximum net power, the analysis for the maximum net power characterization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system is carried out. A maximum net power control (MNPC) strategy based on an implicit generalized predictive control (IGPC) and a reference governor is proposed to keep optimal oxygen excess ratio (OER) trajectory. The IGPC based on an effective informed adaptive particle swarm optimization (EIA-PSO) algorithm is developed to solve the predictive control law and reduce the computational complexity in the rolling optimization process. The simulations of three conditional tests are implemented and the results demonstrate that the proposed strategy can track the optimal OER trajectory, reduce the parasitic power and maximize the output net power. The comprehensive comparisons based on three conditional tests verify that the MNPC-IGPC has better robust performance in the presence of large disturbances, time delay and various noises. The experimental comparison with internal control system of Ballard 1.2 kW Nexa Power Module testifies the validity of the MNPC-IGPC for increasing the net power. Hence, this proposed strategy can provide better behavior to guarantee optimal OER trajectory and the maximum net power even though the disturbances and uncertainties occur.

  9. Application of Fuel Cells to Marine Power Generation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Senichi, Sasaki

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are one of the future technologies for marine energy sources. A fuel cell combines hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, with water and heat as its by-product. Since the conversion of the fuel to energy takes place via an electrochemical process, the process is clean, quiet and highly efficient. This paper presents the types and characteristics of fuel cells, the status of marine use, and the outline of safety requirements which apply to fuel cell power generation systems.

  10. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  11. Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets for Protocol Software Generation and Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge; Kristensen, Lars Michael; Kindler, Ekkart

    This paper presents the formal definition of Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets (PA-CPNs). PA-CPNs represent a class of Coloured Petri Nets (CPNs) that are designed to support automated code genera-tion of protocol software. PA-CPNs restrict the structure of CPN models and allow Petri net...... elements to be annotated with so-called pragmatics, which are exploited for code generation. The approach and tool for gen-erating code is called PetriCode and has been discussed and evaluated in earlier work already. The contribution of this paper is to give a formal def-inition for PA-CPNs; in addition...

  12. Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets for Protocol Software Generation and Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerland Simonsen, Kent Inge; Kristensen, Lars Michael; Kindler, Ekkart

    2015-01-01

    PetriCode is a tool that supports automated generation of protocol software from a restricted class of Coloured Petri Nets (CPNs) called Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets (PA-CPNs). Petri-Code and PA-CPNs have been designed with five main requirements in mind, which include the same model...

  13. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  14. Code Generation from Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge

    implemented in a prototype tool called PetriCode. We defined several criteria for our code generation approach, the approach should be scalable so that is can be used to generate code for industrial sized protocols. The models should be verifiable and it should be possible to perform efficient verification...... the PA-CPN model that describe the protocol design. The generated code is also shown to be readable and we demonstrate that a generated implementation can be easily integrated with third party software. We also show that our approach scales to industrial sized protocols by applying our approach...

  15. Government net income in the fuel alcohol marketing; Estimativa do saldo do governo na comercializacao de alcool carburante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brugnaro, Caetano

    1992-12-31

    This study aims to analyse the fuel price formation structures in order to estimate the governmental net income in fuel alcohol marketing and to develop a mathematical model to forecast these estimates under alternative economic scenarios. Three scenarios - an optimistic, an intermediary and a pessimistic were set up through intuitive projections and the mathematical model developed was applied to them. 33 refs., 9 tabs.

  16. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  17. Generator gas as a fuel to power a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutak Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of gasification process of dried sewage sludge and use of generator gas as a fuel for dual fuel turbocharged compression ignition engine are presented. The results of gasifying showed that during gasification of sewage sludge is possible to obtain generator gas of a calorific value in the range of 2.15  2.59 MJ/m3. It turned out that the generator gas can be effectively used as a fuel to the compression ignition engine. Because of gas composition, it was possible to run engine with partload conditions. In dual fuel operation the high value of indicated efficiency was achieved equal to 35%, so better than the efficiency of 30% attainable when being fed with 100% liquid fuel. The dual fuel engine version developed within the project can be recommended to be used in practice in a dried sewage sludge gasification plant as a dual fuel engine driving the electric generator loaded with the active electric power limited to 40 kW (which accounts for approx. 50% of its rated power, because it is at this power that the optimal conditions of operation of an engine dual fuel powered by liquid fuel and generator gas are achieved. An additional advantage is the utilization of waste generated in the wastewater treatment plant.

  18. Solar-fuel generation: Towards practical implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-01-01

    Limiting reliance on non-renewable fossil fuels inevitably depends on a more efficient utilization of solar energy. Materials scientists discuss the most viable approaches to produce high-energy-density fuels from sunlight that can be implemented in existing infrastructures....

  19. Pragmatics annotated coloured petri nets for protocol software generation and verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge Fagerland; Kristensen, Lars M.; Kindler, Ekkart

    2016-01-01

    Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets (PA-CPNs) are a restricted class of Coloured Petri Nets (CPNs) developed to support automated generation of protocol software. The practical application of PA-CPNs and the supporting PetriCode software tool have been discussed and evaluated in earlier pape...... already. The contribution of this paper is to give a formal definition of PA-CPNs, motivate the definitions, and demonstrate how the structure of PA-CPNs can be exploited for more efficient verification....

  20. Web 2.0 and the Net Generation - A Critical Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    , and books have revolved around social media, web 2.0, personal learning environments, student-centred learning, and student-generated content. Alongside these internet developments we have witnessed debates on what schools and universities can do to cater to the 'net-generation' or the 'digital natives' in...

  1. POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, O.E.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

  2. The new generation of vehicles: market opportunities for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Steven G.; Patil, Pandit G.; Venkateswaran, S. R.

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a historic US Government-auto industry partnership initiated in 1993, is pursuing three specific, interrelated goals, including the development of the next generation of vehicles capable of achieving up to three times the fuel efficiency of today's comparable vehicles. Fuel cells have been identified as one of three primary propulsion system candidates to meet this triple fuel efficiency goal, since they can dramatically increase automotive propulsion efficiency combined with very low to zero emissions. The US Government is working closely with industry and research institutions in pursuing a strategy of aggressive research and development (R&D) to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. The US Department of Energy has a major role in this fuel cell technology development effort. R&D activities are focused on overcoming the major technical, economic, and infrastructure-related hurdles. The high efficiency, very low emissions, and other favorable characteristics of fuel cells (such as fuel flexibility, low noise, and vibration) create significant market opportunities for fuel cells over the entire spectrum of transportation applications. While the focus of near-term markets for fuel cell vehicles will be urban areas having severe air-quality problems, long-term market prospects are encouraging since fuel cell vehicles can compete on an even ground with conventional vehicles in all key aspects, including vehicle range and refueling. This paper will discuss near- and long-term market opportunities for fuel cells in transportation and provide an update on driving regulatory developments in the USA at the federal and state level. The paper also provides an introduction to the PNGV (focusing on the role and prospects for fuel cells) and discusses the status of fuel cell vehicle development projects.

  3. Net Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Lidin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Unlike television, where the role of the viewer is limited by channel changing, the Internet allows to demonstrate your own will, to ask questions and get answers, to express your opinion and, on the whole, to self-actualize. It is the conversational nature of the Internet that gave rise to the most common forms of the Internet addiction: surfing, cybersex and cybercommunication.

  4. Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labinov, Solomon D [Knoxville, TN; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Judkins, Roddie R [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-21

    A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

  5. The Knowledge Building Paradigm: A Model of Learning for Net Generation Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Donald

    2005-01-01

    In this article Donald Philip describes Knowledge Building, a pedagogy based on the way research organizations function. The global economy, Philip argues, is driving a shift from older, industrial models to the model of the business as a learning organization. The cognitive patterns of today's Net Generation students, formed by lifetime exposure…

  6. An Expanded Study of Net Generation Perceptions on Privacy and Security on Social Networking Sites (SNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.; Doshi, Vijal

    2012-01-01

    Social networking on the Internet continues to be a frequent avenue of communication, especially among Net Generation consumers, giving benefits both personal and professional. The benefits may be eventually hindered by issues in information gathering and sharing on social networking sites. This study evaluates the perceptions of students taking a…

  7. Process for Generating Engine Fuel Consumption Map: Ricardo Cooled EGR Boost 24-bar Standard Car Engine Tier 2 Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document summarizes the process followed to utilize the fuel consumption map of a Ricardo modeled engine and vehicle fuel consumption data to generate a full engine fuel consumption map which can be used by EPA's ALPHA vehicle simulations.

  8. Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Hager, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

  9. Synthesizing Dynamic Patterns by Spatial-Temporal Generative ConvNet

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Jianwen; Zhu, Song-Chun; Wu, Ying Nian

    2016-01-01

    Video sequences contain rich dynamic patterns, such as dynamic texture patterns that exhibit stationarity in the temporal domain, and action patterns that are non-stationary in either spatial or temporal domain. We show that a spatial-temporal generative ConvNet can be used to model and synthesize dynamic patterns. The model defines a probability distribution on the video sequence, and the log probability is defined by a spatial-temporal ConvNet that consists of multiple layers of spatial-tem...

  10. Gasification of torrefied fuel at power generation for decentralized consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safin, R. R.; Khakimzyanov, I. F.; Galyavetdinov, N. R.; Mukhametzyanov, S. R.

    2017-10-01

    The increasing need of satisfaction of the existing needs of the population and the industry for electric energy, especially in the areas remote from the centralized energy supply, results in need of development of “small-scale energy generation”. At the same time, the basis in these regions is made by the energy stations, using imported fuel, which involve a problem of increase in cost and transportation of fuel to the place of consumption. The solution of this task is the use of the torrefied waste of woodworking and agricultural industry as fuel. The influence of temperature of torrefaction of wood fuel on the developed electric generator power is considered in the article. As a result of the experiments, it is revealed that at gasification of torrefied fuel from vegetable raw material, the generating gas with the increased content of hydrogen and carbon oxide, in comparison with gasification of the raw materials, is produced. Owing to this, the engine capacity increases that exerts direct impact on power generation by the electric generator.

  11. Net-generation attributes and seductive properties of the internet as predictors of online activities and internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Louis

    2004-06-01

    Born between 1977 and 1997, Net-generation is the first generation to grow up surrounded by home computers, video games, and the Internet. As children of the Baby Boomers, the Internet is the medium of choice for the Net-geners. Based on the assumption that Net-generation has unique characteristics, this study examined (1) how Net-geners addicted to the Internet differ from the non-addicted and (2) how these attributes, together with the seductive properties of the Internet, are related to Internet addiction. Data were gathered from a probability sample of 699 Net-geners between the ages of 16 and 24. Results show that Net-geners addicted to the Internet tend to be young female students. Being emotionally open on the Net and a heavy user of ICQ were most influential in predicting Net-geners' problematic use of the Internet. Addicted Net-geners are also strongly linked to the pleasure of being able to control the simulated world in online games. The finding reinforces previous research that "dependents" of the Internet spend most of their time in the synchronous communication environment engaging in interactive online games, chat rooms, and ICQ for pleasure-seeking or escape, while "non-dependents" use information-gathering functions available on the Internet. Furthermore, Internet addicts tend to watch television significantly less, indicating a displacement effect on traditional media use for the Net-generation.

  12. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. The low temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has recently been identified as an attractive option for stationary power generation, based on the relatively simple and benign materials employed, the zero-emission character of the device, and the expected high power density, high reliability and low cost. However, a PEMFC stack fueled by hydrogen with the combined properties of low cost, high performance and high reliability has not yet been demonstrated. Demonstration of such a stack will remove a significant barrier to implementation of this advanced technology for electric power generation from hydrogen. Work done in the past at LANL on the development of components and materials, particularly on advanced membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs), has contributed significantly to the capability to demonstrate in the foreseeable future a PEMFC stack with the combined characteristics described above. A joint effort between LANL and an industrial stack manufacturer will result in the demonstration of such a fuel cell stack for stationary power generation. The stack could operate on hydrogen fuel derived from either natural gas or from renewable sources. The technical plan includes collaboration with a stack manufacturer (CRADA). It stresses the special requirements from a PEMFC in stationary power generation, particularly maximization of the energy conversion efficiency, extension of useful life to the 10 hours time scale and tolerance to impurities from the reforming of natural gas.

  13. Web 2.0 and the Net Generation - A Critical Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    , and books have revolved around social media, web 2.0, personal learning environments, student-centred learning, and student-generated content. Alongside these internet developments we have witnessed debates on what schools and universities can do to cater to the 'net-generation' or the 'digital natives' in......In the recent years, social media and web 2.0 have been hot topics within educational debates and within the research area of networked learning. The latter is evident from symposia and papers from the last years' networked learning conferences, but also European research projects, special issues...

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  15. k-Same-Net: k-Anonymity with Generative Deep Neural Networks for Face Deidentification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaž Meden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Image and video data are today being shared between government entities and other relevant stakeholders on a regular basis and require careful handling of the personal information contained therein. A popular approach to ensure privacy protection in such data is the use of deidentification techniques, which aim at concealing the identity of individuals in the imagery while still preserving certain aspects of the data after deidentification. In this work, we propose a novel approach towards face deidentification, called k-Same-Net, which combines recent Generative Neural Networks (GNNs with the well-known k-Anonymitymechanism and provides formal guarantees regarding privacy protection on a closed set of identities. Our GNN is able to generate synthetic surrogate face images for deidentification by seamlessly combining features of identities used to train the GNN model. Furthermore, it allows us to control the image-generation process with a small set of appearance-related parameters that can be used to alter specific aspects (e.g., facial expressions, age, gender of the synthesized surrogate images. We demonstrate the feasibility of k-Same-Net in comprehensive experiments on the XM2VTS and CK+ datasets. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed approach through reidentification experiments with recent recognition models and compare our results with competing deidentification techniques from the literature. We also present facial expression recognition experiments to demonstrate the utility-preservation capabilities of k-Same-Net. Our experimental results suggest that k-Same-Net is a viable option for facial deidentification that exhibits several desirable characteristics when compared to existing solutions in this area.

  16. Three generation production biotechnology of biomass into bio-fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    The great change of climate change, depletion of natural resources, and scarcity of fossil fuel in the whole world nowadays have witnessed a sense of urgency home and abroad among scales of researchers, development practitioners, and industrialists to search for completely brand new sustainable solutions in the area of biomass transforming into bio-fuels attributing to our duty-that is, it is our responsibility to take up this challenge to secure our energy in the near future with the help of sustainable approaches and technological advancements to produce greener fuel from nature organic sources or biomass which comes generally from organic natural matters such as trees, woods, manure, sewage sludge, grass cuttings, and timber waste with a source of huge green energy called bio-fuel. Biomass includes most of the biological materials, livings or dead bodies. This energy source is ripely used industrially, or domestically for rather many years, but the recent trend is on the production of green fuel with different advance processing systems in a greener. More sustainable method. Biomass is becoming a booming industry currently on account of its cheaper cost and abundant resources all around, making it fairly more effective for the sustainable use of the bio-energy. In the past few years, the world has witnessed a remarkable development in the bio-fuel production technology, and three generations of bio-fuel have already existed in our society. The combination of membrane technology with the existing process line can play a vital role for the production of green fuel in a sustainable manner. In this paper, the science and technology for sustainable bio-fuel production will be introduced in detail for a cleaner world.

  17. The Influence of Output Variability from Renewable Electricity Generation on Net Energy Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Kunz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One key approach to analyzing the feasibility of energy extraction and generation technologies is to understand the net energy they contribute to society. These analyses most commonly focus on a simple comparison of a source’s expected energy outputs to the required energy inputs, measured in the form of energy return on investment (EROI. What is not typically factored into net energy analysis is the influence of output variability. This omission ignores a key attribute of biological organisms and societies alike: the preference for stable returns with low dispersion versus equivalent returns that are intermittent or variable. This biologic predilection for stability, observed and refined in academic financial literature, has a direct relationship to many new energy technologies whose outputs are much more variable than traditional energy sources. We investigate the impact of variability on net energy metrics and develop a theoretical framework to evaluate energy systems based on existing financial and biological risk models. We then illustrate the impact of variability on nominal energy return using representative technologies in electricity generation, with a more detailed analysis on wind power, where intermittence and stochastic availability of hard-to-store electricity will be factored into theoretical returns.

  18. Tactical techno-economic analysis of electricity generation from forest, fossil, and wood waste fuels in a heating plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palander Teijo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Finnish energy industry is subject to policy decisions regarding renewable energy production and energy efficiency regulation. Conventional electricity generation has environmental side-effects that may cause global warming. Renewable fuels are superior because they offer near-zero net emissions. In this study, we investigated a heating mill's ability to generate electricity from forest fuels in southern Finland on a 1-year strategic decision-making horizon. The electricity-generation, -purchase, and -sales decisions are made using three different energy efficiency and forest technology rates. Then the decision environment was complicated by the sequence-dependent procurement chains for forest fuels (below-ground on a tactical decision-making horizon. With this aim, fuel data of three forest fuel procurement teams were collected for 3 months. The strategic fuel procurement decisions were adjusted to the changed decision environment based on a tactical techno-economic analysis using forest technology rates. The optimal energy product and fuel mixtures were solved by minimizing procurement costs, maximizing production revenues, and minimizing energy losses.

  19. A Renewably Powered Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Station Community Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Sekura, Linda S.; Prokopius, Paul; Theirl, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The proposed project goal is to encourage the use of renewable energy and clean fuel technologies for transportation and other applications while generating economic development. This can be done by creating an incubator for collaborators, and creating a manufacturing hub for the energy economy of the future by training both white- and blue-collar workers for the new energy economy. Hydrogen electrolyzer fueling stations could be mass-produced, shipped and installed in collaboration with renewable energy power stations, or installed connected to the grid with renewable power added later.

  20. Power generation costs for alternate reactor fuel cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    The total electric generating costs at the power plant busbar are estimated for various nuclear reactor fuel cycles which may be considered for power generation in the future. The reactor systems include pressurized water reactors (PWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), light-water pre-breeder and breeder reactors (LWPR, LWBR), and a fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR). Fuel cycles include once-through, uranium-only recycle, and full recycle of the uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel assemblies. The U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ price for economic transition from once-through LWR fuel cycles to both PWR recycle and LMFBR systems is estimated. Electric power generation costs were determined both for a reference set of unit cost parameters and for a range of uncertainty in these parameters. In addition, cost sensitivity parameters are provided so that independent estimations can be made for alternate cost assumptions.

  1. Merits of excess bagasse as fuel for generating electricity. [Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea, P.

    1981-05-01

    The rising cost of fuel oil improves the economics for sugar factories of using excess bagasse to produce more electricity than they require for sale to the public utility companies. Recently, the United States Sugar Corporation, in Florida, initiated the operation of a 20 MW plant fueled with excess bagasse only, and the electricity it generates is sold to a local utility. This constitutes a saving of 10 million liters of oil per year. The operating cycle is described of a system of high-pressure boilers and automatically controlled turbogenerator for the production of energy from bagasse. This system is a pre-engineered design which is very simple to install and operate and can be fitted in with the electric-generating installations which are normally found in practically any sugar factory without making significant modifications to the factory. An economic analysis is presented of power generation using excess bagasse for a 3MW unit and a 4MW unit.

  2. Study on the Tribological Characteristics of Australian Native First Generation and Second Generation Biodiesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mofijur Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesels are a renewable energy source, and they have the potential to be used as alternatives to diesel fuel. The aim of this study is to investigate the wear and friction characteristics of Australian native first generation and second generation biodiesels using a four-ball tribo tester. The biodiesel was produced through a two-step transesterification process and characterized according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards. The tribological experiment was carried out at a constant 1800 rpm and different loads and temperatures. In addition, the surface morphology of the ball was tested by scanning electron microscope (SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analysis. The test results indicated that biodiesel fuels have a lower coefficient of frictions (COF and lower wear scar diameter (WSD up to 83.50% and 41.28%, respectively, compared to conventional diesel fuel. The worn surface area results showed that biodiesel fuel has a minimum percentage of C and O, except Fe, compared to diesel. In addition, the worn surface area for diesel was found (2.20%–27.92% to be higher than biodiesel. The findings of this study indicated that both first and second generation biodiesel fuels have better tribological performance than diesel fuel, and between the biodiesel fuels, macadamia biodiesel showed better lubrication performance.

  3. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. A central objective of a LANL/Industry collaborative effort supported by the Hydrogen Program is to integrate PEM fuel cell and novel stack designs at LANL with stack technology of H-Power Corporation (H-Power) in order to develop a manufacturable, low-cost/high-performance hydrogen/air fuel cell stack for stationary generation of electric power. A LANL/H-Power CRADA includes Tasks ranging from exchange, testing and optimization of membrane-electrode assemblies of large areas, development and demonstration of manufacturable flow field, backing and bipolar plate components, and testing of stacks at the 3-5 cell level and, finally, at the 4-5 kW level. The stack should demonstrate the basic features of manufacturability, overall low cost and high energy conversion efficiency. Plans for future work are to continue the CRADA work along the time line defined in a two-year program, to continue the LANL activities of developing and testing stainless steel hardware for longer term stability including testing in a stack, and to further enhance air cathode performance to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies as required for stationary power application.

  4. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) gas generation from N-Fuel in multi-canister overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, T.D.

    1996-08-01

    During the conversion from wet pool storage for spent nuclear fuel at Hanford, gases will be generated from both radiolysis and chemical reactions. The gas generation phenomenon needs to be understood as it applies to safety and design issues,specifically over pressurization of sealed storage containers,and detonation/deflagration of flammable gases. This study provides an initial basis to predict the implications of gas generation on the proposed functional processes for spent nuclear fuel conversion from wet to dry storage. These projections are based upon examination of the history of fuel manufacture at Hanford, irradiation in the reactors, corrosion during wet pool storage, available fuel characterization data and available information from literature. Gas generation via radiolysis and metal corrosion are addressed. The study examines gas generation, the boundary conditions for low medium and high levels of sludge in SNF storage/processing containers. The functional areas examined include: flooded and drained Multi-Canister Overpacks, cold vacuum drying, shipping and staging and long term storage.

  5. [Relationships amongst work values, job characteristics and job involvement in "net generation" nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sue-Hui; Chiou, Chii-Jun

    2010-04-01

    Children of the so-called "net generation" began joining the nurse workforce from the mid-1990s. Studies on the characteristics of this generation have been done primarily outside of Taiwan, and results may not adequately reflect conditions in Taiwan due to cultural differences. This study aimed to investigate the relationships amongst work values, job characteristics and job involvement in "net generation" nurses. This study employed a cross-sectional design. A randomized sample of 370 nurses born between 1977 and 1985 working in a medical center or a community hospital in Southern Taiwan accepted our invitation to join this study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. (1) Variables including work values, job characteristics, head nurse leadership qualities, job structure and opportunities for in-service education all correlated significantly with job involvement. (2) Regression analysis showed work values, job characteristics, head nurse leadership and religious belief to be significant predictors of job involvement, explaining 22.6% of the variance. This study provides insights that may be of potential value to nursing administrators. We suggest that administrators adopt democratic management practices, build diverse learning methods, strengthen autonomy, completeness, and feedback, and provide appropriate work guidance for nurses to increase job involvement.

  6. C code generation from Petri-net-based logic controller specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobelny, Michał; Grobelna, Iwona; Karatkevich, Andrei

    2017-08-01

    The article focuses on programming of logic controllers. It is important that a programming code of a logic controller is executed flawlessly according to the primary specification. In the presented approach we generate C code for an AVR microcontroller from a rule-based logical model of a control process derived from a control interpreted Petri net. The same logical model is also used for formal verification of the specification by means of the model checking technique. The proposed rule-based logical model and formal rules of transformation ensure that the obtained implementation is consistent with the already verified specification. The approach is validated by practical experiments.

  7. Semi-fuel cell studies for powering underwater devices: integrated design for maximized net power output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas-Valencia, Andres M.; Short, R. Timothy; Adornato, Lori; Langebrake, Larry

    2010-04-01

    Use of sensor systems in water bodies has applications that range from environmental and oceanographic research to port and homeland security. Power sources are often the limiting component for further reduction of sensor system size and weight. We present recent investigations of metal-anode water-activated galvanic cells, specifically water-activated Alcells using inorganic alkali peroxides and solid organic oxidizers (heterocyclic halamines), in a semi-fuel cell configuration (i.e., with cathode species generated in situ and flow-through cells). The oxidizers utilized are inexpensive solid materials that are generally (1) safer to handle than liquid solutions or gases, (2) have inherently higher current and energy capacity (as they are not dissolved), and, (3) if appropriately packaged, will not degrade over time. The specific energy (S.E.) of Al-alkali peroxide was found to be 230 Wh/kg (460 Wh/kg, considering only active materials) in a seven-gram cell. Interestingly, when the cell size was increased (making more area of the catalytic cathode electrode available), the results from a single addition of water in an Al-organic oxidizer cell (weighing ~18 grams) showed an S.E. of about 200 Wh/kg. This scalability characteristic suggests that values in excess of 400 Wh/kg could be obtained in a semi-fuel-cell-like system. In this paper, we also present design considerations that take into account the energy requirements of the pumping devices and show that the proposed oxidizers, and the possible control of the chemical equilibrium of these cathodes in solution, may help reduce this power requirement and hence enhance the overall energetic balance.

  8. Economical analysis of combined fuel cell generators and absorption chillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morsy El-Gohary

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a co-generation system based on combined heat and power for commercial units. For installation of a co-generation system, certain estimates for this site should be performed through making assessments of electrical loads, domestic water, and thermal demand. This includes domestic hot water, selection of the type of power generator, fuel cell, and the type of air conditioning system, and absorption chillers. As a matter of fact, the co-generation system has demonstrated good results for both major aspects, economic and environmental. From the environmental point of view, this can be considered as an ideal solution for problems concerned with the usage of Chlorofluoro carbons. On the other hand, from the economic point of view, the cost analysis has revealed that the proposed system saves 4% of total cost through using the co-generation system.

  9. Microbial fuel cells generating electricity from rhizodeposits of rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schamphelaire, Liesje; Van den Bossche, Leen; Dang, Hai Son; Höfte, Monica; Boon, Nico; Rabaey, Korneel; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-04-15

    Living plants transport substantial amounts of organic material into the soil. This process, called rhizodeposition, provides the substrate for the rhizospheric microbial community. In this study, a laboratory-scale sediment microbial fuel cell, of which the anode is positioned in the rhizosphere of the rice plants, is used to microbially oxidize the plant-derived organics. An electrical current was generated through the in situ oxidation of rhizodeposits from living rice plants. The electrical power output of a sediment microbial fuel cell was found to be a factor 7 higher in the presence of actively growing plants. This process offers the potential of light-driven power generation from living plants in a nondestructive way. Sustainable power productions up to 330 W ha(-1) could be attributed to the oxidation of the plant-derived compounds.

  10. Generation of a global fuel data set using the Fuel Characteristic Classification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucrecia Pettinari, M.; Chuvieco, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the methods for the generation of the first global fuel data set, containing all the parameters required to be input in the Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS). The data set was developed from different spatial variables, both based on satellite Earth observation products and fuel databases, and is comprised by a global fuelbed map and a database that includes the parameters of each fuelbed that affect fire behavior and effects. A total of 274 fuelbeds were created and parameterized, and can be input into FCCS to obtain fire potentials, surface fire behavior and carbon biomass for each fuelbed. We present a first assessment of the fuel data set by comparing the carbon biomass obtained from our FCCS fuelbeds with the average biome values of four other regional or global biomass products. The results showed a good agreement both in terms of geographical distribution and biomass loads when compared to other biomass data, with the best results found for tropical and boreal forests (Spearman's coefficient of 0.79 and 0.77). This global fuel data set may be used for a varied range of applications, including fire danger assessment, fire behavior estimations, fuel consumption calculations and emissions inventories.

  11. Assessment of cleaner electricity generation technologies for net CO{sub 2} mitigation in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limmeechokchai, B.; Suksuntornsiri, P. [Thammasat University, Pathum Thani (Thailand)

    2007-02-15

    The choice of electricity generation technologies not only directly affects the amount of CO{sub 2} emission from the power sector, but also indirectly affects the economy-wide CO{sub 2} emission. It is because electricity is the basic requirement of economic sectors and final consumption within the economy. In Thailand, although the power development plan (PDP) has been planned for the committed capacity to meet the future electricity demand, there are some undecided electricity generation technologies that will be studied for technological options. The economy-wide CO{sub 2} mitigations between selecting cleaner power generation options instead of pulverized coal-thermal technology of the undecided capacity are assessed by energy input-output analysis (IOA). The decomposition of IOA presents the fuel-mix effect, input structural effect, and final demand effect by the change in technology of the undecided capacity. The cleaner technologies include biomass power generation, hydroelectricity and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Results of the analyses show that if the conventional pulverized coal technology is selected in the undecided capacity, the economy-wide CO{sub 2} emission would be increased from 223 million ton in 2006 to 406 million ton in 2016. Renewable technology presents better mitigation option for replacement of conventional pulverized coal technology than the cleaner coal technology. The major contributor of CO{sub 2} mitigation in cleaner coal technology is the fuel mix effect due to higher conversion efficiency.

  12. Distributed generation system using wind/photovoltaic/fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buasri, Panhathai

    This dissertation investigates the performance and the operation of a distributed generation (DG) power system using wind/photovoltaic/fuel cell (W/PV/FC). The power system consists of a 2500 W photovoltaic array subsystem, a 500 W proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack subsystem, 300 W wind turbine, 500 W wind turbine, and 1500 W wind energy conversion subsystems. To extract maximum power from the PV, a maximum power point tracker was designed and fabricated. A 4 kW single phase inverter was used to convert the DC voltage to AC voltage; also a 44 kWh battery bank was used to store energy and prevent fluctuation of the power output of the DG system. To connect the fuel cell to the batteries, a DC/DC controller was designed and fabricated. To monitor and study the performance of the DG system under variable conditions, a data acquisition system was designed and installed. The fuel cell subsystem performance was evaluated under standalone operation using a variable resistance and under interactive mode, connected to the batteries. The manufacturing data and the experimental data were used to develop an electrical circuit model to the fuel cell. Furthermore, harmonic analysis of the DG system was investigated. For an inverter, the AC voltage delivered to the grid changed depending on the time, load, and electronic equipment that was connected. The quality of the DG system was evaluated by investigating the harmonics generated by the power electronics converters. Finally, each individual subsystem of the DG system was modeled using the neuro-fuzzy approach. The model was used to predict the performance of the DG system under variable conditions, such as passing clouds and wind gust conditions. The steady-state behaviors of the model were validated by the experimental results under different operating conditions.

  13. Hydrogen generation at ambient conditions: application in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The efficient generation of hydrogen from formic acid/amine adducts at ambient temperature is demonstrated. The highest catalytic activity (TOF up to 3630 h(-1) after 20 min) was observed in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts. Compared to the previously known methods to generate hydrogen from liquid feedstocks, the systems presented here can be operated at room temperature without the need for any high-temperature reforming processes, and the hydrogen produced can then be directly used in fuel cells. A variety of Ru precursors and phosphine ligands were investigated for the decomposition of formic acid/amine adducts. These catalytic systems are particularly interesting for the generation of H2 for new applications in portable electric devices.

  14. 75 FR 66008 - Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Parts 433 and 435 RIN 1904-AB96 Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal... proposed rulemaking (NOPR) regarding the fossil fuel- generated energy consumption ] requirements for new... regarding the fossil fuel-generated energy consumption requirements for new Federal buildings and major...

  15. 75 FR 63404 - Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Parts 433 and 435 RIN 1904-AB96 Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption... address the reduction of fossil fuel-generated energy consumption in new Federal buildings and Federal... they believe meeting the full fossil fuel-generated energy consumption reduction level is technically...

  16. Energy system analysis of fuel cells and distributed generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    heating and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have been evaluated in different energy systems with or without large- scale wind power and with different means of house heating. The overall result shows that the fuel savings achieved with the same technology differ very much from one system to another. The FC...... technologies can be made. However, some general points can be made. In the short and medium term, natural gas-based FC-CHP systems seem to be best practice in most energy systems, while hydrogen-based systems including vehicles only seem to be relevant in systems with considerably larger imbalances between...... technologies are very often connected to the use of hydrogen, which has to be provided e.g. from electrolysers. Decentralised and distributed generation has the possibility of improving the overall energy efficiency and flexibility of energy systems. Therefore, energy system analysis tools and methodologies...

  17. Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

    2012-03-30

    Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

  18. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  19. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  20. PyBoolNet: a python package for the generation, analysis and visualization of boolean networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarner, Hannes; Streck, Adam; Siebert, Heike

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this project is to provide a simple interface to working with Boolean networks. Emphasis is put on easy access to a large number of common tasks including the generation and manipulation of networks, attractor and basin computation, model checking and trap space computation, execution of established graph algorithms as well as graph drawing and layouts. P y B ool N et is a Python package for working with Boolean networks that supports simple access to model checking via N u SMV, standard graph algorithms via N etwork X and visualization via dot . In addition, state of the art attractor computation exploiting P otassco ASP is implemented. The package is function-based and uses only native Python and N etwork X data types. https://github.com/hklarner/PyBoolNet. hannes.klarner@fu-berlin.de.

  1. [Electricity generation from sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater using microbial fuel cell technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Yi; Sun, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Liang; Xiao, Yao; Zhao, Hai

    2010-10-01

    Air cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) were investigated for electricity production from sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater containing 5000 mg/L of chemical oxygen demand (COD). Maximum power density of 334.1 mW/m2, coulombic efficiency (CE) of 10.1% and COD removal efficiency of 92.2% were approached. The effect of phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and COD concentration on the performance of MFC was further examined. The addition of PBS from 50 mmol/L to 200 mmol/L increased the maximum power density and CE by 33.4% and 26.0%, respectively. However, the COD removal efficiency was not relative to PBS concentration in the wastewater. When the COD increased from 625 mg/L to 10 000 mg/L, the maximum value of COD removal efficiency and the maximum power density were gained at the wastewater strength of 5 000 mg/L. But the CE ranged from 28.9% to 10.3% with a decreasing trend. These results demonstrate that sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater can be used for electricity generation in MFC while at the same time achieving wastewater treatment. The increasing of PBS concentration can improve the power generation of MFC. The maximum power density of MFC increases with the rise of COD concentration, but the electricity generation will decrease for the acidification of high wastewater concentration.

  2. FORMATION OF THE SYNTHESIS ALGORITHMS OF THE COORDINATING CONTROL SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF THE AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF PETRI NETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gurskiy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The coordinating control system by drives of the robot-manipulator is presented in this article. The purpose of the scientific work is the development and research of the new algorithms for parametric synthesis of the coordinating control systems. To achieve this aim it is necessary to develop the system generating the required parametric synthesis algorithms and performing the necessary procedures according to the generated algorithm. This scientific work deals with the synthesis of Petri net in the specific case with the automatic generation of Petri nets.

  3. Analysis of energy and water management in terms of fuel-cell electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzer, R.; Höhlein, B.

    Hydrogen-powered low-temperature fuel cells (PEFCs) are the energy conversion units in vehicles with methanol as the energy carrier and a power train consisting of the following main units: methanol reformer (H2 production) including catalytic converter, gas treatment, PEFC with peripheral units, electric motor with electric controllers and gearbox. The process engineering analysis is based on a simulation model and describes the energy and water management as a function of different assumptions as well as operating and ambient conditions for net electricity generation in a PEFC-powered power train. In particular, it presents an approach for balancing both water recovery (PEFC) and the use of water for the methanol reforming process as well as for the humidification of the PEFC. The overall balances present an optimised energy management including peripheral air compression for the PEFC.

  4. Electricity generation from the mud by using microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Sitinoor Adeib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs is a bio-electrochemical device that harnesses the power of respiring microbes to convert organic substrates directly into electrical energy. This is achieved when bacteria transfer electrons to an electrode rather than directly to an electron acceptor. Their technical feasibility has recently been proven and there is great enthusiasm in the scientific community that MFCs could provide a source of “green electricity”. Microbial fuel cells work by allowing bacteria to do what they do best, oxidize and reduce organic molecules. Bacterial respiration is basically one big redox reaction in which electrons are being moved around. The objective is to generate electricity throughout the biochemical process using chemical waste basically sludge, via microbial fuel cells. The methodology includes collecting sludge from different locations, set up microbial fuel cells with the aid of salt bridge and observing the results in voltage measurement. The microbial fuel cells consist of two chambers, iron electrodes, copper wire, air pump (to increase the efficiency of electron transfer, water, sludge and salt bridge. After several observations, it is seen that this MFC can achieve up until 202 milivolts (0.202volts with the presence of air pump. It is proven through the experiments that sludge from different locations gives different results in term of the voltage measurement. This is basically because in different locations of sludge contain different type and amount of nutrients to provide the growth of bacteria. Apart from that, salt bridge also play an important role in order to transport the proton from cathode to anode. A longer salt bridge will give a higher voltage compared to a short salt bridge. On the other hand, the limitations that this experiment facing is the voltage that being produced did not last long as the bacteria activity slows down gradually and the voltage produced are not really great in amount. Lastly to

  5. Fuel Cells in the Waste-to-Energy Chain Distributed Generation Through Non-Conventional Fuels and Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    McPhail, Stephen J; Moreno, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    As the availability of fossils fuels becomes more limited, the negative impact of their consumption becomes an increasingly relevant factor in our choices with regards to primary energy sources. The exponentially increasing demand for energy is reflected in the mass generation of by-products and waste flows which characterize current society’s development and use of fossil sources. The potential for recoverable material and energy in these ever-increasing refuse flows is huge, even after the separation of hazardous constituent elements, allowing safe and sustainable further exploitation of an otherwise 'wasted' resource.  Fuel Cells in the Waste-to-Energy Chain explores the concept of waste-to-energy through a 5 step process which reflects the stages during the transformation of  refuse flows to a valuable commodity such as clean energy. By providing selected, integrated alternatives to the current centralized, wasteful, fossil-fuel based infrastructure, Fuel Cells in the Waste-to-Energy Chain explores ho...

  6. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

    2012-04-01

    This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 787­8 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the

  7. The NetVISA automatic association tool. Next generation software testing and performance under realistic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Arora, Nimar; Kushida, Noriyuki; Tomuta, Elena; Kebede, Fekadu; Feitio, Paulino

    2016-04-01

    The CTBTO's International Data Centre is in the process of developing the next generation software to perform the automatic association step. The NetVISA software uses a Bayesian approach with a forward physical model using probabilistic representations of the propagation, station capabilities, background seismicity, noise detection statistics, and coda phase statistics. The software has been in development for a few years and is now reaching the stage where it is being tested in a realistic operational context. An interactive module has been developed where the NetVISA automatic events that are in addition to the Global Association (GA) results are presented to the analysts. We report on a series of tests where the results are examined and evaluated by seasoned analysts. Consistent with the statistics previously reported (Arora et al., 2013), the first test shows that the software is able to enhance analysis work by providing additional event hypothesis for consideration by analysts. A test on a three-day data set was performed and showed that the system found 42 additional real events out of 116 examined, including 6 that pass the criterion for the Reviewed Event Bulletin of the IDC. The software was functional in a realistic, real-time mode, during the occurrence of the fourth nuclear test claimed by the Democratic People's Republic of Korea on January 6th, 2016. Confirming a previous statistical observation, the software found more associated stations (51, including 35 primary stations) than GA (36, including 26 primary stations) for this event. Nimar S. Arora, Stuart Russell, Erik Sudderth. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA) April 2013, vol. 103 no. 2A pp709-729.

  8. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01

    . Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

  9. Development of Kinetic Mechanisms for Next-Generation Fuels and CFD Simulation of Advanced Combustion Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNenly, Matt J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whitesides, Russell [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mehl, Marco [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Killingsworth, Nick J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Predictive chemical kinetic models are needed to represent next-generation fuel components and their mixtures with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels. These kinetic models will allow the prediction of the effect of alternative fuel blends in CFD simulations of advanced spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines. Enabled by kinetic models, CFD simulations can be used to optimize fuel formulations for advanced combustion engines so that maximum engine efficiency, fossil fuel displacement goals, and low pollutant emission goals can be achieved.

  10. Fault Diagnosis System of Wind Turbine Generator Based on Petri Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han

    Petri net is an important tool for discrete event dynamic systems modeling and analysis. And it has great ability to handle concurrent phenomena and non-deterministic phenomena. Currently Petri nets used in wind turbine fault diagnosis have not participated in the actual system. This article will combine the existing fuzzy Petri net algorithms; build wind turbine control system simulation based on Siemens S7-1200 PLC, while making matlab gui interface for migration of the system to different platforms.

  11. Energy production from marine biomass: Fuel cell power generation driven by methane produced from seaweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, S.; Imou, K. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Biological and Environmental Engineering; Jonouchi, K. [Yanmar Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Human Resources

    2008-07-01

    Global warming has become one of the most serious environmental problems. To cope with the problem, it is necessary to substitute renewable energy for nonrenewable fossil fuel. Biomass, which is one of the renewable energies, is considered to be carbon-neutral, meaning that the net CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere remains unchanged provided the CO{sub 2} emitted by biomass combustion and that fixed by photosynthesis are balanced. Biomass is also unique because it is the only organic matter among renewable energies. In other words, fuels and chemicals can be produced from biomass in addition to electricity and heat. Marine biomass has attracted less attention than terrestrial biomass for energy utilization so far, but is work considering especially for a country like Japan which has long available coastlines. This paper discusses the utilization of marine biomass as an energy resource in Japan. A marine biomass energy system in Japan was proposed consisting of seaweed cultivation (Laminaria japonica) at offshore marine farms, biogas production via methane fermentation of the seaweeds, and fuel cell power generation driven by the generated biogas. The authors estimated energy output, energy supply potential, and CO{sub 2} mitigation in Japan on the basis of the proposed system. As a result, annual energy production was estimated to be 1.02 x 10{sup 9} kWh/yr at nine available sites. Total CO{sub 2} mitigation was estimated to be 1.04 x 10{sup 6} tonnes per annum at the nine sites. However, the CO{sub 2} emission for the construction of relevant facilities is not taken into account in this paper. The estimated CO{sub 2} mitigation is equivalent to about 0.9% of the required CO{sub 2} mitigation for Japan per annum under the Kyoto Protocol framework.

  12. Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2013-07-16

    Non-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Neutron measurements of the fuel remaining in the TMI II once-through steam generators (OTSG'S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geelhood, B.D.; Abel, K.H.

    1989-02-01

    Polypropylene tubes containing a string of 18 copper rods were inserted into the lower head region and each J-leg of the two once-through steam generators (OTSG) of the unit two reactor at Three Mile Island. The object was to measure the neutron flux present in those regions and estimate the amount of residual fuel remaining in each OTSG. The neutron flux from any residual fuel induces a radioisotope, /sup 64/Cu, in the copper coupons. The /sup 64/Cu activity is detected by coincidence counting the two 511-keV gamma rays produced by the annihilation of the positron emitted in the decay of /sup 64/Cu. The copper coupons were placed between two 6-inch diameter, 6-inch long NaI(Tl) crystals and the electronics produced a coincidence count whenever the two gamma rays were uniquely detected. The net coincidence count is proportional to the amount of /sup 64/Cu activity in the coupon. This document discusses calculation methods, statistical methods, and results of this research. 3 figs., 30 tabs.

  14. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  15. How to protect the distribution net with the increase of the distributed generation; Como proteger as redes de distribuicao com o crescimento da geracao distribuida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rintamaki, Olli [ABB Oy, Zurich (Switzerland); Kauhaniemi, Kimmo [Vaasa University (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    The growth of the distributed generation impose new challenges to the protection of the distribution nets. The main critical point has been the net drop, which needs the separation between the generator unit and the net. A possible solution is the use of the line differential relay. Using appropriate communication channel, it guarantees selective protection for the feeder. This solution makes possible the correct operation of the feeder and the generator unit.

  16. Fuel from water: the photochemical generation of hydrogen from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiji; Eisenberg, Richard

    2014-08-19

    Hydrogen has been labeled the fuel of the future since it contains no carbon, has the highest specific enthalpy of combustion of any chemical fuel, yields only water upon complete oxidation, and is not limited by Carnot considerations in the amount of work obtained when used in a fuel cell. To be used on the scale needed for sustainable growth on a global scale, hydrogen must be produced by the light-driven splitting of water into its elements, as opposed to reforming of methane, as is currently done. The photochemical generation of H2, which is the reductive side of the water splitting reaction, is the focus of this Account, particularly with regard to work done in the senior author's laboratory over the last 5 years. Despite seminal work done more than 30 years ago and the extensive research conducted since then on all aspects of the process, no viable system has been developed for the efficient and robust photogeneration of H2 from water using only earth abundant elements. For the photogeneration of H2 from water, a system must contain a light absorber, a catalyst, and a source of electrons. In this Account, the discovery and study of new Co and Ni catalysts are described that suggest H2 forms via a heterocoupling mechanism from a metal-hydride and a ligand-bound proton. Several complexes with redox active dithiolene ligands are newly recognized to be effective in promoting the reaction. A major new development in the work described is the use of water-soluble CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as light absorbers for H2 generation in water. Both activity and robustness of the most successful systems are impressive with turnover numbers (TONs) approaching 10(6), activity maintained over 15 days, and a quantum yield for H2 of 36% with 520 nm light. The water solubilizing capping agent for the first system examined was dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) anion, and the catalyst was determined to be a DHLA complex of Ni(II) formed in situ. Dissociation of DHLA from the QD surface proved

  17. Generation of transportation fuel from solid municipal waste plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin

    2010-09-15

    Transportation fuels derived from fossil fuels are subjected to the price fluctuations of the global marketplace, and constitute a major expense in the operation of a vehicle. Emissions from the evaporation and combustion of these fuels contribute to a range of environmental problems, causing poor air quality and emitting greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Alternative fuels created from domestic sources have been proposed as a solution to these problems, and many fuels are being developed based on biomass and other renewable sources. Natural State Research, Inc. developed different alternative hydrocarbon fuel which is produced from waste plastic materials.

  18. Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki; Kim, Jungrae; Oh, Sangeun; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new method for treating animal wastewaters and simultaneously producing electricity. Preliminary tests using a two-chambered MFC with an aqueous cathode indicated that electricity could be generated from swine wastewater containing 8320 +/- 190 mg/L of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) (maximum power density of 45 mW/m2). More extensive tests with a single-chambered air cathode MFC produced a maximum power density with the animal wastewater of 261 mW/m2 (200 omega resistor), which was 79% larger than that previously obtained with the same system using domestic wastewater (146 +/- 8 mW/m2) due to the higher concentration of organic matter in the swine wastewater. Power generation as a function of substrate concentration was modeled according to saturation kinetics, with a maximum power density of P(max) = 225 mW/m2 (fixed 1000 omega resistor) and half-saturation concentration of K(s) = 1512 mg/L (total COD). Ammonia was removed from 198 +/- 1 to 34 +/- 1 mg/L (83% removal). In order to try to increase power output and overall treatment efficiency, diluted (1:10) wastewater was sonicated and autoclaved. This pretreated wastewater generated 16% more power after treatment (110 +/- 4 mW/m2) than before treatment (96 +/- 4 mW/m2). SCOD removal was increased from 88% to 92% by stirring diluted wastewater, although power output slightly decreased. These results demonstrate that animal wastewaters such as this swine wastewater can be used for power generation in MFCs while at the same time achieving wastewater treatment.

  19. A Study on Fuel Options for Power Generation in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerin Wangjiraniran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the impact of utilizing gas, coal and nuclear for longterm power generation on generation cost, emission and resource availability. A scenario-based energy accounting model has been applied for creating long-term future scenarios. A baseline scenario has been created on the basis of the existing power development plan (PDP. Three alternative scenarios of coal, nuclear and gas options have been projected for the period beyond the PDP, i.e. 2022-2030. The results indicate that nuclear has high potential for GHG mitigation and cost reduction. For coal option, the benefit of cost reduction would be diminished at carbon price above 40 USD/ton. However, clean technology development as well as the momentum of global trend will be the key factor for coal utilization. The results also show the need of fuel diversification in term of the natural gas reserve depletion. It is clearly seen that natural gas supply in Thailand would inevitably depends very much on the LNG import in long-term. Hence, attraction of natural gas in term of cheap domestic resource utilization will be vanished.

  20. ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM SWINE WASTEWATER USING MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimezie Jason Ogugbue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial fuel cell (MFC was investigated. Swine wastewater was collected into dual-chambered (aerobic and anaerobic fuel cell. The maximum power output using copper and carbon electrodes were 250.54 and 52.33 µW, while 10.0 and 5.0 cm salt bridge length between the cathode and anode were 279.50 and 355.26 µW, respectively. Potassium permanganate and ordinal water gave a maximum power output of 1287.8 and 13 9.18 µW. MFCs utilize microbial communities to degrade organic materials found within wastewater and converted stored chemical energy to electrical energy in a single step. The initial bacterial and fungal counts were 7.4×106 and 1.1×103 CFU ml-1. Bacterial counts steadily increased with time to 1.40×107 CFU ml-1 while fungal count declined to 4.4×106 CFU ml-1 after day 60. The declined in microbial counts may be attributed to the time necessary for acclimatization of microbes to the anode. The genera identified were Bacillus, Citrobacter, Pseudomonas, Lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus and Rhizopus. These microbes acted as primary and secondary utilizers, utilizing carbon and other organics of the wastewater. Chemical parameters indicated that the biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 91.4–23.2 mg/L, giving 75% while the chemical oxygen demand ranged from 243.1–235.2 mg/L, representing 3.3%. Although, the metabolic activities of microbes were responsible for the observed degradation, leading to electricity, the overall power output depended on the distance between the anode and cathode compartment, types of electrode materials and mediators and oxygen reaction at the cathode.

  1. Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrianowycz, Orest; Norley, Julian; Stuart, David J; Flaherty, David; Wayne, Ryan; ; Williams, Warren; Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan H; Zawodzinski, Tom; Pietrasz, Patrick

    2010-04-15

    The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the

  2. An Integrated Model to Compare Net Electricity Generation for Carbon Dioxide- and Water-Based Geothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vikas

    Utilization of supercritical CO2 as a geothermal fluid instead of water has been proposed by Brown in 2000 and its advantages have been discussed by him and other researchers such as Karsten Pruess and Fouillac. This work assesses the net electricity that could be generated by using supercritical CO2 as a geothermal working fluid and compares it with water under the same temperature and pressure reservoir conditions. This procedure provides a method of direct comparison of water and CO2 as geothermal working fluids, in terms of net electricity generation over time given a constant geothermal fluid flow rate. An integrated three-part model has been developed to determine net electricity generation for CO2- and water-based geothermal reservoirs. This model consists of a wellbore model, reservoir simulation, and surface plant simulation. To determine the bottomhole pressure and temperature of the geothermal fluid (either water or CO2) in the injection well, a wellbore model was developed using fluid-phase, thermodynamic equations of state, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer models. A computer program was developed that solves for the temperature and pressure of the working fluid (either water or CO 2) down the wellbore by simultaneously solving for the fluid thermophysical properties, heat transfer, and frictional losses. For the reservoir simulation, TOUGH2, a general purpose numerical simulator has been used to model the temperature and pressure characteristics of the working fluid in the reservoir. The EOS1 module of TOUGH2 has been used for the water system and the EOS2 module of the TOUGH2 code has been employed for the CO2 case. The surface plant is simulated using CHEMCAD, a chemical process simulator, to determine the net electricity generated. A binary organic (iso-pentane) Rankine cycle is simulated. The calculated net electricity generated for the optimized water and CO2 systems are compared over the working time of the reservoir. Based on the theoretical

  3. Differential Die-Away Instrument: Report on Fuel Assembly Mock-up Measurements with Neutron Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsell, Alison Victoria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rael, Carlos D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Desimone, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-18

    Fresh fuel experiments for the differential die-away (DDA) project were performed using a DT neutron generator, a 15x15 PWR fuel assembly, and nine 3He detectors in a water tank inside of a shielded cell at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Eight different fuel enrichments were created using low enriched (LEU) and depleted uranium (DU) dioxide fuel rods. A list-mode data acquisition system recorded the time-dependent signal and analysis of the DDA signal die-away time was performed. The die-away time depended on the amount of fissile material in the fuel assembly and the position of the detector. These experiments were performed in support of the spent nuclear fuel Next Generation Safeguards Initiative DDA project. Lessons learned from the fresh fuel DDA instrument experiments and simulations will provide useful information to the spent fuel project.

  4. MODELLING AND FUZZY LOGIC CONTROL OF PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEM POWER GENERATION FOR RESIDENTIAL APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    MAMMAR, Khaled; Chaker, Abdelkader

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a dynamic model of Fuel cell system for residential power generation. The models proposedinclude a fuel cell stack model, reformer model and DC/AC inverter model. More then an analytical details ofhow active and reactive power output of a proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system is controlled.Furthermore a fuzzy logic (FLC) controller is used to control active power of PEM fuel cell system. Thecontroller modifies the hydrogen flow feedback from the terminal load. Si...

  5. Tri-generation System based on Municipal Waste Gasification, Fuel Cell and an Absorption Chiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannis Katsaros

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the design of a novel tri-generation system based on gasification of municipal solid wastes, a solid oxide fuel cell and an ammonia-water absorption chiller. Tri-generation systems can be implemented in buildings such as hospitals and hotels, where there is a continuous and large demand for electricity, heating and cooling. The system is modelled in Aspen Plus and the influence of different operating parameters on the system performance was studied. The findings suggest that low air equivalent ratios and high gasification temperatures enhance the overall system performance. Syngas cleaning with metal sorbents zinc oxide and sodium bicarbonate for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen chloride concentrations proved to be very effective, reducing the concentration of contaminants to < 1 ppm (part per million levels. The possibility of covering the demand profiles of a specific building was also investigated: the system could fully meet the electricity and cooling demands, whereas the heat requirements could be satisfied only up to 55%. Moreover, assuming 20 years of operation, the payback period was 4.5 years and the net present value exceeded 5 million euros.

  6. Preliminary ecotoxicity assessment of new generation alternative fuels in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gunther; Dolecal, Renee E; Colvin, Marienne A; George, Robert D

    2014-06-01

    The United States Navy (USN) is currently demonstrating the viability of environmentally sustainable alternative fuels to power its fleet comprised of aircraft and ships. As with any fuel used in a maritime setting, there is potential for introduction into the environment through transport, storage, and spills. However, while alternative fuels are often presumed to be eco-friendly relative to conventional petroleum-based fuels, their environmental fate and effects on marine environments are essentially unknown. Here, standard laboratory-based toxicity experiments were conducted for two alternative fuels, jet fuel derived from Camelina sativa (wild flax) seeds (HRJ5) and diesel fuel derived from algae (HRD76), and two conventional counterparts, jet fuel (JP5) and ship diesel (F76). Initial toxicity tests performed on water-accommodated fractions (WAF) from neat fuels partitioned into seawater, using four standard marine species in acute and chronic/sublethal tests, indicate that the alternative fuels are significantly less toxic to marine organisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moqsud, M A; Yoshitake, J; Bushra, Q S; Hyodo, M; Omine, K; Strik, David

    2015-02-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) in soil mixed with compost. A total of six buckets filled with the same soil were used with carbon fiber as the electrodes for the test. Rice plants were planted in five of the buckets, with the sixth bucket containing only soil and an external resistance of 100 ohm was used for all cases. It was observed that the cells with rice plants and compost showed higher values of voltage and power density with time. The highest value of voltage showed around 700 mV when a rice plant with 1% compost mixed soil was used, however it was more than 95% less in the case of no rice plant and without compost. Comparing cases with and without compost but with the same number of rice plants, cases with compost depicted higher voltage to as much as 2 times. The power density was also 3 times higher when the compost was used in the paddy PMFCs which indicated the influence of compost on bio-electricity generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electricity generation from tetrathionate in microbial fuel cells by acidophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulonen, Mira L K; Kokko, Marika E; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2015-03-02

    Inorganic sulfur compounds, such as tetrathionate, are often present in mining process and waste waters. The biodegradation of tetrathionate was studied under acidic conditions in aerobic batch cultivations and in anaerobic anodes of two-chamber flow-through microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All four cultures originating from biohydrometallurgical process waters from multimetal ore heap bioleaching oxidized tetrathionate aerobically at pH below 3 with sulfate as the main soluble metabolite. In addition, all cultures generated electricity from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5 with ferric iron as the terminal cathodic electron acceptor. The maximum current and power densities during MFC operation and in the performance analysis were 79.6 mA m(-2) and 13.9 mW m(-2) and 433 mA m(-2) and 17.6 mW m(-2), respectively. However, the low coulombic efficiency (below 5%) indicates that most of the electrons were directed to other processes, such as aerobic oxidation of tetrathionate and unmeasured intermediates. The microbial community analysis revealed that the dominant species both in the anolyte and on the anode electrode surface of the MFCs were Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. This study provides a proof of concept that tetrathionate serves as electron donor for biological electricity production in the pH range of 1.2-2.5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electricity generation using membrane and salt bridge microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booki Min; Shaoan Cheng [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Logan, B.E. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). The Penn State Hydrogen Energy Center

    2005-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be used to directly generate electricity from the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, but optimization of MFCs will require that we know more about the factors that can increase power output such as the type of proton exchange system which can affect the system internal resistance. Power output in a MFC containing a proton exchange membrane was compared using a pure culture (Geobacter metallireducens) or a mixed culture (wastewater inoculum). Power output with either inoculum was essentially the same, with 40 {+-} 1 mW/m{sup 2} for G. metallireducens and 38 {+-} 1 mW/m{sup 2} for the wastewater inoculum. We also examined power output in a MFC with a salt bridge instead of a membrane system. Power output by the salt bridge MFC (inoculated with G. metallireducens) was 2.2 mW/m{sup 2}. The low power output was directly attributed to the higher internal resistance of the salt bridge system (19920 {+-} 50 {omega}) compared to that of the membrane system (1286 {+-} 1 {omega}) based on measurements using impedance spectroscopy. In both systems, it was observed that oxygen diffusion from the cathode chamber into the anode chamber was a factor in power generation. Nitrogen gas sparging, L-cysteine (a chemical oxygen scavenger), or suspended cells (biological oxygen scavenger) were used to limit the effects of gas diffusion into the anode chamber. Nitrogen gas sparging, for example, increased overall Coulombic efficiency (47% or 55%) compared to that obtained without gas sparging (19%). These results show that increasing power densities in MFCs will require reducing the internal resistance of the system, and that methods are needed to control the dissolved oxygen flux into the anode chamber in order to increase overall Coulombic efficiency. (author)

  11. Generating Ship-to-Shore Bulk Fuel Delivery Schedules for the Marine Expeditionary Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS GENERATING SHIP-TO-SHORE BULK FUEL DELIVERY SCHEDULES FOR THE MARINE EXPEDITIONARY UNIT by...Thesis August 2016 to June 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GENERATING SHIP-TO-SHORE BULK FUEL DELIVERY SCHEDULES FOR THE MARINE EXPEDITIONARY UNIT 5. FUNDING...that deliver supplies ashore. In this thesis, we focus specifically on the delivery of bulk fuel for aMarine ExpeditionaryUnit (MEU).We introduce

  12. Unified Quantum Model of Work Generation in Thermoelectric Generators, Solar and Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alicki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the previous papers, the idea of “hidden oscillations” has been applied to explain work generation in semiconductor photovoltaic cells and thermoelectric generators. The aim of this paper is firstly to extend this approach to fuel cells and, secondly, to create a unified quantum model for all types of such devices. They are treated as electron pumps powered by heat or chemical engines. The working fluid is electron gas and the necessary oscillating element (“piston” is provided by plasma oscillation. Those oscillations are localized around the junction that also serves as a diode rectifying fast electric charge oscillations and yielding a final output direct current (DC. The dynamics of the devices are governed by the Markovian master equations that can be derived in a rigorous way from the underlying Hamiltonian models and are consistent with the laws of thermodynamics. The new ingredient is the derivation of master equations for systems driven by chemical reactions.

  13. Fuel cell drive system with hydrogen generation in test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emonts, B.; Bøgild Hansen, J.; Schmidt, H.; Grube, T.; Höhlein, B.; Peters, R.; Tschauder, A.

    In the future, drive systems for vehicles with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) may be the environmentally more acceptable alternative to conventional drives with internal combustion engines. The energy carrier may not be gasoline or diesel, as in combustion engines today, but methanol, which is converted on-board into a hydrogen-rich synthesis gas in a reforming reaction with water. After removal of carbon monoxide in a gas-cleaning step, the conditioned synthesis gas is converted into electricity in a fuel cell using air as the oxidant. The electric energy thus generated serves to supply a vehicle's electric drive system. Based on the process design for a test drive system, a test facility was prepared and assembled at Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ). Final function tests with the PEMFC and the integrated compact methanol reformer (CMR) were carried out to determine the performance and the dynamic behaviour. With regard to the 50-kW(H 2)-compact methanol reformer, a special design of catalytic burner was constructed. The burner units, with a total power output of 16 kW, were built and tested under different states of constant and alternating load. If selecting a specific catalyst loading of 40 g Pt/m 2, the burner emissions are below the super ultra low emission vehicle (SULEV) standard. The stationary performance test of the CMR shows a specific hydrogen production of 6.7 m N3/(kg cat h) for a methanol conversion rate of 95% at 280°C. Measurements of the transient behaviour of the CMR clearly show a response time of about 20 s, reaching 99% of the hydrogen flow demand due to the limited performance of the test facility control system. Simulations have been carried out in order to develop a control strategy for hydrogen production by the CMR during the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). Based on the NEDC, an optimized energy management for the total drive system was evaluated and the characteristic data for different peak load storage systems are

  14. Perceived intrusiveness and trust in relation to online advertising : A qualitative study amongst individuals of the Net Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Beauvillain, Antoine; Tiger, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to advance an understanding of trust and perceived intrusiveness in online advertising. The theoretical framework in this thesis is based upon theories about trust and intrusiveness that derives from previous research. The theory of psychological reactance is a further constituent. These concepts and theories are defined and discussed. and possible models are introduced. Semi-structured interviews with eight individuals of the Net Generation have been ...

  15. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Bock Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic–martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  16. Development of multifunctional additives for new generation bio-fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, A.; Krar, M.; Poelczmann, G.; Hancsok, J. (Univ. of Pannonia, Veszprem (HU)), Email: beckadam@almos.uni.pannon.hu

    2009-07-01

    Modern fuels consist of environmental friendly blending components and high performance additives. Among the applied additives the detergent-depoestron (DD) additives have very important role. Their function is to clean and keep clean the fuel supply system and the combustion chamber, thus the removal of deposits and the prevention of their formation. Nowadays, fuel blending components of renewable origin (biodiesel, mixture of iso- and normal paraffins produced from triglycerides, synthetic gasoline and gas oil based on synthesis gas etc.) will be an important part of the transportation fuels reserves, and their importance will increase in the future. Additives have to be applied to enhance the properties and quality of the above mentioned fuels. During our research activity the aim of our work was to develop such multifunctional additives that are partly produced from renewable feedstock. It is commonly known that conventional succinic-type additives have high detergent-dispersant efficiency, thus we chose to modify the structure of this additive in order to assure further advantageous effects. The modification of the additive structure was carried out by the incorporation of a fatty acid methyl ester and/or styrene comonomer by applying radically initiated synthesis. Efficiency of the synthesized novel additives was investigated in biodiesel containing diesel fuel, bio gas oil (mixture of iso and normal paraffins produced from triglycerides) containing diesel fuel and synthetic gas oil (produced from biomass based synthesis gas) containing diesel fuel. Analytical and performance tests showed that the novel additives have similar or better detergent-dispersant efficiency compared to that of the high performance reference additive, furthermore, the new structure assures lubricity improving and corrosion inhibiting effects. (orig.)

  17. Proposal of a new generation of Laser Beacon for time calibration in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, Diego [IFIC, Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático José Beltrán, 2. 46980 Paterna (Spain); Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The KM3NeT collaboration aims at the construction of a multi-km3 high-energy neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea consisting of a matrix of pressure resistant glass spheres holding each a set (31) of small area photomultipliers. The main motivation of the telescope is to observe cosmic neutrinos through the Cherenkov light induced in sea water by charged particles produced in neutrino interactions with the surrounding medium. A relative time calibration between photomultipliers of the order of 1 ns is required to achieve an optimal performance. To this end, several time calibration subsystems have been developed. In this article, the proposal of a last generation Laser Beacon, to be used in KM3NeT and developed to measure and monitor the relative time offsets between photomultipliers, is presented.

  18. Power systems considerations for use in fuel cell generation plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collinson, A.; Howson, D.; Morgan, T. [EA Technology (United Kingdom)

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this report is to undertake a critical study of power conditioning technology and its applications to fuel cell systems. The inverter is examined as a key element in the overall power conditioning system and also factors influencing the design for grid-connected systems is described. The cost of power conditioning equipment is identified as a major barrier to commercialisation of fuel cell technology and so areas which will require R and D effort have been highlighted. An underlying theme is that in order to achieve future cost targets it will be necessary for the experts in all of the relevant fields to work closely together in order to arrive at the optimal reduced cost solution. This will involve collaborative ventures between Fuel Cell Designers, Inverter Manufacturers and Distribution Network Engineers to ensure that R and D activities are targeted in the most appropriate areas. (author)

  19. Electricity generation by living plants in a plant microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Society is facing local and global challenges to secure needs of people. One of those needs is the increasing demand of energy. Currently most energy is generated by conversion of fossil fuels. The major drawback of using fossil fuels is pollution of the environment by emission of carbon dioxide,

  20. Fuel production from biomass: generation of liquid biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ghergheleş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic fermentation processes mayalso be used to produce liquid fuels frombiological raw materials. An example is theethanol production from glucose, known asstandard yeast fermentation in the beer, wine andliquor industries. It has to take place in steps, suchthat the ethanol is removed (by distillation ordehydrator application whenever itsconcentration approaches a value (around 12%which would impede reproduction of the yeastculture.

  1. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moqsud, M.A.; Yoshitake, J.; Bushra, Q.S.; Hyodo, M.; Omine, K.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells

  2. 300 W polymer electrolyte fuel cell generators for educational purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, A.; Buechi, F.N.; Scherer, G.G.; Haas, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Popelis, I. [Fachhochschule Solothurn Nordwestschweiz (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A 300 W fuel cell power pack has been developed for educational purposes in close collaboration with the Fachhochschule Solothurn Nordwestschweiz. The project was initiated and financed by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy. The outlay and the performance of the power pack are described. (author) 3 figs.

  3. Generation and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Carbon Sequestration in Northwest Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Peavey; Norm Bessette

    2007-09-30

    The objective of the project is to develop the technology capable of capturing all carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from natural gas fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system. In addition, the technology to electrochemically oxidize any remaining carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide will be developed. Success of this R&D program would allow for the generation of electrical power and thermal power from a fossil fuel driven SOFC system without the carbon emissions resulting from any other fossil fueled power generationg system.

  4. Performance Analysis of a Hybrid Generation System of Wind Turbines, Photovoltaic Modules, and a Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Ceran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of energy analysis of a generation system consisting of wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, a fuel cell with a polymer membrane, and an electrolyser. The analysis was carried out for three configurations of generating devices’ connections with consumer: I – wind turbines and photovoltaic modules supply electrolyser, II – paralel co-operation of fuel cell with renewables, III – renewables supply electrolyser, with the option of direct supply of the consumer.

  5. Performance Analysis of a Hybrid Generation System of Wind Turbines, Photovoltaic Modules, and a Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Bartosz Ceran; Krzysztof Sroka

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of energy analysis of a generation system consisting of wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, a fuel cell with a polymer membrane, and an electrolyser. The analysis was carried out for three configurations of generating devices’ connections with consumer: I – wind turbines and photovoltaic modules supply electrolyser, II – paralel co-operation of fuel cell with renewables, III – renewables supply electrolyser, with the option of direct supply of the consumer....

  6. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.S.; Moeller-Holst, S.; Webb, D.M.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1998-08-01

    The objective is to develop and demonstrate a 4 kW, hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) stack, based on non-machined stainless steel hardware and on membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) of low catalyst loadings. The stack is designed to operate at ambient pressure on the air-side and can accommodate operation at higher fuel pressures, if so required. This is to be accomplished by working jointly with a fuel cell stack manufacturer, based on a CRADA. The performance goals are 57% energy conversion efficiency hydrogen-to-electricity (DC) at a power density of 0.9 kW/liter for a stack operating at ambient inlet pressures. The cost goal is $600/kW, based on present materials costs.

  7. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Major insights into the relationship between life-history features and fitness have come from Lotka's proof that population growth rate is determined by the level (expected amount) of reproduction and the average timing of reproduction of an individual. But this classical result is limited...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...... features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  8. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  9. A simulation study of Solid Oxide fuel cell for IGCC power generation using Aspen Plus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Kim, Hyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    operating conditions and using diverse fuels. The SOFC stack model developed using the chemical process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus which is of equilibrium type and is based on Gibbs free energy minimization. The SOFC model performs heat and mass balances and considers the ohmic, activation......The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a promising technology for electricity generation. Sulfur free syngas from the gas cleaning unit serves as a fuel for SOFC in IGFC (Integrated gasification Fuel cell) power plant. It converts the chemical energy of the fuel gas directly to electric energy...... and therefore, very high efficiencies can be achieved. The high operating temperature of the SOFC also provides excellent possibilities for cogeneration application. The outputs from SOFC can be utilized by HRSG which helps to drive steam generator. Recent developments in modeling techniques has resulted...

  10. Advances in the generation of a new emulsified fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, A. [Technical Consultancy, Energy Plus UC, Huitzilac, Morelos (Mexico); Ramirez, M. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Aseguramiento de Hidrocarburos, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Medina, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Departamento de Termofluidos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bolado, R.; Mora, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Laboratorio de Combustion, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    The development of a new emulsified fuel is described, from the conceptual idea to the semi-industrial tests of the final product. The starting point was the necessity to lower the particulate matter (PM) emissions produced by the combustion of more than 200 MBD of heavy fuel oil (HFO) used for electric power conversion. The major component of HFO is a vacuum residue of the oil refining process mixed with light cycle oils to make it pumpable. An alternative to handle and burn the high viscosity residue (solid at room temperature) is by converting it in an oil-in-water emulsion. The best emulsions resulted of 70% residue in 30% water, Sauter Mean Diameter of 10-20 {mu}m and a stability of more than 90 days. Spray burning tests of the emulsion against HFO in a semi-industrial 500 kW furnace showed a reduction in PM emissions of 24-36%. (orig.)

  11. Development of molten carbonate fuel cells for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    The broad and comprehensive program included elements of system definition, cell and system modeling, cell component development, cell testing in pure and contaminated environments, and the first stages of technology scale up. Single cells, with active areas of 45 sq cm and 582 sq cm, were operated at 650 C and improved to state of the art levels through the development of cell design concepts and improved electrolyte and electrode components. Performance was shown to degrade by the presence of fuel contaminants, such as sulfur and chlorine, and due to changes in electrode structure. Using conventional hot press fabrication techniques, electrolyte structures up to 20" x 20" were fabricated. Promising approaches were developed for nonhot pressed electrolyte structure fabrication and a promising electrolyte matrix material was identified. This program formed the basis for a long range effort to realize the benefits of molten carbonate fuel cell power plants.

  12. Measured effect of wind generation on the fuel consumption of an isolated diesel power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1983-06-01

    The Block Island Power Company (BIPCO), on Block Island, Rhode Island, operates an isolated electric power system consisting of diesel generation and an experimental wind turbine. The 150-kW wind turbine, designated MOD-OA by the U.S. Department of Energy is typically operated in parallel with two diesel generators to serve an average winter load of 350 kW. Wind generation serves up to 60 percent of the system demand depending on wind speed and total system load. Results of diesel fuel consumption measurements are given for the diesel units operated in parallel with the wind turbine and again without the wind turbine. The fuel consumption data are used to calculate the amount of fuel displaced by wind energy. Results indicate that the wind turbine displaced 25,700 lbs. of the diesel fuel during the test period, representing a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of 6.7 percent while generating 11 percent of the total electric energy. The amount of displaced fuel depends on operating conditions and system load. It is also shown that diesel engine throttle activity resulting from wind gusts which rapidly change the wind turbine output do not significantly influence fuel consumption.

  13. Measured effect of wind generation on the fuel consumption of an isolated diesel power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiller, P.; Scott, G.; Shaltens, R.

    1983-06-01

    The Block Island Power Company (BIPCO), on Block Island, Rhode Island, operates an isolated electric power system consisting of diesel generation and an experimental wind turbine. The 150-kW wind turbine, designated MOD-OA by the U.S. Department of Energy is typically operated in parallel with two diesel generators to serve an average winter load of 350 kW. Wind generation serves up to 60% of the system demand depending on wind speed and total system load. Results of diesel fuel consumption measurements are given for the diesel units operated in parallel with the wind turbine and again without the wind turbine. The fuel consumption data are used to calculate the amount of fuel displaced by wind energy. Results indicate that the wind turbine displaced 25,700 lbs. of the diesel fuel during the test period, representing a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of 6.7% while generating 11% of the total electrical energy. The amount of displaced fuel depends on operating conditions and system load. It is also shown that diesel engine throttle activity resulting from wind gusts which rapidly change the wind turbine output do not significantly influence fuel consumption.

  14. Measured effect of wind generation on the fuel consumption of an isolated diesel power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, P. H.; Scott, G. W.; Shaltens, R. K.

    1983-01-01

    The Block Island Power Company (BIPCO), on Block Island, Rhode Island, operates an isolated electric power system consisting of diesel generation and an experimental wind turbine. The 150-kW wind turbine, designated MOD-OA by the U.S. Department of Energy is typically operated in parallel with two diesel generators to serve an average winter load of 350 kW. Wind generation serves up to 60 percent of the system demand depending on wind speed and total system load. Results of diesel fuel consumption measurements are given for the diesel units operated in parallel with the wind turbine and again without the wind turbine. The fuel consumption data are used to calculate the amount of fuel displaced by wind energy. Results indicate that the wind turbine displaced 25,700 lbs. of the diesel fuel during the test period, representing a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of 6.7 percent while generating 11 percent of the total electric energy. The amount of displaced fuel depends on operating conditions and system load. It is also shown that diesel engine throttle activity resulting from wind gusts which rapidly change the wind turbine output do not significantly influence fuel consumption.

  15. Electricity generation by microbial fuel cells fuelled with wheat straw hydrolysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    Electricity production from microbial fuel cells fueled with hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw can achieve both energy production and domestic wastewater purification. The hydrolysate contained mainly xylan, carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds. Power generation...... density with the hydrolysate was higher than the one with only xylan (120 mW m−2) and carboxylic acids as fuel. The higher power density can be caused by the presence of phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates, which could mediate electron transport. Electricity generation with the hydrolysate resulted...... in 95% degradation of the xylan and glucan. The study demonstrates that lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be used for co-treatment with domestic wastewater for power generation in microbial fuel cells....

  16. New-generation radiotracers for nAChR and NET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Yushin [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: ding@bnl.gov; Fowler, Joanna [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Advances in radiotracer chemistry and instrumentation have merged to make positron emission tomography (PET) a powerful tool in the biomedical sciences. Positron emission tomography has found increased application in the study of drugs affecting the brain and whole body, including the measurement of drug pharmacokinetics (using a positron-emitter-labeled drug) and drug pharmacodynamics (using a labeled tracer). Thus, radiotracers are major scientific tools enabling investigations of molecular phenomena, which are at the heart of understanding human disease and developing effective treatments; however, there is evidently a bottleneck in translating basic research to clinical practice. In the meantime, the poor ability to predict the in vivo behavior of chemical compounds based on their log P's and affinities emphasizes the need for more knowledge in this area. In this article, we focus on the development and translation of radiotracers for PET studies of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the norepinephrine transporter (NET), two molecular systems that urgently need such an important tool to better understand their functional significance in the living human brain.

  17. Procedure for determining maximum sustainable power generated by microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Joseph; Beyenal, Haluk; Marsili, Enrico; Veluchamy, Raajaraajan Angathevar; Demir, Goksel; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2006-02-01

    Power generated by microbial fuel cells is computed as a product of current passing through an external resistor and voltage drop across this resistor. If the applied resistance is very low, then high instantaneous power generated by the cell is measured, which is not sustainable; the cell cannot deliver that much power for long periods of time. Since using small electrical resistors leads to erroneous assessment of the capabilities of microbial fuel cells, a question arises: what resistor should be used in such measurements? To address this question, we have defined the sustainable power as the steady state of power delivery by a microbial fuel cell under a given set of conditions and the maximum sustainable power as the highest sustainable power that a microbial fuel cell can deliver under a given set of conditions. Selecting the external resistance that is associated with the maximum sustainable power in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is difficult because the operator has limited influence on the main factors that control power generation: the rate of charge transfer at the current-limiting electrode and the potential established across the fuel cell. The internal electrical resistance of microbial fuel cells varies, and it depends on the operational conditions of the fuel cell. We have designed an empirical procedure to predict the maximum sustainable power that can be generated by a microbial fuel cell operated under a given set of conditions. Following the procedure, we change the external resistors incrementally, in steps of 500 omega every 10, 60, or 180 s and measure the anode potential, the cathode potential, and the cell current. Power generated in the microbial fuel cell that we were using was limited by the anodic current. The anodic potential was used to determine the condition where the maximum sustainable power is obtained. The procedure is simple, microbial fuel cells can be characterized within an hour, and the results of the measurements can serve

  18. Carbon as a fuel for efficient electricity generation in carbon solid oxide fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypkiewicz Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the impact of the physicochemical properties of carbonaceous solid fuels on the performance of a direct carbon solid oxide fuel cell (DC-SOFC was investigated. High-purity synthetic carbon powders such as carbon black N-220 and Carbo Medicinalis FP5 were chosen for analytical and electrochemical investigations in a DC-SOFC. The research focussed on choosing an optimised, cost-effective, high-purity carbon powder which could be applied as a solid reference fuel for all tests performed on a single DC-SOFC cell as well as on DC-SOFC stack constructions. Most of the electrochemical investigations described in this paper were performed using square DCSOFCs with dimensions of 5 × 5 cm. The relationship between structure, physicochemical properties, and electrochemical reactivity in a DC-SOFC was analysed.

  19. Simultaneous energy generation and UV quencher removal from landfill leachate using a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Syeed Md; Novak, John T; Brazil, Brian; He, Zhen

    2017-11-01

    The presence of UV quenching compounds in landfill leachate can negatively affect UV disinfection in a wastewater treatment plant when leachate is co-treated. Herein, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated to remove UV quenchers from a landfill leachate with simultaneous bioelectricity generation. The key operating parameters including hydraulic retention time (HRT), anolyte recirculation rate, and external resistance were systematically studied to maximize energy recovery and UV absorbance reduction. It was found that nearly 50% UV absorbance was reduced under a condition of HRT 40 days, continuous anolyte recirculation, and 10 Ω external resistance. Further analysis showed a total reduction of organics by 75.3%, including the reduction of humic acids, fulvic acids, and hydrophilic fraction concentration as TOC. The MFC consumed 0.056 kWh m-3 by its pump system for recirculation and oxygen supply. A reduced HRT of 20 days with periodical anode recirculation (1 hour in every 24 hours) and 39 Ω external resistance (equal to the internal resistance of the MFC) resulted in the highest net energy of 0.123 kWh m-3. Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used as an effective post-treatment step and could achieve 89.1% UV absorbance reduction with 40 g L-1. The combined MFC and GAC treatment could reduce 92.9% of the UV absorbance and remove 89.7% of the UV quenchers. The results of this study would encourage further exploration of using MFCs as an energy-efficient method for removing UV quenchers from landfill leachate.

  20. Generator Set Durability Testing Using 25% ATJ Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CL15-8613 Results Min Max Saybolt Color D156 -- 22 Acid Number D3242 mg KOH / g 0.004 0.015 Chemical Composition D1319 Aromatics...UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 30 Figure 7. Acid and Base Numbers The recommendation to change the oil at 500 hours is a good one, as the lines were...Hansen Edwin A. Frame U.S. Army TARDEC Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) San Antonio, TX for

  1. Water treatment for fossil fuel power generation - technology status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-07

    This technology status report focuses on the use of water treatment technology in fossil fuel power plants. The use of polymeric ion exchange resins for deionization of water, the currently preferred use of ion exchange for economically treating water containing low dissolved salts, the use of low pressure high-flux membranes, membrane microfiltration, and reverse osmosis are discussed. Details are given of the benefits of the technologies, water use at power plants, the current status of water treatment technologies, and the potential for future developments, along with power plant market trends and potentials, worldwide developments, and UK capabilities in water treatment plant design and manufacturing.

  2. Pollutants generated by the combustion of solid biomass fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Jenny M; Ma, Lin; Williams, Alan; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This book considers the pollutants formed by the combustion of solid biomass fuels. The availability and potential use of solid biofuels is first discussed because this is the key to the development of biomass as a source of energy.This is followed by details of the methods used for characterisation of biomass and their classification.The various steps in the combustion mechanisms are given together with a compilation of the kinetic data. The chemical mechanisms for the formation of the pollutants: NOx, smoke and unburned hydrocarbons, SOx, Cl compounds, and particulate metal aerosols

  3. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  4. Cases for the Net Generation: An Empirical Examination of Students' Attitude toward Multimedia Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Michael; Vibert, Conor

    2016-01-01

    Case studies have been an important tool in business, legal, and medical education for generations of students. Traditional text-based cases tend to be self-contained and structured in such a way as to teach a particular concept. The multimedia cases introduced in this study feature unscripted web-hosted video interviews with business owners and…

  5. Reviews on Fuel Cell Technology for Valuable Chemicals and Energy Co-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisitsree Wiyaratn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a review of co-generation process in fuel cell type reactor to produce valuable chemical compounds along with electricity. The chemicals and energy co-generation processes have been shown to be a promising alternative to conventional reactors and conventional fuel cells with pure water as a byproduct. This paper reviews researches on chemicals and energy co-generation technologies of three types of promising fuel cell i.e. solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC, alkaline fuel cell (AFC, and proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. In addition, the research studies on applications of SOFCs, AFCs, and PEMFCs with chemical production (i.e. nitric oxide, formaldehyde, sulfur oxide, C2 hydrocarbons, alcohols, syngas and hydrogen peroxide were also given. Although, it appears that chemicals and energy co-generation processes have potential to succeed in commercial applications, the development of cheaper catalyst materials with longer stability ,and understanding in thermodynamic are still challenging to improve the overall system performance and enable to use in commercial market.

  6. Catering to the Needs of the "Digital Natives" or Educating the "Net Generation"?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Jones, Chris

    2010-01-01

    that there is a generation of digital natives, but that young people may need to develop skills often associated with the digital natives. The authors present a case reflecting these pedagogical aims, involving an online Web 2.0 learning environment called Ekademia. The findings of the case reflect a gap between...... to curricular activities, involve a more concerted pedagogical effort, and be supported by a higher degree of institutionalization....

  7. Generation of daily solar irradiation by means of artificial neural net works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Adalberto N.; Tiba, Chigueru; Fraidenraich, Naum [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000 - CDU, CEP 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    The present study proposes the utilization of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) as an alternative for generating synthetic series of daily solar irradiation. The sequences were generated from the use of daily temporal series of a group of meteorological variables that were measured simultaneously. The data used were measured between the years of 1998 and 2006 in two temperate climate localities of Brazil, Ilha Solteira (Sao Paulo) and Pelotas (Rio Grande do Sul). The estimates were taken for the months of January, April, July and October, through two models which are distinguished regarding the use or nonuse of measured bright sunshine hours as an input variable. An evaluation of the performance of the 56 months of solar irradiation generated by way of ANN showed that by using the measured bright sunshine hours as an input variable (model 1), the RMSE obtained were less or equal to 23.2% being that of those, although 43 of those months presented RMSE less or equal to 12.3%. In the case of the model that did not use the measured bright sunshine hours but used a daylight length (model 2), RMSE were obtained that varied from 8.5% to 37.5%, although 38 of those months presented RMSE less or equal to 20.0%. A comparison of the monthly series for all of the years, achieved by means of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (to a confidence level of 99%), demonstrated that of the 16 series generated by ANN model only two, obtained by model 2 for the months of April and July in Pelotas, presented significant difference in relation to the distributions of the measured series and that all mean deviations obtained were inferior to 0.39 MJ/m{sup 2}. It was also verified that the two ANN models were able to reproduce the principal statistical characteristics of the frequency distributions of the measured series such as: mean, mode, asymmetry and Kurtosis. (author)

  8. Proliferation resistances of Generation IV recycling facilities for nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Åberg Lindell, Matilda

    2013-01-01

    The effects of global warming raise demands for reduced CO2 emissions, whereas at the same time the world’s need for energy increases. With the aim to resolve some of the difficulties facing today’s nuclear power, striving for safety, sustainability and waste minimization, a new generation of nuclear energy systems is being pursued: Generation IV. New reactor concepts and new nuclear facilities should be at least as resistant to diversion of nuclear material for weapons production, as were th...

  9. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  10. Energy generation from biomass with the aid of fuel cells; Energetische Nutzung von Biomasse mit Brennstoffzellenverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    To provide an opportunity for information exchange at the interface between biomass use for energy generation and developers of fuel cells, the workshop 'Energy generation from biomass with the aid of fuel cells' was held by the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe on 9 and 10 December 1998. The lectures and discussions permit to assess better the opportunities and restraints resulting from the use of biogenous fuel gas in fuel cells. (orig.) [German] Um an der Schnittstelle zwischen der energetischen Nutzung von Biomasse und den Entwicklern von Brennstoffzellen einen Informationsaustausch zu ermoeglichen, wurde am 9. und 10. Dezember 1998 der Workshop 'Energetische Nutzung von Biomasse mit Brennstoffzellenverfahren' von der FNR veranstaltet. Die Vortraege und die Diskussion erlauben eine bessere Einschaetzung der Moeglichkeiten und Restriktionen, die sich bei dem Einsatz von biogenen Brenngasen in Brennstoffzellen ergeben. (orig.)

  11. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  12. A multi-area fuel-based generation-transmission planning procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepasian, M.S. [Power and Water Industry Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seifi, H. [Tarbiat-Modares Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbari, A. [Semnan Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rae, S. [Tavanir Co., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Linear programming was used to optimize a transmission and fuel supply planning procedure for a large-scale Iranian power system. Preliminary studies were conducted to determine optimum transmission scenarios. A 3-area test system was used to develop an algorithm capable of determining optimum generation allocations for each area while minimizing transmission expansion requirements. The power system consisted of 16 regional utilities interconnected by 400 and 230 kV transmission elements. The generation scenarios considered installation costs, imported fuel costs, and the cost of tie-line reinforcements. Generation scenarios considered fuel supplies for power plants located throughout Iran. The study showed that while fuel resources were located primarily in the southern area, hydraulic resources were located in the southwest of the country. Fuel was largely consumed in the northern region of Iran. It was concluded that the algorithm can be used to calculate the costs of supplying fuel and transmission reinforcements. Further research is being conducted to develop genetic and hybrid algorithms for use in the ongoing study. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  13. Net energy output from harvesting small-diameter trees using a mechanized system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei Pan; Han-Sup Han; Leonard R. Johnson; William J. Elliot

    2008-01-01

    What amount of extra energy can be generated after subtracting the total energy consumed to produce the biomass energy? Knowing the ratio between energy output and input is a valid question when highly mechanized systems that consume fossil fuels are used to harvest and transport forest biomass for energy. We estimated the net energy generated from mechanical fuel...

  14. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  15. Net Influence of an Internally Generated Guasi-biennial Oscillation on Modelled Stratospheric Climate and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke David; Newman, Paul A.; Song, InSun

    2013-01-01

    A Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry- Climate Model (GEOSCCM) simulation with strong tropical non-orographic gravity wave drag (GWD) is compared to an otherwise identical simulation with near-zero tropical non-orographic GWD. The GEOSCCM generates a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) zonal wind signal in response to a tropical peak in GWD that resembles the zonal and climatological mean precipitation field. The modelled QBO has a frequency and amplitude that closely resembles observations. As expected, the modelled QBO improves the simulation of tropical zonal winds and enhances tropical and subtropical stratospheric variability. Also, inclusion of the QBO slows the meridional overturning circulation, resulting in a generally older stratospheric mean age of air. Slowing of the overturning circulation, changes in stratospheric temperature and enhanced subtropical mixing all affect the annual mean distributions of ozone, methane and nitrous oxide. Furthermore, the modelled QBO enhances polar stratospheric variability in winter. Because tropical zonal winds are easterly in the simulation without a QBO, there is a relative increase in tropical zonal winds in the simulation with a QBO. Extratropical differences between the simulations with and without a QBO thus reflect the westerly shift in tropical zonal winds: a relative strengthening of the polar stratospheric jet, polar stratospheric cooling and a weak reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  16. Photonic microstructures for energy-generating clear glass and net-zero energy buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Mikhail; Alghamedi, Ramzy; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Transparent energy-harvesting windows are emerging as practical building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), capable of generating electricity while simultaneously reducing heating and cooling demands. By incorporating spectrally-selective diffraction gratings as light deflecting structures of high visible transparency into lamination interlayers and using improved spectrally-selective thin-film coatings, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass windows with minimum attenuation. At the same time, the ultraviolet (UV) and a part of incident solar infrared (IR) radiation energy are converted and/or deflected geometrically towards the panel edge for collection by CuInSe2 solar cells. Experimental results show power conversion efficiencies in excess of 3.04% in 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed clear glass panels facing direct sunlight, and up to 2.08% in 50 cm × 50 cm installation-ready framed window systems. These results confirm the emergence of a new class of solar window system ready for industrial application.

  17. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  18. New generation nuclear fuel structures: dense particles in selectively soluble matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, David J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pattillo, Steve G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Phillips, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a technology for dispersing sub-millimeter sized fuel particles within a bulk matrix that can be selectively dissolved. This may enable the generation of advanced nuclear fuels with easy separation of actinides and fission products. The large kinetic energy of the fission products results in most of them escaping from the sub-millimeter sized fuel particles and depositing in the matrix during burning of the fuel in the reactor. After the fuel is used and allowed to cool for a period of time, the matrix can be dissolved and the fission products removed for disposal while the fuel particles are collected by filtration for recycle. The success of such an approach would meet a major goal of the GNEP program to provide advanced recycle technology for nuclear energy production. The benefits of such an approach include (1) greatly reduced cost of the actinide/fission product separation process, (2) ease of recycle of the fuel particles, and (3) a radiation barrier to prevent theft or diversion of the recycled fuel particles during the time they are re-fabricated into new fuel. In this study we describe a method to make surrogate nuclear fuels of micrometer scale W (shell)/Mo (core) or HfO2 particles embedded in an MgO matrix that allows easy separation of the fission products and their embedded particles. In brief, the method consists of physically mixing W-Mo or hafnia particles with an MgO precursor. Heating the mixture, in air or argon, without agitation, to a temperature is required for complete decomposition of the precursor. The resulting material was examined using chemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray computed tomography and found to consist of evenly dispersed particles in an MgO + matrix. We believe this methodology can be extended to actinides and other matrix materials.

  19. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  20. Migration from Gasoline to Gaseous Fuel for Small-scale Electricity Generation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukandar Sukandar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study that gives a consideration to change fuel source for electricity generator from gasoline to combustible gas. A gaseous fuel conversion technology is presented and its performance is compared with gasoline. In the experiment, two types of load were tested, resistive and resistive-inductive. By using both fuels mostly the power factor (Cos ? of resistive-inductive load variations were greater than 0.8, and they had slight difference on operational voltage. The drawback of using gaseous fuel is the frequency of the electricity might be up to 10 Hz deviated from the standard frequency (i.e. 50 Hz. In the lab scale experiment, the gasoline consumption increased proportionally with the load increase, while using gaseous fuel the consumption of gas equal for two different load value in the range of 50% maximum load, which is 100 gram per 15 minutes operation. Therefore, the use of gaseous generation system should have average power twice than the required load. The main advantage using gaseous fuel (liquefied petroleum gas or biogas compared to gasoline is a cleaner emitted gas after combustion.

  1. Electricity generation from wastewaters with starch as carbon source using a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero-Hernandez, E; Smith, T J; Akid, R

    2013-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells represent a new method for producing electricity from the oxidation of organic matter. A mediatorless microbial fuel cell was developed using Escherichia coli as the active bacterial component with synthetic wastewater of potato extract as the energy source. The two-chamber fuel cell, with a relation of volume between anode and cathode chamber of 8:1, was operated in batch mode. The response was similar to that obtained when glucose was used as the carbon source. The performance characteristics of the fuel cell were evaluated with two different anode and cathode shapes, platinised titanium strip or mesh; the highest maximum power density (502mWm(-2)) was achieved in the microbial fuel cell with mesh electrodes. In addition to electricity generation, the MFC exhibited efficient treatment of wastewater so that significant reduction of initial oxygen demand of wastewater by 61% was observed. These results demonstrate that potato starch can be used for power generation in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell with high removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  3. Expert System analysis of non-fuel assembly hardware and spent fuel disassembly hardware: Its generation and recommended disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Douglas Alan [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Almost all of the effort being expended on radioactive waste disposal in the United States is being focused on the disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, with little consideration for other areas that will have to be disposed of in the same facilities. one area of radioactive waste that has not been addressed adequately because it is considered a secondary part of the waste issue is the disposal of the various Non-Fuel Bearing Components of the reactor core. These hardware components fall somewhat arbitrarily into two categories: Non-Fuel Assembly (NFA) hardware and Spent Fuel Disassembly (SFD) hardware. This work provides a detailed examination of the generation and disposal of NFA hardware and SFD hardware by the nuclear utilities of the United States as it relates to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. All available sources of data on NFA and SFD hardware are analyzed with particular emphasis given to the Characteristics Data Base developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the characterization work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Rochester Gas & Electric. An Expert System developed as a portion of this work is used to assist in the prediction of quantities of NFA hardware and SFD hardware that will be generated by the United States` utilities. Finally, the hardware waste management practices of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Sweden, and Japan are studied for possible application to the disposal of domestic hardware wastes. As a result of this work, a general classification scheme for NFA and SFD hardware was developed. Only NFA and SFD hardware constructed of zircaloy and experiencing a burnup of less than 70,000 MWD/MTIHM and PWR control rods constructed of stainless steel are considered Low-Level Waste. All other hardware is classified as Greater-ThanClass-C waste.

  4. Mustard tuber wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation using microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fei; Fu, Guokai; Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Chunling

    2013-05-01

    Mustard tuber wastewater (MTWW) was utilized as fuel in the typical dual-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to recover bio-energy and to obtain effluent treatment simultaneously. The whole experiment was divided into four phases characterized by increasing contents of primary clarifier effluent (PCE). Results showed substrate1, with which MFC generated a maximum power density of 246 mW/m(2), was the most appropriate fuel in terms of power recovery and the internal resistance and columbic efficiency were 121 Ω and 67.7±1%, respectively. When feeding MFCs with substrate4, 85±0% of COD could be removed, which was the highest COD removal, however, the power retrieve efficiency was much lower. Interestingly, significantly negative correlation (Ppower-generating performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Electricity generation from macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera hydrolysates using an alkaline fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Susu; Liu, Xianhua; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Pingping

    2016-12-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a method for the direct power generation using macroalgae Enteromorpha prolifera. The process conditions for the saccharification of macroalgae were optimized and a type of alkaline fuel cell contained no precious metal catalysts was developed. Under optimum conditions (170°C and 2% hydrochloric acid for 45min), dilute acid hydrolysis of the homogenized plants yielded 272.25g reducing sugar/kg dry algal biomass. The maximum power density reached 3.81W/m(2) under the condition of 3M KOH and 18.15g/L reducing sugar in hydrolysate, higher than any other reported algae-fed fuel cells. This study represents the first report on direct electricity generation from macroalgae using alkaline fuel cells, suggesting that there is great potential for the production of renewable energy using marine biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Numerical solution of moving boundary problem for deposition process in solid fuel gas generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokhov, V. M.; Dorofeenko, S. O.; Sharov, M. S.; Toktaliev, P. D.

    2016-11-01

    Moving boundary problem in application to process of depositions formation in gas generator are considered. Gas generator, as a part of fuel preparation system of high-speed vehicle, convert solid fuel into multicomponent multiphase mixture, which further burned down in combustion chamber. Mathematical model of two-phase “gas-solid particles” flow, including Navier-Stokes equations for turbulent flow in gas generator and mass, impulse conservations laws for elementary depositions layer are proposed. Verification of proposed mathematical model for depositions mass in gas generator conditions is done. Further possible improvements of proposed model, based on more detail accounting of particle-wall interaction and wall's surface adhesion properties are analyzed.

  7. Influence of the pressure holding time on strain generation in fuel injection lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basara, Adis, E-mail: adis.basara@evonik.com [Process Technology and Engineering, Evonik Degussa GmbH, Rodenbacher Chaussee 4, 63457 Hanau-Wolfgang (Germany); Alt, Nicolas; Schluecker, Eberhard [Institute for Process Technology and Machinery, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstrasse 4, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    An influence of the pressure holding time on residual strain generation during the autofrettage process was studied experimentally for the first time in the present work. It is the state of the art that fuel injection lines are held at the autofrettage pressure for only a few seconds in an industrial production. In doing so, it is assumed that a desirable residual stress-strain pattern is generated. However, the results of the experimental investigations outlined in this work indicated that completion of the plastic deformation caused by the autofrettage process and generation of the desirable stress-strain pattern require a much longer period. As shown, a third-order polynomial equation best described the interdependence between the time required for the completion of the process, the corresponding autofrettage pressure and the generated strain state. The method presented can be used as a tool for the determination of the optimal autofrettage process parameters in industrial production of fuel injection lines.

  8. A small portable proton exchange membrane fuel cell and hydrogen generator for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlhart, O J; Rohonyi, P; Modroukas, D; Driller, J

    1997-01-01

    Small, lightweight power sources for total artificial hearts (TAH), left ventricular assist devices (LVAD), and other medical products are under development. The new power source will provide 2 to 3 times the capacity of conventional batteries. The implications of this new power source are profound. For example, for the Heartmate LVAD, 5 to 8 hours of operation are obtained with 3 lb of lead acid batteries (Personal Communication Mr. Craig Sherman, Thermo Cardiosystems, Inc TCI 11/29/96). With the same weight, as much as 14 hours of operation appear achievable with the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell power source. Energy densities near 135 watt-hour/L are achievable. These values significantly exceed those of most conventional and advanced primary and secondary batteries. The improvement is mission dependent and even applies for the short deployment cited above. The comparison to batteries becomes even more favorable if the mission length is increased. The higher capacity requires only replacement of lightweight hydride cartridges and logistically available water. Therefore, when one spare 50 L hydride cartridge weighing 115 g is added to the reactant supply the energy density of the total system increases to 230 watt-hour/kg. This new power source is comprised of a hydrogen fueled, air-breathing PEM fuel cell and a miniature hydrogen generator (US Patent No 5,514,353). The fuel cell is of novel construction and differs from conventional bipolar PEM fuel cells by the arrangement of cells on a single sheet of ion-exchange membrane. The construction avoids the weight and volume penalty of conventional bipolar stacks. The hydrogen consumed by the fuel cell is generated load-responsively in the miniature hydrogen generator, by reacting calcium hydride with water, forming in the process hydrogen and lime. The generator is cartridge rechargeable and available in capacities providing up to several hundred watt-hours of electric power.

  9. Performance of diesel cycle engine-generator operating on dual fuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of diesel cycle engine-generator operating on dual fuel mode with gasification gas. Paulo Job Brenneisen, Luiz Inácio Chavez, Angélica Buzinaro Avaci, Carlos Eduardo Camargo Nogueira, Deonir Secco, Reinaldo Prandini Ricieri, Reinaldo Aparecido Bariccatti ...

  10. Adaptive sliding mode control of interleaved parallel boost converter for fuel cell energy generation system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fadil, H.; Giri, F.; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of controlling energy generation systems including fuel cells (FCs) and interleaved boost power converters. The proposed nonlinear adaptive controller is designed using sliding mode control (SMC) technique based on the system nonlinear model. The latter accounts...

  11. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  12. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from prima...

  13. Next-generation batteries and fuel cells for commercial, military, and space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, A R

    2012-01-01

    Distilling complex theoretical physical concepts into an understandable technical framework, Next-Generation Batteries and Fuel Cells for Commercial, Military, and Space Applications describes primary and secondary (rechargeable) batteries for various commercial, military, spacecraft, and satellite applications for covert communications, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. It emphasizes the cost, reliability, longevity, and safety of the next generation of high-capacity batteries for applications where high energy density, minimum weight and size, and reliability in harsh conditions are

  14. Demonstration and Verification of a Turbine Power Generation System Utilizing Renewable Fuel: Landfill Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    diluted gas stream - downstream of where the LFG feed gas and dilution air are mixed before entering the FP250 compressor. However, due to the...worldwide, including landfill and biogas , coal mines, associated petroleum gas , and mainstream power generation markets. Ener-Core is hopeful that the...FINAL REPORT Demonstration and Verification of a Turbine Power Generation System Utilizing Renewable Fuel: Landfill Gas ESTCP Project EW

  15. Fuel-Cell Power Systems Incorporating Mg-Based H2 Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Narayan, Sri R.

    2009-01-01

    Two hydrogen generators based on reactions involving magnesium and steam have been proposed as means for generating the fuel (hydrogen gas) for such fuel-cell power systems as those to be used in the drive systems of advanced motor vehicles. The hydrogen generators would make it unnecessary to rely on any of the hydrogen storage systems developed thus far that are, variously, too expensive, too heavy, too bulky, and/or too unsafe to be practical. The two proposed hydrogen generators are denoted basic and advanced, respectively. In the basic hydrogen generator (see figure), steam at a temperature greater than or equals 330 C would be fed into a reactor charged with magnesium, wherein hydrogen would be released in the exothermic reaction Mg + H2O yields MgO + H2. The steam would be made in a flash boiler. To initiate the reaction, the boiler could be heated electrically by energy borrowed from a storage battery that would be recharged during normal operation of the associated fuel-cell subsystem. Once the reaction was underway, heat from the reaction would be fed to the boiler. If the boiler were made an integral part of the hydrogen-generator reactor vessel, then the problem of transfer of heat from the reactor to the boiler would be greatly simplified. A pump would be used to feed water from a storage tank to the boiler.

  16. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  18. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  19. Beyond the Net Generation Debate: A Comparison of Digital Learners in Face-to-Face and Virtual Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Gros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, an important debate has arisen about the characteristics of today’s students due to their intensive experience as users of ICT. The main belief is that frequent use of technologies in everyday life implies that competent users are able to transfer their digital skills to learning activities. However, empirical studies developed in different countries reveal similar results suggesting that the “digital native” label does not provide evidence of a better use of technology to support learning. The debate has to go beyond the characteristics of the new generation and focus on the implications of being a learner in a digitalised world. This paper is based on the hypothesis that the use of technology to support learning is not related to whether a student belongs to the Net Generation, but that it is mainly influenced by the teaching model.The study compares behaviour and preferences towards ICT use in two groups of university students: face-to-face students and online students. A questionnaire was applied to a sample of students from five universities with different characteristics (one offers online education and four offer face-to-face education with LMS teaching support.Findings suggest that although access to and use of ICT is widespread, the influence of teaching methodology is very decisive. For academic purposes, students seem to respond to the requirements of their courses, programmes, and universities. There is a clear relationship between students’ perception of usefulness regarding certain ICT resources and their teachers’ suggested uses of technologies. The most highly rated technologies correspond with those proposed by teachers. The study shows that the educational model (face-to-face or online has a stronger influence on students’ perception of usefulness regarding ICT support for learning than the fact of being a digital native.

  20. Biotreatment of Slaughterhouse Wastewater Accompanied with Sustainable Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Z. Ismail

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC for simultaneous bioremediation of slaughterhouse wastewater and sustainable power generation. For the first time, an integrated system of tubular type microbial fuel cell (MFC was used in this study. The MFC consisted of three concentric Plexiglas tubes; the inner tube was the anaerobic anodic compartment, the mid tube was the aerobic biocathodic chamber, and the outer tube act as an aerobic bioreactor for extended nitrification process. The MFC system was connected to a complementary external anaerobic bioreactor for denitrification process. The microbial fuel cell was inoculated with freshly collected activated sludge and was continuously fueled with simulated slaughterhouse wastewater. Results revealed that the removal efficiency of the chemical oxygen demand (COD was up to 99%, and the power generation was 165 mW/m2. Also, results demonstrated that maximum removal of NO3- via the denitrification process in the final effluent was 94.7% when the initial concentration of NO3- in the effluent of the extended bioreactor was 15.2 mg/L. Approximately; complete recovery of nitrogen gas was obtained in the complementary external anaerobic bioreactor. These results indicated that MFC could be a promising approach for slaughterhouse wastewater bioremediation and renewable power generation.

  1. Is the "Net Generation" Ready for Digital Citizenship? Perspectives from the IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study 2013. Policy Brief No. 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ryan; Engel, Laura C.; Hastedt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The rise of digital information and communication technologies (ICT) has made the acquisition of computer and information literacy (CIL) a leading factor in creating an engaged, informed, and employable citizenry. However, are young people, often described as "digital natives" or the "net generation," developing the necessary…

  2. Performance of Microbial Fuel Cell for Wastewater Treatment and Electricity Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Yavari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy will have an important role as a resource of energy in the future. Microbial fuel cell (MFC is a promising method to obtain electricity from organic matter andwastewater treatment simultaneously. In a pilot study, use of microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment and electricity generation investigated. The bacteria of ruminant used as inoculums. Synthetic wastewater used at different organic loading rate. Hydraulic retention time was aneffective factor in removal of soluble COD and more than 49% removed. Optimized HRT to achieve the maximum removal efficiency and sustainable operation could be regarded 1.5 and 2.5 hours. Columbic efficiency (CE affected by organic loading rate (OLR and by increasing OLR, CE reduced from 71% to 8%. Maximum voltage was 700mV. Since the microbial fuel cell reactor considered as an anaerobic process, it may be an appropriate alternative for wastewater treatment

  3. Electricity Generation from Organic Matters in Biocatalyst-Based Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a novel technology for converting organic matter directly to electricity via biocatalytic reactions by microorganisms. MFCs can also be used for wastewater treatment by the oxidations of organic pollutants during the electricity generation. Several factors for opti......Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a novel technology for converting organic matter directly to electricity via biocatalytic reactions by microorganisms. MFCs can also be used for wastewater treatment by the oxidations of organic pollutants during the electricity generation. Several factors...... for optimum power generation in MFC have been investigated at previous studies. A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC), which is a novel configuration, was developed by immersing an anode electrode and a cathode chamber in an anaerobic reactor. Domestic wastewater without any amendments was used...... as the medium and the inoculum in the experiments. The SMFC could successfully generate a stable voltage of 0.428±0.003V with a fixed 470Ω resistor from acetate. From the polarization test, the maximum power density of 204mWm−2 was obtained at current density of 595mAm−2 (external resistance = 180Ω). The power...

  4. Fuel Economy Improvement by Utilizing Thermoelectric Generator in Heavy-Duty Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. D.; Hu, T.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances in thermoelectric technology have made exhaust-based thermoelectric generators (TEGs) promising for recovery of waste heat. Utilization of exhaust-based TEGs in heavy-duty vehicles was studied in this work. Given that the generated power is limited, the alternator is still indispensable. To improve the fuel economy, the generated electricity must be integrated into the automotive electrical system and consumed by electrical loads. Therefore, two feasible ways of integrating the generated electricity into the automotive electrical system are discussed: one in which the original alternator works only under certain conditions, i.e., the "thermostat" strategy, and another in which a smaller alternator is adopted and works together with the TEG, i.e., the "cooperative work" strategy. The overall performance and efficiency are obtained through simulation analysis. The simulation results show that both methods can improve the fuel economy, but the former provides better results. Moreover, if the electrical loads can be properly modified, the fuel economy is further improved. These simulation results lay a solid foundation for application of TEGs in vehicles in the future.

  5. Combined Power Generation and Carbon Sequestration Using Direct FuelCell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2006-03-01

    The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cell offers an innovative approach for separation of carbon dioxide from greenhouse gases (GHG). The carbonate fuel cell system also produces electric power at high efficiency. The simultaneous generation of power and sequestration of greenhouse gases offer an attractive scenario for re-powering the existing coal-fueled power plants, in which the carbonate fuel cell would separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas and would generate additional pollutant-free electric power. Development of this system is concurrent with emergence of Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) technology for generation of electric power from fossil fuels. DFC is based on carbonate fuel cell featuring internal reforming. This technology has been deployed in MW-scale power plants and is readily available as a manufactured product. This final report describes the results of the conceptualization study conducted to assess the DFC-based system concept for separation of CO2 from GHG. Design and development studies were focused on integration of the DFC systems with coal-based power plants, which emit large amounts of GHG. In parallel to the system design and simulation activities, operation of laboratory scale DFC verified the technical concept and provided input to the design activity. The system was studied to determine its effectiveness in capturing more than ninety percent of CO2 from the flue gases. Cost analysis was performed to estimate the change in cost of electricity for a 200 MW pulverized coal boiler steam cycle plant retrofitted with the DFC-based CO2 separation system producing an additional 127 MW of electric power. The cost increments as percentage of levelized cost of electricity were estimated for a range of separation plant installations per year and a range of natural gas cost. The parametric envelope meeting the goal (<20% increase in COE) was identified. Results of this feasibility study indicated that DFC-based separation

  6. Entropy generation during the quasi-steady burning of spherical fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghavan, V.; Gogos, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Babu, V.; Sundararajan, T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2007-06-15

    Entropy generation during the quasi-steady combustion of spherical liquid fuel particles has been presented in detail. The effects of freestream velocity, particle diameter, ambient temperature and gravity, on the entropy generation rate, have been discussed in detail. In the range of sub-critical freestream velocity, where an envelope flame is present, the entropy generation rate presents a minimum value. At a critical velocity, where the flame transition occurs, the entropy generation rate reaches a maximum value. Flame transition significantly affects the entropy generation rate, which suffers a sharp decrease in its value after the transition. Heat transfer and chemical reaction contribute almost equally to the total entropy generation rate. When normal gravity is considered in an upward flow configuration, there is an increase in the entropy generation rate as compared to the zero gravity case. The effect of gravity poses a complex variation pattern in the entropy generation rate, for a downward flow configuration. The entropy generation rate decreases with increasing ambient temperature. The entropy generation rate increases with the particle diameter. A correlation has been presented for the non-dimensional entropy generation number as a function of Froude number. (author)

  7. Is there a "net generation" in veterinary medicine? A comparative study on the use of the Internet and Web 2.0 by students and the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhaven, Christoph; Tipold, Andrea; Fischer, Martin R; Ehlers, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Informal and formal lifelong learning is essential at university and in the workplace. Apart from classical learning techniques, Web 2.0 tools can be used. It is controversial whether there is a so-called net generation amongst people under 30. To test the hypothesis that a net generation among students and young veterinarians exists. An online survey of students and veterinarians was conducted in the German-speaking countries which was advertised via online media and traditional print media. 1780 people took part in the survey. Students and veterinarians have different usage patterns regarding social networks (91.9% vs. 69%) and IM (55.9% vs. 24.5%). All tools were predominantly used passively and in private, to a lesser extent also professionally and for studying. The use of Web 2.0 tools is useful, however, teaching information and media skills, preparing codes of conduct for the internet and verification of user generated content is essential.

  8. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  9. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catal, Tunc [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Li, Kaichang [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bermek, Hakan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains. (author)

  10. Microbial fuel cell powered by lipid extracted algae: A promising system for algal lipids and power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Amitap; Vijay, Ankisha; Dixit, Ambesh; Chhabra, Meenu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a promising microbial fuel cell (MFC) system has been developed, wherein algae is cultivated in the cathode chamber, algae biomass is harvested and lipids are extracted. The lipid extracted algal (LEA) biomass was then used asan electron donor substrate. The performance of MFCs fed with LEA biomass was compared with that of fruit waste fed MFCs (FP-MFCs), wherein LEA-fed MFC was superior in all aspects. Power density of 2.7Wm -3 was obtained by LEA-fed MFCs which is 145% and 260% higher than FP MFC and control MFC respectively. The volumetric algae productivity of 0.028kgm -3 day -1 in cathode chamber was achieved. The system was able to generate 0.0136kWhKg -1 CODday -1 of electric energy and 0.0782kWhm -3 day -1 of algal oil energy. The proposed system is a net energy producer which does not rely heavily on the external supply of electron donor substrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear Power and Justice between Generations. A Moral Analysis of Fuel Cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Taebi, B.

    2010-01-01

    When we produce nuclear power we are depleting a non-renewable resource (uranium) that will eventually not be available to future generations. Furthermore the ensuing nuclear waste needs to be isolated from the biosphere for long periods of time to come. This gives rise to the problem of justice to posterity or intergenerational justice. Different production methods or nuclear fuel cycles address these issues differently which is why we first need to carefully scrutinize all the possibilities...

  12. Systems of three generation using fuel cells; Sistemas de trigeracao com o uso de celulas a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Martin Diaz, Jose Ignacio; Aperribay Maiztegui, Victor; San Martin Diaz, Jose Javier [Escuela Universitaria de Ingenieria Tecnica Industrial de Eibar, Guipuzcoa, Pais Vasco (Spain); Zamora Belver, Inmaculada; Eguia Lopez, Pablo [Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieria de Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The three generation includes production processes and simultaneous use oe electric power, heat and cold from a fuel source providing global high energy efficiency, reduction of emission of gases in the atmosphere, losses of investments, and more reliability in the supply. This paper approaches the use of fuel cells for three generation, and presents different subsystems of generation with the main characteristics and applications. (author)

  13. Conceptual design of clean electricity generation units deploying recovery technologies from waste coal-based fuel feedstock

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero, Francisco; Clemente Jul, María del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Fossil fuels, coal and gas, accounts by far the basis of electricity generation and will remain playing a key role in the global energy mix. Coal is the most intensive resource use to generate electricity and heat but also use for the industry to produce chemicals and materials. This study proposes four (4) alternatives of electricity generation facility from waste coal-based feedstock, including the analysis of additional portions of another fuels and waste, like coal, urban organic solid...

  14. Electrical Power Generation with Himalayan Mud Soil using Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debajyoti Bose

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Topsoil microbial community primarily consists of bacteria species that can generate electricity if a microbial fuel cell is incorporated with it. Since such electron producing bacteria are abundant in nature, microbial fuel cells can be considered as clean source of electricity generation and a prospect for renewable energy growth.  Here, the authors have shown experiments with a real microbial fuel cell, investigating electrical power production from it using the Himalayan top soil of Dehradun in Uttarakhand, India. At the smallest level it can help remote rural areas to power lamps or other less energy intensive devices. Using a setup that includes anode, cathode, and related electrical fittings this work has utilized these bacteria over time and observe the power they produce; also the addition of nutrients to the soil which increases the rate of power production has also been experimented. The setup brings together the concept of energy, electronics and microbiology under one framework and is in line with issues relating to climate change, energy security and sustainability. An attempt has been made to explore the spectrum of scenarios and speculating the possibility of generating renewable power using the Himalayan top soil.

  15. Electricity and H2 generation from hemicellulose by sequential fermentation and microbial fuel/electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Di; Yang, Xuewei; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2015-09-01

    Electricity and hydrogen generation by bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens in a dual-chamber microbial fuel/electrolysis cell following the fermentation of hemicellulose by bacteria Moorella thermoacetica was investigated. Experimental results showed that 10 g l-1 xylose under 60 °C was appropriate for the fermentation of xylose by M. thermoacetica, yielding 0.87 g-acetic acid per gram of xylose consumed. Corncob hydrolysate could also be fermented to produce acetic acid, but with lower yield (0.74 g-acid per g-xylose). The broths of xylose and corncob hydrolysate fermented by M. thermoacetica containing acetic acid were fed to G. sulfurreducens in a dual-chamber microbial fuel/electrolysis cell for electricity and hydrogen generation. The highest open-circuit cell voltages generated were 802 and 745 mV, and hydrogen yields were 41.7 and 23.3 mmol per mol-acetate, in xylose and corncob hydrolysate fermentation broth media, respectively. The internal resistance of the microbial fuel/electrolysis cell fed with corncob hydrolysate fermentation broth (3472 Ω) was much higher than that with xylose fermentation broth (1993 Ω) or sodium acetate medium (467 Ω), which was believed to be the main cause of the variation in hydrogen yield of the three feeding media.

  16. Developing A Family-Size Biogas-Fueled Electricity Generating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Haryanto

    2017-06-01

     Keywords: biogas; family size; generator; electricity; bio-filter.  Article History: Received Janury 16th 2017; Received in revised form 2nd June 2017; Accepted 18th June 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Haryanto, A., Marotin, F., Triyono, S., Hasanudin, U. (2017, Developing A Family-Size Biogas-Fueled Electricity Generating System. International Journal of Renewable Energy Develeopment, 6(2, 111-118. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.2.111-118

  17. Domestic use of overseas renewable energy -Potential as power generating fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomofumi; Murata, Kenji; Kamiya, Shoji; Ota, Ken-ichiro; Sakata, Ko; Fukuda, Kenzo; Ishimoto, Yuki

    2010-09-15

    For Japan, it will be very important in the future to establish a social system that can consistently import or produce a set amount of resource supplies without green house gas emissions. In this study, we developed a concept for a global hydrogen energy system using wind power generation as a hydrogen source, investigated its economic efficiency, compared it with power generating fuels used at existing thermal power plants, and examined the feasibility of the global hydrogen energy system. As a result, it would be more effective to decommission existing oil-fired thermal power plants and construct new hydrogen turbine plants.

  18. Microbial fuel cells - Applications for generation of electrical power and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathuriya, Abhilasha Singh; Yakhmi, J V

    2016-01-01

    A Microbial Fuel Cell is a bioelectrochemical device that exploits metabolic activities of living microorganisms for generation of electric current. The usefulness and unique and exclusive architecture of this device has received wide attention recently of engineers and researchers of various disciplines such as microbiologists, chemical engineers, biotechnologists, environment engineers and mechanical engineers, and the subject of MFCs has thereby progressed as a well-developed technology. Sustained innovations and continuous development efforts have established the usefulness of MFCs towards many specialized and value-added applications beyond electricity generation, such as wastewater treatment and implantable body devices. This review is an attempt to provide an update on this rapidly growing technology.

  19. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... degradation and formation of more oxidized products (acetate and formate) as well as less reduced products (lactate and ethanol) compared to the controls. The reduced power generation in the presence of DMW was attributed to the presence of bacterial inhibitors such as phenolic compounds. Therefore, new...

  20. Developing the User Experience for a Next Generation Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulator (NGFCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schneider, Erich [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Livnat, Yarden [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hiromoto, Robert [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Scopatz, Anthony [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Brossard, Dominique [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheufele, Dietram [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-07-30

    This project made substantial progress on its original aim for providing a modern user experience for nuclear fuel cycle analysis while also creating a robust and functional next- generation fuel cycle simulator. The Cyclus kernel experienced a dramatic clari cation of its interfaces and data model, becoming a full- edged agent-based framework, with strong support for third party developers of novel archetypes. The most important contribution of this project to the the development of Cyclus was the introduction of tools to facilitate archetype development. These include automated code generation of routine archetype components, metadata annotations to provide re ection and rich description of each data member's purpose, and mechanisms for input validation and output of complex data. A comprehensive social science investigation of decision makers' interests in nuclear fuel cycles, and speci cally their interests in nuclear fuel cycle simulators (NFCSs) as tools for understanding nuclear fuel cycle options, was conducted. This included document review and analysis, stakeholder interviews, and a survey of decision makers. This information was used to study the role of visualization formats and features in communicating information about nuclear fuel cycles. A exible and user-friendly tool was developed for building Cyclus analysis models, featuring a drag-and-drop interface and automatic input form generation for novel archetypes. Cycic allows users to design fuel cycles from arbitrary collections of facilities for the rst time, with mechanisms that contribute to consistency within that fuel cycle. Interacting with some of the metadata capabilities introduced in the above-mentioned tools to support archetype development, Cycic also automates the generation of user input forms for novel archetypes with little to no special knowledge required by the archetype developers. Translation of the fundamental metrics of Cyclus into more interesting quantities is

  1. Recovery Act: Demonstration of a SOFC Generator Fueled by Propane to Provide Electrical Power to Real World Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessette, Norman [Acumentrics Corporation, Westwood, MA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this project provided with funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was to demonstrate a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator capable of operation on propane fuel to improve efficiency and reduce emissions over commercially available portable generators. The key objectives can be summarized as: Development of two portable electrical generators in the 1-3kW range utilizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and propane fuel; The development and demonstration of a proof-of-concept electro-mechanical propane fuel interface that provides a user friendly capability for managing propane fuel; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators to power media production equipment over the course of several months at multiple NASCAR automobile racing events; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators at scheduled events by first responders (police, fire) of the City of Folsom California; and Capturing data with regard to the systems’ ability to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Targets and evaluating the ease of use and potential barriers to further adoption of the systems.

  2. Three Essays on Renewable Energy Policy and its Effects on Fossil Fuel Generation in Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Eric

    In this dissertation, I investigate the effectiveness of renewable policies and consider their impact on electricity markets. The common thread of this research is to understand how renewable policy incentivizes renewable generation and how the increasing share of generation from renewables affects generation from fossil fuels. This type of research is crucial for understanding whether policies to promote renewables are meeting their stated goals and what the unintended effects might be. To this end, I use econometric methods to examine how electricity markets are responding to an influx of renewable energy. My dissertation is composed of three interrelated essays. In Chapter 1, I employ recent scholarship in spatial econometrics to assess the spatial dependence of Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), a prominent state-based renewable incentive. In Chapter 2, I explore the impact of the rapid rise in renewable generation on short-run generation from fossil fuels. And in Chapter 3, I assess the impact of renewable penetration on coal plant retirement decisions.

  3. Fair division of generation profile and fuel consumption in isolated micro-grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Heussen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Islands and rural areas can decrease their cost of energy by exploiting renewable energy as compared to diesel- only generation. Operation of such isolated micro-grids requires allocation of units for grid stability. Depending on the control strategy employed, the fluctuating renewable production...... leads to more stressed loading conditions of diesel generators. We propose a control strategy employing fair division of generator allocation using a compensation procedure based on social choice methods. A co-simulation set up with separate power system and control strategy simulators is used...... to provide a proof-of-concept case study of an isolated micro-grid with two wind turbines and three diesel generators. In comparison with a simple master- slave allocation, the proposed coordination scheme improves the distribution of fuel allocation by 27,5%, reduces under-load time by 43,5% and decreases...

  4. Engine-integrated solid oxide fuel cells for efficient electrical power generation on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates the use of engine-integrated catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in vehicles with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, CPOx reactors, and three gas turbine (GT) engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed and checked against relevant data and source material. Fuel efficiency is increased by 4% and 8% in the 50 kW and 90 kW separate exhaust turbofan systems respectively at only modest cost in specific power (8% and 13% reductions respectively). Similar results are achieved in other engine types. An additional benefit of hybridization is the ability to provide more electric power (factors of 3 or more in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. A sensitivity analysis shows that the most important parameters affecting the system's performance are operating voltage, percent fuel oxidation, and SOFC assembly air flows. Taken together, this study shows that it is possible to create a GT-SOFC hybrid where the GT mitigates balance of plant losses and the SOFC raises overall system efficiency. The result is a synergistic system with better overall performance than stand-alone components.

  5. Electricity generation from the treatment of wastewater with a hybrid up-flow microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katuri, Krishna P; Scott, K

    2010-09-01

    The performance of a prototype up-flow single-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) for electrical power generation using brewery wastewater as fuel is reported. The designed reactor consisted of three zones, namely a lower anaerobic digestion zone, a central MFC zone, and an upper effluent clarifier zone. Tests were conducted in batch mode using a beer wastewater as the fuel/electron donor (COD concentration: 430 mg/L) and mixed consortia (both sewage microflora and anaerobic sludge) as a source of electrogenic bacteria. A stable current density of approximately 2,270 mA/m(2) was generated under continuous polarization with a constant external resistance (0.01 kOmega) and cell polarization gave a peak power density of 330 mW/m(2) at a current density of 1,680 mA/m(2). Electrochemical impedance analysis showed that the overall internal resistance of the reactor was quite low, that is, 8.0 Omega. Cyclic voltammetric analysis of the anodic biofilm at low scan rate revealed quite complex processes at the anode, with three redox peaks, at potentials of 116, 214, and 319 mV (vs. NHE). 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Design of flexible polyphenylene proton-conducting membrane for next-generation fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Junpei; Taki, Ryunosuke; Mochizuki, Takashi; Shimizu, Ryo; Akiyama, Ryo; Uchida, Makoto; Miyatake, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are promising devices for clean power generation in automotive, stationary, and portable applications. Perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomers (for example, Nafion) have been the benchmark PEMs; however, several problems, including high gas permeability, low thermal stability, high production cost, and environmental incompatibility, limit the widespread dissemination of PEMFCs. It is believed that fluorine-free PEMs can potentially address all of these issues; however, none of these membranes have simultaneously met the criteria for both high performance (for example, proton conductivity) and durability (for example, mechanical and chemical stability). We present a polyphenylene-based PEM (SPP-QP) that fulfills the required properties for fuel cell applications. The newly designed PEM exhibits very high proton conductivity, excellent membrane flexibility, low gas permeability, and extremely high stability, with negligible degradation even under accelerated degradation conditions, which has never been achieved with existing fluorine-free PEMs. The polyphenylene PEM also exhibits reasonably high fuel cell performance, with excellent durability under practical conditions. This new PEM extends the limits of existing fluorine-free proton-conductive materials and will help to realize the next generation of PEMFCs via cost reduction as well as the performance improvement compared to the present PFSA-based PEMFC systems. PMID:29075671

  7. A Critical Heat Generation for Safe Nuclear Fuels after a LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a thermo-elasto-plastic-creep finite element procedure to the analysis of an accidental behavior of nuclear fuel as well as normal behavior. The result will be used as basic data for the robust design of nuclear power plant and fuels. We extended the range of mechanical strain from small or medium to large adopting the Hencky logarithmic strain measure in addition to the Green-Lagrange strain and Almansi strain measures, for the possible large strain situation in accidental environments. We found that there is a critical heat generation after LOCA without ECCS (event category 5, under which the cladding of fuel sustains the internal pressure and temperature for the time being for the rescue of the power plant. With the heat generation above the critical value caused by malfunctioning of the control rods, the stiffness of cladding becomes zero due to the softening by high temperature. The weak position of cladding along the length continuously bulges radially to burst and to discharge radioactive substances. This kind of cases should be avoid by any means.

  8. Design of flexible polyphenylene proton-conducting membrane for next-generation fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Junpei; Taki, Ryunosuke; Mochizuki, Takashi; Shimizu, Ryo; Akiyama, Ryo; Uchida, Makoto; Miyatake, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are promising devices for clean power generation in automotive, stationary, and portable applications. Perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomers (for example, Nafion) have been the benchmark PEMs; however, several problems, including high gas permeability, low thermal stability, high production cost, and environmental incompatibility, limit the widespread dissemination of PEMFCs. It is believed that fluorine-free PEMs can potentially address all of these issues; however, none of these membranes have simultaneously met the criteria for both high performance (for example, proton conductivity) and durability (for example, mechanical and chemical stability). We present a polyphenylene-based PEM (SPP-QP) that fulfills the required properties for fuel cell applications. The newly designed PEM exhibits very high proton conductivity, excellent membrane flexibility, low gas permeability, and extremely high stability, with negligible degradation even under accelerated degradation conditions, which has never been achieved with existing fluorine-free PEMs. The polyphenylene PEM also exhibits reasonably high fuel cell performance, with excellent durability under practical conditions. This new PEM extends the limits of existing fluorine-free proton-conductive materials and will help to realize the next generation of PEMFCs via cost reduction as well as the performance improvement compared to the present PFSA-based PEMFC systems.

  9. Electric power generation by a submersible microbial fuel cell equipped with a membrane electrode assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Thygesen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were incorporated into the cathode chamber of a submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC). A close contact of the electrodes could produce high power output from SMFC in which anode and cathode electrodes were connected in parallel. In polarization test, the maxi......Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were incorporated into the cathode chamber of a submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC). A close contact of the electrodes could produce high power output from SMFC in which anode and cathode electrodes were connected in parallel. In polarization test......, the maximum power density was 631mW/m2 at current density of 1772mA/m2 at 82Ω. With 180-Ω external resistance, one set of the electrodes on the same side could generate more power density of 832±4mW/m2 with current generation of 1923±4mA/m2. The anode, inclusive a biofilm behaved ohmic, whereas a Tafel type...... behavior was observed for the oxygen reduction. The various impedance contributions from electrodes, electrolyte and membrane were analyzed and identified by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Air flow rate to the cathode chamber affected microbial voltage generation, and higher power generation...

  10. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Danish Khan

    Full Text Available Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE and power density (PD attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5-8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6-18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity recovery.

  11. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  12. Zero-emission power generation. Fuel cells are coming, but still facing obstacles in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickmann, Thorsten [Eisenhut GmbH und Co. KG, Osterode am Harz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    For several years, low-emission energy systems have been asked for. It is all the more astonishing that an almost zero-emission method of power generation was invented more than 150 years ago but has not been successfully established yet. Fuel cells have been gaining ground since the new millennium, especially in Germany and Japan. Following the Japanese Government's decision to significantly reduce emission rates of the insular state, the economy has started to develop and refine fuel cell technology. Due to the planned nuclear phase-out, this new energy concept has started to come into focus in Germany as well. The new technology is designed for stationary and mobile applications alike and can hence provide power for domestic housing as well as for vehicles. There are, however, still supply chain deficiencies that impede a more widespread commercialisation. (orig.)

  13. Surface Area Expansion of Electrodes with Grass-like Nanostructures to Enhance Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Zhang, Yifeng; Noori, Jafar Safaa

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have applications possibilities for wastewater treatment, biotransformation, and biosensor, but the development of highly efficient electrode materials is critical for enhancing the power generation. Two types of electrodes modified with nanoparticles or grass-like nan...

  14. Modeling and control of hybrid wind/photovoltaic/fuel cell distributed generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caisheng

    Due to ever increasing energy consumption, rising public awareness of environmental protection, and steady progress in power deregulation, alternative (i.e., renewable and fuel cell based) distributed generation (DG) systems have attracted increased interest. Wind and photovoltaic (PV) power generation are two of the most promising renewable energy technologies. Fuel cell (FC) systems also show great potential in DG applications of the future due to their fast technology development and many merits they have, such as high efficiency, zero or low emission (of pollutant gases) and flexible modular structure. The modeling and control of a hybrid wind/PV/FC DG system is addressed in this dissertation. Different energy sources in the system are integrated through an AC bus. Dynamic models for the main system components, namely, wind energy conversion system (WECS), PV energy conversion system (PVECS), fuel cell, electrolyzer, power electronic interfacing circuits, battery, hydrogen storage tank, gas compressor and gas pressure regulator, are developed. Two types of fuel cells have been modeled in this dissertation: proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Power control of a grid-connected FC system as well as load mitigation control of a stand-alone FC system are investigated. The pitch angle control for WECS, the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control for PVECS, and the control for electrolyzer and power electronic devices, are also addressed in the dissertation. Based on the dynamic component models, a simulation model for the proposed hybrid energy system has been developed using MATLAB/Simulink. The overall power management strategy for coordinating the power flows among the different energy sources is presented in the dissertation. Simulation studies have been carried out to verify the system performance under different scenarios using a practical load profile and real weather data. The results show that the overall power

  15. Electricity generation by a baffle-chamber membraneless microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiqiang

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for organic waste and wastewater treatment represent innovative technologies for pollution control and energy generation. The research reported here considers the influence of reactor configurations designed to mitigate the impact of oxygen transport on electricity generation by a baffle-chamber membraneless MFC. The reactor was constructed to reduce mixing in the vicinity of the cathode and facilitate thick (>1 mm) biofilm formation on the cathode by adding anaerobic biomass/sludge (4330 ± 410 mg COD L -1), resulting in an overall coulombic efficiency of more than 30% at glucose concentrations ranging from 96 to 960 mg COD L -1, compared to previously reported efficiencies power (approximately 0.3 mW m -2) and power generation was primarily associated with glucose degradation (e.g., 129 ± 15 mW m -2).

  16. Investigation of gas generation in regenerative fuel cells by low-energy X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamet, Omer Faruk; Deevanhxay, Phengxay; Tsushima, Shohji; Hirai, Shuichiro

    2015-11-01

    Gas generation and discharge behaviors in an operating regenerative fuel cell (RFC) are investigated using low-energy X-ray radiography. In situ visualization at high spatial and temporal resolution reveal dynamic and inhomogeneous behaviors of the gas generation in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) in the RFC. Temporal and spatial variation of the gas thickness in the MEA is quantitatively discussed and shows an intermittent and periodic discharge processes of the gas generated by electrolysis, suggesting that the reaction sites in the catalyst layer and the discharging path of gas bubbles are well established in the MEA for the electrolysis. Larger gas accumulation and discharge in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) under the ribs are identified in comparison with those under the channels, which is attributed to the relatively longer path for accumulated gas under the ribs to be discharged into the flow channels.

  17. WaveNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User-Interface ( GUI ) data management tool developed for Corps coastal...generates tabular and graphical information for project planning and design documents. The WaveNet is a web-based GUI designed to provide users with a...data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran, Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for USACE applications

  18. Cost-Performance Analysis and Optimization of Fuel-Burning Thermoelectric Power Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Kazuaki; Shakouri, Ali

    2013-07-01

    Energy cost analysis and optimization of thermoelectric (TE) power generators burning fossil fuel show a lower initial cost compared with commercialized micro gas turbines but higher operating cost per energy due to moderate efficiency. The quantitative benefit of the thermoelectric system on a price-per-energy (/J) basis lies in its scalability, especially at a smaller scale (energy source for combustion. The produced heat generates electric power. Unlike waste heat recovery systems, the maximum power output from the TE generator is not necessarily equal to the economic optimum (lowest /kWh). The lowest cost is achieved when the TE module is optimized between the maximum power output and the maximum efficiency, dependent on the fuel price and operation time duration. The initial investment (/W) for TE systems is much lower than for micro gas turbines when considering a low fractional area for the TE elements, e.g., 5% to 10% inside the module. Although the initial cost of the TE system is much less, the micro gas turbine has a lower energy price for longer-term operation due to its higher efficiency. For very long-term operation, operating cost dominates, thus efficiency and material ZT become the key cost factors.

  19. Thionine increases electricity generation from microbial fuel cell using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and exoelectrogenic mixed culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Najafpour, Ghasem Darzi; Ghoreyshi, Ali Asghar; Talebnia, Farid; Premier, Giuliano C; Bakeri, Gholamreza; Kim, Jung Rae; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2012-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been shown to be capable of clean energy production through the oxidation of biodegradable organic waste using various bacterial species as biocatalysts. In this study we found Saccharomyces cerevisiae, previously known electrochemcially inactive or less active species, can be acclimated with an electron mediator thionine for electrogenic biofilm formation in MFC, and electricity production is improved with facilitation of electron transfer. Power generation of MFC was also significantly increased by thionine with both aerated and non-aerated cathode. With electrochemically active biofilm enriched with swine wastewater, MFC power increased more significantly by addition of thionine. The optimum mediator concentration was 500 mM of thionine with S. cerevisae in MFC with the maximum voltage and current generation in the microbial fuel cell were 420 mV and 700 mA/m(2), respectively. Cyclic voltametry shows that thionine improves oxidizing and reducing capability in both pure culture and acclimated biofilm as compared to non-mediated cell. The results obtained indicated that thionine has great potential to enhance power generation from unmediated yeast or electrochemically active biofilm in MFC.

  20. ZTEK`s ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine system for distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, M.; Nathanson, D. [Ztek Corp., Waltham, MA (United States); Bradshaw, D.T. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Ztek`s Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system has exceptional potential for utility electric power generation because of: simplicity of components construction, capability for low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of very high quality by-product heat (up to 1000{degrees}C), and system integration simplicity. Utility applications of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell are varied and include distributed generation units (sub-MW to 30MW capacity), repowering existing power plants (i.e. 30MW to 100MW), and multi-megawatt central power plants. A TVA/EPRI collaboration program involved functional testing of the advanced solid oxide fuel cell stacks and design scale-up for distributed power generation applications. The emphasis is on the engineering design of the utility modules which will be the building blocks for up to megawatt scale power plants. The program has two distinctive subprograms: Verification test on a 1 kW stack and 25kW module for utility demonstration. A 1 kW Planar SOFC stack was successfully operated for 15,000 hours as of December, 1995. Ztek began work on a 25kW SOFC Power System for TVA, which plans to install the 25kW SOFC at a host site for demonstration in 1997. The 25kW module is Ztek`s intended building block for the commercial use of the Planar SOFC. Systems of up to megawatt capacity can be obtained by packaging the modules in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional arrays.

  1. NET-VISA, a Bayesian method next-generation automatic association software. Latest developments and operational assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Kushida, Noriyuki; Mialle, Pierrick; Tomuta, Elena; Arora, Nimar

    2017-04-01

    The Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) has been developing a Bayesian method and software to perform the key step of automatic association of seismological, hydroacoustic, and infrasound (SHI) parametric data. In our preliminary testing in the CTBTO, NET_VISA shows much better performance than its currently operating automatic association module, with a rate for automatic events matching the analyst-reviewed events increased by 10%, signifying that the percentage of missed events is lowered by 40%. Initial tests involving analysts also showed that the new software will complete the automatic bulletins of the CTBTO by adding previously missed events. Because products by the CTBTO are also widely distributed to its member States as well as throughout the seismological community, the introduction of a new technology must be carried out carefully, and the first step of operational integration is to first use NET-VISA results within the interactive analysts' software so that the analysts can check the robustness of the Bayesian approach. We report on the latest results both on the progress for automatic processing and for the initial introduction of NET-VISA results in the analyst review process

  2. Development of planar solid oxide fuel cells for power generation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, N.Q. [AlliedSignal Aerospce Equipment Systems, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for a variety of electric power generation application. The planar design offers simple cell geometry, high power density, and multiple fabrication and gas manifolding options. Planar SOFC technology has received much attention recently, and significant progress has been made in this area. Recent effort at AlliedSignal has focused on the development of high-performance, lightweight planar SOFCs, having thin-electrolyte films, that can be operated efficiently at reduced temperatures (< 1000{degrees}C). The advantages of reduced-temperature operation include wider material choice (including use of metallic interconnects), expected longer cell life, reduced thermal stress, improved reliability, and reduced fuel cell cost. The key aspect in the development of thin-film SIFCs is to incorporate the thin electrolyte layer into the desired structure of cells in a manner that yields the required characteristics. AlliedSignal has developed a simple and cost-effective method based on tape calendering for the fabrication of thin-electrolyte SOFCs. Thin-electrolyte cells made by tape calendering have shown extraordinary performance, e.g., producing more than 500mW/cm{sup 2} at 700{degrees}C and 800mW/cm{sup 2} at 800{degrees}C with hydrogen as fuel and air is oxidant. thin-electrolyte single cells have been incorporated into a compliant metallic stack structure and operated at reduced and operated at reduced-temperature conditions.

  3. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFC's for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-sq cm per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

  4. Generation of high-resolution wind fields from the dense meteorological station network WegenerNet in South-Eastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Christoph; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Fuchsberger, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    To investigate weather and climate on a local scale as well as for evaluating regional climate models (RCMs) the Wegener Center at the University of Graz established the long-term field experiment WegenerNet Feldbach region, a dense grid of 153 meteorological stations. The observations of these stations are managed by an automatic WegenerNet Processing system. This system includes a quality check of collected observations and a Data Product Generator (DPG), among other subsystems. Products already implemented in the DPG are gridded weather and climate products, generated from the main parameters temperature, precipitation and relative humidity (Kirchengast et. al., Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 95, 227-242, 2014). Missing elements are gridded wind fields from wind observations. Wind is considered as one of the most difficult meteorological variables to model and depends on many different parameters such as topography and surface roughness. Therefore a simple interpolation can only be performed in case of uniform characteristics of landscape. The presentation introduces our method of generation of wind fields from near real-time observations of the WegenerNet. Purpose of this work is to provide a database with 3D wind fields in a high spatial and time resolution as addition to the existing products, for evaluating convection permitting climate models as well as investigating weather and climate on a local scale. Core of the application is the diagnostic California Meteorological Model (CALMET). This model computes 3D wind fields based on meteorological observational data, a digital elevation model and land use categories. The application generates the required input files from meteorological stations of the WegenerNet Feldbach region and triggers the start of the CALMET model with these input files. In a next step the modeled wind fields are stored automatically every 30 minutes with a spatial resolution of 100 x 100 m in the WegenerNet database. To verify the

  5. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  6. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  7. Cathode Assessment for Maximizing Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Utilizing Bioethanol Effluent as Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Guotao; Thygesen, Anders; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity production requires effective current generation from waste products via robust cathode reduction. Three cathode types using dissolved oxygen cathodes (DOCs), ferricyanide cathodes (FeCs) and air cathodes (AiCs) were therefore assessed...... responses to substrate loading rates and external resistance. At the lowest external resistance of 27 and highest substrate loading rate of 2 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) per Lday, FeC-MFC generated highest average current density (1630 mA/m(2)) followed by AiC-MFC (802 mA/m(2)) and DOC-MFC (184 mA/m(2......)). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the impedance of the cathodes. It was thereby confirmed that the FeC-MFC produced the highest current density with the lowest internal resistance for the cathode. However, in a setup using bioethanol effluent, the AiC-MFC was concluded...

  8. Enhanced vanadium (V) reduction and bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cells with biocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Rui; Zhang, Baogang; Li, Jiaxin; Lv, Qing; Wang, Song; Gu, Qian

    2017-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a promising approach for remediation of toxic vanadium (V) contaminated environment. Herein, enhanced V(V) reduction and bioelectricity generation are realized in MFCs with biocathode. Synergistically electrochemical and microbial reductions result in the nearly complete removals of V(V) within 7 d operation with initial concentration of 200 mg L-1. Maximum power density of 529 ± 12 mW m-2 is obtained. Electrochemical tests reveal that biocathode promotes electron transfers and reduces charge transfer resistance. XPS analysis confirms that V(IV) is the main reduction product, which precipitates naturally under neutral conditions. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis indicates that the newly appeared Dysgonomonas is responsible for V(V) reduction and Klebsiella contributes mainly to bioelectricity generation in MFCs with biocathode. This study further improves the performance of remediating V(V) contaminated environment based on MFC technology.

  9. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT GENERATION IN A MICROBIAL FUEL CELL INOCULATED WITH MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Teleken

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFC are electrochemical devices that utilize the ability of some microorganisms to oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons resulting from their metabolism to an insoluble acceptor. The goal of the present study was to model the kinetics of electrical current generation from an MFC inoculated with marine sediment. For this purpose, a differential equation system was used, including the Nernst-Monod relationship and Ohm's Law, to describe the microbial metabolism and the mechanism of extracellular electron transfer (EET, respectively. The experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis were properly described by the model. It was concluded that marine microorganisms preferably use a direct mechanism of EET by means of nanowires to establish the electrochemical contact with the anode. The mathematical modeling could help understand MFC operation and, consequently, contribute to improving power generation from this source.

  10. Microbial fuel cells for azo dye treatment with electricity generation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Komal; Subramanian, Sindhu; Basu, Suddhasatwa

    2013-03-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) has great potential for treating wastewater containing azo dyes for decolourization, and simultaneous production of electricity with the help of microorganisms as biocatalysts. The concept of MFC has been already well established for the production of electricity; however, not much work has been published regarding dye decolourization with simultaneous electricity generation using MFCs. This paper reviews the performance limitations, future prospects, and improvements in technology in terms of commercial viability of azo dye decolourization with electricity generation in MFC. The major limitation identified is the high cost of cathode catalyst. Therefore, there is need of developing inexpensive cathode catalysts. Biocathode is one such option. Moreover, enhanced performance can be obtained by photo-assisted electrochemical process like rutile coated cathode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electricity generation from carbon monoxide and syngas in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Abid; Guiot, Serge R; Mehta, Punita; Raghavan, Vijaya; Tartakovsky, Boris

    2011-05-01

    Electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been a subject of significant research efforts. MFCs employ the ability of electricigenic bacteria to oxidize organic substrates using an electrode as an electron acceptor. While MFC application for electricity production from a variety of organic sources has been demonstrated, very little research on electricity production from carbon monoxide and synthesis gas (syngas) in an MFC has been reported. Although most of the syngas today is produced from non-renewable sources, syngas production from renewable biomass or poorly degradable organic matter makes energy generation from syngas a sustainable process, which combines energy production with the reprocessing of solid wastes. An MFC-based process of syngas conversion to electricity might offer a number of advantages such as high Coulombic efficiency and biocatalytic activity in the presence of carbon monoxide and sulfur components. This paper presents a discussion on microorganisms and reactor designs that can be used for operating an MFC on syngas.

  12. Evaluation Of Electricity Generation From Animal Based Wastes In A Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duduyemi Oladejo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Electric current from organic waste of poultry droppings were generated with A Microbial Fuel Cell MFC technology to evaluate affects of temperature 30 to 50oC 100gl 300gl and 500gl slurry concentrations prepared with the distilled water and inoculated when introduced into the anodic chamber. A constant concentration of 50gl of the oxidizing agent Potassium ferricyanide at the cathode chamber was prepared to evaluate the voltage and current generated by the set up for 7 days in each case. Higher slurry concentrations were observed to generate higher initial current and voltage than in lower concentrations. Higher slurry concentrations also demonstrated sustained power generation up to the day 6 before decline. A maximum current of 1.1V and 0.15 mA was achieved while the temperature variation was observed to have minimal effect within the range considered at low concentration. A MFC is a biochemical-catalyzed system capable of generating electricity as a by-product also providing an alternative method of waste treatment. Application Alternative power source and waste treatment.

  13. Anode macrostructures influence electricity generation in microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yoshikazu; Miyahara, Morio; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microbes for generating electricity from organic substrates, including waste biomass and wastewater pollutants. MFCs have the potential to treat wastewater and simultaneously generate electricity. The present study examined how anode macrostructure influences wastewater treatment, electricity generation and microbial communities in MFCs. Cassette-electrode MFCs were equipped with graphite-felt anodes with three different macrostructures, flat-plate (FP), vertical-fin (VF), and horizontal-fin (HF) structures (these were composed of a same amount of graphite felt), and were continuously supplied with artificial wastewater containing starch as the major organic constituent. Polarization analyses revealed that MFCs equipped with VF and HF anodes generated 33% and 21% higher volumetric power densities, respectively, than that of MFCs equipped with FP anodes. Organics were also more efficiently removed from wastewater in MFCs with VF and HF anodes compared to reactors containing FP anodes. In addition, pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments from microbial samples collected from the anodes showed that the presence of fins also affected the bacterial compositions in anode biofilms. Taken together, the findings presented here suggest that the modification of anodes with fins improves organics removal and electricity generation in MFCs. The optimization of anode macrostructure therefore appears to be a promising strategy for improving MFC performance without additional material costs. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Electricity generation and contaminants degradation performances of a microbial fuel cell fed with Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The electricity generation performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) utilizing Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater was studied with an H-shape reactor. Indexes including pH, conductivity, oxidation peak potential and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the anolyte were monitored to investigate the contaminants degradation performance of the MFC during the electricity generation process, besides, contaminant ingredients in anodic influent and effluent were analyzed by GC-MS and IR spectra as well. The maximum power density of the MFC could achieve 118.1 mW/m2 and the internal resistance was about 480 omega. Connected with a 1 000 omega external resistance, the output potential was about 0.4 V. Fed with 5 mL Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater, the electricity generation lasted about 133 h and the coulombic efficiency was about 3.93%. At the end of electricity generation cycle, COD decreased by 90.1% while NH4(+) -N decreased by 66.8%. Furfural compounds, phenols and some other complicated organics could be decomposed and utilized in the electricity generation process, and the residual contaminants in effluent included some long-chain fatty acids, esters, ethers, and esters with benzene ring, cycloalkanes, cycloolefins, etc. The results indicate that MFC, which can degrade and utilize the organic contaminants in Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater simultaneously, provides a new approach for resource recovery treatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater.

  15. Optimization of Bioelectricity Generation in Constructed Wetland-Coupled Microbial Fuel Cell Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailiang Song

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Constructed wetland-coupled microbial fuel cell systems (CW-MFCs incorporate an aerobic zone and an anaerobic zone to generate electricity that achieves the oxidative degradation of contaminants. However, there are few reports on the performance of such coupled systems. In this study, we determined the optimal configuration of CW-MFCs to characterize their electricity generation performance. Based on the results using different levels of dissolved oxygen among the CW-MFCs, we concluded that a 20-cm distance between the anode and cathode produced an optimal removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD of 94.90% with a 0.15 W/m3 power density, 339.80 Ω internal resistance, and 0.31% coulombic efficiency. In addition, a COD of 200 mg/L provided greater electricity generation (741 mV open circuit voltage, 0.20 W/m3 power density, 339.80 Ω internal resistance, and 0.49 mA current and purification ability (90.45% COD removal to meet system COD loading limitations than did higher COD values. By adding 50 mM phosphate buffer solution to synthetic wastewater, relatively high conductivity and buffer capacity were achieved, resulting in improvement in electricity generation. These findings highlight important aspects of bioelectricity generation in CW-MFCs.

  16. Microbial electricity generation in rice paddy fields: recent advances and perspectives in rhizosphere microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use living microbes for the conversion of organic matter into electricity. MFC systems can be applied to the generation of electricity at water/sediment interfaces in the environment, such as bay areas, wetlands, and rice paddy fields. Using these systems, electricity generation in paddy fields as high as ∼80 mW m(-2) (based on the projected anode area) has been demonstrated, and evidence suggests that rhizosphere microbes preferentially utilize organic exudates from rice roots for generating electricity. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses have been conducted to identify the microbial species and catabolic pathways that are involved in the conversion of root exudates into electricity, suggesting the importance of syntrophic interactions. In parallel, pot cultures of rice and other aquatic plants have been used for rhizosphere MFC experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. The findings from these studies have demonstrated the potential of electricity generation for mitigating methane emission from the rhizosphere. Notably, however, the presence of large amounts of organics in the rhizosphere drastically reduces the effect of electricity generation on methane production. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential of these systems for mitigating methane emission from rice paddy fields. We suggest that paddy-field MFCs represent a promising approach for harvesting latent energy of the natural world.

  17. Electricity generation through a photo sediment microbial fuel cell using algae at the cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neethu, B; Ghangrekar, M M

    2017-12-01

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are bio-electrochemical devices generating electricity from redox gradients occurring across the sediment-water interface. Sediment microbial carbon-capture cell (SMCC), a modified SMFC, uses algae grown in the overlying water of sediment and is considered as a promising system for power generation along with algal cultivation. In this study, the performance of SMCC and SMFC was evaluated in terms of power generation, dissolved oxygen variations, sediment organic matter removal and algal growth. SMCC gave a maximum power density of 22.19 mW/m2, which was 3.65 times higher than the SMFC operated under similar conditions. Sediment organic matter removal efficiencies of 77.6 ± 2.1% and 61.0 ± 1.3% were obtained in SMCC and SMFC, respectively. With presence of algae at the cathode, a maximum chemical oxygen demand and total nitrogen removal efficiencies of 63.3 ± 2.3% (8th day) and 81.6 ± 1.2% (10th day), respectively, were observed. The system appears to be favorable from a resources utilization perspective as it does not depend on external aeration or membranes and utilizes algae and organic matter present in sediment for power generation. Thus, SMCC has proven its applicability for installation in an existing oxidation pond for sediment remediation, algae growth, carbon conversion and power generation, simultaneously.

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF NEXT-GENERATION SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CASKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haire, M.J.; Forsberg, C.W.; Matveev, V.Z.; Shapovalov, V.I.

    2004-10-03

    The design of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) casks used in the present SNF disposition systems has evolved from early concepts about the nuclear fuel cycle. The reality today is much different from that envisioned by early nuclear scientists. Most SNF is placed in pool storage, awaiting reprocessing (as in Russia) or disposal at a geologic SNF repository (as in the United States). Very little transport of SNF occurs. This paper examines the requirements for SNF casks from today's perspective and attempts to answer this question: What type of SNF cask would be produced if we were to start over and design SNF casks based on today's requirements? The characteristics for a next-generation SNF cask system are examined and are found to be essentially the same in Russia and the United States. It appears that the new depleted uranium dioxide (DUO2)-steel cermet material will enable these requirements to be met. Depleted uranium (DU) is uranium in which a portion of the 235U isotope has been removed during a uranium enrichment process. The DUO2-steel cermet material is described. The United States and Russia are cooperating toward the development of a next-generation, dual-purpose, storage and transport SNF system.

  19. Simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biomass production by an immobilized photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huanhuan; Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Hu, Youshuang; Zhao, Yingying

    2014-05-01

    A photosynthetic algal microbial fuel cell (PAMFC) was constructed by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells to fulfill electricity generation, biomass production and wastewater treatment. The immobilization conditions, including the concentration of immobilized matrix, initial inoculation concentration and cross-linking time, were investigated both for the growth of C. vulgaris and power generation. It performed the best at 5 % sodium alginate and 2 % calcium chloride as immobilization matrix, initial inoculation concentration of 10(6) cell/mL and cross-linking time of 4 h. Our findings indicated that C. vulgaris immobilization was an effective and promising approach to improve the performance of PAMFC, and after optimization the power density and Coulombic efficiency improved by 258 and 88.4 %, respectively. Important parameters such as temperature and light intensity were optimized on the performance. PAMFC could achieve a COD removal efficiency of 92.1 %, and simultaneously the maximum power density reached 2,572.8 mW/m(3) and the Coulombic efficiency was 14.1 %, under the light intensity of 5,000 lux and temperature at 25 °C.

  20. Treatment of Oil Wastewater and Electricity Generation by Integrating Constructed Wetland with Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional oil sewage treatment methods can achieve satisfactory removal efficiency, but energy consumption problems during the process of oil sewage treatment are worth attention. The integration of a constructed wetland reactor and a microbial fuel cell reactor (CW-MFC to treat oil-contaminated wastewater, compared with a microbial fuel cell reactor (MFC alone and a constructed wetland reactor (CW alone, was explored in this research. Performances of the three reactors including chemical oxygen demand (COD, oil removal, and output voltage generation were continuously monitored. The COD removals of three reactors were between 73% and 75%, and oil removals were over 95.7%. Compared with MFC, the CW-MFC with a MnO2 modified cathode produced higher power density and output voltage. Maximum power densities of CW-MFC and MFC were 3868 mW/m3 (102 mW/m2 and 3044 mW/m3 (80 mW/m2, respectively. The plants in CW-MFC play a positive role for reactor cathode potential. Both plants and cathode modification can improve reactor performance of electricity generation.

  1. Forecasting Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption for Power Generation Using QHSA-Based LSSVM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecasting of fossil fuel energy consumption for power generation is important and fundamental for rational power energy planning in the electricity industry. The least squares support vector machine (LSSVM is a powerful methodology for solving nonlinear forecasting issues with small samples. The key point is how to determine the appropriate parameters which have great effect on the performance of LSSVM model. In this paper, a novel hybrid quantum harmony search algorithm-based LSSVM (QHSA-LSSVM energy forecasting model is proposed. The QHSA which combines the quantum computation theory and harmony search algorithm is applied to searching the optimal values of and C in LSSVM model to enhance the learning and generalization ability. The case study on annual fossil fuel energy consumption for power generation in China shows that the proposed model outperforms other four comparative models, namely regression, grey model (1, 1 (GM (1, 1, back propagation (BP and LSSVM, in terms of prediction accuracy and forecasting risk.

  2. Treatment of Oil Wastewater and Electricity Generation by Integrating Constructed Wetland with Microbial Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiao; Wu, Zhenxing; Liu, Lifen; Zhang, Fengxiang; Liang, Shengna

    2016-11-01

    Conventional oil sewage treatment methods can achieve satisfactory removal efficiency, but energy consumption problems during the process of oil sewage treatment are worth attention. The integration of a constructed wetland reactor and a microbial fuel cell reactor (CW-MFC) to treat oil-contaminated wastewater, compared with a microbial fuel cell reactor (MFC) alone and a constructed wetland reactor (CW) alone, was explored in this research. Performances of the three reactors including chemical oxygen demand (COD), oil removal, and output voltage generation were continuously monitored. The COD removals of three reactors were between 73% and 75%, and oil removals were over 95.7%. Compared with MFC, the CW-MFC with a MnO₂ modified cathode produced higher power density and output voltage. Maximum power densities of CW-MFC and MFC were 3868 mW/m³ (102 mW/m²) and 3044 mW/m³ (80 mW/m²), respectively. The plants in CW-MFC play a positive role for reactor cathode potential. Both plants and cathode modification can improve reactor performance of electricity generation.

  3. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  4. Energy generation in a Microbial Fuel Cell using anaerobic sludge from a wastewater treatment plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Fabiano Passos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In microbial fuel cells (MFCs, the oxidation of organic compounds catalyzed by microorganisms (anode generates electricity via electron transfer to an external circuit that acts as an electron acceptor (cathode. Microbial fuel cells differ in terms of the microorganisms employed and the nature of the oxidized organic compound. In this study, a consortium of anaerobic microorganisms helped to treat the secondary sludge obtained from a sewage treatment plant. The microorganisms were grown in a 250 mL bioreactor containing a carbon cloth. The reactor was fed with media containing acetate (as the carbon source for 48 days. Concomitantly, the electrochemical data were measured with the aid of a digital multimeter and data acquisition system. At the beginning of the MFC operation, power density was low, probably due to slow microorganism growth and adhesion. The power density increased from the 15th day of operation, reaching a value of 13.5 μW cm–2 after ca. 24 days of operation, and remained stable until the end of the process. Compared with data in the literature, this power density value is promising; improvements in the MFC design and operation could increase this value even further. The system investigated herein employed excess sludge as a biocatalyst in an MFC. This opens up the possibility of using organic acids and/or carbohydrate-rich effluents to feed MFCs, and thereby provide simultaneous effluent treatment and energy generation.

  5. Micro-generation systems and electrolysers for refuelling private bi-fuel cars at home

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newborough, M. [ITM Power plc, Mill House, Royston Road, Wendens Ambo, Saffron Walden, Essex CB11 4JX (United Kingdom); Peacock, A.D. [The Energy Academy, Heriot Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    An assessment is presented of the prospective use of micro-generation systems in conjunction with electrolysers and hydrogen stores for refuelling private bi-fuel (gasoline/hydrogen) cars with hydrogen. For a range of system sizes and three power source operating modes, predictions are made of the annual travel range on hydrogen and the associated CO{sub 2} savings. A basic system (Mode A) operating solely from the output of a photovoltaic array was found to generate sufficient hydrogen to allow a passenger vehicle with a fuel efficiency of 8.5 l/100 km (33 mpg) to travel 613 km annually per kW of PV installed. An alternative system (Mode B) that permitted network electricity to contribute to hydrogen production, provided that the CO{sub 2} emission factor of the generated hydrogen was half that of gasoline, enabled an annual travel distance of 772 km per kW of PV installed. A hybrid micro-generation system comprising a PV and micro-CHP system (Mode C), where the electricity that would otherwise be exported from the dwelling was diverted to hydrogen production, achieved a more consistent hydrogen production rate across the year. This resulted in a lower on-site storage requirement; when compared with Mode A, it provided an additional annual travel distance on hydrogen of between 1285 and 1833 km. A utility factor was employed to indicate the extent to which a system design could deliver a given daily driving distance on hydrogen across the year. High utility factors (>70%) were only achievable for modest daily driving distances (10-17 km) for the considered range of PV sizes (1.7-8.5 kW). (author)

  6. Role of dissolved oxygen on the degradation mechanism of Reactive Green 19 and electricity generation in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Li; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Nordin, Noradiba

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a membraneless photocatalytic fuel cell with zinc oxide loaded carbon photoanode and platinum loaded carbon cathode was constructed to investigate the impact of dissolved oxygen on the mechanism of dye degradation and electricity generation of photocatalytic fuel cell. The photocatalytic fuel cell with high and low aeration rate, no aeration and nitrogen purged were investigated, respectively. The degradation rate of diazo dye Reactive Green 19 and the electricity generation was enhanced in photocatalytic fuel cell with higher dissolved oxygen concentration. However, the photocatalytic fuel cell was still able to perform 37% of decolorization in a slow rate (k = 0.033 h -1 ) under extremely low dissolved oxygen concentration (approximately 0.2 mg L -1 ) when nitrogen gas was introduced into the fuel cell throughout the 8 h. However, the change of the UV-Vis spectrum indicates that the intermediates of the dye could not be mineralized under insufficient dissolved oxygen level. In the aspect of electricity generation, the maximum short circuit current (0.0041 mA cm -2 ) and power density (0.00028 mW cm -2 ) of the air purged photocatalytic fuel cell was obviously higher than that with nitrogen purging (0.0015 mA cm -2 and 0.00008 mW cm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of Fuel Consumption Indexes of Co-generation Combined Cycle Steam and Gas Units with unfired waste heat boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Kachan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the developed methodology and the results of determination of fuel consumption indexes of co-generation combined cycle steam and gas units (PGU with unfired waste heat boilers apply to PGU-230 of 3-d co-generation power plant ofMinsk. 

  8. Electricity generation and microbial community analysis of alcohol powered microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Jung, Sok Hee; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2007-09-01

    Two different microbial fuel cell (MFC) configurations were investigated for electricity production from ethanol and methanol: a two-chambered, aqueous-cathode MFC; and a single-chamber direct-air cathode MFC. Electricity was generated in the two-chamber system at a maximum power density typical of this system (40+/-2 mW/m2) and a Coulombic efficiency (CE) ranging from 42% to 61% using ethanol. When bacteria were transferred into a single-chamber MFC known to produce higher power densities with different substrates, the maximum power density increased to 488+/-12 mW/m2 (CE = 10%) with ethanol. The voltage generated exhibited saturation kinetics as a function of ethanol concentration in the two-chambered MFC, with a half-saturation constant (Ks) of 4.86 mM. Methanol was also examined as a possible substrate, but it did not result in appreciable electricity generation. Analysis of the anode biofilm and suspension from a two-chamber MFC with ethanol using 16S rDNA-based techniques indicated that bacteria with sequences similar to Proteobacterium Core-1 (33.3% of clone library sequences), Azoarcus sp. (17.4%), and Desulfuromonas sp. M76 (15.9%) were significant members of the anode chamber community. These results indicate that ethanol can be used for sustained electricity generation at room temperature using bacteria on the anode in a MFC.

  9. Agricultural Bio-Fueled Generation of Electricity and Development of Durable and Efficent NOx Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Rodney

    2007-08-08

    The objective of this project was to define the scope and cost of a technology research and development program that will demonstrate the feasibility of using an off-the-shelf, unmodified, large bore diesel powered generator in a grid-connected application, utilizing various blends of BioDiesel as fuel. Furthermore, the objective of project was to develop an emissions control device that uses a catalytic process and BioDiesel (without the presence of Ammonia or Urea)to reduce NOx and other pollutants present in a reciprocating engine exhaust stream with the goal of redefining the highest emission reduction efficiencies possible for a diesel reciprocating generator. Process: Caterpillar Power Generation adapted an off-the-shelf Diesel Generator to run on BioDiesel and various Petroleum Diesel/BioDiesel blends. EmeraChem developed and installed an exhaust gas cleanup system to reduce NOx, SOx, volatile organics, and particulates. The system design and function was optimized for emissions reduction with results in the 90-95% range;

  10. Kinetics of substrate degradation and electricity generation in anodic denitrification microbial fuel cell (AD-MFC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiqiang; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Hui; Chen, Tingting; Xie, Zuofu; Cai, Jing; Abbas, Ghulam

    2013-12-01

    Effect of substrate concentration on substrate degradation and electricity generation in anodic denitrification microbial fuel cell (AD-MFC) was investigated over a broad range of substrate concentrations. Substrate degradation rates and power generation could be promoted with increasing substrate concentration in a certain range, but both of them would be inhibited at high substrate concentrations. Maximum denitrification rate of 1.26 ± 0.01 kg NO(-)-N/m(3)d and maximum output voltage of 1016.75 ± 4.74 mV could be achieved when initial NO3(-)-N concentration was 1999.95 ± 2.86 mg/L. Based on Han-Levenspiel model, kinetics of substrate degradation and power generation in the AD-MFC were established. According to the kinetic model, the half-saturation coefficient and the critical inhibitory concentration for nitrate were more than 200 and 4300 mg/L, respectively. The results demonstrated that AD-MFC was capable of treating nitrate-containing wastewater and generating electricity simultaneously, and tolerant to high strength nitrate-containing wastewater. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Method and apparatus for steam mixing a nuclear fueled electricity generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Durst, Bruce M.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the efficiency and performance of a nuclear electrical generation system that comprises the addition of steam handling equipment to an existing plant that results in a surprising increase in plant performance. More particularly, a gas turbine electrical generation system with heat recovery boiler is installed along with a micro-jet high pressure and a low pressure mixer superheater. Depending upon plant characteristics, the existing moisture separator reheater (MSR) can be either augmented or done away with. The instant invention enables a reduction in T.sub.hot without a derating of the reactor unit, and improves efficiency of the plant's electrical conversion cycle. Coupled with this advantage is a possible extension of the plant's fuel cycle length due to an increased electrical conversion efficiency. The reduction in T.sub.hot further allows for a surprising extension of steam generator life. An additional advantage is the reduction in erosion/corrosion of secondary system components including turbine blades and diaphragms. The gas turbine generator used in the instant invention can also replace or augment existing peak or emergency power needs. Another benefit of the instant invention is the extension of plant life and the reduction of downtime due to refueling.

  12. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-09-22

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  13. Power generation and oil sands process-affected water treatment in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongdong; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-01

    Oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), a product of bitumen isolation in the oil sands industry, is a source of pollution if not properly treated. In present study, OSPW treatment and voltage generation were examined in a single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) under the effect of inoculated carbon source and temperature. OSPW treatment with an anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFC (AS-MFC) generated 0.55 ± 0.025 V, whereas an MFC inoculated with mature-fine tailings (MFT-MFC) generated 0.41 ± 0.01 V. An additional carbon source (acetate) significantly improved generated voltage. The voltage detected increased to 20-23% in MFCs when the condition was switched from ambient to mesophilic. The mesophilic condition increased OSPW treatment efficiency in terms of lowering the chemical oxygen demand and acid-extractable organics. Pyrosequencing analysis of microbial consortia revealed that Proteobacteria were the most abundant in MFCs and microbial communities in the AS-MFC were more diverse than those in the MFT-MFC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dip Majumder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059, a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm chemical oxygen demand (COD could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  15. MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS USING DIFFERENT TYPES OF WASTEWATER FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND SIMULTANEOUSLY REMOVED POLLUTANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NUR SYAZANA NATASYA HISHAM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are a device that converts chemical energy to electrical energy during substrate oxidation with the aid of microorganisms that act as biocatalysts. The energy contained in organic matter is converted to useful electrical power. An MFC operates as electrons from the microorganisms transfer from a reduced electron donor to an electron acceptor at a higher electrochemical potential. The aims of the study are to determine the most efficient wastewater source that can generate the highest rate of electricity production by using MFCs and to determine the removal rate of carbon and nitrogen in wastewater by using MFCs. The three different wastewater samples used were activated sludge, palm oil mill effluent (POME and leachate from food waste. The highest rate of voltage generation is achieved when the MFC was operated with leachate (0.455 V, followed by POME (0.444 V and activated sludge (0.396 V. However, based on the study of the graph pattern generated, activated sludge provided the most consistent record in terms of electricity generation. The highest efficiency of COD removal is achieved by activated sludge (37.5 %, followed by leachate (6.11 %. The activated sludge has also shown the highest efficiency in terms of nitrogen removal (65.28 %, followed by POME (48.12 % and leachate (25.15 %.

  16. Electricity generation from cattle manure slurry by cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kengo; Ito, Toshihiro; Kawano, Yoshihiro; Iguchi, Atsushi; Miyahara, Morio; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-11-01

    Cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells (CE-MFCs) are efficient and scalable devices for electricity production from organic waste. Previous studies have demonstrated that CE-MFCs are capable of generating electricity from artificial wastewater at relatively high efficiencies. In this study, a single-cassette CE-MFC was constructed, and its capacity for electricity generation from cattle manure suspended in water (solid to water ratio of 1:50) was examined. The CE-MFC reactor was operated in batch mode for 49 days; electricity generation became stable 2 weeks after initiating the operation. The maximum power density was measured at 16.3 W m⁻³ on day 26. Sequencing analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained from the original manure and from anode biofilms suggested that Chloroflexi and Geobacteraceae were abundant in the anode biofilm (29% and 18%, respectively), whereas no Geobacteraceae sequences were detected in the original manure sample. The results of this study suggest that CE-MFCs can be used to generate electricity from water-suspended cattle manure in a scalable MFC system. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anaerobic microbial fuel cell treating combined industrial wastewater: Correlation of electricity generation with pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Umara; Jin, Wang; Pervez, Arshid; Bhatti, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Tariq, Madiha; Shaheen, Shahida; Iqbal, Akhtar; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a new technology that not only generates energy but treats wastewater as well. A dual chamber MFC was operated under laboratory conditions. Wastewater samples from vegetable oil industries, metal works, glass and marble industries, chemical industries and combined industrial effluents were collected and each was treated for 98h in MFC. The treatment efficiency for COD in MFC was in range of 85-90% at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 96h and had significant impact on wastewater treatment as well. The maximum voltage of 890mV was generated when vegetable oil industries discharge was treated with columbic efficiency of 5184.7C. The minimum voltage was produced by Glass House wastewater which was 520mV. There was positive significant co-relation between COD concentration and generated voltage. Further research should be focused on the organic contents of wastewater and various ionic species affecting voltage generation in MFC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation. PMID:25247576

  19. Microbial Fuel Cells for Simultaneous Electricity Generation and Organic Degradation from Slaughterhouse Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelinus Christwardana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel Cell (MFC has gained a lot of attention in recent years due to its capability in simultaneously reducing organic component and generating electricity. Here multicultural rumen microbes (RM were used to reduce organic component of slaughterhouse wastewater in a self-fabricated MFC. The objectives of this study were to determine the MFC configuration and to find out its maximum capability in organic degradation and electricity generation. The experiments were conducted by employing, different types of electrode materials, electrode size, and substrate-RM ratio. Configuration of MFC with graphite-copper electrode 31.4 cm2 in size, and substrate-RM ratio 1:10 shows the best result with current density of 318 mA m-2, potential  2.4 V, and achieve maximum power density up to 700 mW m-2. In addition, self-fabricated MFC also shows its ability in reducing organic component by measuring the chemical oxygen demand (COD up to 67.9% followed by increasing pH from 5.9 to 7.5. MFC operating at ambient condition (29oC and pH 7.5, is emphasized as green-technology for slaughterhouse wastewater treatment. Article History: Received March 26, 2016; Received in revised form June 20, 2016; Accepted June 25, 2016; Available online How to Cite This Article: Prabowo, A.K., Tiarasukma, A.P., Christwardana, M. and Ariyanti, D. (2016 Microbial Fuel Cells for Simultaneous Electricity Generation and Organic Degradation from Slaughterhouse Wastewater. Int. Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 5(2, 107-112. http://dx.doi.org/10.14710/ijred.5.2.107-112 

  20. A performance analysis of integrated solid oxide fuel cell and heat recovery steam generator for IGFC system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Lee, Jinwook; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a promising technology for electricity generation. Sulfur-free syngas from a gas-cleaning unit serves as fuel for SOFC in integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power plants. It converts the chemical energy of fuel gas directly into electric energy, thus high...... efficiencies can be achieved. The outputs from SOFC can be utilized by heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), which drives the steam turbine for electricity production. The SOFC stack model was developed using the process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus, which is of the equilibrium type. Various ranges...... describes IGFC power plants, particularly the optimization of HRSG to improve the efficiency of the heat recovery from the SOFC exhaust gas and to maximize the power production in the steam cycle in the IGFC system. HRSG output from different pressure levels varies depending on the SOFC output. The steam...

  1. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best

  2. Assessment of the implementation issues for fuel cells in domestic and small scale stationary power generation and CHP applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G.; Cruden, A.; Hart, J.

    2002-07-01

    This report discusses implementation issues associated with the use of fuel cells in <10 kW domestic, small-scale power generation and combined heat and power (CHP) operations in the UK. The report examines the key issues (fuel cell system standards and certification, fuel infrastructure, commercial issues and competing CHP technologies), before discussing non-technical issues including finance, ownership, import and export configuration, pricing structure, customer acceptability, installation, operation and training of servicing and commissioning personnel. The report goes on to discuss market and technical drivers, grid connection issues and solutions, operations and maintenance. Recommendations for the future are made.

  3. A Sodium-Ion-Conducting Direct Formate Fuel Cell: Generating Electricity and Producing Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinshi; Feng, Ying; Sun, Xianda; He, Yaling

    2017-05-15

    A barrier that limits the development of the conventional cation-exchange membrane direct liquid fuel cells (CEM-DLFCs) is that the CEM-DLFCs need additional base to offer both alkaline environment and charge carriers. Herein, we propose a Na+ -conducting direct formate fuel cell (Na-DFFC) that is operated in the absence of added base. A proof-of-concept Na-DFFC yields a peak power density of 33 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, mainly because the hydrolysis of sodium formate provides enough OH- and Na+ ions, proving the conceptual feasibility. Moreover, contrary to the conventional chlor-alkali process, this Na-DFFC enables to generate electricity and produce NaOH simultaneously without polluting the environment. The Na-DFFC runs stably during 13 hours of continuous operation at a constant current of 10 mA, along with a theoretical production of 195 mg NaOH. This work presents a new type of electrochemical conversion device that possesses a wide range of potential applications. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Bioelectricity generation using two chamber microbial fuel cell treating wastewater from food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoorian, Hossein Jafari; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Jafari, Ahmad Jonidi; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Rajabizadeh, Ahmad; Khanjani, Narges

    2013-05-10

    Electricity generation from microbial fuel cells which treat food processing wastewater was investigated in this study. Anaerobic anode and aerobic cathode chambers were separated by a proton exchange membrane in a two-compartment MFC reactor. Buffer solutions and food industry wastewater were used as electrolytes in the anode and cathode chambers, respectively. The produced voltage and current intensity were measured using a digital multimeter. Effluents from the anode compartment were tested for COD, BOD5, NH3, P, TSS, VSS, SO4 and alkalinity. The maximum current density and power production were measured 527mA/m(2) and 230mW/m(2) in the anode area, respectively, at operation organic loading (OLR) of 0.364g COD/l.d. At OLR of 0.182g COD/l.d, maximum voltage and columbic efficiency production were recorded 0.475V and 21%, respectively. Maximum removal efficiency of COD, BOD5, NH3, P, TSS, VSS, SO4 and alkalinity were 86, 79, 73, 18, 68, 62, 30 and 58%, respectively. The results indicated that catalysts and mediator-less microbial fuel cells (CAML-MFC) can be considered as a better choice for simple and complete energy conversion from the wastewater of such industries and also this could be considered as a new method to offset wastewater treatment plant operating costs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reversible solid oxide fuel cell for natural gas/renewable hybrid power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Shi, Yixiang; Zheng, Yi; Cai, Ningsheng

    2017-02-01

    Renewable energy (RE) is expected to be the major part of the future energy. Presently, the intermittence and fluctuation of RE lead to the limitation of its penetration. Reversible solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) as the energy storage device can effectively store the renewable energy and build a bidirectional connection with natural gas (NG). In this paper, the energy storage strategy was designed to improve the RE penetration and dynamic operation stability in a distributed system coupling wind generators, internal combustion engine, RSOFC and lithium-ion batteries. By compromising the relative deviation of power supply and demand, RE penetration, system efficiency and capacity requirement, the strategy that no more than 36% of the maximum wind power output is directly supplied to users and the other is stored by the combination of battery and reversible solid oxide fuel cell is optimal for the distributed system. In the case, the RE penetration reached 56.9% and the system efficiency reached 55.2%. The maximum relative deviation of power supply and demand is also lower than 4%, which is significantly superior to that in the wind curtailment case.

  6. The HLA-net GENE[RATE] pipeline for effective HLA data analysis and its application to 145 population samples from Europe and neighbouring areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J M; Buhler, S; Roessli, D; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we present for the first time an integrated version of the Gene[rate] computer tools which have been developed during the last 5 years to analyse human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data in human populations, as well as the results of their application to a large dataset of 145 HLA-typed population samples from Europe and its two neighbouring areas, North Africa and West Asia, now forming part of the Gene[va] database. All these computer tools and genetic data are, from now, publicly available through a newly designed bioinformatics platform, HLA-net, here presented as a main achievement of the HLA-NET scientific programme. The Gene[rate] pipeline offers user-friendly computer tools to estimate allele and haplotype frequencies, to test Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium, to recode HLA data, to convert file formats, to display population frequencies of chosen alleles and haplotypes in selected geographic regions, and to perform genetic comparisons among chosen sets of population samples, including new data provided by the user. Both numerical and graphical outputs are generated, the latter being highly explicit and of publication quality. All these analyses can be performed on the pipeline after scrupulous validation of the population sample's characterisation and HLA typing reporting according to HLA-NET recommendations. The Gene[va] database offers direct access to the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1 and -DPB1 frequencies and summary statistics of 145 population samples having successfully passed these HLA-NET 'filters', and representing three European subregions (South-East, North-East and Central-West Europe) and two neighbouring areas (North Africa, as far as Sudan, and West Asia, as far as South India). The analysis of these data, summarized in this review, shows a substantial genetic variation at the regional level in this continental area. These results have main implications for population genetics

  7. Addition of acetate improves stability of power generation using microbial fuel cells treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stager, Jennifer L; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Logan, Bruce E

    2017-12-01

    Power generation using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) must provide stable, continuous conversion of organic matter in wastewaters into electricity. However, when relatively small diameter (0.8cm) graphite fiber brush anodes were placed close to the cathodes in MFCs, power generation was unstable during treatment of low strength domestic wastewater. One reactor produced 149mW/m(2) before power generation failed, while the other reactor produced 257mW/m(2), with both reactors exhibiting severe power overshoot in polarization tests. Using separators or activated carbon cathodes did not result in stable operation as the reactors continued to exhibit power overshoot based on polarization tests. However, adding acetate (1g/L) to the wastewater produced stable performance during fed batch and continuous flow operation, and there was no power overshoot in polarization tests. These results highlight the importance of wastewater strength and brush anode size for producing stable and continuous power in compact MFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal via a dual chamber microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paniz Izadi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs have recently been used to alter different sources of substrates to produce bioelectricity. MFCs can also be used for wastewater treatment and electricity generation simultaneously. Sulfur compounds such as sulfides commonly exist in wastewater and organic waste. In this study a dual chamber MFC was constructed for power production. Sulfide was used as the electron donor in the anaerobic anode compartment. A mixed culture of microorganisms was used as an active biocatalyst to convert the substrate into electricity. The obtained experimental results illustrated that the MFC can successfully alter sulfide to elementary sulfur while generating power. The initial concentration of sulfide in the anode compartment was 0.4 g l-1 and it was completely removed after 3 days of MFC operation. The influence of oxygen was examined in the cathode chamber and the cell voltage gradually increased during aeration, reaching 480 mV after 1200 s. Hexacyanoferrate was added to the cathodic solution in different concentrations and its effects were investigated. The maximum generated voltage, power and current density were 988.9145 mV, 346.746 mW.m-2, 1285.64 mA.m-2, respectively and they were obtained in the presence of 1.4 g l-1 of mediator.

  9. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Understanding electricity generation in osmotic microbial fuel cells through integrated experimental investigation and mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Mohan; Ping, Qingyun; Lu, Yaobin; Abu-Reesh, Ibrahim M; He, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Osmotic microbial fuel cells (OsMFCs) are a new type of MFCs with integrating forward osmosis (FO). However, it is not well understood why electricity generation is improved in OsMFCs compared to regular MFCs. Herein, an approach integrating experimental investigation and mathematical model was adopted to address the question. Both an OsMFC and an MFC achieved similar organic removal efficiency, but the OsMFC generated higher current than the MFC with or without water flux, resulting from the lower resistance of FO membrane. Combining NaCl and glucose as a catholyte demonstrated that the catholyte conductivity affected the electricity generation in the OsMFC. A mathematical model of OsMFCs was developed and validated with the experimental data. The model predicated the variation of internal resistance with increasing water flux, and confirmed the importance of membrane resistance. Increasing water flux with higher catholyte conductivity could decrease the membrane resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characteristics of electricity generation and biodegradation in tidal river sludge-used microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touch, Narong; Hibino, Tadashi; Nagatsu, Yoshiyuki; Tachiuchi, Kouhei

    2014-04-01

    The electricity generation behavior of microbial fuel cell (MFC) using the sludge collected from the riverbank of a tidal river, and the biodegradation of the sludge by the electricity generation are evaluated. Although the maximum current density (150-300 mA/m(2)) was higher than that of MFC using freshwater sediment (30 mA/m(2)), the output current was greatly restricted by the mass transfer limitation. However, our results also indicate that placing the anode in different locations in the sludge could reduce the mass transfer limitation. After approximately 3 months, the removal efficiency of organic carbon was approximately 10%, demonstrated that MFC could also enhance the biodegradation of the sludge by nearly 10-fold comparing with the natural biodegradation. We also found that the biodegradation could be identified by the behavior of oxygen consumption of the sludge. Importantly, the oxygen consumption of the sludge became higher along with the electricity generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Progress and challenges in utilization of palm oil biomass as fuel for decentralized electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazmi, Aqeel Ahmed [Process Systems Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor Bahru, JB (Malaysia); Biomass Conversion Research Center (BCRC), Department of Chemical Engineering, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Zahedi, Gholamreza; Hashim, Haslenda [Process Systems Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor Bahru, JB (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    It has been broadly accepted worldwide that global warming, indeed, is the greatest threat of the time to the environment. Renewable energy (RE) is expected as a perfect solution to reduce global warming and to endorse sustainable development. Progressive release of greenhouse gases (GHG) from increasing energy-intensive industries has eventually caused human civilization to suffer. Realizing the exigency of reducing emissions and simultaneously catering to needs of industries, researchers foresee the RE as the perfect entrant to overcome these challenges. RE provides an effective option for the provision of energy services from the technical point of view while biomass, a major source of energy in the world until before industrialization when fossil fuels become dominant, appears an important renewable source of energy and researches have proven from time to time its viability for large-scale production. Being a widely spread source, biomass offers the execution of decentralized electricity generation gaining importance in liberalized electricity markets. The decentralized power is characterized by generation of electricity nearer to the demand centers, meeting the local energy needs. Researchers envisaged an increasing decentralization of power supply, expected to make a particular contribution to climate protection. This article investigates the progress and challenges for decentralized electricity generation by palm oil biomass according to the overall concept of sustainable development. (author)

  13. Efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation: Data selection and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzi, Elisa [Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (Italy); Verdolini, Elena, E-mail: elena.verdolini@feem.it [Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (Italy); Universita Cattolica, del Sacro Cuore di Milano (Italy); Hascic, Ivan [OECD Environment Directorate (France)

    2011-11-15

    This paper studies patenting dynamics in efficiency improving electricity generation technologies as an important indicator of innovation activity. We build a novel database of worldwide patent applications in efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation and then analyse patenting trends over time and across countries. We find that patenting has mostly been stable over time, with a recent decreasing trend. OECD countries represent the top innovators and the top markets for technology. Some non-OECD countries, and particularly China, are also very active in terms of patenting activity in this sector. The majority of patents are first filed in OECD countries and only then in BRIC and other non-OECD countries. BRIC and other non-OECD countries apply for patents that are mostly marketed domestically, but BRIC countries represent important markets for patent duplication of OECD inventions. These results are indicative of significant technology transfer in the field of efficiency-improving technologies for electricity production. - Highlights: > We study innovation in efficiency-improving electricity generation technologies. > Relevant patents are identified and used as an indicator of innovation. > We show that there is significant technology transfer in this field. > Most patents are first filed in OECD countries and then in non-OECD countries. > Patents in non-OECD countries are mostly marketed domestically.

  14. Continuous bioelectricity generation through treatment of Victoria blue R: A novel microbial fuel cell operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wang, Guey-Horng; Tsai, Teh-Hua; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2017-07-29

    A novel two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) operation with a continuous anaerobic-aerobic decolorization system was developed to improve the degradation of the triphenylmethane dye, Victoria blue R (VBR). In addition, bioelectricity was generated during the VBR degradation process, and the operation parameters were optimized. The results indicated that the VBR removal efficiency and electricity generation were affected by the VBR concentration, liquid retention time (LRT), external resistance, gas retention time (GRT), and shock loading. The optimal operation parameters were as follows: VBR concentration, 600 mg L-1; LRT, 24 h; external resistance, 3300 Ω; and GRT, 60 s. Under these operating conditions, the VBR removal efficiency, COD removal efficiency, and power density were 98.2% ± 0.3%, 97.6% ± 0.5%, and 30.6 ± 0.4 mW m-2, respectively. According to our review of the relevant literature, this is the first paper to analyze the electrical characteristics of a continuous two-chamber MFC operation and demonstrate the feasibility of the simultaneous electricity generation and decolorization of VBR.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cells powered by biomass gasification for high efficiency power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadsbøll, Rasmus Østergaard; Thomsen, Jesper; Bang-Møller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Increased use of bioenergy is a very cost-effective and flexible measure to limit changes in the climate and the infrastructure. One of the key technologies toward a higher implementation of biomass is thermal gasification, which enables a wide span of downstream applications. In order to improve...... efficiencies, flexibility and possibly costs of current biomass power generating systems, a power plant concept combining solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and gasification is investigated experimentally. The aim of the study is to examine the commercial operation system potential of these two technologies...... part-load operation; and a longer test to investigate stability. The study shows experimentally the potential and feasibility of a SOFC-gasification system with a commercial gasifier and a SOFC stack by measuring the highest reported values of such a system, with biomass-to-electricity efficiencies up...

  16. Electron acceptors for energy generation in microbial fuel cells fed with wastewaters: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chuan-Shu; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Yang, Hou-Yun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained tremendous global interest over the last decades as a device that uses bacteria to oxidize organic and inorganic matters in the anode with bioelectricity generation and even for purpose of bioremediation. However, this prospective technology has not yet been carried out in field in particular because of its low power yields and target compounds removal which can be largely influenced by electron acceptors contributing to overcome the potential losses existing on the cathode. This mini review summarizes various electron acceptors used in recent years in the categories of inorganic and organic compounds, identifies their merits and drawbacks, and compares their influences on performance of MFCs, as well as briefly discusses possible future research directions particularly from cathode aspect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coupling a PEM fuel cell and the hydrogen generation from aluminum waste cans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Susana Silva; Albanil Sanchez, Loyda; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. CP 62210 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia y Sustentabilidad, UPCH, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    High purity hydrogen was generated from the chemical reaction of aluminum and sodium hydroxide. The aluminum used in this study was obtained from empty soft drink cans and treated with concentrated sulfuric acid to remove the paint and plastic film. One gram of aluminum was reacted with a solution of 2moldm{sup -3} of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen produced from aluminum cans and oxygen obtained from a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer or air, was fed to a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell to produce electricity. Yields of 44 mmol of hydrogen contained in a volume of 1.760dm{sup 3} were produced from one gram of aluminum in a time period of 20 min. (author)

  18. Electricity generation by Propionibacterium freudenreichii in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Alison; Sivell, Jamie-Lynn; Kirkwood, Kathlyn M

    2016-01-01

    To test Propionibacterium freudenreichii as a novel biocatalyst in a glycerol-oxidizing microbial fuel cell (MFC). Two strains, P. freudenreichii ssp. shermanii and P. freudenreichii ssp. freudenreichii, were screened as anodic biocatalysts and shown to produce power from glycerol in an MFC. Voltage was generated with and without resazurin in the medium, showing that both strains are exoelectrogenic. Polarization data showed that an MFC with P. freudenreichii ssp. shermanii reached a maximum open circuit voltage of 485 mV and a maximum power density of 14.9 mW m(-2). Glycerol consumption was about 50 % lower in MFCs than in fermentations, indicating a metabolic shift in the MFC environment. P. freudenreichii ssp. shermanii and P. freudenreichii ssp. freudenreichii were shown for the first time to act as exoelectrogenic anodic biocatalysts in MFCs.

  19. Injectable Spontaneous Generation of Tremendous Self-Fueled Liquid Metal Droplet Motors in a Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, You-You; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Micro motors that could run in liquid environment is very important for a variety of practices such as serving as pipeline robot, soft machine, drug delivery, or microfluidics system etc. However, fabrication of such tiny motors is generally rather time and cost consumptive and has been a tough issue due to involve too many complicated procedures and tools. Here, we show a straightforward injectable way for spontaneously generating autonomously running soft motors in large quantity. A basic fabrication strategy thus enabled is established and illustrated. It was found that, injecting the GaIn alloy pre-fueled with aluminum into electrolyte would automatically split in seconds into tremendous droplet motors swiftly running here and there. The driving force originated from the galvanic cell reaction among alloy, aluminum and surrounding electrolyte which offers interior electricity and hydrogen gas as motion power. This finding opens the possibility to develop injectable tiny-robots, droplet machines or microfl...

  20. Development of next generation micro-CHP system: Based on high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsalis, A.

    2012-01-15

    Novel proposals for the modeling and operation of a micro-CHP (combined-heat-and-power) residential system based on HT-PEMFC (High Temperature-Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell) technology are described and analyzed to investigate the technical feasibility of such systems. The proposed systems must provide electricity, hot water, and space heating for an average single-family household in Denmark. A complete fuel processing subsystem, with all necessary BOP (balance-of-plant) components, is modeled and coupled to the fuel cell stack subsystem. The research project is divided into five main study topics: (a) Modeling, simulation and validation of the system in LabVIEW environment to provide the ability of Data Acquisition of actual components, and thereby more realistic design in the future; (b) Modeling, parametric study, and sensitivity analysis of the system in EES (Engineering Equation Solver). The parametric study is conducted to determine the most viable system/component design based on maximizing total system efficiency; (c) An improved operational strategy is formulated and applied in an attempt to minimize operational implications, experienced when using conventional operational strategies; (d) Application of a GA (Genetic Algorithm) optimization strategy. The objective function of the single-objective optimization strategy is the net electrical efficiency of the micro-CHP system. The implemented optimization procedure attempts to maximize the objective function by variation of nine decision variables; (e) The micro-CHP system is optimized by formulating and applying a process integration methodology. The methodology involves system optimization targeting in net electrical efficiency maximization. Subsequently a MINLP (Mixed Integer Non-Linear Programming) problem optimization strategy is applied to minimize the annual cost of the HEN (Heat Exchanger Network). The results obtained throughout this research work indicate the high potential of the proposed

  1. Diesel engine fuel consumption and emission analysis using steam generated non-surfactant water-in-diesel emulsion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avianto Sugeng, Dhani; Zahari, Mohamad Fathur Hafeezat Mohd; Muhsin Ithnin, Ahmad; Jazair Yahya, Wira

    2017-10-01

    Efforts in making water in diesel emulsion (W/D) with the absence of surfactant have been developed to address the issues of long-term stability and the dependence on surfactants. This paper discusses an alternative formation method of a non-surfactant W/D, e.g. by steam condensation. By injecting steam into a batch of colder diesel fuel, fine water droplets are formed and suspended in the fuel forming an emulsion. The droplets are confirmed to be in the size range of hundreds of nanometers. The emissions of NOx is reduced by a maximum of 71%, whereas the CO and UHC emissions are increased by maximum respectively 180% and a surprising 517%. Not less interesting is the lower BSFC which was measured at a maximum reduction of 18.4%. These results on emission analysis together with the brake specific fuel consumption confirm this method to resemble the combustion behaviour of a conventional emulsion fuel of lower NOx and BSFC, yet higher CO and UHC

  2. Generation of electricity from FeCl3 pretreatment of rice straw using a fuel cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ilgook; Saif Ur Rehman, Muhammad; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Han, Jong-In

    2013-05-01

    This study explored a new approach to the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using FeCl3 combined with a fuel cell system to generate electricity. After pretreatment, ferric iron (Fe(3+)), a strong catalyst in the hydrolysis of carbohydrate, was found to be reduced to ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) by means of the oxidation of xylose and lignin. Ferrous iron, as a fuel, was employed to the anode part of a fuel cell, generating power of 1110 mW/m(2). During the fuel cell operation, ferrous iron was completely removed through oxidation to ferric iron and precipitated out. The optimal conditions for the operation of the fuel cell were found to be a pH of 7.0 and ferrous iron concentration of above 0.008 M. These results clearly show that a fuel cell system could be used not only to remove ferrous iron from liquid hydrolysate, but also to produce electricity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  4. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  5. Perchlorate remediation using packed-bed bioreactors and electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki

    Two pilot-scale fixed bed bioreactors were operated in continuous mode in order to treat groundwater contaminated by perchlorate. The bioreactors were constructed and operated side-by-side at the Texas Street Well Facility in Redlands, California. Each reactor was packed with either sand or plastic media. A perchlorate-reducing bacterium, Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, was used to inoculate the bioreactors. Perchlorate was successfully removed down to a non-detectable level (flow rate of 0.126 L/s. A regular backwashing cycle (once a week) was an important factor for completely removing perchlorate in groundwater. Power generation directly from pure or mixed organic matter was examined using microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which were run either in batch or continuous mode. In batch experiments, both a pure culture (Geobactor metallireducens) and a mixed culture (wastewater inoculum) were used as the biocatalyst, and acetate was added as substrate in the anode chamber of the MFC. Power output in a membrane MFC with either inoculum was essentially the same, with 40 +/- 1 mW/m2 for G. metallireducens and 38 +/- 1 mW/m2 for mixed culture. A different type of the MFC containing a salt bridge instead of a membrane system was examined to generate power using the same substrate and pure culture as used in the membrane MFC. Power output in the salt bridge MFC was 2.2 mW/m 2. It was found that the lower power output was directly attributed to the higher internal resistance of the salt bridge system (19920 +/- 50 O) in comparison with that of the membrane system (1286 +/- 1 O). Continuous electricity generation was examined in a flat plate microbial fuel cell (FPMFC) using domestic wastewater and specific organic substrates. The FPMFC, containing a combined electrode/proton exchange membrane (PEM), was initially acclimated for one month to domestic wastewater, and then was operated as a plug flow reactor system. Power density using domestic wastewater as a substrate was 72 +/- 1 mW/m2 at

  6. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover Biomass Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xin

    2009-08-01

    Corn stover is usually treated by an energy-intensive or expensive process to extract sugars for bioenergy production. However, it is possible to directly generate electricity from corn stover in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through the addition of microbial consortia specifically acclimated for biomass breakdown. A mixed culture that was developed to have a high saccharification rate with corn stover was added to singlechamber, air-cathode MFCs acclimated for power production using glucose. The MFC produced a maximum power of 331 mW/ m 2 with the bioaugmented mixed culture and corn stover, compared to 510 mW/m2 using glucose. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed the communities continued to evolve on both the anode and corn stover biomass over 60 days, with several bacteria identified including Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The use of residual solids from the steam exploded corn stover produced 8% more power (406 mW/m2) than the raw corn stover. These results show that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using naturally occurring bacteria. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  7. Integrating forward osmosis into microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment, water extraction and bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Brastad, Kristen S; He, Zhen

    2011-08-01

    A novel osmotic microbial fuel cell (OsMFC) was developed by using a forward osmosis (FO) membrane as a separator. The performance of the OsMFC was examined with either NaCl solution or artificial seawater as a catholyte (draw solution). A conventional MFC with a cation exchange membrane was also operated in parallel for comparison. It was found that the OsMFC produced more electricity than the MFC in both batch operation (NaCl solution) and continuous operation (seawater), likely due to better proton transport with water flux through the FO membrane. Water flux from the anode into the cathode was clearly observed with the OsMFC but not in the MFC. The solute concentration of the catholyte affected both electricity generation and water flux. These results provide a proof of concept that an OsMFC can simultaneously accomplish wastewater treatment, water extraction (from the wastewater), and electricity generation. The potential applications of the OsMFC are proposed for either water reuse (linking to reverse osmosis for reconcentration of draw solution) or seawater desalination (connecting with microbial desalination cells for further wastewater treatment and desalination).

  8. Electricity generation using white and red wine lees in air cathode microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe Sciarria, Tommy; Merlino, Giuseppe; Scaglia, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Mecheri, Barbara; Borin, Sara; Licoccia, Silvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a useful biotechnology to produce electrical energy from different organic substrates. This work reports for the first time results of the application of single chamber MFCs to generate electrical energy from diluted white wine (WWL) and red wine (RWL) lees. Power obtained was of 8.2 W m-3 (262 mW m-2; 500 Ω) and of 3.1 W m-3 (111 mW m-2; 500Ω) using white and red wine lees, respectively. Biological processes lead to a reduction of chemical oxygen (TCOD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) of 27% and 83% for RWL and of 90% and 95% for WWL, respectively. These results depended on the degradability of organic compounds contained, as suggest by BOD5/TCOD of WWL (0.93) vs BOD5/TCOD of RWL (0.33), and to the high presence of polyphenols in RWL that inhibited the process. Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 15 ± 0%, for WWL, was in line with those reported in the literature for other substrates, i.e. CE of 14.9 ± 11.3%. Different substrates led to different microbial consortia, particularly at the anode. Bacterial species responsible for the generation of electricity, were physically connected to the electrode, where the direct electron transfer took place.

  9. Bioelectrochemical desalination and electricity generation in microbial desalination cell with dewatered sludge as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanyu; Jiang, Junqiu; Zhao, Qingliang; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Guodong; Fan, Qingxin; Wei, Liangliang; Ding, Jing; Zheng, Zhen

    2014-04-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) with common liquid anodic substrate exhibit a slow startup and destructive pH drop, and abiotic cathodes have high cost and low sustainability. A biocathode MDC with dewatered sludge as fuel was developed for synergistic desalination, electricity generation and sludge stabilization. Experimental results indicated that the startup period was reduced to 3d, anodic pH was maintained between 6.6 and 7.6, and high stability was shown under long-term operation (300d). When initial NaCl concentrations were 5 and 10g/L, the desalinization rates during stable operation were 46.37±1.14% and 40.74±0.89%, respectively. The maximum power output of 3.178W/m(3) with open circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.118V was produced on 130d. After 300d, 25.71±0.15% of organic matter was removed. These results demonstrated that dewatered sludge was an appropriate anodic substrate to enhance MDC stability for desalination and electricity generation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pKa of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to generate electricity from fermented primary sludge. Fermentation (30°C, 9days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1-16.5g/L), volatile suspended solids (24.1-15.3g/L) and pH (5.7-4.5), and increased conductivity (2.4-4.7mS/cm), soluble COD (2.66-15.5g/L), and volatile fatty acids (1.9-10.1g/L). To lower the COD and increase pH, fermentation supernatant was diluted with primary effluent before being used in the MFCs. The maximum power density was 0.32±0.01W/m2, compared to 0.24±0.03W/m2 with only primary effluent. Power densities were higher with phosphate buffer added to the supernatant (1.03±0.06W/m2) or the solution (0.87±0.05W/m2). Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 18% to 57%, and sCOD removals from 84% to 94%. These results demonstrated that sludge can effectively be used for power generation when fermented and then diluted with only primary effluent. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Performance of Klebsiella oxytoca to generate electricity from POME in microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md. Amirul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to evaluate the electricity generation from microbial fuel cell (MFC and to analyze the microbial community structure of city wastewater and anaerobic sludge to enhance the MFC performance. MFCs, enriched with palm oil mill effluent (POME were employed to harvest electricity by innoculating of Klebsiella oxytoca, collected from city wastewater and other microbes from anaerobic sludge (AS. The MFC showed maximum power density of 207.28 mW/m3 with continuous feeding of POME using microbes from AS. Subsequent replacement with Klebsiella oxytoca resulted maximum power density of 1236 mW/m3 by utilizing complex substrate POME which was six times higher as compared to MFC operated with AS. Based on Biolog gene III analysis, relatively higher abundance of Klebsiella oxytoca was detected in the city wastewater. Predominant microorganisms such as Gammaproteobacteria, Azospiraoryzae, Acetobacterperoxydans and Solimonasvariicoloris were isolated from palm oil anaerobic sludge as well as from biofilm of MFC. Enriched electrochemically active bacteria Klebsiella oxytoca showed better performance to generate electricity from complex POME substrates compare to AS. These results demonstrate that the power output of MFCs can be increased significantly using Klebsiella oxytoca.

  13. Possibilities of optimum fuel utilization. Utilization of the useful heat in gas-fired heat generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, L. (Ruhrgas A.G., Essen (Germany, F.R.))

    1976-06-01

    A report is given on a process which permits complete or at least substantial utilization of the upper calorific value of a fuel. This happens by cooling the exhaust gases in an additional appliance connected with the outlet side of the actual boiler, so that most of the sensible heat from the exhaust gases can be used. In addition, the condensation heat of the steam can be utilized by separating this steam contained in the exhaust gas. The lower part of the appliance is constructed as a condensation storage tank with an overflow. The exhaust gases leaving the heat generator are passed into the appliance and cooled in water trickling down in counter-current direction. With the aid of the research carried out and a calculation of economy, it is shown that, considering the present-day state of engineering, the additional appliance can profitably be introduced if the output of the heat generator for the apparatus is greater than 0.2 Gcal/h.

  14. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pK(a) of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hybrid fuel cell/diesel generation total energy system, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    Meeting the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (DGSCC) electrical and thermal requirements with the existing system was compared with using fuel cells. Fuel cell technology selection was based on a 1985 time frame for installation. The most cost-effective fuel feedstock for fuel cell application was identified. Fuels considered included diesel oil, natural gas, methanol and coal. These fuel feedstocks were considered not only on the cost and efficiency of the fuel conversion process, but also on complexity and integration of the fuel processor on system operation and thermal energy availability. After a review of fuel processor technology, catalytic steam reformer technology was selected based on the ease of integration and the economics of hydrogen production. The phosphoric acid fuel cell was selected for application at the GDSCC due to its commercial readiness for near term application. Fuel cell systems were analyzed for both natural gas and methanol feedstock. The subsequent economic analysis indicated that a natural gas fueled system was the most cost effective of the cases analyzed.

  16. Wood fuel for power generation at Wendel, California. Volume 2. Business structure and economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The business structure and operating approach recommended for economic procurement of wood fuel for the proposed Honey Lake hybrid power plant are covered including: (a) constraints, (b) availability of wood fuel, (c) business approach and organization, (d) cost of wood fuel, and (e) socioeconomic considerations.

  17. Getting to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

  18. Validation of a Waste Heat Recovery Model for a 1kW PEM Fuel Cell using Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saufi Sulaiman, M.; Mohamed, W. A. N. W.; Singh, B.; Fitrie Ghazali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cell is a device that generates electricity through electrochemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. A major by-product of the exothermic reaction is waste heat. The recovery of this waste heat has been subject to research on order to improve the overall energy utilization. However, nearly all of the studies concentrate on high temperature fuel cells using advanced thermodynamic cycles due to the high quality of waste heat. The method, characteristics and challenges in harvesting waste heat from a low temperature fuel cell using a direct energy conversion device is explored in this publication. A heat recovery system for an open cathode 1kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) was developed using a single unit of thermoelectric generator (TEG) attached to a heat pipe. Power output of the fuel cell was varied to obtain the performance of TEG at different stack temperatures. Natural and forced convections modes of cooling were applied to the TEG cold side. This is to simulate the conditions of a mini fuel cell vehicle at rest and in motion. The experimental results were analysed and a mathematical model based on the thermal circuit analogy was developed and compared. Forced convection mode resulted in higher temperature difference, output voltage and maximum power which are 3.3°C, 33.5 mV, and 113.96mW respectively. The heat recovery system for 1 kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) using single TEG was successfully established and improved the electrical production of fuel cell. Moreover, the experimental results obtained was in a good agreement with theoretical results.

  19. Fuel prices scenario generation based on a multivariate GARCH model for risk analysis in a wholesale electricity market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batlle, C.; Barquin, J. [Universidad Pontifica Comillas, Madrid (Spain). Instituto de Investigacion Tecnologica

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents a fuel prices scenario generator in the frame of a simulation tool developed to support risk analysis in a competitive electricity environment. The tool feeds different erogenous risk factors to a wholesale electricity market model to perform a statistical analysis of the results. As the different fuel series that are studied, such as the oil or gas ones, present stochastic volatility and strong correlation among them, a multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedastic (GARCH) model has been designed in order to allow the generation of future fuel prices paths. The model makes use of a decomposition method to simplify the consideration of the multidimensional conditional covariance. An example of its application with real data is also presented. (author)

  20. Model-based optimal control of a hybrid power generation system consisting of photovoltaic arrays and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervas, P. L.; Sarimveis, H.; Palyvos, J. A.; Markatos, N. C. G.

    Hybrid renewable energy systems are expected to become competitive to conventional power generation systems in the near future and, thus, optimization of their operation is of particular interest. In this work, a hybrid power generation system is studied consisting of the following main components: photovoltaic array (PV), electrolyser, metal hydride tanks, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The key advantage of the hybrid system compared to stand-alone photovoltaic systems is that it can store efficiently solar energy by transforming it to hydrogen, which is the fuel supplied to the fuel cell. However, decision making regarding the operation of this system is a rather complicated task. A complete framework is proposed for managing such systems that is based on a rolling time horizon philosophy.

  1. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  2. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joesph W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klebanoff, Leonard E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Munoz-Ramos, Karina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Akhil, Abbas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curgus, Dita B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schenkman, Benjamin L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today’s technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Electrochem's PEM Fuel Cell Power Plant for NASA's 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Michael C.; Hoberecht, Mark

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program is being developed to meet national needs for civil and commercial space access with goals of reducing the launch costs, increasing the reliability, and reducing the maintenance and operating costs. To this end, NASA is considering an all- electric capability for NGLT vehicles requiring advanced electrical power generation technology at a nominal 20 kW level with peak power capabilities six times the nominal power. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been identified as a viable candidate to supply this electrical power; however, several technology aspects need to be assessed. Electrochem, Inc., under contract to NASA, has developed a breadboard power generator to address these technical issues with the goal of maximizing the system reliability while minimizing the cost and system complexity. This breadboard generator operates with dry hydrogen and oxygen gas using eductors to recirculate the gases eliminating gas humidification and blowers from the system. Except for a coolant pump, the system design incorporates passive components allowing the fuel cell to readily follow a duty cycle profile and that may operate at high 6:1 peak power levels for 30 second durations. Performance data of the fuel cell stack along with system performance is presented to highlight the benefits of the fuel cell stack design and system design for NGLT vehicles.

  4. Optimal Enactment of a Stand-alone Hybrid Wind-Fuel Cell based Distributed Generation System through Fuzzy Logic Control

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Saad Alam

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a hybrid distributed power generation (DG) system composed of two renewable energy sources, viz. a wind turbine and a fuel cell is proposed. A fuzzy logic controller has been introduced for optimal power management to provide electric supply to a residential load on a continuous basis based on the feasibility of economic power generation. This controller directs power to a fixed voltage bus in the power conditioning unit (PCU). The fixed voltage bus supplies the load, while the ...

  5. An analysis of hydrogen production from ammonia hydride hydrogen generators for use in military fuel cell environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifer, Nicholas; Gardner, Kristopher

    In an effort to simultaneously improve upon existing power storage and generation devices while supplying America's war fighters with state-of-the-art equipment, the US military has focused on fuel cell technology for several military applications. These applications include soldier and sensor power (0-100 W) and auxiliary power units (500-3000 W). Over the past few years, the fuel cell industry has realized remarkable decreases in the size and weight of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. However, a safe and affordable means of storing and generating hydrogen does not yet exist to justify their transition into the field. In order to assess the hydrogen storage capacity and hydrogen generation rates of ammonia (NH 3) based systems, the US Army Communications-Electronics Research, Development, and Engineering Center (CERDEC), tested several ammonia hydride hydrogen generator systems built by Hydrogen Components Inc. (HCI). Experimental results and analysis illustrate that while there are developments necessary at the sub-system level, the hydrogen generators are ideal energy storage devices for low power (5 W) operations over wide temperature ranges. The results show that the hydrogen generators are capable of operating autonomously for over 50+ h of operation (at a 5 W load) and producing hydrogen delivery system energy densities of 480 Wh/kg.

  6. ACQUISITION AS A GENERATOR STRATEGY FROM COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES IN THE BRAZILIAN MARKET OF FUELS DISTRIBUITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Fernandes Pereira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject from this work is about acquisitions as organizational strategies and it is guided by the general objective on identifying if the acquisition of Texaco by Ultra Group, in Brazil, could generate competitive advantages. Thus, the main aim is to characterize, specifically, the fuel distribution sector in Brazil, presenting characteristics, strategies, classification of resources and the competitive advantage’s identification in the buying process of Texaco by Ultra Group. The methodology used for this research is a case study of qualitative nature. Data collection has been performed through literature review, documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews. In the analysis of collected data, specific objectives have been met. It was clear, therefore, the presence of features such as scale earnings, brand exposure, better management practices, synergies, tangible and intangible assets and market growth. So, those resources are classified according to the competitive implications. Then, it might be concluded that Texaco´s acquisition could bring competitive advantages for Ultra / Ipiranga Group. Respondents believe the sector is growing and businesses tend to grow despite the world crisis. They also confirmed that, in a highly competitive market, strategic alliances and market growing are factors that may ensure success to each company.

  7. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676±93mW/m2, followed by semi-coke (376±47mW/m2), graphite (122±14mW/m2) and carbon felt (60±43mW/m2). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ≥15g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (~3 or ~6cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of microbial fuel cells for electricity generation from oil-contaminated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiro; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Akiteru; Yoda, Minoru; Ishiguro, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2016-11-01

    Large quantities of oils and fats are discharged into wastewater from food industries. We evaluated the possibility of using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the generation of electricity from food-industry wastewater containing vegetable oils. Single-chamber MFCs were supplied with artificial wastewater containing soybean oil, and oil removal and electric output were examined under several different conditions. We found that MFC performance could be improved by supplementing wastewater with an emulsifier, inoculating MFCs with oil-contaminated soil, and coating the graphite-felt anodes with carbon nanotubes, resulting in a power output of more than 2 W m(-2) (based on the projected area of the anode). Sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments detected abundant amount of Burkholderiales bacteria (known to include oil degraders) in the oil-contaminated soil and anode biofilm, whereas those affiliated with the genus Geobacter were only detected in the anode biofilm. These results suggest that MFCs can be used for energy recovery from food industry wastewater containing vegetable oils. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electricity generation and brewery wastewater treatment from sequential anode-cathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Li-xin; Sun, Qian; Kong, Fan-ying

    2010-02-01

    A sequential anode-cathode double-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC), in which the effluent of anode chamber was used as a continuous feed for an aerated cathode chamber, was constructed in this experiment to investigate the performance of brewery wastewater treatment in conjugation with electricity generation. Carbon fiber was used as anode and plain carbon felt with biofilm as cathode. When hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 14.7 h, a relatively high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 91.7%-95.7% was achieved under long-term stable operation. The MFC displayed an open circuit voltage of 0.434 V and a maximum power density of 830 mW/m(3) at an external resistance of 300 Omega. To estimate the electrochemical performance of the MFC, electrochemical measurements were carried out and showed that polarization resistance of anode was the major limiting factor in the MFC. Since a high COD removal efficiency was achieved, we conclude that the sequential anode-cathode MFC constructed with bio-cathode in this experiment could provide a new approach for brewery wastewater treatment.

  10. Biological treatment of steroidal drug industrial effluent and electricity generation in the microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru; Gao, Chongyang; Zhao, Yang-Guo; Wang, Aijie; Lu, Shanshan; Wang, Min; Maqbool, Farhana; Huang, Qing

    2012-11-01

    The single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to treat steroidal drug production wastewater (SPW) and generate electricity simultaneously. The results indicated that the maximum COD removal efficiency reached 82%, total nitrogen and sulfate removal rate approached 62.47% and 26.46%, respectively. The maximum power density and the Coulombic efficiency reached to 22.3Wm(-3) and 30%, respectively. The scanning electron microscope showed that the dominant microbial populations were remarkably different in morphology on the surface of SPW and acetate-fed anodes. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles revealed that the microbial community structure fed with different concentrations of SPW presented a gradual succession and unique bacterial sequences were detected on the SPW and acetate-fed anodes. This research demonstrates that MFCs fed with SPW achieved a high efficiency of power density and simultaneous nutrient removal, and the dominant microorganisms on the anode were related to the types and the concentrations of substrates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous organic matter removal and disinfection of wastewater with enhanced power generation in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Dipak A; Ghadge, Anil N; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2014-07-01

    Presence of pathogenic microorganism in anodic effluent of microbial fuel cell (MFC) makes it unfit for reuse. In this study, performance of dual chamber MFC was evaluated in terms of organic matter removal, power generation and disinfection in cathodic chamber. Anodic effluent was treated further in cathodic chamber for achieving disinfection with different doses of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) with available chlorine varying from 0.67, 1.32, 2, 3 and 4 g/L. Addition of different doses of NaOCl resulted in satisfactory disinfection along with removal of nitrogenous compounds. Power output of MFC improved up to 3g/L of available chlorine (6.5 W/m(3)); however, further increase in chlorine concentration decreased the power. Voltammetric and impedance analysis showed higher and faster electron reduction and decrease in polarization resistance at 3g/L dose. Higher organic matter removal from wastewater and complete elimination of microorganism, along with improved power output, demonstrates effectiveness of hypochlorite as catholyte. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chitin degradation and electricity generation by Aeromonas hydrophila in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; He, Hui; Zeng, Raymond J; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2017-02-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biopolymers in nature and the main composition of shrimp and crab shells (usually as food wastes). Thus it is essential to investigate the potential of degrading chitin for energy recovery. This study investigated the anaerobic degradation of chitin by Aeromonas hydrophila, a chitinolytic and popular electroactive bacterium, in both fermentation and microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems. The primary chitin metabolites produced in MFC were succinate, lactate, acetate, formate, and ethanol. The total metabolite concentration from chitin degradation increased seven-fold in MFC compared to the fermentation system, as well as additional electricity generation. Moreover, A. hydrophila degraded GlcNAc (the intermediate of chitin hydrolysis) significantly faster (0.97 and 0.94 mM C/d/mM-GlcNAc) than chitin (0.13 and 0.03 mM C/d/mM-GlcNAc) in MFC and fermentation systems, indicating that extracellular hydrolysis of chitin was the rate-limiting step and this step could be accelerated in MFC. Furthermore, more chemicals produced by the addition of exogenous mediators in MFC. This study proves that the chitin could be degraded effectively by an electroactive bacterium in MFC, and our results suggest that this bioelectrochemical system might be useful for the degradation of recalcitrant biomass to recover energy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-03-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires a better understanding the importance of the different factors such as electrode surface area and reactor geometry relative to solution conditions such as conductivity and substrate concentration. It is shown here that the substrate concentration has significant effect on anode but not cathode performance, while the solution conductivity has a significant effect on the cathode but not the anode. The cathode surface area is always important for increasing power. Doubling the cathode size can increase power by 62% with domestic wastewater, but doubling the anode size increases power by 12%. Volumetric power density was shown to be a linear function of cathode specific surface area (ratio of cathode surface area to reactor volume), but the impact of cathode size on power generation depended on the substrate strength (COD) and conductivity. These results demonstrate the cathode specific surface area is the most critical factor for scaling-up MFCs to obtain high power densities. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Study of CO2 recovery in a carbonate fuel cell tri-generation plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Giorgio; McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Lanzini, Andrea; Santarelli, Massimo

    2015-06-01

    The possibility of separating and recovering CO2 in a biogas plant that co-produces electricity, hydrogen, and heat is investigated. Exploiting the ability of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) to concentrate CO2 in the anode exhaust stream reduces the energy consumption and complexity of CO2 separation techniques that would otherwise be required to remove dilute CO2 from combustion exhaust streams. Three potential CO2 concentrating configurations are numerically simulated to evaluate potential CO2 recovery rates: 1) anode oxidation and partial CO2 recirculation, 2) integration with exhaust from an internal combustion engine, and 3) series connection of molten carbonate cathodes initially fed with internal combustion engine (ICE) exhaust. Physical models have been calibrated with data acquired from an operating MCFC tri-generating plant. Results illustrate a high compatibility between hydrogen co-production and CO2 recovery with series connection of molten carbonate systems offering the best results for efficient CO2 recovery. In this case the carbon capture ratio (CCR) exceeds 73% for two systems in series and 90% for 3 MCFC in series. This remarkably high carbon recovery is possible with 1.4 MWe delivered by the ICE system and 0.9 MWe and about 350 kg day-1 of H2 delivered by the three MCFC.

  15. Two-stage pretreatment of excess sludge for electricity generation in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Yang-Guo; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2018-01-12

    Thermophiles hydrolysis and acidogens fermentation were sequentially adopted to pretreat excess sludge for microbial fuel cell (MFC) electricity production. The results indicated that MFC fed with the thermophiles-acidogens pretreated sludge (MFC AB), reached a higher removal of ammonia nitrogen than the MFC fed with the heating hydrolysis and acidogens fermentation pretreated sludge (MFC NB). However, compared with the MFC AB, MFC NB presented a better performance for removal of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) (90.08%) and protein (82.42%). As for the electricity production, MFC NB obtained higher voltage of 0.632 V and maximum power density with 1.05 W/m3 while MFC AB reached maximum voltage of 0.373 V and maximum power density of 0.58 W/m3. Bacterial 16S rRNA-based molecular microbial techniques showed that microbial communities on both MFC anode biofilms was diverse and different. The cooperation of fermentation bacteria and electricigen Shewanella baltica in the MFC NB may have contributed towards the improvement of electricity generation.

  16. Electricity generation and brewery wastewater treatment from sequential anode-cathode microbial fuel cell*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Wu, Ying; Zhao, Li-xin; Sun, Qian; Kong, Fan-ying

    2010-01-01

    A sequential anode-cathode double-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC), in which the effluent of anode chamber was used as a continuous feed for an aerated cathode chamber, was constructed in this experiment to investigate the performance of brewery wastewater treatment in conjugation with electricity generation. Carbon fiber was used as anode and plain carbon felt with biofilm as cathode. When hydraulic retention time (HRT) was 14.7 h, a relatively high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 91.7%–95.7% was achieved under long-term stable operation. The MFC displayed an open circuit voltage of 0.434 V and a maximum power density of 830 mW/m3 at an external resistance of 300 Ω. To estimate the electrochemical performance of the MFC, electrochemical measurements were carried out and showed that polarization resistance of anode was the major limiting factor in the MFC. Since a high COD removal efficiency was achieved, we conclude that the sequential anode-cathode MFC constructed with bio-cathode in this experiment could provide a new approach for brewery wastewater treatment. PMID:20104642

  17. Minimization of Fuel Costs and Gaseous Emissions of Electric Power Generation by Model Predictive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Elaiw

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a model predictive control (MPC approach for the periodic implementation of the optimal solutions of two optimal dynamic dispatch problems with emission and transmission line losses. The first problem is the dynamic economic emission dispatch (DEED which is a multiobjective optimization problem which minimizes both fuel cost and pollutants emission simultaneously under a set of constraints. The second one is the profit-based dynamic economic emission dispatch (PBDEED which is also a multi-objective optimization problem which maximizes the profit and minimizes the emission simultaneously under a set of constraints. Both the demand and energy price are assumed to be periodic and the total transmission loss is assumed to be a quadratic function of the generator power outputs. We assume that there are certain disturbances or uncertainties in the execution of the optimal controller and in the forecasted demand. The convergence and robustness of the MPC algorithm are demonstrated through the application of MPC to the DEED and PBDEED problems with five-unit and six-unit test systems, respectively.

  18. Fabrication of stainless steel mesh gas diffusion electrode for power generation in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shi-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Heng; Zhang, Jin-Na; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Ren, Nan-Qi; Gong, Xiao-Bo

    2011-01-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a new membrane electrode assembly by using stainless steel mesh (SSM) as raw material and its effectiveness as gas diffusion electrode (GDE) for electrochemical oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC). Based on feeding glucose (0.5 g L(-1)) substrate to a single-chambered MFC, power generation using SSM-based GDE was increased with the decrease of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) content applied during fabrication, reaching the optimum power density of 951.6 mW m(-2) at 20% PTFE. Repeatable cell voltage of 0.51 V (external resistance of 400 Ω) and maximum power density of 951.6 mW m(-2) produced for the MFC with SSM-based GDE are comparable to that of 0.52 V and 972.6 mW m(-2), respectively obtained for the MFC containing typical carbon cloth (CC)-made GDE. Besides, Coulombic efficiency (CE) is found higher for GDE (SSM or CC) with membrane assembly than without, which results preliminarily from the mitigation of Coulombic loss being associated with oxygen diffusion and substrate crossover. This study demonstrates that with its good electrical conductivity and much lower cost, the SSM-made GDE suggests a promising alternative as efficient and more economically viable material to conventional typical carbon for power production from biomass in MFC. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electricity Generation From Synthetic Wastewater in a Laboratory Scale Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Kılıç

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, natural energy sources were exhausted with developing technology in all of the world. This problem caused to increase scientific researches that intensified to find new alternative energy sources. One of the these new alternative energy sources is microbial fuel cells (MFC. MFCs have been studied for sustainable enegry generation and wastewater treatment technology. MFC is a system that can convert chemical energy in organic matters to electric energy directly. In MFC system, wastewater is also treated together with energy production. Unlike a conventional bioreactor, MFCs consist of compartments or elements for electrochemical reactions, including an anode chamber, a cathode and often an ion exchange membrane. Microorganisms grown as attached to carbon electrode in anode chamber oxidizes organics in wastewater and converts to H+ ions and electrones. In the literature, several reactor types are developed in different researches. In this study, a laboratory scale reactor (kubic type-KMFC is used for electricity production and also organic removal. Synthetic wastewater was used in the reactor and energy production was measured together with COD removal efficiencies.

  20. Electricity generation of single-chamber microbial fuel cells at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment will require operation of these systems over a wide range of wastewater temperatures. MFCs at room or higher temperatures (20-35°C) are relatively well studied compared those at lower temperatures. MFC performance was examined here over a temperature range of 4-30°C in terms of startup time needed for reproducible power cycles, and performance. MFCs initially operated at 15°C or higher all attained a reproducible cycles of power generation, but the startup time to reach stable operation increased from 50h at 30°C to 210h at 15°C. At temperatures below 15°C, MFCs did not produce appreciable power even after one month of operation. If an MFC was first started up at temperature of 30°C, however, reproducible cycles of power generation could then be achieved at even the two lowest temperatures of 4°C and 10°C. Power production increased linearly with temperature at a rate of 33±4mW°C-1, from 425±2mWm-2 at 4°C to 1260±10mWm-2 at 30°C. Coulombic efficiency decreased by 45% over this same temperature range, or from CE=31% at 4°C to CE=17% at 30°C. These results demonstrate that MFCs can effectively be operated over a wide range of temperatures, but our findings have important implications for the startup of larger scale reactors where low wastewater temperatures could delay or prevent adequate startup of the system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  1. Fiscal 2000 survey of refuse-fueled power generation introduction technology, etc. Survey of industrial refuse-fueled power generation (Industrial refuse-fueled power generation case study implementation - 1); 2000 nendo chosa haikibutsu hatsuden donyu gijutsu chosa to - Sangyo haikibutsu hatsuden chosa (Sangyo haikibutsu hatsuden case study no jisshi - 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Case studies were conducted of industrial refuse-fueled power generation using plastic waste, paper waste, and wood chips, and the same using the excretions of cattle. In the study of power generation fueled by mixed waste containing plastic waste, 325t/d, 220t/d, and 130t/d incinerators having the lower calorific value of 5,960-6,401 kcal/kg were taken up, and steam conditions, generator output, generating-end efficiency, station service power ratio, sending-end efficiency, etc., were tentatively calculated. As for cost efficiency, a manufacturer's estimate indicated that commercialization would be impossible in all the cases unless the construction cost was cut down. In the study of excretion-fueled power generation, cases were taken up where medium-temperature fermentation proceeded for the excretions of 620-29,853 dairy cows (32-1,576 t/d). A calculation was performed on conditions that the construction cost and maintenance/utility costs were as estimated by the manufacturer, that the excretion treatment and power generation facilities were covered by subsidies, and that personnel expenses of 6-million yen were necessary. It was then found that there would be commercial viability in case the yield was 790t/d or higher. (NEDO)

  2. Electricity generation from palm oil tree empty fruit bunch (EFB) using dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, N. F.; Mahmood, N. A. B. N.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Muhammad, S. A. F. S.; Amalina, N. S.

    2017-06-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been discovered and utilized in laboratory scale for electricity production based on microbial degradation of organic compound. However, various source of fuel has been tested and recently complex biomass such as lignocellulose biomass has been focused on. In the present research, oil palm tree empty fruit bunch (EFB) has been tested for power production using dual chamber MFC and power generation analysis has been conducted to address the performance of MFC. In addition, two microorganisms (electric harvesting microbe and cellulose degrading microbe) were used in the MFC operation. The analysis include voltage produced, calculated current and power. The first section in your paper

  3. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  4. Benchmarking the expected stack manufacturing cost of next generation, intermediate-temperature protonic ceramic fuel cells with solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alexis; Ricote, Sandrine; Braun, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    Recent progress in the performance of intermediate temperature (500-600 °C) protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs) has demonstrated both fuel flexibility and increasing power density that approach commercial application requirements. These developments may eventually position the technology as a viable alternative to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The PCFCs investigated in this work are based on a BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY20) thin electrolyte supported by BZY20/Ni porous anodes, and a triple conducting cathode material comprised of BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-δ (BCFZY0.1). These cells are prepared using a low-cost solid-state reactive sintering (SSRS) process, and are capable of power densities of 0.156 W cm-2 at 500 °C operating directly from methane fuel. We develop a manufacturing cost model to estimate the Nth generation production costs of PCFC stack technology using high volume manufacturing processes and compare them to the state-of-the-art in SOFC technology. The low-cost cell manufacturing enabled by the SSRS technique compensates for the lower PCFC power density and the trade-off between operating temperature and efficiency enables the use of lower-cost stainless steel materials. PCFC stack production cost estimates are found to be as much as 27-37% lower at 550 °C than SOFCs operating at 800 °C.

  5. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  6. Driving cycle characterization and generation, for design and control of fuel cell buses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bruinsma; Bram Veenhuizen; P. van den Bosch; Edwin Tazelaar

    2009-01-01

    Optimization routines for battery, supercap and fuel cell stack in a fuel cell based propulsion system face two problems: the tendency to cycle beating and the necessity to maintain identical amounts of stored energy in battery and supercap at the start and end of the driving cycle used in the

  7. Generator module architecture for a large solid oxide fuel cell power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Riggle, Matthew W.; Litzinger, Kevin P.

    2013-06-11

    A solid oxide fuel cell module contains a plurality of integral bundle assemblies, the module containing a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion receiving air inlet feed and containing a base support, the base supports dense, ceramic exhaust manifolds which are below and connect to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the fuel cells comprise a fuel cell stack bundle all surrounded within an outer module enclosure having top power leads to provide electrical output from the stack bundle, where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all 100% of the weight of the stack, and each bundle assembly has its own control for vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control.

  8. Simultaneous processes of electricity generation and ceftriaxone sodium degradation in an air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Kong, Fanying; Zheng, Hongtao; Yin, Jinling; Cao, Dianxue; Ren, Yueming; Wang, Guiling

    2011-03-01

    A single chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an air-cathode is successfully demonstrated using glucose-ceftriaxone sodium mixtures or ceftriaxone sodium as fuel. Results show that the ceftriaxone sodium can be biodegraded and produce electricity simultaneously. Interestingly, these ceftriaxone sodium-glucose mixtures play an active role in production of electricity. The maximum power density is increased in comparison to 1000 mg L-1 glucose (19 W m-3) by 495% for 50 mg L-1 ceftriaxone sodium + 1000 mg L-1 glucose (113 W m-3), while the maximum power density is 11 W m-3 using 50 mg L-1 ceftriaxone sodium as the sole fuel. Moreover, ceftriaxone sodium biodegradation rate reaches 91% within 24 h using the MFC in comparison with 51% using the traditional anaerobic reactor. These results indicate that some toxic and bio-refractory organics such as antibiotic wastewater might be suitable resources for electricity generation using the MFC technology.

  9. OPTIM: Computer program to generate a vertical profile which minimizes aircraft fuel burn or direct operating cost. User's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A profile of altitude, airspeed, and flight path angle as a function of range between a given set of origin and destination points for particular models of transport aircraft provided by NASA is generated. Inputs to the program include the vertical wind profile, the aircraft takeoff weight, the costs of time and fuel, certain constraint parameters and control flags. The profile can be near optimum in the sense of minimizing: (1) fuel, (2) time, or (3) a combination of fuel and time (direct operating cost (DOC)). The user can also, as an option, specify the length of time the flight is to span. The theory behind the technical details of this program is also presented.

  10. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-12-15

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

  11. Next Generation Safeguards Initiative research to determine the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies: Purpose, approach, constraints, implementation, and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Schear, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy has funded a multi-lab/multi-university collaboration to quantify the plutonium mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins from them. The goal of this research effort is to quantify the capability of various non-destructive assay (NDA) technologies as well as to train a future generation of safeguards practitioners. This research is "technology driven" in the sense that we will quantify the capabilities of a wide range of safeguards technologies of interest to regulators and policy makers; a key benefit to this approach is that the techniques are being tested in a unified manner. When the results of the Monte Carlo modeling are evaluated and integrated, practical constraints are part of defining the potential context in which a given technology might be applied. This paper organizes the commercial spent fuel safeguard needs into four facility types in order to identify any constraints on the NDA system design. These four facility types are the following: future reprocessing plants, current reprocessing plants, once-through spent fuel repositories, and any other sites that store individual spent fuel assemblies (reactor sites are the most common facility type in this category). Dry storage is not of interest since individual assemblies are not accessible. This paper will overview the purpose and approach of the NGSI spent fuel effort and describe the constraints inherent in commercial fuel facilities. It will conclude by discussing implementation and calibration of measurement systems. This report will also provide some motivation for considering a couple of other safeguards concepts (base measurement and fingerprinting) that might meet the safeguards need but not require the determination of plutonium mass.

  12. Concurrent Phosphorus Recovery and Energy Generation in Mediator-Less Dual Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells: Mechanisms and Influencing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Almatouq

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the mechanism and key factors influencing concurrent phosphorus (P recovery and energy generation in microbial fuel cells (MFC during wastewater treatment. Using a mediator-less dual chamber microbial fuel cell operated for 120 days; P was shown to precipitate as struvite when ammonium and magnesium chloride solutions were added to the cathode chamber. Monitoring data for chemical oxygen demand (COD, pH, oxidation reduction potential (ORP and aeration flow rate showed that a maximum 38% P recovery was achieved; and this corresponds to 1.5 g/L, pH > 8, −550 ± 10 mV and 50 mL/min respectively, for COD, pHcathode, ORP and cathode aeration flow rate. More importantly, COD and aeration flow rate were shown to be the key influencing factors for the P recovery and energy generation. Results further show that the maximum P recovery corresponds to 72 mW/m2 power density. However, the energy generated at maximum P recovery was not the optimum; this shows that whilst P recovery and energy generation can be concurrently achieved in a microbial fuel cell, neither can be at the optimal value.

  13. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  14. Assessment of indoor pollutants generated from bio and synthetic fuels in selected villages of Burdwan, West Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, N K; Bhaumik, R; Das, C R; Aditya, P; Datta, J K; Banerjee, A; Das, K

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to access the pollutant generated from bio-fuels like bamboo sticks, cow dung, paddy straw, carbon dust cake, gobar gas, jute stick, and mustard stick and synthetic fuel like LPG during cooking in rural villages of Burdwan, West Bengal, India and its fluctuation in living room. The average SO2 released from the fuels was found in the following order: bamboo stick > cow dung > paddy straw > carbon cake > gobar gas > jute stick > LPG > mustard stick; NO2 emission was in the following order : mustard stick > carbon dust cake > paddy straw > cow dung cake > LPG, jute stick > gobar gas > bamboo stick > and SPM was obtained in the following sequence: cow dung cake > bamboo stick > carbon dust cake > gobar gas > LPG > mustard stick > paddy straw > jute stick, respectively. The highest living room to kitchen room (L/K) ratio of SO2, NO, and SPM was found in LPG, gobar gas, jute stick respectively in 2009 and followed by bamboo stick > paddy straw > jute stick > cow dung cake, respectively in 2010. Results of this study suggest that different fuels released different amount of air pollutants, but more extensive study is needed to confirm the relationship between fuels and released air pollutants.

  15. Evaluation of the impacts of biodiesel and second generation biofuels on NO(x) emissions for CARB diesel fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajbabaei, Maryam; Johnson, Kent C; Okamoto, Robert A; Mitchell, Alexander; Pullman, Marcie; Durbin, Thomas D

    2012-08-21

    The impact of biodiesel and second generation biofuels on nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) emissions from heavy-duty engines was investigated using a California Air Resources Board (CARB) certified diesel fuel. Two heavy-duty engines, a 2006 engine with no exhaust aftertreatment, and a 2007 engine with a diesel particle filter (DPF), were tested on an engine dynamometer over four different test cycles. Emissions from soy- and animal-based biodiesels, a hydrotreated renewable diesel, and a gas to liquid (GTL) fuel were evaluated at blend levels from 5 to 100%. NO(x) emissions consistently increased with increasing biodiesel blend level, while increasing renewable diesel and GTL blends showed NO(x) emissions reductions with blend level. NO(x) increases ranged from 1.5% to 6.9% for B20, 6.4% to 18.2% for B50, and 14.1% to 47.1% for B100. The soy-biodiesel showed higher NO(x) emissions increases compared to the animal-biodiesel. NO(x) emissions neutrality with the CARB diesel was achieved by blending GTL or renewable diesel fuels with various levels of biodiesel or by using di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP). It appears that the impact of biodiesel on NO(x) emissions might be a more important consideration when blended with CARB diesel or similar fuels, and that some form of NO(x) mitigation might be needed for biodiesel blends with such fuels.

  16. Fossil fuel-fired power generation. Case studies of recently constructed coal- and gas-fired plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, C. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-23

    To meet future energy demand growth and replace older or inefficient units, a large number of fossil fuel-fired plants will be required to be built worldwide in the next decade. Yet CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fired power generation are a major contributor to climate change. As a result, new plants must be designed and operated at highest efficiency both to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and to facilitate deployment of CO{sub 2} capture and storage in the future. The series of case studies in this report, which respond to a request to the IEA from the G8 Summit in July 2005, were conducted to illustrate what efficiency is achieved now in modern plants in different parts of the world using different grades of fossil fuels. The plants were selected from different geographical areas, because local factors influence attainable efficiency. The case studies include pulverized coal combustion (PCC) with both subcritical and supercritical (very high pressure and temperature) steam turbine cycles, a review of current and future applications of coal-fuelled integrated gasification combined cycle plants (IGCC), and a case study of a natural gas fired combined cycle plant to facilitate comparisons. The results of these analyses show that the technologies for high efficiency (low CO{sub 2} emission) and very low conventional pollutant emissions (particulates, SO{sub 2}, NOx) from fossil fuel-fired power generation are available now through PCC, IGCC or NGCC at commercially acceptable cost. This report contains comprehensive technical and indicative cost information for modern fossil fuel-fired plants that was previously unavailable. It serves as a valuable sourcebook for policy makers and technical decision makers contemplating decisions to build new fossil fuel-fired power generation plants.

  17. Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator for Maximum Power Output in Micro-CHP Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse; Mortensen, Paw Vestergård; Enkeshafi, Ali A.

    2011-01-01

    and market segments which are not yet quantified. This paper quantifies a micro-CHP system based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a high-performance TE generator. Based on a 3 kW fuel input, the hybrid SOFC implementation boosts electrical output from 945 W to 1085 W, with 1794 W available for heating......One of the most obvious early market applications for thermoelectric generators (TEG) is decentralized micro combined heat and power (CHP) installations of 0.5 kWe to 5 kWe based on fuel cell technology. Through the use of TEG technology for waste heat recovery it is possible to increase...... the electricity production in micro-CHP systems by more than 15%, corresponding to system electrical efficiency increases of some 4 to 5 percentage points. This will make fuel cell-based micro-CHP systems very competitive and profitable and will also open opportunities in a number of other potential business...

  18. Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator for Maximum Power Output in Micro-CHP Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosendahl, L. A.; Mortensen, Paw V.; Enkeshafi, Ali A.

    2011-05-01

    One of the most obvious early market applications for thermoelectric generators (TEG) is decentralized micro combined heat and power (CHP) installations of 0.5 kWe to 5 kWe based on fuel cell technology. Through the use of TEG technology for waste heat recovery it is possible to increase the electricity production in micro-CHP systems by more than 15%, corresponding to system electrical efficiency increases of some 4 to 5 percentage points. This will make fuel cell-based micro-CHP systems very competitive and profitable and will also open opportunities in a number of other potential business and market segments which are not yet quantified. This paper quantifies a micro-CHP system based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a high-performance TE generator. Based on a 3 kW fuel input, the hybrid SOFC implementation boosts electrical output from 945 W to 1085 W, with 1794 W available for heating purposes.

  19. A novel pilot-scale stacked microbial fuel cell for efficient electricity generation and wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Xuechen; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Xia

    2016-07-01

    A novel stacked microbial fuel cell (MFC) which had a total volume of 72 L with granular activated carbon (GAC) packed bed electrodes was constructed and verified to present remarkable power generation and COD removal performance due to its advantageous design of stack and electrode configuration. During the fed-batch operation period, a power density of 50.9 ± 1.7 W/m(3) and a COD removal efficiency of 97% were achieved within 48 h. Because of the differences among MFC modules in the stack, reversal current occurred in parallel circuit connection with high external resistances (>100 Ω). This reversal current consequently reduced the electrochemical performance of some MFC modules and led to a lower power density in parallel circuit connection than that in independent circuit connection. While increasing the influent COD concentrations from 200 to 800 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 1.25 h in continuous operation mode, the power density of stacked MFC increased from 25.6 ± 2.5 to 42.1 ± 1.2 W/m(3) and the COD removal rates increased from 1.3 to 5.2 kg COD/(m(3) d). This study demonstrated that this novel MFC stack configuration coupling with GAC packed bed electrode could be a feasible strategy to effectively scale up MFC systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cells, SOFC, in future power generation; Fastoxidbraensleceller, SOFC, i framtida kraftgenerering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Kent; Baafaelt, M.

    1997-02-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, SOFC, is a very promising technological area for generating electricity in the future. Especially for small scale cogeneration. SOFC is an excellent choice due to its high efficiencies at small power plant sizes. The expected size of the power plants is 10-20 MWe but larger ones might be built. An important part of the assumptions in this report is the SOFC electric efficiency dependence of the pressure in the process. The electric efficiency is assumed to be 50% at atmospheric pressure and 55% at 10 atmospheres. These assumptions lead to a formula that describes the electric efficiency as a function of the pressure. The parametric study shows that the pressure has a very large influence of the electric efficiency. At low pressure and high Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) the electric efficiency will be higher than at high pressure and low TIT. The post intercooler temperature and the pressure drop over the SOFC unit have a moderate effect on the electric efficiency. In the process calculations the TIT is shown to have a very small influence on the plant efficiencies. Consequently, by lowering the TIT, the need for blade cooling and tougher materials can be avoided, with only a small electric efficiency decrease. The recuperator is a central part of the process. It evens out the influence from other parts in the process. This is one of the reasons why the polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and the expander have such a low influence on the process efficiency. The report shows that to receive high efficiencies in a SOFC/GT power plant, the points mentioned below should be taken into consideration: The pressure in the process should be approximately 4 bar; The compressor should have an intercooler; The TIT should be below the temperature where blade cooling is needed; No steam cycle should be connected after the gas turbine at sizes of 5-20 MW. 32 refs, 67 figs, 9 tabs, 15 appendices

  1. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  2. Performance Improvement of a Portable Electric Generator Using an Optimized Bio-Fuel Ratio in a Single Cylinder Two-Stroke Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Hiroaki

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of an electrical generator using bio-fuel and gasoline blends of different composition as fuel in a single cylinder engine is presented. The effect of an optimized blend ratio of bio-fuel with gasoline on engine performance improvement and thereby on the electrical generator output is studied. Bio-fuels such as ethanol, butanol and methanol are blended with gasoline in different proportions and evaluated for performance. The effects of different bio-fuel/gasoline blending ratios are compared experimentally with that of the gasoline alone using the output power developed by the electric generator as the evaluation parameter. With a composition of 10% ethanol–gasoline, the engine performance is increased up to 6% and with a blending ratio of 20% butanol–gasoline the performance is increased up to 8% compared to the use of 100% gasoline. The investigations are performed on a portable generator used in palm tree harvesting applications.

  3. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Professor of. Computer Science and. Automation at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His research interests are broadly in the areas of stochastic modeling and scheduling methodologies for future factories; and object oriented modeling. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Petri Nets. 1. Overview and Foundations.

  4. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Petri Nets - Overview and Foundations. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department ot Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  5. Policy schemes, operational strategies and system integration of residential co-generation fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise-Lotte Pade; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Münster, Marie

    2013-01-01

    a heat-driven strategy, with and without time-differentiated tariffs, and an electricity price driven strategy for the operation as a virtual power plant. The corresponding support schemes identified cover feed-in tariffs, net metering and feed-in premiums. Additionally, the interplay of the micro......CHP units with the national energy systems has been analysed. Our main findings are that net metering would be an appropriate tool to support FC based microCHP in Denmark, whereas a price premium would be the preferable tool in France and Portugal. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC...

  6. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  7. Traction Power Converter for PEM Fuel Cell Multi-Stack Generator

    OpenAIRE

    VULTURESCU, B; DE-BERNARDINIS, A; LALLEMAND, R; COQUERY, G

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the study, based on technical specifications, of a power converter structure candidate to fuel cell multi-stack association for urban transport applications. This study is carried out in the frame of the French SPACT-80 research project. The converter topology is based on a DC-DC 3-phase IGBT interleaved boost converter which should meet the following relevant criteria: high efficiency, redundancy, minimisation of fuel cell current ripple, compactness, fault handling and s...

  8. Development of Membraneless Sodium Perborate Fuel Cell for Media Flexible Power Generation

    OpenAIRE

    K. Ponmani; Durga, S.; Arun, A.; S. Kiruthika; B. Muthukumaran

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the media flexibility of membraneless sodium perborate fuel cell (MLSPBFC) using acid/alkaline bipolar electrolyte in which the anode is in acidic media while the cathode is in alkaline media, or vice versa. Investigation of the cell operation is conducted by using formic acid as a fuel and sodium perborate as an oxidant for the first time under “acid-alkaline media” configurations. The MLSPBFC architecture enables interchangeable operation with different media combinations...

  9. Communicating with the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    minimizes viral attacks but significant threats still remain that need to be defended against. 60 17 Smartphones, particularly iPhones and Android ...security measures to safeguard smart phones from Blended Attacks, worms and viruses, and Peer-to-Peer applications where adversaries gain access to...military App Store for Android , 3G for battlefields,‖ Syfy Network online, March 4, 2010, http://dvice.com/archives/2010/03/darpa-wants-mil.php, (accessed

  10. Challenges and opportunities associated with the introduction of next-generation long-lasting insecticidal nets for malaria control: a case study from Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfazghi, Kemi; Traore, Adama; Ranson, Hilary; N'Fale, Sagnon; Hill, Jenny; Worrall, Eve

    2016-07-22

    Reductions in malaria incidence in Africa can largely be attributed to increases in malaria vector control activities; predominately the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). With insecticide resistance affecting an increasing number of malaria-endemic countries and threatening the effectiveness of conventional LLINs, there is an increasing urgency to implement alternative tools that control these resistant populations. The aim of this study was to identify potential challenges and opportunities for accelerating access to next-generation LLINs in Burkina Faso, a country with areas of high levels of insecticide resistance. An analytical framework was used to guide the selection of interviewees, data collection and analysis. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with key informants in April 2014 in Burkina Faso. Interviews were conducted in French and English, audio recorded, transcribed and entered into NVivo 10 for data management and analysis. Data were coded according to the framework themes and then analysed to provide a description of the key points and explain patterns in the data. Interviewees reported that the policy architecture in Burkina Faso is characterised by a strong framework of actors that contribute to policymaking and strong national research capacity which indirectly contributes to national policy change via collaboration with internationally led research. Financing significantly impacts the potential adoption, availability and affordability of next-generation LLINs. This confers significant power on international donors that fund vector control. National decisions around which LLINs to procure were restricted to quantity and delivery dates; the potential to tackle insecticide resistance was not part of the decision-making process. Furthermore, at the time of the study, there was no World Health Organization (WHO) guidance on where and when next-generation LLINs might positively impact on malaria transmission, severely limiting

  11. Sustainable power generation from floating macrophytes based ecological microenvironment through embedded fuel cells along with simultaneous wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata Mohan, S; Mohanakrishna, G; Chiranjeevi, P

    2011-07-01

    Miniatured floating macrophyte based ecosystem (FME) designed with Eichornia as the major biota was evaluated for bioelectricity generation and wastewater treatment. Three fuel cell assemblies (non-catalyzed electrodes) embedded in FME were evaluated with domestic sewage and fermented distillery wastewater in continuous mode for 210 days. Fermented distillery effluents from biohydrogen production (dark-fermentation) process exhibited effective power generation with simultaneous waste remediation. Two fuel cell assemblies (A1 and A2) showed effective bioelectricity generation. Increasing the organic load of wastewater showed good correlation with both power generation (A1, 211.14 mA/m(2); A2, 224.93 mA/m(2)) and wastewater treatment (COD removal, 86.67% and VFA removal 72.32%). Combining A1 and A2 assemblies depicted stabilized performance with respect to current and voltage along with significant decrease in ohmic and activation losses. FME also exhibited effective removal of nitrates, colour and turbidity from wastewater. The studied miniatured ecological system facilitates both energy generation and wastewater treatment with a sustainable perspective. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ensuring Reliable Natural Gas-Fired Generation with Fuel Contracts and Storage - DOE/NETL-2017/1816

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myles, Paul T. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Labarbara, Kirk A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Logan, Cecilia Elise [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2017-11-17

    This report finds that natural gas-fired power plants purchase fuel both on the spot market and through firm supply contracts; there do not appear to be clear drivers propelling power plants toward one or the other type. Most natural gas-fired power generators are located near major natural gas transmission pipelines, and most natural gas contracts are currently procured on the spot market. Although there is some regional variation in the type of contract used, a strong regional pattern does not emerge. Whether gas prices are higher with spot or firm contracts varies by both region and year. Natural gas prices that push the generators higher in the supply curve would make them less likely to dispatch. Most of the natural gas generators discussed in this report would be unlikely to enter firm contracts if the agreed price would decrease their dispatch frequency. The price points at which these generators would be unlikely to enter a firm contract depends upon the region that the generator is in, and how dependent that region is on natural gas. The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) is more dependent on natural gas than either Eastern Interconnection or Western Interconnection. This report shows that above-ground storage is prohibitively expensive with respect to providing storage for an extended operational fuel reserve comparable to the amount of on-site fuel storage used for coal-fired plants. Further, both pressurized and atmospheric tanks require a significant amount of land for storage, even to support one day’s operation at full output. Underground storage offers the only viable option for 30-day operational storage of natural gas, and that is limited by the location of suitable geologic formations and depleted fields.

  13. Reference Guide Microsoft.NET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee M van der; Verspaij GJ; Rosbergen S; IMP; NMD

    2003-01-01

    Developers, administrators and managers can get more understanding of the .NET technology with this report. They can also make better choices how to use this technology. The report describes the results and conclusions of a study of the usability for the RIVM of this new generation .NET development

  14. Application of Thermoelectric Devices to Fuel Cell Power Generation: Demonstration and Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huston, John; Wyatt, Chris; Nichols, Chris; Binder, Michael J; Holcomb, Franklin H

    2004-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) is concerned with reliable and cost-effective power generation of on-site power generators as well as minimizing the environment impact of these generators. Thermoelectric (TE...

  15. Development of Membraneless Sodium Perborate Fuel Cell for Media Flexible Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ponmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the media flexibility of membraneless sodium perborate fuel cell (MLSPBFC using acid/alkaline bipolar electrolyte in which the anode is in acidic media while the cathode is in alkaline media, or vice versa. Investigation of the cell operation is conducted by using formic acid as a fuel and sodium perborate as an oxidant for the first time under “acid-alkaline media” configurations. The MLSPBFC architecture enables interchangeable operation with different media combinations. The experimental results indicate that operating under “acid-alkaline media” conditions significantly improves the fuel cell performance compared with all-acidic and all-alkaline conditions. The effects of flow rates and the concentrations of various species at both the anode and cathode on the cell performance are also investigated. It has been demonstrated that the laminar flow based microfluidic membraneless fuel cell can reach a maximum power density of 28.2 mW cm−2 with a fuel mixture flow rate of 0.3 mL min−1 at room temperature.

  16. Advanced chemical hydride-based hydrogen generation/storage system for fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breault, R.W.; Rolfe, J. [Thermo Power Corp., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Because of the inherent advantages of high efficiency, environmental acceptability, and high modularity, fuel cells are potentially attractive power supplies. Worldwide concerns over clean environments have revitalized research efforts on developing fuel cell vehicles (FCV). As a result of intensive research efforts, most of the subsystem technology for FCV`s are currently well established. These include: high power density PEM fuel cells, control systems, thermal management technology, and secondary power sources for hybrid operation. For mobile applications, however, supply of hydrogen or fuel for fuel cell operation poses a significant logistic problem. To supply high purity hydrogen for FCV operation, Thermo Power`s Advanced Technology Group is developing an advanced hydrogen storage technology. In this approach, a metal hydride/organic slurry is used as the hydrogen carrier and storage media. At the point of use, high purity hydrogen will be produced by reacting the metal hydride/organic slurry with water. In addition, Thermo Power has conceived the paths for recovery and regeneration of the spent hydride (practically metal hydroxide). The fluid-like nature of the spent hydride/organic slurry will provide a unique opportunity for pumping, transporting, and storing these materials. The final product of the program will be a user-friendly and relatively high energy storage density hydrogen supply system for fuel cell operation. In addition, the spent hydride can relatively easily be collected at the pumping station and regenerated utilizing renewable sources, such as biomass, natural, or coal, at the central processing plants. Therefore, the entire process will be economically favorable and environmentally friendly.

  17. Long-Term Hydrocarbon Trade Options for the Maghreb Region and Europe—Renewable Energy Based Synthetic Fuels for a Net Zero Emissions World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Fasihi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about climate change and increasing emission costs are drivers for new sources of fuels for Europe. Sustainable hydrocarbons can be produced synthetically by power-to-gas (PtG and power-to-liquids (PtL facilities, for sectors with low direct electrification such as aviation, heavy transportation and chemical industry. Hybrid PV–Wind power plants can harvest high solar and wind potentials of the Maghreb region to power these systems. This paper calculates the cost of these fuels for Europe, and presents a respective business case for the Maghreb region. Calculations are hourly resolved to find the least cost combination of technologies in a 0.45° × 0.45° spatial resolution. Results show that, for 7% weighted average cost of capital (WACC, renewable energy based synthetic natural gas (RE-SNG and RE-diesel can be produced in 2030 for a minimum cost of 76 €/MWhHHV (0.78 €/m3SNG and 88 €/MWhHHV (0.85 €/L, respectively. While in 2040, these production costs can drop to 66 €/MWhHHV (0.68 €/m3SNG and 83 €/MWhHHV (0.80 €/L, respectively. Considering access to a WACC of 5% in a de-risking project, oxygen sales and CO2 emissions costs, RE-diesel can reach fuel-parity at crude oil prices of 101 and 83 USD/bbl in 2030 and 2040, respectively. Thus, RE-synthetic fuels could be produced to answer fuel demand and remove environmental concerns in Europe at an affordable cost.

  18. Bio-electrochemical treatment of distillery wastewater in microbial fuel cell facilitating decolorization and desalination along with power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanakrishna, G; Venkata Mohan, S; Sarma, P N

    2010-05-15

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC; open-air cathode) was evaluated as bio-electrochemical treatment system for distillery wastewater during bioelectricity generation. MFC was operated at three substrate loading conditions in fed-batch mode under acidophilic (pH 6) condition using anaerobic consortia as anodic-biocatalyst. Current visualized marked improvement with increase in substrate load without any process inhibition (2.12-2.48mA). Apart from electricity generation, MFC documented efficient treatment of distillery wastewater and illustrated its function as an integrated wastewater treatment system by simultaneously removing multiple pollutants. Fuel cell operation yielded enhanced substrate degradation (COD, 72.84%) compared to the fermentation process ( approximately 29.5% improvement). Interestingly due to treatment in MFC, considerable reduction in color (31.67%) of distillery wastewater was also observed as against color intensification normally observed due to re-polymerization in corresponding anaerobic process. Good reduction in total dissolved solids (TDS, 23.96%) was also noticed due to fuel cell operation, which is generally not amenable in biological treatment. The simultaneous removal of multiple pollutants observed in distillery wastewater might be attributed to the biologically catalyzed electrochemical reactions occurring in the anodic chamber of MFC mediated by anaerobic substrate metabolism. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. SARAPAN—A Simulated-Annealing-Based Tool to Generate Random Patterned-Channel-Age in CANDU Fuel Management Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doddy Kastanya

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In any reactor physics analysis, the instantaneous power distribution in the core can be calculated when the actual bundle-wise burnup distribution is known. Considering the fact that CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium utilizes on-power refueling to compensate for the reduction of reactivity due to fuel burnup, in the CANDU fuel management analysis, snapshots of power and burnup distributions can be obtained by simulating and tracking the reactor operation over an extended period using various tools such as the *SIMULATE module of the Reactor Fueling Simulation Program (RFSP code. However, for some studies, such as an evaluation of a conceptual design of a next-generation CANDU reactor, the preferred approach to obtain a snapshot of the power distribution in the core is based on the patterned-channel-age model implemented in the *INSTANTAN module of the RFSP code. The objective of this approach is to obtain a representative snapshot of core conditions quickly. At present, such patterns could be generated by using a program called RANDIS, which is implemented within the *INSTANTAN module. In this work, we present an alternative approach to derive the patterned-channel-age model where a simulated-annealing-based algorithm is used to find such patterns, which produce reasonable power distributions.

  20. A comparison between fuel cells and other alternatives for marine electric power generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousri M.A. Welaya

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The world is facing a challenge in meeting its needs for energy. Global energy consumption in the last half-century has increased very rapidly and is expected to continue to grow over the next 50 years. However, it is expected to see significant differences between the last 50 years and the next. This paper aims at introducing a good solution to replace or work with conventional marine power plants. This includes the use of fuel cell power plant operated with hydrogen produced through water electrolysis or hydrogen produced from natural gas, gasoline, or diesel fuels through steam reforming processes to mitigate air pollution from ships.

  1. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  2. Cogeneration and production of 2nd generation bio fuels using biomass gasification; Cogeneracion y produccion de biocombustibles de 2 generacion mediante gasificacion de biomasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uruena Leal, A.; Diez Rodriguez, D.; Antolin Giraldo, G.

    2011-07-01

    Thermochemical decomposition process of gasification, in which a carbonaceous fuel, under certain conditions of temperature and oxygen deficiency, results in a series of reactions that will produce a series of gaseous products is now widely used for high performance energetic and versatility of these gaseous products for energy and 2nd generation bio fuels and reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. (Author)

  3. Influence of the operational parameters on bioelectricity generation in continuous microbial fuel cell, experimental and computational fluid dynamics modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszuk, Paweł; Zamojska-Jaroszewicz, Anna; Makowski, Łukasz

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the organic loading rate (also known as active anodic chamber volume) on bioelectricity generation in a continuous, two-chamber microbial fuel cell for the treatment of synthetic wastewater, with glucose as the only carbon source, was examined. Ten sets of experiments with different combinations of hydraulic retention times (0.24-1.14 d) and influent chemical oxygen demand concentrations were performed to verify the impact of organic loading rate on the voltage generation capacity of a simple dual-chamber microbial fuel cell working in continuous mode. We found that there is an optimal hydraulic retention time value at which the maximum voltage is generated: 0.41 d. However, there were no similar effects, in terms of voltage generation, when a constant hydraulic retention time with different influent chemical oxygen demand of wastewater was used. The obtained maximal voltage value (600 mV) has also been compared to literature data. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to calculate the fluid flow and the exit age distribution of fluid elements in the reactor to explain the obtained experimental results and identify the crucial parameters for the design of bioreactors on an industrial scale.

  4. Emissions, ultra fine particles, and health effects from heavy-duty engines running on first- and second-generation alternative fuels; Gasfoermige und partikulaere Emissionen sowie Umweltwirkungen von Nutzfahrzeugmotoren im Betrieb mit Alternativkraftstoffen der ersten und zweiten Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krahl, J. [Fachhochschule Coburg (Germany); Munach, A.; Grope, N.; Schroeder, O.; Ruschel, Y. [Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany); Buenger, J. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany). Inst. BGFA; Hofmann, L. [Argillon, Redwitz (Germany); Schwarz, S. [IVECO Motorenforschung AG, Arbon (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01

    In Germany and in many European countries biodiesel is a popular substitute for fossil diesel fuel. It is used as neat fuel and as blend component (mainly 5%) to diesel fuel. However, a fuel cannot be considered as environmentally friendly only because it derives from a renewable source. The regulated and some of the most important non-regulated emissions and the impact on human health must be investigated and judged as well. In course of the investigations a heavy-duty engine (emission class Euro 3) was tested to investigate the fuel influence. More precisely, first-generation alternative fuels (biodiesel, rape seed oil), second-generation alternative fuel (gas-to-liquid fuel, GTL), and blends of biodiesel, GTL, and diesel fuel were compared to diesel fuel. Besides the regulated emissions, the focus was on the ultra fine particles. In the European Union, the ultra fine particles are under suspect to induce severe health problems. For the detection of the ultra fine particles, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electronic low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used. Additionally, Ames-tests were carried out to determine the mutagenic potency of particulate matter extracts. Moreover, a 1000 hours biodiesel endurance test was accomplished with an Euro 4 test engine equipped with a urea based SCR (selective catalytic reduction) pilot series system. Goal of the test was to investigate how far a concentration of 10 ppm phosphorus can affect the catalyst and therefore the emissions. (orig.)

  5. Sustainable Power Generation in Continuous Flow Microbial Fuel Cell Treating Actual Wastewater: Influence of Biocatalyst Type on Electricity Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Z. Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m2 obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively.

  6. Sustainable power generation in continuous flow microbial fuel cell treating actual wastewater: influence of biocatalyst type on electricity production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Jaeel, Ali Jwied

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to simultaneously treat wastewater for reuse and to generate electricity. This study mainly considers the performance of an upflow dual-chambered MFC continuously fueled with actual domestic wastewater and alternatively biocatalyzed with aerobic activated sludge and strain of Bacillus Subtilis. The behavior of MFCs during initial biofilm growth and characterization of anodic biofilm were studied. After 45 days of continuous operation, the biofilms on the anodic electrode were well developed. The performance of MFCs was mainly evaluated in terms of COD reductions and electrical power output. Results revealed that the COD removal efficiency was 84% and 90% and the stabilized power outputs were clearly observed achieving a maximum value of 120 and 270 mW/m(2) obtained for MFCs inoculated with mixed cultures and Bacillus Subtilis strain, respectively.

  7. Electricity generation and microbial community response to substrate changes in microbial fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Min, Booki; Huang, L.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of substrate changes on the performance and microbial community of two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in this study. The MFCs enriched with a single substrate (e.g., acetate, glucose, or butyrate) had different acclimatization capability to substrate changes. The ...

  8. Design of a Fuel Processor System for Generating Hydrogen for Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolavennu, Panini K.; Telotte, John C.; Palanki, Srinivas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to design a train of tubular reactors that use a methane feed to produce hydrogen of the desired purity so that it can be utilized by a fuel cell for automotive applications. Reaction engineering principles, which are typically covered at the undergraduate level, are utilized to design this reactor train. It is shown…

  9. Electricity generation by a novel design tubular plant microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.A.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The tubular plant microbial fuel cell was designed to increase the feasibility of this technology. To test the new setup two anode materials were investigated, namely a graphite felt and graphite granules. The average power output based on membrane area was 10 mW m-2 for felt, and 12 mW m-2 for

  10. Electricity generation by a plant microbial fuel cell with an integrated oxygen reducing biocathode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetser, K.; Sudirjo, E.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we show that a chemical ferricyanide cathode can be replaced by a biological oxygen reducing cathode in a plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) with a new record power output. A biocathode was successfully integrated in a PMFC and operated for 151 days. Plants growth continued and the power

  11. Stochastic model of wind-fuel cell for a semi-dispatchable power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez-Mendoza, Fernanda; Bacher, Peder; Madsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which are embedded in one complete system with the wind power. This study uses historic wind speed data from Mexico; the forecasts are obtained using the recursive least square algorithm with a forgetting factor. The proposed approach provides probabilistic information...

  12. Development of a catalytic combustor for a stationary fuel cell power generation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Sangseok [Chung Nam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea); Hong, Dongjin [Hyosung Corporation, Anyang 431-080 (Korea); Lee, Youngduk; Lee, Sangmin; Ahn, Kookyoung [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea)

    2010-05-15

    The anode off-gas of high temperature stationary fuel cell stacks still includes fuel components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbon due to the innate characteristics of the fuel cell operation. Even though the anode off-gas has fuel contents, the flammability is very limited due to the vapor concentration of the anode off-gas. A catalytic combustor is applied as an off-gas combustor so as to utilize the waste energy of anode off-gas by stimulating a chemical reaction over selected operating conditions. Temperature and flow uniformity in the radial direction are very significant factors of the durability, because the catalytic combustion is carried out on the surface of the catalyst site. On the other hand, the catalyst selection is also very important due to the composition of the anode off-gas. In this study, the flow uniformity is presented prior to a catalyst screening test. From the results of the screening test, where three commercially available catalysts are tested, KIMM-I and KIMM-II are selected as candidates for a catalytic combustor of anode off-gas. (author)

  13. KM3NeT

    CERN Multimedia

    KM3NeT is a large scale next-generation neutrino telescope located in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea, optimized for the discovery of galactic neutrino sources emitting in the TeV energy region.

  14. Zinc isotopic composition of particulate matter generated during the combustion of coal and coal + tire-derived fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, D.M.; Gieré, R.; Ren, M.; Landa, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric Zn emissions from the burning of coal and tire-derived fuel (TDF) for power generation can be considerable. In an effort to lay the foundation for tracking these contributions, we evaluated the Zn isotopes of coal, a mixture of 95 wt % coal + 5 wt % TDF, and the particulate matter (PM) derived from their combustion in a power-generating plant. The average Zn concentrations and δ(66)Zn were 36 mg/kg and 183 mg/kg and +0.24‰ and +0.13‰ for the coal and coal + TDF, respectively. The δ(66)Zn of the PM sequestered in the cyclone-type mechanical separator was the lightest measured, -0.48‰ for coal and -0.81‰ for coal+TDF. The δ(66)Zn of the PM from the electrostatic precipitator showed a slight enrichment in the heavier Zn isotopes relative to the starting material. PM collected from the stack had the heaviest δ(66)Zn in the system, +0.63‰ and +0.50‰ for the coal and coal + TDF, respectively. Initial fractionation during the generation of a Zn-rich vapor is followed by temperature-dependent fractionation as Zn condenses onto the PM. The isotopic changes of the two fuel types are similar, suggesting that their inherent chemical differences have only a secondary impact on the isotopic fractionation process.

  15. Conceptual design for a kerosene fuel-rich gas-generator of a turbopump-fed liquid rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Min; Koo, Jaye; Cho, Won Kook; Lee, Eun Seok

    2012-10-01

    A design method for a kerosene fuel-rich gas-generator of a liquid rocket engine using turbopumps to supply propellant was performed at a conceptual level. The gas-generator creates hot gases, enabling the turbine to operate the turbopumps. A chemical non-equilibrium analysis and a droplet vaporization model were used for the estimation of the burnt gas properties and characteristic chamber length. A premixed counter-flow flame analysis was performed for the prediction of the burnt gas properties, namely the temperature, the specific heat ratio and heat capacity, and the chemical reaction time. To predict the vaporization time, the Spalding model, using a single droplet in convective condition, was used. The minimum residence time in the chamber and the characteristic length were calculated by adding the reaction time and the vaporization time. Using the characteristic length, the design methods for the fuel-rich gas-generator were established. Finally, a parametric study was achieved for the effects of the O/F ratio, mass flow rate, chamber pressure, initial droplet temperature, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet velocity.

  16. Electricity Generation with the Novel 3D Electrode from Swim Wastewater in a Dual-chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Mei-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The swine wastewater has the characteristics of high concentration of organic matter, suspended solids and more high ammonia nitrogen, odor, complex pollution ingredient and large emissions. Microbial fuel cells (MFC is an electrochemical and biological systems related to chemical energy into electrical energy. A two-chambered cubic microbial fuel cell was used to evaluate the effect of a novel 3D electrode which made of iron and copper on the electricity generation. The swine wastewater containing total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD 3300±300 mg/L was used as the feedstock in anode chamber, and the potassium ferricyanide was used as electron acceptor in cathode chamber. The MFC reactor was incubated with the initial pH 7.0 in a air-shaker with a temperature (ca. 35°C and 100 rpm in fed-batch mode. A fixed external resistance (R of 100 Ω was connected between the electrodes and the closed circuit potentials of the MFCs were recorded every 2 min. The results show that using iron 3D electrode has the peak electricity generation of 176 mV at the first two day and maintained the stable electricity voltage of 110 mV during the 5th to 15th days. The COD removal efficiency could reach 80%. Using copper 3D electrode only can generate the peak electricity of 33.1 mV and stable electricity of 27 mV with the COD removal efficiency of 70%.

  17. Electricity generation of Plant Microbial Fuel Cell (PMFC using Cyperus Involucratus R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuttawut Klaisongkram

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is a study of microbial fuel cells produce electricity from plants using Cyperus involucratus R. called Plant Microbial Fuel Cell (PMFC. As a result of the polarization curve, by adjusting the external resistance between 10 to 12,000 ohms, it was found that the internal resistance of PMFC1 , PMFC2 , MFC1 and MFC2 was 9.78, 11.06, 9.47 and 11.92 ohms respectively. The results showed that the optimum size of the anode electrode is 242 square centimeters and adding soil by using the external resistance 100 ohms. The highest average power density equaled to 5.99 milliwatts per square meter of the anode electrode. Finally the wastewater in PMFC was reduced 53.5 percent in the period of 5 days compared with un-treated wastewater.

  18. Stress and plastic deformation of MEA in fuel cells. Stresses generated during cell assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bograchev, Daniil [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Elecrtrochemistry RAN, Leninski prospekt 31, Moscow 117071 (Russian Federation); Gueguen, Mikael; Grandidier, Jean-Claude [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, LMPM UMR CNRS 6617, ENSMA, Teleport 2, 1 av. Clement Ader, BP 40109 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Martemianov, Serguei [Laboratoire d' Etudes Thermiques, LET UMR CNRS 6608, ESIP-University of Poitiers, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers (France)

    2008-05-15

    A linear elastic-plastic 2D model of fuel cell with hardening is developed for analysis of mechanical stresses in MEA arising in cell assembly procedure. The model includes the main components of real fuel cell (membrane, gas diffusion layers, graphite plates, and seal joints) and clamping elements (steel plates, bolts, nuts). The stress and plastic deformation in MEA are simulated with ABAQUS code taking into account the realistic clamping conditions. The stress distributions are obtained on the local and the global scales. The first one corresponds to the single tooth/channel structure. The global scale deals with features of the entire cell (the seal joint and the bolts). Experimental measurements of the residual membrane deformations have been provided at different bolts torques. The experimental data are in a good agreement with numerical predictions concerning the beginning of the plastic deformation. (author)

  19. Fuel-cell based power generating system having power conditioning apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Sudip K.; Pradhan, Sanjaya K.

    2010-10-05

    A power conditioner includes power converters for supplying power to a load, a set of selection switches corresponding to the power converters for selectively connecting the fuel-cell stack to the power converters, and another set of selection switches corresponding to the power converters for selectively connecting the battery to the power converters. The power conveners output combined power that substantially optimally meets a present demand of the load.

  20. Enhanced Fuel-Optimal Trajectory-Generation Algorithm for Planetary Pinpoint Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, James C.; Scharf, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    An enhanced algorithm is developed that builds on a previous innovation of fuel-optimal powered-descent guidance (PDG) for planetary pinpoint landing. The PDG problem is to compute constrained, fuel-optimal trajectories to land a craft at a prescribed target on a planetary surface, starting from a parachute cut-off point and using a throttleable descent engine. The previous innovation showed the minimal-fuel PDG problem can be posed as a convex optimization problem, in particular, as a Second-Order Cone Program, which can be solved to global optimality with deterministic convergence properties, and hence is a candidate for onboard implementation. To increase the speed and robustness of this convex PDG algorithm for possible onboard implementation, the following enhancements are incorporated: 1) Fast detection of infeasibility (i.e., control authority is not sufficient for soft-landing) for subsequent fault response. 2) The use of a piecewise-linear control parameterization, providing smooth solution trajectories and increasing computational efficiency. 3) An enhanced line-search algorithm for optimal time-of-flight, providing quicker convergence and bounding the number of path-planning iterations needed. 4) An additional constraint that analytically guarantees inter-sample satisfaction of glide-slope and non-sub-surface flight constraints, allowing larger discretizations and, hence, faster optimization. 5) Explicit incorporation of Mars rotation rate into the trajectory computation for improved targeting accuracy. These enhancements allow faster convergence to the fuel-optimal solution and, more importantly, remove the need for a "human-in-the-loop," as constraints will be satisfied over the entire path-planning interval independent of step-size (as opposed to just at the discrete time points) and infeasible initial conditions are immediately detected. Finally, while the PDG stage is typically only a few minutes, ignoring the rotation rate of Mars can introduce 10s

  1. Preliminary Studies on Immobilized Cells-Based Microbial Fuel Cell System on Its Power Generation Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hadi Mesran; Syafikah Mamat; Yee Rui Pang; Tan Yi Hong; Muneera Z; Mohd Nazlee Faisal M. Ghazali; Md Abbas Ali; Nik Azmi Nik Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is considered an alternative energy production technology that uses the degradation ability of microbes toward organic matters. The resultant products are electrons that will be transferred to the electrode and flows to cathode of the MFC through an external circuit to produce current. The flow of electrons and protons can be channeled to an external circuit to produce electricity. Although the MFC has many advantages, the power density produced is still low. This ha...

  2. Decentralized generation of electricity from biomass with proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonssen, Richard; Woudstra, Nico; Verkooijen, Adrian H. M.

    Biomass can be applied as the primary source for the production of hydrogen in the future. The biomass is converted in an atmospheric fluidized bed gasification process using steam as the gasifying agent. The producer gas needs further cleaning and processing before the hydrogen can be converted in a fuel cell; it is assumed that the gas cleaning processes are able to meet the requirements for a PEM-FC. The compressed hydrogen is supplied to a hydrogen grid and can be used in small-scale decentralized CHP units. In this study it is assumed that the CHP units are based on low temperature PEM fuel cells. For the evaluation of alternative technologies the whole chain of centralized hydrogen production from biomass up to and including decentralized electricity production in PEM fuel cells is considered. Two models for the production of hydrogen from biomass and three models for the combined production of electricity and heat with PEM fuel cells are built using the computer program Cycle-Tempo. Two different levels of hydrogen purity are considered in this evaluation: 60% and 99.99% pure hydrogen. The purity of the hydrogen affects both the efficiencies of the hydrogen production as well as the PEM-FC systems. The electrical exergy efficiency of the PEM-FC system without additional heat production is calculated to be 27.66% in the case of 60% hydrogen and 29.06% in the case of 99.99% pure hydrogen. The electrical exergy efficiencies of the whole conversion chain appear to be 21.68% and 18.74%, respectively. The high losses during purification of the hydrogen gas result in a higher efficiency for the case with low purity hydrogen. The removal of the last impurities strongly increases the overall exergy losses of the conversion chain.

  3. Generation of Electrostatic Charge in Fuel Handling Systems: A Literature Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-24

    attention previously, namely Zhukov 1151, who studied streaming currents in petroleum ether, and Obukh et a]. [16], who employed Koszman and Gavis ...of TS-l Fuel as it is Pumped into the Tanker," Tekhnika Vysokikh Napryazhenly, 143 (1972) The author’s have modified Koszman and Gavis ’ equation for...parameters as flow velocity, pipe diameter and pipe length, are used to test the validity of the Koszman and Gavis and Gibbings and Hignett equations relating

  4. Policy schemes, operational strategies and system integration of residential co-generation fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Lise-Lotte Pade; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Münster, Marie; Birkl, Christoph; Ropenus, Stephanie; Morthorst, Poul Erik; Obé, Elisabeth; Kötter, Editha; Huber, Andreas; Costa, Ana I.A.; Kroff, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a holistic approach for the commercialisation of fuel cells for stationary applications. We focus our analyses on microCHP based on SOFC units fired with natural gas. We analyse the interaction of operational strategies under different ownership arrangements, required support levels and system integration aspects. The operational strategies, support mechanisms and ownership arrangements have been identified through actor analysis involving experts from Denmark, France and ...

  5. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  6. Light harvesting proteins for solar fuel generation in bioengineered photoelectrochemical cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihssen, Julian; Braun, Artur; Faccio, Greta; Gajda-Schrantz, Krisztina; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2014-01-01

    The sun is the primary energy source of our planet and potentially can supply all societies with more than just their basic energy needs. Demand of electric energy can be satisfied with photovoltaics, however the global demand for fuels is even higher. The direct way to produce the solar fuel hydrogen is by water splitting in photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells, an artificial mimic of photosynthesis. There is currently strong resurging interest for solar fuels produced by PEC cells, but some fundamental technological problems need to be solved to make PEC water splitting an economic, competitive alternative. One of the problems is to provide a low cost, high performing water oxidizing and oxygen evolving photoanode in an environmentally benign setting. Hematite, α-Fe2O3, satisfies many requirements for a good PEC photoanode, but its efficiency is insufficient in its pristine form. A promising strategy for enhancing photocurrent density takes advantage of photosynthetic proteins. In this paper we give an overview of how electrode surfaces in general and hematite photoanodes in particular can be functionalized with light harvesting proteins. Specifically, we demonstrate how low-cost biomaterials such as cyanobacterial phycocyanin and enzymatically produced melanin increase the overall performance of virtually no-cost metal oxide photoanodes in a PEC system. The implementation of biomaterials changes the overall nature of the photoanode assembly in a way that aggressive alkaline electrolytes such as concentrated KOH are not required anymore. Rather, a more environmentally benign and pH neutral electrolyte can be used.

  7. Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

    2005-08-30

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by

  8. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

  9. Analysis of organic compounds' degradation and electricity generation in anaerobic fluidized bed microbial fuel cell for coking wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinmin; Wu, Jianjun; Guo, Qingjie

    2017-12-01

    A single-chambered packing-type anaerobic fluidized microbial fuel cell (AFBMFC) with coking wastewater (CWW) as fuel was built to treat CWW, which not only has high treating efficiency, but also can convert organic matter in wastewater into electricity. AFBMFC was constructed by using anaerobic sludge that was domesticated as inoculation sludge, which was used to biochemically treat CWW. The organic compounds in CWW were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction step by step every day. The extraction phase was concentrated by a rotary evaporator and a nitrogen sweeping device and was analyzed by GC-MS. And the electricity-generation performances of AFBMFC were investigated. The results show that the composition of CWW was complicated, which mainly contains hydrocarbons, phenols, nitrogenous organic compounds, alcohols and aldehydes, esters and acids and so on. After a cycle of anaerobic biochemical treatment, the content of organic compounds in the effluent decreased significantly. After the treatment of AFBMFC, 99.9% phenols, 98.4% alcohol and aldehydes and 95.3% nitrogenous compounds were biodegraded. In the effluent, some new compounds (such as tricosane and dibutyl phthalate) were produced. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of CWW decreased from 3372 to 559 mg/L in the closed-circuit microbial fuel cell, and the COD removal was 83.4 ± 1.0%. The maximum power density of AFBMFC was 2.13 ± 0.01 mW m-2.

  10. Bio-oils and other bio fuels used in heat- and power generation; Flytande biobraenslen foer el- och vaermeproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandgren, Annamaria; Ekdahl, Emma; Sernhed, Kerstin; Lindstroem, Erica

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assemble and disseminate knowledge about bio-oils and other bio fuels which are used for heat- and power generation or liquid bio fuels/oils that may become interesting in the future. One aim of this study was to give an updated picture of the Swedish market for bio-oils and to provide an overview of practical experience on the usage of bio-oils in the Swedish heat and power industry. In order to show a green profile, bio-oils can be used in the heat and power generation. However, not all bio-oils can be viewed as climate friendly. Some production of bio-oils may actually - if a lifecycle perspective is considered - lead to increased emissions of greenhouse gases, and there are also ethical issues that need to be considered. The data collection was carried out in three different fields. The objective of the first part was to create an overview of the Swedish market for liquid bio fuels/oils for heat and power production. The second part of the study aimed to clarify the issues surrounding environmental and ethical issues associated with the use of different bio-oils. A selection of oil crops for a closer study was made based on production volume (soybean, palm oil and rapeseed) and expected future potential (jatropha). This part of the study was based on a literature review. In the third part of the study technical and practical experiences from using bio-oils in heat and power production were studied. The interviews made with purchasing managers in the second part gave valuable information on which utilities would be the most interesting to interview for the study of technical and practical experiences, where interviews were carried out with persons familiar with the daily operation of the plant. The use of liquid bio fuels was about 4.3 % of total fuel use in Swedish district heating production in 2007 (1.2 % pine oil and 3.0 % other bio-oil). In other words, it is mainly bio-oils that have been used and not other types of liquid

  11. 40 CFR 80.1426 - How are RINs generated and assigned to batches of renewable fuel by renewable fuel producers or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-food grade corn oil Ethanol Sugarcane Fermentation 5 Ethanol Cellulosic Biomass from crop residue... fuel producer, or for renewable fuel made with ethanol produced by a foreign ethanol producer, unless the foreign renewable fuel producer or foreign ethanol producer is registered with EPA as required in...

  12. Generation and mid-IR measurement of a gas-phase to predict security parameters of aviation jet fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Carracedo, M P; Andrade, J M; Calviño, M A; Prada, D; Fernández, E; Muniategui, S

    2003-07-27

    The worldwide use of kerosene as aviation jet fuel makes its safety considerations of most importance not only for aircraft security but for the workers' health (chronic and/or acute exposure). As most kerosene risks come from its vapours, this work focuses on predicting seven characteristics (flash point, freezing point, % of aromatics and four distillation points) which assess its potential hazards. Two experimental devices were implemented in order to, first, generate a kerosene vapour phase and, then, to measure its mid-IR spectrum. All the working conditions required to generate the gas phase were optimised either in a univariate or a multivariate (SIMPLEX) approach. Next, multivariate prediction models were deployed using partial least squares regression and it was found that both the average prediction errors and precision parameters were satisfactory, almost always well below the reference figures.

  13. Pilot scale single chamber up-flow membrane-less microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment and electricity generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thung, Wei-Eng; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Ridwan, Fahmi Muhammad; Oon, Yoong-Ling; Oon, Yoong-Sin; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur

    2017-04-01

    Pilot scale up-flow membrane-less microbial fuel cell (UFML-MFC) was constructed to study feasibility of the bioreactor for simultaneous degradation of organic substance and electricity generation. The performance of the UFML-MFC was evaluated with different anode electrode (cube carbon felt and stacked carbon felt) in terms of voltage output, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and Coulombic efficiency (CE). Carbon flake were used as cathode in the UFML-MFC. UFML-MFC was operated in three stages where included batch-fed, end of batch fed and semi-continuous. The Cube carbon felt as anode have the better performance in terms of voltage output and electricity generation in all 3 stages. Maximum voltage output was 0.311 ± 0.004 V at 75% of COD reduction and thus CE was 0.15%. The result shows the operational mode is the key to improve the voltage output and also COD reduction.

  14. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power generation/fuel cell powerplant subsystem FMEA/CIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. L.; Bertsch, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Generation/Fuel Cell Powerplant (EPG/FCP) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter EPG/FCP hardware.

  15. Generation and mid-IR measurement of a gas-phase to predict security parameters of aviation jet fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Carracedo, M.P.; Andrade, J.M.; Calvino, M.A.; Prada, D.; Fernandez, E.; Muniategui, S. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, E-15071, A Coruna (Spain)

    2003-07-27

    The worldwide use of kerosene as aviation jet fuel makes its safety considerations of most importance not only for aircraft security but for the workers' health (chronic and/or acute exposure). As most kerosene risks come from its vapours, this work focuses on predicting seven characteristics (flash point, freezing point, % of aromatics and four distillation points) which assess its potential hazards. Two experimental devices were implemented in order to, first, generate a kerosene vapour phase and, then, to measure its mid-IR spectrum. All the working conditions required to generate the gas phase were optimised either in a univariate or a multivariate (SIMPLEX) approach. Next, multivariate prediction models were deployed using partial least squares regression and it was found that both the average prediction errors and precision parameters were satisfactory, almost always well below the reference figures.

  16. Removal of organic matter and electricity generation of sediments from Progreso, Yucatan, Mexico, in a sediment microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gamboa, Nancy Karina; Valdés-Lozano, David Sergio; Barahona-Pérez, Luis Felipe; Alzate-Gaviria, Liliana; Domínguez-Maldonado, Jorge Arturo

    2017-02-01

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are devices that generate electrical energy through sediments rich in organic matter (OM). The present study assessed the potential of sediments collected at two sites in Yucatan, Mexico, (the swamp of Progreso port and Yucalpetén dock) to be used in these electrochemical devices. Sediments were collected during the rainy and winter seasons and were monitored in the SMFC for 120 days through electrochemical and physicochemical characterization. OM removal in the SMFC ranged from 8.1-18.01%, generating a maximum current density of 232.46 mA/cm2 and power density of 95.85 mW/cm2. SUVA analysis indicated that with a young soil, the ratio E4/E6 presented evidence directly related to the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic compound formation, implying humification and, therefore, sediment enrichment.

  17. Sulfide as an alternative electron donor to glucose for power generation in mediator-less microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Sakine; Ghoreyshi, Ali A; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Darzi, Ghasem Najafpour; Pant, Deepak

    2017-10-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the power generation in a dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC). As one of the effective parameters, glucose concentration was studied in the range of 100-1000 mg/L. At the optimum concentration of 500 mg/L of glucose, maximum power generation was 186 mW/m2. As an alternative, sulfide was used as an electron donor and maximum power output was 401 mW/m2 at the concentration of 100 mg/L; which was more than twice of power produced using glucose. Moreover, sulfide removal efficiencies of 70%, 66%, 60%, and 64% were obtained when initial sulfide concentrations of 10, 20, 80, and 100 mg/L were used, respectively.

  18. Comparative life cycle assessment of the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass (IFBB) and whole crop digestion (WCD) in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehle, Lutz; Stuelpnagel, R.; Wachendorf, M. [Department of Grassland Science and Renewable Plant Resources, University of Kassel, Steinstr. 19, 37213 Witzenhausen (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Today's bioenergy systems are very different in cultivation, conservation, conversion of the biomass as well as in the form of the final energy. The assessment of bioenergy systems concerning environmental impacts is increasingly up for discussion. Future challenges will be the development of procedures which reconcile high-yielding and efficient approaches with environment friendly production. Against this background the system of Integrated Generation of Solid Fuel and Biogas from Biomass (IFBB) was suggested to increase net energy yields over a wide range of energy crops in order to obtain a higher biodiversity in energy crop cultivation. In the IFBB procedure the ensiled biomass is separated into a liquid phase for biogas production and into a solid fraction for combustion. This work is aimed at the assessment of the IFBB system in comparison to whole crop digestion (WCD). The assessment is based on crop production in a double-cropping system where winter rye and maize are grown subsequently within one growing season. The main parameters investigated are the efficiency of the whole process, primary energy and greenhouse gas savings as well as potentials of acidification and eutrophication according to principles of Life Cycle Assessment. The calculation of energy efficiency shows a superiority of the IFBB system due to a mainly thermal use of the biomass. Savings of fossil primary energy average at a similar level, whereas greenhouse gas savings are slightly higher for WCD. Investigations on acidification and eutrophication show that both bioenergy systems caused higher emissions compared to the fossil-based reference technique. (author)

  19. External CO2 and water supplies for enhancing electrical power generation of air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, So; Fujiki, Itto; Sano, Daisuke; Okabe, Satoshi

    2014-10-07

    Alkalization on the cathode electrode limits the electrical power generation of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), and thus external proton supply to the cathode electrode is essential to enhance the electrical power generation. In this study, the effects of external CO2 and water supplies to the cathode electrode on the electrical power generation were investigated, and then the relative contributions of CO2 and water supplies to the total proton consumption were experimentally evaluated. The CO2 supply decreased the cathode pH and consequently increased the power generation. Carbonate dissolution was the main proton source under ambient air conditions, which provides about 67% of total protons consumed for the cathode reaction. It is also critical to adequately control the water content on the cathode electrode of air-cathode MFCs because the carbonate dissolution was highly dependent on water content. On the basis of these experimental results, the power density was increased by 400% (143.0 ± 3.5 mW/m(2) to 575.0 ± 36.0 mW/m(2)) by supplying a humid gas containing 50% CO2 to the cathode chamber. This study demonstrates that the simultaneous CO2 and water supplies to the cathode electrode were effective to increase the electrical power generation of air-cathode MFCs for the first time.

  20. Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

    2004-07-17

    Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

  1. Reconciling fossil fuel power generation development and climate issues: CCS and CCS-Ready

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paelinck, Philippe; Sonnois, Louis; Leandri, Jean-Francois

    2010-09-15

    This paper intends to analyse how CCS can contribute to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel power plants and to describe what is its current overall status. Its potential future development is assessed, in both developed and developing countries, and an economical assessment of different investment options highlight the importance of CCS retrofit. The paper analyses then the challenges of the development of fossil fuelled power plants and details case examples to illustrate some technical challenges related to CCS and what are the technical solutions available today to ease and address them: CCS-Ready power plants.

  2. A simple scaled down system to mimic the industrial production of first generation fuel ethanol in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendran, Vijayendran; Basso, Thalita Peixoto; da Silva, Juliana Bueno; Basso, Luiz Carlos; Gombert, Andreas Karoly

    2017-07-01

    Although first-generation fuel ethanol is produced in Brazil from sugarcane-based raw materials with high efficiency, there is still little knowledge about the microbiology, the biochemistry and the molecular mechanisms prevalent in the non-aseptic fermentation environment. Learning-by-doing has hitherto been the strategy to improve the process so far, with further improvements requiring breakthrough technologies. Performing experiments at an industrial scale are often expensive, complicated to set up and difficult to reproduce. Thus, developing an appropriate scaled down system for this process has become a necessity. In this paper, we present the design and demonstration of a simple and effective laboratory-scale system mimicking the industrial process used for first generation (1G) fuel ethanol production in the Brazilian sugarcane mills. We benchmarked this system via the superior phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 strain, compared to other strains from the same species: S288c, baker's yeast, and CEN.PK113-7D. We trust that such a system can be easily implemented in different laboratories worldwide, and will allow a better understanding of the S. cerevisiae strains that can persist and dominate in this industrial, non-aseptic and peculiar environment.

  3. Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and decolorization of methyl orange in a two-chambered microbial fuel cell and bacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Feng, Jinglan; Song, Hong; Sun, Jianhui

    2014-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the simultaneous bioelectricity generation and decolorization of methyl orange (MO) in the anode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in a wide concentration range (from 50 to 800 mg L(-1)) and to reveal the microbial communities on the anode after the MFC was operated continuously for more than 6 months using MO-glucose mixtures as fuel. Interestingly, the added MO played an active role in the production of electricity. The maximum voltage outputs were 565, 658, 640, 629, 617, and 605 mV for the 1 g L(-1) glucose with 0, 50, 100, 200, 300, and 500 mg L(-1) of MO, respectively. The results of three groups of comparison experiments showed that accelerated decolorization of methyl orange (MO) was achieved in the MFC as compared to MFC in open circuit mode and MFC without extra carbon sources. The decolorization efficiency decreased with an increase of MO concentration in the studied concentration range for the dye load increased. A 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing revealed the microbial communities. Geobacter genus known to generate electricity was detected. Bacteroidia class, Desulfovibrio, and Trichococcus genus, which were most likely responsible for degrading methyl orange, were also detected.

  4. Potential use of wood and agriculture wastes as steam generator fuel for thermal enhanced oil recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosstrin, H.M.; McDonald, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Enhanced oil recovery by steam injection methods produces over 200,000 barrels per day of crude oil in California. A sizeable portion of the produced crude, up to 40% for some projects, may be burned to generate steam for injection into the reservoir. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential to use wood and agriculture wastes to replace crude oil as steam generator fuel. The Bakersfield area of California's San Joaquin Valley is the focus for this paper. Production from thermal EOR methods centers around Bakersfield and agriculture and wood wastes are available from the San Joaquin Valley and the nearby Sierra Nevada mountains. This paper documents the production of waste materials by county, estimated energy value of each material, and estimated transportation cost for each material. Both agriculture and wood wastes were found to be available in sizeable quantities and could become attractive steam generation fuels. However, some qualifications need to be made on the use of these materials. Transportation costs will probably limit the range of shipping these materials to perhaps 50 to 100 miles. Availability is subject to competition from existing and developing uses of these materials, such as energy sources in their immediate production area. Existing steam generators probably cannot be retrofitted to burn these materials. Fluidized bed combustion, or low Btu gasification, may be a good technology for utilization. FBC or FBG could accept a variety of waste materials. This will be important because the amount of any single waste may not be large enough to support the energy requirements of a good size thermal f a good size thermal EOR operation.

  5. Micro solid oxide fuel cells: a new generation of micro-power sources for portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiabrera, Francesco; Garbayo, Iñigo; Alayo, Nerea; Tarancón, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Portable electronic devices are already an indispensable part of our daily life; and their increasing number and demand for higher performance is becoming a challenge for the research community. In particular, a major concern is the way to efficiently power these energy-demanding devices, assuring long grid independency with high efficiency, sustainability and cheap production. In this context, technologies beyond Li-ion are receiving increasing attention, among which the development of micro solid oxide fuel cells (μSOFC) stands out. In particular, μSOFC provides a high energy density, high efficiency and opens the possibility to the use of different fuels, such as hydrocarbons. Yet, its high operating temperature has typically hindered its application as miniaturized portable device. Recent advances have however set a completely new range of lower operating temperatures, i.e. 350-450°C, as compared to the typical <900°C needed for classical bulk SOFC systems. In this work, a comprehensive review of the status of the technology is presented. The main achievements, as well as the most important challenges still pending are discussed, regarding (i.) the cell design and microfabrication, and (ii.) the integration of functional electrolyte and electrode materials. To conclude, the different strategies foreseen for a wide deployment of the technology as new portable power source are underlined.

  6. Plant and microorganisms support media for electricity generation in biological fuel cells with living hydrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Juárez, María Guadalupe; Roquero, Pedro; Durán-Domínguez-de-Bazúa, María Del Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Plant support media may impact power output in a biological fuel cell with living plants, due to the physical and biochemical processes that take place in it. A material for support medium should provide the suitable conditions for the robust microbial growth and its metabolic activity, degrading organic matter and other substances; and, transferring electrons to the anode. To consider the implementation of this type of bio-electrochemical systems in constructed wetlands, this study analyzes the electrochemical behavior of biological fuel cells with the vegetal species Phragmites australis, by using two different support media: graphite granules and a volcanic slag, commonly known as tezontle (stone as light as hair, from the Aztec or Nahuatl language). Derived from the results, both, graphite and tezontle have the potential to be used as support medium for plants and microorganisms supporting a maximum power of 26.78mW/m(2) in graphite reactors. These reactors worked under mixed control: with ohmic and kinetic resistances of the same order of magnitude. Tezontle reactors operated under kinetic control with a high activation resistance supplying 9.73mW/m(2). These performances could be improved with stronger bacterial populations in the reactor, to ensure the rapid depletion of substrate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Electricity generating capacity and performance deterioration of a microbial fuel cell fed with beer brewery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köroğlu, Emre Oğuz; Özkaya, Bestamin; Denktaş, Cenk; Çakmakci, Mehmet

    2014-12-01

    This study focused on using beer brewery wastewater (BBW) to evaluate membrane concentrate disposal and production of electricity in microbial fuel cells. In the membrane treatment of BBW, the membrane permeate concentration was 570 ± 30 mg/L corresponding to a chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of 75 ± 5%, and the flux values changed between 160 and 40 L/m(2)-h for all membrane runs. For electricity production from membrane concentrate, the highest current density in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) was observed to be 1950 mA/m(2) according to electrode surface area with 36% COD removal efficiency and 2.48% CE with 60% BBW membrane concentrate. The morphologies of the cation exchange membrane and the MFC deterioration were studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM), attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). A decrease in the thermal stability of the sulfonate (-SO3H) groups was demonstrated and morphological changes were detected in the SEM analysis. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Power Generation Enhancement by Utilizing Plant Photosynthate in Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Constructed Wetland System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shentan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a new technology that coupled constructed wetland (CW with microbial fuel cell (MFC (CW-MFC was developed to convert solar energy into electricity on the principles of photosynthetic MFC by utilizing root exudates of Ipomoea aquatica as part of fuel. The maximum power density of 12.42 mW m−2 produced from the CW-MFC planted with Ipomoea aquatica was 142% higher than that of 5.13 mW m−2 obtained from the unplanted CW-MFC. The maximum power output for the planted CW-MFC could be divided into two parts: the maximum power yield from in the water body was 66.05 KJ Kg−1  , and the maximum power transformation from plant photosynthesis was 2.31 GJ ha−1 year−1. The average COD removal efficiencies were 92.1% and 94.8% in the unplanted CW-MFC and planted CW-MFC, respectively; the average TN removal efficiencies amounted to 54.4% and 90.8% in the unplanted CW-MFC and planted CW-MFC. This research demonstrates that planting Ipomoea aquatica in the CW-MFC achieved a higher power density and nutrient removal of nitrogen simultaneously.

  9. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    .... Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days...

  10. MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS USING DIFFERENT TYPES OF WASTEWATER FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATION AND SIMULTANEOUSLY REMOVED POLLUTANT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NUR SYAZANA NATASYA HISHAM; SHAHROM MD ZAIN; SAKINAH JUSOH; NURINA ANUAR; FATIHAH SUJA; AMIRUDDIN ISMAIL; NOOR EZLIN AHMAD BASRI

    2013-01-01

    .... The aims of the study are to determine the most efficient wastewater source that can generate the highest rate of electricity production by using MFCs and to determine the removal rate of carbon...

  11. Electricity generation and microbial community in microbial fuel cell using low-pH distillery wastewater at different external resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hongsuck; Kim, Byunggoon; Kim, Jiyeon; Lee, Taeho; Yu, Jaecheul

    2014-09-30

    Single chamber MFC (SMFC) consisted of two separator-electrode assemblies (SEA) using low-pH distillery wastewater (DW) was operated under continuous mode. The electricity generation and microbial community were analyzed according to the external resistance (Rext; 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 kΩ). The two SEAs exhibited different electricity generations, despite sharing the same anodic chamber. The SMFC showed the largest maximum power density (PDmax) of 3.7 W/m(3) (SEA 1) and 12.9 W/m(3) (SEA 2) at 5 kΩ. These results demonstrated that low-pH wastewater could be sufficiently used as fuels for electricity generation. Pyrosequencing analysis showed that microbial communities at the phylum level were significantly different according to the Rext. The communities of SEA 1 were slightly different from those of SEA 2. In both SEAs, Firmicutes (>45%) were the most dominant at 0.1 kΩ, while Firmicutes (>34%) and Caldiserica (>34%) were dominant at 5 kΩ. Caldiserica sp. might significantly contribute to electricity generation under low-pH and high-Rext. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of particulate emissions from a diesel generator fueled with varying blends of biodiesel and fossil diesel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jen-Hsiung; Chen, Shui-Jen; Huang, Kuo-Lin; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Kuo, Wen-Chien; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the particulate matter (PM), particle-bound carbons, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from a diesel-engine generator fuelled with blends of pure fossil diesel oil (D100) and varying percentages of waste-edible-oil biodiesel (W10, 10 vol %; W20, 20 vol %; W30, 30 vol %; and W50, 50 vol %) under generator loads of 0, 1.5, and 3 kW. On average, the PM emission factors of all blends was 30.5 % (range, 13.7-52.3 %) lower than that of D100 under the tested loads. Substituting pure fossil diesel oil with varying percentages of waste-edible-oil biodiesel reduced emissions of particle-bound total carbon (TC) and elemental carbon (EC). The W20 blend had the lowest particle-bound organic carbon (OC) emissions. Notably, W10, W20, and W30 also had lower Total-PAH emissions and lower total equivalent toxicity (Total-BaP(eq)) compared to D100. Additionally, the brake-specific fuel consumption of the generator correlated positively with the ratio of waste-edible-oil biodiesel to pure fossil diesel. However, generator energy efficiency correlated negatively with the ratio of waste-edible-oil biodiesel to pure fossil diesel.

  13. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive activated carbon (AC) air cathode was developed as an alternative to a platinum-catalyzed electrode for oxygen reduction in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). AC was cold-pressed with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder to form the cathode around a Ni mesh current collector. This cathode construction avoided the need for carbon cloth or a metal catalyst, and produced a cathode with high activity for oxygen reduction at typical MFC current densities. Tests with the AC cathode produced a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for achieving useful rates of oxygen reduction in air cathode MFCs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Electricity generation and modeling of microbial fuel cell from continuous beer brewery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qing; Wu, Ying; Cao, Dianxue; Zhao, Lixin; Sun, Qian

    2009-09-01

    Electricity production and modeling of microbial fuel cell (MFC) from continuous beer brewery wastewater was studied in this paper. A single air-cathode MFC was constructed, carbon fiber was used as anode and diluted brewery wastewater (COD=626.58 mg/L) as substrate. The MFC displayed an open-circuit voltage of 0.578 V and a maximum power density of 9.52 W/m(3) (264 mW/m(2)). Using the model based on polarization curve, various voltage losses were quantified. At current density of 1.79 A/m(2), reaction kinetic loss and mass transport loss both achieved to 0.248 V; while ohmic loss was 0.046 V. Results demonstrated that it was feasible and stable for producing bioelectricity from brewery wastewater; while the most important factors which influenced the performance of the MFC are reaction kinetic loss and mass transport loss.

  15. Inoculum selection to enhance performance of a microbial fuel cell for electricity generation during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathuriya, Abhilasha Singh

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the influence of various anaerobic inoculums to enhance microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance utilizing tannery wastewater as substrate. Three bacterial electrogenic strains, tolerant to tannery environment, were isolated from soil contaminated with tannery waste and tannery wastewater was inoculated with these monotypes and mixed consortia of three bacterial strains in different MFCs. Comparative analysis was made by treating the tannery wastewater with foreign microbial consortia (activated sludge inoculum) and with only natural habitat microbes already present in plain wastewater. It was observed that inoculum contributes great effect on the MFC performance. Among the studied inoculation strategies, mixed electrogenic strain inocula enabled higher current yield along with concurrent substrate removal efficiency. On the contrary, plain wastewater resulted in relatively low efficiency.

  16. Skeletal mechanism generation for surrogate fuels using directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Niemeyer, Kyle E; Raju, Mandhapati P

    2016-01-01

    A novel implementation for the skeletal reduction of large detailed reaction mechanisms using the directed relation graph with error propagation and sensitivity analysis (DRGEPSA) is developed and presented with examples for three hydrocarbon components, n-heptane, iso-octane, and n-decane, relevant to surrogate fuel development. DRGEPSA integrates two previously developed methods, directed relation graph-aided sensitivity analysis (DRGASA) and directed relation graph with error propagation (DRGEP), by first applying DRGEP to efficiently remove many unimportant species prior to sensitivity analysis to further remove unimportant species, producing an optimally small skeletal mechanism for a given error limit. It is illustrated that the combination of the DRGEP and DRGASA methods allows the DRGEPSA approach to overcome the weaknesses of each, specifically that DRGEP cannot identify all unimportant species and that DRGASA shields unimportant species from removal. Skeletal mechanisms for n-heptane and iso-octane ...

  17. Power generation using adjustable Nafion/PTFE mixed binders in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Jia; Shi, Xinxin; Lee, He; Li, Nan; Ren, Nanqi

    2010-10-15

    Nafion, poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) and polymers made of Nafion-PTFE mixture (Nafion and PTFE ratios of 1:2 and 2:1) were examined as catalyst binders in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFC tests showed that the maximum power density (from 549 to 1060 mW/m2) increased with the increase of Nafion percentage in binders (from 0% to 100%). Multi-cycle tests (25 cycles) showed that the maximum voltages decreased by 4-6% with simultaneous increase in Coulombic efficiency in all MFCs using various binders (from 20% to 29% with Nafion binder; from 17% to 26% with other binders), indicating that adjustable Nafion/PTFE mixed polymers were applicable in MFCs as catalyst binders when considering both cost and performance of cathodes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [Electricity generation using the short-arm air-cathode microbial fuel cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Li, Ding-jie; Li, Hao-ran; Du, Zhu-wei

    2009-10-15

    The short-arm air-cathode microbial fuel cell (ACMFC) was constructed using a cramp to fix the proton exchange membrane (PEM) and carbon paper with 0.5 mg/cm2 onto the short-arm side of the anode chamber. Exoelectrogens on the surface of graphite rod were enriched by a sludge microbial fuel cell from the anaerobic digestion sludge. And the cyclic voltammetry result showed these microbes had electrochemical activities. Using the graphite rod covered by exoelectrogens as the anode and sodium acetate as the substrate, the short-arm ACMFC showed a maximal power density (Pm) of 738 mW/m2, internal resistance (Ri) of 280 omega and open circuit voltage (OCV) of 741 mV. Continuous sparging the anode chamber with nitrogen or removal of the proton exchange membrane enhance the Pm of the cell to 745 mW/m2 and 759 mW/m2 respectively. When both of the two measures were used together, the Pm reached up to 922 mW/m2. Under these three conditions the Ri of the cell was kept around 280 omega. When the substrate concentration was 12.62-100.96 mg/L and external resistance was 510 omega, the maximal voltage of the cell and the substrate concentration showed an obvious linear relation (R2 = 0.99). But when the concentration was above 100.96 mg/L, the maximal voltage stably kept around 302mV(the external resistance was 510 omega). However, the Coulombic efficiency of the short-arm ACMFC gradually increased with the increase of the substrate concentration, from 31.83% to 45.03%.

  19. Understanding Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salom, Jaume; Widén, Joakim; Candanedo, José

    2011-01-01

    Although several alternative definitions exist, a Net-Zero Energy Building (Net ZEB) can be succinctly described as a grid-connected building that generates as much energy as it uses over a year. The “net-zero” balance is attained by applying energy conservation and efficiency measures...... and by incorporating renewable energy systems. While based on annual balances, a complete description of a Net ZEB requires examining the system at smaller time-scales. This assessment should address: (a) the relationship between power generation and building loads and (b) the resulting interaction with the power grid....... This paper presents and categorizes quantitative indicators suitable to describe both aspects of the building’s performance. These indicators, named LMGI - Load Matching and Grid Interaction indicators, are easily quantifiable and could complement the output variables of existing building simulation tools...

  20. Characterization of Electricity Generated by Soil in Microbial Fuel Cells and the Isolation of Soil Source Exoelectrogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Bin Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil has been used to generate electrical power in microbial fuel cells (MFCs and exhibited several potential applications. This study aimed to reveal the effect of soil properties on the generated electricity and the diversity of soil source exoelectrogenic bacteria. Seven soil samples were collected across China and packed into air-cathode MFCs to generate electricity over a 270 d period. The Fe(III-reducing bacteria in soil were enriched and sequenced by Illumina pyrosequencing. Culturable strains of Fe(III-reducing bacteria were isolated and identified phylogenetically. Their exoelectrogenic ability was evaluated by polarization measurement. The results showed that soils with higher organic carbon content but lower soil pH generated higher peak voltage and charge. The sequencing of Fe(III-reducing bacteria showed that Clostridia were dominant in all soil samples. At the family level, Clostridiales Family XI. incertae sedis were dominant in soils with lower organic carbon content but higher pH (>8, while Clostridiaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Planococcaceae were dominant in soils with higher organic carbon content but lower pH. The isolated culturable strains were allied phylogenetically to fifteen different species, of which eleven were Clostridium. The others were Robinsoniella peoriensis, Hydrogenoanaerobacterium saccharovorans, Eubacterium contortum and Oscillibacter ruminantium. The maximum power density generated by the isolates in the MFCs ranged from 16.4 to 28.6 mW m-2. We concluded that soil organic carbon content had the most important effect on power generation and that the Clostridiaceae were the dominant exoelectrogenic bacterial group in soil. This study might lead to the discovery of more soil source exoelectrogenic bacteria species.

  1. Electricity generation and nutrients removal from high-strength liquid manure by air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Nelson, Chad; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are widely tested to recover electrical energy from waste streams containing organic matter. When high-strength wastewater, such as liquid animal manure, is used as a medium, inhibition on anode and cathode catalysts potentially impairs the effectiveness of MFC performance in power generation and pollutant removal. This study evaluated possible inhibitive effects of liquid swine manure components on MFC power generation, improved liquid manure-fed MFCs performance by pretreatment (dilution and selective adsorption), and modeled the kinetics of organic matter and nutrients removal kinetics. Parameters monitored included pH, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations. The removals of VFA and TAN were efficient, indicated by the short half-life times of 4.99 and 7.84 d, respectively. The mechanism for phosphate decrease was principally the salt precipitation on cathode, but the removal was incomplete after 42-d operation. MFC with an external resistor of 2.2 kΩ and fed with swine wastewater generated relatively small power (28.2 μW), energy efficiency (0.37%) and Coulombic efficiency (1.5%). Dilution of swine wastewater dramatically improved the power generation as the inhibitory effect was decreased. Zeolite and granular activated carbon were effective in the selective adsorption of ammonia or organic matter in swine wastewater, and so substantially improved the power generation, energy efficiency, and Coulombic efficiency. A smaller external resistor in the circuit was also observed to promote the organic matter degradation and thus to shorten the treatment time. Overall, air-cathode MFCs are promising for generating electrical power from livestock wastewater and meanwhile reducing the level of organic matter and nutrients.

  2. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  3. Enhanced Electricity Generation by Using Cheese Whey Wastewater in A Single-chamber Membrane Less Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A.Z. Al-Fetlawi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs are biochemical-catalyzed systems in which electricity is produced by oxidizing  biodegradable organic matters in presence of  bacteria. Many places suffer from lack of electricity infrastructure or even existence" ,"but in the same area  there is wastewater that can be used to generate clean energy". "A batch system single chamber  and  membrane-less microbial fuel cell is designed with wastewater as inoculum and fuel in the same time(before adding cheese whey at pH =7±0.4 and an operating temperature of 30 0C ". Wastewater samples are collected from the Al-Delmaj marsh site at an initial chemical oxygen demand concentration of 862 mg/l and pH of 7.8 (reduced to 7±0.4 in all experiments by adding HCL acid. Rectangular sheets of graphite and smooth surface carbon fiber of 42 cm2 surface area used for anode and cathode electrodes. The obtained results indicated that the cell performance for the cell using graphite for anode and cathode electrodes is better than that using the carbon fiber of smooth surface .the obtained  open circuit voltage and power per unit surface area (for graphite  were" 190 mV and 5.95 mW/m2 respectively ."Cheese whey as substrate was used to enhance the performance of cell to  439 mV OCV and 121.9mW/m2  maximum power density" .

  4. Models of energy sources for EV and HEV: fuel cells, batteries, ultracapacitors, flywheels and engine-generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mierlo, Joeri; Van den Bossche, Peter; Maggetto, Gaston

    Resulting from a Ph.D. research a Vehicle Simulation Programme (VSP) is proposed and continuously developed. It allows simulating the behaviour of electric, hybrid, fuel cell and internal combustion vehicles while driving any reference cycle [Simulation software for comparison and design of electric, hybrid electric and internal combustion vehicles with respect to energy, emissions and performances, Ph.D. Thesis, Department Electrical Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium, April 2000]. The goal of the simulation programme is to study power flows in vehicle drive trains and the corresponding component losses, as well as to compare different drive train topologies. This comparison can be realised for energy consumption and emissions as well as for performances (acceleration, range, maximum slope, etc.). The software package and its validation are described in [J. Automot. Eng., SAE IEE 215 (9) (2001) 1043L]. Different hybrid and electric drive trains are implemented in the software [Views on hybrid drive train power management strategies, in: Proceedings of the EVS-17, Montreal, Canada, October 2000]. The models used for the energy sources like fuel cells, batteries, ultracapacitors, flywheels and engine-generator units will be discussed in this paper in three stages: first their functionality and characteristics are described, next the way these characteristics can be implemented in a simulation model will be explained and finally some calculation results will illustrate the approach. This paper is aimed to give an overview of simulation models of energy sources for battery, hybrid and fuel cell electric vehicles. Innovative is the extreme modularity and exchangeability of different components functioning as energy sources. The unique iteration algorithm of the simulation programme allows to accurately simulate drive train maximum performances as well as all kind of power management strategies in different types of hybrid drive trains [IEEE Trans. Veh

  5. Fuel prices, emission standards, and generation costs for coal vs natural gas power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratson, Lincoln F; Haerer, Drew; Patiño-Echeverri, Dalia

    2013-05-07

    Low natural gas prices and stricter, federal emission regulations are promoting a shift away from coal power plants and toward natural gas plants as the lowest-cost means of generating electricity in the United States. By estimating the cost of electricity generation (COE) for 304 coal and 358 natural gas plants, we show that the economic viability of 9% of current coal capacity is challenged by low natural gas prices, while another 56% would be challenged by the stricter emission regulations. Under the current regulations, coal plants would again become the dominant least-cost generation option should the ratio of average natural gas to coal prices (NG2CP) rise to 1.8 (it was 1.42 in February 2012). If the more stringent emission standards are enforced, however, natural gas plants would remain cost competitive with a majority of coal plants for NG2CPs up to 4.3.

  6. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control

  7. Comparing the sustainability parameters of renewable, nuclear and fossil fuel electricity generation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Annette; Strezov, Vladimir; Evans, Tim

    2010-09-15

    The sustainability parameters of electricity generation have been assessed by the application of eight key indicators. Photovoltaics, wind, hydro, geothermal, biomass, natural gas, coal and nuclear power have been assessed according to their price, greenhouse gas emissions, efficiency, land use, water use, availability, limitations and social impacts on a per kilowatt hour basis. The relevance of this information to the Australian context is discussed. Also included are the results of a survey on Australian opinions regarding electricity generation, which found that Australian prefer solar electricity above any other method, however coal, biomass and nuclear power have low acceptance.

  8. Raising Generation Tech Preparing Your Children for a Media-Fueled World

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Today's children are being raised as 'digital natives' in a world dominated by popular culture and technology. TV shows, computers, video games, social networking sites, advertisements, and cell phones too often have an unnecessarily strong-and negative? influence on children.  But pulling the plug just isn't an option in a world where being connected is essential for success. In Raising Generation Tech,  noted parenting and new-media expert Dr. Jim Taylor explores how popular culture and technology shape children's lives. The essential message from Raising Generation Tech is that excessive

  9. Efficient decolorization of real dye wastewater and bioelectricity generation using a novel single chamber biocathode-microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2012-09-01

    Large scale applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been severely hindered by several problems such as high internal resistance, low power output, expensive materials, and complicated configuration. To address these issues, a granular activated carbon based single chamber microbial fuel cell (GACB-SCMFC) has been designed using GAC-biocathodes without using any expensive materials for the simultaneous decolorization of real dye wastewater and electricity generation. The GACB-SCMFC produced a power density of 8 W/m(3) which indicates the GAC-biocathode can be a good alternative to platinum and other chemical catalysts. The dye wastewater was primarily treated at the anode and further polishing steps were occurred at the aerobic cathode. Toxicity measurement shows that the effluent after GACB-SCMFC operation was much less toxic compared to the original dye wastewater. Additional advantage of the GACB-SCMFC is that pH was automatically adjusted from 12.2 to 8 during 48 h of hydraulic retention time (HRT). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A general overview of generation IV molten salt reactor (MSR) and the use of thorium as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Carlos H.; Stefani, Giovanni L.; Santos, Thiago A., E-mail: carlos.yamaguchi@usp.br, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    The molten salt reactors (MSRs) make use of fluoride salt as primary cooler, at low pressure. Although considered a generation IV reactor, your concept isn't new, since in the 1960 years the Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a little prototype of 8MWt. Over the 20{sup th} century, other countries, like UK, Japan, Russia, China and France also did research in the area, especially with the use of thorium as fuel. This goes with the fact that Brazil possess the biggest reserve of thorium in the world. In the center of nuclear engineering at IPEN is being created a study group connected to thorium reactors, which purpose is to investigate reactors using thorium to produce {sup 233}U and tailing burn, thus making the MSR using thorium as fuel, an object of study. This present work searches to do a general summary about the researches of MSR's, having as focus the utilization of thorium with the goal being to show it's efficiency and utilization is doable. (author)

  11. Combining hybrid cars and synthetic fuels with electricity generation and carbon capture and storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, O.P.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288519361; van den Broek, M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/092946895; Turkenburg, W.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073416355; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2011-01-01

    We examined the co-evolution of the transportation, and electricity and heat generation sectors in the Netherlands until 2040 using a MARKAL bottom-up cost optimisation model. All scenario variants investigated indicate a switch away from crude oil-based diesel and petrol for transportation. Lowest

  12. Optimization of a thermoelectric generator subsystem for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Xin; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    cell stack. All through this study, different electrical connection styles of all the thermoelectric generator (TEG) modules in the subsystem and their influences are also discussed. In the end, the subsystem configuration is further optimized and a higher subsystem power output is achieved. All TEG...

  13. Nuclear Power and Justice between Generations. A Moral Analysis of Fuel Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taebi, B.

    2010-01-01

    When we produce nuclear power we are depleting a non-renewable resource (uranium) that will eventually not be available to future generations. Furthermore the ensuing nuclear waste needs to be isolated from the biosphere for long periods of time to come. This gives rise to the problem of justice to

  14. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  15. Pressurized air cathodes for enhanced stability and power generation by microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    He, Weihua

    2016-09-30

    Large differences between the water and air pressure in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can deform and damage cathodes. To avoid deformation, the cathode air pressure was controlled to balance pressure differences between the air and water. Raising the air pressures from 0 to 10 kPa at a set cathode potential of −0.3 V (versus Ag/AgCl) enhanced cathode performance by 17%, but pressures ≥25 kPa decreased current and resulted in air leakage into the solution. Matching the air pressure with the water pressure avoided cathode deformation and improved performance. The maximum power density increased by 15%, from 1070 ± 20 to 1230 ± 70 mW m, with balanced air and water pressures of 10–25 kPa. Oxygen partial pressures ≥12.5 kPa in the cathode compartment maintained the oxygen reduction rate to be within 92 ± 1% of that in ambient air. The use of pressurized air flow through the cathode compartments can enable closer spacing of the cathodes compared to passive gas transfer systems, which could make the reactor design more compact. The energy cost of pressurizing the cathodes was estimated to be smaller than the increase in power that resulted from the use of pressurized cathodes.

  16. Nanomaterial characterization and synthesis for solar energy utilization and hydrogen fuel generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Xi, Donjuan; Pei, Qibing; Han, Song; Zhou, Chongwu

    2006-08-01

    Semiconducting metal oxide nanowires represent a class of novel materials that are of superior properties to naoparticles currently used in dye sensitized solar cell and polymer hybrid solar cells. The quasi one-dimensional nanostructure and surface states of nanowires improve carrier mobility and charge transfer through interface interactions of theses nanocomposite materials. Raman spectroscopy, especially resonant Raman spectroscopy, is used to correlate nanomaterial synthesis condition to the structural, optical and electric transport properties that are important to photocatalysis, exciton transport and recombination and hydrogen storage mechanism. For example, highly orientated ZnO nanowires studied with Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy demonstrated the high efficiency of the phonon and electron coupling. These results are compared with that of other ZnO forms such as thin film, polycrystalline powder and solid. The Raman bandwidths and shifts of nanowires revealed the phonon confinement in the quasi one-dimensional nanostructures, which is further demonstrated with In IIO 3 nanowires at 5, 10, 20, 30 nm in diameters. Room temperature photoluminescence results also show band gap shifts with nanowire dimensions. Nanowire sizes, defects and strains, controlled by synthesis conditions, have shown to determine band structure and optical phonon properties. We also discuss characterization and synthesis of carbon nanotube based composite materials including polymer electropolymerization and infiltration. Combining significantly enhanced mechanical compressive strength and excellent electric conductivity, these composite materials offer potentials to fuel cell anode materials as multifunctional hydrogen storage media.

  17. A light-assisted biomass fuel cell for renewable electricity generation from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamousis, Rachel L; Osterloh, Frank E

    2012-08-01

    A solar-energy-driven biomass fuel cell for the production of electricity from wastewater using only air and light as additional resources is described. The device consists of a photoelectrochemical cell that contains a nanostructured titanium dioxide or tungsten trioxide film as photoanode and a platinum air electrode as cathode, in separate compartments. The TiO(2) or WO(3) films are fabricated from TiO(2) nanocrystals or from sodium tungstate solutions on top of fluorine-doped tin dioxide. Devices were tested with electrolyte only, synthetic wastewater, or with aqueous glucose solution, under irradiation with sunlight, broad spectral illumination, and monochromatic light. Measured light conversion efficiencies were between 0.007 % and 1.7 %, depending on conditions. The highest efficiency (1.7 %) and power output (0.73 mW cm(-2)) are determined for TiO(2) electrodes under 395 nm illumination. In contrast to TiO(2), the WO(3) electrodes are active under visible light (>440 nm), but the IPCE value is low (2 %). Apart from limited visible-light absorption, the overall performance of the device is limited by the substrate concentration in the water and by transport resistance through the cell. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Power generation using carbon mesh cathodes with different diffusion layers in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Yong

    2011-11-01

    An inexpensive carbon material, carbon mesh, was examined to replace the more expensive carbon cloth usually used to make cathodes in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different diffusion layers were tested using carbon mesh: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and Goretex cloth. Carbon mesh with a mixture of PDMS and carbon black as a diffusion layer produced a maximum power density of 1355 ± 62 mW m -2 (normalized to the projected cathode area), which was similar to that obtained with a carbon cloth cathode (1390 ± 72 mW m-2). Carbon mesh with a PTFE diffusion layer produced only a slightly lower (6.6%) maximum power density (1303 ± 48 mW m-2). The Coulombic efficiencies were a function of current density, with the highest value for the carbon mesh and PDMS (79%) larger than that for carbon cloth (63%). The cost of the carbon mesh cathode with PDMS/Carbon or PTFE (excluding catalyst and binder costs) is only 2.5% of the cost of the carbon cloth cathode. These results show that low cost carbon materials such as carbon mesh can be used as the cathode in an MFC without reducing the performance compared to more expensive carbon cloth. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling wastewater using a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liping; Logan, Bruce E

    2008-08-01

    Increased interest in sustainable agriculture and bio-based industries requires that we find more energy-efficient methods for treating cellulose-containing wastewaters. We examined the effectiveness of simultaneous electricity production and treatment of a paper recycling plant wastewater using microbial fuel cells. Treatment efficiency was limited by wastewater conductivity. When a 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS, 5.9 mS/cm) was added to the wastewater, power densities reached 501+/-20 mW/m2, with a coulombic efficiency of 16+/-2%. There was efficient removal of soluble organic matter, with 73+/-1% removed based on soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and only slightly greater total removal (76+/-4%) based on total COD (TCOD) over a 500-h batch cycle. Cellulose was nearly completely removed (96+/-1%) during treatment. Further increasing the conductivity (100 mM PBS) increased power to 672+/-27 mW/m2. In contrast, only 144+/-7 mW/m2 was produced using an unamended wastewater (0.8 mS/cm) with TCOD, SCOD, and cellulose removals of 29+/-1%, 51+/-2%, and 16+/-1% (350-h batch cycle). These results demonstrate limitations to treatment efficiencies with actual wastewaters caused by solution conductivity compared to laboratory experiments under more optimal conditions.

  20. Electricity generation from food wastes and characteristics of organic matters in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Tian, Yu; Zuo, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Xiaoyue; Li, Lipin; Su, Xinying

    2016-04-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated as an alternative way to recover electricity from canteen based food waste. Characteristics of the organics in food waste before and after the MFC treatment were analyzed to investigate how the organic matters were biodegraded and transformed during the MFC treatment. A maximum power density of 5.6W/m(3) and an average output voltage of 0.51V were obtained. During the MFC operation, the hydrophilic and acidic fractions were more readily degraded, compared to the neutral fractions. Additionally, aromatic compounds in the hydrophilic fraction were more preferentially removed than non-aromatic compounds. The MFC could easily remove the tryptophan protein-like substances in all fractions and aromatic proteins in hydrophilic and hydrophobic neutral fractions. Additionally, the hydrophobic amide-1 proteins and aliphatic components were readily hydrolyzed and biodegraded in the MFC. These findings may facilitate the pretreatment and posttreatment choices for MFC system fed with food waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutual facilitations of food waste treatment, microbial fuel cell bioelectricity generation and Chlorella vulgaris lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qingjie; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Jiang, Liqun; Yu, Ze

    2016-03-01

    Food waste contains large amount of organic matter that may be troublesome for handing, storage and transportation. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) was successfully constructed with different inoculum densities of Chlorella vulgaris for promoting food waste treatment. Maximum COD removal efficiency was registered with 44% and 25 g CODL(-1)d(-1) of substrate degradation rate when inoculated with the optimal initial density (150 mg L(-1)) of C. vulgaris, which were 2.9 times and 3.1 times higher than that of the abiotic cathode. With the optimum inoculum density of C. vulgaris, the highest open circuit voltage, working voltage and power density of MFC were 260 mV, 170 mV and 19151 mW m(-3), respectively. Besides the high biodiesel quality, promoted by MFC stimulation the biomass productivity and highest total lipid content of C. vulgaris were 207 mg L(-1)d(-1) and 31%, which were roughly 2.7 times and 1.2 times higher than the control group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Next-generation polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells using titanium foam as gas diffusion layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyelim; Kim, Ok-Hee; Kim, Minhyoung; Choe, Heeman; Cho, Yong-Hun; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2014-05-28

    In spite of their high conversion efficiency and no emission of greenhouse gases, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) suffer from prohibitively high cost and insufficient life-span of their core component system, the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this paper, we are proposing Ti foam as a promising alternative electrode material in the MEA. Indeed, it showed a current density of 462 mA cm(-2), being ca. 166% higher than that with the baseline Toray 060 gas diffusion layer (GDL) (278 mA cm(-2)) with 200 ccm oxygen supply at 0.7 V, when used as the anode GDL, because of its unique three-dimensional strut structure promoting highly efficient catalytic reactions. Furthermore, it exhibits superior corrosion resistance with almost no thickness and weight changes in the accelerated corrosion test, as opposed to considerable reductions in the weight and thickness of the conventional GDL. We believe that this paper suggests profound implications in the commercialization of PEMFCs, because the metallic Ti foam provides a longer-term reliability and chemical stability, which can reduce the loss of Pt catalyst and, hence, the cost of PEMFCs.

  3. Microbial diversity structure in acetate single chamber microbial fuel cell for electricity generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Z. Khater

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the performance of acetate feed membrane less single chamber microbial fuel cell and physical characterization of the bio film present on the anode surface using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and 16S rRNA analyzer. The performance has been investigated using Teflon treated carbon paper with 0.3 mg/cm2 Pt/C loaded as a cathode and carbon paper as an anode. The maximum open circuit potential is noticed as 791 mV, the system successfully revealed a maximum power density of 86.1 mW m−2 at stable current density of 354 mA m−2 with high coulombic efficiency of 65% at maximum degradation rate of 96%. SEM showed the dense adherence of microorganisms on the anode. 16S rRNA sequencing results indicates phylogenetic mixture in the communities of anodic biofilm and there is no single dominant bacterial species. The dominant phyla are Firmicutes, Gamma Proteobacteria, Alpha Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, with ten dominant microbial strains: Bacillus firmus, Shewanella profunda, Bacillus isronensis, Brevundimonas bullata, Pseudomonas putida, Planococcus citreus, Micrococcus endophyticus, Acinetobacter tandoii, Bacillus safensis and Shewanella xiamenensis.

  4. Power generation using an activated carbon fiber felt cathode in an upflow microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Qian

    2010-02-01

    An activated carbon fiber felt (ACFF) cathode lacking metal catalysts is used in an upflow microbial fuel cell (UMFC). The maximum power density with the ACFF cathode is 315 mW m-2, compared to lower values with cathodes made of plain carbon paper (67 mW m-2), carbon felt (77 mW m-2), or platinum-coated carbon paper (124 mW m-2, 0.2 mg-Pt cm-2). The addition of platinum to the ACFF cathode (0.2 mg-Pt cm-2) increases the maximum power density to 391 mW m-2. Power production is further increased to 784 mW m-2 by increasing the cathode surface area and shaping it into a tubular form. With ACFF cutting into granules, the maximum power is 481 mW m-2 (0.5 cm granules), and 667 mW m-2 (1.0 cm granules). These results show that ACFF cathodes lacking metal catalysts can be used to substantially increase power production in UMFC compared to traditional materials lacking a precious metal catalyst. © 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Comparative study on power generation of dual-cathode microbial fuel cell according to polarization methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-yu; Ryu, Wyan-seuk; Cho, Sung-il; Lim, Kyeong-ho

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) exist in various forms depending on the type of pollutant to be removed and the expected performance. Dual-cathode MFCs, with their simple structure, are capable of removing both organic matter and nitrogen. Moreover, various methods are available for the collection of polarization data, which can be used to calculate the maximum power density, an important factor of MFCs. Many researchers prefer the method of varying the external resistance in a single-cycle due to the short measurement time and high accuracy. This study compared power densities of dual-cathode MFCs in a single-cycle with values calculated over multi-cycles to determine the optimal polarization method. External resistance was varied from high to low and vice versa in the single-cycle, to calculate power density. External resistance was organized in descending order with initial start-up at open circuit voltage (OCV), and then it was organized in descending order again after the initial start-up at 1000 Ω. As a result, power density was underestimated at the anoxic cathode when the external resistance was varied from low to high, and overestimated at the aerobic cathode and anoxic cathode when external resistance at OCV was reduced following initial start-up. In calculating the power densities of dual-cathode MFCs, this paper recommends the method of gradually reducing the external resistance after initial start-up with high external resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Treatment of carbon fiber brush anodes for improving power generation in air–cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Feng, Yujie

    2010-04-02

    Carbon brush electrodes have been used to provide high surface areas for bacterial growth and high power densities in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A high-temperature ammonia gas treatment has been used to enhance power generation, but less energy-intensive methods are needed for treating these electrodes in practice. Three different treatment methods are examined here for enhancing power generation of carbon fiber brushes: acid soaking (CF-A), heating (CF-H), and a combination of both processes (CF-AH). The combined heat and acid treatment improve power production to 1370 mW m-2, which is 34% larger than the untreated control (CF-C, 1020 mW m-2). This power density is 25% higher than using only acid treatment (1100 mW m-2) and 7% higher than that using only heat treatment (1280 mW m-2). XPS analysis of the treated and untreated anode materials indicates that power increases are related to higher N1s/C1s ratios and a lower C-O composition. These findings demonstrate efficient and simple methods for improving power generation using graphite fiber brushes, and provide insight into reasons for improving performance that may help to further increase power through other graphite fiber modifications. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Addressing Palm Biodiesel as Renewable Fuel for the Indonesian Power Generation Sector: Java-Madura-Bali System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarianto Indrawan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy security defined as how to equitably provide available, affordable, reliable efficient, environmentally friendly, proactively governed and socially acceptable energy services to end user. It has in recent years taken attention of policymakers in different parts of the world. Formulating policy to improve energy security is mandatory, not only because of depleting fossil resource, but also implementing diversity of energy source since utilization abundant renewable energy resources can increase the security of energy supply. One of the abundant renewable energy resources in Indonesia is palm oil. This study analyses the utilization of palm biodiesel for Indonesian power generation sector in the Java-Madura-Bali (JAMALI system. Two scenarios were created by projecting the demand and environmental impact as well as GHG emissions reduction over the next 25 years. The first scenario subjects on current energy policy, while the second scenario is to substitute of fossil fuel which is still used in the JAMALI power generation system. Effect of palm biodiesel on emission of Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Monoxide, Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Particulate Matter, and Volatile Organic Compounds were estimated for each scenario. An externality analysis to complete the environmental analysis was conducted and resource analysis of palm oil plantation based biodiesel was also estimated. Finally, the economics feasibility of palm biodiesel in the power generation sector was analyzed.

  8. Effects of draw solutions and membrane conditions on electricity generation and water flux in osmotic microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zheng; He, Zhen

    2012-04-01

    This study provided an early effort to investigate the draw solutions as catholytes, FO membrane conditions, and backwash for membrane cleaning in an osmotic microbial fuel cell (OsMFC). The results demonstrated that sodium chloride was a suitable candidate as a catholyte solute with good performance in both electricity generation and water flux, although its pH required buffering via acid addition. Adding a small amount of hydrochloric acid decreased the catholyte pH from 9.0 to 2.5 and increased the current generation by 50%, but did not affect water flux. It was also found that the fouled FO membrane improved electricity generation but lost the function of water flux. The damaged FO membrane resulted in a water flux of 0.39 LMH, much lower than 2-3 LMH with a new FO membrane. Backwash with adding NaCl (0.2-0.5M) into the anolyte was examined but did not obviously alleviate membrane fouling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of electricity generation from ultrasonic and heat/alkaline pretreatment of different sludge types using microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Eun; Yoon, Joung Yee; Gurung, Anup; Kim, Dong-Jin

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of different sludge pretreatment methods (ultrasonic vs. combined heat/alkali) with varied sources of municipal sewage sludge (primary sludge (PS), secondary excess sludge (ES), anaerobic digestion sludge (ADS)) on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Introduction of ultrasonically pretreated sludge (PS, ES, ADS) to MFCs generated maximum power densities of 13.59, 9.78 and 12.67mW/m(2) and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiencies of 87%, 90% and 57%, respectively. The sludge pretreated by combined heat/alkali (0.04N NaOH at 120°C for 1h) produced maximum power densities of 10.03, 5.21 and 12.53mW/m(2) and SCOD removal efficiencies of 83%, 75% and 74% with PS, ES and ADS samples, respectively. Higher SCOD by sludge pretreatment enhanced performance of the MFCs and the electricity generation was linearly proportional to the SCOD removal, especially for ES. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of Pseudomonas species producing phenazine-based metabolites in the anodes of microbial fuel cells to improve electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The Hai Pham; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy [Ghent Univ. (BE). Lab. of Microbial Ecology and Technology (LabMET); De Maeyer, Katrien; Hoefte, Monica [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Lab. of Phytopathology; Rabaey, Korneel [Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). Advanced Water Management Centre

    2008-10-15

    The rate of anodic electron transfer is one of the factors limiting the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). It is known that phenazine-based metabolites produced by Pseudomonas species can function as electron shuttles for Pseudomonas themselves and also, in a syntrophic association, for Gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we have investigated whether phenazine-based metabolites and their producers could be used to improve the electricity generation of a MFC operated with a mixed culture. Both anodic supernatants obtained from MFCs operated with a Pseudomonas strain (P-PCA) producing phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) and those from MFCs operated with a strain (P-PCN) producing phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) exerted similarly positive effects on the electricity generation of a mixed culture. Replacing supernatants of MFCs operated with a mixed culture with supernatants of MFCs operated with P-PCN could double the currents generated. Purified PCA and purified PCN had similar effects. If the supernatant of an engineered strain overproducing PCN was used, the effect could be maintained over longer time courses, resulting in a 1.5-fold increase in the production of charge. Bioaugmentation of the mixed culture MFCs using slow release tubes containing P-PCN not only doubled the currents but also maintained the effect over longer periods. The results demonstrated the electron-shuttling effect of phenazine-based compounds produced by Pseudomonas species and their capacity to improve the performance of MFCs operated with mixed cultures. (orig.)

  11. Characterization of the COD removal, electricity generation, and bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells treating molasses wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae G; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-11-09

    The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, electricity generation, and microbial communities were compared in 3 types of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) treating molasses wastewater. Single-chamber MFCs without and with a proton exchange membrane (PEM), and double-chamber MFC were constructed. A total of 10,000 mg L(-1) COD of molasses wastewater was continuously fed. The COD removal, electricity generation, and microbial communities in the two types of single-chamber MFCs were similar, indicating that the PEM did not enhance the reactor performance. The COD removal in the single-chamber MFCs (89-90%) was higher than that in the double-chamber MFC (50%). However, electricity generation in the double-chamber MFC was higher than that in the single-chamber MFCs. The current density (80 mA m(-2)) and power density (17 mW m(-2)) in the double-chamber MFC were 1.4- and 2.2-times higher than those in the single-chamber MFCs, respectively. The bacterial community structures in single- and double-chamber MFCs were also distinguishable. The amount of Proteobacteria in the double-chamber MFC was 2-3 times higher than those in the single-chamber MFCs. For the archaeal community, Methanothrix (96.4%) was remarkably dominant in the single-chamber MFCs, but Methanobacterium (35.1%), Methanosarcina (28.3%), and Methanothrix (16.2%) were abundant in the double-chamber MFC.

  12. Elaboration of Copper-Oxygen Mediated C–H Activation Chemistry in Consideration of Future Fuel and Feedstock Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Yoon; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    To contribute solutions for current energy concerns, improvements in the efficiency of C-H bond cleavage chemistry, e.g., selective oxidation of methane to methanol, could minimize losses in natural gas usage or produce feedstocks for fuels. Oxidative C-H activation is also a component of polysaccharide degradation, affording alternative biofuels from abundant biomass. Thus, an understanding of active-site chemistry in copper monooxygenases, those activating strong C-H bonds is briefly reviewed. Then, recent advances in the synthesis-generation and study of various copper-oxygen intermediates are highlighted. Of special interest are cupric-superoxide, Cu-hydroperoxo and Cu-oxy complexes. Such investigations can contribute to an enhanced future application of C-H oxidation or oxygenation processes using air, as concerning societal energy goals. PMID:25756327

  13. Alkaline-acid Zn-H2O Fuel Cell for Simultaneous Generation of Hydrogen and Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenhai; Cai, Pingwei; Li, Yan; Wang, Genxiang

    2018-01-08

    An alkaline-acid Zn-H2O fuel cell is proposed for simultaneously generating electricity with an open circuit voltage of about 1.25 V and producing H2 with almost 100% Faradic efficiency. We demonstrate the as-developed hybrids cell, thanks to harvesting energy from both the electrochemical neutralization and electrochemical Zn oxidation, can deliver a power density of up to 80 mW cm-2, an energy density of 934 Wh kg-1, and maintain long-term stability for H2 producing with an output voltage of 1.16 V at a current density of 10 mA cm-2. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Anolyte recycling enhanced bioelectricity generation of the buffer-free single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yueping; Chen, Jinli; Shi, Yugang; Li, Xiufen; Yang, Na; Wang, Xinhua

    2017-11-01

    Anolyte acidification is an inevitable restriction for the bioelectricity generation of buffer-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, acidification of the buffer-free KCl anolyte has been thoroughly eliminated through anolyte recycling. The accumulated HCO 3 - concentration in the recycled KCl anolyte was above 50mM, which played as natural buffer and elevated the anolyte pH to above 8. The maximum power density (P max ) increased from 322.9mWm -2 to 527.2mWm -2 , which is comparable with the phosphate buffered MFC. Besides Geobacter genus, the gradually increased anolyte pH and conductivity induced the growing of electrochemically active Geoalkalibacter genus, in the anode biofilm. Anolyte recycling is a feasible strategy to strengthen the self-buffering capacity of buffer-free MFCs, thoroughly eliminate the anolyte acidification and prominently enhance the electric power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transient signal generation in a self-assembled nanosystem fueled by ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzato, Cristian; Prins, Leonard J.

    2015-07-01

    A fundamental difference exists in the way signal generation is dealt with in natural and synthetic systems. While nature uses the transient activation of signalling pathways to regulate all cellular functions, chemists rely on sensory devices that convert the presence of an analyte into a steady output signal. The development of chemical systems that bear a closer analogy to living ones (that is, require energy for functioning, are transient in nature and operate out-of-equilibrium) requires a paradigm shift in the design of such systems. Here we report a straightforward strategy that enables transient signal generation in a self-assembled system and show that it can be used to mimic key features of natural signalling pathways, which are control over the output signal intensity and decay rate, the concentration-dependent activation of different signalling pathways and the transient downregulation of catalytic activity. Overall, the reported methodology provides temporal control over supramolecular processes.

  16. Analysis and design of an ultrahigh temperature hydrogen-fueled MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moder, Jeffrey P.; Myrabo, Leik N.; Kaminski, Deborah A.

    1993-01-01

    A coupled gas dynamics/radiative heat transfer analysis of partially ionized hydrogen, in local thermodynamic equilibrium, flowing through an ultrahigh temperature (10,000-20,000 K) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator is performed. Gas dynamics are modeled by a set of quasi-one-dimensional, nonlinear differential equations which account for friction, convective and radiative heat transfer, and the interaction between the ionized gas and applied magnetic field. Radiative heat transfer is modeled using nongray, absorbing-emitting 2D and 3D P-1 approximations which permit an arbitrary variation of the spectral absorption coefficient with frequency. Gas dynamics and radiative heat transfer are coupled through the energy equation and through the temperature- and density-dependent absorption coefficient. The resulting nonlinear elliptic problem is solved by iterative methods. Design of such MHD generators as onboard, open-cycle, electric power supplies for a particular advanced airbreathing propulsion concept produced an efficient and compact 128-MWe generator characterized by an extraction ratio of 35.5 percent, a power density of 10,500 MWe/cu m, and a specific (extracted) energy of 324 MJe/kg of hydrogen. The maximum wall heat flux and total wall heat load were 453 MW/sq m and 62 MW, respectively.

  17. Art/Net/Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik; Lindstrøm, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The seminar Art|Net|Work deals with two important changes in our culture. On one side, the network has become essential in the latest technological development. The Internet has entered a new phase, Web 2.0, including the occurrence of as ‘Wiki’s’, ‘Peer-2-Peer’ distribution, user controlled...... the praxis of the artist. We see different kinds of interventions and activism (including ‘hacktivism’) using the network as a way of questioning the invisible rules that govern public and semi-public spaces. Who ‘owns’ them? What kind of social relationships do they generate? On what principle...

  18. Analysis on the electrothermal performance of a energy generation system using fuel cells; Analise acerca do desempenho eletrotermico de um sistema de geracao de energia com celulas a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtado, J.G. de M.; Serra, E.T. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Codeceira Neto, A. [Companhia Hidro Eletrica de Sao Francisco (CHESF), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This work performs a study centered on the analysis of the electrothermal performance of a power generation system with proton exchange polymer membrane fuel cells, and presents considerations related to the optimization of the power generation and the operational performance of the cogeneration system considering the 5 kW nominal electric power of the Fuel Cells Laboratory of CEPEL - ELETROBRAS. The obtained results indicates that the energy generation system base on the fuel cells presents optimum operation temperatures of 40 grade Celsius.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of biofuels as fuels for high temperature fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milewski Jarosław

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on mathematical modeling and numerical simulations, applicativity of various biofuels on high temperature fuel cell performance are presented. Governing equations of high temperature fuel cell modeling are given. Adequate simulators of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC have been done and described. Performance of these fuel cells with different biofuels is shown. Some characteristics are given and described. Advantages and disadvantages of various biofuels from the system performance point of view are pointed out. An analysis of various biofuels as potential fuels for SOFC and MCFC is presented. The results are compared with both methane and hydrogen as the reference fuels. The biofuels are characterized by both lower efficiency and lower fuel utilization factors compared with methane. The presented results are based on a 0D mathematical model in the design point calculation. The governing equations of the model are also presented. Technical and financial analysis of high temperature fuel cells (SOFC and MCFC are shown. High temperature fuel cells can be fed by biofuels like: biogas, bioethanol, and biomethanol. Operational costs and possible incomes of those installation types were estimated and analyzed. A comparison against classic power generation units is shown. A basic indicator net present value (NPV for projects was estimated and commented.

  20. Sustainable power generation in microbial fuel cells using bicarbonate buffer and proton transfer mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanzhen; Hu, Hongqiang; Liu, Hong

    2007-12-01

    Phosphate buffer solution has been commonly used in MFC studiesto maintain a suitable pH for electricity-generating bacteria and/or to increase the solution conductivity. However, addition of a high concentration of phosphate buffer in MFCs could be expensive, especially for wastewater treatment. In this study, the performances of MFCs with cloth electrode assemblies (CEA) were evaluated using bicarbonate buffer solutions. A maximum power density of 1550 W/m3 (2770 mW/ m2) was obtained at a current density of 0.99 mA/cm2 using a pH 9 bicarbonate buffer solution. Such a power density was 38.6% higher than that using a pH 7 phosphate buffer at the same concentration of 0.2 M. Based on the quantitative comparison of free proton transfer rates, diffusion rates of pH buffer species, and the current generated, a facilitated proton transfer mechanism was proposed for MFCs in the presence of the pH buffers. The excellent performance of MFCs using bicarbonate as pH buffer and proton carrier indicates that bicarbonate buffer could be served as a low-cost and effective pH buffer for practical applications, especially for wastewater treatment.

  1. Determination of the Quantitative Characteristics of the Engine of a Household Power Plant when Using Generator Gas as an Alternative Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotnikov S. A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is due to the need to study the feasibility of replacing traditional fuel with alternative types (generator gas when using a household power plant. The purpose of the study is to obtain the value of a small-displacement engine GG-2700 with a working volume of 1563 cm3 when it works on commercial fuel (gasoline and generator gas. For this purpose, the authors developed an experimental setup on the basis of a small-sized household power station with fixation of variable parameters on a personal computer and a graphical representation of the measurement results. The records of the indicator diagrams allowed determining the burning time of various fuels. As a result, for the first time, there were obtained quantitative indicators of fuel efficiency and toxicity of exhaust gases of the small-displacement engine GG-2700 with a working volume of 1563 cm3 when using commercial fuel (gasoline and generator gas. The analysis of the data showed an increase in the specific consumption of generator gas in comparison with gasoline from 34.6% to 50.4% and a decrease in the content of toxic components in the exhaust gases: carbon monoxide (CO – in 1.05 ... 1.25 times, hydrocarbons (CxHy - in 1,1 ... 1,39 times, nitrogen oxides (NOх - in 3,9 ... 5,7 times. The obtained results prove the expediency of using generator gas as an alternative fuel for the engine of a household power plant.

  2. Fast Biofilm Formation and Its Role on Power Generation in Palm Oil Mill Effluent Fed Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Maksudur R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, fast formation and characterization of biofilm and its role on power generation in the microbial fuel cell (MFC were investigated and the biofilm formation was also correlated with electrochemical behavior of the MFC. MFC was operated with palm oil mill effluent as substrate and carbon cloth as electrode. A biofilm comprising electrochemically active bacteria on the anode surface showed crucial effect to enhance the performance of the MFC. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the presence of biofilm and scanning electron microscopy examined a biofilm and microbial clumps on electrode surface. The current density was directly dependent on the biofilm growth and increased significantly during the initial growth. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was done to monitor the progress of the anode colonization by the microorganisms in the MFC. The findings of this study demonstrated that biofilm formation facilitated electron transport as well as decreased the charge transfer resistance of the anode and thus increased the power generation in the cell.

  3. Intermittent contact of fluidized anode particles containing exoelectrogenic biofilms for continuous power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jia

    2014-09-01

    Current generation in a microbial fuel cell can be limited by the amount of anode surface area available for biofilm formation, and slow substrate degradation kinetics. Increasing the anode surface area can increase the amount of biofilm, but performance will improve only if the anode material is located near the cathode to minimize solution internal resistance. Here we demonstrate that biofilms do not have to be in constant contact with the anode to produce current in an MFC. Granular activated carbon particles enriched with exoelectrogenic biofilm are fluidized (by stirring) in the anode chamber of the MFC, resulting in only intermittent contact between the particles and the anode current collector. The maximum power density generated is 951 ± 10 mW m-2, compared to 813 ± 2 mW m-2 for the control without stirring (packed bed), and 525 ± 1 mW m-2 in the absence of GAC particles and without stirring. GAC-biofilm particles demonstrate capacitor-like behavior, but achieve nearly constant discharge conditions due to the large number of particles that contact the current collector. These results provide proof of concept for the development of flowable electrode reactors, where anode biofilms can be electrically charged in a separate storage tank and then rapidly discharged in compact anode chambers. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Hybrid system up-flow constructed wetland integrated with microbial fuel cell for simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Yoong-Ling; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Oon, Yoong-Sin; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur; Thung, Wei-Eng

    2015-06-01

    An innovative design of upflow constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell (UFCW-MFC) planted with cattail was used for simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity generation. The electrodes material employed in the study was carbon felt. The main aim of this study is to assess the performance of the UFCW coupling with MFC in term of ability to treat wastewater and the capability to generate bioelectricity. The oxidation reduction potential (ORP) and dissolved oxygen (DO) profile showed that the anaerobic and aerobic regions were well developed in the lower and upper bed, respectively, of UFCW-MFC. Biodegradation of organic matter, nitrification and denitrification was investigated and the removal efficiencies of COD, NO3(-), NH4(+) were 100%, 40%, and 91%, respectively. The maximum power density of 6.12 mW m(-2) and coulombic efficiency of 8.6% were achieved at electrode spacing of anode 1 (A1) and cathode (15 cm). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing organic matter removal, biopolymer recovery and electricity generation from distillery wastewater by combining fungal fermentation and microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh Ray, S; Ghangrekar, M M

    2015-01-01

    For enhancing organic matter removal from cereal-based distillery stillage two-stage treatment consisting of fermentation by Aspergillus awamori followed by microbial fuel cell (MFC) is proposed. Considerable reduction in total and soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) up to 70% and 40%, respectively, along with 98% reduction of suspended solids (SS) has been achieved during fungal pretreatment. The process generated chitosan, a useful fermentation byproduct from fungal mycelia, as 0.6-0.7g/l of settled sludge with mycelium (3.8% solids). Prior treatment of wastewater with fungal strain enhanced the power generation in MFC by 2.9 times at an organic loading rate of 1.5kgCOD/m(3)day, demonstrating soluble COD reduction of 92% in MFC. While treating distillery wastewater, this two-stage integrated biological process demonstrated overall 99% COD removal and almost complete removal of SS, delivering ample scope for scale-up and industrial application to offer effective solution for distillery wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and electricity generation in solar photocatalytic fuel cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Voon, Chun-Hong; Wong, Yee-Shian; Yusoff, NikAthirah; Lee, Sin-Li; Yusuf, Sara Yasina

    2017-10-01

    The photocatalytic fuel cell (PFC) system was developed in order to study the effect of several operating parameters in degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and its electricity generation. Light irradiation, initial dye concentration, aeration, pH and cathode electrode are the operating parameters that might give contribution in the efficiency of PFC system. The degradation of RB5 depends on the presence of light irradiation and solar light gives better performance to degrade the azo dye. The azo dye with low initial concentration decolorizes faster compared to higher initial concentration and presence of aeration in PFC system would enhance its performance. Reactive Black 5 rapidly decreased at higher pH due to the higher amount of OH generated at higher pH and Pt-loaded carbon (Pt/C) was more suitable to be used as cathode in PFC system compared to Cu foil and Fe foil. The rapid decolorization of RB5 would increase their voltage output and in addition, it would also increase their V oc , J sc and P max . The breakage of azo bond and aromatic rings was confirmed through UV-Vis spectrum and COD analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Azo dyes wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation in a novel process of electrolysis cell combined with microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haiming; Wang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    A new process of electrolysis cell (EC) coupled with microbial fuel cell (MFC) was developed here and its feasibility in methyl red (MR) wastewater treatment and simultaneous electricity generation was assessed. Results indicate that an excellent MR removal and electricity production performance was achieved, where the decolorization and COD removal efficiencies were 100% and 89.3%, respectively and a 0.56V of cell voltage output was generated. Electrolysis voltage showed a positive influence on decolorization rate (DR) but also cause a rapid decrease in current efficiency (CE). Although a low COD removal rate of 38.5% was found in EC system, biodegradability of MR solution was significantly enhanced, where the averaged DR was 85.6%. Importantly, COD removal rate in EC-MFC integrated process had a 50.8% improvement compared with the single EC system. The results obtained here would be beneficial to provide a prospective alternative for azo dyes wastewater treatment and power production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Study on ammonium and organics removal combined with electricity generation in a continuous flow microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuxin; Li, Lan; Li, Huiqiang; Wang, Hui; Yang, Ping

    2017-11-01

    A continuous microbial fuel cell system was constructed treating ammonium/organics rich wastewater. Operational performance of MFC system, mechanisms of ammonium removal, effect of ammonium on organics removal and energy output, C and N balance of anode chamber and microbial community analysis of anode chamber were studied. It was concluded that 0.0914kg/m 3 d NH 4 + -N and 5.739kg/m 3 d COD were removed from anode chamber and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) occurred in cathode chamber resulting in COD, TN removal rate of 88.53%, 71.35% respectively. Excess ammonium affected energy output and the MFC system reached maximum energy output of 816.8mV and 62.94mW/m 3 . In anode chamber, Spirochaetes bacterium sp., Methanobacterium formicicum sp. was predominant in bacteria, archaea communities respectively which contributed to wastewater treatment and electricity generation. This study showed the potential for practical application of continuous flow MFC system treating ammonium/organics rich wastewater and achieving electricity generation simultaneously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Power generation using spinel manganese-cobalt oxide as a cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Gad-Allah, Tarek A; El-Khatib, K M; El-Gohary, Fatma

    2011-11-01

    This study focused on the use of spinel manganese-cobalt (Mn-Co) oxide, prepared by a solid state reaction, as a cathode catalyst to replace platinum in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) applications. Spinel Mn-Co oxides, with an Mn/Co atomic ratios of 0.5, 1, and 2, were prepared and examined in an air cathode MFCs which was fed with a molasses-laden synthetic wastewater and operated in batch mode. Among the three Mn-Co oxide cathodes and after 300 h of operation, the Mn-Co oxide catalyst with Mn/Co atomic ratio of 2 (MnCo-2) exhibited the highest power generation 113 mW/m2 at cell potential of 279 mV, which were lower than those for the Pt catalyst (148 mW/m2 and 325 mV, respectively). This study indicated that using spinel Mn-Co oxide to replace platinum as a cathodic catalyst enhances power generation, increases contaminant removal, and substantially reduces the cost of MFCs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION USING THE PLUG POWER SU1 FUEL CELL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Plug Power SU1 Fuel Cell System manufactured by Plug Power. The SU1 is a proton exchange membrane fuel cell that requires hydrogen (H2) as fuel. H2 is generally not available, so the ...

  12. Battery-free Wireless Sensor Network For Advanced Fossil-Fuel Based Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jia

    2011-02-28

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the project supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FG26-07NT4306. The aim of the project was to conduct basic research into battery-free wireless sensing mechanism in order to develop novel wireless sensors and sensor network for physical and chemical parameter monitoring in a harsh environment. Passive wireless sensing platform and five wireless sensors including temperature sensor, pressure sensor, humidity sensor, crack sensor and networked sensors developed and demonstrated in our laboratory setup have achieved the objective for the monitoring of various physical and chemical parameters in a harsh environment through remote power and wireless sensor communication, which is critical to intelligent control of advanced power generation system. This report is organized by the sensors developed as detailed in each progress report.

  13. Technological evaluation of fuel cells using natural gas for distributed power generation; Avaliacao tecnologica da utilizacao de gas natural em celulas a combustivel para geracao distribuida de energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Mauricio O. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia Mecanica; Giannini, Marcio P.; Arouca, Mauricio C. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Planejamento Energetico

    2004-07-01

    The search for sustainable and more rational means of power generation motivates the scientific crew to search for more efficient and cleaner systems. Oil dependence becomes from the kind of development that the humanity had and cannot be dismissed. The question is how to use this source in a more intelligent way. Fuel Cells are electrochemical devices that convert into electric energy the chemical energy from oxi-reduction reactions between a fuel and an oxidant. The current fuel used in a Fuel Cell is hydrogen and oxygen is the oxidant. The great advantage of this device is its efficiency, higher than the one achieved with internal combustion engines. Also Fuel Cells are not limited by Carnot's efficiency. This paper is about the implementation of a distributed generation system using Fuel Cells. Technical aspects are approached together with economical and environmental needs. The already existence of Gas pipelines and the grown production of Natural Gas presented by Brazil turns it into a good market for the implementation of this energy source. The evaluation of this paper shows that is technically possible to use NG in Fuel Cells, mostly in South and Southeast regions, applying the distributed generation of energy concept. The most interesting in a strategic manner is that Brazil already have an indication that it's capable of developing this technology, opening a new market tuning with world's new technological developments. Many research centers develop this technology, not only from the cell composition itself, but also manufacturing techniques. (author)

  14. Electricity generation from eucalyptus and bagasse by sugar mills in Nicaragua: a comparison with fuel oil electricity generation on the basis of costs, macro-economic impacts and environmental emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broek, R. van den; Turkenburg, W. [Utrecht University (Netherlands). Dept. of Science, Technology and Society; Burg, T. van den [University of Twente (Netherlands). Faculty of Public Administration and Public Policy; Wijk, A. van [Ecofys, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Two sugar mills in Nicaragua plan to generate electricity from bagasse during the sugarcane season and eucalyptus during the rest of the year, and to sell it to the national grid. This study compared this concept with the most logical alternative at the moment, which is electricity generated from fuel oil. Costs, macro-economic impacts and environmental emissions are considered. The low cost of land and labour means that eucalyptus can be produced more cheaply than fuel oil (1.7 as compared to 3.2 dollars/GJ{sub LHV}). Consequently, it was calculated that a sugar mill can produce electricity from biomass for 4.9 c/kWh as compared to 5.8 c/kWh for electricity from an oil fired plant. About 64% of the money spent on biomass power stays within Nicaragua, thus contributing to its GDP, whereas in the case of fuel oil 83% goes abroad. The employment generated by the production of electricity from fuel oil is 15 person.yr/MW.yr, compared to 32 person.yr/MW.yr for biomass. Comparing biomass with fuel oil, emissions of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} equivalents are, respectively, 67 and 18 times lower. Particulate emissions can be much higher in the biomass case because of lack of flue gas cleaning. We can conclude that biomass electricity generation by sugar mills in Nicaragua can compete with power generation from fuel oil. Moreover, it has an overall better environmental performance, creates double the amount of jobs, and contributes about four times as much to the GDP of Nicaragua. (author)

  15. Next-Generation Electrochemical Energy Materials for Intermediate Temperature Molten Oxide Fuel Cells and Ion Transport Molten Oxide Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, Valery V

    2017-02-21

    High temperature electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and oxygen separators based on ceramic materials are used for efficient energy conversion. These devices generally operate in the temperature range of 800-1000 °C. The high operating temperatures lead to accelerated degradation of the SOFC and oxygen separator materials. To solve this problem, the operating temperatures of these electrochemical devices must be lowered. However, lowering the temperature is accompanied by decreasing the ionic conductivity of fuel cell electrolyte and oxygen separator membrane. Therefore, there is a need to search for alternative electrolyte and membrane materials that have high ionic conductivity at lower temperatures. A great many opportunities exist for molten oxides as electrochemical energy materials. Because of their unique electrochemical properties, the molten oxide innovations can offer significant benefits for improving energy efficiency. In particular, the newly developed electrochemical molten oxide materials show high ionic conductivities at intermediate temperatures (600-800 °C) and could be used in molten oxide fuel cells (MOFCs) and molten oxide membranes (MOMs). The molten oxide materials containing both solid grains and liquid channels at the grain boundaries have advantages compared to the ceramic materials. For example, the molten oxide materials are ductile, which solves a problem of thermal incompatibility (difference in coefficient of thermal expansion, CTE). Besides, the outstanding oxygen selectivity of MOM materials allows us to separate ultrahigh purity oxygen from air. For their part, the MOFC electrolytes show the highest ionic conductivity at intermediate temperatures. To evaluate the potential of molten oxide materials for technological applications, the relationship between the microstructure of these materials and their transport and mechanical properties must be revealed. This Account summarizes the latest results on

  16. Hazardous waste and used oil fuel burning; Continuing regulatory concerns for generators, marketers and burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelpel, J.W. (Honigman Miller Schwartz and Cohn, Detroit, MI (US))

    1987-01-01

    With the closing of interim status 'windows' and with the interest of many present HWF blenders and burners in restricting entry into the field, the concerns and opportunities associated with the blending and burning marketplace remain topical and in some areas not yet clearly defined. Also, further regulation, such as the promised rules for burners due in April, 1987, may force some to leave the field, thus creating additional concerns and opportunities. In any event, because hazardous wastes with substantial heat value will be generated for many years to come and because of the present load on available hazardous waste incinerators, blending and burning of HWF and used oil promise to remain an extremely important means of destruction of these materials. The author presents a discussion of the following areas: history, who can blend and who can't, who can burn and who can't, regulation of combustion residuals, impact of the land disposal ban rules, and state and other federal regulatory impacts.

  17. Evaluation of organic matter removal and electricity generation by using integrated microbial fuel cells for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Ishida, Mitsuyoshi; Ogino, Akifumi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    A floating all-in-one type of microbial fuel cell (Fa-MFC) that allows simple operation and installation in existing wastewater reservoirs for decomposition of organic matter was designed. A prototype cell was constructed by fixing a tubular floater to an assembly composed of a proton-exchange membrane and an air-cathode. To compare anode materials, carbon-cloth anodes or carbon-brush anodes were included in the assembly. The fabricated assemblies were floated in 1-L beakers filled with acetate medium. Both reactors removed acetate at a rate of 133-181 mg/L/d. The Fa-MFC quipped with brush anodes generated a 1.7-fold higher maximum power density (197 mW/m(2)-cathode area) than did that with cloth anodes (119 mW/m(2)-cathode area). To evaluate the performance of the Fa-MFCs on more realistic substrates, artificial wastewater, containing peptone and meat extract, was placed in a 2-L beaker, and the Fa-MFC with brush anodes was floated in the beaker. The Fa-MFC removed the chemical oxygen demand of the wastewater at a rate of 465-1029 mg/L/d, and generated a maximum power density of 152 mW/m(2)-cathode area. When the Fa-MFC was fed with actual livestock wastewater, the biological oxygen demand of the wastewater was removed at a rate of 45-119 mg/L/d, with electricity generation of 95 mW/m(2)-cathode area. Bacteria related to Geobacter sulfurreducens were predominantly detected in the anode biofilm, as deduced from the analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence.

  18. Numerical model of a thermoelectric generator with compact plate-fin heat exchanger for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Chen, Min

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of an exhaust heat recovery system for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) stack. The system is designed as thermoelectric generators (TEGs) sandwiched in the walls of a compact plate-fin heat exchanger. Its model is based...

  19. Multiregional environmental comparison of fossil fuel power generation-Assessment of the contribution of fugitive emissions from conventional and unconventional fossil resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, Evert A.; Ramirez, Andrea; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the influence of fugitive methane emissions from coal, natural gas, and shale gas extraction on the greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of fossil fuel power generation through its life cycle. A multiregional hybridized life cycle assessment (LCA) model is used to evaluate

  20. Analysis of the design and economics of molten carbonate fuel cell tri-generation systems providing heat and power for commercial buildings and H2 for FC vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuping; Ogden, Joan; Yang, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    This study models the operation of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) tri-generation systems for “big box” store businesses that combine grocery and retail business, and sometimes gasoline retail. Efficiency accounting methods and parameters for MCFC tri-generation systems have been developed. Interdisciplinary analysis and an engineering/economic model were applied for evaluating the technical, economic, and environmental performance of distributed MCFC tri-generation systems, and for exploring the optimal system design. Model results show that tri-generation is economically competitive with the conventional system, in which the stores purchase grid electricity and NG for heat, and sell gasoline fuel. The results are robust based on sensitivity analysis considering the uncertainty in energy prices and capital cost. Varying system sizes with base case engineering inputs, energy prices, and cost assumptions, it is found that there is a clear tradeoff between the portion of electricity demand covered and the capital cost increase of bigger system size. MCFC Tri-generation technology provides lower emission electricity, heat, and H2 fuel. With NG as feedstock the CO2 emission can be reduced by 10%-43.6%, depending on how the grid electricity is generated. With renewable methane as feedstock CO2 emission can be further reduced to near zero.

  1. Commercialization scenarios of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications for stationary power generation in the United States by the year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Stephen; Mahadevan, Kathya

    Battelle is identifying the most likely markets and economic impacts of stationary polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells in the range of 1-250 kW in the U.S. by the year 2015. For this task, Battelle is using the Interactive Future Simulations (IFS™), an analytical modeling and forecasting tool that uses expert judgment, trend analysis, and cross-impact analysis methods to generate most likely future conditions for PEM fuel cell applications, market acceptance, commercial viability, and economic impacts. The cross-impact model contains 28 descriptors including commercial and technological advances in both polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells and fossil fuel technologies, sources of hydrogen, investments, public policy, environmental regulation, value to consumers, commercialization leadership, modes of generation, and the reliability and prices of grid electricity. One likely scenario to the year 2015 is that the PEM fuel cells will be limited to commercial and industrial customers in the range of 50-200 kW with a market size less than US$ 5 billion a year.

  2. Steam and partial oxidation reforming options for hydrogen production from fossil fuels for PEM fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousri M.A. Welaya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM generates electrical power from air and from hydrogen or hydrogen rich gas mixtures. Therefore, there is an increasing interest in converting current hydrocarbon based marine fuels such as natural gas, gasoline, and diesel into hydrogen rich gases acceptable to the PEM fuel cells on board ships. Using chemical flow sheeting software, the total system efficiency has been calculated. Natural gas appears to be the best fuel for hydrogen rich gas production due to its favorable composition of lower molecular weight compounds. This paper presents a study for a 250 kW net electrical power PEM fuel cell system utilizing a partial oxidation in one case study and steam reformers in the second. This study has shown that steam-reforming process is the most competitive fuel processing option in terms of fuel processing efficiency. Partial oxidation process has proved to posses the lowest fuel processing efficiency. Among the options studied, the highest fuel processing efficiency is achieved with natural gas steam reforming system.

  3. Semiconductor-Based, Solar-Driven Photochemical Cells for Fuel Generation from Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehezkeli, Omer; Bedford, Nicholas M; Park, Eunsol; Ma, Ke; Cha, Jennifer N

    2016-11-23

    There has been active interest to identify new methods to reduce CO 2 into usable fuel sources. In this work, we demonstrate two types of photo-electrochemical cells (PECs) that photoreduce CO 2 directly to formate in aqueous solutions both in the presence and absence of external bias or additional electron sources. The photocathodes were either a CuFeO 2 /CuO electrode or a bilayer of CdTe on NiO, whereas the photoanode was a bilayer of NiO x on CdS. The PECs were characterized by using both electrochemistry and spectroscopy, and the products formed from CO 2 reduction were characterized and quantified by using 1 H NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS. In addition, an organohydride catalyst was tested in conjunction with the PECs, which not only showed a significant gain of 85 times in CO 2 reduction (27 μm formate without the catalyst, 2.3 mm formate with it) compared to the NiO/CdTe photocathode system but could also generate methanol under an external bias (10 μm). © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Substrate removal and electricity generation in a membrane-less microbial fuel cell for biological treatment of wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiping; Jiang, Sunny C; Wang, Yun; Xiao, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Microbial fuel cells have gained popularity in recent years due to its promise in converting organic wastewater into renewable electrical energy. In this study, a membrane-less MFC with a biocathode was developed to evaluate its performance in electricity generation while simultaneously treating wastewater. The MFC fed with a continuous flow of 2g/day acetate produced a power density of 30 mW/m(2) and current density of 245 mA/m(2). A substrate degradation efficiency (SDE) of 75.9% was achieved with 48.7% attributed to the anaerobic process and 27.2% to the aerobic process. Sequencing analysis of the microbial consortia using 16S rDNA pryosequencing showed the predominance of Bacteroidia in the anode after one month of operation, while the microbial community in the cathode chamber was dominated by Gamma-proteobacteria and Beta-proteobacteria. Coulombic efficiencies varied from 19.8% to 58.1% using different acetate concentrations, indicating power density can be further improved through the accumulation of electron-transferring bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Granular activated carbon based microbial fuel cell for simultaneous decolorization of real dye wastewater and electricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2011-12-15

    Decolorization of dye wastewater before discharge is pivotal because of its immense color and toxicities. In this study, a granular activated carbon based microbial fuel cell (GACB-MFC) was used without using any expensive materials like Nafion membrane and platinum catalyst for simultaneous decolorization of real dye wastewater and bioelectricity generation. After 48 hours of GACB-MFC operation, 73% color was removed at anode and 77% color was removed at cathode. COD removal was 71% at the anode and 76% at the cathode after 48 hours. Toxicity measurements showed that cathode effluent was almost nontoxic after 24 hours. The anode effluent was threefold less toxic compared to original dye wastewater after 48 hours. The GACB-MFC produced a power density of 1.7 W/m(3) with an open circuit voltage 0.45 V. One of the advantages of the GACB-MFC system is that pH was automatically adjusted from 12.4 to 7.2 and 8.0 at the anode and cathode during 48 hours operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Computational investigation of the flow field contribution to improve electricity generation in granular activated carbon-assisted microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Li, Jian; Battaglia, Francine; He, Zhen

    2016-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer an alternative approach to treat wastewater with less energy input and direct electricity generation. To optimize MFC anodic performance, adding granular activated carbon (GAC) has been proved to be an effective way, most likely due to the enlarged electrode surface for biomass attachment and improved mixing of the flow field. The impact of a flow field on the current enhancement within a porous anode medium (e.g., GAC) has not been well understood before, and thus is investigated in this study by using mathematical modeling of the multi-order Butler-Volmer equation with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. By comparing three different CFD cases (without GAC, with GAC as a nonreactive porous medium, and with GAC as a reactive porous medium), it is demonstrated that adding GAC contributes to a uniform flow field and a total current enhancement of 17%, a factor that cannot be neglected in MFC design. However, in an actual MFC operation, this percentage could be even higher because of the microbial competition and energy loss issues within a porous medium. The results of the present study are expected to help with formulating strategies to optimize MFC with a better flow pattern design.

  7. Microbial fuel cell operation using monoazo and diazo dyes as terminal electron acceptor for simultaneous decolourisation and bioelectricity generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oon, Yoong-Sin; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Oon, Yoong-Ling; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur; Thung, Wei-Eng; Nordin, Noradiba

    2017-03-05

    Monoazo and diazo dyes [New coccine (NC), Acid orange 7 (AO7), Reactive red 120 (RR120) and Reactive green 19 (RG19)] were employed as electron acceptors in the abiotic cathode of microbial fuel cell. The electrons and protons generated from microbial organic oxidation at the anode which were utilized for electrochemical azo dye reduction at the cathodic chamber was successfully demonstrated. When NC was employed as the electron acceptor, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and dye decolourisation efficiencies obtained at the anodic and cathodic chamber were 73±3% and 95.1±1.1%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the decolourisation rates of monoazo dyes were ∼50% higher than diazo dyes. The maximum power density in relation to NC decolourisation was 20.64mW/m2, corresponding to current density of 120.24mA/m2. The decolourisation rate and power output of different azo dyes were in the order of NC>AO7>RR120>RG19. The findings revealed that the structure of dye influenced the decolourisation and power performance of MFC. Azo dye with electron-withdrawing group at para substituent to azo bond would draw electrons from azo bond; hence the azo dye became more electrophilic and more favourable for dye reduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sustainable energy recovery in wastewater treatment by microbial fuel cells: stable power generation with nitrogen-doped graphene cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Chuan; Hou, Shuang-Xia; Yang, Nuan

    2013-12-03

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) recover energy sustainably in wastewater treatment. Performance of non-noble cathode catalysts with low cost in neutral medium is vital for stable power generation. Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) as cathode catalyst was observed to exhibit high and durable activity at buffered pH 7.0 during electrochemical measurements and in MFCs with respect to Pt/C counterpart. Electrochemical measurements showed that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on NG possessed sustained activity close to the state-of-art Pt/C in terms of onset potential and electron transfer number. NG-MFCs displayed maximum voltage output of 650 mV and maximum power density of 776 ± 12 mW m(-2), larger than 610 mV and 750 ± 19 mW m(-2) of Pt/C-MFCs, respectively. Furthermore, long-time test lasted over 90 days, during which the maximum power density of NG-MFCs declined by 7.6%, with stability comparable to Pt/C-MFCs. Structure characterization of NG implied that the relatively concentrated acidic oxygen-containing groups improved such long-time stability by repelling the protons due to the same electrostatic force, and thus the C-N active centers for ORR were left undestroyed. These findings demonstrated the competitive advantage of NG to advance the application of MFCs for recovering biomass energy in treatment of wastewater with neutral pH.

  9. Influence of glass wool as separator on bioelectricity generation in a constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Zhao, Yaqian; Tang, Cheng; Doherty, Liam

    2018-02-01

    To figure out the impact of the separator on the electrical performance of the newly established constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell (CW-MFC), two parallel upflow CW-MFC systems, with and without glass wool (GW), were set up in this study. System performances in terms of bioelectricity production were monitored for more than 4 months. Results showed that the highest voltage was achieved in non-separator (NS) system (465.7 ± 4.2 mV with electrode spacing of 5 cm), which is 48.9% higher than the highest value generated in GW system (312 ± 7.0 mV with electrode spacing of 2 cm). The highest power density was produced in NS system (66.22 mW/m2), which is 3.9 times higher than the value in GW system (17.14 mW/m2). The diffusion of oxygen from the open air was greatly hindered by the biofilm formed under the cathode. This kind of biofilm can be severed as the "microbial separator", playing the same role in a real separator. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Simultaneous degradation of refractory organic pesticide and bioelectricity generation in a soil microbial fuel cell with different conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian; Yu, Chunyan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Fang; Li, Xianning

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the soil microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed based on sandy soil to remove the refractory organic pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in topsoil by a simple method. The construction of membraneless single-chamber soil MFCs by setting up the cathode- and the anode-activated carbon, inoculating the sludge and adding the co-substrates can promote HCB removal significantly. The results showed that HCB removal efficiencies in the soils contaminated with 40, 80  and 200 mg/kg were 71.14%, 62.15% and 50.06%, respectively, which were 18.65%, 18.46% and 19.17% higher than the control, respectively. The electricity generation of soil MFCs in different HCB concentrations was analyzed. The highest power density reached was 70.8 mW/m 2 , and an internal resistance of approximately 960 Ω was obtained when an external resistance loading of 1000 Ω was connected. Meanwhile, the influences of temperature, substrate species and substrate concentrations on soil MFCs initial electricity production were investigated. The addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the soil MFCs system contributed to the improvement in HCB removal efficiency.

  11. Microbial fuel cell operation using monoazo and diazo dyes as terminal electron acceptor for simultaneous decolourisation and bioelectricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oon, Yoong-Sin [Water Research Group (WAREG), School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ong, Soon-An, E-mail: ongsoonan@yahoo.com [Water Research Group (WAREG), School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Ho, Li-Ngee [School of Materials Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Wong, Yee-Shian; Oon, Yoong-Ling; Lehl, Harvinder Kaur; Thung, Wei-Eng [Water Research Group (WAREG), School of Environmental Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Nordin, Noradiba [School of Materials Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2017-03-05

    Highlights: • Monoazo and diazo dyes were used as electron acceptor in the abiotic cathode of MFC. • Simultaneous decolourisation and bioelectricity generation were achieved. • Azo dye structures influenced the decolourisation performance. • Positive relation between decolourisation rate and power performance. - Abstract: Monoazo and diazo dyes [New coccine (NC), Acid orange 7 (AO7), Reactive red 120 (RR120) and Reactive green 19 (RG19)] were employed as electron acceptors in the abiotic cathode of microbial fuel cell. The electrons and protons generated from microbial organic oxidation at the anode which were utilized for electrochemical azo dye reduction at the cathodic chamber was successfully demonstrated. When NC was employed as the electron acceptor, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and dye decolourisation efficiencies obtained at the anodic and cathodic chamber were 73 ± 3% and 95.1 ± 1.1%, respectively. This study demonstrated that the decolourisation rates of monoazo dyes were ∼50% higher than diazo dyes. The maximum power density in relation to NC decolourisation was 20.64 mW/m{sup 2}, corresponding to current density of 120.24 mA/m{sup 2}. The decolourisation rate and power output of different azo dyes were in the order of NC > AO7 > RR120 > RG19. The findings revealed that the structure of dye influenced the decolourisation and power performance of MFC. Azo dye with electron-withdrawing group at para substituent to azo bond would draw electrons from azo bond; hence the azo dye became more electrophilic and more favourable for dye reduction.

  12. Effect of salt concentration and mediators in salt bridge microbial fuel cell for electricity generation from synthetic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevda, Surajbhan; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using agar salt bridges for proton transport in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFC). It also tries to elucidate and effect of mediators on electricity production from wastewaters through experimentation using a simulated wastewater. In order to offset the very high cost of proton exchange membrane, salt bridges have been used in dual chamber MFCs. When the concentration of salt was varied in agar salt bridges from 1% to 10%, the volumetric power density changed from 1.71 to 84.99 mW/m(3) with a concomitant variation in power density from 0.32 to 16.02 mW/m(2). The maximum power density was observed at 5% salt concentration with 10% agar, which was accompanied by 88.41% COD reduction. In the case of methylene blue (0.01 mM) as the electron mediator, the voltage and current generation were 0.551 V and 0.47 mA, respectively. A maximum open circuit voltage of 0.718 V was seen at 0.08 mM methylene blue concentration, whereas maximum power densities of 17.59 mW/m(2) and 89.22 mW/m(3) were obtained. Different concentrations of neutral red were also tried out as mediators. A maximum open circuit voltage of 0.730 V was seen at 0.01 mM neutral red, corresponding to a power density of 12.02 mW/m(2) (volumetric power density of 60.97 mW/m(3)). Biofilm formation on the electrode surface was not observed in the presence of mediators, but was present in the absence of mediators. The results clearly demonstrated the feasibility to use agar salt bridge for proton transport and role of mediators in MFCs to generate electricity.

  13. Simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation in a microbial fuel cell equipped with an oxic cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Renbing; Zhang, Shaohui; Zhao, Li; Zhong, Liuxiang

    2017-02-01

    With sulfide as an anodic electron donor and ammonium as a cathodic substrate, the feasibility of simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation was investigated in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) equipped with an oxic cathode. Successful simultaneous sulfide removal, nitrification, and electricity generation in this MFC were achieved in 35 days, with the sulfide and ammonium removal percent of 92.7 ± 1.4 and 96.4 ± 0.3%, respectively. The maximum power density increased, but the internal resistance decreased with the increase of feeding sulfide concentration from 62.9 ± 0.3 to 238.5 ± 0.2 mg S/L. Stable ammonium removal with complete nitrification, preparing for future denitrification, was obtained throughout the current study. Sulfide removal loading significantly increased with the increase of feeding sulfide concentration at each external resistance, but no significant correlation between sulfide removal loading and external resistance was found at each feeding sulfide concentration. The charge recovery and anodic coulombic efficiency (CE) significantly decreased with the increase of external resistance. High feeding sulfide concentration led to low anodic CE. Granular sulfur deposition was found on the anode graphite fiber. The appropriate feeding sulfide concentration for sulfide removal and sulfur deposition was deemed to be 178.0 ± 1.7 mg S/L, achieving a sulfur deposition percent of 69.7 ± 0.6%.

  14. Generating power from cellulose in an alkaline fuel cell enhanced by methyl viologen as an electron-transfer catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Miaoqing; Liu, Xianhua; Feng, Mengnan; Zhang, Pingping; Wang, Guangyi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we developed a single-compartment direct cellulose alkaline fuel cell by using nickel foam as the anode and methyl viologen as an electron transfer catalyst. The maximum power density of the fuel cell at optimal conditions is 450 mW m-2. High-performance liquid chromatography detected short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids in the oxidation products. Using common reed and red algae as fuels, the fuel cell achieved maximum power densities of 295 mW m-2 and 154 mW m-2, respectively.

  15. 40 CFR 80.1126 - How are RINs generated and assigned to batches of renewable fuel by renewable fuel producers or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from a chemical conversion process that uses another renewable fuel as a feedstock; and (B) The... imports a batch of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste-derived ethanol having an equivalence value of 2.5, that party must assign at least one gallon-RIN to each gallon of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

  16. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rosener, B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host ``na-net.ornl.gov`` at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message ``send index`` to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user`s perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  17. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rosener, B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host na-net.ornl.gov'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message send index'' to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user's perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  18. Critical assessment of power trains with fuel-cell systems and different fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhlein, B.; von Andrian, S.; Grube, Th; Menzer, R.

    Legal regulations (USA, EU) are a major driving force for intensifying technological developments with respect to the global automobile market. In the future, highly efficient vehicles with very low emission levels will include low-temperature fuel-cell systems (PEFC) as units of electric power trains. With alcohols, ether or hydrocarbons used as fuels for these new electric power trains, hydrogen as PEFC fuel has to be produced on board. These concepts including the direct use of methanol in fuel-cell systems, differ considerably in terms of both their development prospects and the results achieved so far. Based on process engineering analyses for net electricity generation in PEFC-powered power trains, as well as on assumptions for electric power trains and vehicle configurations, different fuel-cell performances and fuel processing units for octane, diesel, methanol, ethanol, propane and dimethylether have been evaluated as fuels. The possible benefits and key challenges for different solutions of power trains with fuel-cell systems/on-board hydrogen production and with direct methanol fuel-cell (DMFC) systems have been assessed. Locally, fuel-cell power trains are almost emission-free and, unlike battery-powered vehicles, their range is comparable to conventional vehicles. Therefore, they have application advantages cases of particularly stringent emission standards requiring zero emission. In comparison to internal combustion engines, using fuel-cell power trains can lead to clear reductions in primary energy demand and global, climate-relevant emissions providing the advantage of the efficiency of the hydrogen/air reaction in the fuel cell is not too drastically reduced by additional conversion steps of on-board hydrogen production, or by losses due to fuel supply provision.

  19. A new approach for bio-jet fuel generation from palm oil and limonene in the absence of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Zhao, Chen

    2015-12-18

    The traditional methodology includes a carbon-chain shortening strategy to produce bio-jet fuel from lipids via a two-stage process with hydrogen. Here, we propose a new solution using a carbon-chain filling strategy to convert C10 terpene and lipids to jet fuel ranged hydrocarbons with aromatic hydrocarbon ingredients in the absence of hydrogen.

  20. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER FINAL RECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 1, 1999 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002 REV. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH, RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy [1-1,1-2]. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties [1-3,1-4]. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily