WorldWideScience

Sample records for net generation fuel

  1. Communicating with the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    resource investment is necessary to sustain a high quality all-volunteer force. 9 Leadership Technique for the Net Generation Army Regulation 600...Generations at Work, Millenials at Work, http://www.generationsatwork. com /articles_millennials_at_work.php (accessed November 21, 2010). 31 Thomas

  2. Solar Fuel Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  3. Solar fuels generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S.; Spurgeon, Joshua M.

    2016-10-25

    The solar fuels generator includes an ionically conductive separator between a gaseous first phase and a second phase. A photoanode uses one or more components of the first phase to generate cations during operation of the solar fuels generator. A cation conduit is positioned provides a pathway along which the cations travel from the photoanode to the separator. The separator conducts the cations. A second solid cation conduit conducts the cations from the separator to a photocathode.

  4. Net Generation's Learning Styles in Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Eleni; Kalokairinou, Athina

    2015-01-01

    Numerous surveys have confirmed that emerging technologies and Web 2.0 tools have been a defining feature in the lives of current students, estimating that there is a fundamental shift in the way young people communicate, socialize and learn. Nursing students in higher education are characterized as digital literate with distinct traits which influence their learning styles. Millennials exhibit distinct learning preferences such as teamwork, experiential activities, structure, instant feedback and technology integration. Higher education institutions should be aware of the implications of the Net Generation coming to university and be prepared to meet their expectations and learning needs.

  5. Development of net energy ratio for quad-generation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kumar, Amit

    2012-01-01

    The conversion of biomass to four different outputs via gasification and catalytic methanation is a renewable technology that could reduce the use of fossil fuels and GHG emissions. This study investigates the energy aspects of producing electricity, heat, methanol and methane. The Gas Technology...... Institute (GTI) gasifier and Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) technologies are used for this quad generation process. Three different biomass feedstocks are considered in this study. The net energy ratio for six different pathways having the range of between 1.3–9.3. The lowest limit corresponds to the straw......-based power, heat, methanol and methane production pathway using GTI technology. Since more efficient alternatives exist for the generation of heat and electricity from biomass, it is argued that syngas is best used for methanol production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the energy performance...

  6. The Net Generation, the Internet, and Political Communication and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicki, Damir; Dumancic, Mario; Topolovcan, Tomislav

    2017-01-01

    The Net Generation, a generation which grew up with digital media, differs from older generations which entered the world of digital media and the Internet afterwards. The Internet itself opened new possibilities of communication and participation in the sphere of politics as well. Research was conducted among students at the Faculty of Teacher…

  7. Maritime Fuel Cell Generator Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Fuel costs and emissions in maritime ports are an opportunity for transportation energy efficiency improvement and emissions reduction efforts. Ocean-going vessels, harbor craft, and cargo handling equipment are still major contributors to air pollution in and around ports. Diesel engine costs continually increase as tighter criteria pollutant regulations come into effect and will continue to do so with expected introduction of carbon emission regulations. Diesel fuel costs will also continue to rise as requirements for cleaner fuels are imposed. Both aspects will increase the cost of diesel-based power generation on the vessel and on shore. Although fuel cells have been used in many successful applications, they have not been technically or commercially validated in the port environment. One opportunity to do so was identified in Honolulu Harbor at the Young Brothers Ltd. wharf. At this facility, barges sail regularly to and from neighbor islands and containerized diesel generators provide power for the reefers while on the dock and on the barge during transport, nearly always at part load. Due to inherent efficiency characteristics of fuel cells and diesel generators, switching to a hydrogen fuel cell power generator was found to have potential emissions and cost savings.

  8. Net energy analysis of different electricity generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    This document is a report on the net energy analysis of nuclear power and other electricity generation systems. The main objectives of this document are: To provide a comprehensive review of the state of knowledge on net energy analysis of nuclear and other energy systems for electricity generation; to address traditional questions such as whether nuclear power is a net energy producer or not. In addition, the work in progress on a renewed application of the net energy analysis method to environmental issues is also discussed. It is expected that this work could contribute to the overall comparative assessment of different energy systems which is an ongoing activity at the IAEA. 167 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  9. Power generation from solid fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Spliethoff, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Power Generation from Solid Fuels introduces the different technologies to produce heat and power from solid fossil (hard coal, brown coal) and renewable (biomass, waste) fuels, such as combustion and gasification, steam power plants and combined cycles etc. The book discusses technologies with regard to their efficiency, emissions, operational behavior, residues and costs. Besides proven state of the art processes, the focus is on the potential of new technologies currently under development or demonstration. The main motivation of the book is to explain the technical possibilities for reduci

  10. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M.Q.

    2008-01-01

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions

  11. Incremental net social benefit associated with using nuclear-fueled power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maoz, I.

    1976-12-01

    The incremental net social benefit (INSB) resulting from nuclear-fueled, rather than coal-fired, electric power generation is assessed. The INSB is defined as the difference between the 'incremental social benefit' (ISB)--caused by the cheaper technology of electric power generation, and the 'incremental social cost' (ISC)--associated with an increased power production, which is induced by cheaper technology. Section 2 focuses on the theoretical and empirical problems associated with the assessment of the long-run price elasticity of the demand for electricity, and the theoretical-econometric considerations that lead to the reasonable estimates of price elasticities of demand from those provided by recent empirical studies. Section 3 covers the theoretical and empirical difficulties associated with the construction of the long-run social marginal cost curves (LRSMC) of electricity. Sections 4 and 5 discuss the assessment methodology and provide numerical examples for the calculation of the INSB resulting from nuclear-fueled power generation

  12. Fuel selection for radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, A.

    1988-06-01

    The availability of Radioisotope Thermoeletric Generator fuels is evaluated based on the amount of fuel discharged from selected power reactors. In general, the best alternatives are either to use Plutonium-238 produced by irradiation of Neptunium-237 generated in typical thermal reactors or to use Curium-244 directly separated from the discharged fuels of fast or thermal reactors. (author) [pt

  13. The Strategies of Academic Library to Serve Net-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Pratama Setiawan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The  fast  developments  in  information  and  communication  technology  have  rapidly  shaped  and created enormous changes in the way people live and use libraries. The generation who grow in this era is called net generation. Academic libraries, where the majority of the users are the net-generation,  have  started  to  implement  the  concept  of  hybrid  library  as  a  response  of  the technological  advances.  The  trend  of  digital  collections  usage  is  getting  increase,  on  the  other hand,  the  number  of  library  visitor  is  getting  lower  significantly.  The  condition  make  librarians afraid  of  being  abandoned  by  its  users,  whereas  libraries  still  have  many  physical  collections. This paper is written as a result of simple observation in some libraries where the needs of net-generation  has  accommodated.  The  concept  of library  as  place,  and  library  marketing  offer  the solutions to deal with the problem. Libraries can develop and provide some facilities that suitable with  the net-generation  characteristics.  In  addition,  libraries  can  create  some  events  to  promote their services even the collections to attract the users to visit library.

  14. Automatic Structure-Based Code Generation from Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lars Michael; Westergaard, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Automatic code generation based on Coloured Petri Net (CPN) models is challenging because CPNs allow for the construction of abstract models that intermix control flow and data processing, making translation into conventional programming constructs difficult. We introduce Process-Partitioned CPNs...... (PP-CPNs) which is a subclass of CPNs equipped with an explicit separation of process control flow, message passing, and access to shared and local data. We show how PP-CPNs caters for a four phase structure-based automatic code generation process directed by the control flow of processes....... The viability of our approach is demonstrated by applying it to automatically generate an Erlang implementation of the Dynamic MANET On-demand (DYMO) routing protocol specified by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF)....

  15. The Strategies of Academic Library to Serve Net-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    candra pratama setiawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast developments in information and communication technology have rapidly shaped and created enormous changes in the way people live and use libraries. The generation who grow in this era is called net generation. Academic libraries, where the majority of the users are the netgeneration, have started to implement the concept of hybrid library as a response of the technological advances. The trend of digital collections usage is getting increase, on the other hand, the number of library visitor is getting lower significantly. The condition make librarians afraid of being abandoned by its users, whereas libraries still have many physical collections. This paper is written as a result of simple observation in some libraries where the needs of netgeneration has accomodated. The concept of library as place, and library marketing offer the solutions to deal with the problem. Libraries can develop and provide some facilities that suitable with the net-generation characteristics. In addition, libraries can create some events to promote their services even the collections to attract the users to visit library.

  16. Neural net generated seismic facies map and attribute facies map

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addy, S.K.; Neri, P.

    1998-01-01

    The usefulness of 'seismic facies maps' in the analysis of an Upper Wilcox channel system in a 3-D survey shot by CGG in 1995 in Lavaca county in south Texas was discussed. A neural net-generated seismic facies map is a quick hydrocarbon exploration tool that can be applied regionally as well as on a prospect scale. The new technology is used to classify a constant interval parallel to a horizon in a 3-D seismic volume based on the shape of the wiggle traces using a neural network technology. The tool makes it possible to interpret sedimentary features of a petroleum deposit. The same technology can be used in regional mapping by making 'attribute facies maps' in which various forms of amplitude attributes, phase attributes or frequency attributes can be used

  17. Developments in fossil fuel electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, A.; Argiri, M.

    1993-01-01

    A major part of the world's electricity is generated by the combustion of fossil fuels, and there is a significant environmental impact due to the production of fossil fuels and their combustion. Coal is responsible for 63% of the electricity generated from fossil fuels; natural gas accounts for about 20% and fuel oils for 17%. Because of developments in supply and improvements in generating efficiencies there is apparently a considerable shift towards a greater use of natural gas, and by the year 2000 it could provide 25% of the world electricity output. At the same time the amount of fuel oil burned will have decreased. The means to minimize the environmental impact of the use of fossil fuels, particularly coal, in electricity production are considered, together with the methods of emission control. Cleaner coal technologies, which include fluidized bed combustion and an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), can reduce the emissions of NO x , SO 2 and CO 2 . (author)

  18. Fuel cells for electricity generation from carbonaceous fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledjeff-Hey, K; Formanski, V; Roes, J [Gerhard-Mercator- Universitaet - Gesamthochschule Duisburg, Fachbereich Maschinenbau/Fachgebiet Energietechnik, Duisburg (Germany); Heinzel, A [Fraunhofer Inst. for Solar Energy Systems (ISE), Freiburg (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    Fuel cells, which are electrochemical systems converting chemical energy directly into electrical energy with water and heat as by-products, are of interest as a means of generating electricity which is environmentally friendly, clean and highly efficient. They are classified according to the electrolyte used. The main types of cell in order of operating temperature are described. These are: alkaline fuel cells, the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC); the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC); the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC); the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Applications depend on the type of cell and may range from power generation on a large scale to mobile application in cars or portable systems. One of the most promising options is the PEM-fuel cell stack where there has been significant improvement in power density in recent years. The production from carbonaceous fuels and purification of the cell fuel, hydrogen, is considered. Of the purification methods available, hydrogen separation by means of palladium alloy membranes seems particular effective in reducing CO concentrations to the low levels required for PEM cells. (UK)

  19. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruka, Roswell J [Pittsburgh, PA; Basel, Richard A [Pittsburgh, PA; Zhang, Gong [Murrysville, PA

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  20. Digital generation, net generation, millennials, Y generation: reflecting about the relation between the youths and digital technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Cristina; Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS) Rede La Salle

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed is critically reflect on the relationship of the youths with the TD, by discussing the generational approach. This approach in different researches linked the youths, through terms like Digital Generation, Net Generation, Millennials and Y Generation, creating stereotypes and excluding social, cultural, economic and political perspectives. The results of this qualitative research, based on reflections through literature, sees reality of Brazilian youths that do not have acces...

  1. Nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okajima, Yasujiro

    1985-01-01

    As of June 30, 1984, in 25 countries, 311 nuclear power plants of about 209 million kW were in operation. In Japan, 27 plants of about 19 million kW were in operation, and Japan ranks fourth in the world. The present state of nuclear power generation and nuclear fuel cycle is explained. The total uranium resources in the free world which can be mined at the cost below $130/kgU are about 3.67 million t, and it was estimated that the demand up to about 2015 would be able to be met. But it is considered also that the demand and supply of uranium in the world may become tight at the end of 1980s. The supply of uranium to Japan is ensured up to about 1995, and the yearly supply of 3000 st U 3 O 8 is expected in the latter half of 1990s. The refining, conversion and enrichment of uranium are described. In Japan, a pilot enrichment plant consisting of 7000 centrifuges has the capacity of about 50 t SWU/year. UO 2 fuel assemblies for LWRs, the working of Zircaloy, the fabrication of fuel assemblies, the quality assurance of nuclear fuel, the behavior of UO 2 fuel, the grading-up of LWRs and nuclear fuel, and the nuclear fuel business in Japan are reported. The reprocessing of spent fuel and plutonium fuel are described. (Kako, I.)

  2. Community Net Energy Metering: How Novel Policies Expand Benefits of Net Metering to Non-Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, James; Varnado, Laurel

    2009-04-01

    As interest in community solutions to renewable energy grows, more states are beginning to develop policies that encourage properties with more than one meter to install shared renewable energy systems. State net metering policies are evolving to allow the aggregation of multiple meters on a customer’s property and to dissolve conventional geographical boundaries. This trend means net metering is expanding out of its traditional function as an enabling incentive to offset onsite customer load at a single facility. This paper analyzes community net energy metering (CNEM) as an emerging vehicle by which farmers, neighborhoods, and municipalities may more easily finance and reap the benefits of renewable energy. Specifically, it aims to compare and contrast the definition of geographical boundaries among different CNEM models and examine the benefits and limitations of each approach. As state policies begin to stretch the geographic boundaries of net metering, they allow inventive solutions to encourage renewable energy investment. This paper attempts to initiate the conversation on this emerging policy mechanism and offers recommendations for further development of these policies.

  3. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  4. Prediction model for initial point of net vapor generation for low-flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qi; Zhao Hua; Yang Ruichang

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of the initial point of net vapor generation is significant for the calculation of phase distribution in sub-cooled boiling. However, most of the investigations were developed in high-flow boiling, and there is no common model that could be successfully applied for the low-flow boiling. A predictive model for the initial point of net vapor generation for low-flow forced convection and natural circulation is established here, by the analysis of evaporation and condensation heat transfer. The comparison between experimental data and calculated results shows that this model can predict the net vapor generation point successfully in low-flow sub-cooled boiling

  5. Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets for Protocol Software Generation and Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge; Kristensen, Lars Michael; Kindler, Ekkart

    This paper presents the formal definition of Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets (PA-CPNs). PA-CPNs represent a class of Coloured Petri Nets (CPNs) that are designed to support automated code genera-tion of protocol software. PA-CPNs restrict the structure of CPN models and allow Petri net...... elements to be annotated with so-called pragmatics, which are exploited for code generation. The approach and tool for gen-erating code is called PetriCode and has been discussed and evaluated in earlier work already. The contribution of this paper is to give a formal def-inition for PA-CPNs; in addition...

  6. Remembering Differently: Use of Memory Strategies among Net-Generation ESL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakarami, Alireza; Mardziah, H. Abdullah; Faiz, S. Abdullah; Tan, Bee Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Net-generation learners are growing up in an era when much of the learning, communication, socializing and ways of working take place through digital means. Living in this digital era may result in different ways of thinking, ways of approaching learning, strategies, and priorities. The Net-Geners therefore, need new skills and new strategies to…

  7. Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets for Protocol Software Generation and Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagerland Simonsen, Kent Inge; Kristensen, Lars Michael; Kindler, Ekkart

    2015-01-01

    PetriCode is a tool that supports automated generation of protocol software from a restricted class of Coloured Petri Nets (CPNs) called Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets (PA-CPNs). Petri-Code and PA-CPNs have been designed with five main requirements in mind, which include the same model...

  8. Pragmatics annotated coloured petri nets for protocol software generation and verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge Fagerland; Kristensen, Lars M.; Kindler, Ekkart

    2016-01-01

    Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets (PA-CPNs) are a restricted class of Coloured Petri Nets (CPNs) developed to support automated generation of protocol software. The practical application of PA-CPNs and the supporting PetriCode software tool have been discussed and evaluated in earlier papers...

  9. Power generation from refuse derived fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surroop, Dinesh; Mohee, Romeela

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The beginning of the third millennium has been characterized by a progressive increase in the demand for fossil fuels, which has caused a steep rise in oil price. At the same time, several environmental disasters have increased the sensitivity of world-wide public opinion towards the effect that environmental pollution has on human health and climate change. These conditions have fostered a renewed interest in renewable energy like solar energy, wind energy, biomass and solid wastes. In addition, the disposal of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a critical and costly problem. The traditional landfill method requires large amounts of land and contaminates air, water and soil. The increase in socio-economic condition during the past ten years has also significantly increased the amount of solid waste generated. There are around 1200 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated daily, of which the combustibles namely plastics, paper and textile waste represent 28%, and with the present generation rate, the landfill will be filled by 2012. The study was, therefore, initiated to assess the potential of power generation from refused derived fuels (RDF) from municipal solid waste (MSW) in order to reduce the dependency on fossil fuels. There are 336 tons which is equivalent to 12 tons/ h of RDF that can be generated daily from the MSW and this would generate 19.2 MW power. There will be 312 kg/ h of ash that would be generated and the NO x and SO 2 concentration were found to be 395.5 and 43.3 mg/ Nm 3 respectively. It was also found that the amount of non-biogenic CO 2 produced was 471 g/ kWhe. (author)

  10. Impact of fuel-dependent electricity retail charges on the value of net-metered PV applications in vertically integrated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaidis, Alexandros I.; Milidonis, Andreas; Charalambous, Charalambos A.

    2015-01-01

    Retail electricity charges inevitably influence the financial rationale of using net-metered photovoltaic (PV) applications since their structure as well as their level may vary significantly over the life-cycle of a customer-sited PV generation system. This subsequently introduces a further uncertainty for a ratepayer considering a net-metered PV investment. To thoroughly comprehend this uncertainty, the paper employs a top-down approach – in vertically integrated environments – to model the volatility of partially hedged electricity charges and its subsequent impact on the value of bill savings from net-metered PV systems. Besides the utility's pricing strategy and rate structures, particular emphasis is given in modeling the fossil fuel mix component that introduces a significant source of uncertainty on electricity charges and thus on the value of bill savings of net-metered, customer-sited, PV applications. - Highlights: • A top-down approach of developing traditional electricity charges is provided. • The combined effect of pricing strategies, rate structures and fuels is examined. • Fossil fuel prices can substantially affect the net metering compensation. • A financial risk assessment for net-metered PV systems is performed

  11. Fuel processor and method for generating hydrogen for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir [Naperville, IL; Lee, Sheldon H. D. [Willowbrook, IL; Carter, John David [Bolingbrook, IL; Krumpelt, Michael [Naperville, IL; Myers, Deborah J [Lisle, IL

    2009-07-21

    A method of producing a H.sub.2 rich gas stream includes supplying an O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel to an inner reforming zone of a fuel processor that includes a partial oxidation catalyst and a steam reforming catalyst or a combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst. The method also includes contacting the O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel with the partial oxidation catalyst and the steam reforming catalyst or the combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst in the inner reforming zone to generate a hot reformate stream. The method still further includes cooling the hot reformate stream in a cooling zone to produce a cooled reformate stream. Additionally, the method includes removing sulfur-containing compounds from the cooled reformate stream by contacting the cooled reformate stream with a sulfur removal agent. The method still further includes contacting the cooled reformate stream with a catalyst that converts water and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and H.sub.2 in a water-gas-shift zone to produce a final reformate stream in the fuel processor.

  12. Point of net vapor generation and vapor void fraction in subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Zuber, N.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis is presented directed at predicting the point of net vapor generation and vapor void fraction in subcooled boiling. It is shown that the point of net vapor generation depends upon local conditions--thermal and fluid dynamic. Thus, at low mass flow rates the net vapor generation is determined by thermal conditions, whereas at high mass flow rates the phenomenon is hydrodynamically controlled. Simple criteria are derived which can be used to predict these local conditions for net vapor generation. These criteria are used to determine the vapor void fraction is subcooled boiling. Comparison between the results predicted by this analysis and experimental data presently available shows good agreement for wide range of operating conditions, fluids and geometries. (U.S.)

  13. The determination of the initial point of net vapor generation in flow subcooled boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Changqi; Sun Zhongning

    2000-01-01

    The experimental results for the initial point of net vapor generation in up-flow subcooled boiling in an internally-heated annulus are given. The characteristics of the initial point of net vapor generation and the problem on gamma ray attenuation measurement are discussed. The comparison between the data and a calculation model is given, it is showed that the data agree well with the model

  14. Code Generation from Pragmatics Annotated Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kent Inge

    limited work has been done on transforming CPN model to protocol implementations. The goal of the thesis is to be able to automatically generate high-quality implementations of communication protocols based on CPN models. In this thesis, we develop a methodology for generating implementations of protocols...... third party libraries and the code should be easily usable by third party code. Finally, the code should be readable by developers with expertise on the considered platforms. In this thesis, we show that our code generation approach is able to generate code for a wide range of platforms without altering...... such as games and rich web applications. Finally, we conclude the evaluation of the criteria of our approach by using the WebSocket PA-CPN model to show that we are able to verify fairly large protocols....

  15. Reviewing the Need for Gaming in Education to Accommodate the Net Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekebrede, G.; Warmelink, H. J. G.; Mayer, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of simulations and games in Dutch higher education. This development is based on the perception that students belong to the "gamer generation" or "net generation": a generation that has grown up with computer games and other technology affecting their preferred learning styles, social…

  16. Method for generating hydrogen for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.; Carter, John David; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a H.sub.2 rich gas stream includes supplying an O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel to an inner reforming zone of a fuel processor that includes a partial oxidation catalyst and a steam reforming catalyst or a combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst. The method also includes contacting the O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel with the partial oxidation catalyst and the steam reforming catalyst or the combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst in the inner reforming zone to generate a hot reformate stream. The method still further includes cooling the hot reformate stream in a cooling zone to produce a cooled reformate stream. Additionally, the method includes removing sulfur-containing compounds from the cooled reformate stream by contacting the cooled reformate stream with a sulfur removal agent. The method still further includes contacting the cooled reformate stream with a catalyst that converts water and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and H.sub.2 in a water-gas-shift zone to produce a final reformate stream in the fuel processor.

  17. Demonstration tokamak fusion power plant for early realization of net electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Okano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Shinya, K.; Ogawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A demonstration tokamak fusion power plant Demo-CREST is proposed as the device for early realization of net electric power generation by fusion energy. The plasma configuration for Demo-CREST is optimized to satisfy the electric breakeven condition (the condition for net electric power, P e net = 0 MW) with the plasma performance of the ITER reference operation mode. This optimization method is considered to be suitable for the design of a demonstration power plant for early realization of net electric power generation, because the demonstration power plant has to ensure the net electric generation. Plasma performance should also be more reliably achieved than in past design studies. For the plasma performance planned in the present ITER programme, net electric power from 0 to 500 MW is possible with Demo-CREST under the following engineering conditions: maximum magnetic field 16 T, thermal efficiency 30%, NBI system efficiency 50% and NBI current drive power restricted to 200 MW. By replacing the blanket system with one of higher thermal efficiency, a net electric power of about 1000 MW is also possible so that the performance of the commercial plant with Demo-CREST can also be studied from the economic point of view. The development path from the experimental reactor 'ITER' to the commercial plant 'CREST' through the demonstration power plant 'Demo-CREST' is proposed as an example of the fast track concept. (author)

  18. Fuel recycling and 4. generation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, J.G.; Gauche, F.; Mathonniere, G.

    2012-01-01

    The 4. generation reactors meet the demand for sustainability of nuclear power through the saving of the natural resources, the minimization of the volume of wastes, a high safety standard and a high reliability. In the framework of the GIF (Generation 4. International Forum) France has decided to study the sodium-cooled fast reactor. Fast reactors have the capacity to recycle plutonium efficiently and to burn actinides. The long history of reprocessing-recycling of spent fuels in France is an asset. A prototype reactor named ASTRID could be entered into operation in 2020. This article presents the research program on the sodium-cooled fast reactor, gives the status of the ASTRID project and present the scenario of the progressive implementation of 4. generation reactors in the French reactor fleet. (A.C.)

  19. Generation of net electric power with a tokamak reactor under foreseeable physical and engineering conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Yoshida, T.; Tomabechi, K.

    2004-01-01

    This study reveals for the first time the plasma performance required for a tokamak reactor to generate net electric power under foreseeable engineering conditions. It was found that the reference plasma performance of the ITER inductive operation mode with β N = 1.8, HH = 1.0, andf nGW 0.85 had sufficient potential to achieve the electric break-even condition (net electric power P e net = 0MW) under the following engineering conditions: machine major radius 6.5m ≤ R p ≤ 8.5m, the maximum magnetic field on TF coils B tmax = 16 T, thermal efficiency η e 30%, and NBI system efficiency η NBI = 50%. The key parameters used in demonstrating net electric power generation in tokamak reactors are β N and fη GW . ≥ 3.0 is required for P e net ∼ 600MW with fusion power P f ∼ 3000MW. On the other hand, fη GW ≥ 1.0 is inevitable to demonstrate net electric power generation, if high temperatures, such as average temperatures of T ave > 16 keV, cannot be selected for the reactor design. To apply these results to the design of a tokamak reactor for demonstrating net electric power generation, the plasma performance diagrams on the Q vs P f (energy multiplication factor vs fusion power) space for several major radii (i.e. 6.5, 7.5, and 8.5 m) were depicted. From these figures, we see that a design with a major radius R p ∼ 7.5m seems preferable for demonstrating net electric power generation when one aims at early realization of fusion energy. (author)

  20. Fuel cells make gains in power generation market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The ultra-low emission, highly efficient natural gas-fueled fuel cell system is beginning to penetrate the electric power generation market in the US and abroad as the fuel cell industry lowers product costs. And, even as the current market continues to grow, fuel cell companies are developing new technology with even higher levels of energy efficiency. The paper discusses fuel cell efficiency, business opportunities, work to reduce costs, and evolving fuel cell technology

  1. On the Optimal Design of Distributed Generation Policies: Is Net Metering Ever Optimal?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, David; Sappington, David

    2014-01-01

    Electricity customers who install solar panels often are paid the prevailing retail price for the electricity they generate. We show that this "net metering" policy typically is not optimal. A payment for distributed generation (w) that is below the retail price of electricity (r) will induce the welfare-maximizing level of distributed generation (DG) when centralized generation and DG produce similar (pollution) externalities. However, w can optimally exceed r when DG entails a substantial r...

  2. Fuel cell system economics: comparing the costs of generating power with stationary and motor vehicle PEM fuel cell systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation examines the economics of producing electricity from proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems under various conditions, including the possibility of using fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) to produce power when they are parked at office buildings and residences. The analysis shows that the economics of both stationary fuel cell and FCV-based power vary significantly with variations in key input variables such as the price of natural gas, electricity prices, fuel cell and reformer system costs, and fuel cell system durability levels. The 'central case' results show that stationary PEM fuel cell systems can supply electricity for offices and homes in California at a net savings when fuel cell system costs reach about $6000 for a 5 kW home system ($1200/kW) and $175,000 for a 250 kW commercial system ($700/kW) and assuming somewhat favorable natural gas costs of $6/GJ at residences and $4/GJ at commercial buildings. Grid-connected FCVs in commercial settings can also potentially supply electricity at competitive rates, in some cases producing significant annual benefits. Particularly attractive is the combination of net metering along with time-of-use electricity rates that allow power to be supplied to the utility grid at the avoided cost of central power plant generation. FCV-based power at individual residences does not appear to be as attractive, at least where FCV power can only be used directly or banked with the utility for net metering and not sold in greater quantity, due to the low load levels at these locations that provide a poor match to automotive fuel cell operation, higher natural gas prices than are available at commercial settings, and other factors

  3. Hydrogen generation from biogenic and fossil fuels by autothermal reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Thomas; Heinzel, Angelika; Vogel, Bernhard

    Hydrogen generation for fuel cell systems by reforming technologies from various fuels is one of the main fields of investigation of the Fraunhofer ISE. Suitable fuels are, on the one hand, gaseous hydrocarbons like methane, propane but also, on the other hand, liquid hydrocarbons like gasoline and alcohols, e.g., ethanol as biogenic fuel. The goal is to develop compact systems for generation of hydrogen from fuel being suitable for small-scale membrane fuel cells. The most recent work is related to reforming according to the autothermal principle — fuel, air and steam is supplied to the reactor. Possible applications of such small-scale autothermal reformers are mobile systems and also miniature fuel cell as co-generation plant for decentralised electricity and heat generation. For small stand-alone systems without a connection to the natural gas grid liquid gas, a mixture of propane and butane is an appropriate fuel.

  4. Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    2010-01-01

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

  5. An Expanded Study of Net Generation Perceptions on Privacy and Security on Social Networking Sites (SNS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.; Doshi, Vijal

    2012-01-01

    Social networking on the Internet continues to be a frequent avenue of communication, especially among Net Generation consumers, giving benefits both personal and professional. The benefits may be eventually hindered by issues in information gathering and sharing on social networking sites. This study evaluates the perceptions of students taking a…

  6. Conceptual design of an electricity generating tritium breeding blanket sector for INTOR/NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.

    1984-01-01

    A study is made of a fusion reactor power blanket and its associated equipment with the objective of producing a conceptual design for a blanket sector of INTOR, or one of its national variants (e.g. NET), from which electricity could be generated simultaneously with the breeding of tritium. (author)

  7. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

  8. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included

  9. Resistive wall tearing mode generated finite net electromagnetic torque in a static plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Xu, M.; Qu, H. P.; Peng, X. D.; Wang, Z. H.; Xu, J. Q.; Qiu, X. M.; Liu, Y. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The MARS-F code [Y. Q. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 3681 (2000)] is applied to numerically investigate the effect of the plasma pressure on the tearing mode stability as well as the tearing mode-induced electromagnetic torque, in the presence of a resistive wall. The tearing mode with a complex eigenvalue, resulted from the favorable averaged curvature effect [A. H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], leads to a re-distribution of the electromagnetic torque with multiple peaking in the immediate vicinity of the resistive layer. The multiple peaking is often caused by the sound wave resonances. In the presence of a resistive wall surrounding the plasma, a rotating tearing mode can generate a finite net electromagnetic torque acting on the static plasma column. Meanwhile, an equal but opposite torque is generated in the resistive wall, thus conserving the total momentum of the whole plasma-wall system. The direction of the net torque on the plasma is always opposite to the real frequency of the mode, agreeing with the analytic result by Pustovitov [Nucl. Fusion 47, 1583 (2007)]. When the wall time is close to the oscillating time of the tearing mode, the finite net torque reaches its maximum. Without wall or with an ideal wall, no net torque on the static plasma is generated by the tearing mode. However, re-distribution of the torque density in the resistive layer still occurs

  10. Electricity generation using microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, Y.; Manoj Muthu Kumar, S.; Das, D. [Department of Biotechnology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2008-01-15

    Conversion of biomass into electricity is possible using microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The present paper deals with the studies of a two-chambered salt bridge MFC using Enterobacter cloacae IIT-BT 08 in MYG medium. The effect of different electron mediators, concentration of the mediator, ionic strength (salt concentration) of the medium and the surface area of the salt-bridge in contact with the anode and cathode chambers on the power generation in MFCs are reported. In the case of methyl viologen (MV) (0.1 mM) as the electron mediator, the voltage generation was 0.4 V but no current was detected. Different concentrations of methylene blue (MB) were also studied as the mediator. A maximum voltage of 0.37 V was seen at 0.05 mM MB, whereas a maximum current and power of 56.7{mu} A and 19.2{mu} W, respectively, were observed in the case of 0.03 mM MB with a voltage of 0.34 V. The corresponding power density and current density of 9.3mW/m{sup 2} and 27.6mA/m{sup 2}, respectively, were obtained. When the surface area of the salt bridge in contact with the anode and cathode chambers was increased, a proportionate improvement in the power output from 19.2 to 708{mu} W was detected. The maximum power density and current density of 236mW/m{sup 2} and 666.7mA/m{sup 2}, respectively, which are found to be very promising for a salt bridge MFC were observed. (author)

  11. Net Rotation of the Lithosphere in Mantle Convection Models with Self-consistent Plate Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerault, M.; Coltice, N.

    2017-12-01

    Lateral variations in the viscosity structure of the lithosphere and the mantle give rise to a discordant motion between the two. In a deep mantle reference frame, this motion is called the net rotation of the lithosphere. Plate motion reconstructions, mantle flow computations, and inferences from seismic anisotropy all indicate some amount of net rotation using different mantle reference frames. While the direction of rotation is somewhat consistent across studies, the predicted amplitudes range from 0.1 deg/Myr to 0.3 deg/Myr at the present-day. How net rotation rates could have differed in the past is also a subject of debate and strong geodynamic arguments are missing from the discussion. This study provides the first net rotation calculations in 3-D spherical mantle convection models with self-consistent plate generation. We run the computations for billions of years of numerical integration. We look into how sensitive the net rotation is to major tectonic events, such as subduction initiation, continental breakup and plate reorganisations, and whether some governing principles from the models could guide plate motion reconstructions. The mantle convection problem is solved with the finite volume code StagYY using a visco-pseudo-plastic rheology. Mantle flow velocities are solely driven by buoyancy forces internal to the system, with free slip upper and lower boundary conditions. We investigate how the yield stress, the mantle viscosity structure and the properties of continents affect the net rotation over time. Models with large lateral viscosity variations from continents predict net rotations that are at least threefold faster than those without continents. Models where continents cover a third of the surface produce net rotation rates that vary from nearly zero to over 0.3 deg/Myr with rapide increase during continental breakup. The pole of rotation appears to migrate along no particular path. For all models, regardless of the yield stress and the

  12. Generator gas as a fuel to power a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutak Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of gasification process of dried sewage sludge and use of generator gas as a fuel for dual fuel turbocharged compression ignition engine are presented. The results of gasifying showed that during gasification of sewage sludge is possible to obtain generator gas of a calorific value in the range of 2.15  2.59 MJ/m3. It turned out that the generator gas can be effectively used as a fuel to the compression ignition engine. Because of gas composition, it was possible to run engine with partload conditions. In dual fuel operation the high value of indicated efficiency was achieved equal to 35%, so better than the efficiency of 30% attainable when being fed with 100% liquid fuel. The dual fuel engine version developed within the project can be recommended to be used in practice in a dried sewage sludge gasification plant as a dual fuel engine driving the electric generator loaded with the active electric power limited to 40 kW (which accounts for approx. 50% of its rated power, because it is at this power that the optimal conditions of operation of an engine dual fuel powered by liquid fuel and generator gas are achieved. An additional advantage is the utilization of waste generated in the wastewater treatment plant.

  13. Solar-fuel generation: Towards practical implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-01-01

    Limiting reliance on non-renewable fossil fuels inevitably depends on a more efficient utilization of solar energy. Materials scientists discuss the most viable approaches to produce high-energy-density fuels from sunlight that can be implemented in existing infrastructures....

  14. Study on onset of nucleate boiling and net vapor generation point in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Wada, Noriyoshi; Koizumi, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    The onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and the point of net vapor generation on subcooled flow boiling, focusing on liquid subcooling and liquid velocity were investigated experimentally and analytically. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin-film (35μm) and subcooled water in a range of the liquid velocity from 0.27 to 4.6 m/s at 0.10MPa. The liquid subcoolings were 20, 30 and 40K, respectively. Temperatures at the onset of nucleate boiling obtained in the experiments increased with the liquid subcoolings and the liquid velocities. The increases in the temperature of ONB were represented with the classical stability theory of preexisting nuclei. The measured results of the net vapor generation agreed well with the results of correlation by Saha and Zuber in the range of the present experiments. (J.P.N.)

  15. Onset of a nucleate boiling and incipient point of net vapor generation in narrow channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, G.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study on onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) and incipient point of net vapor generation (IPNVG) in narrow rectangular channel was presented. Flow direction in the channel was vertical upward. The experimental results indicate that the classical correlations of ONB for conventional channels were not suitable for the present narrow rectangular channel. The wall superheat needed to initiate boiling is found to be higher for the same given values of heat and mass flux. The experimental results of IPNVG indicate that the heat flux, triggering net vapor generation in narrow rectangular channel, is litter lower than that calculated by correlations for conventional channels. The relative prediction error of qIPNVG by Griffith model, Saha model and Sun model ranges from -17.9% to +9.6%. A new correlation was developed to predict the ONB in narrow rectangular channel. The proposed correlation predictions agreed well with the experimental data. (author)

  16. Fuel oil systems for standby diesel-generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    This Standard provides the design requirements for fuel oil system for diesel-generators that provide standby power for a nuclear power generating station. The system includes all essential equipment from and including fuel oil storage tanks up to the terminal connection on the diesel-engine. It does not include that portion of the fuel oil system supplied by the diesel-generator manufacturer which is in accordance with Trial-Use Criteria for Diesel-Generator Units Applied as Standby Power Supplies for Nuclear Power Generating Stations, IEEE-387-1972. This definition of scope is intended to exclude only those factory-assembled, engine-mounted appurtances supplied with a diesel-generator unit. Integral tanks are, however, within the scope of this Standard. It also excludes motors, motor control centers, switchgear, cables, and other electrical equipment which is used in operation of the fuel oil system, except to define interface requirements

  17. Bio-fuels of the first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    After having briefly recalled the objective of use of renewable energies and the role bio-fuels may play, this publication briefly presents various bio-fuels: bio-diesel (from colza, soybean or sunflower oil), and ethanol (from beet, sugar cane, wheat or corn). Some key data regarding bio-fuel production and use in France are briefly commented. The publication outlines strengths (a positive energy assessment, a decreased dependency on imported fossil fuels and a higher supply safety, a diversification of agriculture revenues and prospects, a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions) and weaknesses (uncertainty regarding the evolution of soil use, an environmental impact related to farming methods) of this sector. Actions undertaken by the ADEME in collaboration with other agencies and institutions are briefly overviewed

  18. Dynamic tritium inventory of a NET/ITER fuel cycle with lithium salt solution blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spannagel, G.; Gierszewski, P.

    1991-01-01

    At the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center (KfK) a flexible tool is being developed to simulate the dynamics of tritium inventories. This tool can be applied to any tritium handling system, especially to the fuel cycle components of future nuclear fusion devices. This instrument of simulation will be validated in equipment to be operated at the Karlsruhe Tritium Laboratory. In this study tritium inventories in a NET/ITER type fuel cycle involving a lithium salt solution blanket are investigated. The salt solution blanket serves as an example because it offers technological properties which are attractive in modeling the process; the example does not impair the general validity of the tool. Usually, the operation strategy of complex structures will deteriorate due to failures of the subsystems involved. These failures together with the reduced availability ensuing from them will be simulated. The example of this study is restricted to reduced availabilities of two subsystems, namely the reactor and the tritium recovery system. For these subsystems the influence of statistically varying intervals of operation is considered. Strategies we selected which are representative of expected modes of operation. In the design of a fuel cycle, care will be taken that prescribed availabilities of the subsystems can be achieved; however, the description of reactor operation is a complex task since operation breaks down into several campaigns for which rules have been specified which enable determination of whether a campaign has been successful and can be stopped. Thus, it is difficult to predict the overall behavior prior to a simulation which includes stochastic elements. Using the example mentioned above the capabilities of the tool will be illustrated; besides the presentation of results of inventory simulation, the applicability of these data will be discussed. (orig.)

  19. Web 2.0 and the Net Generation - A Critical Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, social media and web 2.0 have been hot topics within educational debates and within the research area of networked learning. The latter is evident from symposia and papers from the last years' networked learning conferences, but also European research projects, special issues......, and books have revolved around social media, web 2.0, personal learning environments, student-centred learning, and student-generated content. Alongside these internet developments we have witnessed debates on what schools and universities can do to cater to the 'net-generation' or the 'digital natives' in...

  20. The Influence of Output Variability from Renewable Electricity Generation on Net Energy Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Kunz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One key approach to analyzing the feasibility of energy extraction and generation technologies is to understand the net energy they contribute to society. These analyses most commonly focus on a simple comparison of a source’s expected energy outputs to the required energy inputs, measured in the form of energy return on investment (EROI. What is not typically factored into net energy analysis is the influence of output variability. This omission ignores a key attribute of biological organisms and societies alike: the preference for stable returns with low dispersion versus equivalent returns that are intermittent or variable. This biologic predilection for stability, observed and refined in academic financial literature, has a direct relationship to many new energy technologies whose outputs are much more variable than traditional energy sources. We investigate the impact of variability on net energy metrics and develop a theoretical framework to evaluate energy systems based on existing financial and biological risk models. We then illustrate the impact of variability on nominal energy return using representative technologies in electricity generation, with a more detailed analysis on wind power, where intermittence and stochastic availability of hard-to-store electricity will be factored into theoretical returns.

  1. Neural net based determination of generator-shedding requirements in electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M [Electrical Engineering Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sobajic, D J; Pao, Y -H [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Computer Engineering and Science AI WARE Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents an application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in support of a decision-making process by power system operators directed towards the fast stabilisation of multi-machine systems. The proposed approach considers generator shedding as the most effective discrete supplementary control for improving the dynamic performance of faulted power systems and preventing instabilities. The sensitivity of the transient energy function (TEF) with respect to changes in the amount of dropped generation is used during the training phase of ANNs to assess the critical amount of generator shedding required to prevent the loss of synchronism. The learning capabilities of neural nets are used to establish complex mappings between fault information and the amount of generation to be shed, suggesting it as the control signal to the power system operator. (author)

  2. The price of fuel oil for power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, G.J.Y.; Liaw, Y.Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    This study establishes a break-even analysis model for fuel oil generation. The authors calculate the break-even points of the international fuel oil prices for the existing coal-fired power plants, the nuclear power plants and the newly-built coal/oil-fired power plants

  3. [Relationships amongst work values, job characteristics and job involvement in "net generation" nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sue-Hui; Chiou, Chii-Jun

    2010-04-01

    Children of the so-called "net generation" began joining the nurse workforce from the mid-1990s. Studies on the characteristics of this generation have been done primarily outside of Taiwan, and results may not adequately reflect conditions in Taiwan due to cultural differences. This study aimed to investigate the relationships amongst work values, job characteristics and job involvement in "net generation" nurses. This study employed a cross-sectional design. A randomized sample of 370 nurses born between 1977 and 1985 working in a medical center or a community hospital in Southern Taiwan accepted our invitation to join this study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. (1) Variables including work values, job characteristics, head nurse leadership qualities, job structure and opportunities for in-service education all correlated significantly with job involvement. (2) Regression analysis showed work values, job characteristics, head nurse leadership and religious belief to be significant predictors of job involvement, explaining 22.6% of the variance. This study provides insights that may be of potential value to nursing administrators. We suggest that administrators adopt democratic management practices, build diverse learning methods, strengthen autonomy, completeness, and feedback, and provide appropriate work guidance for nurses to increase job involvement.

  4. Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labinov, Solomon D [Knoxville, TN; Armstrong, Timothy R [Clinton, TN; Judkins, Roddie R [Knoxville, TN

    2008-10-21

    A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

  5. Design method of control system for HTGR fuel handling process with control Petri net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zandong; Luo Sheng; Liu Jiguo

    2008-01-01

    As a complex mechanical system,the fuel handling system (FHS) of pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is with the features of complicated structure, numerous control devices and strict working scheduling. It is very important to precisely describe the function of FHS and effectively design its control system. A design method of control system based on control Petri net (CPN) is introduced in this paper. By associating outputs and operations with places, associating inputs and conditions with transitions, and introducing macro-places and macro-actions, the CPN realizes hierarchy design of complex control system. Based on the analysis of basic functions and working flow of FHS, its control system is described and designed by CPN. According to the firing regulation of transition,the designed CPN can be easily converted into LAD program of PLC, which can be implemented on the FHS simulating control test-bed. Application illuminates that proposed method has the advantages of clear design structure, exact description power and effective design ability of control program, which can meet the requirements of FHS control sys-tem design. (authors)

  6. Development of net energy ratio and emission factor for quad-generation pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Rosendahl, Lasse; Kumar, Amit

    2014-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate the energy performance, reduce GHG and acid rain precursor emission, and use of biomass for different outputs based on demand. Finally, a sensitivity analysis and a comparative study ar conducted for expected technological improvements and factors that could increase the energy......, methanol and methane. Circulating fluidized bed gasifier and the gas technology institute (GTI) gasifier technologies are used for this quad-generation process. Two different biomass feedstocks are considered in this study. The net energy ratio for six different pathways having the range of between 1...

  7. Radioactive Waste Generation in Pyro-SFR Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Fanxing; Park, Byung Heung; Ko, Won Il

    2011-01-01

    Which nuclear fuel cycle option to deploy is of great importance in the sustainability of nuclear power. SFR fuel cycle employing pyroprocessing (named as Pyro- SFR Cycle) is one promising fuel cycle option in the near future. Radioactive waste generation is a key criterion in nuclear fuel cycle system analysis, which considerably affects the future development of nuclear power. High population with small territory is one special characteristic of ROK, which makes the waste management pretty important. In this study, particularly the amount of waste generation with regard to the promising advanced fuel cycle option was evaluated, because the difficulty of deploying an underground repository for HLW disposal requires a longer time especially in ROK

  8. Power generation versus fuel production in light water hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1977-06-01

    The economic potentials of fissile-fuel-producing light-water hybrid reactors (FFP-LWHR) and of fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) LWHR's are compared. A simple economic model is constructed that gives the capital investment allowed for the hybrid reactor so that the cost of electricity generated in the hybrid based energy system equals the cost of electricity generated in LWR's. The power systems considered are LWR, FSS-LWHR, and FFP-LWHR plus LWR, both with and without plutonium recycling. The economic potential of FFP-LWHR's is found superior to that of FSS-LWHR's. Moreover, LWHR's may compete, economically, with LWR's. Criteria for determining the more economical approach to hybrid fuel or power production are derived for blankets having a linear dependence between F and M. The examples considered favor the power generation rather than fuel production

  9. Power generation costs for alternate reactor fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolen, G.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1980-09-01

    The total electric generating costs at the power plant busbar are estimated for various nuclear reactor fuel cycles which may be considered for power generation in the future. The reactor systems include pressurized water reactors (PWR), heavy-water reactors (HWR), high-temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR), liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), light-water pre-breeder and breeder reactors (LWPR, LWBR), and a fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR). Fuel cycles include once-through, uranium-only recycle, and full recycle of the uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel assemblies. The U 3 O 8 price for economic transition from once-through LWR fuel cycles to both PWR recycle and LMFBR systems is estimated. Electric power generation costs were determined both for a reference set of unit cost parameters and for a range of uncertainty in these parameters. In addition, cost sensitivity parameters are provided so that independent estimations can be made for alternate cost assumptions

  10. GeneNetWeaver: in silico benchmark generation and performance profiling of network inference methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffter, Thomas; Marbach, Daniel; Floreano, Dario

    2011-08-15

    Over the last decade, numerous methods have been developed for inference of regulatory networks from gene expression data. However, accurate and systematic evaluation of these methods is hampered by the difficulty of constructing adequate benchmarks and the lack of tools for a differentiated analysis of network predictions on such benchmarks. Here, we describe a novel and comprehensive method for in silico benchmark generation and performance profiling of network inference methods available to the community as an open-source software called GeneNetWeaver (GNW). In addition to the generation of detailed dynamical models of gene regulatory networks to be used as benchmarks, GNW provides a network motif analysis that reveals systematic prediction errors, thereby indicating potential ways of improving inference methods. The accuracy of network inference methods is evaluated using standard metrics such as precision-recall and receiver operating characteristic curves. We show how GNW can be used to assess the performance and identify the strengths and weaknesses of six inference methods. Furthermore, we used GNW to provide the international Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessments and Methods (DREAM) competition with three network inference challenges (DREAM3, DREAM4 and DREAM5). GNW is available at http://gnw.sourceforge.net along with its Java source code, user manual and supporting data. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. dario.floreano@epfl.ch.

  11. Agricultural residues as fuel for producer gas generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeglund, C

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports on results from a series of tests with four different types of agricultural residues as fuel for producer gas generation. The fuels are coconut shells, coconut husks, pelletized wheat-straw and pressed sugar cane. The tests were made with a 73 Hp (50 kW) agricultural tractor diesel engine equipped with a standard gasifier developed for wood chips in Sweden, and run on a testbed at the Swedish National Machinery Testing Institute. The engine was operated on approximately 10% diesel oil and 90% producer gas. The gas composition, its calorific value and temperature, the pressure drop and the engine power were monitored. Detailed elementary analysis of the fuel and gas were carried out. Observations were also made regarding the important aspects of bridging and slagging in the gasifier. The tests confirmed that coconut shells make an excellent fuel for producer gas generation. After 8 hours of running no problems with slags and bridging were experienced. Coconut husks showed no bridging but some slag formation. The gasifier operated satisfactorily for this fuel. Pelletized wheat straw and pressed sugar cane appeared unsuitable as fuel in the unmodified test gasifier (Type F 300) due to slag formation. It is important to note, however, that the present test results are not optimal for any of the fuels used, the gasifier being designed for wood-chips and not for the test-fuels used. Tests using approximately modified gasifiers are planned for the future.

  12. Solid waste generation in reprocessing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    North, E.D.

    1975-01-01

    Estimates are made of the solid wastes generated annually from a 750-ton/year plant (such as the NFS West Valley plant): high-level waste, hulls, intermediate level waste, failed equipment, HEPA filters, spent solvent, alpha contaminated combustible waste, and low specific activity waste. The annual volume of each category is plotted versus the activity level

  13. EDF energy generation UK transport of irradiated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R. [EDF Energy, London, (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01

    This paper give an overview of irradiated fuel transport in the UK. It describes the design of irradiated fuel flask used by EDF Energy; operational experience and good practices learnt from over 50 years of irradiated fuel transport. The AGRs can store approximately 9 months generation of spent fuel, hence the ability to transport irradiated fuel is vital. Movements are by road to the nearest railhead, typically less than 2 miles and then by rail to Sellafield, up to 400 miles, for reprocessing or long term storage. Road and rail vehicles are covered. To date in the UK: over 30,000 Magnox flask journeys and over 15,000 AGR A2 flask journeys have been carried out.

  14. Beyond pure offsetting: Assessing options to generate Net-Mitigation-Effects in carbon market mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, Carsten; Wartmann, Sina; Höhne, Niklas; Blok, Kornelis

    2014-01-01

    The current project-based carbon market mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and the Joint Implementation (JI) do not have a direct impact on global greenhouse gas emission levels, because they only replace or offset emissions. Nor do they contribute to host country's national greenhouse gas emission reduction targets. Contributions to net emission reductions in host countries is likely to become mandatory in new mechanisms under development such as in the framework for various approaches, a new market-based mechanism and even in a reformed JI. This research analysed the question if approaches for carbon market-based mechanisms exist that allow the generation of net emission reductions in host countries while keeping project initiation attractive. We present a criteria-based assessment method and apply it for four generic options in existing mechanisms and derive implications for future mechanism frameworks. We identified the application of “discounts” on the amount of avoided emissions for the issuance of carbon credits and “standardisation below business as usual” as most promising options over “limiting the crediting period” and “over-conservativeness”. We propose to apply these options differentiated over project types based on internal rate of return to ensure cost-efficiency and attractiveness. - Highlights: • Options for net emission reductions of market-based mechanisms are assessed. • Research combines past and current views for project and sector-based mechanisms. • Implementation ensures initiation of mitigation activities is not discouraged. • Important insights for methodological design of new market-based mechanisms. • Profitability-based approach for project-based mechanisms suggested

  15. Neutron radiation characteristics of the IVth generation reactor spent fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedenko, Sergey; Shamanin, Igor; Grachev, Victor; Knyshev, Vladimir; Ukrainets, Olesya; Zorkin, Andrey

    2018-03-01

    Exploitation of nuclear power plants as well as construction of new generation reactors lead to great accumulation of spent fuel in interim storage facilities at nuclear power plants, and in spent fuel «wet» and «dry» long-term storages. Consequently, handling the fuel needs more attention. The paper is focused on the creation of an efficient computational model used for developing the procedures and regulations of spent nuclear fuel handling in nuclear fuel cycle of the new generation reactor. A Thorium High-temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Unit (HGTRU, Russia) was used as an object for numerical research. Fuel isotopic composition of HGTRU was calculated using the verified code of the MCU-5 program. The analysis of alpha emitters and neutron radiation sources was made. The neutron yield resulting from (α,n)-reactions and at spontaneous fission was calculated. In this work it has been shown that contribution of (α,n)-neutrons is insignificant in case of such (Th,Pu)-fuel composition and HGTRU operation mode, and integral neutron yield can be approximated by the Watt spectral function. Spectral and standardized neutron distributions were achieved by approximation of the list of high-precision nuclear data. The distribution functions were prepared in group and continuous form for further use in calculations according to MNCP, MCU, and SCALE.

  16. EDUCATION IN TIMES NET GENERATION: HOW DIGITAL IMMIGRANTS CAN TEACH DIGITAL NATIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Viana Chaves

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Members of the knowledge society, of the network society or of the informatics society are some names that seem to define the current generation. Net generation is a generic nomenclature which covers all the previous terms. Digital immigrants are the subjects whom were born before the advent of digital technologies and who joined to them. Digital natives are the subjects whom were born in the current generation and that would have special qualities, especially regarding the learning process. Considering all this context, a question arises: how the digital immigrants teach the digital natives? This item justifies itself because there is a meeting of generations, in theory, significantly differentiated. Due to this, it would be necessary to identify the appropriate educational forms according to the presented situation. Our teaching experience convinces us that, yes, we should valorize the information’s technologies and communication, understanding that these are means, not ends. It is important to highlight that any tool causes advances and regressions, a fact that serves to guide our teaching practice.

  17. An approach to prospective consequential life cycle assessment and net energy analysis of distributed electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Christopher; Gilbert, Paul; Raugei, Marco; Mander, Sarah; Leccisi, Enrica

    2017-01-01

    Increasing distributed renewable electricity generation is one of a number of technology pathways available to policy makers to meet environmental and other sustainability goals. Determining the efficacy of such a pathway for a national electricity system implies evaluating whole system change in future scenarios. Life cycle assessment (LCA) and net energy analysis (NEA) are two methodologies suitable for prospective and consequential analysis of energy performance and associated impacts. This paper discusses the benefits and limitations of prospective and consequential LCA and NEA analysis of distributed generation. It concludes that a combined LCA and NEA approach is a valuable tool for decision makers if a number of recommendations are addressed. Static and dynamic temporal allocation are both needed for a fair comparison of distributed renewables with thermal power stations to account for their different impact profiles over time. The trade-offs between comprehensiveness and uncertainty in consequential analysis should be acknowledged, with system boundary expansion and system simulation models limited to those clearly justified by the research goal. The results of this approach are explorative, rather than for accounting purposes; this interpretive remit, and the assumptions in scenarios and system models on which results are contingent, must be clear to end users. - Highlights: • A common LCA and NEA framework for prospective, consequential analysis is discussed. • Approach to combined LCA and NEA of distributed generation scenarios is proposed. • Static and dynamic temporal allocation needed to assess distributed generation uptake.

  18. Assessment of ethanol-fueled IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power plants in distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, R. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Lefeld, J. [PSI Energy, Plainfield, IN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Ethanol-fueled cell power plants presents several significant opportunities for the power generation industry. The potential exists to reduce pollution, help the nation shift from its dependence on imported fuels, reduce global warming, and strengthen the economy. Two important developments can be merged to create a clean, high-technology, bio-based energy system: the production of ethanol fuels and the application of fuel cell power plants. Utilization of ethanol will be in dual-fueled applications initially, and evolve toward the primary fuel as the need for renewable energy sources increase and the economic competitiveness improves. This assessment addresses the major issues of this proposed concept and outlines the benefits anticipated to the environment, US agriculture, energy supplies, and electric power customers. Economic and technical aspects of the concept are also reviewed. One of PSI Energy`s primary interests is the utilization of renewable fuels supplied by their customer base. The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell is an advanced electric power generation technology currently under development by M-C Power. Commercial applications within the power generation industry are scheduled to begin during the late 1990s.

  19. Optimum fuel allocation in parallel steam generator systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollettini, U.; Cangioli, E.; Cerri, G.; Rome Univ. 'La Sapienza'; Trento Univ.

    1991-01-01

    An optimization procedure was developed to allocate fuels into parallel steam generators. The procedure takes into account the level of performance deterioration connected with the loading history (fossil fuel allocation and maintenance) of each steam generator. The optimization objective function is the system hourly cost, overall steam demand being satisfied. Costs are due to fuel and electric power supply and to plant depreciation and maintenance as well. In order to easily updata the state of each steam generator, particular care was put in the general formulation of the steam production function by adopting a special efficiency-load curve description based on a deterioration scaling parameter. The influence of the characteristic time interval length on the optimum operation result is investigated. A special implementation of the method based on minimum cost paths is suggested

  20. Gasification of torrefied fuel at power generation for decentralized consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safin, R. R.; Khakimzyanov, I. F.; Galyavetdinov, N. R.; Mukhametzyanov, S. R.

    2017-10-01

    The increasing need of satisfaction of the existing needs of the population and the industry for electric energy, especially in the areas remote from the centralized energy supply, results in need of development of “small-scale energy generation”. At the same time, the basis in these regions is made by the energy stations, using imported fuel, which involve a problem of increase in cost and transportation of fuel to the place of consumption. The solution of this task is the use of the torrefied waste of woodworking and agricultural industry as fuel. The influence of temperature of torrefaction of wood fuel on the developed electric generator power is considered in the article. As a result of the experiments, it is revealed that at gasification of torrefied fuel from vegetable raw material, the generating gas with the increased content of hydrogen and carbon oxide, in comparison with gasification of the raw materials, is produced. Owing to this, the engine capacity increases that exerts direct impact on power generation by the electric generator.

  1. Net vapor generation point in boiling flow of trichlorotrifluoroethane at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions at which the void in subcooled boiling starts to undergo a rapid increase were studied experimentally. The experiments were performed in a 12.7 x 9.5 mm rectangular channel. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in one wall. The pressure ranged from 9.45 to 20.7 bar, mass velocity from 600 to 7000 kg/sq m sec, and subcooling from 16 to 67 C. Photographs were used to determine when detached bubbles first appeared in the bulk flow. Measurements of bubble layer thickness along the wall were also made. Results showed that the point of net vapor generation is close to the occurrence of fully-developed boiling.

  2. FORMATION OF THE SYNTHESIS ALGORITHMS OF THE COORDINATING CONTROL SYSTEMS BY MEANS OF THE AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF PETRI NETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Gurskiy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The coordinating control system by drives of the robot-manipulator is presented in this article. The purpose of the scientific work is the development and research of the new algorithms for parametric synthesis of the coordinating control systems. To achieve this aim it is necessary to develop the system generating the required parametric synthesis algorithms and performing the necessary procedures according to the generated algorithm. This scientific work deals with the synthesis of Petri net in the specific case with the automatic generation of Petri nets.

  3. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. The low temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has recently been identified as an attractive option for stationary power generation, based on the relatively simple and benign materials employed, the zero-emission character of the device, and the expected high power density, high reliability and low cost. However, a PEMFC stack fueled by hydrogen with the combined properties of low cost, high performance and high reliability has not yet been demonstrated. Demonstration of such a stack will remove a significant barrier to implementation of this advanced technology for electric power generation from hydrogen. Work done in the past at LANL on the development of components and materials, particularly on advanced membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs), has contributed significantly to the capability to demonstrate in the foreseeable future a PEMFC stack with the combined characteristics described above. A joint effort between LANL and an industrial stack manufacturer will result in the demonstration of such a fuel cell stack for stationary power generation. The stack could operate on hydrogen fuel derived from either natural gas or from renewable sources. The technical plan includes collaboration with a stack manufacturer (CRADA). It stresses the special requirements from a PEMFC in stationary power generation, particularly maximization of the energy conversion efficiency, extension of useful life to the 10 hours time scale and tolerance to impurities from the reforming of natural gas.

  4. Efficiency of poly-generating high temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalef, Pere; Brown, Tim; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, Scott [National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC), University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3550 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    High temperature fuel cells can be designed and operated to poly-generate electricity, heat, and useful chemicals (e.g., hydrogen) in a variety of configurations. The highly integrated and synergistic nature of poly-generating high temperature fuel cells, however, precludes a simple definition of efficiency for analysis and comparison of performance to traditional methods. There is a need to develop and define a methodology to calculate each of the co-product efficiencies that is useful for comparative analyses. Methodologies for calculating poly-generation efficiencies are defined and discussed. The methodologies are applied to analysis of a Hydrogen Energy Station (H{sub 2}ES) showing that high conversion efficiency can be achieved for poly-generation of electricity and hydrogen. (author)

  5. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  6. 40 CFR 80.531 - How are motor vehicle diesel fuel credits generated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How are motor vehicle diesel fuel... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel... are motor vehicle diesel fuel credits generated? (a) Generation of credits from June 1, 2006 through...

  7. Three generation production biotechnology of biomass into bio-fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chaocheng

    2017-08-01

    The great change of climate change, depletion of natural resources, and scarcity of fossil fuel in the whole world nowadays have witnessed a sense of urgency home and abroad among scales of researchers, development practitioners, and industrialists to search for completely brand new sustainable solutions in the area of biomass transforming into bio-fuels attributing to our duty-that is, it is our responsibility to take up this challenge to secure our energy in the near future with the help of sustainable approaches and technological advancements to produce greener fuel from nature organic sources or biomass which comes generally from organic natural matters such as trees, woods, manure, sewage sludge, grass cuttings, and timber waste with a source of huge green energy called bio-fuel. Biomass includes most of the biological materials, livings or dead bodies. This energy source is ripely used industrially, or domestically for rather many years, but the recent trend is on the production of green fuel with different advance processing systems in a greener. More sustainable method. Biomass is becoming a booming industry currently on account of its cheaper cost and abundant resources all around, making it fairly more effective for the sustainable use of the bio-energy. In the past few years, the world has witnessed a remarkable development in the bio-fuel production technology, and three generations of bio-fuel have already existed in our society. The combination of membrane technology with the existing process line can play a vital role for the production of green fuel in a sustainable manner. In this paper, the science and technology for sustainable bio-fuel production will be introduced in detail for a cleaner world.

  8. A self-regulating hydrogen generator for micro fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Pengwang, Eakkachai; Shannon, Mark A. [Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Masel, Richard I. [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 213 Roger Adams Lab, 600 S. Mathews, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    The ever-increasing power demands and miniaturization of portable electronics, micro-sensors and actuators, and emerging technologies such as cognitive arthropods have created a significant interest in development of micro fuel cells. One of the major challenges in development of hydrogen micro fuel cells is the fabrication and integration of auxiliary systems for generating, regulating, and delivering hydrogen gas to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this paper, we report the development of a hydrogen gas generator with a micro-scale control system that does not consume any power. The hydrogen generator consists of a hydride reactor and a water reservoir, with a regulating valve separating them. The regulating valve consists of a port from the water reservoir and a movable membrane with via holes that permit water to flow from the reservoir to the hydride reactor. Water flows towards the hydride reactor, but stops within the membrane via holes due to capillary forces. Water vapor then diffuses from the via holes into the hydride reactor resulting in generation of hydrogen gas. When the rate of hydrogen consumed by the MEA is lower than the generation rate, gas pressure builds up inside the hydride reactor, deflecting the membrane, closing the water regulator valve, until the pressure drops, whereby the valve reopens. We have integrated the self-regulating micro hydrogen generator to a MEA and successfully conducted fuel cell tests under varying load conditions. (author)

  9. Estimating the net electricity energy generation and demand using the ant colony optimization approach. Case of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toksari, M. Duran

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents Turkey's net electricity energy generation and demand based on economic indicators. Forecasting model for electricity energy generation and demand is first proposed by the ant colony optimization (ACO) approach. It is multi-agent system in which the behavior of each ant is inspired by the foraging behavior of real ants to solve optimization problem. Ant colony optimization electricity energy estimation (ACOEEE) model is developed using population, gross domestic product (GDP), import and export. All equations proposed here are linear electricity energy generation and demand (linear A COEEGE and linear ACOEEDE) and quadratic energy generation and demand (quadratic A COEEGE and quadratic ACOEEDE). Quadratic models for both generation and demand provided better fit solution due to the fluctuations of the economic indicators. The ACOEEGE and ACOEEDE models indicate Turkey's net electricity energy generation and demand until 2025 according to three scenarios. (author)

  10. Study on performance of blended fuel PPO - Diesel at generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Joni; Prasetyo, Dwi Husodo; Murti, S. D. Sumbogo; Adiarso, Priyanto, Unggul

    2018-02-01

    Bio-energy is renewable energy made from plant. Biomass-based energy sources are potentially CO2 neutral and recycle the same carbon atoms. In order to reduce pollution caused by fossil fuel combustion either for mechanical or electrical energy generation, the performance characteristic of purified palm oil blends are analyzed at various ratios. Bio-energy, Pure Plant Oil, represent a sustainable solution.A generator has been modified due to adapt the viscosity ofblended fuel, PPO - diesel, by pre-heating. Several PPO - diesel composition and injection timing were tested in order to investigate the characteristic of mixed fuel with and without pre-heating. The term biofuel refers to liquid or gaseous fuels for the internal combustion engines that are predominantly produced fro m biomass. Surprising result showed that BSFC of blended PPO - diesel was more efficient when injection timing set more than 15° BTDC. The mixed fuel produced power with less mixed fuel even though the calorie content of diesel is higher than PPO. The most efficient was 20% PPO in diesel with BSFC 296 gr fuel / kwh rather than 100% diesel with BSFC 309 gr fuel / kwh at the same injection timing 18° BTDC with pre-heating. The improvement of BSFC is caused by heating up of mixed fuel which it added calorie in the mixed fuel. Therefore, the heating up of blended PPO - diesel is not only to adapt the viscosity but also improving the efficiency of fuel usage representing by lower BSFC. In addition, torque of the 20% PPO was also as smooth as 100% diesel representing by almost the same torqueat injection timing 15° BTDC. The AIP Proceedings article template has many predefined paragraph styles for you to use/apply as you write your paper. To format your abstract, use the Microsoft Word template style: Abstract. Each paper must include an abstract. Begin the abstract with the word "Abstract" followed by a period in bold font, and then continue with a normal 9 point font.

  11. Study on the Tribological Characteristics of Australian Native First Generation and Second Generation Biodiesel Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mofijur Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesels are a renewable energy source, and they have the potential to be used as alternatives to diesel fuel. The aim of this study is to investigate the wear and friction characteristics of Australian native first generation and second generation biodiesels using a four-ball tribo tester. The biodiesel was produced through a two-step transesterification process and characterized according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM standards. The tribological experiment was carried out at a constant 1800 rpm and different loads and temperatures. In addition, the surface morphology of the ball was tested by scanning electron microscope (SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analysis. The test results indicated that biodiesel fuels have a lower coefficient of frictions (COF and lower wear scar diameter (WSD up to 83.50% and 41.28%, respectively, compared to conventional diesel fuel. The worn surface area results showed that biodiesel fuel has a minimum percentage of C and O, except Fe, compared to diesel. In addition, the worn surface area for diesel was found (2.20%–27.92% to be higher than biodiesel. The findings of this study indicated that both first and second generation biodiesel fuels have better tribological performance than diesel fuel, and between the biodiesel fuels, macadamia biodiesel showed better lubrication performance.

  12. Power generation from furfural using the microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yong; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Zhang, Cuiping [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Furfural is a typical inhibitor in the ethanol fermentation process using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as raw materials. In the literature, no report has shown that furfural can be utilized as the fuel to produce electricity in the microbial fuel cell (MFC), a device that uses microbes to convert organic compounds to generate electricity. In this study, we demonstrated that electricity was successfully generated using furfural as the sole fuel in both the ferricyanide-cathode MFC and the air-cathode MFC. In the ferricyanide-cathode MFC, the maximum power densities reached 45.4, 81.4, and 103 W m{sup -3}, respectively, when 1000 mg L{sup -1} glucose, a mixture of 200 mg L{sup -1} glucose and 5 mM furfural, and 6.68 mM furfural were used as the fuels in the anode solution. The corresponding Coulombic efficiencies (CE) were 4.0, 7.1, and 10.2% for the three treatments, respectively. For pure furfural as the fuel, the removal efficiency of furfural reached up to 95% within 12 h. In the air-cathode MFC using 6.68 mM furfural as the fuel, the maximum values of power density and CE were 361 mW m{sup -2} (18 W m{sup -3}) and 30.3%, respectively, and the COD removal was about 68% at the end of the experiment (about 30 h). Increase in furfural concentrations from 6.68 to 20 mM resulted in increase in the maximum power densities from 361 to 368 mW m{sup -2}, and decrease in CEs from 30.3 to 20.6%. These results indicated that some toxic and biorefractory organics such as furfural might still be suitable resources for electricity generation using the MFC technology. (author)

  13. Technical and economic analysis of electricity generation from forest, fossil, and wood-waste fuels in a Finnish heating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palander, Teijo

    2011-01-01

    The Finnish energy industry is subject to policy decisions regarding renewable energy production and energy efficiency. Conventional electricity generation has environmental side-effects that may cause global warming. Renewable fuels are superior because they offer near-zero net emissions. In this study, I investigated a heating mill's ability to generate electricity from forest fuels in southern Finland on a 1-year strategic decision-making horizon. I solved the electricity generation problem using optimization of the energy products and fuel mixtures based on energy efficiency and forest technology. The decision environment was complicated by the sequence-dependent procurement chains for forest fuels. The optimal product and fuel mixtures were selected by minimizing procurement costs, maximizing production revenues, and minimizing energy losses. The combinatorial complexity of the problem required the use of adaptive techniques to solve a multiple-objective linear programming system with industrial relevance. I discuss the properties of the decision-support system and methodology and illustrate pricing of electricity generation based on real industrial data. The electricity-generation, -purchase, and -sales decisions are made based on a comprehensive technical and economic analysis that accounts for procurement of local forest fuels in a holistic supply chain model. -- Highlights: → I use adaptive techniques to solve a multiple-objective linear programming system with industrial relevance. → I investigated a heating mill's ability to generate electricity from forest fuels. → The electricity-generation, -purchase, and -sales decisions are made based on a comprehensive technical and economic analysis. → The optimal product and fuel mixtures were selected by minimizing procurement costs, maximizing production revenues, and minimizing energy losses.

  14. Fault Diagnosis System of Wind Turbine Generator Based on Petri Net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han

    Petri net is an important tool for discrete event dynamic systems modeling and analysis. And it has great ability to handle concurrent phenomena and non-deterministic phenomena. Currently Petri nets used in wind turbine fault diagnosis have not participated in the actual system. This article will combine the existing fuzzy Petri net algorithms; build wind turbine control system simulation based on Siemens S7-1200 PLC, while making matlab gui interface for migration of the system to different platforms.

  15. Radioactive Wastes Generated From JAERI Partitioning-Transmutation Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Shinichi; Morita, Yasuji; Nishihara, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    Production of lower-level radioactive wastes, as well as the reduction in radioactivity of HLW, is an important performance indicator in assessing the viability of a partitioning-transmutation system. We have begun to identify the chemical compositions and to quantify the amounts of radioactive wastes that may be generated by JAERI's processes. Long-lived radionuclides such as 14 C and 59 Ni and spallation products of Pb-Bi coolants are added to the existing inventory of these nuclides that are generated in the current fuel cycle. Spent salts of KCl-LiCl, which is not generated from the current fuel cycle, will be introduced as a waste. (authors)

  16. Ontario Hydro Pickering Generating Station fuel handling system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underhill, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    The report briefly describes the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on-power fuel handling system and refuelling cycle. Lifetime performance parameters of the fuelling system are presented, including station incapability charged to the fuel handling system, cost of operating and maintenance, dose expenditure, events causing system unavailability, maintenance and refuelling strategy. It is concluded that the 'CANDU' on-power fuelling system, by consistently contributing less than 1% to the PNGS incapability, has been credited with a 6 to 20% increase in reactor capacity factor, compared to off-power fuelling schemes. (author)

  17. A Renewably Powered Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Station Community Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Sekura, Linda S.; Prokopius, Paul; Theirl, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The proposed project goal is to encourage the use of renewable energy and clean fuel technologies for transportation and other applications while generating economic development. This can be done by creating an incubator for collaborators, and creating a manufacturing hub for the energy economy of the future by training both white- and blue-collar workers for the new energy economy. Hydrogen electrolyzer fueling stations could be mass-produced, shipped and installed in collaboration with renewable energy power stations, or installed connected to the grid with renewable power added later.

  18. Achievement report for fiscal 2000 on the phase II research and development for hydrogen utilizing international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Task 6. Development of fuel cell of pure hydrogen fueled solid polymer type; 2000 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) dai 2 ki kenkyu kaihatsu. Task 6. Junsuiso kyokyu kotai kobunshigata nenryo denchi no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    This paper describes the achievements in fiscal 2000 from the WE-NET Phase II for research and development Task-6. The objective is to verify performance and reliability, by means of field tests, of a power generation plant using fuel cells of pure hydrogen fueled solid polymer type with power transmission terminal efficiency of 45% and output of 30 kW. The fuel cells were developed by using the cathode humidification process as a humidification method suitable for operation at high utilization rates. With a three-cell stack made by using this humidification process (having an effective area of 289 cm{sup 2}), verification was made on the current density of 0.2A/cm{sup 2}, the characteristics of 0.75V or higher, and the uniform voltage distribution performance being the immediate targets. In order to mitigate the hydrogen utilization in the fuel cells, discussions were given on the serial flow system that divides the laminated cells into two blocks. Thus, operation was found possible with the utilization rate in each block reduced to about 80% by selecting an adequate division rate even if the hydrogen utilization rate is 96% in the entire stack. Stable operation has been performed in the 5-kW class power generation test using the cathode interior humidifying system. Specifications for 30-kW class power plant, system configuration, safety, and material balance were discussed. The basic design was made on the hydrogen gas humidity adjusting system. (NEDO)

  19. Soviet steam generator technology: fossil fuel and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosengaus, J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Soviet Union, particular operational requirements, coupled with a centralized planning system adopted in the 1920s, have led to a current technology which differs in significant ways from its counterparts elsewhere in the would and particularly in the United States. However, the monograph has a broader value in that it traces the development of steam generators in response to the industrial requirements of a major nation dealing with the global energy situation. Specifically, it shows how Soviet steam generator technology evolved as a result of changing industrial requirements, fuel availability, and national fuel utilization policy. The monograph begins with a brief technical introduction focusing on steam-turbine power plants, and includes a discussion of the Soviet Union's regional power supply (GRES) networks and heat and power plant (TETs) systems. TETs may be described as large central co-generating stations which, in addition to electricity, provide heat in the form of steam and hot water. Plants of this type are a common feature of the USSR today. The adoption of these cogeneration units as a matter of national policy has had a central influence on Soviet steam generator technology which can be traced throughout the monograph. The six chapters contain: a short history of steam generators in the USSR; steam generator design and manufacture in the USSR; boiler and furnace assemblies for fossil fuel-fired power stations; auxiliary components; steam generators in nuclear power plants; and the current status of the Soviet steam generator industry. Chapters have been abstracted separately. A glossary is included containing abbreviations and acronyms of USSR organizations. 26 references

  20. Economical analysis of combined fuel cell generators and absorption chillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morsy El-Gohary

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a co-generation system based on combined heat and power for commercial units. For installation of a co-generation system, certain estimates for this site should be performed through making assessments of electrical loads, domestic water, and thermal demand. This includes domestic hot water, selection of the type of power generator, fuel cell, and the type of air conditioning system, and absorption chillers. As a matter of fact, the co-generation system has demonstrated good results for both major aspects, economic and environmental. From the environmental point of view, this can be considered as an ideal solution for problems concerned with the usage of Chlorofluoro carbons. On the other hand, from the economic point of view, the cost analysis has revealed that the proposed system saves 4% of total cost through using the co-generation system.

  1. Fossil fuel power generation within the European Research Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-12-10

    The report is the first in a series of three produced by the PowerClean Thematic Network that looks at and defines future requirements for research and development of fossil fuel power generation in the European Union. It makes the case for fossil fuel R & D with emphasis on the need for clean coal technologies (to increased efficiency and other CO{sub 2} capture and storage) For satisfying future energy demands of the enlarged European Union between now and 2030. The report concludes that affirmative R, D and D action is needed to support the EU power industry, working together on a Europe-wide basis, to establish the use of coal and other fossil fuels in near-zero emissions power plant. The role model would be the European Research Area, as in the Sixth Framework Programme (FP6), but with a more comprehensive range of technical objectives recognising the importance of fossil fuels. Section headings are: introduction; current energy use; future needs and requirements; the future for clean fossil fuel energy in Europe; comparison with approaches adopted elsewhere (USA Vision 21 and FutureGen programmes, Japan); and responsibilities for EU coal R, D & D. 14 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

  3. Net metering in British Columbia : white paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, T.

    2003-01-01

    Net metering was described as being the reverse registration of an electricity customer's revenue meter when interconnected with a utility's grid. It is a provincial policy designed to encourage small-distributed renewable power generation such as micro-hydro, solar energy, fuel cells, and larger-scale wind energy. It was noted that interconnection standards for small generation is an important issue that must be addressed. The British Columbia Utilities Commission has asked BC Hydro to prepare a report on the merits of net metering in order to support consultations on a potential net metering tariff application by the utility. This report provides information on net metering with reference to experience in other jurisdictions with net metering, and the possible costs and benefits associated with net metering from both a utility and consumer perspective. Some of the barriers and policy considerations for successful implementation of net metering were also discussed. refs., tabs., figs

  4. Solid polymer fuel cell stationary power generation design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyke, S.H.; Wood, A.; Williams, G.J.; Kearney, P.

    2000-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a study investigating potential markets for solid polymer fuel cells (SPFC) stationary power generating systems and evaluating design options for grid connected and stand-alone systems. The specification of potential application for SPFC systems, initial modelling and economic analysis of twelve candidate SPFC applications, and the ranking and evaluation of candidate applications are examined. Details are given of performance modelling and economic analysis of four preferred SPFC systems (domestic, commercial, light industrial, and transportable generation), and comparison of SPFC with competing technologies. The economics of SPFC and conventional technologies for commercial applications are compared and market opportunities and potential barriers to commercialisation are identified.

  5. 40 CFR 80.535 - How are NRLM diesel fuel credits generated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGULATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive... the standards of § 80.510(a) or (b). V520 = The total volume of motor vehicle diesel fuel produced or... generated by both a foreign refiner and by an importer for the same motor vehicle diesel fuel. (iii) Credits...

  6. Hydrogen generation at ambient conditions: application in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddien, Albert; Loges, Björn; Junge, Henrik; Beller, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The efficient generation of hydrogen from formic acid/amine adducts at ambient temperature is demonstrated. The highest catalytic activity (TOF up to 3630 h(-1) after 20 min) was observed in the presence of in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts. Compared to the previously known methods to generate hydrogen from liquid feedstocks, the systems presented here can be operated at room temperature without the need for any high-temperature reforming processes, and the hydrogen produced can then be directly used in fuel cells. A variety of Ru precursors and phosphine ligands were investigated for the decomposition of formic acid/amine adducts. These catalytic systems are particularly interesting for the generation of H2 for new applications in portable electric devices.

  7. Schema generation in recurrent neural nets for intercepting a moving target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Andreas G

    2010-06-01

    The grasping of a moving object requires the development of a motor strategy to anticipate the trajectory of the target and to compute an optimal course of interception. During the performance of perception-action cycles, a preprogrammed prototypical movement trajectory, a motor schema, may highly reduce the control load. Subjects were asked to hit a target that was moving along a circular path by means of a cursor. Randomized initial target positions and velocities were detected in the periphery of the eyes, resulting in a saccade toward the target. Even when the target disappeared, the eyes followed the target's anticipated course. The Gestalt of the trajectories was dependent on target velocity. The prediction capability of the motor schema was investigated by varying the visibility range of cursor and target. Motor schemata were determined to be of limited precision, and therefore visual feedback was continuously required to intercept the moving target. To intercept a target, the motor schema caused the hand to aim ahead and to adapt to the target trajectory. The control of cursor velocity determined the point of interception. From a modeling point of view, a neural network was developed that allowed the implementation of a motor schema interacting with feedback control in an iterative manner. The neural net of the Wilson type consists of an excitation-diffusion layer allowing the generation of a moving bubble. This activation bubble runs down an eye-centered motor schema and causes a planar arm model to move toward the target. A bubble provides local integration and straightening of the trajectory during repetitive moves. The schema adapts to task demands by learning and serves as forward controller. On the basis of these model considerations the principal problem of embedding motor schemata in generalized control strategies is discussed.

  8. 75 FR 66008 - Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings; Correction AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... the fossil fuel- generated energy consumption [[Page 66009

  9. Effect of operating methods of wind turbine generator system on net power extraction under wind velocity fluctuations in fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Hashizume, Takumi [Waseda Univ., Advanced Research Inst. for Science and Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Outa, Eisuke [Waseda Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Tokyo (Japan); Tanzawa, Yoshiaki [Nippon Inst. of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Saitama (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    The effect of how a wind turbine generator system is operated is discussed from the viewpoint of net power extraction with wind velocity fluctuation in relation to the scale and the dynamic behaviour of the system. On a wind turbine generator system consisting of a Darrieus-Savonius hybrid wind turbine, a load generator and a battery, we took up two operating methods: constant tip speed ratio operation for a stand-alone system (Scheme 1) and synchronous operation by connecting a grid (Scheme 2). With our simulation model, using the result of the net extracting power, we clarified that Scheme 1 is more effective than Scheme 2 for small-scale systems. Furthermore, in Scheme 1, the appropriate rated power output of the system under each wind condition can be confirmed. (Author)

  10. Integration of direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells for highly efficient power generation from hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Choi, Pyoungho; Smith, Franklyn; Bokerman, Gary [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In view of impending depletion of hydrocarbon fuel resources and their negative environmental impact, it is imperative to significantly increase the energy conversion efficiency of hydrocarbon-based power generation systems. The combination of a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor with a direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells (FC) as a means for a significant increase in chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency is discussed in this paper. The data on development and operation of a thermocatalytic hydrocarbon decomposition reactor and its coupling with a proton exchange membrane FC are presented. The analysis of the integrated power generating system including a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor, direct carbon and hydrogen FC using natural gas and propane as fuels is conducted. It was estimated that overall chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of the integrated system varied in the range of 49.4-82.5%, depending on the type of fuel and FC used, and CO{sub 2} emission per kW{sub el}h produced is less than half of that from conventional power generation sources. (author)

  11. Direct fuel cell - A high proficiency power generator for biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, P.S.; Steinfeld, G.; Baker, B.S.

    1994-01-01

    Conversion of renewable bio-based resources into energy offers significant benefits for our environment and domestic economic activity. It also improves national security by displacing fossil fuels. However, in the current economic environment, it is difficult for biofuel systems to compete with other fossil fuels. The biomass-fired power plants are typically smaller than 50 MW, lower in electrical efficiencies (<25%) and experience greater costs for handling and transporting the biomass. When combined with fuel cells such as the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC), biofuels can produce power more efficiently with negligible environmental impact. Agricultural and other waste biomass can be converted to ethanol or methane-rich biofuels for power generation use in the DFC. These DFC power plants are modular and factory assembled. Due to their electrochemical (non-combustion) conversion process, these plants are environmentally friendly, highly efficient and potentially cost effective, even in sizes as small as a few meagawatts. They can be sited closer to the source of the biomass to minimize handling and transportation costs. The high-grade waste heat available from DFC power plants makes them attractive in cogeneration applications for farming and rural communities. The DFC potentially opens up new markets for biofuels derived from wood, grains and other biomass waste products

  12. Verification of a Subgroup Generation Method for Thorium Fuel Assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Ohsung; Kim, Myunghyun

    2013-01-01

    Resonance parameter consists of subgroup level and weight. The subgroup weight is obtained by solving the ultrafine slowing down equation and fixed source problem. That means this cross section library procedure considers conservation of the shielded cross section for pin-cell in order to obtain subgroup parameters. There are some isotopes to be concerned for research such as actinides and thorium. Minor actinides(MA) are existing with very small amount in a spent fuel, but effect is not negligible in a high burnup fuel assemblies. Some MAs have high fission cross sections under thermal neutron spectrum. Thorium isotopes was not investigated as much as uranium, but it has high potential for future application. In this study, a new cross section library to be replaced with HELIOS library was generated and compared for the assembly calculation, specially for assembly with thorium. An average capture cross section value at a certain fuel pin and multiplication factor of assembly were compared with nTRACER calculation with HELIOS library and Monte Carlo calculation of MCNP with ENDF-B/II. The accuracy of library data generated for thorium isotope in nTRACER calculation was tested for WASB model. There was a great improvement in K-eff and capture cross section for this assembly compared with old library, HELIOS library

  13. Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

    2012-03-30

    Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

  14. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  15. Feasibility and desirability of employing the thorium fuel cycle for power generation - 254

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehgal, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Thorium fuel cycle for nuclear power generation has been considered since the very start of the nuclear power era. In spite of a very large amount of research, experimentation, pilot scale and prototypic scale installations, the thorium fuel was not adopted for large scale power generation [1,2]. This paper reviews the developments over the years on the front and the back-end of the thorium fuel cycle and describes the pros and cons of employing the thorium fuel cycle for large generation of nuclear power. It examines the feasibility and desirability of employing the thorium fuel cycle in concert with the uranium fuel cycle for power generation. (authors)

  16. Fuel procurement for first generation fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gore, B.F.; Hendrickson, P.L.

    1976-09-01

    The provision of deuterium, tritium, lithium and beryllium fuel materials for fusion power plants is examined in this document. Possible fusion reactions are discussed for use in first generation power plants. Requirements for fuel materials are considered. A range of expected annual consumption is given for each of the materials for a 1000 megawatts electric (MWe) fusion power plant. Inventory requirements are also given. Requirements for an assumed fusion power plant electrical generating capacity of 10 6 MWe (roughly twice present U.S. generating capacity) are also given. The supply industries are then examined for deuterium, lithium, and beryllium. Methods are discussed for producing the only tritium expected to be purchased by a commercial fusion industry--an initial inventory for the first plant. Present production levels and methods are described for deuterium, lithium and beryllium. The environmental impact associated with production of these materials is then discussed. The toxicity of beryllium is described, and methods are indicated to keep worker exposure to beryllium as low as achievable

  17. Examination of spent fuel radiation energy conversion for electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung, E-mail: msyim@kaist.ac.kr

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Utilizing conversion of radiation energy of spent fuel to electric energy. • MCNPX modeling and experiment were used to estimate energy conversion. • The converted energy may be useful for nuclear security applications. • The converted energy may be utilized for safety applications through energy storage. - Abstract: Supply of electricity inside nuclear power plant is one of the most important considerations for nuclear safety and security. In this study, generation of electric energy by converting radiation energy of spent nuclear fuel was investigated. Computational modeling work by using MCNPX 2.7.0 code along with experiment was performed to estimate the amount of electric energy generation. The calculation using the developed modeling work was validated through comparison with an integrated experiment. The amount of electric energy generation based on a conceptual design of an energy conversion module was estimated to be low. But the amount may be useful for nuclear security applications. An alternative way of utilizing the produced electric energy could be considered for nuclear safety application through energy storage. Further studies are needed to improve the efficiency of the proposed energy conversion concept and to examine the issue of radiation damage and economic feasibility.

  18. [Electricity generation from corn steepwater using microbial fuel cell technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Na; Zhou, Shun-Gui; Zhang, Jin-Tao; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2009-02-15

    Corn steepwater containing 49,732.2 mg/L of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was used as fuel for a membrane electrode assembly microbial fuel cell (MEA-MFC), which could generate electricity and treat the wastewater at the same time. During a batch experiment of 94 days with a fixed 1,000 Omega external resistance, the maximum voltage output of 525.0 mV and power density of 169.6 mW/m2 were obtained after 17 days, corresponding to the current density, internal resistance and open voltage of 440.2 mA/m2, 350 Omega and 619.5 mV, respectively. However, data showed that the coulombic efficiency was only 1.6%, suggesting very limited COD was utilized for electricity generation. At the conclusion of the test, the removals of COD and ammonia-nitrogen were achieved 51.6% and 25.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates that corn steepwater can be used for power generation in MFC with simultaneous accomplishments of wastewater treatment, providing a novel approach for the safe disposal and recycle of corn steepwater.

  19. Design of improved fuel cell controller for distributed generation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen Berenguer, F.A. [Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste, 1109, J5400ARL San Juan (Argentina); Molina, M.G. [CONICET, Instituto de Energia Electrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Av. Libertador San Martin Oeste, 1109, J5400ARL San Juan (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The world has been undergoing a deregulation process which allowed competition in the electricity generation sector. This situation is bringing the opportunity for electricity users to generate power by using small-scale generation systems with emerging technologies, allowing the development of distributed generation (DG). A fuel cell power plant (FCPP) is a distributed generation technology with a rapid development because it has promising characteristics, such as low pollutant emissions, silent operation, high efficiency and long lifetime because of its small number of moving parts. The power conditioning system (PCS) is the interface that allows the effective connection to the electric power system. With the appropriate topology of the PCS and its control system design, the FCPP unit is capable of simultaneously performing both instantaneous active and reactive power flow control. This paper describes the design and implementation of a novel high performance PCS of an FCPP and its controller, for applications in distributed generation systems. A full detailed model of the FCPP is derived and a new three-level control scheme is designed. The dynamic performance of the proposed system is validated by digital simulation in SimPowerSystems (SPS) of MATLAB/Simulink. (author)

  20. Fuel development for reactors of new generation in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odeychuk, N.P.

    2006-01-01

    elements development with fuel on a basis: Metal: uranium, alloys of uranium; Ceramic: uranium dioxide, thorium dioxide, uranium carbonitride, uranium oxycarbide, mixed oxide of uranium and thorium. The special attention is given to discussion of the basic technological schemes of reception of the fuel microspheres, coated particles and spherical fuel elements for HTGR. Features of reception carbongraphite materials and products by the methods of volumetric gas-phase condensation of porous preparations by pyrocarbon are considered. Results of investigations of the basic fuel elements characteristics and their components, materials and products with pyrocarbon binding, including in conditions of reactor irradiations are discussed. The review concerning the experience of the development the fuel elements with fuel based on metal uranium is given. In NSC KIPT constructions and manufacturing techniques of components for active zones of new perspective directions of atomic engineering are created and proved, also was laid the foundation for the base design and technological decisions for the fourth generation nuclear reactors

  1. Generation of net sediment transport by velocity skewness in oscillatory sheet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Yong; Chen, Genfa; Wang, Fujun; Tang, Xuelin

    2018-01-01

    This study utilizes a qualitative approach and a two-phase numerical model to investigate net sediment transport caused by velocity skewness beneath oscillatory sheet flow and current. The qualitative approach is derived based on the pseudo-laminar approximation of boundary layer velocity and exponential approximation of concentration. The two-phase model can obtain well the instantaneous erosion depth, sediment flux, boundary layer thickness, and sediment transport rate. It can especially illustrate the difference between positive and negative flow stages caused by velocity skewness, which is considerably important in determining the net boundary layer flow and sediment transport direction. The two-phase model also explains the effect of sediment diameter and phase-lag to sediment transport by comparing the instantaneous-type formulas to better illustrate velocity skewness effect. In previous studies about sheet flow transport in pure velocity-skewed flows, net sediment transport is only attributed to the phase-lag effect. In the present study with the qualitative approach and two-phase model, phase-lag effect is shown important but not sufficient for the net sediment transport beneath pure velocity-skewed flow and current, while the asymmetric wave boundary layer development between positive and negative flow stages also contributes to the sediment transport.

  2. [Electricity generation from sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater using microbial fuel cell technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Bo; Yang, Yi; Sun, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Liang; Xiao, Yao; Zhao, Hai

    2010-10-01

    Air cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) were investigated for electricity production from sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater containing 5000 mg/L of chemical oxygen demand (COD). Maximum power density of 334.1 mW/m2, coulombic efficiency (CE) of 10.1% and COD removal efficiency of 92.2% were approached. The effect of phosphate buffer solution (PBS) and COD concentration on the performance of MFC was further examined. The addition of PBS from 50 mmol/L to 200 mmol/L increased the maximum power density and CE by 33.4% and 26.0%, respectively. However, the COD removal efficiency was not relative to PBS concentration in the wastewater. When the COD increased from 625 mg/L to 10 000 mg/L, the maximum value of COD removal efficiency and the maximum power density were gained at the wastewater strength of 5 000 mg/L. But the CE ranged from 28.9% to 10.3% with a decreasing trend. These results demonstrate that sweet potato fuel ethanol wastewater can be used for electricity generation in MFC while at the same time achieving wastewater treatment. The increasing of PBS concentration can improve the power generation of MFC. The maximum power density of MFC increases with the rise of COD concentration, but the electricity generation will decrease for the acidification of high wastewater concentration.

  3. Electricity generation from the mud by using microbial fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Sitinoor Adeib

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs is a bio-electrochemical device that harnesses the power of respiring microbes to convert organic substrates directly into electrical energy. This is achieved when bacteria transfer electrons to an electrode rather than directly to an electron acceptor. Their technical feasibility has recently been proven and there is great enthusiasm in the scientific community that MFCs could provide a source of “green electricity”. Microbial fuel cells work by allowing bacteria to do what they do best, oxidize and reduce organic molecules. Bacterial respiration is basically one big redox reaction in which electrons are being moved around. The objective is to generate electricity throughout the biochemical process using chemical waste basically sludge, via microbial fuel cells. The methodology includes collecting sludge from different locations, set up microbial fuel cells with the aid of salt bridge and observing the results in voltage measurement. The microbial fuel cells consist of two chambers, iron electrodes, copper wire, air pump (to increase the efficiency of electron transfer, water, sludge and salt bridge. After several observations, it is seen that this MFC can achieve up until 202 milivolts (0.202volts with the presence of air pump. It is proven through the experiments that sludge from different locations gives different results in term of the voltage measurement. This is basically because in different locations of sludge contain different type and amount of nutrients to provide the growth of bacteria. Apart from that, salt bridge also play an important role in order to transport the proton from cathode to anode. A longer salt bridge will give a higher voltage compared to a short salt bridge. On the other hand, the limitations that this experiment facing is the voltage that being produced did not last long as the bacteria activity slows down gradually and the voltage produced are not really great in amount. Lastly to

  4. Energy system analysis of fuel cells and distributed generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    This chapter introduces Energy System Analysis methodologies and tools, which can be used for identifying the best application of different Fuel Cell (FC) technologies to different regional or national energy systems. The main point is that the benefits of using FC technologies indeed depend...... on the energy system in which they are used. Consequently, coherent energy systems analyses of specific and complete energy systems must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of FC technologies and in order to be able to compare alternative solutions. In relation to distributed generation, FC...... technologies are very often connected to the use of hydrogen, which has to be provided e.g. from electrolysers. Decentralised and distributed generation has the possibility of improving the overall energy efficiency and flexibility of energy systems. Therefore, energy system analysis tools and methodologies...

  5. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

    2012-04-01

    This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 787­8 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the

  6. Gas-Cooled Reactor Programs annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1973. [HTGR fuel reprocessing, fuel fabrication, fuel irradiation, core materials, and fission product distribution; GCFR fuel irradiation and steam generator modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Coobs, J.H.; Lotts, A.L.

    1976-04-01

    Progress is summarized in studies relating to HTGR fuel reprocessing, refabrication, and recycle; HTGR fuel materials development and performance testing; HTGR PCRV development; HTGR materials investigations; HTGR fuel chemistry; HTGR safety studies; and GCFR irradiation experiments and steam generator modeling.

  7. Steam generators and fuel engineering utilizing solid, liquid, gaseous and special fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thor, G

    1983-01-01

    Provided were technological specifications and details in the design of brown coal fired steam generators, produced in the German Democratic Republic. These steam generators range in their capacity between 1.6 and more than 1,000 t/h. The appropriate coal feeding systems, water supply and cleaning equipment, coal pulverizers and ash removal units are also manufactured. Various schemes show the design of a 25 to 64 t/h, a 320 t/h and an 815 t/h brown coal steam generator. Specifications are given for series of fuel pulverizers available, for the water circulation system and steam evaporators. The VEB Dampferzeugerbau Berlin also offers steam generators for saliniferous brown coal with a steam capacity up to 125 t/h, steam generators for pulverized black coal with a capacity up to 350 t/h and oil and gas fired generators up to 250 t/h. The company has experience in combustion of biomass (sugar cane waste) with oil in steam generators of more than 100 t/h capacity, and in projecting firing systems for other biofuels including rice, peanut and coconut hulls, wood and bark. Multi-biofuel firing in combination with coal for steam generation is also regarded as possible. (In English)

  8. NetGen: a novel network-based probabilistic generative model for gene set functional enrichment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Duanchen; Liu, Yinliang; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Wu, Ling-Yun

    2017-09-21

    High-throughput experimental techniques have been dramatically improved and widely applied in the past decades. However, biological interpretation of the high-throughput experimental results, such as differential expression gene sets derived from microarray or RNA-seq experiments, is still a challenging task. Gene Ontology (GO) is commonly used in the functional enrichment studies. The GO terms identified via current functional enrichment analysis tools often contain direct parent or descendant terms in the GO hierarchical structure. Highly redundant terms make users difficult to analyze the underlying biological processes. In this paper, a novel network-based probabilistic generative model, NetGen, was proposed to perform the functional enrichment analysis. An additional protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was explicitly used to assist the identification of significantly enriched GO terms. NetGen achieved a superior performance than the existing methods in the simulation studies. The effectiveness of NetGen was explored further on four real datasets. Notably, several GO terms which were not directly linked with the active gene list for each disease were identified. These terms were closely related to the corresponding diseases when accessed to the curated literatures. NetGen has been implemented in the R package CopTea publicly available at GitHub ( http://github.com/wulingyun/CopTea/ ). Our procedure leads to a more reasonable and interpretable result of the functional enrichment analysis. As a novel term combination-based functional enrichment analysis method, NetGen is complementary to current individual term-based methods, and can help to explore the underlying pathogenesis of complex diseases.

  9. Portable Fuel Cell Battery Charger with Integrated Hydrogen Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossel, Ulf G. [CH-5452 Oberrohrdorf (Switzerland)

    1999-10-01

    A fully self-sufficient portable fuel cell battery charger has been designed, built, operated and is now prepared for commercialisation. The lightweight device is equipped with 24 circular polymer electrolyte cells of an innovative design. Each cell is a complete unit and can be tested prior to stacking. Hydrogen is admitted to the anode chamber from the centre of the cell. Air can reach the cathode by diffusion through a porous metal foam layer placed between cathode and separator plate. Soft seals surround the centre hole of the cells to separate hydrogen from air. Water vapour generated by the electrochemical conversion is released into the atmosphere via the porous metal foam on the cathode. All hydrogen fed to the dead-ended anode chamber is converted to electric power. The device is equipped with a chemical hydrogen generator. The fuel gas is formed by adding small amounts of water to a particular chemical compound which is contained in disposable cartridges. With one such cartridge enough hydrogen can be generated to operate CD-players, radios, recorders or portable computers for some hours, depending on the current drawn by the electronic device. The handy portable battery charger delivers about 10 W at 12 V DC. It is designed to be used in remote areas as autonomous power source for charging batteries used in radios, CD players, cellular telephones, radio transmitters, flash lights or model air planes. The power can also be used directly to provide light, sound or motion. Patents have been filed and partners are sought for commercialisation. (author) 4 figs.

  10. Fuel Cells in the Waste-to-Energy Chain Distributed Generation Through Non-Conventional Fuels and Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    McPhail, Stephen J; Moreno, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    As the availability of fossils fuels becomes more limited, the negative impact of their consumption becomes an increasingly relevant factor in our choices with regards to primary energy sources. The exponentially increasing demand for energy is reflected in the mass generation of by-products and waste flows which characterize current society’s development and use of fossil sources. The potential for recoverable material and energy in these ever-increasing refuse flows is huge, even after the separation of hazardous constituent elements, allowing safe and sustainable further exploitation of an otherwise 'wasted' resource.  Fuel Cells in the Waste-to-Energy Chain explores the concept of waste-to-energy through a 5 step process which reflects the stages during the transformation of  refuse flows to a valuable commodity such as clean energy. By providing selected, integrated alternatives to the current centralized, wasteful, fossil-fuel based infrastructure, Fuel Cells in the Waste-to-Energy Chain explores ho...

  11. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01

    . Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

  12. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    examples to show how reproductive timing Tc and level R0 are shaped by stage dynamics (individual trait changes), selection on the trait, and parent-offspring phenotypic correlation. We also show how population structure can affect dispersion in reproduction among ages and stages. These macroscopic...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...

  13. Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Copper anode corrosion affects power generation in microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Xiuping

    2013-07-16

    Non-corrosive, carbon-based materials are usually used as anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In some cases, however, metals have been used that can corrode (e.g. copper) or that are corrosion resistant (e.g. stainless steel, SS). Corrosion could increase current through galvanic (abiotic) current production or by increasing exposed surface area, or decrease current due to generation of toxic products from corrosion. In order to directly examine the effects of using corrodible metal anodes, MFCs with Cu were compared with reactors using SS and carbon cloth anodes. MFCs with Cu anodes initially showed high current generation similar to abiotic controls, but subsequently they produced little power (2 mW m-2). Higher power was produced with microbes using SS (12 mW m-2) or carbon cloth (880 mW m-2) anodes, with no power generated by abiotic controls. These results demonstrate that copper is an unsuitable anode material, due to corrosion and likely copper toxicity to microorganisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Distributed generation technologies : small turbines/fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skowronski, M.

    1998-01-01

    Allied Signal Power Systems Inc. is a company with 76,580 employees and $ 14 billion in sales in 1996. The company's various divisions are major players in aerospace equipment systems, commercial avionics, electronic systems, engines, automotive brake systems, safety restraint systems, turbochargers, premium car care products, chemicals plastics and advanced materials. This paper describes a developed a turbogenerator designed for use in electric power generation. The new engine is inherently simple with high reliability. Its advantages over a conventional engine include: (1) one moving part, (2) no oil system, (3) multi-fuel capability, (4) no gears or gearboxes, (5) no separate starter motor, (6) ultra low emissions, and (7) lower operating costs. Although there are relatively high costs associated with its aerospace design, consumers, the environment and the electrical system/grid could all benefit from the turbogenerator. Installation and variable costs and target markets were discussed. 3 tabs., 12 figs

  16. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-01

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and economic assessment. The investigation was conducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperature. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasibility issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density

  17. Nuclear-fuel-cycle facility deployment and price generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    The enrichment process and how it is to be modeled in the International Nuclear Model (INM) is described. The details of enrichment production, planning, unit price generation, demand estimation and ordering are examined. The enrichment process from both the producer's and the utility's point of view is analyzed. The enrichment separative-work-unit (SWU) contracts are also discussed. The relationship of the enrichment process with other sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, expecially uranium mining and milling is considered. There are portions of the enrichment process that are not completely understood at the present time. These areas, which require further study, will be pinpointed in the following discussion. In many cases, e.g., the advent of SMU brokerage activities, the answers will emerge only in time. In other cases, e.g., political trends, uncertainties will always remain. It is possible to cast the uncertainties in a probabilistic framework, but this is beyond the scope of this report. INM, a comprehensive model of the international nuclear industry, simulates the market decision process based on current and future price expectations under a broad range of scenario specifications. INM determines the proper reactor mix as well as the planning, operation, and unit price generation of the attendant nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The level of detail of many of the enrichment activities presented in this report, e.g., the enrichment contracts, is too fine to be incorporated into INM. Nevertheless, they are presented in a form that is ammendable to modeling. The reasons for this are two-fold. First, it shows the level of complexity that would be required to model the entire system. Second, it presents the structural framework for a detailed, stand-alone enrichment model

  18. Fuel cell - An alternative for power and heat generating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubcu, Victor; Ursescu, Gabriel; Zubcu, Dorina Silvia; Miler, Mihai Cristian

    2004-01-01

    One of the most promising energy generating technologies is the fuel cell (FC) because of its high efficiency and low emissions. There are even zero chemical emissions FC and cogeneration plants based on FC generate low heat emissions too. FC was invented 160 years ago but it was usually used only since 1960 in space missions. A FC farm tractor was tested 40 years ago. FC was again taken into account by power engineering since 1990 and it is now considered a credible alternative to power and heat generating. The thermal power engineers (and not only they) have two problems of cardinal importance for mankind to solve: - Energy saving (by increasing of energy generating efficiency) and - Environmental protection (by reducing chemical and heat emissions). The possibilities to use FC to generate power and heat are practically endless: on the earth, in the air and outer space, by and under water, in numberless areas of human activities. FC are now powering buses, cars, trains, boats, plains, scooters, highway road signs etc. There are already miniature FC for portable electronics. Homes, schools, hospitals, institutes, banks, police stations, etc are using FC to generate power and heat for their facilities. The methane gas produced by wastewater treatment plants and landfills is converted into electricity by using FC. Being less expensive than nuclear and solar source of energy, FC is now generally used in the space missions (in addition FC generates water). In this work an analysis of the possibilities to use FC especially for combined power and heat generating is presented. FC is favourite as energy source in space missions because it is less expensive than nuclear or solar sources. All major automobile companies have FC powered automobiles in testing stage. Mini FC for phone, laptop, and electronics are already on market. FC will be use to pagers, video recorders, small portable tools, miniature robots, special devices as hearing aid various devices, smoke detectors

  19. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  20. Generation of transportation fuel from solid municipal waste plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin

    2010-09-15

    Transportation fuels derived from fossil fuels are subjected to the price fluctuations of the global marketplace, and constitute a major expense in the operation of a vehicle. Emissions from the evaporation and combustion of these fuels contribute to a range of environmental problems, causing poor air quality and emitting greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming. Alternative fuels created from domestic sources have been proposed as a solution to these problems, and many fuels are being developed based on biomass and other renewable sources. Natural State Research, Inc. developed different alternative hydrocarbon fuel which is produced from waste plastic materials.

  1. Prospective thorium fuels for future nuclear energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2017-01-01

    In the beginning of the Nuclear Era, many countries were interested on thorium, particularly during the 1950 1970 periods. Nevertheless, since its discovery almost two centuries ago, the use of thorium has been restricted to gas mantles employed in gas lighting. The future world energy needs will increase and, even if we assumed a conservative contribution of nuclear generation, it will be occur a significant increasing in the uranium prices, taking into account that uranium, as used in the present thermal reactors, is a finite resource. Nowadays approximately the worldwide yearly requirement of uranium for about 435 nuclear reactors in operation is 65,000 metric t. Therefore, alternative solutions for future must be developed. Thorium is nearly three times more abundant than uranium in The Earth's crust. Despite thorium is not a fissile material, 232 Th can be converted to 233 U (fissile) more efficiently than 238 U to 239 Pu. Besides this, thorium is an environment alternative energy source and also inherently resistant to proliferation.. Many countries had initiated research on thorium in the past, Nevertheless, the interest evanesced due new uranium resources discoveries and availability of enriched uranium at low prices from obsolete weapons. Some papers evaluate the thorium resources in Brazil over 1.200.000 metric t. Then, the thorium alternative must be seriously considered in Brazil for strategic reasons. A brief history of thorium and its utilization are presented, besides a very short discussion about prospective thorium nuclear fuels for the next generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  2. Operation results of 3-rd generation nuclear fuel WWER-440 in initial period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeev, V.; Panov, A.

    2011-01-01

    On unit 4 of Kola NPP trial operation of 3-rd generation's fuel began in 2010. Fuel assemblies of 3-rd generation (FA-3) have a number of design features that provide better operational characteristics. Concise description of a design and the basic advantages of fuel of 3-rd generation are described in articles. Increasing of efficiency of nuclear fuel usage will be achieved by reduction of the parasitic capture of thermal neutrons in constructional materials (weight of zirconium is reduced), optimization of uranium-water relation (increase in fuel elements step), increasing of uranium loading (usage of fuel pellets with increased diameter and without central hole in them). By results of trial operation mass transition to use of given type of assemblies in WWER-440 is possible. This report presents the basic outcomes of the trial operation, a brief survey of the obtained data. The basic characteristics of the reactor core with fuel of 3-rd generation are resulted in work. (authors)

  3. Fuel-cycle analysis of early market applications of fuel cells: Forklift propulsion systems and distributed power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgowainy, Amgad; Gaines, Linda; Wang, Michael [Center for Transportation Research, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    Forklift propulsion systems and distributed power generation are identified as potential fuel cell applications for near-term markets. This analysis examines fuel cell forklifts and distributed power generators, and addresses the potential energy and environmental implications of substituting fuel-cell systems for existing technologies based on fossil fuels and grid electricity. Performance data and the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model are used to estimate full fuel-cycle emissions and use of primary energy sources. The greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts of fuel-cell forklifts using hydrogen from steam reforming of natural gas are considerably lower than those using electricity from the average U.S. grid. Fuel cell generators produce lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and alternative distributed combustion technologies. If fuel-cell generation technologies approach or exceed the target efficiency of 40%, they offer significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions compared to alternative combustion technologies. (author)

  4. Tri-generation System based on Municipal Waste Gasification, Fuel Cell and an Absorption Chiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannis Katsaros

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work focuses on the design of a novel tri-generation system based on gasification of municipal solid wastes, a solid oxide fuel cell and an ammonia-water absorption chiller. Tri-generation systems can be implemented in buildings such as hospitals and hotels, where there is a continuous and large demand for electricity, heating and cooling. The system is modelled in Aspen Plus and the influence of different operating parameters on the system performance was studied. The findings suggest that low air equivalent ratios and high gasification temperatures enhance the overall system performance. Syngas cleaning with metal sorbents zinc oxide and sodium bicarbonate for the removal of hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen chloride concentrations proved to be very effective, reducing the concentration of contaminants to < 1 ppm (part per million levels. The possibility of covering the demand profiles of a specific building was also investigated: the system could fully meet the electricity and cooling demands, whereas the heat requirements could be satisfied only up to 55%. Moreover, assuming 20 years of operation, the payback period was 4.5 years and the net present value exceeded 5 million euros.

  5. ELECTRICITY GENERATION FROM SWINE WASTEWATER USING MICROBIAL FUEL CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimezie Jason Ogugbue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Electricity generation from swine wastewater using microbial fuel cell (MFC was investigated. Swine wastewater was collected into dual-chambered (aerobic and anaerobic fuel cell. The maximum power output using copper and carbon electrodes were 250.54 and 52.33 µW, while 10.0 and 5.0 cm salt bridge length between the cathode and anode were 279.50 and 355.26 µW, respectively. Potassium permanganate and ordinal water gave a maximum power output of 1287.8 and 13 9.18 µW. MFCs utilize microbial communities to degrade organic materials found within wastewater and converted stored chemical energy to electrical energy in a single step. The initial bacterial and fungal counts were 7.4×106 and 1.1×103 CFU ml-1. Bacterial counts steadily increased with time to 1.40×107 CFU ml-1 while fungal count declined to 4.4×106 CFU ml-1 after day 60. The declined in microbial counts may be attributed to the time necessary for acclimatization of microbes to the anode. The genera identified were Bacillus, Citrobacter, Pseudomonas, Lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus and Rhizopus. These microbes acted as primary and secondary utilizers, utilizing carbon and other organics of the wastewater. Chemical parameters indicated that the biochemical oxygen demand ranged from 91.4–23.2 mg/L, giving 75% while the chemical oxygen demand ranged from 243.1–235.2 mg/L, representing 3.3%. Although, the metabolic activities of microbes were responsible for the observed degradation, leading to electricity, the overall power output depended on the distance between the anode and cathode compartment, types of electrode materials and mediators and oxygen reaction at the cathode.

  6. Anaerobic digestion for methane generation and ammonia reforming for hydrogen production: A thermodynamic energy balance of a model system to demonstrate net energy feasibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babson, David M.; Bellman, Karen; Prakash, Shaurya; Fennell, Donna E.

    2013-01-01

    During anaerobic digestion, organic matter is converted to carbon dioxide and methane, and organic nitrogen is converted to ammonia. Generally, ammonia is recycled as a fertilizer or removed via nitrification–denitrification in treatment systems; alternatively it could be recovered and catalytically converted to hydrogen, thus supplying additional fuel. To provide a basis for further investigation, a theoretical energy balance for a model system that incorporates anaerobic digestion, ammonia separation and recovery, and conversion of the ammonia to hydrogen is reported. The model Anaerobic Digestion-Bioammonia to Hydrogen (ADBH) system energy demands including heating, pumping, mixing, and ammonia reforming were subtracted from the total energy output from methane and hydrogen to create an overall energy balance. The energy balance was examined for the ADBH system operating with a fixed feedstock loading rate with C:N ratios (gC/gN) ranging from 136 to 3 which imposed corresponding total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations of 20–10,000 mg/L. Normalizing total energy potential to the methane potential alone indicated that at a C:N ratio of 17, the energy output was greater for the ADBH system than from anaerobic digestion generating only methane. Decreasing the C:N ratio increased the methane content of the biogas comprising primarily methane to >80% and increased the ammonia stripping energy demand. The system required 23–34% of the total energy generated as parasitic losses with no energy integration, but when internally produced heat and pressure differentials were recovered, parasitic losses were reduced to between 8 and 17%. -- Highlights: •Modeled an integrated Anaerobic Digestion-Bioammonia to Hydrogen (ADBH) system. •Demonstrated positive net energy produced over a range of conditions by ADBH. •Demonstrated significant advantages of dual fuel recovery for energy gain by >20%. •Suggested system design considerations for energy recovery with

  7. Surface roughness effects on onset of nucleate boiling and net vapor generation point in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Wada, Noriyoshi; Koizumi, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    The ability to predict void formation and void fraction in subcooled flow boiling is of importance to the nuclear reactor technology because the presence of voids affects the steady state and transient response of a reactor. The onset of nucleate boiling and the point of net vapor generation on subcooled flow boiling, focusing on surface roughness, liquid subcooling and liquid velocity were investigated experimentally and analytically. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin-film and subcooled water in a range of the liquid velocity from 0.27 to 4.6 m/s at 0.10MPa; the liquid subcoolings were 20, 30 and 40K, respectively. The surface roughness on the test heater was observed by SEM. Experimental results showed that temperatures at the onset nucleate boiling increased with increasing the liquid subcoolings or the liquid velocities. The trend of increase in the temperature at the ONB was in good agreement with the present analytical result based on the stability theory of preexisting nuclei. The measured results for the net vapor generation point agreed well with the results of correlation by Saha and Zuber in the range of the present experiments. The temperature at the ONB decreased with an increasing size of surface roughness, while the NVG-point was independent on the surface roughness. The dependence on the ONB temperature of the roughness size was also represented well by the present analytical model

  8. Development of WWER-440 fuel. Use of fuel assemblies of 2-nd and 3-rd generations with increased enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilchenko, I.; Lushin, V.; Ananev, U.; Baranov, A.; Kukushkin, U.

    2009-01-01

    The problem of increasing the power of units at NPPs with WWER-440 is of current importance. There are all the necessary prerequisites for the above-stated problem as a result of updating the design of fuel assemblies and codes. The decrease of power peaking factor in the core is achieved by using profiled fuel assemblies, fuel-integrated burning absorber, FAs with modernized docking unit, modern codes, which allows decreasing conservatism of RP safety substantiation. A wide range of experimental studies of fuel behaviour has been performed which has reached burn-up of (50-60) MW·day/kgU in transition and emergency conditions, post-reactor studies of fuel assemblies, fuel rods and fuel pellets with a 5-year operating period have been performed, which prove high reliability of fuel, presence of a large margin in the fuel pillar, which helps reactor operation at increased power. The results of the work performed on introduction of 5-6 fuel cycles show that the ultimate fuel state on operability in WWER-440 reactors is far from being achieved. Neutron-physical and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the cores of working power units with RP V-213 are such that actual (design and measured) power peaking factors on fuel assemblies and fuel rods, as a rule, are smaller than the maximum design values. This factor is a real reserve for power forcing. There is experience of operating Units 1, 2, 4 of the Kola NPP and Unit 2 of the Rovno NPP at increased power. Units of the Loviisa NPP are operated at 109 % power. During transfer to work at increased power it is reasonable to use fuel assemblies with increased height of the fuel pillar, which allows decreasing medium linear power distribution. Further development of the 2-nd generation fuel assembly design and consequent transition to working fuel assemblies of the 3-rd generation provides significant improvement of fuel consumption under the conditions of WWER-440 reactors operation with more continuous fuel cycles and

  9. New-generation radiotracers for nAChR and NET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Yushin [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)]. E-mail: ding@bnl.gov; Fowler, Joanna [Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Advances in radiotracer chemistry and instrumentation have merged to make positron emission tomography (PET) a powerful tool in the biomedical sciences. Positron emission tomography has found increased application in the study of drugs affecting the brain and whole body, including the measurement of drug pharmacokinetics (using a positron-emitter-labeled drug) and drug pharmacodynamics (using a labeled tracer). Thus, radiotracers are major scientific tools enabling investigations of molecular phenomena, which are at the heart of understanding human disease and developing effective treatments; however, there is evidently a bottleneck in translating basic research to clinical practice. In the meantime, the poor ability to predict the in vivo behavior of chemical compounds based on their log P's and affinities emphasizes the need for more knowledge in this area. In this article, we focus on the development and translation of radiotracers for PET studies of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and the norepinephrine transporter (NET), two molecular systems that urgently need such an important tool to better understand their functional significance in the living human brain.

  10. Benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akio; Ikehara, Tadashi; Ito, Takuya; Saji, Etsuro

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a benchmark problem suite for studying the physics of next-generation fuels of light water reactors. The target discharge burnup of the next-generation fuel was set to 70 GWd/t considering the increasing trend in discharge burnup of light water reactor fuels. The UO 2 and MOX fuels are included in the benchmark specifications. The benchmark problem consists of three different geometries: fuel pin cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly. In the pin cell problem, detailed nuclear characteristics such as burnup dependence of nuclide-wise reactivity were included in the required calculation results to facilitate the study of reactor physics. In the assembly benchmark problems, important parameters for in-core fuel management such as local peaking factors and reactivity coefficients were included in the required results. The benchmark problems provide comprehensive test problems for next-generation light water reactor fuels with extended high burnup. Furthermore, since the pin cell, the PWR assembly and the BWR assembly problems are independent, analyses of the entire benchmark suite is not necessary: e.g., the set of pin cell and PWR fuel assembly problems will be suitable for those in charge of PWR in-core fuel management, and the set of pin cell and BWR fuel assembly problems for those in charge of BWR in-core fuel management. (author)

  11. Unified Quantum Model of Work Generation in Thermoelectric Generators, Solar and Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Alicki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the previous papers, the idea of “hidden oscillations” has been applied to explain work generation in semiconductor photovoltaic cells and thermoelectric generators. The aim of this paper is firstly to extend this approach to fuel cells and, secondly, to create a unified quantum model for all types of such devices. They are treated as electron pumps powered by heat or chemical engines. The working fluid is electron gas and the necessary oscillating element (“piston” is provided by plasma oscillation. Those oscillations are localized around the junction that also serves as a diode rectifying fast electric charge oscillations and yielding a final output direct current (DC. The dynamics of the devices are governed by the Markovian master equations that can be derived in a rigorous way from the underlying Hamiltonian models and are consistent with the laws of thermodynamics. The new ingredient is the derivation of master equations for systems driven by chemical reactions.

  12. Preliminary ecotoxicity assessment of new generation alternative fuels in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gunther; Dolecal, Renee E; Colvin, Marienne A; George, Robert D

    2014-06-01

    The United States Navy (USN) is currently demonstrating the viability of environmentally sustainable alternative fuels to power its fleet comprised of aircraft and ships. As with any fuel used in a maritime setting, there is potential for introduction into the environment through transport, storage, and spills. However, while alternative fuels are often presumed to be eco-friendly relative to conventional petroleum-based fuels, their environmental fate and effects on marine environments are essentially unknown. Here, standard laboratory-based toxicity experiments were conducted for two alternative fuels, jet fuel derived from Camelina sativa (wild flax) seeds (HRJ5) and diesel fuel derived from algae (HRD76), and two conventional counterparts, jet fuel (JP5) and ship diesel (F76). Initial toxicity tests performed on water-accommodated fractions (WAF) from neat fuels partitioned into seawater, using four standard marine species in acute and chronic/sublethal tests, indicate that the alternative fuels are significantly less toxic to marine organisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Electricity generation from tetrathionate in microbial fuel cells by acidophiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulonen, Mira L.K.; Kokko, Marika E.; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Puhakka, Jaakko A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electricity can be generated from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5. • Tetrathionate disproportionated to sulfate and elemental sulfur. • Biohydrometallurgical process waters contained electrochemically active bacteria. • Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. were identified from the MFCs. - Abstract: Inorganic sulfur compounds, such as tetrathionate, are often present in mining process and waste waters. The biodegradation of tetrathionate was studied under acidic conditions in aerobic batch cultivations and in anaerobic anodes of two-chamber flow-through microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All four cultures originating from biohydrometallurgical process waters from multimetal ore heap bioleaching oxidized tetrathionate aerobically at pH below 3 with sulfate as the main soluble metabolite. In addition, all cultures generated electricity from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5 with ferric iron as the terminal cathodic electron acceptor. The maximum current and power densities during MFC operation and in the performance analysis were 79.6 mA m −2 and 13.9 mW m −2 and 433 mA m −2 and 17.6 mW m −2 , respectively. However, the low coulombic efficiency (below 5%) indicates that most of the electrons were directed to other processes, such as aerobic oxidation of tetrathionate and unmeasured intermediates. The microbial community analysis revealed that the dominant species both in the anolyte and on the anode electrode surface of the MFCs were Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. This study provides a proof of concept that tetrathionate serves as electron donor for biological electricity production in the pH range of 1.2–2.5

  14. Electricity generation from tetrathionate in microbial fuel cells by acidophiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulonen, Mira L.K., E-mail: mira.sulonen@tut.fi; Kokko, Marika E.; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Puhakka, Jaakko A.

    2015-03-02

    Highlights: • Electricity can be generated from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5. • Tetrathionate disproportionated to sulfate and elemental sulfur. • Biohydrometallurgical process waters contained electrochemically active bacteria. • Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. were identified from the MFCs. - Abstract: Inorganic sulfur compounds, such as tetrathionate, are often present in mining process and waste waters. The biodegradation of tetrathionate was studied under acidic conditions in aerobic batch cultivations and in anaerobic anodes of two-chamber flow-through microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All four cultures originating from biohydrometallurgical process waters from multimetal ore heap bioleaching oxidized tetrathionate aerobically at pH below 3 with sulfate as the main soluble metabolite. In addition, all cultures generated electricity from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5 with ferric iron as the terminal cathodic electron acceptor. The maximum current and power densities during MFC operation and in the performance analysis were 79.6 mA m{sup −2} and 13.9 mW m{sup −2} and 433 mA m{sup −2} and 17.6 mW m{sup −2}, respectively. However, the low coulombic efficiency (below 5%) indicates that most of the electrons were directed to other processes, such as aerobic oxidation of tetrathionate and unmeasured intermediates. The microbial community analysis revealed that the dominant species both in the anolyte and on the anode electrode surface of the MFCs were Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. This study provides a proof of concept that tetrathionate serves as electron donor for biological electricity production in the pH range of 1.2–2.5.

  15. Prospective thorium fuels for future nuclear energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lainetti, Paulo E.O., E-mail: lainetti@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    In the beginning of the Nuclear Era, many countries were interested on thorium, particularly during the 1950 1970 periods. Nevertheless, since its discovery almost two centuries ago, the use of thorium has been restricted to gas mantles employed in gas lighting. The future world energy needs will increase and, even if we assumed a conservative contribution of nuclear generation, it will be occur a significant increasing in the uranium prices, taking into account that uranium, as used in the present thermal reactors, is a finite resource. Nowadays approximately the worldwide yearly requirement of uranium for about 435 nuclear reactors in operation is 65,000 metric t. Therefore, alternative solutions for future must be developed. Thorium is nearly three times more abundant than uranium in The Earth's crust. Despite thorium is not a fissile material, {sup 232}Th can be converted to {sup 233}U (fissile) more efficiently than {sup 238}U to {sup 239}Pu. Besides this, thorium is an environment alternative energy source and also inherently resistant to proliferation.. Many countries had initiated research on thorium in the past, Nevertheless, the interest evanesced due new uranium resources discoveries and availability of enriched uranium at low prices from obsolete weapons. Some papers evaluate the thorium resources in Brazil over 1.200.000 metric t. Then, the thorium alternative must be seriously considered in Brazil for strategic reasons. A brief history of thorium and its utilization are presented, besides a very short discussion about prospective thorium nuclear fuels for the next generation of nuclear reactors. (author)

  16. Externally-fired combined cycle: An effective coal fueled technology for repowering and new generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoddard, L.E.; Bary, M.R. [Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Gray, K.M. [Pennsylvania Electric Co., Johnstown, PA (United States); LaHaye, P.G. [Hague International, South Portland, ME (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) is an attractive emerging technology for powering high efficiency combined gas and steam turbine cycles with coal or other ash bearing fuels. In the EFCC, the heat input to a gas turbine is supplied indirectly through a ceramic air heater. The air heater, along with an atmospheric coal combustor and ancillary equipment, replaces the conventional gas turbine combustor. A steam generator located downstream from the ceramic air heater and steam turbine cycle, along with an exhaust cleanup system, completes the combined cycle. A key element of the EFCC Development Program, the 25 MMBtu/h heat-input Kennebunk Test Facility (KTF), has recently begun operation. The KTF has been operating with natural gas and will begin operating with coal in early 1995. The US Department of Energy selected an EFCC repowering of the Pennsylvania Electric Company`s Warren Station for funding under the Clean Coal Technology Program Round V. The project focuses on repowering an existing 48 MW (gross) steam turbine with an EFCC power island incorporating a 30 MW gas turbine, for a gross power output of 78 MW and a net output of 72 MW. The net plant heat rate will be decreased by approximately 30% to below 9,700 Btu/kWh. Use of a dry scrubber and fabric filter will reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and particulate emissions to levels under those required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions are controlled by the use of staged combustion. The demonstration project is currently in the engineering phase, with startup scheduled for 1997. This paper discusses the background of the EFCC, the KTF, the Warren Station EFCC Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, the commercial plant concept, and the market potential for the EFCC.

  17. Study Of The Fuel Cycle Effect To The Electricity Generating Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimy, D. H.

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle cost contributes relatively small fraction to the total nuclear power generation cost, I.e. about 15 to 30%, compared to the fuel cost in the coal-generated electricity (40-60%). Or in the oil-generated electricity (70-80%). This situation will give effect that the future generation cost is much less sensitive to the changes in the fuel prince than in the case of fossil fuel power plants. The study has shown that by assuming a 100% increase in the natural uranium price, the total nuclear fuel cycle cost would increase only by about 27% and in turn it contributes about 29% increase to the total nuclear fuel cycle cost. As a result, it contributes only 4 to 8% increase in the nuclear energy generation cost. As a comparison, if the same situation should occur to fossil fuel plants, the assumed fuel price increase would have increased the electricity generating cost by about 40-65% for coal-fired plants, and about 70-85% for oil-fired plants. This study also has assesses the economic aspects of the electricity generating cots for nuclear power plant (NPP) and the coal power plant. For an NPP the most affecting factor is the investment cost, while for the coal power plant, the major factor influencing the total cost is the price/cost of the fuel

  18. Catering to the Needs of the "Digital Natives" or Educating the "Net Generation"?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Jones, Chris

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors explore perspectives on the notion of “digital natives” and present a case in which Web 2.0 technologies were introduced to students. They discuss studies critical of the generational metaphor, and argue that it should not be uncritically assumed that there is a gener...

  19. Cases for the Net Generation: An Empirical Examination of Students' Attitude toward Multimedia Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Michael; Vibert, Conor

    2016-01-01

    Case studies have been an important tool in business, legal, and medical education for generations of students. Traditional text-based cases tend to be self-contained and structured in such a way as to teach a particular concept. The multimedia cases introduced in this study feature unscripted web-hosted video interviews with business owners and…

  20. Likelihood and consequences of fuel string compression at Point Lepreau Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, P.J.; Gibb, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    During an accident which results in fuel heatup, axial thermal expansion of the fuel string relative to the pressure tube will occur. If the temperature transient is sufficiently severe, the fuel string may contact the shieled plugs at both ends of the channel. Any additional axial thermal expansion will result in deformation of fuel and fuel channel components, leading to tensile or compressive stresses in the different fuel channel components. If these loads become sufficiently large, they could result in failure of a fuel channel component or to channel failure due to bending of a fuel element under load. The analysis described in this paper demonstrates that this process would not result in fuel channel failure for a design basis accident at Point Lepreau Generating Station (PLGS), even if the station were retubed to 'as-built' channel lengths. (author)

  1. Spent fuel storage at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generation Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.R.; Field, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) has developed a strategy for the storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel and is now in the process of licensing and manufacturing a Transportable Storage System (TSS). Staff has also engaged in impact limiter testing, non-fuel bearing component reinsertion, storage and disposal of GTCC waste, and site specific upgrades in support of spent fuel dry storage

  2. Characteristics of radioactive waste streams generated in HTGR fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of a study concerned with identification and characterization of radioactive waste streams from an HTGR fuel reprocessing plant. Approximate quantities of individual waste streams as well as pertinent characteristics of selected streams have been estimated. Most of the waste streams are unique to HTGR fuel reprocessing. However, waste streams from the solvent extraction system and from the plant facilities do not differ greatly from the corresponding LWR fuel reprocessing wastes

  3. Next Generation Fuel Cell Technology for Passenger Cars and Buses

    OpenAIRE

    Mohrdieck, Dr.

    2009-01-01

    Daimler is presenting its latest fuel cell vehicle, the Mercedes-Benz B-Class F-CELL in 2009. Being one of the first series-produced fuel cell vehicles so far, the B-Class F-CELL will be a milestone on the road to commercialization of hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Equipped with advanced fuel cell technology it is suited for everyday operation and designed to fully meet customers´ expectations. From 2010 onwards, this zero emission vehicle is going to be operated by selected customers i...

  4. Fuel flexibility in power generation onboard offshore floating units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keep, Jeroen van [Waertsilae Corporation, Helsinki (Finland)

    2012-07-01

    Power Plants for offshore oil and gas installations utilizing dual fuel (DF) reciprocating engines are by many owners seen as an interesting alternative to conventional solutions due to the apparent advantages in fuel flexibility, fuel efficiency and lower emission. The paper summarizes the dual fuel technology, typical solutions for FPSO's and operational. Items that are discussed: DF operation and how it works; fuel flexibility, including transfer between fuel modes; fuel efficiency, also in production an important cost saver; emissions of the different fuel modes; size and weights, constraints; experiences of the P-63 project. With the above it is safe to conclude that the DF-technology is mature with important benefits for the offshore production market in certain specific applications, most notably the FPSO's for fields in low gas to oil ratios, bringing important fuel cost savings and also for new-built F-LNG/FSO/FPSO's where the power plant can be accommodated below decks, freeing up valuable deck space for the process plant. (author)

  5. Prediction of power system frequency response after generator outages using neural nets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M B; Popovic, D P [Electrotechnicki Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sobajic, D J; Pao, Y -H [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1993-09-01

    A new methodology is presented for estimating the frequency behaviour of power systems necessary for an indication of under-frequency load shedding in steady-state security assessment. It is well known that large structural disturbances such as generator tripping or load outages can initiate cascading outages, system separation into islands, and even the complete breakup. The approach provides a fairly accurate method of estimating the system average frequency response without making simplifications or neglecting non-linearities and small time constants in the equations of generating units, voltage regulators and turbines. The efficiency of the new procedure is demonstrated using the New England power system model for a series of characteristic perturbations. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by comparison with the simulation of short-term dynamics including effects of control and automatic devices. (author)

  6. Generation of daily solar irradiation by means of artificial neural net works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Adalberto N.; Tiba, Chigueru; Fraidenraich, Naum [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000 - CDU, CEP 50.740-540 Recife, Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    The present study proposes the utilization of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) as an alternative for generating synthetic series of daily solar irradiation. The sequences were generated from the use of daily temporal series of a group of meteorological variables that were measured simultaneously. The data used were measured between the years of 1998 and 2006 in two temperate climate localities of Brazil, Ilha Solteira (Sao Paulo) and Pelotas (Rio Grande do Sul). The estimates were taken for the months of January, April, July and October, through two models which are distinguished regarding the use or nonuse of measured bright sunshine hours as an input variable. An evaluation of the performance of the 56 months of solar irradiation generated by way of ANN showed that by using the measured bright sunshine hours as an input variable (model 1), the RMSE obtained were less or equal to 23.2% being that of those, although 43 of those months presented RMSE less or equal to 12.3%. In the case of the model that did not use the measured bright sunshine hours but used a daylight length (model 2), RMSE were obtained that varied from 8.5% to 37.5%, although 38 of those months presented RMSE less or equal to 20.0%. A comparison of the monthly series for all of the years, achieved by means of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (to a confidence level of 99%), demonstrated that of the 16 series generated by ANN model only two, obtained by model 2 for the months of April and July in Pelotas, presented significant difference in relation to the distributions of the measured series and that all mean deviations obtained were inferior to 0.39 MJ/m{sup 2}. It was also verified that the two ANN models were able to reproduce the principal statistical characteristics of the frequency distributions of the measured series such as: mean, mode, asymmetry and Kurtosis. (author)

  7. Stress and Diffusion in Stored Pu ZPPR Fuel from Alpha Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles W. Solbrig; Chad L. Pope; Jason P. Andrus

    2014-07-01

    ZPPR (Zero Power Physics Reactor) is a research reactor that has been used to investigate breeder reactor fuel designs. The reactor has been dismantled but its fuel is still stored there. Of concern are its plutonium containing metal fuel elements which are enclosed in stainless steel cladding with gas space filled with helium–argon gas and welded air tight. The fuel elements which are 5.08 cm by 0.508 cm up to 20.32 cm long (2 in × 0.2 in × 8 in) were manufactured in 1968. A few of these fuel elements have failed releasing contamination raising concern about the general state of the large number of other fuel elements. Inspection of the large number of fuel elements could lead to contamination release so analytical studies have been conducted to estimate the probability of failed fuel elements. This paper investigates the possible fuel failures due to generation of helium in the metal fuel from the decay of Pu and its possible damage to the fuel cladding from metal fuel expansion or from diffusion of helium into the fuel gas space. This paper (1) calculates the initial gas loading in a fuel element and its internal free volume after it has been brought into the atmosphere at ZPPR, (2) shows that the amount of helium generated by decay of Pu over 46 years since manufacture is significantly greater than this initial loading, (3) determines the amount of fuel swelling if the helium stays fixed in the fuel plate and estimates the amount of helium which diffuses out of the fuel plate into the fuel plenum assuming the helium does not remain fixed in the fuel plate but can diffuse to the plenum and possibly through the cladding. Since the literature is not clear as to which possibility occurs, as with Schroedinger’s cat, both possibilities are analyzed. The paper concludes that (1) if the gas generated is fixed in the fuel, then the fuel swelling it can cause would not cause any fuel failure and (2) if the helium does diffuse out of the fuel (in accordance

  8. Small global effect on terrestrial net primary production due to increased fossil fuel aerosol emissions from East Asia during the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Michael; Rap, Alex; Reddington, Carly; Spracklen, Dominick; Buermann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The global terrestrial carbon sink has increased since the start of this century at a time of rapidly growing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel burning. Here we test the hypothesis that increases in atmospheric aerosols from fossil fuel burning have increased the diffuse fraction of incoming solar radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis leading to increased plant carbon uptake. Using a combination of atmospheric and biospheric models, we find that changes in diffuse light associated with fossil fuel aerosol emission accounts for only 2.8% of the increase in global net primary production (1.221 PgC/yr) over the study period 1998 to 2007. This relatively small global signal is however a result of large regional compensations. Over East Asia, the strong increase in fossil fuel emissions contributed nearly 70% of the increased plant carbon uptake (21 TgC/yr), whereas the declining fossil fuel aerosol emissions in Europe and North America contributed negatively (-16% and -54%, respectively) to increased plant carbon uptake. At global scale, we also find the CO2 fertilization effect on photosynthesis to be the dominant driver of increased plant carbon uptake, in line with previous studies. These results suggest that further research into alternative mechanisms by which fossil fuel emissions could increase carbon uptake, such as nitrogen deposition and carbon-nitrogen interactions, is required to better understand a potential link between the recent changes in fossil fuel emissions and terrestrial carbon uptake.

  9. Are you ready for the net generation or the free agent learner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desilets, Lynore D

    2011-08-01

    The newest generation of soon to be health care professionals was raised by Father Google and Mother IM. The world has been a connected place for them their entire lives. They are experts at multitasking. They prefer electronic over print news, dictionaries, and maps; cell phones that do more than make phone calls; e-mail exchanges over face-to-face visits; online payments over checks; and credit cards over cash. In this column, I share some information about technology and these digital natives that I, a digital immigrant, have recently discovered. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Development of a high-efficiency hydrogen generator for fuel cells for distributed power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duraiswamy, K.; Chellappa, Anand [Intelligent Energy, 2955 Redondo Ave., Long Beach, CA 90806 (United States); Smith, Gregory; Liu, Yi; Li, Mingheng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA 91768 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    A collaborative effort between Intelligent Energy and Cal Poly Pomona has developed an adsorption enhanced reformer (AER) for hydrogen generation for use in conjunction with fuel cells in small sizes. The AER operates at a lower temperature (about 500 C) and has a higher hydrogen yield and purity than those in the conventional steam reforming. It employs ceria supported rhodium as the catalyst and potassium-promoted hydrotalcites to remove carbon dioxide from the products. A novel pulsing feed concept is developed for the AER operation to allow a deeper conversion of the feedstock to hydrogen. Continuous production of near fuel-cell grade hydrogen is demonstrated in the AER with four packed beds running alternately. In the best case of methane reforming, the overall conversion to hydrogen is 92% while the carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide concentrations in the production stream are on the ppm level. The ratio of carbon dioxide in the regeneration exhaust to the one in the product stream is on the order of 10{sup 3}. (author)

  11. Net Influence of an Internally Generated Guasi-biennial Oscillation on Modelled Stratospheric Climate and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Margaret M.; Oman, Luke David; Newman, Paul A.; Song, InSun

    2013-01-01

    A Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry- Climate Model (GEOSCCM) simulation with strong tropical non-orographic gravity wave drag (GWD) is compared to an otherwise identical simulation with near-zero tropical non-orographic GWD. The GEOSCCM generates a quasibiennial oscillation (QBO) zonal wind signal in response to a tropical peak in GWD that resembles the zonal and climatological mean precipitation field. The modelled QBO has a frequency and amplitude that closely resembles observations. As expected, the modelled QBO improves the simulation of tropical zonal winds and enhances tropical and subtropical stratospheric variability. Also, inclusion of the QBO slows the meridional overturning circulation, resulting in a generally older stratospheric mean age of air. Slowing of the overturning circulation, changes in stratospheric temperature and enhanced subtropical mixing all affect the annual mean distributions of ozone, methane and nitrous oxide. Furthermore, the modelled QBO enhances polar stratospheric variability in winter. Because tropical zonal winds are easterly in the simulation without a QBO, there is a relative increase in tropical zonal winds in the simulation with a QBO. Extratropical differences between the simulations with and without a QBO thus reflect the westerly shift in tropical zonal winds: a relative strengthening of the polar stratospheric jet, polar stratospheric cooling and a weak reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  12. Photonic microstructures for energy-generating clear glass and net-zero energy buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliev, Mikhail; Alghamedi, Ramzy; Nur-E-Alam, Mohammad; Alameh, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Transparent energy-harvesting windows are emerging as practical building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), capable of generating electricity while simultaneously reducing heating and cooling demands. By incorporating spectrally-selective diffraction gratings as light deflecting structures of high visible transparency into lamination interlayers and using improved spectrally-selective thin-film coatings, most of the visible solar radiation can be transmitted through the glass windows with minimum attenuation. At the same time, the ultraviolet (UV) and a part of incident solar infrared (IR) radiation energy are converted and/or deflected geometrically towards the panel edge for collection by CuInSe2 solar cells. Experimental results show power conversion efficiencies in excess of 3.04% in 10 cm × 10 cm vertically-placed clear glass panels facing direct sunlight, and up to 2.08% in 50 cm × 50 cm installation-ready framed window systems. These results confirm the emergence of a new class of solar window system ready for industrial application. PMID:27550827

  13. An Automated Process for Generation of New Fuel Breakdown Mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Violi, Angela

    2006-01-01

    .... It combines advanced computational techniques in a synergistic study of the critical processes in fuel decomposition at a level of detail that can help distinguish, correct, and quantify mechanisms for these processes...

  14. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowin, C.R.; Wiltsee, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the environmental and other benefits of using biomass and waste fuel energy to displace fossil fuels are well known, the economic realities are such that these fuels cannot compete effectively in the current market without tax credits, subsidies and other artificial measures. In 1992, EPRI initiated a strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels and power technologies, both to develop consistent performance and cost data for the leading fuels and technologies and to identify the conditions which favor and create market pull for biomass and waste fuel energy. Using the final results of the EPRI project, this paper compares the relative performance and cost of power generation from coal, natural gas, and biomass and waste fuels. The range of fuels includes wood, agricultural wastes, municipal solid waste, refuse-derived fuel, scrap tires and tire-derived fuel. The power technologies include pulverized coal and natural gas/combined cycle power plants, cofiring with coal in coal-fired utility boilers, direct combustion in dedicated mass burn, stoker and fluidized bed boilers, and wood gasification/combined cycle-power plants. The analysis suggests that, in the near term, the highest-efficiency, lowest-cost, lowest-risk technology is cofiring with coal in industrial and utility boilers. However, this approach is economically feasible only when the fuel is delivered at a deep discount relative to fossil fuel, or the fuel user receives a tipping fee, subsidy, or emissions credit. (author)

  15. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  16. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Bock Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic–martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  17. Generation of hydrogen free radicals from water for fuels by electric field induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nong, Guangzai; Chen, Yiyi; Li, Ming; Zhou, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen free radicals are generated from water splitting. • Hydrogen fuel is generated from water by electric field induction. • Hydrocarbon fuel is generated from CO_2 and water by electric field induction. - Abstract: Water is the most abundant resource for generating hydrogen fuel. In addition to dissociating H"+ and "−OH ions, certain water molecules dissociate to radicals under an electric field are considered. Therefore, an electric field inducing reactor is constructed and operated to generate hydrogen free radicals in this paper. Hydrogen free radicals begin to be generated under a 1.0 V electric field, and increasing the voltage and temperature increases the number of hydrogen free radicals. The production rate of hydrogen free radicals is 0.245 mmol/(L h) at 5.0 V and room temperature. The generated hydrogen free radicals are converted to polymer fuel and hydrogen fuel at production rates of 0.0093 mmol/(L h) and 0.0038 mmol/(L h) respectively, under 5.0 V and 0.25 mA. The results provide a way to generate hydrogen free radicals, which might be used to generate hydrocarbon fuel in industrial manufacture.

  18. Energy use and environmental impact of new alternative fuel mix in electricity generation in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Amin, A.Q.; Siwar, C.; Jaafar, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The Government of Malaysia introduced a five-fuel diversification strategy in 1999 to ensure security of energy supply. This strategy will continue until 2020 to reduce Malaysia's dependence on fossil fuels for generating electricity. This paper empirically explored the economic impact of electricity generation and scenario analysis that separately identifies impact on the environment of coal, fuel and hydro generating electricity technologies. It also evaluated emissions of carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxide for the year 1991 and 2000 based on business as usual techniques and projection of those emissions based on business as usual and fuel mix strategy as specified in the fuel diversification strategy. The strategy in the electricity sector aims for a gradual change in fuel use from 74.9 per cent natural gas, 9.7 per cent coal, 10.4 per cent hydro, and 5 per cent petroleum in the year 2000 to 40 per cent natural gas, 30 per cent hydro, 29 per cent coal, and only 1 per cent petroleum by the year 2020. This paper presented the underlying model which is based on input-output techniques. The pollution emission levels from the fossil fuels were estimated. The study revealed that the fuel mix envisioned by the Fuel Diversification Strategy, designed to reduce Malaysia's dependence on fuel oil and increase its energy security would result in an increase in undesired emissions. 16 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  19. Utilizing Philippine Calatrava coal-diesel oil mixture (CDOM) as alternative fuel for industrial steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archie B. Maglaya [De La Salle University, Manila (Philippines). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-01-01

    The fast depletion of fuel oil and the continuous increase in the demand for power is a global issue. In the Philippines, the demand for diesel oil is expected to increase significantly in a 20-year period as projected by the Department of Energy. In line with the Philippine Government's thrust to lessen the dependence on imported energy, the agenda for the search for alternative fuel is highly prioritized. Thus, this paper presents the results of the study on performance analysis and efficiency test of a diesel oil fired industrial steam generator using Philippine Calatrava coal-diesel oil mixture (CDOM) as alternative fuel. A computer program was developed in HyperText Markup Language (HTML{copyright}) and JavaScript{copyright} to aid the computation of the adiabatic flame temperature from the governing system of equations based on the heat interaction between CDOM fuel, combustion air and products of combustion to determine the most desirable alternative fuel. Actual experimentation for the determination of CDOM fuel properties was also conducted to verify the alternative fuel selected through theoretical calculations. Results showed that the CDOM fuel with a particle size passing 75 {mu}m (-200 mesh) sieve having a proportion of 5% pulverized coal-95% diesel oil and 10% pulverized coal-90% diesel oil could be handled throughout the test with no degradation of the industrial steam generator. The steam generator efficiency using diesel oil is close to the steam generator efficiency using both CDOM fuels. 20 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Photosynthetic Energy Storage for the Built Environment: Modeling Energy Generation and Storage for Net-Zero Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter-Marck, Eli Morris

    There is a growing need to address the energy demand of the building sector with non-polluting, renewable energy sources. The Net Zero Energy Building (NZEB) mandate seeks to reduce the impact of building sector energy consumption by encouraging on-site energy generation as a way to offset building loads. However, current approaches to designing on-site generation fail to adequately match the fluctuating load schedules of the built environment. As a result, buildings produce highly variable and often-unpredictable energy import/export patterns that create stress on energy grids and increase building dependence on primary energy resources. This research investigates the potential of integrating emerging photo-electrochemical (PEC) technologies into on-site generation systems as a way to enable buildings to take a more active role in collecting, storing and deploying energy resources according to their own demand schedules. These artificially photosynthetic systems have the potential to significantly reduce variability in hour-to-hour and day-to-day building loads by introducing high-capacity solar-hydrogen into the built environment context. The Building Integrated Artificial Photosynthesis (BIAP) simulation framework presented here tests the impact of hydrogen based energy storage on NZEB performance metrics with the goal of developing a methodology that makes on-site energy generation more effective at alleviating excessive energy consumption in the building sector. In addition, as a design performance framework, the BIAP framework helps guide how material selection and scale up of device design might tie photo-electrochemical devices into parallel building systems to take full advantage of the potential outputs of photosynthetic building systems.

  1. A Bayesian stochastic frontier analysis of Chinese fossil-fuel electricity generation companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Zhongfei; Barros, Carlos Pestana; Borges, Maria Rosa

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the technical efficiency of Chinese fossil-fuel electricity generation companies from 1999 to 2011, using a Bayesian stochastic frontier model. The results reveal that efficiency varies among the fossil-fuel electricity generation companies that were analysed. We also focus on the factors of size, location, government ownership and mixed sources of electricity generation for the fossil-fuel electricity generation companies, and also examine their effects on the efficiency of these companies. Policy implications are derived. - Highlights: • We analyze the efficiency of 27 quoted Chinese fossil-fuel electricity generation companies during 1999–2011. • We adopt a Bayesian stochastic frontier model taking into consideration the identified heterogeneity. • With reform background in Chinese energy industry, we propose four hypotheses and check their influence on efficiency. • Big size, coastal location, government control and hydro energy sources all have increased costs

  2. Argentine activities on fuels for nuclear generation stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olezza, R.L.; Valesi, J.

    1995-01-01

    In the last six years, significant changes have taken place in the nuclear fuel activity field in Argentina, therefore all the areas of the nuclear fuel cycle have been strongly influenced by these. The strategies carried out by CNEA to give an initial answer to the modifications of the domestic and international context of the nuclear fuel cycle were described in the previous Conference. Three years later, it is possible to appreciate the first results of the application of those strategies, and also that the frame has continued not only evolving and requiring new answers, but adapting and accentuating some strategies as well. A brief review of those results is presented here, together with a summary of the condition of the current situation and of the proposals to face it. (author)

  3. Diversity of fuel sources for electricity generation in an evolving U.S. power sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLuccia, Janelle G.

    Policymakers increasingly have shown interest in options to boost the relative share of renewable or clean electricity generating sources in order to reduce negative environmental externalities from fossil fuels, guard against possible resource constraints, and capture economic advantages from developing new technologies and industries. Electric utilities and non-utility generators make decisions regarding their generation mix based on a number of different factors that may or may not align with societal goals. This paper examines the makeup of the electric power sector to determine how the type of generator and the presence (or lack) of competition in electricity markets at the state level may relate to the types of fuel sources used for generation. Using state-level electricity generation data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration from 1990 through 2010, this paper employs state and time fixed-effects regression modeling to attempt to isolate the impacts of state-level restructuring policies and the emergence of non-utility generators on states' generation from coal, from fossil fuel and from renewable sources. While the analysis has significant limitations, I do find that state-level electricity restructuring has a small but significant association with lowering electricity generation from coal specifically and fossil fuels more generally. Further research into the relationship between competition and fuel sources would aid policymakers considering legislative options to influence the generation mix.

  4. Issues for Conceptual Design of AFCF and CFTC LWR Spent Fuel Separations Influencing Next-Generation Aqueous Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Hebditch; R. Henry; M. Goff; K. Pasamehmetoglu; D. Ostby

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) strategic plan, which aims to meet US and international energy, safeguards, fuel supply and environmental needs by harnessing national laboratory R and D, deployment by industry and use of international partnerships. Initially, two industry-led commercial scale facilities, an advanced burner reactor (ABR) and a consolidated fuel treatment center (CFTC), and one developmental facility, an advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) are proposed. The national laboratories will lead the AFCF to provide an internationally recognized R and D center of excellence for developing transmutation fuels and targets and advancing fuel cycle reprocessing technology using aqueous and pyrochemical methods. The design drivers for AFCF and the CFTC LWR spent fuel separations are expected to impact on and partly reflect those for industry, which is engaging with DOE in studies for CFTC and ABR through the recent GNEP funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The paper summarizes the state-of-the-art of aqueous reprocessing, gives an assessment of engineering drivers for U.S. aqueous processing facilities, examines historic plant capital costs and provides conclusions with a view to influencing design of next-generation fuel reprocessing plants

  5. One approach to accepting and transporting spent fuel from early-generation reactors with short fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, R.W.; Bentz, E.J. Jr.; Bentz, C.B.

    1993-01-01

    In the early days of development of commercial nuclear power reactors in the U.S., the overall length and uranium loading of the fuel assemblies were considerably less than those of later generation facilities. In turn, some of these early facilities were designed for handling shorter casks than currently-certified casks. The spent fuel assemblies from these facilities are nearly all standard fuel within the definition in the Standard Contract (10 CFR 961) between the utilities and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (the Big Rock Point fuel cross-section is outside the standard fuel dimension), and the utilities involved hold early delivery rights under DOE's oldest-fuel-first (OFF) allocation scenario. However, development of casks suitable for satisfying the acceptance and transportation requirements of some of these facilities is not currently underway in the DOE Cask System Development Program (CSDP). While the total MTU of these fuels is relatively small compared to the total program, the number of assemblies to be transported is significant, especially in the early years of operation according to the OFF allocation scenario. We therefore perceive a need for DOE to develop an approach and to implement plans to satisfy the unique acceptance and transportation requirements of these facilities. One such approach is outlined below. (author)

  6. Electricity generation by living plants in a plant microbial fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.A.

    2012-01-01

    Society is facing local and global challenges to secure needs of people. One of those needs is the increasing demand of energy. Currently most energy is generated by conversion of fossil fuels. The major drawback of using fossil fuels is pollution of the environment by emission of carbon

  7. Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory

  8. Fuel production from biomass: generation of liquid biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ghergheleş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic fermentation processes mayalso be used to produce liquid fuels frombiological raw materials. An example is theethanol production from glucose, known asstandard yeast fermentation in the beer, wine andliquor industries. It has to take place in steps, suchthat the ethanol is removed (by distillation ordehydrator application whenever itsconcentration approaches a value (around 12%which would impede reproduction of the yeastculture.

  9. 300 W polymer electrolyte fuel cell generators for educational purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukada, A; Buechi, F N; Scherer, G G; Haas, O [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Popelis, I [Fachhochschule Solothurn Nordwestschweiz (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A 300 W fuel cell power pack has been developed for educational purposes in close collaboration with the Fachhochschule Solothurn Nordwestschweiz. The project was initiated and financed by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy. The outlay and the performance of the power pack are described. (author) 3 figs.

  10. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moqsud, M.A.; Yoshitake, J.; Bushra, Q.S.; Hyodo, M.; Omine, K.; Strik, D.P.B.T.B.

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells

  11. Measuring the linear heat generation rate of a nuclear reactor fuel pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A miniature gamma thermometer is described which is capable of travelling through bores distributed in an array through a nuclear reactor core and measure the linear heat generation rate of the fuel pins. (U.K.)

  12. Fast reactor fuel failures and steam generator leaks: Transient and accident analysis approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    This report consists of a survey of activities on transient and accident analysis for the LMFR. It is focused on the following subjects: Fuel transient tests and analyses in hypothetical incident/accident situations; sodium-water interaction in steam generators, and sodium fires: test and analyses. There are also sections dealing with the experimental and analytical studies of: fuel subassembly failures; sodium boiling, molten fuel-coolant interaction; molten material movement and relocation in fuel bundles; heat removal after an accident or incident; sodium-water reaction in steam generator; steam generator protection systems; sodium-water contact in steam generator building; fire-fighting methods and systems to deal with sodium fires. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Control of hybrid fuel cell/energy storage distributed generation system against voltage sag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajizadeh, Amin; Golkar, Masoud Aliakbar [Electrical Engineering Department, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Seyedkhandan, Dr. Shariati Ave, P.O. Box 16315-1355, Tehran (Iran)

    2010-06-15

    Fuel cell (FC) and energy storage (ES) based hybrid distributed power generation systems appear to be very promising for satisfying high energy and high power requirements of power quality problems in distributed generation (DG) systems. In this study, design of control strategy for hybrid fuel cell/energy storage distributed power generation system during voltage sag has been presented. The proposed control strategy allows hybrid distributed generation system works properly when a voltage disturbance occurs in distribution system and hybrid system stays connected to the main grid. Hence, modeling, controller design, and simulation study of a hybrid distributed generation system are investigated. The physical model of the fuel cell stack, energy storage and the models of power conditioning units are described. Then the control design methodology for each component of the hybrid system is proposed. Simulation results are given to show the overall system performance including active power control and voltage sag ride-through capability of the hybrid distributed generation system. (author)

  14. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowin, C.R.; Wiltsee, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Although the environmental and other benefits of using biomass and waste fuel energy to displace fossil fuels are well known, the economic realities are such that these fuels can not compete effectively in the current market without tax credits, subsidies, and other artificial measures. In 1992, EPRI initiated a strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels and power technologies, both to develop consistent performance and cost data for the leading fuels and technologies and to identify the conditions that favor and create market pull for biomass and waste fuel energy. Using the interim results of the EPRI project, this paper compares the relative performance and cost of power generation from coal, natural gas, and biomass and waste fuels. The range of fuels includes wood, agricultural wastes, municipal solid waste, refuse-derived fuel, scrap tires, and tire-derived fuel, scrap tires, and tire-derived fuel. The power technologies include pulverized coal and natural gas/combined cycle power plants, cofiring with coal in coal-fired utility boilers, and wood gasification/combined cycle power plants. The analysis suggests that, in the near term, the highest-efficiency, lowest-cost, lowest-risk technology is cofiring with coal in industrial and utility boilers. However, this relative to fossil fuel, or the fuel user receives a tipping fee, subsidy, or emissions credit. In order to increase future use of biomass and waste fuels, a joint initiative, involving government, industry, and fuel suppliers, transporters, and users, is needed to develop low-cost and efficient energy crop production and power technology

  15. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, Joseph W.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina; Akhil, Abbas A.; Curgus, Dita B.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examine proton exchange membrane fuel cells on-board commercial airplanes. ► We model the added fuel cell system’s effect on overall airplane performance. ► It is feasible to implement an on-board fuel cell system with current technology. ► Systems that maximize waste heat recovery are the best performing. ► Current PEM and H 2 storage technology results in an airplane performance penalty. -- Abstract: Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they could offer a performance advantage for the airplane when using today’s off-the-shelf technology. We also examine the effects of the fuel cell system on airplane performance with (1) different electrical loads, (2) different locations on the airplane, and (3) expected advances in fuel cell and hydrogen storage technologies. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic simulation, we found that an additional fuel cell system on a commercial airplane is technically feasible using current technology. Although applied to a Boeing 787-type airplane, the method presented is applicable to other airframes as well. Recovery and on-board use of the heat and water that is generated by the fuel cell is an important method to increase the benefit of such a system. The best performance is achieved when the fuel cell is coupled to a load that utilizes the full output of the fuel cell for the entire flight. The effects of location are small and location may be better determined by other considerations such as safety and modularity. Although the PEM fuel cell generates power more efficiently than the gas turbine generators currently used, when considering the effect of the fuel cell system on the airplane’s overall performance we found that an overall

  16. Advances in the generation of a new emulsified fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, A. [Technical Consultancy, Energy Plus UC, Huitzilac, Morelos (Mexico); Ramirez, M. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Aseguramiento de Hidrocarburos, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Medina, E. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Departamento de Termofluidos, Facultad de Ingenieria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bolado, R.; Mora, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Laboratorio de Combustion, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-08-15

    The development of a new emulsified fuel is described, from the conceptual idea to the semi-industrial tests of the final product. The starting point was the necessity to lower the particulate matter (PM) emissions produced by the combustion of more than 200 MBD of heavy fuel oil (HFO) used for electric power conversion. The major component of HFO is a vacuum residue of the oil refining process mixed with light cycle oils to make it pumpable. An alternative to handle and burn the high viscosity residue (solid at room temperature) is by converting it in an oil-in-water emulsion. The best emulsions resulted of 70% residue in 30% water, Sauter Mean Diameter of 10-20 {mu}m and a stability of more than 90 days. Spray burning tests of the emulsion against HFO in a semi-industrial 500 kW furnace showed a reduction in PM emissions of 24-36%. (orig.)

  17. Development of molten carbonate fuel cells for power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    The broad and comprehensive program included elements of system definition, cell and system modeling, cell component development, cell testing in pure and contaminated environments, and the first stages of technology scale up. Single cells, with active areas of 45 sq cm and 582 sq cm, were operated at 650 C and improved to state of the art levels through the development of cell design concepts and improved electrolyte and electrode components. Performance was shown to degrade by the presence of fuel contaminants, such as sulfur and chlorine, and due to changes in electrode structure. Using conventional hot press fabrication techniques, electrolyte structures up to 20" x 20" were fabricated. Promising approaches were developed for nonhot pressed electrolyte structure fabrication and a promising electrolyte matrix material was identified. This program formed the basis for a long range effort to realize the benefits of molten carbonate fuel cell power plants.

  18. Design and optimization of automotive thermoelectric generators for maximum fuel efficiency improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempf, Nicholas; Zhang, Yanliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A three-dimensional automotive thermoelectric generator (TEG) model is developed. • Heat exchanger design and TEG configuration are optimized for maximum fuel efficiency increase. • Heat exchanger conductivity has a strong influence on maximum fuel efficiency increase. • TEG aspect ratio and fin height increase with heat exchanger thermal conductivity. • A 2.5% fuel efficiency increase is attainable with nanostructured half-Heusler modules. - Abstract: Automotive fuel efficiency can be increased by thermoelectric power generation using exhaust waste heat. A high-temperature thermoelectric generator (TEG) that converts engine exhaust waste heat into electricity is simulated based on a light-duty passenger vehicle with a 4-cylinder gasoline engine. Strategies to optimize TEG configuration and heat exchanger design for maximum fuel efficiency improvement are provided. Through comparison of stainless steel and silicon carbide heat exchangers, it is found that both the optimal TEG design and the maximum fuel efficiency increase are highly dependent on the thermal conductivity of the heat exchanger material. Significantly higher fuel efficiency increase can be obtained using silicon carbide heat exchangers at taller fins and a longer TEG along the exhaust flow direction when compared to stainless steel heat exchangers. Accounting for major parasitic losses, a maximum fuel efficiency increase of 2.5% is achievable using newly developed nanostructured bulk half-Heusler thermoelectric modules.

  19. Hydrogen generation from natural gas for the fuel cell systems of tomorrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Andrew L.

    In most cases hydrogen is the preferred fuel for use in the present generation of fuel cells being developed for commercial applications. Of all the potential sources of hydrogen, natural gas offers many advantages. It is widely available, clean, and can be converted to hydrogen relatively easily. When catalytic steam reforming is used to generate hydrogen from natural gas, it is essential that sulfur compounds in the natural gas are removed upstream of the reformer and various types of desulfurisation processes are available. In addition, the quality of fuel required for each type of fuel cell varies according to the anode material used, and the cell temperature. Low temperature cells will not tolerate high concentrations of carbon monoxide, whereas the molten fuel cell (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes contain nickel on which it is possible to electrochemically oxidise carbon monoxide directly. The ability to internally reform fuel gas is a feature of the MCFC and SOFC. Internal reforming can give benefits in terms of increased electrical efficiency owing to the reduction in the required cell cooling and therefore parasitic system losses. Direct electrocatalysis of hydrocarbon oxidation has been the elusive goal of fuel cell developers over many years and recent laboratory results are encouraging. This paper reviews the principal methods of converting natural gas into hydrogen, namely catalytic steam reforming, autothermic reforming, pyrolysis and partial oxidation; it reviews currently available purification techniques and discusses some recent advances in internal reforming and the direct use of natural gas in fuel cells.

  20. Binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashevski, D; Dimitrov, K.; Armenski, S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a field of binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells is presented. Special attention of application of height temperature SOFC fuel cells and binary co-generative units has been given. These units made triple electricity and heat. Principle of combination of fuel cells with binary cycles has been presented. A model and computer programme for calculation of BKPFC, has been created. By using the program, all the important characteristic-results are calculated: power, efficiency, emission, dimension and economic analysis. On base of results, conclusions and recommendations has been given. (Author)

  1. Binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashevski, D; Dimitrov, K.; Armenski, S.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a field of binary co-generative plants with height temperature SOFC fuel cells is presented. Special attention of application of height temperature SOFC fuel cells and binary co-generative units has been given. These units made triple electricity and heat. Principle of combination of fuel cells with binary cycles has been presented. A model and computer programme for calculation of BKPFC, has been created. By using the program, all the important characteristic-results are calculated: power, efficiency, emission, dimension and economic analysis. On base of results, conclusions and recommendations has been given. (Author)

  2. Major design issues of molten carbonate fuel cell power generation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    In addition to the stack, a fuel cell power generation unit requires fuel desulfurization and reforming, fuel and oxidant preheating, process heat removal, waste heat recovery, steam generation, oxidant supply, power conditioning, water supply and treatment, purge gas supply, instrument air supply, and system control. These support facilities add considerable cost and system complexity. Bechtel, as a system integrator of M-C Power`s molten carbonate fuel cell development team, has spent substantial effort to simplify and minimize these supporting facilities to meet cost and reliability goals for commercialization. Similiar to other fuels cells, MCFC faces design challenge of how to comply with codes and standards, achieve high efficiency and part load performance, and meanwhile minimize utility requirements, weight, plot area, and cost. However, MCFC has several unique design issues due to its high operating temperature, use of molten electrolyte, and the requirement of CO2 recycle.

  3. Simultaneous energy generation and UV quencher removal from landfill leachate using a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander, Syeed Md; Novak, John T; Brazil, Brian; He, Zhen

    2017-11-01

    The presence of UV quenching compounds in landfill leachate can negatively affect UV disinfection in a wastewater treatment plant when leachate is co-treated. Herein, a microbial fuel cell (MFC) was investigated to remove UV quenchers from a landfill leachate with simultaneous bioelectricity generation. The key operating parameters including hydraulic retention time (HRT), anolyte recirculation rate, and external resistance were systematically studied to maximize energy recovery and UV absorbance reduction. It was found that nearly 50% UV absorbance was reduced under a condition of HRT 40 days, continuous anolyte recirculation, and 10 Ω external resistance. Further analysis showed a total reduction of organics by 75.3%, including the reduction of humic acids, fulvic acids, and hydrophilic fraction concentration as TOC. The MFC consumed 0.056 kWh m -3 by its pump system for recirculation and oxygen supply. A reduced HRT of 20 days with periodical anode recirculation (1 hour in every 24 hours) and 39 Ω external resistance (equal to the internal resistance of the MFC) resulted in the highest net energy of 0.123 kWh m -3 . Granular activated carbon (GAC) was used as an effective post-treatment step and could achieve 89.1% UV absorbance reduction with 40 g L -1 . The combined MFC and GAC treatment could reduce 92.9% of the UV absorbance and remove 89.7% of the UV quenchers. The results of this study would encourage further exploration of using MFCs as an energy-efficient method for removing UV quenchers from landfill leachate.

  4. Is the "Net Generation" Ready for Digital Citizenship? Perspectives from the IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study 2013. Policy Brief No. 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ryan; Engel, Laura C.; Hastedt, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The rise of digital information and communication technologies (ICT) has made the acquisition of computer and information literacy (CIL) a leading factor in creating an engaged, informed, and employable citizenry. However, are young people, often described as "digital natives" or the "net generation," developing the necessary…

  5. NULIF: neutron spectrum generator, few-group constant calculator, and fuel depletion code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittkopf, W.A.; Tilford, J.M.; Andrews, J.B. II; Kirschner, G.; Hassan, N.M.; Colpo, P.N.

    1977-02-01

    The NULIF code generates a microgroup neutron spectrum and calculates spectrum-weighted few-group parameters for use in a spatial diffusion code. A wide variety of fuel cells, non-fuel cells, and fuel lattices, typical of PWR (or BWR) lattices, are treated. A fuel depletion routine and change card capability allow a broad range of problems to be studied. Coefficient variation with fuel burnup, fuel temperature change, moderator temperature change, soluble boron concentration change, burnable poison variation, and control rod insertion are readily obtained. Heterogeneous effects, including resonance shielding and thermal flux depressions, are treated. Coefficients are obtained for one thermal group and up to three epithermal groups. A special output routine writes the few-group coefficient data in specified format on an output tape for automated fitting in the PDQ07-HARMONY system of spatial diffusion-depletion codes

  6. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East

  7. Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

  8. Electricity generation by microbial fuel cells fuelled with wheat straw hydrolysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Anders; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    Electricity production from microbial fuel cells fueled with hydrolysate produced by hydrothermal treatment of wheat straw can achieve both energy production and domestic wastewater purification. The hydrolysate contained mainly xylan, carboxylic acids, and phenolic compounds. Power generation...... in 95% degradation of the xylan and glucan. The study demonstrates that lignocellulosic hydrolysate can be used for co-treatment with domestic wastewater for power generation in microbial fuel cells....... density with the hydrolysate was higher than the one with only xylan (120 mW m−2) and carboxylic acids as fuel. The higher power density can be caused by the presence of phenolic compounds in the hydrolysates, which could mediate electron transport. Electricity generation with the hydrolysate resulted...

  9. Pollutants generated by the combustion of solid biomass fuels

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Jenny M; Ma, Lin; Williams, Alan; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This book considers the pollutants formed by the combustion of solid biomass fuels. The availability and potential use of solid biofuels is first discussed because this is the key to the development of biomass as a source of energy.This is followed by details of the methods used for characterisation of biomass and their classification.The various steps in the combustion mechanisms are given together with a compilation of the kinetic data. The chemical mechanisms for the formation of the pollutants: NOx, smoke and unburned hydrocarbons, SOx, Cl compounds, and particulate metal aerosols

  10. Water treatment for fossil fuel power generation - technology status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This technology status report focuses on the use of water treatment technology in fossil fuel power plants. The use of polymeric ion exchange resins for deionization of water, the currently preferred use of ion exchange for economically treating water containing low dissolved salts, the use of low pressure high-flux membranes, membrane microfiltration, and reverse osmosis are discussed. Details are given of the benefits of the technologies, water use at power plants, the current status of water treatment technologies, and the potential for future developments, along with power plant market trends and potentials, worldwide developments, and UK capabilities in water treatment plant design and manufacturing

  11. Biomimetic and microbial approaches to solar fuel generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnuson, Ann; Anderlund, Magnus; Johansson, Olof; Lindblad, Peter; Lomoth, Reiner; Polivka, Tomas; Ott, Sascha; Stensjö, Karin; Styring, Stenbjörn; Sundström, Villy; Hammarström, Leif

    2009-12-21

    Photosynthesis is performed by a multitude of organisms, but in nearly all cases, it is variations on a common theme: absorption of light followed by energy transfer to a reaction center where charge separation takes place. This initial form of chemical energy is stabilized by the biosynthesis of carbohydrates. To produce these energy-rich products, a substrate is needed that feeds in reductive equivalents. When photosynthetic microorganisms learned to use water as a substrate some 2 billion years ago, a fundamental barrier against unlimited use of solar energy was overcome. The possibility of solar energy use has inspired researchers to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that show analogy to parts of the intricate molecular machinery of photosynthesis. Recent years have seen a reorientation of efforts toward creating integrated light-to-fuel systems that can use solar energy for direct synthesis of energy-rich compounds, so-called solar fuels. Sustainable production of solar fuels is a long awaited development that promises extensive solar energy use combined with long-term storage. The stoichiometry of water splitting into molecular oxygen, protons, and electrons is deceptively simple; achieving it by chemical catalysis has proven remarkably difficult. The reaction center Photosystem II couples light-induced charge separation to an efficient molecular water-splitting catalyst, a Mn(4)Ca complex, and is thus an important template for biomimetic chemistry. In our aims to design biomimetic manganese complexes for light-driven water oxidation, we link photosensitizers and charge-separation motifs to potential catalysts in supramolecular assemblies. In photosynthesis, production of carbohydrates demands the delivery of multiple reducing equivalents to CO(2). In contrast, the two-electron reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen is much less demanding. Virtually all microorganisms have enzymes called hydrogenases that convert protons to hydrogen, many of

  12. Generator Set Durability Testing Using 25% ATJ Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED 3 Table 1. Chemical & Physical Properties of Evaluated 25% ATJ Blend Test ASTM Method Units SwRI Sample ID...25% ATJ Blend Test ASTM Method Units SwRI Sample ID CL15-8613 Results Min Max Flash Point D93 °C 56.5 38 Density D4052 Test...Chemical & Physical Properties of Evaluated 25% ATJ Blend Test ASTM Method Units SwRI Sample ID CL15-8613 Results Min Max Fuel System Icing Inhibitor

  13. Coal gasification integration with solid oxide fuel cell and chemical looping combustion for high-efficiency power generation with inherent CO2 capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shiyi; Lior, Noam; Xiang, Wenguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel power system integrating coal gasification with SOFC and chemical looping combustion. • The plant net power efficiency reaches 49.8% with complete CO 2 separation. • Energy and exergy analysis of the entire plant is conducted. • Sensitivity analysis shows a nearly constant power output when SOFC temperature and pressure vary. • NiO oxygen carrier shows higher plant efficiency than using Fe 2 O 3 and CuO. - Abstract: Since solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) produce electricity with high energy conversion efficiency, and chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a process for fuel conversion with inherent CO 2 separation, a novel combined cycle integrating coal gasification, solid oxide fuel cell, and chemical looping combustion was configured and analyzed. A thermodynamic analysis based on energy and exergy was performed to investigate the performance of the integrated system and its sensitivity to major operating parameters. The major findings include that (1) the plant net power efficiency reaches 49.8% with ∼100% CO 2 capture for SOFC at 900 °C, 15 bar, fuel utilization factor = 0.85, fuel reactor temperature = 900 °C and air reactor temperature = 950 °C, using NiO as the oxygen carrier in the CLC unit. (2) In this parameter neighborhood the fuel utilization factor, the SOFC temperature and SOFC pressure have small effects on the plant net power efficiency because changes in pressure and temperature that increase the power generation by the SOFC tend to decrease the power generation by the gas turbine and steam cycle, and v.v.; an advantage of this system characteristic is that it maintains a nearly constant power output even when the temperature and pressure vary. (3) The largest exergy loss is in the gasification process, followed by those in the CO 2 compression and the SOFC. (4) Compared with the CLC Fe 2 O 3 and CuO oxygen carriers, NiO results in higher plant net power efficiency. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first

  14. The next generation fuel cells: anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauqir, A.; Zahoor, S.

    2013-01-01

    Many environmentally friendly alternatives (solar, wind, hydroelectric, and geothermal power) can only be used in particular environments. In contrast, fuel cells can have near-zero emissions, are quiet and efficient, and can work in any environment where the temperature is lower than the cell's operating temperature. Among various types of fuel cells, the AEMFC is the most recent one and has advantages such as excellent performance compared to other candidate fuel cells due to its active O/sub 2/ electrode kinetics and flexibility to use a wide range of electro-catalysts such as silver and nickels contrary to expensive one (Platinum) required for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Anion exchange membrane (AEM) is a crucial part in AEMFC, determining durability and electrochemical performances of membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The role of an AEM is to conduct hydroxyl ions from cathode to anode. If this conduction is not sufficiently high and selective, the corresponding fuel cell will not find any practical application. One of the major problems associated with AEMFC is much lower conductivities of anion compare to proton conductivity in PEMFCs, even upon similar working condition. Thus AEMs is only practical, if it is chemically and mechanically stable against severe basic operation conditions and highly hydroxyl ions conductive. The conventional AEMs based on animated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon or even fluorinated polymers tend to be attacked by hydroxyl ions, causing the degradation during operation is strongly basic conditions. (author)

  15. Survey of a technology to introduce the waste-fueled power generation. Basic manual for introduction of the waste-fueled power generation; Haikibutsu hatsuden donyu gijutsu chosa. Haikibutsu hatsuden donyu kihon manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Local government offices, etc., which are expected to shoulder responsibility for introducing the waste-fueled power generation, want to need exact information on technical information concerning the waste-fueled power generation and the method to materialize the introduction plan, etc. Therefore, Electric Power Development Co. surveyed and studied it under the contract with NEDO. The results were collected together as a basic manual for introduction of the waste-fueled power generation. As an outline of the waste-fueled power generation, the manual explains the significance, the present situation and potentials, the waste-fueled power system, an outline of working out the waste-fueled power generation plan, an outline of construction and operation/maintenance of the waste-fueled power generation, an outline of various systems relating to the waste-fueled power generation, etc. As the items for the study of making a concrete plan for power generation equipment, the manual explains the amount of refuse to be incinerated, the present status of generation capacity as viewed from the quality of refuse, the quality of refuse and the design of power generation equipment, boiler efficiency, power generation efficiency, construction cost and operation cost, etc. In addition, the paper describes a case study of the waste-fueled power generation plan. 118 figs., 39 tabs.

  16. Potential CO{sub 2} reduction by fuel substitution to generate electricity in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masjuki, H.H.; Mahlia, T.M.I.; Choudhury, I.A.; Saidur, R. [University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineers

    2002-04-01

    Because of changing fossil fuel prices, sources and environmental consciousness, Malaysian utilities have been forced to change the type of energy sources to generate electricity. This new policy of electricity generation companies will change fuel use gradually from 70% gas, 15% coal, 10% hydro and 5% petroleum in the year 2000 to 40% gas, 30% hydro, 29% coal and only 1% petroleum in the year of 2020. These changes tend to reduce CO{sub 2} emission. This study predicts the potential CO{sub 2} reduction due to these changes. The calculation is based on CO{sub 2} emission for unit electricity generated and the changing type of fuel percentages for electricity generation in Malaysia. The study found that the substitution will reduce CO{sub 2} emission from power plants in this country.

  17. Is there a "net generation" in veterinary medicine? A comparative study on the use of the Internet and Web 2.0 by students and the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhaven, Christoph; Tipold, Andrea; Fischer, Martin R; Ehlers, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    Informal and formal lifelong learning is essential at university and in the workplace. Apart from classical learning techniques, Web 2.0 tools can be used. It is controversial whether there is a so-called net generation amongst people under 30. To test the hypothesis that a net generation among students and young veterinarians exists. An online survey of students and veterinarians was conducted in the German-speaking countries which was advertised via online media and traditional print media. 1780 people took part in the survey. Students and veterinarians have different usage patterns regarding social networks (91.9% vs. 69%) and IM (55.9% vs. 24.5%). All tools were predominantly used passively and in private, to a lesser extent also professionally and for studying. The use of Web 2.0 tools is useful, however, teaching information and media skills, preparing codes of conduct for the internet and verification of user generated content is essential.

  18. Analytical investigation of high temperature 1 kW solid oxide fuel cell system feasibility in methane hydrate recovery and deep ocean power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizi, Mohammad Ali; Brouwer, Jacob; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) model was developed. • Hydrate bed methane dissociation model was integrated with the SOFC model. • SOFC operated steadily for 120 days at high pressure deep ocean environment. • Burning some of the dissociated gas for SMR heat leads to more net methane produced. • Higher SOFC fuel utilization produces higher integrated system efficiency. - Abstract: Methane hydrates are potential valuable energy resources. However, finding an efficient method for methane gas recovery from hydrate sediments is still a challenge. New challenges arise from increasing environmental protection. This is due in part to the technical difficulties involved in the efficient dissociation of methane hydrates at high pressures. In this study, a new approach is proposed to produce valuable products of: 1. Net methane gas recovery from the methane hydrate sediment, and 2. Deep ocean power generation. We have taken the first steps toward utilization of a fuel cell system in methane gas recovery from deep ocean hydrate sediments. An integrated high pressure and high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and steam methane reformer (SMR) system is analyzed for this application and the recoverable amount of methane from deep ocean sediments is measured. System analysis is accomplished for two major cases regarding system performance: 1. Energy for SMR is provided by the burning part of the methane gas dissociated from the hydrate sediment. 2. Energy for SMR is provided through heat exchange with fuel cell effluent gases. We found that the total production of methane gas is higher in the first case compared to the second case. The net power generated by the fuel cell system is estimated for all cases. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of integrated electrochemical devices to accomplish energy efficient dissociation of methane hydrate gases in deep ocean sediments. Concepts for use of electrochemical devices

  19. OPTIMIZING IGNITION AND COMBUSTION OF FUELS TO THE NAVAL STEAM GENERATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu MOROIANU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The continuous damage of the used fuel quality, of its dispersion due to the increasingviscosity, make necessary the volume expansion and the rise of the e electric spark power used at ignition. Asimilar situation appears to the transition of the generator operation from the marine Diesel heavy fuel to theresidues of water-fuel mixture. So, it feels like using an ignition system with high specific energy and power ableto perform the starting and burning of the fuels mentioned above. Such a system is that which uses a lowtemperature plasma jet. Its use involves obtaining a high temperature area round about the jet, with a highdischarge power, extending the possibility of obtaining a constant burning of different concentration (densitymixtures. Besides the action of the temperature of the air-fuel mixture, the plasma jet raises the rate of oxidationreaction as a result of appearance of lot number of active centers such as loaded molecules, atoms, ions, freeradicals

  20. Energy generation from biomass with the aid of fuel cells; Energetische Nutzung von Biomasse mit Brennstoffzellenverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    To provide an opportunity for information exchange at the interface between biomass use for energy generation and developers of fuel cells, the workshop 'Energy generation from biomass with the aid of fuel cells' was held by the Fachagentur Nachwachsende Rohstoffe on 9 and 10 December 1998. The lectures and discussions permit to assess better the opportunities and restraints resulting from the use of biogenous fuel gas in fuel cells. (orig.) [German] Um an der Schnittstelle zwischen der energetischen Nutzung von Biomasse und den Entwicklern von Brennstoffzellen einen Informationsaustausch zu ermoeglichen, wurde am 9. und 10. Dezember 1998 der Workshop 'Energetische Nutzung von Biomasse mit Brennstoffzellenverfahren' von der FNR veranstaltet. Die Vortraege und die Diskussion erlauben eine bessere Einschaetzung der Moeglichkeiten und Restriktionen, die sich bei dem Einsatz von biogenen Brenngasen in Brennstoffzellen ergeben. (orig.)

  1. Integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from green cut material from landscape conservation and private households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgen, F; Richter, F; Wachendorf, M

    2011-11-01

    Green cut material is a potential source of renewable energy which is not fully exploited through conventional energy recovery systems. A new energy conversion process, the integrated generation of solid fuel and biogas from biomass (IFBB), which includes mechanical separation after hydro-thermal conditioning, was investigated. Ash softening temperature and lower heating value of the solid fuel were increased through the IFFB process in comparison to the untreated raw material. The net energy yield of IFBB at 40 °C conditioning temperature ranged between 1.96 and 2.85 kWh kg(-1) dry matter (DM) and for the direct combustion between 1.75 and 2.65 kWh kg(-1) DM. Conversion efficiencies for the IFBB system were 0.42-0.68 and for direct combustion 0.42-0.63. The IFBB system produces storable energy from material which is nowadays not used for energy conversion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous pollutant removal and electricity generation in denitrifying microbial fuel cell with boric acid-borate buffer solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Shaohui; Li, Meng; Wei, Yan

    2015-01-01

    A double-chamber denitrifying microbial fuel cell (MFC), using boric acid-borate buffer solution as an alternative to phosphate buffer solution, was set up to investigate the influence of buffer solution concentration, temperature and external resistance on electricity generation and pollutant removal efficiency. The result revealed that the denitrifying MFC with boric acid-borate buffer solution was successfully started up in 51 days, with a stable cell voltage of 205.1 ± 1.96 mV at an external resistance of 50 Ω. Higher concentration of buffer solution favored nitrogen removal and electricity generation. The maximum power density of 8.27 W/m(3) net cathodic chamber was obtained at a buffer solution concentration of 100 mmol/L. An increase in temperature benefitted electricity generation and nitrogen removal. A suitable temperature for this denitrifying MFC was suggested to be 25 °C. Decreasing the external resistance favored nitrogen removal and organic matter consumption by exoelectrogens.

  3. Intelligent Power Management of hybrid Wind/ Fuel Cell/ Energy Storage Power Generation System

    OpenAIRE

    A. Hajizadeh; F. Hassanzadeh

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an intelligent power management strategy for hybrid wind/ fuel cell/ energy storage power generation system. The dynamic models of wind turbine, fuel cell and energy storage have been used for simulation of hybrid power system. In order to design power flow control strategy, a fuzzy logic control has been implemented to manage the power between power sources. The optimal operation of the hybrid power system is a main goal of designing power management strategy. The hybrid ...

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCE OF PARAMETERS OF CONTROL OF HEATING POWER GENERATING UNITS ON FUEL CONSUMPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchinnikov P.A.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is presented analysis of the influence of parameters of state of the process of control on the increase of the fuel consumption of heat power generating units. There are presented results of calculations of the increase of the fuel consumption at the deviation of the working steam temperature and pressure from rated values. Result of calculus is compared with the experiment.

  5. Life cycle analyses applied to first generation bio-fuels consumed in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This rather voluminous publication reports detailed life cycle analyses for the different present bio-fuels channels also named first-generation bio-fuels: bio-ethanol, bio-diesel, pure vegetal oils, and oil. After a recall of the general principles adopted for this life-cycle analysis, it reports the modelling of the different channels (agricultural steps, bio-fuel production steps, Ethyl tert-butyl ether or ETBE steps, vehicles, animal fats and used vegetal oils, soil assignment change). It gives synthetic descriptions of the different production ways (methyl ester from different plants, ethanol from different plants). It reports and compares the results obtained in terms of performance

  6. Generation of SCALE 6 Input Data File for Cross Section Library of PWR Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Cho, Dong Keun

    2010-11-01

    In order to obtain the cross section libraries of the Korean Pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel (SF), SCALE 6 code input files have been generated. The PWR fuel data were obtained from the nuclear design report (NDR) of the current operating PWRs. The input file were prepared for 16 fuel types such as 4 types of Westinghouse 14x14, 3 types of OPR-1000 16x16, 4 types of Westinghouse 16x16, and 6 types of Westinghouse 17x17. For each fuel type, 5 kinds of fuel enrichments have been considered such as 1.5, 2.0 ,3.0, 4.0 and 5.0 wt%. In the SCALE 6 calculation, a ENDF-V 44 group was used. The 25 burnup step until 72000 MWD/T was used. A 1/4 symmetry model was used for 16x16 and 17x17 fuel assembly, and 1/2 symmetry model was used for 14x14 fuel assembly The generated cross section libraries will be used for the source-term analysis of the PWR SF

  7. Evaluation of next generation biomass derived fuels for the transport sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsita, Katerina G.; Pilavachi, Petros A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates next generation biomass derived fuels for the transport sector, employing the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Eight different alternatives of fuels are considered in this paper: bio-hydrogen, bio-synthetic natural gas, bio-dimethyl ether, bio-methanol, hydro thermal upgrading diesel, bio-ethanol, algal biofuel and electricity from biomass incineration. The evaluation of alternative fuels is performed according to various criteria that include economic, technical, social and policy aspects. In order to evaluate each alternative fuel, one base scenario and five alternative scenarios with different weight factors selection per criterion are presented. After deciding the alternative fuels’ scoring against each criterion and the criteria weights, their synthesis gives the overall score and ranking for all alternative scenarios. It is concluded that synthetic natural gas and electricity from biomass incineration are the most suitable next generation biomass derived fuels for the transport sector. -- Highlights: •Eight alternative fuels for the transport sector have been evaluated. •The method of the AHP was used. •The evaluation is performed according to economic, technical, social and policy criteria. •Bio-SNG and electricity from biomass incineration are the most suitable fuels

  8. Optimal setpoint generation for improved fuel temperature performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, R.M.; Edwards, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear power plant systems feature a high degree of non-linearity and high noise level, and the performance of conventional control systems may degrade when power plants operate under a wide range of conditions, such as startup, test, shutdown, etc. The conventional control system is not intended for nuclear power plant full-range operation. This is the reason that, at present, nuclear power plants rely on manual operations for most wide-range control and only use automatic control around nominal conditions. The availability of new powerful control techniques and mathematical tools has motivated an expanding research effort toward the development of the advanced hybrid feedforward-feedback control system. The planned command input is based on the analysis of a system model in some form in order to improve the performance of the overall system. The use of a feedforward optimal controller to improve the fuel temperature response to a step change in desired reactor power is being demonstrated. The Penn State TRIGA reactor is used as the basis of the reactor model so that validation of the controller may be shown

  9. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  10. NEW MATERIAL NEEDS FOR HYDROCARBON FUEL PROCESSING: Generating Hydrogen for the PEM Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrauto, R.; Hwang, S.; Shore, L.; Ruettinger, W.; Lampert, J.; Giroux, T.; Liu, Y.; Ilinich, O.

    2003-08-01

    The hydrogen economy is fast approaching as petroleum reserves are rapidly consumed. The fuel cell promises to deliver clean and efficient power by combining hydrogen and oxygen in a simple electrochemical device that directly converts chemical energy to electrical energy. Hydrogen, the most plentiful element available, can be extracted from water by electrolysis. One can imagine capturing energy from the sun and wind and/or from the depths of the earth to provide the necessary power for electrolysis. Alternative energy sources such as these are the promise for the future, but for now they are not feasible for power needs across the globe. A transitional solution is required to convert certain hydrocarbon fuels to hydrogen. These fuels must be available through existing infrastructures such as the natural gas pipeline. The present review discusses the catalyst and adsorbent technologies under development for the extraction of hydrogen from natural gas to meet the requirements for the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The primary market is for residential applications, where pipeline natural gas will be the source of H2 used to power the home. Other applications including the reforming of methanol for portable power applications such as laptop computers, cellular phones, and personnel digital equipment are also discussed. Processing natural gas containing sulfur requires many materials, for example, adsorbents for desulfurization, and heterogeneous catalysts for reforming (either autothermal or steam reforming) water gas shift, preferential oxidation of CO, and anode tail gas combustion. All these technologies are discussed for natural gas and to a limited extent for reforming methanol.

  11. New Earth-abundant Materials for Large-scale Solar Fuels Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Rajiv Ramanujam; Cui, Wei; Tilley, S David

    2018-05-30

    The solar resource is immense, but the power density of light striking the Earth's surface is relatively dilute, necessitating large area solar conversion devices in order to harvest substantial amounts of power for renewable energy applications. In addition, energy storage is a key challenge for intermittent renewable resources such as solar and wind, which adds significant cost to these energies. As the majority of humanity's present-day energy consumption is based on fuels, an ideal solution is to generate renewable fuels from abundant resources such as sunlight and water. In this account, we detail our recent work towards generating highly efficient and stable Earth-abundant semiconducting materials for solar water splitting to generate renewable hydrogen fuel.

  12. Stochastic model of wind-fuel cell for a semi-dispatchable power generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez-Mendoza, Fernanda; Bacher, Peder; Madsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which are embedded in one complete system with the wind power. This study uses historic wind speed data from Mexico; the forecasts are obtained using the recursive least square algorithm with a forgetting factor. The proposed approach provides probabilistic information......Hybrid systems are implemented to improve the efficiency of individual generation technologies by complementing each other. Intermittence is a challenge to overcome especially for renewable energy sources for electric generation, as in the case of wind power. This paper proposes a hybrid system...... for short-term wind power generation and electric generation as the outcome of the hybrid system. A method for a semi-dispatchable electric generation based on time series analysis is presented, and the implementation of wind power and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell models controlled by a model...

  13. ASGARD - Advanced fuelS for Generation IV reActors: Reprocessing and Dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, C.; Retegan, T.; De Visser-Tynova, E.; Wallenius, J.; Sarsfield, M.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Thanks to its interdiciplinary nature ASGARD has created a common platform for many aspects of novel nuclear fuel cycles, 25% into the project everything is running according to plan with significant advances in most domains. The training and education scheme used in ASGARD has already been successfully implemented allowing young scientists in the field to present their results internationally and also visit other ASGARD labs. The future collaboration with e.g. SACESS and CINCH II will enable the creation of significant added value to the communities involved. More will come. We have only begun.....

  14. Optimal balance between energy demand and onsite energy generation for robust net zero energy buildings considering future scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotireddy, R.R.; Hoes, P.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Net-zero energy buildings have usually very low energy demand, and consequently heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems are designed and controlled to meet this low energy demand. However, a number of uncertainties in the building use, operation and external conditions such as

  15. MX 8: the next generation high capacity system for the transport of fresh MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potelle, F.; Issard, H.

    1998-01-01

    The choice of reprocessing policy was made a long time ago in France, leading to the development of an advanced Pu recycling industry. In 1987, Saint Laurent was the first French reactor to be loaded with fresh MOX fuel. Transnucleaire, then in charge of transport packaging development, created the FS 69 concept, derived from the classical RCC concept for the transport of UO 2 fresh fuel. On the other hand, Cogema, as the main actor in the field of fuel cycle and thus in transport matters, developed the associated security truck and security caisson in order to provide the transport system with the acceptable Physical Protection devices required by French Authorities. As a whole, the security truck and the FS 69 have now been used for more than ten years with a remarkable level of efficiency and safety. Indeed, more than 600 fresh MOX fuel elements have been delivered, without any incident, both regarding safety or fuel integrity requirements. But, as a matter of fact, the replacement of FS 69 transport system is now scheduled for several reasons. First of all, the burnups achieved with UO 2 fuel progressed together with its enrichment within the last ten years, and the MOX 'equivalence' also implies that its Pu content be increased to enhance its reactor performances: from 5.25 % of Pu content today, the MOX fuel will reach 7% tomorrow, and almost 10% the day after tomorrow. Lastly, the reprocessing/recycling policy has been confirmed and amplified, leading to an increasing number of 'moxified' reactors. As a consequence, the French utility (EDF), the fuel designer (Fragema, the joint venture between Framatome and Cogema), the fuel manufacturer (Cogema), and the transporter (Transnucleaire) joined in a specific working group devoted to the development of the MX 8, the next generation high capacity system for the land transport of MOX fuel. (authors)

  16. Migration from Gasoline to Gaseous Fuel for Small-scale Electricity Generation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukandar Sukandar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study that gives a consideration to change fuel source for electricity generator from gasoline to combustible gas. A gaseous fuel conversion technology is presented and its performance is compared with gasoline. In the experiment, two types of load were tested, resistive and resistive-inductive. By using both fuels mostly the power factor (Cos ? of resistive-inductive load variations were greater than 0.8, and they had slight difference on operational voltage. The drawback of using gaseous fuel is the frequency of the electricity might be up to 10 Hz deviated from the standard frequency (i.e. 50 Hz. In the lab scale experiment, the gasoline consumption increased proportionally with the load increase, while using gaseous fuel the consumption of gas equal for two different load value in the range of 50% maximum load, which is 100 gram per 15 minutes operation. Therefore, the use of gaseous generation system should have average power twice than the required load. The main advantage using gaseous fuel (liquefied petroleum gas or biogas compared to gasoline is a cleaner emitted gas after combustion.

  17. The generation of denatured reactor plutonium by different options of the fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M.; Kessler, G. [Inst. for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Research Center Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    Denatured (proliferation resistant) reactor plutonium can be generated in a number of different fuel cycle options. First denatured reactor plutonium can be obtained if, instead of low enriched U-235 PWR fuel, re-enriched U-235/U-236 from reprocessed uranium is used (fuel type A). Also the envisaged existing 2,500 t of reactor plutonium (being generated world wide up to the year 2010), mostly stored in intermediate fuel storage facilities at present, could be converted during a transition phase into denatured reactor plutonium by the options fuel type B and D. Denatured reactor plutonium could have the same safeguards standard as present low enriched (<20% U-235) LWR fuel. It could be incinerated by recycling once or twice in PWRs and subsequently by multi-recycling in FRs (CAPRA type or IFRs). Once denatured, such reactor plutonium could remain denatured during multiple recycling. In a PWR, e.g., denatured reactor plutonium could be destroyed at a rate of about 250 kg/GWey. While denatured reactor plutonium could be recycled and incinerated under relieved IAEA safeguards, neptunium would still have to be monitored by the IAEA in future for all cases in which considerable amounts of neptunium are produced. (orig.)

  18. MHD power generation for the synthetic-fuels industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.S. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The integration of open cycle MHD with various processes for the recovery of hydrocarbons for heavy oil deposits, oil sands, and oil shales are examined along with its use in producing medium Btu gas, synthetic natural gas and solvent refined coal. The major features of the MHD cycle which are of interest are: (a) the ability to produce hydrogen through the shift reaction by introducing H 2 O into the substoichiometric combustion product flow exiting the MHD diffuser, (b) the use of high temperature waste heat in the MHD exhaust, and (c) the ability of the seed in the MHD flow to remove sulfur from the combustion products. Therefore the use of the MHD cycle allows coal to be used in an environmentally acceptable manner in place of hydrocarbons which are now used to produce process heat and hydrogen. The appropriate plant sizes are in the range of 25 to 50 MWe and the required MHD generator enthalpy extraction efficiencies are low. Sale of electricity produced, over and above that used in the process, can provide a revenue stream which can improve the economics of the hydrocarbon processing. This, coupled with the replacement of coal for hydrocarbons in certain phases of the process, should improve the overall economics, while not requiring a high level of performance by the MHD components. Therefore, this area should be an early target of opportunity for the commercialization of MHD

  19. Projection of fossil fuels consumption in the Venezuelan electricity generation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidoza, Jorge A.; Gallo, Waldyr L.R.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a prospective analysis on the impacts of recent efficient energy policies application in Venezuela, integrating both oil production and electricity supply to assess energy resources balance in a quantitative manner. A special focus is given to main fossil fuels used in the electric power industry; natural gas, diesel oil and fuel oil. Four scenarios were proposed, ranging from a low-economy-growth/low-efficiency scenario to an optimist high-economy-growth/high-efficiency scenario. Efficiency effects are more notorious for high-economy-growth case, fuel consumption for electricity generation reduces 38% for natural gas, 12% for diesel and 29% for fuel oil, in the established time period. Deficits in oil and gas Venezuelan production were also determined, deficits are highly affected by economical forecasting, and by fuel smuggling in Venezuelan borders. Results showed the high importance of energy efficiency policies development for Venezuela, in order to reduce fossil fuel domestic consumption to allocate them in a more profitable market. - Highlights: • We made a prospective analysis on efficient energy policies impacts in Venezuela. • Reduced fuel consumption was obtained for efficient scenarios. • Current energy regulations are not enough to encourage energy efficiency. • Hydroelectricity projects need more promotion to have deeper impacts.

  20. Methodology for comparing the health effects of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhyne, W.R.; El-Bassioni, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    A methodology was developed for comparing the health risks of electricity generation from uranium and coal fuels. The health effects attributable to the construction, operation, and decommissioning of each facility in the two fuel cycle were considered. The methodology is based on defining (1) requirement variables for the materials, energy, etc., (2) effluent variables associated with the requirement variables as well as with the fuel cycle facility operation, and (3) health impact variables for effluents and accidents. The materials, energy, etc., required for construction, operation, and decommissioning of each fuel cycle facility are defined as primary variables. The materials, energy, etc., needed to produce the primary variable are defined as secondary requirement variables. Each requirement variable (primary, secondary, etc.) has associated effluent variables and health impact variables. A diverging chain or tree is formed for each primary variable. Fortunately, most elements reoccur frequently to reduce the level of analysis complexity. 6 references, 11 figures, 6 tables

  1. Expert System analysis of non-fuel assembly hardware and spent fuel disassembly hardware: Its generation and recommended disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all of the effort being expended on radioactive waste disposal in the United States is being focused on the disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, with little consideration for other areas that will have to be disposed of in the same facilities. one area of radioactive waste that has not been addressed adequately because it is considered a secondary part of the waste issue is the disposal of the various Non-Fuel Bearing Components of the reactor core. These hardware components fall somewhat arbitrarily into two categories: Non-Fuel Assembly (NFA) hardware and Spent Fuel Disassembly (SFD) hardware. This work provides a detailed examination of the generation and disposal of NFA hardware and SFD hardware by the nuclear utilities of the United States as it relates to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. All available sources of data on NFA and SFD hardware are analyzed with particular emphasis given to the Characteristics Data Base developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the characterization work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Rochester Gas ampersand Electric. An Expert System developed as a portion of this work is used to assist in the prediction of quantities of NFA hardware and SFD hardware that will be generated by the United States' utilities. Finally, the hardware waste management practices of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Sweden, and Japan are studied for possible application to the disposal of domestic hardware wastes. As a result of this work, a general classification scheme for NFA and SFD hardware was developed. Only NFA and SFD hardware constructed of zircaloy and experiencing a burnup of less than 70,000 MWD/MTIHM and PWR control rods constructed of stainless steel are considered Low-Level Waste. All other hardware is classified as Greater-ThanClass-C waste

  2. Influence of the pressure holding time on strain generation in fuel injection lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basara, Adis; Alt, Nicolas; Schluecker, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    An influence of the pressure holding time on residual strain generation during the autofrettage process was studied experimentally for the first time in the present work. It is the state of the art that fuel injection lines are held at the autofrettage pressure for only a few seconds in an industrial production. In doing so, it is assumed that a desirable residual stress-strain pattern is generated. However, the results of the experimental investigations outlined in this work indicated that completion of the plastic deformation caused by the autofrettage process and generation of the desirable stress-strain pattern require a much longer period. As shown, a third-order polynomial equation best described the interdependence between the time required for the completion of the process, the corresponding autofrettage pressure and the generated strain state. The method presented can be used as a tool for the determination of the optimal autofrettage process parameters in industrial production of fuel injection lines.

  3. Federal tax incentives and disincentives for the adoption of wood-fuel electric-generating technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, L.J.; Hadley, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate the effects of current federal tax policy on the financial criteria that investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) and non-utility electricity generators (NUGs) use to evaluate wood-fuel electric-generating technologies, distinguishing between dedicated-plantation and wood-waste fuels. Accelerated tax depreciation, the 1.5 cent/kWh production tax credit for the dedicated-plantation technology, and the alternative minimum tax are the most important tax provisions. The results indicate that federal tax laws have significantly different effects on the evaluation criteria, depending on the plant's ownership (IOU vs NUG) and type of fuel (dedicated-plantation vs wood-waste). (Author)

  4. The next generation of CANDU technologies: profiling the potential for hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the Next-generation CANDU Power Reactor technologies currently under development at AECL. The innovations introduced into proven CANDU technologies include a compact reactor core design, which reduces the size by a factor of one third for the same power output; improved thermal efficiency through higher-pressure steam turbines; reduced use of heavy water (one quarter of the heavy water required for existing plants), thus reducing the cost and eliminating many material handling concerns; use of slightly enriched uranium to extend fuel life to three times that of existing natural uranium fuel and additions to CANDU's inherent passive safety. With these advanced features, the capital cost of constructing the plant can be reduced by up to 40 per cent compared to existing designs. The clean, affordable CANDU-generated electricity can be used to produce hydrogen for fuel cells for the transportation sector, thereby reducing emissions from the transportation sector

  5. Next-generation batteries and fuel cells for commercial, military, and space applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, A R

    2012-01-01

    Distilling complex theoretical physical concepts into an understandable technical framework, Next-Generation Batteries and Fuel Cells for Commercial, Military, and Space Applications describes primary and secondary (rechargeable) batteries for various commercial, military, spacecraft, and satellite applications for covert communications, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. It emphasizes the cost, reliability, longevity, and safety of the next generation of high-capacity batteries for applications where high energy density, minimum weight and size, and reliability in harsh conditions are

  6. DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2001-01-01

    During the period October 1, 2000 - December 31, 2000, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) executed a Cooperative Agreement with the National Energy Technology Laboratory to implement a major cofiring demonstration at the Willow Island Generating Station Boiler No.2. Willow Island Boiler No.2 is a cyclone boiler. Allegheny also will demonstrate separate injection cofiring at the Albright Generating Station Boiler No.3, a tangentially fired boiler. The Allegheny team includes Foster Wheeler as its primary subcontractor. Additional subcontractors are Cofiring Alternatives and N.S. Harding and Associates. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. The second quarter of the project involved completing the designs for each location. Further, geotechnical investigations proceeded at each site. Preparations were made to perform demolition on two small buildings at the Willow Island site. Fuels strategies were initiated for each site. Test planning commenced for each site. A groundbreaking ceremony was held at the Willow Island site on October 18, with Governor C. Underwood being the featured speaker

  7. Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Fei; Ren, Lijiao; Pu, Yuepu; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to generate electricity from fermented primary sludge. Fermentation (30°C, 9days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1-16.5g/L), volatile suspended solids (24.1-15.3g/L) and pH (5

  8. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  9. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In a computer system, for example, typical discrete events ... This project brought out a series of influential reports on Petri net theory in the mid and late ... Technology became a leading centre for Petri net research and from then on, Petri nets ...

  10. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of SO2 emission regulations and fuel prices on levellized energy costs for industrial steam generation options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdogan, Sibel; Arikol, Mahir

    1992-01-01

    We discuss the impacts of SO 2 emission regulations and fuel prices on levellized energy costs of industrial steam generation options. A computer model called INDUSTEAM has been utilized. The steam-supply options comprise conventional grate-firing, bubbling and circulating fluidized beds, fuel-oil, and natural-gas-fired systems. Fuels of different SO 2 pollution potential have been evaluated assuming six environmental scenarios and varying fuel prices. A capacity range of 10-90 MW th is covered. (author)

  12. Strategic analysis of biomass and waste fuels for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltsee, G.A. Jr.; Easterly, J.; Vence, T.

    1993-12-01

    In this report, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) intends to help utility companies evaluate biomass and wastes for power generation. These fuels may be alternatives or supplements to fossil fuels in three applications: (1) utility boiler coining; (2) dedicated combustion/energy recovery plants; and 3) dedicated gasification/combined cycle plants. The report summarizes data on biomass and waste properties, and evaluates the cost and performance of fuel preparation and power generation technologies. The primary biomass and waste resources evaluated are: (1) wood wastes (from forests, mills, construction/demolition, and orchards) and short rotation woody crops; (2) agricultural wastes (from fields, animals, and processing) and herbaceous energy crops; and (3) consumer or industrial wastes (e.g., municipal solid waste, scrap tires, sewage sludge, auto shredder waste). The major fuel types studied in detail are wood, municipal solid waste, and scrap tires. The key products of the project include the BIOPOWER model of biomass/waste-fired power plant performance and cost. Key conclusions of the evaluation are: (1) significant biomass and waste fuel resources are available; (2) biomass power technology cannot currently compete with natural gas-fired combined cycle technology; (3) coining biomass and waste fuels with coal in utility and industrial boilers is the most efficient, lowest cost, and lowest risk method of energy recovery from residual materials; (4) better biomass and waste fuel production and conversion technology must be developed, with the help of coordinated government energy and environmental policies and incentives; and (5) community partnerships can enhance the chances for success of a project

  13. Electricity Generation from Organic Matters in Biocatalyst-Based Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Booki; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    for optimum power generation in MFC have been investigated at previous studies. A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC), which is a novel configuration, was developed by immersing an anode electrode and a cathode chamber in an anaerobic reactor. Domestic wastewater without any amendments was used......Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a novel technology for converting organic matter directly to electricity via biocatalytic reactions by microorganisms. MFCs can also be used for wastewater treatment by the oxidations of organic pollutants during the electricity generation. Several factors...... as the medium and the inoculum in the experiments. The SMFC could successfully generate a stable voltage of 0.428±0.003V with a fixed 470Ω resistor from acetate. From the polarization test, the maximum power density of 204mWm−2 was obtained at current density of 595mAm−2 (external resistance = 180Ω). The power...

  14. Biotreatment of Slaughterhouse Wastewater Accompanied with Sustainable Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Z. Ismail

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC for simultaneous bioremediation of slaughterhouse wastewater and sustainable power generation. For the first time, an integrated system of tubular type microbial fuel cell (MFC was used in this study. The MFC consisted of three concentric Plexiglas tubes; the inner tube was the anaerobic anodic compartment, the mid tube was the aerobic biocathodic chamber, and the outer tube act as an aerobic bioreactor for extended nitrification process. The MFC system was connected to a complementary external anaerobic bioreactor for denitrification process. The microbial fuel cell was inoculated with freshly collected activated sludge and was continuously fueled with simulated slaughterhouse wastewater. Results revealed that the removal efficiency of the chemical oxygen demand (COD was up to 99%, and the power generation was 165 mW/m2. Also, results demonstrated that maximum removal of NO3- via the denitrification process in the final effluent was 94.7% when the initial concentration of NO3- in the effluent of the extended bioreactor was 15.2 mg/L. Approximately; complete recovery of nitrogen gas was obtained in the complementary external anaerobic bioreactor. These results indicated that MFC could be a promising approach for slaughterhouse wastewater bioremediation and renewable power generation.

  15. Examination of the Properties of a Spent Fuel based Electricity Generation System - Scintillator Performance Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Gammavoltaic was proposed by Karl Scharf in 1960. The low efficiency resulted in gammavoltaic being used as a radiation detector. In the 1990s the efficiency of gammavoltaic increased by the use of a scintillator. Gammavoltaic was further studied as a power source for spent fuel transportation and a nuclear battery in the 2000s Haneol Lee and Man-Sung Yim also suggested electricity generation system based on spent fuel stored inside the fuel pool of a nuclear power plant. This study proposed the systematic design of an electricity conversion system using CsI(Tl) scintillator and a-Si photovoltaic cell. As such, this study is selected to be a reference paper. The results of this paper indicate a self-absorption effect from the reference model. This effect is negligible while the irradiation degradation has to be considered. Two main ways to reduce radiation induced degradation are scintillator shielding and replacing scintillator material with a material having higher radiation resistance. The analysis of the scintillator used in the 'electricity generation system using gamma radiation from spent fuel' was performed to evaluate the ideal electricity generation in the reference research.

  16. Hydrogen generator, via catalytic partial oxidation of methane for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recupero, Vincenzo; Pino, Lidia; Di Leonardo, Raffaele; Lagana', Massimo; Maggio, Gaetano

    It is well known that the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas. A valid alternative could be a process based on partial oxidation of methane, since the process is mildly exothermic and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed. This paper covers the activities, performed by the CNR Institute of Transformation and Storage of Energy (CNR-TAE), on theoretical and experimental studies for a compact hydrogen generator, via catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane, integrated with second generation fuel cells (EC-JOU2 contract). In particular, the project focuses the attention on methane partial oxidation via heterogeneous selective catalysts, in order to: demonstrate the basic catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane (CSPOM) technology in a subscale prototype, equivalent to a nominal output of 5 kWe; develop the CSPOM technology for its application in electric energy production by means of fuel cells; assess, by a balance of plant analysis, and a techno-economic evaluation, the potential benefits of the CSPOM for different categories of fuel cells.

  17. Examination of the Properties of a Spent Fuel based Electricity Generation System - Scintillator Performance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Gammavoltaic was proposed by Karl Scharf in 1960. The low efficiency resulted in gammavoltaic being used as a radiation detector. In the 1990s the efficiency of gammavoltaic increased by the use of a scintillator. Gammavoltaic was further studied as a power source for spent fuel transportation and a nuclear battery in the 2000s Haneol Lee and Man-Sung Yim also suggested electricity generation system based on spent fuel stored inside the fuel pool of a nuclear power plant. This study proposed the systematic design of an electricity conversion system using CsI(Tl) scintillator and a-Si photovoltaic cell. As such, this study is selected to be a reference paper. The results of this paper indicate a self-absorption effect from the reference model. This effect is negligible while the irradiation degradation has to be considered. Two main ways to reduce radiation induced degradation are scintillator shielding and replacing scintillator material with a material having higher radiation resistance. The analysis of the scintillator used in the 'electricity generation system using gamma radiation from spent fuel' was performed to evaluate the ideal electricity generation in the reference research

  18. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  19. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  20. U. S. Fuel Cycle Technologies R and D Program for Next Generation Nuclear Materials Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M. C.; Vega, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies R and D program under the Office of Nuclear Energy is working to advance technologies to enhance both the existing and future fuel cycles. One thrust area is in developing enabling technologies for next generation nuclear materials management under the Materials Protection, Accounting and Control Technologies (MPACT) Campaign where advanced instrumentation, analysis and assessment methods, and security approaches are being developed under a framework of Safeguards and Security by Design. An overview of the MPACT campaign's activities and recent accomplishments is presented along with future plans

  1. Operational experience for the latest generation of ATRIUM trademark 10 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoss, Volker; Hoffmann, Petra Britt; Schaefer, Jens

    2011-01-01

    AREVA NP's ATRIUM trademark 10 product family was first introduced to the BWR market in 1992. Lead test campaigns confirmed the outstanding product performance and justified introduction of reload quantities. Further development of particular product features was demonstrated and implemented in the fuel design to meet highest expectations for reliability and fuel economics. The latest generation called ATRIUM trademark 10XP and subsequently ATRIUM trademark 10XM was introduced in 2002 and 2005, respectively. The first lead test assemblies completed their operation successfully after seven cycles. (orig.)

  2. U.S. FUEL CYCLE TECHNOLOGIES R&D PROGRAM FOR NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. MILLER

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Technologies R&D program under the Office of Nuclear Energy is working to advance technologies to enhance both the existing and future fuel cycles. One thrust area is in developing enabling technologies for next generation nuclear materials management under the Materials Protection, Accounting and Control Technologies (MPACT Campaign where advanced instrumentation, analysis and assessment methods, and security approaches are being developed under a framework of Safeguards and Security by Design. An overview of the MPACT campaign's activities and recent accomplishments is presented along with future plans.

  3. Fair division of generation profile and fuel consumption in isolated micro-grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosek, Anna Magdalena; Heussen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    leads to more stressed loading conditions of diesel generators. We propose a control strategy employing fair division of generator allocation using a compensation procedure based on social choice methods. A co-simulation set up with separate power system and control strategy simulators is used...... to provide a proof-of-concept case study of an isolated micro-grid with two wind turbines and three diesel generators. In comparison with a simple master- slave allocation, the proposed coordination scheme improves the distribution of fuel allocation by 27,5%, reduces under-load time by 43,5% and decreases...

  4. Simulation-based Investigation of Electric Power Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Mansung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma radiation energy from spent nuclear fuels to produce electricity as emergency power source. The proposed electric power system includes electricity generation and storage. Electricity generation was based on conversion of gamma energy to light energy using a scintillator and then to electric energy using a solar cell. Generated electricity was to be stored in a battery as a power source. The efficiency of energy conversion and the extent of the resulting electric power source capability were examined by computer model-based simulation. Main factors which affect to total electric power generated include thermal power of nuclear power plant, average burn-up period for fuel rod, battery charging time, and scintillator thickness. The estimated total power generation and its possible application is discussed. Although the output power increases as scintillator becomes thicker, thick scintillator can be problem because of its high price. There are two ways to solve this problem. The first one is to use thin scintillator to whole fuel assembly area. The second one is to use thick scintillator to limited region. But the current per fuel assembly for the first case for 4000MWth, 72 month burnup is about several to tens of microampere scale, which is too small to charge. Because of this the system is supposed to have thick scintillator system with limited region. Based on the results, the generated electricity is expected to be insufficient to operate the safety injection pumps even at the maximum power output. This may be important for security purposes. Based on the current design, the solar cell efficiency is estimated to be around 1.5-4%. As the efficiency is a strong function of scintillation wavelength, improving the efficiency may be possible by broadening the wavelength through the use of multiple scintillators. Future work will also include validation of the results through experiments, and material reliability

  5. Simulation-based Investigation of Electric Power Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Mansung

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma radiation energy from spent nuclear fuels to produce electricity as emergency power source. The proposed electric power system includes electricity generation and storage. Electricity generation was based on conversion of gamma energy to light energy using a scintillator and then to electric energy using a solar cell. Generated electricity was to be stored in a battery as a power source. The efficiency of energy conversion and the extent of the resulting electric power source capability were examined by computer model-based simulation. Main factors which affect to total electric power generated include thermal power of nuclear power plant, average burn-up period for fuel rod, battery charging time, and scintillator thickness. The estimated total power generation and its possible application is discussed. Although the output power increases as scintillator becomes thicker, thick scintillator can be problem because of its high price. There are two ways to solve this problem. The first one is to use thin scintillator to whole fuel assembly area. The second one is to use thick scintillator to limited region. But the current per fuel assembly for the first case for 4000MWth, 72 month burnup is about several to tens of microampere scale, which is too small to charge. Because of this the system is supposed to have thick scintillator system with limited region. Based on the results, the generated electricity is expected to be insufficient to operate the safety injection pumps even at the maximum power output. This may be important for security purposes. Based on the current design, the solar cell efficiency is estimated to be around 1.5-4%. As the efficiency is a strong function of scintillation wavelength, improving the efficiency may be possible by broadening the wavelength through the use of multiple scintillators. Future work will also include validation of the results through experiments, and material reliability

  6. A study on the generation of radioactive corrosion product at PWR for extended fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Chul Song; Kun Jai Lee

    2001-01-01

    Current nuclear power plant operating practice is to extend the time between refueling from a 12 month operating cycle to an 18-24 month period. This current to longer fuel cycles has complicated the dilemma of finding optimum pH range for the primary coolant chemistry. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in ICRP publication No. 60 recommends optimization of operator radiation exposure (ORE) in nuclear power plants. CRUD formed in the plants is the major source of ORE and its transport mechanism is not understood. To analyze the generation of CRUD at the extended fuel cycle, the COTRAN code, which was developed at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), was used. It predicts that the activity of CRUD decreases as the pH of the coolant increases. For the same period of different fuel cycles, as the operating fuel cycle duration is increased, the generation of the CRUD increases. In this paper, enriched boric acid (40% enriched 10 B concentration) for reactivity control is adopted as the required chemical shim rather than natural boric acid. The effect of the enriched boric acid (EBA) is that the neutron absorption capability of the chemical shim is maintained while decreasing the required boron and lithium concentration in the reactor coolant system. By employing enriched boric acid, the amounts of CRUD generated are reduced, because the high pH-operating period is extended. From the waste generation point of view, more filters or ion exchangers to remove CRUD are required and the amounts of waste are increased at the extended fuel cycle. (author)

  7. Performance of Microbial Fuel Cell for Wastewater Treatment and Electricity Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Yavari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy will have an important role as a resource of energy in the future. Microbial fuel cell (MFC is a promising method to obtain electricity from organic matter andwastewater treatment simultaneously. In a pilot study, use of microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment and electricity generation investigated. The bacteria of ruminant used as inoculums. Synthetic wastewater used at different organic loading rate. Hydraulic retention time was aneffective factor in removal of soluble COD and more than 49% removed. Optimized HRT to achieve the maximum removal efficiency and sustainable operation could be regarded 1.5 and 2.5 hours. Columbic efficiency (CE affected by organic loading rate (OLR and by increasing OLR, CE reduced from 71% to 8%. Maximum voltage was 700mV. Since the microbial fuel cell reactor considered as an anaerobic process, it may be an appropriate alternative for wastewater treatment

  8. Removal of actinides from high-level wastes generated in the reprocessing of commercial fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; Leuze, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    Progress is reported on a technical feasibility study of removing the very long-lived actinides (uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) from high-level wastes generated in the commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. The study was directed primarily at wastes from the reprocessing of light water reactor (LWR) fuels and specifically to developing satisfactory methods for reducing the actinide content of these wastes to values that would make 1000-year-decayed waste comparable in radiological toxicity to natural uranium ore deposits. Although studies are not complete, results thus far indicate the most promising concept for actinide removal includes both improved recovery of actinides in conventional fuel reprocessing and secondary processing of the high-level wastes. Secondary processing will be necessary for the removal of americium and curium and perhaps some residual plutonium. Laboratory-scale studies of separations methods that appear most promising are reported and conceptual flowsheets are discussed. (U.S.)

  9. Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units in operation on fossil fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girshfel' d, V Ya; Khanaev, V A; Volkova, E D; Gorelov, V A; Gershenkroi, M L

    1979-01-01

    Increasing the flexibility of base-load generating units operating on fossil fuel by modifying them is a necessary measure. The highest economic effect is attained with modification of gas- and oil-fired generating units in the Western United Power Systems of the European part of the SPSS. On the basis of available experience, 150- and 200-MW units can be extensively used to regulate the power in the European part of the SPSS through putting them into reserve for the hours of the load dip at night. The change under favorable conditions of 150- and 200-MW units operating on coal to a district-heating operating mode does not reduce the possibilities for flexible operation of these units because it is possible greatly to unload the turbines while the minimum load level of the pulverized fuel fired boiler is retained through transferring a part of the heat load to the desuperheater. It is necessary to accumulate and analyze experience with operation of generating units (especially of supercritical units) with regular shutdowns and starts of groups of units and to solve the problems of modification of generating units, with differentiation with respect to types of fuel and to the united power supply system.

  10. Fossil-fuel dependence and vulnerability of electricity generation: Case of selected European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharyya, Subhes C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses the diversity of fuel mix for electricity generation in selected European countries and investigates how the fuel bill has changed as a share of GDP between 1995 and 2005. The drivers of fuel-dependence-related vulnerability are determined using Laspeyres index decomposition. A 'what-if' analysis is carried out to analyse the changes in the vulnerability index due to changes in the drivers and a scenario analysis is finally used to investigate the future vulnerability in the medium term. The paper finds that the British and the Dutch electricity systems are less diversified compared to three other countries analysed. The gas dependence of the Dutch and Italian systems made them vulnerable but the vulnerability increased in all countries in recent years. Gas price and the level of dependence on gas for power generation mainly influenced the gas vulnerability. The United Kingdom saw a substantial decline in its coal vulnerability due to a fall in coal price and coal dependence in electricity generation. The scenario analysis indicates that UK is likely to face greater gas vulnerability in the future due to increased gas dependence in electricity generation and higher import dependence.

  11. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges and Irradiated Metallic Uranium Fuel Particles Series III Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Elmore, Monte R.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2003-01-01

    The path forward for managing of Hanford K Basin sludge calls for it to be packaged, shipped, and stored at T Plant until final processing at a future date. An important consideration for the design and cost of retrieval, transportation, and storage systems is the potential for heat and gas generation through oxidation reactions between uranium metal and water. This report, the third in a series (Series III), describes work performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to assess corrosion and gas generation from irradiated metallic uranium particles (fuel particles) with and without K Basin sludge addition. The testing described in this report consisted of 12 tests. In 10 of the tests, 4.3 to 26.4 g of fuel particles of selected size distribution were placed into 60- or 800-ml reaction vessels with 0 to 100 g settled sludge. In another test, a single 3.72-g fuel fragment (i.e., 7150-mm particle) was placed in a 60 ml reaction vessel with no added sludge. The twelfth test contained only sludge. The fuel particles were prepared by crushing archived coupons (samples) from an irradiated metallic uranium fuel element. After loading the sludge materials (whether fuel particles, mixtures of fuel particles and sludge, or sludge-only) into reaction vessels, the solids were covered with an excess of K Basin water, the vessels closed and connected to a gas measurement manifold, and the vessels back-flushed with inert neon cover gas. The vessels were then heated to a constant temperature. The gas pressures and temperatures were monitored continuously from the times the vessels were purged. Gas samples were collected at various times during the tests, and the samples analyzed by mass spectrometry. Data on the reaction rates of uranium metal fuel particles with water as a function of temperature and particle size were generated. The data were compared with published studies on metallic uranium corrosion kinetics. The effects of an intimate overlying sludge layer

  12. Committing to coal and gas: Long-term contracts, regulation, and fuel switching in power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Michael

    Fuel switching in the electricity sector has important economic and environmental consequences. In the United States, the increased supply of gas during the last decade has led to substantial switching in the short term. Fuel switching is constrained, however, by the existing infrastructure. The power generation infrastructure, in turn, represents commitments to specific sources of energy over the long term. This dissertation explores fuel contracts as the link between short-term price response and long-term plant investments. Contracting choices enable power plant investments that are relationship-specific, often regulated, and face uncertainty. Many power plants are subject to both hold-up in investment and cost-of-service regulation. I find that capital bias is robust when considering either irreversibility or hold-up due to the uncertain arrival of an outside option. For sunk capital, the rental rate is inappropriate for determining capital bias. Instead, capital bias depends on the regulated rate of return, discount rate, and depreciation schedule. If policies such as emissions regulations increase fuel-switching flexibility, this can lead to capital bias. Cost-of-service regulation can shorten the duration of a long-term contract. From the firm's perspective, the existing literature provides limited guidance when bargaining and writing contracts for fuel procurement. I develop a stochastic programming framework to optimize long-term contracting decisions under both endogenous and exogenous sources of hold-up risk. These typically include policy changes, price shocks, availability of fuel, and volatility in derived demand. For price risks, the optimal contract duration is the moment when the expected benefits of the contract are just outweighed by the expected opportunity costs of remaining in the contract. I prove that imposing early renegotiation costs decreases contract duration. Finally, I provide an empirical approach to show how coal contracts can limit

  13. The influence of the size of the CHP (combined heat and power) system integrated with a biomass fueled gas generator and piston engine on the thermodynamic and economic effectiveness of electricity and heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek-Osikowska, Anna; Bartela, Łukasz; Kotowicz, Janusz; Sobolewski, Aleksander; Iluk, Tomasz; Remiorz, Leszek

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the possibility and the cost of using gas from biomass gasification in the production of electricity and generation of heat using a piston engine in which the power in the supplied biomass is no more than 50 MW. A mathematical model that allows for thermodynamic and economic analysis was designed. The input data regarding the gas generator and the process gas were collected in real experiments on the research installation. Electricity and heat production efficiencies and the electric and heat power of the system were primarily used as indicators of the thermodynamic effectiveness. For the economic analysis, discount methods were adopted that consider the legal and economic environment of such investments. Given the assumptions, the analysis shows that positive economic indicators can characterize the considered systems. The work also included sensitivity analysis of change of the selected characteristic quantities on the evaluation indices. The economic viability of such systems is strongly influenced by many factors, mainly price of fuel and green certificates. When the price of fuel is higher than 9.62 €/GJ or the price of certificates lower than 26.75 €/MWh the NPV (net present value) and NPVR (net present value ratio) indices do not reach positive values for any size of installation. - Highlights: • CHP systems integrated with biomass gasification and piston engine(s) were examined. • An experiment with a biomass-fed gasifier was conducted and the data were used for calculations. • The conditions for economic profitability were determined. • Sensitivity analyses of the influence of the selected quantities were performed. • Price of green certificates and price of fuel are the most important for economic viability

  14. The new generation of exhaust aftertreatment systems for lean fuel gasoline engines; Die neue Generation von Abgasnachbehandlungssystemen fuer magerlaufende Benzinmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckhoff, Stephan; Hoyer, Ruediger; Adam, Frank; Lammarck, Christian; Mueller, Wilfried [Umicore AG und Co. KG, Hanau-Wolfgang (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Stratified gasoline direct injection engines show a great potential for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions and therefore improved fuel economy. The next generation of stratified gasoline engines with turbo charger and more efficient combustion are expected to have even lower exhaust temperatures compared with current series vehicle with stratified combustion. For this reason exhaust gas aftertreatment systems are required which have low light off temperatures for HC and CO during lean combustion and a high NOx-storage efficiency at low temperatures. This study shows the great improvements made over the last years for the development of new TWC and NOx-storage catalysts for the aftertreatment for lean GDI. A precious metal related cost reduction of about 40% was achieved for the new generation of aftertreatment systems. (orig.)

  15. Experimental Analysis of a Small Generator set Operating on Dual Fuel Diesel-Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Alex Vailatti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to analyze the operation of a generator set on single fuel mode with diesel oil, and on dual fuel mode using diesel–ethanol blends. The engine used to realize the experimental analysis was a diesel cycle model, single cylinder, direct injection, air refrigerated and coupled to a three-phase electric generator, whose set capacity was 8.0 kVA. The generated electric energy was dissipated in electrical resistances inside a reservoir with running water. Fuels were blended in different volumetric ratios, using a small portion of vegetable castor oil to promote the homogenization. The percentages of substitutions of diesel oil were by 10% to 50%, increasing by 10% the replacement for each sample. Also, the engine was operated with 100% substitution of diesel oil, i.e., for this condition, the samples were composed of ethanol/castor oil 90/10 (volume/volume, 80/20 and 75/25. The blends of diesel and ethanol did not obtain good performance, mainly in taxes of substitution above 40%, causing combustion failures, operational instability, and increase of fuel consumption, although it has achieved a greatly reduction on opacity percentages. The blends with 100% of substitution of diesel oil obtained good performance except to blend with 90% ethanol, where occurred combustion failures, which caused operational instability. To these conditions, the results achieved are increase of consumption by 17%, decrease of opacity by 79%, decrease of exhaust gas temperature by 3.5% and increase of engine thermal efficiency by 1.3%. At the ethanol – castor oil blends there was a decrease in the percentage of opacity by 96%, decrease of exhaust gas temperature by 17.6%, with a minimum of operational irregularities, although fuel consumption has increased by 52.4% and the engine thermal efficiency has decreased almost 1.7%.

  16. A dynamic, dependent type system for nuclear fuel cycle code generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scopatz, A. [The University of Chicago 5754 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle may be interpreted as a network or graph, thus allowing methods from formal graph theory to be used. Nodes are often idealized as nuclear fuel cycle facilities (reactors, enrichment cascades, deep geologic repositories). With the advent of modern object-oriented programming languages - and fuel cycle simulators implemented in these languages - it is natural to define a class hierarchy of facility types. Bright is a quasi-static simulator, meaning that the number of material passes through a facility is tracked rather than natural time. Bright is implemented as a C++ library that models many canonical components such as reactors, storage facilities, and more. Cyclus is a discrete time simulator, meaning that natural time is tracked through out the simulation. Therefore a robust, dependent type system was developed to enable inter-operability between Bright and Cyclus. This system is capable of representing any fuel cycle facility. Types declared in this system can then be used to automatically generate code which binds a facility implementation to a simulator front end. Facility model wrappers may be used either internally to a fuel cycle simulator or as a mechanism for inter-operating multiple simulators. While such a tool has many potential use cases it has two main purposes: enabling easy performance of code-to-code comparisons and the verification and the validation of user input.

  17. Generation of heat on fuel rod in cosine pattern by using induction heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keettikkal, Felix; Sajeesh, Divya; Rao, Poornima; Hande, Shashank; Dakave, Ganesh; Kute, Tushar; Mahajan, Akshay; Kulkarni, R.D.

    2017-01-01

    Fuel rods are used in a nuclear reactor for fission process. When these rods are cooled by water during the heat transfer, the temperature stress causes undesirable defects in the fuel rod. Studying these defects occurring in the fuel rod in the nuclear cluster during nuclear reaction is a difficult task because fission reaction makes it difficult to analyse the changes in the rod. Hence there is a need to use a replica of the rod with similar thermal stress to study and analyse the rod for the defects. Normally the heat generated on the fuel rod follows a cosine pattern which is an inherent characteristic inside a nuclear reactor. In view of this, in this paper induction heating method is used on a rod to create an exact replica of the cosine pattern of heat by varying the pitch of the coil. First, a MATLAB simulation is done using simulink. Then a prototype of the model has been developed comprising of carbon steel pipe, with length and outside diameter of 1 meter and 48.2 mm, respectively. Instead of using water as coolant, rod is simulated in air. Therefore, the heat generated is lost by normal convection and radiation. Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development or in some kind of experiment using nuclear reactor. Induction heating becomes an alternative to classical heating technologies because of its advantages such as efficiency, quickness, safety, clean heating and accurate power control. (author)

  18. Microbial Fuel Cells using Mixed Cultures of Wastewater for Electricity Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zain, S.M; Roslani, N.S.; Hashim, R.; Anuar, N.; Suja, F.; Basi, N.E.A.; Anuar, N.; Daud, W.R.W.

    2011-01-01

    Fossil fuels (petroleum, natural gas and coal) are the main resources for generating electricity. However, they have been major contributors to environmental problems. One potential alternative to explore is the use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which generate electricity using microorganisms. MFCs uses catalytic reactions activated by microorganisms to convert energy preserved in the chemical bonds between organic molecules into electrical energy. MFC has the ability to generate electricity during the wastewater treatment process while simultaneously treating the pollutants. This study investigated the potential of using different types of mixed cultures (raw sewage, mixed liquor from the aeration tank and return waste activated sludge) from an activated sludge treatment plant in MFCs for electricity generation and pollutant removals (COD and total kjeldahl nitrogen, TKN). The MFC in this study was designed as a dual-chambered system, in which the chambers were separated by a Nafion TM membrane using a mixed culture of wastewater as a bio catalyst. The maximum power density generated using activated sludge was 9.053 mW/ cm 2 , with 26.8 % COD removal and 40 % TKN removal. It is demonstrated that MFC offers great potential to optimize power generation using mixed cultures of wastewater. (author)

  19. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catal, Tunc [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong [Department of Biological and Ecological Engineering, Oregon State University, 116 Gilmore Hall, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Li, Kaichang [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 102 97331, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bermek, Hakan [Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Istanbul Technical University, 34469-Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains. (author)

  20. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  1. Effects of water-emulsified fuel on a diesel engine generator's thermal efficiency and exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syu, Jin-Yuan; Chang, Yuan-Yi; Tseng, Chao-Heng; Yan, Yeou-Lih; Chang, Yu-Min; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lin, Wen-Yinn

    2014-08-01

    Water-emulsified diesel has proven itself as a technically sufficient improvement fuel to improve diesel engine fuel combustion emissions and engine performance. However, it has seldom been used in light-duty diesel engines. Therefore, this paper focuses on an investigation into the thermal efficiency and pollution emission analysis of a light-duty diesel engine generator fueled with different water content emulsified diesel fuels (WD, including WD-0, WD-5, WD-10, and WD-15). In this study, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide were analyzed by a vehicle emission gas analyzer and the particle size and number concentration were measured by an electrical low-pressure impactor. In addition, engine loading and fuel consumption were also measured to calculate the thermal efficiency. Measurement results suggested that water-emulsified diesel was useful to improve the thermal efficiency and the exhaust emission of a diesel engine. Obviously, the thermal efficiency was increased about 1.2 to 19.9%. In addition, water-emulsified diesel leads to a significant reduction of nitric oxide emission (less by about 18.3 to 45.4%). However the particle number concentration emission might be increased if the loading of the generator becomes lower than or equal to 1800 W. In addition, exhaust particle size distributions were shifted toward larger particles at high loading. The consequence of this research proposed that the water-emulsified diesel was useful to improve the engine performance and some of exhaust emissions, especially the NO emission reduction. Implications: The accumulated test results provide a good basis to resolve the corresponding pollutants emitted from a light-duty diesel engine generator. By measuring and analyzing transforms of exhaust pollutant from this engine generator, the effects of water-emulsified diesel fuel and loading on emission characteristics might be more clear. Understanding reduction of pollutant emissions during the use

  2. Present technologies and the next future in Mexico for the power generation starting from fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez S, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    A brief analysis is done of the expected evolution of the world energy and electrical energy demand and a projection of the Mexican electrical demand is presented. Typical data for electric power generation technologies that currently in use or under development are presented and a discussion is made of the factors that influence technology selection, particularly for fossil fuel technologies. Taking into account the current expansion plans of the Mexican electrical sector, and proposing some reasonable hypotheses about the behavior of the factors that were identified, the evolution of the electrical demand in Mexico up to the year 2020 is presented, showing the installed capacity expected for each fuel and for each technology. At the end the needs for research and development in the area of power generation, emphasizing the Mexican R and D Programs, are discussed. (Author)

  3. Acquisition of wood fuel at the Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropelin, W. [Burlington Electric Dept., VT (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Joseph C. McNeil Generating Station is the world`s largest single boiler, municipally-owned, wood-fired electrical generating plant. The 50 megawatt McNeil Station is located in Burlington, Vermont and is owned by several Vermont public and private electric utilities. The operator and majority owner is the City of Burlington Electric Department (BED). Wood fuel procurement for the McNeil Station has been conducted in an environmentally sensitive way. Harvesting is carried out in conformance with a comprehensive wood chip harvesting policy and monitored by professional foresters. Unpredictable levels of Station operation require rigid adherence to a wood storage plan that minimizes the risk of over heating and spontaneous combustion of stockpiled fuel.

  4. Emerging applications of advanced fuels for energy generation and transmutation. Overview of IAEA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pong Eil Juhn; Arkhipov, V.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power generation is an established part of the world's electricity mix. However, the highly radioactive waste generated during power production is of great concern of public perception of nuclear energy. In order for nuclear power to realize its full potential as a major energy source for the entire world, there must be a safe and effective way to deal with this waste. Therefore, science must come to the rescue in the form of new, more effective technology aimed at reducing the amount of long-lived radioactive waste and eliminating nuclear weapons' grade material through transmutation of these isotopes in fission reactors or accelerators. In the framework of IAEA activities on the use of this new technologies the Agency has periodically review and assess the current status of the new fuel cycles, its applications worldwide, its economic benefits, and its perceived advantages vis-a-vis other nuclear fuel cycles. (author)

  5. Impact of the fuel cost in the electric generation cost by nuclear means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez S, J.R.; Alonso V, G.; Gomez R, M.C.; Palacios H, J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, the uranium cost has been increased in the international market due to a countless of factors like they are: increase of the demand, the turnaround of the nuclear energy in some Asian countries, the decrease of the offer due to problems in the mining for their extraction, etc. These increments impact the costs of electric generation in the concept of fuel, presently work is calculated that order is the prospective impact when the costs of the uranium and the services of the fuel cycle are increased to the speed that one has come increasing, and an increase is postulated beyond the 100 usd/lb U 3 O 8 , being also calculated its impact in the total cost of electric generation by nuclear means. (Author)

  6. Net metering: zero electricity bill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangi, A.; Khan, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide move towards renewable energy sources, environmental concerns and decentralization of the power sector have made net metering an attractive option for power generation at small scale. This paper discusses the net metering, economical issues of renewable sources in Pakistan, technical aspects, installation suitability according to varying terrain, existing utility rules and formulation of legislation for net metering making it economically attractive. (author)

  7. Clostridium beijerinckii mutant obtained atmospheric pressure glow discharge generates enhanced electricity in a microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Guo, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-01-01

    A Clostridium beijerinckii mutant M13 was derived from C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 by atmospheric pressure glow discharge. C. beijerinckii M13 generated a maximum output power density of 79.2 mW m(-2) and a maximum output voltage of 230 mV in a microbial fuel cell containing 1 g glucose l(-1) as carbon source and 0.15 g methyl viologen l(-1) as an electron carrier.

  8. Hydrodynamic response of fuel rod with longitudinal fins to upstream generated vortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naot, D.; Oron, A.; Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1984-01-01

    The hydrodynamic response of turbulent channel flow to upstream generated vortices was numerically simulated for fuel element with longitudinal cooling fins. Turbulence is modelled by an algebraic stress model and an energy-dissipation model. The developing flow is solved using a parabolic pressure correction algorithm. The decay of the initial vortices in non-circular sub-channel in the presence of geometry driven secondary currents is described and the uncertainty in the local turbulent shear stresses is discussed. (orig.)

  9. The HLA-net GENE[RATE] pipeline for effective HLA data analysis and its application to 145 population samples from Europe and neighbouring areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J M; Buhler, S; Roessli, D; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we present for the first time an integrated version of the Gene[rate] computer tools which have been developed during the last 5 years to analyse human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data in human populations, as well as the results of their application to a large dataset of 145 HLA-typed population samples from Europe and its two neighbouring areas, North Africa and West Asia, now forming part of the Gene[va] database. All these computer tools and genetic data are, from now, publicly available through a newly designed bioinformatics platform, HLA-net, here presented as a main achievement of the HLA-NET scientific programme. The Gene[rate] pipeline offers user-friendly computer tools to estimate allele and haplotype frequencies, to test Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium, to recode HLA data, to convert file formats, to display population frequencies of chosen alleles and haplotypes in selected geographic regions, and to perform genetic comparisons among chosen sets of population samples, including new data provided by the user. Both numerical and graphical outputs are generated, the latter being highly explicit and of publication quality. All these analyses can be performed on the pipeline after scrupulous validation of the population sample's characterisation and HLA typing reporting according to HLA-NET recommendations. The Gene[va] database offers direct access to the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1 and -DPB1 frequencies and summary statistics of 145 population samples having successfully passed these HLA-NET 'filters', and representing three European subregions (South-East, North-East and Central-West Europe) and two neighbouring areas (North Africa, as far as Sudan, and West Asia, as far as South India). The analysis of these data, summarized in this review, shows a substantial genetic variation at the regional level in this continental area. These results have main implications for population genetics

  10. Fusion through the NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, B.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the next generation of fusion machines which are intended to demonstrate the technical viability of fusion. In Europe, the device that will follow on from JET is known as NET - the Next European Torus. If the design programme for NET proceeds, Europe could start to build the machine in 1994. The present JET programme hopes to achieve breakeven in the early 1990's. NET hopes to reach ignition in the next century, and so lay the foundation for a demonstration reactor. A description is given of the technical specifications of the components of NET, including: the first wall, the divertors to protect the wall, the array of magnets that provide the fields containing the plasma, the superconducting magnets, and the shield of the machine. NET's research programme is briefly outlined, including the testing programme to optimise conditions in the machine to achieve ignition, and its safety work. (U.K.)

  11. Developing a Family-Size Biogas-Fueled Electricity Generating System

    OpenAIRE

    Haryanto, Agus; Marotin, Fadli; Triyono, Sugeng; Hasanudin, Udin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a family-size biogas-fueled electricity generating system consisting of anaerobic digester, bio-filter scrubber, and power generating engine. Biogas was produced from a pilot scale wet anaerobic digester (5-m3 capacity). The biogas was filtered using bio-scrubber column filled with locally made compost to reduce hydrogen sulfide (H2S) content. Biogas composition was analysed using a gas chromatograph and its H2S level was measured using a H2S detector. ...

  12. Developing A Family-Size Biogas-Fueled Electricity Generating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Haryanto

    2017-06-01

     Keywords: biogas; family size; generator; electricity; bio-filter.  Article History: Received Janury 16th 2017; Received in revised form 2nd June 2017; Accepted 18th June 2017; Available online How to Cite This Article: Haryanto, A., Marotin, F., Triyono, S., Hasanudin, U. (2017, Developing A Family-Size Biogas-Fueled Electricity Generating System. International Journal of Renewable Energy Develeopment, 6(2, 111-118. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.6.2.111-118

  13. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... to controls where HAs were not added, addition of commercial HA resulted in increase of power density and coulombic efficiency, which ranged from 7.5% to 67.4% and 24% to 92.6%, respectively. Digested manure wastewater (DMW) was tested as potential mediator for power generation due to its content of natural...

  14. Domestic use of overseas renewable energy -Potential as power generating fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Tomofumi; Murata, Kenji; Kamiya, Shoji; Ota, Ken-ichiro; Sakata, Ko; Fukuda, Kenzo; Ishimoto, Yuki

    2010-09-15

    For Japan, it will be very important in the future to establish a social system that can consistently import or produce a set amount of resource supplies without green house gas emissions. In this study, we developed a concept for a global hydrogen energy system using wind power generation as a hydrogen source, investigated its economic efficiency, compared it with power generating fuels used at existing thermal power plants, and examined the feasibility of the global hydrogen energy system. As a result, it would be more effective to decommission existing oil-fired thermal power plants and construct new hydrogen turbine plants.

  15. Increased power generation from primary sludge by a submersible microbial fuel cell and optimum operational conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vologni, Valentina; Kakarla, Ramesh; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have received attention as a promising renewable energy technology for waste treatment and energy recovery. We tested a submersible MFC with an innovative design capable of generating a stable voltage of 0.250 ± 0.008 V (with a fixed 470 Ω resistor) directly from prima...... prolonged the current generation and increased the power density by 7 and 1.5 times, respectively, in comparison with raw primary sludge. These findings suggest that energy recovery from primary sludge can be maximized using an advanced MFC system with optimum conditions....

  16. DESIGNING AND OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2004-06-01

    During the period July 1, 2000-March 31, 2004, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) conducted an extensive demonstration of woody biomass cofiring at its Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. This demonstration, cofunded by USDOE and Allegheny, and supported by the Biomass Interest Group (BIG) of EPRI, evaluated the impacts of sawdust cofiring in both cyclone boilers and tangentially-fired pulverized coal boilers. The cofiring in the cyclone boiler--Willow Island Generating Station Unit No.2--evaluated the impacts of sawdust alone, and sawdust blended with tire-derived fuel. The biomass was blended with the coal on its way to the combustion system. The cofiring in the pulverized coal boiler--Albright Generating Station--evaluated the impact of cofiring on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) when the sawdust was injected separately into the furnace. The demonstration of woody biomass cofiring involved design, construction, and testing at each site. The results addressed impacts associated with operational issues--capacity, efficiency, and operability--as well as formation and control of airborne emissions such as NO{sub x}, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}2), opacity, and mercury. The results of this extensive program are detailed in this report.

  17. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  18. Application of a heuristic search method for generation of fuel reload configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.; Nissan, E.

    1988-01-01

    A computerized heuristic search method for the generation and optimization of fuel reload configurations is proposed and investigated. The heuristic knowledge is expressed modularly in the form of ''IF-THEN'' production rules. The method was implemented in a program coded in the Franz LISP programming language and executed under the UNIX operating system. A test problem was formulated, based on a typical light water reactor reload problem with a few simplifications assumed, in order to allow formulation of the reload strategy into a relatively small number of rules. A computer run of the problem was performed with a VAX-780 machine. A set of 312 solutions was generated in -- 20 min of execution time. Testing of a few arbitrarily chosen configurations demonstrated reasonably good performance for the computer-generated solutions. A computerized generator of reload configurations may be used for the fast generation or modification of reload patterns and as a tool for the formulation, tuning, and testing of the heuristic knowledge rules used by an ''expert'' fuel manager

  19. Three Essays on Renewable Energy Policy and its Effects on Fossil Fuel Generation in Electricity Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Eric

    In this dissertation, I investigate the effectiveness of renewable policies and consider their impact on electricity markets. The common thread of this research is to understand how renewable policy incentivizes renewable generation and how the increasing share of generation from renewables affects generation from fossil fuels. This type of research is crucial for understanding whether policies to promote renewables are meeting their stated goals and what the unintended effects might be. To this end, I use econometric methods to examine how electricity markets are responding to an influx of renewable energy. My dissertation is composed of three interrelated essays. In Chapter 1, I employ recent scholarship in spatial econometrics to assess the spatial dependence of Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS), a prominent state-based renewable incentive. In Chapter 2, I explore the impact of the rapid rise in renewable generation on short-run generation from fossil fuels. And in Chapter 3, I assess the impact of renewable penetration on coal plant retirement decisions.

  20. Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) by Bacterium Isolated from Rice Paddy Field Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhirruddin, Fakhriah; Amid, Azura; Salim, Wan Wardatul Amani Wan; Suhaida Azmi, Azlin

    2018-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an alternative approach in generating renewable energy by utilising bacteria that will oxidize organic or inorganic substrates, producing electrons yielded as electrical energy. Different species of exoelectrogenic bacteria capable of generating significant amount of electricity in MFC has been identified, using various organic compounds for fuel. Soil sample taken from rice paddy field is proven to contain exoelectrogenic bacteria, thus electricity generation using mixed culture originally found in the soil, and pure culture isolated from the soil is studied. This research will isolate the exoelectrogenic bacterial species in the rice paddy field soil responsible for energy generation. Growth of bacteria isolated from the MFC is observed by measuring the optical density (OD), cell density weight (CDW) and viable cell count. Mixed bacterial species found in paddy field soil generates maximum power of 77.62 μW and 0.70 mA of current. In addition, the research also shows that the pure bacterium in rice paddy field soil can produce maximum power and current at 51.32 μW and 0.28 mA respectively.

  1. ertCPN: The adaptations of the coloured Petri-Net theory for real-time embedded system modeling and automatic code generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattanapong Kurdthongmee

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available A real-time system is a computer system that monitors or controls an external environment. The system must meet various timing and other constraints that are imposed on it by the real-time behaviour of the external world. One of the differences between a real-time and a conventional software is that a real-time program must be both logically and temporally correct. To successfully design and implement a real-time system, some analysis is typically done to assure that requirements or designs are consistent and that they satisfy certain desirable properties that may not be immediately obvious from specification. Executable specifications, prototypes and simulation are particularly useful in real-time systems for debugging specifications. In this paper, we propose the adaptations to the coloured Petri-net theory to ease the modeling, simulation and code generation process of an embedded, microcontroller-based, real-time system. The benefits of the proposed approach are demonstrated by use of our prototype software tool called ENVisAge (an Extended Coloured Petri-Net Based Visual Application Generator Tool.

  2. Developing the User Experience for a Next Generation Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulator (NGFCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Paul H.; Schneider, Erich; Pascucci, Valerio; Livnat, Yarden; Hiromoto, Robert; Scopatz, Anthony; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram

    2017-01-01

    This project made substantial progress on its original aim for providing a modern user experience for nuclear fuel cycle analysis while also creating a robust and functional next- generation fuel cycle simulator. The Cyclus kernel experienced a dramatic clari cation of its interfaces and data model, becoming a full- edged agent-based framework, with strong support for third party developers of novel archetypes. The most important contribution of this project to the the development of Cyclus was the introduction of tools to facilitate archetype development. These include automated code generation of routine archetype components, metadata annotations to provide re ection and rich description of each data member's purpose, and mechanisms for input validation and output of complex data. A comprehensive social science investigation of decision makers' interests in nuclear fuel cycles, and speci cally their interests in nuclear fuel cycle simulators (NFCSs) as tools for understanding nuclear fuel cycle options, was conducted. This included document review and analysis, stakeholder interviews, and a survey of decision makers. This information was used to study the role of visualization formats and features in communicating information about nuclear fuel cycles. A exible and user-friendly tool was developed for building Cyclus analysis models, featuring a drag-and-drop interface and automatic input form generation for novel archetypes. Cycic allows users to design fuel cycles from arbitrary collections of facilities for the first time, with mechanisms that contribute to consistency within that fuel cycle. Interacting with some of the metadata capabilities introduced in the above-mentioned tools to support archetype development, Cycic also automates the generation of user input forms for novel archetypes with little to no special knowledge required by the archetype developers. Translation of the fundamental metrics of Cyclus into more interesting quantities is

  3. Developing the User Experience for a Next Generation Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulator (NGFCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schneider, Erich [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Livnat, Yarden [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hiromoto, Robert [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Scopatz, Anthony [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Brossard, Dominique [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheufele, Dietram [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-07-30

    This project made substantial progress on its original aim for providing a modern user experience for nuclear fuel cycle analysis while also creating a robust and functional next- generation fuel cycle simulator. The Cyclus kernel experienced a dramatic clari cation of its interfaces and data model, becoming a full- edged agent-based framework, with strong support for third party developers of novel archetypes. The most important contribution of this project to the the development of Cyclus was the introduction of tools to facilitate archetype development. These include automated code generation of routine archetype components, metadata annotations to provide re ection and rich description of each data member's purpose, and mechanisms for input validation and output of complex data. A comprehensive social science investigation of decision makers' interests in nuclear fuel cycles, and speci cally their interests in nuclear fuel cycle simulators (NFCSs) as tools for understanding nuclear fuel cycle options, was conducted. This included document review and analysis, stakeholder interviews, and a survey of decision makers. This information was used to study the role of visualization formats and features in communicating information about nuclear fuel cycles. A exible and user-friendly tool was developed for building Cyclus analysis models, featuring a drag-and-drop interface and automatic input form generation for novel archetypes. Cycic allows users to design fuel cycles from arbitrary collections of facilities for the rst time, with mechanisms that contribute to consistency within that fuel cycle. Interacting with some of the metadata capabilities introduced in the above-mentioned tools to support archetype development, Cycic also automates the generation of user input forms for novel archetypes with little to no special knowledge required by the archetype developers. Translation of the fundamental metrics of Cyclus into more interesting quantities is

  4. Analysis of the efficiency and effectiveness of distributed generation in the power station (fuel) Sancti Spiritus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Álvarez, Alfredo; Pérez Pérez, Osvaldo; Bravo Amarante, Edelvy

    2015-01-01

    The severe crisis in the National Electric System (SEN) suffered by Cuba in the late 90's and early 2000 forced to change the design to keep the generation matrix supported in large plants towards where distributed generation small plants throughout the country, the state assumed demand and residential sector. From tools frequently used to evaluate the quality of processes (Scatter diagram, Pareto diagram, Ishikawa diagram and function quality loss Taguchi) was evaluated from indicators index fuel consumption and availability, efficiency and effectiveness of the generation process identifying areas within the plant that the greatest impact on the deviation of both indicators and the impact generated in the services, the economy and the environment. To develop this evaluation the operating data of the years 2012, 2013 and 2014 of the power plant were taken Sancti Spiritus. (full text)

  5. Method and apparatus for preventing inadvertent criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuley, C.R.; Bauman, D.A.; Neuner, J.A.; Feilchenfeld, M.M.; Greenberg, L.

    1984-01-01

    An inadvertent approach to criticality in a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit is detected and an alarm is generated through on-line monitoring of the neutron flux. The difficulties of accurately measuring the low levels of neutron flux in a subcritical reactor are overcome by the use of a microcomputer which continuously generates average flux count rate signals for incremental time periods from thousands of samples taken during each such period and which serially stores the average flux count rate signals for a preselected time interval. At the end of each incremental time period, the microcomputer compares the latest average flux count rate signal with the oldest, and preferably each of the intervening stored values, and if it exceeds any of them by at least a preselected multiplication factor, an alarm is generated. (author)

  6. In-Pile Testing and Instrumentation for Development of Generation-IV Fuels and Materials. Proceedings of a Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    For many years, the increase in efficiency in the production of nuclear electricity has been an economic challenge in many countries which have developed this kind of energy. The increase in fuel burnup and fuel residence time leads to a reduction in the volume of fresh fuel loaded and spent fuel discharged, respectively. More demanding nuclear fuel cycle parameters are combined with a need to operate nuclear power plants with maximal availability and load factors, in load-follow mode and with longer fuel cycles. In meeting these requirements, fuel has to operate in a demanding environment of high radiation fields, high temperatures, high mechanical stresses and high coolant flow. Requirements of increased fuel reliability and minimal fuel failures also remain in force. Under such circumstances, continuous development of more radiation resistant fuel materials, especially advanced cladding, careful and incremental examinations, and improved understanding and modelling of high burnup fuel behaviour are required. Following a recommendation of the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology, the Technical Meeting on In-pile Testing and Instrumentation for Development of Generation-IV Fuels and Materials was held in Halden, Norway, on 21-24 August 2012. The purpose of the meeting was to review the current status and the progress in methods and technologies used for the in-pile testing of nuclear fuel achieved since the previous IAEA meeting on In-core Instrumentation and Reactor Core Assessment, also held in Halden in 2007. Emphasis was placed on advanced techniques applied for the understanding of high burnup fuel behaviour of water cooled power reactors that represent the vast majority of the current nuclear reactor fleet. However, the meeting also included papers and discussion on testing techniques applied or developed specifically for new fuel and structural materials considered for Generation-IV systems. The meeting was attended by 43

  7. Bioelectricity Generation and Bioremediation of an Azo-Dye in a Microbial Fuel Cell Coupled Activated Sludge Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Danish; Abdulateif, Huda; Ismail, Iqbal M.; Sabir, Suhail; Khan, Mohammad Zain

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous bioelectricity generation and dye degradation was achieved in the present study by using a combined anaerobic-aerobic process. The anaerobic system was a typical single chambered microbial fuel cell (SMFC) which utilizes acid navy blue r (ANB) dye along with glucose as growth substrate to generate electricity. Four different concentrations of ANB (50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm) were tested in the SMFC and the degradation products were further treated in an activated sludge post treatment process. The dye decolorization followed pseudo first order kinetics while the negative values of the thermodynamic parameter ∆G (change in Gibbs free energy) shows that the reaction proceeds with a net decrease in the free energy of the system. The coulombic efficiency (CE) and power density (PD) attained peak values at 10.36% and 2,236 mW/m2 respectively for 200 ppm of ANB. A further increase in ANB concentrations results in lowering of cell potential (and PD) values owing to microbial inhibition at higher concentrations of toxic substrates. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed a perfect redox reaction was taking place in the SMFC. The pH, temperature and conductivity remain 7.5–8.0, 27(±2°C and 10.6–18.2 mS/cm throughout the operation. The biodegradation pathway was studied by the gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy technique, suggested the preferential cleavage of the azo bond as the initial step resulting in to aromatic amines. Thus, a combined anaerobic-aerobic process using SMFC coupled with activated sludge process can be a viable option for effective degradation of complex dye substrates along with energy (bioelectricity) recovery. PMID:26496083

  8. Recovery Act: Demonstration of a SOFC Generator Fueled by Propane to Provide Electrical Power to Real World Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessette, Norman [Acumentrics Corporation, Westwood, MA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this project provided with funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was to demonstrate a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) generator capable of operation on propane fuel to improve efficiency and reduce emissions over commercially available portable generators. The key objectives can be summarized as: Development of two portable electrical generators in the 1-3kW range utilizing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and propane fuel; The development and demonstration of a proof-of-concept electro-mechanical propane fuel interface that provides a user friendly capability for managing propane fuel; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators to power media production equipment over the course of several months at multiple NASCAR automobile racing events; The deployment and use of the fuel cell portable generators at scheduled events by first responders (police, fire) of the City of Folsom California; and Capturing data with regard to the systems’ ability to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Targets and evaluating the ease of use and potential barriers to further adoption of the systems.

  9. Fast flux fluid fuel reactor: A concept for the next generation of nuclear power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmiotti, G.; Feldman, E.E.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy has not become the preferred method of electrical energy production largely because of economic, safety, and proliferation concerns and challenges posed by nuclear waste disposal. Economies is the most important factor. To reduce the capital costs, the authors propose a compact configuration with a very high power density and correspondingly reduced reactor component sizes. Enhanced efficiency made possible by higher operating temperatures will also improve the economics of the design, and design simplicity will keep capital, operational, and maintenance costs down. The most direct solution to the nuclear waste problem is to eliminate waste production or, at least, minimize its amount and long-term radiotoxicity. This can be achieved by very high burnups, ideally 100%, and by the eventual transmutation of the long-lived fission products in situ. Very high burnups also improve the economics by optimal exploitation of the fuel. Safety concerns can be addressed by an inherently safe reactor design. Because of the intrinsic nature of nuclear materials, there probably is no definitive answer to proliferation concerns for systems that generate neutrons; however, it is important to minimize proliferation risks. The thorium cycle is a promising option because (a) plutonium is produced only in very small quantities, (b) the presence of 232 U makes handling the fuel very difficult and therefore proliferation resistant, and (c) 233 U is a fissile isotope that is less suitable than 239 Pu for making weapons and can be diluted with other uranium isotopes. An additional benefit of the thorium cycle is that it increases nuclear fuel resources by one order of magnitude. A fast flux fluid fuel reactor is a concept that can satisfy all the foregoing requirements. The fluid fuel systems have a very simple structure. Because integrity of the fuel is not an issue, these systems can operate at very high temperatures, can have high power densities, and can achieve very

  10. Assessment of a novel solid oxide fuel cell tri-generation system for building applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmer, Theo; Worall, Mark; Wu, Shenyi; Riffat, Saffa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Experimental assessment of a first-of-its-kind tri-generation system. • High tri-generation efficiencies of 68–71%. • Inclusion of liquid desiccant provides efficiency increase of 9–15%. • System only economically viable with a government’s financial support. - Abstract: The paper provides a performance analysis assessment of a novel solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) liquid desiccant tri-generation system for building applications. The work presented serves to build upon the current literature related to experimental evaluations of SOFC tri-generation systems, particularly in domestic built environment applications. The proposed SOFC liquid desiccant tri-generation system will be the first-of-its-kind. No research activity is reported on the integration of SOFC, or any fuel cell, with liquid desiccant air conditioning in a tri-generation system configuration. The novel tri-generation system is suited to applications that require simultaneous electrical power, heating and dehumidification/cooling. There are several specific benefits to the integration of SOFC and liquid desiccant air conditioning technology, including; very high operational electrical efficiencies even at low system capacities and the ability to utilise low-grade thermal energy in a (useful) cooling process. Furthermore, the novel tri-generation system has the potential to increase thermal energy utilisation and thus the access to the benefits achievable from on-site electrical generation, primarily; reduced emissions and operating costs. Using empirical SOFC and liquid desiccant component data, an energetic, economic and environmental performance analysis assessment of the novel system is presented. Significant conclusions from the work include: (1) SOFC and liquid desiccant are a viable technological pairing in the development of an efficient and effective tri-generation system. High tri-generation efficiencies in the range of 68–71% are attainable. (2) The inclusion of

  11. Getting to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

  12. Moisture content of PuO2 fuel used for the milliwatt generator heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotelli, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The determination of the moisture content of 238 Pu dioxide fuel for use in Milliwatt Generator heat sources was studied in an attempt to more clearly define the production fuel preloading procedures. The study indicated that water was not present or being adsorbed at various steps of the process (or during storage) that could lead to compatibility problems during pretreatment or long-term storage. The moisture content of the plutonium dioxide was analyzed by a commercial moisture analyzer. The moisture content at all steps of the process including storage averaged from 0.002% to 0.005%. The moisture content of the plutonium dioxide exposed to moist atmosphere for 7 days was 0.001%. These values indicated that no significant amount of moisture was adsorbed by the plutonium dioxide fuel charges. The only significant moisture content found was an average of 3.47%, after self-calcination. This was expected since no additional steps, other than self-heating of the fuel, are taken to remove the water

  13. Engine-integrated solid oxide fuel cells for efficient electrical power generation on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2015-06-01

    This work investigates the use of engine-integrated catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) reactors and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce fuel burn in vehicles with large electrical loads like sensor-laden unmanned air vehicles. Thermodynamic models of SOFCs, CPOx reactors, and three gas turbine (GT) engine types (turbojet, combined exhaust turbofan, separate exhaust turbofan) are developed and checked against relevant data and source material. Fuel efficiency is increased by 4% and 8% in the 50 kW and 90 kW separate exhaust turbofan systems respectively at only modest cost in specific power (8% and 13% reductions respectively). Similar results are achieved in other engine types. An additional benefit of hybridization is the ability to provide more electric power (factors of 3 or more in some cases) than generator-based systems before encountering turbine inlet temperature limits. A sensitivity analysis shows that the most important parameters affecting the system's performance are operating voltage, percent fuel oxidation, and SOFC assembly air flows. Taken together, this study shows that it is possible to create a GT-SOFC hybrid where the GT mitigates balance of plant losses and the SOFC raises overall system efficiency. The result is a synergistic system with better overall performance than stand-alone components.

  14. Transition period fuel cycle from current to next generation reactors for Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junichi; Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Hoshino, Kuniyoshi; Kawamura, Fumio; Shiina, Kouji; Sasahira, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Long-term energy security and global warming prevention can be achieved by a sustainable electricity supply with next generation fast breeder reactors (FBRs). Current light water reactors (LWRs) will be replaced by FBRs and FBR cycle will be established in the future considering the limited amount of uranium (U) resource. The introduction of FBRs requires plutonium (Pu) recovered from LWR spent fuel. The authors propose advanced system named Flexible Fuel Cycle Initiative (FFCI)' which can supply enough Pu and hold no surplus Pu, can respond flexibly the future technical and social uncertainties, and can achieve an economical FBR cycle. FFCI can simplify the 2nd LWR reprocessing facility for Japan (after Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant) which only carries out U removal from LWR spent fuel. Residual 'Recycle Material' is, according to FBRs introduction status, immediately treated in the FBR reprocessing to fabricate FBR fuel or temporarily stored for the utilization in FBRs at necessary timing. FFCI has high flexibility by having several options for future uncertainties by the introduction of Recycle Material as a buffer material between LWR and FBR cycles. (author)

  15. Molten carbonate fuel cell power generation system. Yoyu tansan prime en gata nenryo denchi hatsuden sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uematsu, K; Hatori, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1991-11-01

    In an indirect internal reforming type molten carbonate fuel cell, the reforming temperature is limited less than the operating temperature of the fuel cell, as the heat source for reforming is depended on the reaction heat at about 650 {degree} C of the fuel cell. To improve the reforming rate at the low temperature range, it is considered to increase S/C (ratio of steam to carbon), but this scheme will cause such problems as to increase the voltage drop of the anode, to drop the heat recovery ratio on the cogenerator, to increase the capacity of the heat exchanger, etc. In this invention, in the power generating plant of a molten carbonate fuel cell the inert gas is added to the reforming raw gas, and in addition to the above the gas is mixed with steam and led into the reforming chamber of the plant. When the inert gas which is not directly concerned in the reforming reaction is added to, total mol number increases and the reforming reaction is acceralated. Consequently, the reforming rate can be raised, though the reforming temperature is low. 2 figs.

  16. Nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear fuel makes the rounds: choosing a closed fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle processes, front-end of the fuel cycle: from crude ore to enriched uranium, back-end of the fuel cycle: the second life of nuclear fuel, and tomorrow: multiple recycling while generating increasingly less waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippon, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    France has opted for a policy of processing and recycling spent fuel. This option has already been deployed commercially since the 1990's, but will reach its full potential with the fourth generation. The CEA developed the processes in use today, and is pursuing research to improve, extend, and adapt these technologies to tomorrow's challenges. France has opted for a 'closed cycle' to recycle the reusable materials in spent fuel (uranium and plutonium) and optimise ultimate waste management. France has opted for a 'closed' nuclear fuel cycle. Spent fuel is processed to recover the reusable materials: uranium and plutonium. The remaining components (fission products and minor actinides) are the ultimate waste. This info-graphic shows the main steps in the fuel cycle currently implemented commercially in France. From the mine to the reactor, a vast industrial system ensures the conversion of uranium contained in the ore to obtain uranium oxide (UOX) fuel pellets. Selective extraction, purification, enrichment - key scientific and technical challenges for the teams in the Nuclear Energy Division (DEN). The back-end stages of the fuel cycle for recycling the reusable materials in spent fuel and conditioning the final waste-forms have reached maturity. CEA teams are pursuing their research in support of industry to optimise these processes. Multi-recycle plutonium, make even better use of uranium resources and, over the longer term, explore the possibility of transmuting the most highly radioactive waste: these are the challenges facing future nuclear systems. (authors)

  17. Shipment of gas generating spent fuel on the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, W.S.

    1998-01-01

    , to the onsite movement of commercial spent fuel from a reactor pool to a dry storage facility. In the case of the K Basin spent gas generating played a significant role in the safety analysis

  18. Fuel component of electricity generation cost for the BN-800 reactor with 800 MOX fuel and uranium oxide fuel, increased fuel burnup, and removal of radial breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskach, A.

    2000-01-01

    There are two completed design concepts of NPP with BN-800 type reactors developed with due regard for enhanced safety requirements. They have been created for the 3 rd unit of Beloyarsk NPP and for three units of South Ural NPP. Both concepts are proposed to use mixed oxide fuel (MOX) based on civil plutonium. At this moment economical estimations carried out for these projects need to be revised in connection with the changes of economical situation in Russia and the world nuclear market structure. It is also essential to take into account the existing problem of the excess ex-weapons plutonium utilization and the possibility of using this plutonium to fabricate MOX fuel for the BN-800 reactors. (authors)

  19. Study on fission blanket fuel cycling of a fusion-fission hybrid energy generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Yang, Y.; Xu, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on neutron physics characteristics of a light water cooled fission blanket for a new type subcritical fusion-fission hybrid reactor aiming at electric power generation with low technical limits of fission fuel. The major objective is to study the fission fuel cycling performance in the blanket, which may possess significant impacts on the feasibility of the new concept of fusion-fission hybrid reactor with a high energy gain (M) and tritium breeding ratio (TBR). The COUPLE2 code developed by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University is employed to simulate the neutronic behaviour in the blanket. COUPLE2 combines the particle transport code MCNPX with the fuel depletion code ORIGEN2. The code calculation results show that soft neutron spectrum can yield M > 20 while maintaining TBR >1.15 and the conversion ratio of fissile materials CR > 1 in a reasonably long refuelling cycle (>five years). The preliminary results also indicate that it is rather promising to design a high-performance light water cooled fission blanket of fusion-fission hybrid reactor for electric power generation by directly loading natural or depleted uranium if an ITER-scale tokamak fusion neutron source is achievable.

  20. Design of flexible polyphenylene proton-conducting membrane for next-generation fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Junpei; Taki, Ryunosuke; Mochizuki, Takashi; Shimizu, Ryo; Akiyama, Ryo; Uchida, Makoto; Miyatake, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are promising devices for clean power generation in automotive, stationary, and portable applications. Perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomers (for example, Nafion) have been the benchmark PEMs; however, several problems, including high gas permeability, low thermal stability, high production cost, and environmental incompatibility, limit the widespread dissemination of PEMFCs. It is believed that fluorine-free PEMs can potentially address all of these issues; however, none of these membranes have simultaneously met the criteria for both high performance (for example, proton conductivity) and durability (for example, mechanical and chemical stability). We present a polyphenylene-based PEM (SPP-QP) that fulfills the required properties for fuel cell applications. The newly designed PEM exhibits very high proton conductivity, excellent membrane flexibility, low gas permeability, and extremely high stability, with negligible degradation even under accelerated degradation conditions, which has never been achieved with existing fluorine-free PEMs. The polyphenylene PEM also exhibits reasonably high fuel cell performance, with excellent durability under practical conditions. This new PEM extends the limits of existing fluorine-free proton-conductive materials and will help to realize the next generation of PEMFCs via cost reduction as well as the performance improvement compared to the present PFSA-based PEMFC systems.

  1. A Critical Heat Generation for Safe Nuclear Fuels after a LOCA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study applies a thermo-elasto-plastic-creep finite element procedure to the analysis of an accidental behavior of nuclear fuel as well as normal behavior. The result will be used as basic data for the robust design of nuclear power plant and fuels. We extended the range of mechanical strain from small or medium to large adopting the Hencky logarithmic strain measure in addition to the Green-Lagrange strain and Almansi strain measures, for the possible large strain situation in accidental environments. We found that there is a critical heat generation after LOCA without ECCS (event category 5, under which the cladding of fuel sustains the internal pressure and temperature for the time being for the rescue of the power plant. With the heat generation above the critical value caused by malfunctioning of the control rods, the stiffness of cladding becomes zero due to the softening by high temperature. The weak position of cladding along the length continuously bulges radially to burst and to discharge radioactive substances. This kind of cases should be avoid by any means.

  2. Generation of consistent nuclear properties of DUPIC fuel by DRAGON with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, W.; Rozon, D.

    1998-01-01

    DRAGON code with 89-groups ENDF/B-VI cross section library was used in this paper to generate consistent nuclear properties of DUPIC fuel. The reference feed material used for the DUPIC fuel cycle is a 17x17 French standard 900 MWe PWR spent fuel assembly with 3.2 w/o initial enrichment and 32500 MWD/7 discharge burnup. The PWR fuel assembly was modeled by JPMT/SYBILT transport method in DRAGON to generate nuclide fields of spent PWR fuel. The resultant nuclide fields constitute the initial fuel composition files for reference DUPIC fuel which can be accessed by DRAGON for CANDU 2D cluster geometry depletion calculation and 3D supercell calculation. Because of uneven spatial power distribution in PWR assemblies and full core, unexpected transition cycle, and various fuel management strategy, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to be different from one assembly to the next. This heterogeneity was characterized also by modeling various spent PWR fuel assembly types in the paper. (author)

  3. Simulation of the park for electric generation of the Argentine Republic, analysis of its possible expansion with restrictions in the disposability of the fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubergia, J.H.; Coppari, N.R.; Rey, F.C.

    2004-01-01

    In this work one simulates, using the program MESSAGE, the generation park electric of the Argentine Republic and their possible expansion, with restrictions in the readiness of fossil fuels. This, as other models of planning energetics promoted by IAEA, optimizes the expansion of the net having as function objective the smallest cost in the system. 25 years they were simulated, adopting like base the anus 2000 and considering different scenarios of internal and external demands. It was analysed the increase of the demand with restrictions in the readiness of the natural gas in the winter periods, since the Argentinean electric system has a great dependence of this fuel. To cover the increase of the electric demand, were selected the machines and fuels, at the moment available, with more technical and economic possibilities. In the scenarios without restrictions to the use of natural gas the program selects to the nuclear power station of Atucha II, to the increase of bench mark of the hydraulic power station of Yacireta and combined cycles that burn natural gas. In those in that the supply of natural gas is limited, it selects previously besides the signal ones, other nuclear power stations, other hydroelectric projects and turbines of gas operating with gas oil to cover the top requirements. (Author)

  4. Non-electrical uses of thermal energy generated in the production of fissile fuel in fusion--fission reactors: a comparative economic parametric analysis for a hybrid with or without synthetic fuel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    A parametric analysis has been carried out for testing the sensitivity of the synfuel production cost in relation to crucial economic and technologic quantities (investment costs of hybrid and synfuel plant, energy multiplication of the fission blanket, recirculating power fraction of the fusion driver, etc.). In addition, a minimum synfuel selling price has been evaluated, from which the fission--fusion--synfuel complex brings about a higher economic benefit than does the fusion--fission hybrid entirely devoted to fissile-fuel and electricity generation. Assuming an electricity cost of 2.7 cents/kWh, an annual investment cost per power unit of 4.2 to 6 $/GJ (132 to 189 k$/MWty) for the fission--fusion complex and 1.5 to 3 $/GJ (47 to 95 k$/MWty) for the synfuel plant, the synfuel production net cost (i.e., revenue = cost) varies between 6.5 and 8.6 $/GJ. These costs can compete with those obtained by other processes (natural gas reforming, resid partial oxidation, coal gasification, nuclear fission, solar electrolysis, etc.). This study points out a potential use of the fusion--fission hybrid other than fissile-fuel and electricity generation

  5. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GENERAL I ARTICLE ... In Part 1 of this two-part article, we have seen im- ..... mable logic controller and VLSI arrays, office automation systems, workflow management systems, ... complex discrete event and real-time systems; and Petri nets.

  6. Perspective usage estimation of Volga region combustible shale as a power generating fuel alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolev, E.; Barieva, E.; Eskin, A.

    2018-05-01

    A comprehensive study of combustible shale, common within Tatarstan and Ulyanovsk region, is carried out. The rocks physicochemical parameters are found to meet the power generating fuels requirements. The predictive estimate of ash products properties of combustible shale burning is held. Minding furnace process technology it is necessary to know mineral and organic components behavior when combustible shale is burnt. Since the first will determine slagging properties of energy raw materials, the second – its calorific value. In consideration of this the main research methods were X-ray, thermal and X-ray fluorescence analyses. Summing up the obtained results, we can draw to the following conclusions: 1. The combustible shale in Tatarstan and the Ulyanovsk region has predominantly low calorific value (Qb d = 5-9 MJ/kg). In order to enhance its efficiency and to reduce cost it is possible to conduct rocks burning together with some other organic or organic mineral power generating fuels. 2. High ash content (Ad = 60-80%) that causes a high external ballast content in shale implies the appropriateness of using this fuel resource next to its exploitation site. The acceptable distance to a consumer will reduce unproductive transportation charges for large ash and moisture masses. 3. The performed fuel ash components characteristics, as well as the yield and volatiles composition allow us to specify the basic parameters for boiler units, designed for the Volga combustible shale burning. 4. The noncombustible residual components composition shows that shale ash can be used in manufacture of materials of construction.

  7. A hybrid Genetic Algorithm and Monte Carlo simulation approach to predict hourly energy consumption and generation by a cluster of Net Zero Energy Buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garshasbi, Samira; Kurnitski, Jarek; Mohammadi, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The energy consumption and renewable generation in a cluster of NZEBs are modeled by a novel hybrid Genetic Algorithm and Monte Carlo simulation approach and used for the prediction of instantaneous and cumulative net energy balances and hourly amount of energy taken from and supplied to the central energy grid. - Highlights: • Hourly energy consumption and generation by a cluster of NZEBs was simulated. • Genetic Algorithm and Monte Carlo simulation approach were employed. • Dampening effect of energy used by a cluster of buildings was demonstrated. • Hourly amount of energy taken from and supplied to the grid was simulated. • Results showed that NZEB cluster was 63.5% grid dependant on annual bases. - Abstract: Employing a hybrid Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation approach, energy consumption and renewable energy generation in a cluster of Net Zero Energy Buildings (NZEBs) was thoroughly investigated with hourly simulation. Moreover, the cumulative energy consumption and generation of the whole cluster and each individual building within the simulation space were accurately monitored and reported. The results indicate that the developed simulation algorithm is able to predict the total instantaneous and cumulative amount of energy taken from and supplied to the central energy grid over any time period. During the course of simulation, about 60–100% of total daily generated renewable energy was consumed by NZEBs and up to 40% of that was fed back into the central energy grid as surplus energy. The minimum grid dependency of the cluster was observed in June and July where 11.2% and 9.9% of the required electricity was supplied from the central energy grid, respectively. On the other hand, the NZEB cluster was strongly grid dependant in January and December by importing 70.7% and 76.1% of its required energy demand via the central energy grid, in the order given. Simulation results revealed that the cluster was 63

  8. Costs and Benefits of Using Fuel Cells for Stationary Power Generation at Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow Maintenance Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schendler, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    We compare the costs and benefits of using two types of fuel cell power generation systems versus Southern California Edison to provide the base electricity load for the Marine Corps Logistics Base...

  9. Modeling and control of hybrid wind/photovoltaic/fuel cell distributed generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caisheng

    Due to ever increasing energy consumption, rising public awareness of environmental protection, and steady progress in power deregulation, alternative (i.e., renewable and fuel cell based) distributed generation (DG) systems have attracted increased interest. Wind and photovoltaic (PV) power generation are two of the most promising renewable energy technologies. Fuel cell (FC) systems also show great potential in DG applications of the future due to their fast technology development and many merits they have, such as high efficiency, zero or low emission (of pollutant gases) and flexible modular structure. The modeling and control of a hybrid wind/PV/FC DG system is addressed in this dissertation. Different energy sources in the system are integrated through an AC bus. Dynamic models for the main system components, namely, wind energy conversion system (WECS), PV energy conversion system (PVECS), fuel cell, electrolyzer, power electronic interfacing circuits, battery, hydrogen storage tank, gas compressor and gas pressure regulator, are developed. Two types of fuel cells have been modeled in this dissertation: proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Power control of a grid-connected FC system as well as load mitigation control of a stand-alone FC system are investigated. The pitch angle control for WECS, the maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control for PVECS, and the control for electrolyzer and power electronic devices, are also addressed in the dissertation. Based on the dynamic component models, a simulation model for the proposed hybrid energy system has been developed using MATLAB/Simulink. The overall power management strategy for coordinating the power flows among the different energy sources is presented in the dissertation. Simulation studies have been carried out to verify the system performance under different scenarios using a practical load profile and real weather data. The results show that the overall power

  10. NAC's Modular, Advanced Generation, Nuclear All-purpose STORage (MAGNASTOR) system: new generation multipurpose spent fuel storage for global application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, C.W.

    2004-01-01

    Multipurpose canister systems (MCS) have been designed, licensed, fabricated, constructed, and loaded over the last decade within the U.S. These systems are characterized as concrete-based storage overpacks containing transportable canisters utilizing redundantly welded closures. Canisters are designed and intended to be transferred into transport packagings for shipment off-site, and canister designs do not preclude their use in waste disposal overpacks. NAC has learned a number of significant lessons in the deployment of its first generation MCS. During this period prior to the next procurement phase, NAC has developed a new generation MCS, incorporating the lessons learned from the first generation while considering the capabilities of the plants populating the next phase. The system is identified as the Modular, Advanced Generation, Nuclear All-purpose STORage (MAGNASTOR) system, and this paper addresses its unique design, fabrication, and operations features. Among these are: a unique developed cell basket design, under patent review, that increases spent fuel capacities and simplifies fabrication while providing high strength and heat removal efficiency: a significantly enhanced canister closure design that improves welding time, personnel dose, and drying performance: a low profile vertical concrete cask design that improves on-site handling and site dose rates, offers tangible threat limitations for beyond-design-basis events, and maintains proven and simple construction/operation features: a simple, proven transfer system that facilitates transfer without excessive dose or handling: a new approach to water removal and canister drying, using a moisture entrainment, gas absorption vacuum (MEGAVAC) system. The paper includes design and licensing status of the MAGNASTOR system, and prototyping development that NAC has performed to date

  11. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  12. Key Drivers of PPPs in Electricity Generation in Developing Countries : Cross-Country Evidence of Switching between PPP Investment in Fossil Fuel and Renewable-Based Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Vagliasindi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents new global evidence on the key determinants of public-private partnership investment in electricity generated by fossil fuels and renewable energy based on a panel data analysis for 105 developing countries over a period of 16 years from 1993 to 2008. It aims to identify the key factors affecting private investors' decision to enter electricity generation, through probi...

  13. Experimental study of pressure drops through LOCA-generated debris deposited on a fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong Kwan, E-mail: jksuh@khnp.co.kr [KHNP Central Research Institute, 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Won; Kwon, Sun Guk; Lee, Jae Yong [KHNP Central Research Institute, 1312-70 Yuseong-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Park, Goon Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • In-vessel downstream effect tests were performed in the presence of LOCA-generated debris. • Available driving heads under each LOCA scenario were verified using experimental data. • Fibrous debris was prepared to satisfy the length distribution obtained from the bypass test. • Limiting test conditions were identified through sensitivity studies. - Abstract: Under post loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions, it is postulated that debris can be generated and transported to the containment sump strainer. Some of the debris may pass through the strainer and could challenge the long-term core cooling capability of the plant. To address this safety issue, in-vessel downstream effect tests for the advanced power reactor (APR) 1400 were performed. Fibrous debris is the most crucial material in terms of causing pressure drops, and was prepared in this study to satisfy the fiber length distribution obtained through a strainer bypass test. Sensitivity studies on pressure drops through LOCA-generated debris deposited on a fuel assembly were performed to evaluate the effects of water chemistry and fiber length distribution. The pressure drops with debris laden pure water were substantially less than those with debris laden ordinary tap water. The experiment with fiber length distribution suggested by WCAP-16793 showed lower pressure drops than those with the APR1400 specific fiber length distribution. All the experimental results showed that the pressure drops in the mock-up fuel assembly were less than the available driving head at each LOCA scenario.

  14. Investigation of Electricity Generation by Using Gamma Radiation from Spent Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Haneol; Yim, Man-Sung Yim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the electric power generation with scale spent fuel. OrigenArp has analyzed gamma radiation environment of spent fuel assembly, MCNPX has analyzed the scintillator behavior, and experimental work has analyzed the electric output of photovoltaic cell. Gamma radiation environment analysis result indicates gamma source rapidly decreases for the early storage period. Scintillator analysis result calculates the photon flux distribution which enters photovoltaic cell. Photovoltaic cell experiment calculates electric current, voltage current generation per each system unit. Generated electric power can be used to cope with existing safety system (i.e. storage monitoring system) under severe accident or to operate security system under external invasion situation (i.e. passive physical barrier system). Several researchers have shown that converting radiation energy into electric energy is possible. Karl Scharf studied the direct electric conversion of radiation energy by using photovoltaic cells. Researchers in University of Massachusetts Lowell have studied radiation-electric energy conversion by using gadolinium oxide scintillator and dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs) and N. Horuichi et al. studied radiation-electric energy conversion by using inorganic scintillators and amorphous and crystal photovoltaic cells

  15. Prediction of the amount of hydrogen generated during a molten fuel-coolant interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthern, G.E.; Neuman, J.E.; Madsen, W.W.; Close, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The model in development predicts the production of hydrogen as a result of a molten fuel-coolant interaction in a water-cooled nuclear reactor. It has three interrelated modules: kinetics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. Second and third order rates are assumed for uranium and aluminum respectively, the chosen fuel and cladding. Heat is generated by chemical reaction and radioactive decay and dissipated through radiation and convection. Dispersion of the melt as it descends through a pool of water is modeled using the Weber number, which ratios the shear forces due to the relative velocities of the fluid and the metal to the surface tension of the metal. Hydrogen generation is sensitive to the initial melt temperature and to the assumptions made about the modes of heat transfer, but not the the impact velocity of the metal particle. The hydrogen generation per unit mass of uranium generally increases as the initial particle size decreases suggesting that the kinetics rather than the heat transfer controls the energy balance

  16. Main results on pilot operation during 5 years of the 3rd generation fuel in VVER-440 reactors of Kola NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saprykin, V.; Sumarokov, M.; Gagarinskiy, A.; Sumarokova, A.; Adeev, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the report the results of comparison of main neutron-physical data of exploitation of nuclear fuel are presented for the average enrichment (on U - 235) of 4.87 for the 2nd and 3rd (12 piece) generations with the results of calculations by the complex of the programs KASKAD for 5 fuel loadings of Kola NPP Unit 4 with the reactor VVER- 440. The basic feature of fuel of the 3rd generation as compared with the 2nd is a presence of ribs of inflexibility at corners instead of cover of the fuel assembly and also the increased amount of uranium. The arrangement of fuel rods with different enrichment in fuel assemblies of the 2nd and 3rd generations is chosen identical for the convenient comparison of neutronic and thermohydraulic characteristics of the fuel of different generations. The fuel of 3rd generation was situated in the core symmetrically to the fuel of 2nd one

  17. ZTEK`s ultra-high efficiency fuel cell/gas turbine system for distributed generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, M.; Nathanson, D. [Ztek Corp., Waltham, MA (United States); Bradshaw, D.T. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Ztek`s Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system has exceptional potential for utility electric power generation because of: simplicity of components construction, capability for low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of very high quality by-product heat (up to 1000{degrees}C), and system integration simplicity. Utility applications of the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell are varied and include distributed generation units (sub-MW to 30MW capacity), repowering existing power plants (i.e. 30MW to 100MW), and multi-megawatt central power plants. A TVA/EPRI collaboration program involved functional testing of the advanced solid oxide fuel cell stacks and design scale-up for distributed power generation applications. The emphasis is on the engineering design of the utility modules which will be the building blocks for up to megawatt scale power plants. The program has two distinctive subprograms: Verification test on a 1 kW stack and 25kW module for utility demonstration. A 1 kW Planar SOFC stack was successfully operated for 15,000 hours as of December, 1995. Ztek began work on a 25kW SOFC Power System for TVA, which plans to install the 25kW SOFC at a host site for demonstration in 1997. The 25kW module is Ztek`s intended building block for the commercial use of the Planar SOFC. Systems of up to megawatt capacity can be obtained by packaging the modules in 2-dimensional or 3-dimensional arrays.

  18. Cost of electricity generated and fuel saving of an optimized wind-diesel electricity supply for village in Tangier-area (Morocco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nfaoui, H.; Buret, J.

    1996-01-01

    In several of the remote areas of Morocco, diesel generators are used to provide electrical power. Such systems are often characterized by poor efficiency and high maintenance costs. The integration of wind turbine with a diesel/battery hybrid system is becoming cost-effective in wind locations. In previous works (Nfaoul et al, 1990, 1994a, 1994b), the wind characteristics in Tangier-area were studied on the basis of 12 years (1978-1989) of hourly average wind speed data. A wind/diesel energy system with battery storage has been modelled using the Tangiers wind regime over a one year period (1989), and synthesized consumer load data based on the characteristics of typical usage of domestic appliances, along with the estimated working patterns of a local isolated community. In this work, we use a more realistic hourly consumer load, which is the result of an experiment realized in a Maroccan village using a diesel engine to provide electricity for lighting and audio-visual. The 1989 wind data were reworked for a large series of measurements (12 years). The optimum wind turbine size and the benefits of a storage system on fuel saving are also reviewed. This work is concerned with diesel fuel consumption: an optimum design of the considered system is to be found which minimises the cost energy generation over the equipments' lifetime. Given the economic assumption made (the most important being a fuel price of 4.5 Dh/litre and an interest rate of 5% net of inflation), the wind/diesel energy system has been shown to be competitive with diesel-only generation in the wind regime of the Tangier location for the cost per unit wind turbine swept area less than 3000 Dh/m 2 (8Dh=1$). (author)

  19. Electricity generation from synthesis gas by microbial processes: CO fermentation and microbial fuel cell technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehee; Chang, In Seop

    2009-10-01

    A microbiological process was established to harvest electricity from the carbon monoxide (CO). A CO fermenter was enriched with CO as the sole carbon source. The DGGE/DNA sequencing results showed that Acetobacterium spp. were enriched from the anaerobic digester fluid. After the fermenter was operated under continuous mode, the products were then continuously fed to the microbial fuel cell (MFC) to generate electricity. Even though the conversion yield was quite low, this study proved that synthesis gas (syn-gas) can be converted to electricity with the aid of microbes that do not possess the drawbacks of metal catalysts of conventional methods.

  20. Pressure pulses generated by gas released from a breached fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    In experimental measurements of liquid pressure pulses generated by rapid release of gas from breached fuel elements in a nuclear reactor, different peak pressures were observed at locations equidistant from the origin of the release. Using the model of a submerged spherical bubble with a nonstationary center, this analysis predicts not only that the peak pressure would be higher at a point in front of the advancing bubble than that at a point the same distance behind the bubble origin, but also that the pressure pulse in front of the bubble reaches its peak later than the pulse behind the origin

  1. Residual heat use generated by a 12 kW fuel cell in an electric vehicle heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenar-Santos, Antonio; Alberdi-Jiménez, Lucía; Nasarre-Cortés, Lorenzo; Mora-Larramona, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    A diesel or gasoline vehicle heating is produced by the heat of the engine coolant liquid. Nevertheless, electric vehicles, due to the fact that electric motor transform directly electricity into mechanical energy through electromagnetic interactions, do not generate this heat so other method of providing it has to be developed. This study introduces the system developed in a fuel cell electric vehicle (lithium-ion battery – fuel cell) with residual heat use. The fuel cell electric vehicle is driven by a 12 kW PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell. This fuel cell has an operating temperature around 50 °C. The residual heat generated was originally wasted by interaction with the environment. The new developed heating system designed integrates the heat generated by the fuel cell into the heating system of the vehicle, reducing the global energy consumption and improving the global efficiency as well. - Highlights: • Modification of heating system was done by introducing the residual heat from fuel cell. • Maximum heat achieved by the heating radiator of 9.27 kW. • Reduction of the heat dissipation by the fuel cell cooling system 1.5 kW. • Total efficiency improvement of 20% with an autonomy increase of 21 km

  2. Computer code for the analysis of destructive pressure generation process during a fuel failure accident, PULSE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujishiro, Toshio

    1978-03-01

    The computer code PULSE-2 has been developed for the analysis of pressure pulse generation process when hot fuel particles come into contact with the coolant in a fuel rod failure accident. In the program, it is assumed that hot fuel fragments mix with the coolant instantly and homogeneously in the failure region. Then, the rapid vaporization of the coolant and transient pressure rise in failure region, and the movement of ejected coolant slugs are calculated. The effect of a fuel-particle size distribution is taken into consideration. Heat conduction in the fuel particles and heat transfer at fuel-coolant interface are calculated. Temperature, pressure and void fraction in the mixed region are calculated from the average enthalpy. With physical property subroutines for liquid sodium and water, the model is usable for both LMFBR and LWR conditions. (auth.)

  3. Electricity generation by Enterobacter cloacae SU-1 in mediator less microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samrot, Antony V.; Senthilkumar, P.; Pavankumar, K.; Akilandeswari, G.C. [Department of Biotechnology, Sathyabama University, Rajiv Gandhi Salai, Chennai, Tamilnadu (India); Rajalakshmi, N.; Dhathathreyan, K.S. [Center for Fuel Cell Technology ARCI, IITM Research Park, Phase I, 2nd Floor, 6 Kanagam Road, Tharamani, Chennai 600 113, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-08-15

    We have investigated a Enterobacter cloacae SU-1, bacteria for mediator less microbial fuel cell with different carbon sources and is found to be more effective as the microorganism is able to transfer electrons directly (exo-electrogenic organism) via the cytochromes or the ubiquinone. These carriers of electrons are in form of stable reversible redox couples, not biologically degraded and not toxic to cell. The major advantage of mediator less microbial fuel cells emphasize that additives in the anolyte is not compatible with the purpose of water purification. The anode chamber with the bacteria is maintained under anaerobic conditions so that the bacteria will undergo anaerobic biochemical pathways like Glycolysis, TCA cycle, Electron Transport Chain (ETC) where electrons and protons are released. Here protons are released in TCA cycle and whereas electrons are released from ETC. The mediator less microbial fuel cell delivered an open circuit potential (OCP) of 0.93 V and power of 3 mW/sq cm. During power generation from the microbes, there was a drop in coulombic efficiency in terms of fluctuations during drawing power, as the carbon source is being utilized for the cell growth. (author)

  4. Air quality impacts of increased use of indigenous fuels for power generation in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orbeta, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    The 2002-2011 Philippine Energy plan promotes the restructuring of its troubled power sector to ensure efficiency, reliability in supply and competitive electricity pricing. In particular, the plan promotes the use of indigenous fuels to increase self-sufficiency and reduce dependence on imported fuels. However, the indigenous fuel that will replace imported oil includes coal (a highly polluting energy source) and geothermal power. This paper assessed the environmental and health impacts associated with the development of coal and geothermal energy in the Philippines. It was determined that from 2001 to 2011, the development of geothermal energy could result in less air pollution than a scenario in which only current energy sources are developed. However, the expected increase in generating capacity in the Philippines will result in a general increase in air pollution levels. Local coal is singled out as the primary polluting energy source. Several pollution reduction initiatives were recommended, including improved pollution monitoring and energy efficiency measures. 18 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs., 8 appendices

  5. Development of planar solid oxide fuel cells for power generation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, N.Q. [AlliedSignal Aerospce Equipment Systems, Torrance, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for a variety of electric power generation application. The planar design offers simple cell geometry, high power density, and multiple fabrication and gas manifolding options. Planar SOFC technology has received much attention recently, and significant progress has been made in this area. Recent effort at AlliedSignal has focused on the development of high-performance, lightweight planar SOFCs, having thin-electrolyte films, that can be operated efficiently at reduced temperatures (< 1000{degrees}C). The advantages of reduced-temperature operation include wider material choice (including use of metallic interconnects), expected longer cell life, reduced thermal stress, improved reliability, and reduced fuel cell cost. The key aspect in the development of thin-film SIFCs is to incorporate the thin electrolyte layer into the desired structure of cells in a manner that yields the required characteristics. AlliedSignal has developed a simple and cost-effective method based on tape calendering for the fabrication of thin-electrolyte SOFCs. Thin-electrolyte cells made by tape calendering have shown extraordinary performance, e.g., producing more than 500mW/cm{sup 2} at 700{degrees}C and 800mW/cm{sup 2} at 800{degrees}C with hydrogen as fuel and air is oxidant. thin-electrolyte single cells have been incorporated into a compliant metallic stack structure and operated at reduced and operated at reduced-temperature conditions.

  6. Evaluation Of Electricity Generation From Animal Based Wastes In A Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duduyemi Oladejo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Electric current from organic waste of poultry droppings were generated with A Microbial Fuel Cell MFC technology to evaluate affects of temperature 30 to 50oC 100gl 300gl and 500gl slurry concentrations prepared with the distilled water and inoculated when introduced into the anodic chamber. A constant concentration of 50gl of the oxidizing agent Potassium ferricyanide at the cathode chamber was prepared to evaluate the voltage and current generated by the set up for 7 days in each case. Higher slurry concentrations were observed to generate higher initial current and voltage than in lower concentrations. Higher slurry concentrations also demonstrated sustained power generation up to the day 6 before decline. A maximum current of 1.1V and 0.15 mA was achieved while the temperature variation was observed to have minimal effect within the range considered at low concentration. A MFC is a biochemical-catalyzed system capable of generating electricity as a by-product also providing an alternative method of waste treatment. Application Alternative power source and waste treatment.

  7. Microbial electricity generation in rice paddy fields: recent advances and perspectives in rhizosphere microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use living microbes for the conversion of organic matter into electricity. MFC systems can be applied to the generation of electricity at water/sediment interfaces in the environment, such as bay areas, wetlands, and rice paddy fields. Using these systems, electricity generation in paddy fields as high as ∼80 mW m(-2) (based on the projected anode area) has been demonstrated, and evidence suggests that rhizosphere microbes preferentially utilize organic exudates from rice roots for generating electricity. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses have been conducted to identify the microbial species and catabolic pathways that are involved in the conversion of root exudates into electricity, suggesting the importance of syntrophic interactions. In parallel, pot cultures of rice and other aquatic plants have been used for rhizosphere MFC experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. The findings from these studies have demonstrated the potential of electricity generation for mitigating methane emission from the rhizosphere. Notably, however, the presence of large amounts of organics in the rhizosphere drastically reduces the effect of electricity generation on methane production. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential of these systems for mitigating methane emission from rice paddy fields. We suggest that paddy-field MFCs represent a promising approach for harvesting latent energy of the natural world.

  8. The variation of power generation with organic substrates in single-chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Yogesh; Li, Baikun

    2010-03-01

    The wastewaters consist of diverse types of organic substrates that can be used as the carbon sources for power generation. To explore the utilization of some of these organics, the electricity generation from three substrates (acetate, ethanol, and glucose) was examined over a concentration range of 0.5-35 mM in single-chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs). The power density generated from glucose was the highest at 401 mW/m(2) followed by acetate and ethanol at 368 mW/m(2) and 302 mW/m(2), respectively. The voltage increased with substrate concentration of 0.5-20mM, but significantly decreased at high substrate concentrations of 20-35 mM. Kinetic analysis indicated that the inhibition in the ethanol-fed MFCs was the highest at the concentration of 35 mM, while inhibition in glucose-fed MFCs was the lowest at the concentration of 20mM. These were in accordance with the extents of voltage decrease at high substrate concentration. Moreover, the effect of the distance between anode and cathode on voltage generation was also investigated. The reduction of the electrode distance by 33% in the glucose-fed MFCs reduced the internal resistance by 73% and led to 20% increase in voltage generation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  10. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE ELECTRIC CURRENT GENERATION IN A MICROBIAL FUEL CELL INOCULATED WITH MARINE SEDIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Teleken

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbial fuel cells (MFC are electrochemical devices that utilize the ability of some microorganisms to oxidize organic matter and transfer electrons resulting from their metabolism to an insoluble acceptor. The goal of the present study was to model the kinetics of electrical current generation from an MFC inoculated with marine sediment. For this purpose, a differential equation system was used, including the Nernst-Monod relationship and Ohm's Law, to describe the microbial metabolism and the mechanism of extracellular electron transfer (EET, respectively. The experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry analysis were properly described by the model. It was concluded that marine microorganisms preferably use a direct mechanism of EET by means of nanowires to establish the electrochemical contact with the anode. The mathematical modeling could help understand MFC operation and, consequently, contribute to improving power generation from this source.

  11. Quantifying avoided fuel use and emissions from solar photovoltaic generation in the Western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Paul; Margolis, Robert M; Milford, James M

    2009-01-01

    The electric power system in the Western United States was simulated to evaluate the potential of solar photovoltaics (PV) in reducing fossil-fuel use and associated emissions. The simulations used a utility production cost model to evaluate a series of PV penetrations where up to 10% of the region's electricity is derived from PV. The analysis focused on California, which uses gas for a large fraction of its generation and Colorado, which derives most of its electricity from coal. PV displaces gas and electricity imports almost exclusively in California, with a displacement rate of about 6000-9000 kJ per kWh of PV energy generated. In Colorado, PV offsets mostly gas at low penetration, with increasing coal displacement during nonsummer months and at higher penetration. Associated reductions in CO2, NOx, and SO2 emissions are also calculated.

  12. Distributed generation system with PEM fuel cell for electrical power quality improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, D.; Beites, L.F.; Blazquez, F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, ETSII, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/ Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ballesteros, J.C. [Endesa Generacion, S.A. c/ Ribera de Loira 60, 28042 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    In this paper, a physical model for a distributed generation (DG) system with power quality improvement capability is presented. The generating system consists of a 5 kW PEM fuel cell, a natural gas reformer, hydrogen storage bottles and a bank of ultra-capacitors. Additional power quality functions are implemented with a vector-controlled electronic converter for regulating the injected power. The capabilities of the system were experimentally tested on a scaled electrical network. It is composed of different lines, built with linear inductances and resistances, and taking into account both linear and non-linear loads. The ability to improve power quality was tested by means of different voltage and frequency perturbations produced on the physical model electrical network. (author)

  13. Treatment of soak liquor and bioelectricity generation in dual chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathishkumar, Kuppusamy; Narenkumar, Jayaraman; Selvi, Adikesavan; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Babujanarthanam, Ranganathan; Rajasekar, Aruliah

    2018-02-08

    The discharge of untreated soak liquor from tannery industry causes severe environmental pollution. This study is characterizing the soak liquor as a substrate in the microbial fuel cell (MFC) for remediation along with electricity generation. The dual chamber MFC was constructed and operated. Potassium permanganate was used as cathode solution and carbon felt electrode as anodic and cathodic material, respectively. The soak liquor was characterized by electrochemical studies viz., cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and polarization studies, respectively. The removal percentage of protein, lipid, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were measured before and after treatment with MFC. The results of MFC showed a highest current density of 300 mA/cm 2 and a power density of 92 mW/m 2 . The removal of COD, protein, and lipid were noted as 96, 81, and 97% respectively during MFC process. This MFC can be used in tannery industries for treating soak liquor and simultaneous electricity generation.

  14. Cathode Assessment for Maximizing Current Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Utilizing Bioethanol Effluent as Substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Guotao; Thygesen, Anders; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity production requires effective current generation from waste products via robust cathode reduction. Three cathode types using dissolved oxygen cathodes (DOCs), ferricyanide cathodes (FeCs) and air cathodes (AiCs) were therefore assessed...... to be the most sustainable option since it does not require ferricyanide. The data offer a new add-on option to the straw biorefinery by using bioethanol effluent for microbial electricity production....... using bioethanol effluent, containing 20.5 g/L xylose, 1.8 g/L arabinose and 2.5 g/L propionic acid. In each set-up the anode and cathode had an electrode surface area of 88 cm(2), which was used for calculation of the current density. Electricity generation was evaluated by quantifying current...

  15. PLUTON, Isotope Generation and Depletion in Highly Irradiated LWR Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemehov, Sergei; Motoe, Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The PLUTON-PC is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO 2 , UO 2 -Gd 2 O 3 , inhomogeneous MOX, and UO 2 -ThO 2 . The PLUTON-PC code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. 2 - Methods: Based upon cumulative yields, the PLUTON-PC code calculates as a function of radial position and local burnup concentrations of fission products, macroscopic scattering cross-sections and self-shielding effect which is important for standard fuel (for Pu-242 mainly) and more importantly for homogeneous and inhomogeneous MOX fuel because of higher concentrations of fissile and fertile isotopes of plutonium. The code results in burnup dependent fission rate density profiles throughout the in-reactor irradiation of LWR fuel rods. The isotopes included in calculations have been extended to cover all trans-uranium groups (plutonium plus higher actinides) of fissile and fertile isotopes. Self-shielding problem and scattering effects have been revised and solved for all isotopes in the calculations for adequacy at high burnup, different irradiation conditions and cladding materials

  16. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  17. Improved netting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramley, A.; Clabburn, R.J.T.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for producing netting composed of longitudinal and transverse threads of irradiation cross linked thermoplastic material, the threads being joined together at their crossings by moulded masses of cross linked thermoplastic material. The thread may be formed of polyethylene filaments, subjected to a radiation dose of 15 to 25 MR. The moulding can be conducted at 245 0 to 260 0 C or higher. The product is claimed to be an improved quality of netting, with bonds of increased strength between crossing threads. (U.K.)

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  19. An assessment of econometric models applied to fossil fuel power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracceva, F.; Quercioli, R.

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to provide a general view of those studies, in which the econometric approach is applied to the selection of fuel in fossil fired power generation, focusing the attention to the key role played by the fuel prices. The report consists of a methodological analysis and a survey of the studies available in literature. The methodological analysis allows to assess the adequateness of the econometric approach, in the electrical power utilities policy. With this purpose, the fundamentals of microeconomics, which are the basis of the econometric models, are pointed out and discussed, and then the hypotheses, which are needed to be assumed for complying the economic theory, are verified in their actual implementation in the power generation sector. The survey of the available studies provides a detailed description of the Translog and Logit models, and the results achieved with their application. From these results, the estimated models show to fit the data with good approximation, a certain degree of interfuel substitution and a meaningful reaction to prices on demand side [it

  20. Forecasting Fossil Fuel Energy Consumption for Power Generation Using QHSA-Based LSSVM Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate forecasting of fossil fuel energy consumption for power generation is important and fundamental for rational power energy planning in the electricity industry. The least squares support vector machine (LSSVM is a powerful methodology for solving nonlinear forecasting issues with small samples. The key point is how to determine the appropriate parameters which have great effect on the performance of LSSVM model. In this paper, a novel hybrid quantum harmony search algorithm-based LSSVM (QHSA-LSSVM energy forecasting model is proposed. The QHSA which combines the quantum computation theory and harmony search algorithm is applied to searching the optimal values of and C in LSSVM model to enhance the learning and generalization ability. The case study on annual fossil fuel energy consumption for power generation in China shows that the proposed model outperforms other four comparative models, namely regression, grey model (1, 1 (GM (1, 1, back propagation (BP and LSSVM, in terms of prediction accuracy and forecasting risk.

  1. Management of radioisotope, radiation generator and fuel materials for independent administrative corporations of national university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    This report states the situation, problems and proposal of management of radioisotope, radiation generator and fuel materials by independent administrative corporations of national universities. Four proposals are stated as followings; 1) in order to improve management of radioisotope, radiation generator, fuel materials and X-ray in the universities, organization and definition of the control department in each university and accident measures have to be decided. The middle object and plan should be needed. An appropriate management for proceeding researches should be discussed by closer connection of universities in the country. 2) The budget for safety control has to be identified at distribution of budget of each national university corporations. The insurance method is needed to be discussed. 3) The department in the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology) should be enriched to support researches and safety control of the staff and students. 4) The system, which carries out treatment and disposal of disuse materials and keeps them under the responsibility of the nation, is necessary. (S.Y.)

  2. Understanding Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salom, Jaume; Widén, Joakim; Candanedo, José

    2011-01-01

    Although several alternative definitions exist, a Net-Zero Energy Building (Net ZEB) can be succinctly described as a grid-connected building that generates as much energy as it uses over a year. The “net-zero” balance is attained by applying energy conservation and efficiency measures...... and by incorporating renewable energy systems. While based on annual balances, a complete description of a Net ZEB requires examining the system at smaller time-scales. This assessment should address: (a) the relationship between power generation and building loads and (b) the resulting interaction with the power grid...

  3. Assessment of energy performance and air pollutant emissions in a diesel engine generator fueled with water-containing ethanol-biodiesel-diesel blend of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Wen-Jhy; Liu, Yi-Cheng; Mwangi, Francis Kimani; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Lun; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Liao, Chao-Ning; Wang, Lin-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Biomass based oxygenated fuels have been identified as possible replacement of fossil fuel due to pollutant emission reduction and decrease in over-reliance on fossil fuel energy. In this study, 4 v% water-containing ethanol was mixed with (65-90%) diesel using (5-30%) biodiesel (BD) and 1 v% butanol as stabilizer and co-solvent respectively. The fuels were tested against those of biodiesel-diesel fuel blends to investigate the effect of addition of water-containing ethanol for their energy efficiencies and pollutant emissions in a diesel-fueled engine generator. Experimental results indicated that the fuel blend mix containing 4 v% of water-containing ethanol, 1 v% butanol and 5-30 v% of biodiesel yielded stable blends after 30 days standing. BD1041 blend of fuel, which composed of 10 v% biodiesel, 4 v% of water-containing ethanol and 1 v% butanol demonstrated -0.45 to 1.6% increase in brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC, mL kW -1 h -1 ) as compared to conventional diesel. The better engine performance of BD1041 was as a result of complete combustion, and lower reaction temperature based on the water cooling effect, which reduced emissions to 2.8-6.0% for NO x , 12.6-23.7% particulate matter (PM), 20.4-23.8% total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 30.8-42.9% total BaPeq between idle mode and 3.2 kW power output of the diesel engine generator. The study indicated that blending diesel with water-containing ethanol could achieve the goal of more green sustainability. -- Highlights: → Water-containing ethanol was mixed with diesel using biodiesel and butanol as stabilizer and co-solvent, respectively. → Fuel blends with 4 v% water-containing ethanol, 1 v% butanol, 5-30 v% biodiesel and conventional diesel yielded a stable blended fuel after more than 30 days. → Due to more complete combustion and water quench effect, target fuel BD1041 was gave good energy performance and significant reduction of PM, NO x , total PAH and total BaPeq emissions.

  4. Rich-burn, flame-assisted fuel cell, quick-mix, lean-burn (RFQL) combustor and power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcarek, Ryan J.; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2018-03-01

    Micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cells (mT-FFC) were recently proposed as a modified version of the direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) operating in a dual chamber configuration. In this work, a rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor is combined with a micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (mT-SOFC) stack to create a rich-burn, flame-assisted fuel cell, quick-mix, lean-burn (RFQL) combustor and power generation system. The system is tested for rapid startup and achieves peak power densities after only 35 min of testing. The mT-FFC power density and voltage are affected by changes in the fuel-lean and fuel-rich combustion equivalence ratio. Optimal mT-FFC performance favors high fuel-rich equivalence ratios and a fuel-lean combustion equivalence ratio around 0.80. The electrical efficiency increases by 150% by using an intermediate temperature cathode material and improving the insulation. The RFQL combustor and power generation system achieves rapid startup, a simplified balance of plant and may have applications for reduced NOx formation and combined heat and power.

  5. Role of dissolved oxygen on the degradation mechanism of Reactive Green 19 and electricity generation in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sin-Li; Ho, Li-Ngee; Ong, Soon-An; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Nordin, Noradiba

    2018-03-01

    In this study, a membraneless photocatalytic fuel cell with zinc oxide loaded carbon photoanode and platinum loaded carbon cathode was constructed to investigate the impact of dissolved oxygen on the mechanism of dye degradation and electricity generation of photocatalytic fuel cell. The photocatalytic fuel cell with high and low aeration rate, no aeration and nitrogen purged were investigated, respectively. The degradation rate of diazo dye Reactive Green 19 and the electricity generation was enhanced in photocatalytic fuel cell with higher dissolved oxygen concentration. However, the photocatalytic fuel cell was still able to perform 37% of decolorization in a slow rate (k = 0.033 h -1 ) under extremely low dissolved oxygen concentration (approximately 0.2 mg L -1 ) when nitrogen gas was introduced into the fuel cell throughout the 8 h. However, the change of the UV-Vis spectrum indicates that the intermediates of the dye could not be mineralized under insufficient dissolved oxygen level. In the aspect of electricity generation, the maximum short circuit current (0.0041 mA cm -2 ) and power density (0.00028 mW cm -2 ) of the air purged photocatalytic fuel cell was obviously higher than that with nitrogen purging (0.0015 mA cm -2 and 0.00008 mW cm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Compact PEM fuel cell system combined with all-in-one hydrogen generator using chemical hydride as a hydrogen source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jincheol; Kim, Taegyu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Compact fuel cell system was developed for a portable power generator. • Novel concept using an all-in-one reactor for hydrogen generation was proposed. • Catalytic reactor, hydrogen chamber and separator were combined in a volume. • The system can be used to drive fuel cell-powered unmanned autonomous systems. - Abstract: Compact fuel cell system was developed for a portable power generator. The power generator features a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) using a chemical hydride as a hydrogen source. The hydrogen generator extracted hydrogen using a catalytic hydrolysis from a sodium borohydride alkaline solution. A novel concept using an all-in-one reactor was proposed in which a catalyst, hydrogen chamber and byproduct separator were combined in a volume. In addition, the reactor as well as a pump, cooling fans, valves and controller was integrated in a single module. A 100 W PEMFC stack was connected with the hydrogen generator and was evaluated at various load conditions. It was verified that the stable hydrogen supply was achieved and the developed system can be used to drive fuel cell-powered unmanned autonomous systems.

  7. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 9. Petri Nets - Applications. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 9 September 1999 pp 44-52 ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  8. Net Gain

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Describing the effect of tax incentives for import, production, and sale of nets and insecticides; and ..... So far, China is the only country where a system for the routine treatment of ...... 1993), and the trials in Ecuador and Peru (Kroeger et al.

  9. Electricity generation and microbial community analysis of alcohol powered microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Rae; Jung, Sok Hee; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2007-09-01

    Two different microbial fuel cell (MFC) configurations were investigated for electricity production from ethanol and methanol: a two-chambered, aqueous-cathode MFC; and a single-chamber direct-air cathode MFC. Electricity was generated in the two-chamber system at a maximum power density typical of this system (40+/-2 mW/m2) and a Coulombic efficiency (CE) ranging from 42% to 61% using ethanol. When bacteria were transferred into a single-chamber MFC known to produce higher power densities with different substrates, the maximum power density increased to 488+/-12 mW/m2 (CE = 10%) with ethanol. The voltage generated exhibited saturation kinetics as a function of ethanol concentration in the two-chambered MFC, with a half-saturation constant (Ks) of 4.86 mM. Methanol was also examined as a possible substrate, but it did not result in appreciable electricity generation. Analysis of the anode biofilm and suspension from a two-chamber MFC with ethanol using 16S rDNA-based techniques indicated that bacteria with sequences similar to Proteobacterium Core-1 (33.3% of clone library sequences), Azoarcus sp. (17.4%), and Desulfuromonas sp. M76 (15.9%) were significant members of the anode chamber community. These results indicate that ethanol can be used for sustained electricity generation at room temperature using bacteria on the anode in a MFC.

  10. Agricultural Bio-Fueled Generation of Electricity and Development of Durable and Efficent NOx Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, Rodney

    2007-08-08

    The objective of this project was to define the scope and cost of a technology research and development program that will demonstrate the feasibility of using an off-the-shelf, unmodified, large bore diesel powered generator in a grid-connected application, utilizing various blends of BioDiesel as fuel. Furthermore, the objective of project was to develop an emissions control device that uses a catalytic process and BioDiesel (without the presence of Ammonia or Urea)to reduce NOx and other pollutants present in a reciprocating engine exhaust stream with the goal of redefining the highest emission reduction efficiencies possible for a diesel reciprocating generator. Process: Caterpillar Power Generation adapted an off-the-shelf Diesel Generator to run on BioDiesel and various Petroleum Diesel/BioDiesel blends. EmeraChem developed and installed an exhaust gas cleanup system to reduce NOx, SOx, volatile organics, and particulates. The system design and function was optimized for emissions reduction with results in the 90-95% range;

  11. The downstream side of the nuclear fuel cycle. Tome II: Electricity generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, Ch.; Galley, R.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Office's continuing work in the nuclear field, Mr. Christian Bataille and Mr. Robert Galley, Members of Parliament for the Nord and Aube departements respectively, published in June 1998 the first part of their investigation into the downstream side of the nuclear fuel cycle, focusing on the work done in application of the law of 30 December 1991 concerning research into radioactive waste management. This document supplements that initial technical approach with a technical and economic study of the costs of generating electricity. To begin with, the performance of existing nuclear generating plant is examined, in particular the past, present and future contributions of this plant to the growth and competitiveness of the French economy. Secondly, the competitiveness of the different generating systems is analysed with a view to the construction of new facilities, using the method of discounted average costs which is at present the standard approach governing investment decisions, and identifying the different ways in which the said systems are dealt with as regards the cost categories considered. The potential contributions of external factor analysis and the calculation of external costs are then reviewed in order to evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of the different electricity generating systems on a more global basis. The report includes more than a hundred tables of data and cost curves upon which the Rapporteurs base their comments, conclusions and recommendations

  12. Main results of post-irradiation examinations of new-generation fuel assemblies VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvir, E.; Markov, D.; Polenok, V.; Zhitelev, V.; Kobylyansky, G.

    2009-01-01

    To increase the competitiveness of Russian nuclear fuel at the foreign market and to improve its technical and economic performance in order to provide a necessary level of safety, it is necessary to solve certain important tasks: Increase of fuel burn-up; Extension of operational lifetime of fuel assemblies and operational reliability of nuclear fuel; Introduction of cost-beneficial and flexible fuel cycles. Alternative fuel assemblies TVSA VVER-1000 and TVS-2 are used as a basis to optimize the nuclear fuel and develop advanced fuel cycles for nuclear power plants with VVER-1000 reactor types. Four fuel assemblies TVSA operated during 1 and up to 6 reactor cycles, reference fuel assembly TVS-2 operated during three reactor cycles and achieved an average fuel burnup of 48MW·day/kgU as well as failed fuel assembly TVS-2 operated during one cycle were examined at RIAR in recent years. The main objectives of these examinations were to obtain experimental data in support of operational integrity of products or to find out reasons of their failure. The performed post-irradiation examinations confirmed the operational integrity of alternative fuel assemblies TVSA including their geometrical stability up to the average fuel burnup of 55 MW·day/kgU over the fuel assembly (FA) (up to the maximal fuel burnup of ∼73 MW·day/kgU in fuel rods) and of TVS-2 up to the average fuel burnup of 48 MW·day/kgU over the fuel assembly. The changes introduced in the design of VVER-1000 fuel assembly during the development of alternative fuel assembly TVSA and TVS-2 did not make any negative effect on fuel rods. It was proved that causes of fuel rod failure were not related to design features of fuel assemblies. The design features and operating conditions of fuel assemblies under examinations are briefly described. Post-irradiation examinations proved the geometrical stability of fuel assemblies TVSA and TVS-2 under operation up to the fuel burnup of ∼50 MW day/kgU, as for the

  13. Fuel operation of EDF nuclear fleet presentation of the centralized organization for operational engineering at the nuclear generation division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulin, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    The main feature of EDF Nuclear Fleet is the standardization, with 'series' of homogeneous plants (same equipment, fuel and operation technical documents). For fuel operation, this standardization is related to the concept of 'fuel management scheme' (typical fuel reloads with fixed number and enrichment of fresh assemblies) for a whole series of plants. The context of the Nuclear Fleet lead to the choice of a centralized organization for fuel engineering at the Nuclear Generation Division (DPN), located at UNIPE (National Department for Fleet Operation Engineering) in Lyon. The main features of this organization are the following: - Centralization of the engineering activities for fuel operation support in the Fuel Branch of UNIPE, - Strong real-time link with the nuclear sites, - Relations with various EDF Departments in charge of design, nuclear fuel supply and electricity production optimization. The purposes of the organization are: - Standardization of operational engineering services and products, - Autonomy with independent methods and computing tools, - Reactivity with a technical assistance for sites (24 hours 'hot line'), - Identification of different levels (on site and off site) to solve core operation problems, - Collection, analysis and valorization of operation feedback, - Contribution to fuel competence global management inside EDF. This paper briefly describes the organization. The main figures of annual engineering production are provided. A selection of examples illustrates the contribution to the Nuclear Fleet performance. (authors)

  14. Electricity Generation and Community Wastewater Treatment by Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakthai, S.; Potchanakunakorn, R.; Changjan, A.; Intaravicha, N.; Pramuanl, P.; Srigobue, P.; Soponsathien, S.; Kongson, C.; Maksuwan, A.

    2018-05-01

    The attractive solution to the pressing issues of energy production and community wastewater treatment was using of Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). The objective of this research was to study the efficiency of electricity generation and community wastewater treatment of MFCs. This study used an experimental method completely randomized design (CRD), which consisted of two treatment factors (4×5 factorial design). The first factor was different solution containing organic matter (T) and consisting of 4 level factors including T1 (tap water), T2 (tap water with soil), T3 (50 % V/V community wastewater with soil), and T4 (100% community wastewater with soil). The second factor was the time (t), consisting of 5 level factors t1 (day 1), t2 (day 2), t3 (day 3), t4 (day 4), and t5 (day 5). There were 4 experimental models depending on containing organic matter (T1-T4). The parameter measured consisted of Open Circuit Voltage (OCV), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Total Dissolve Solid (TDS), acidity (pH), Electric Conductivity (EC) and number of bacteria. Data were analysed by ANOVA, followed by Duncan test. The results of this study showed that, the T3 was the highest voltage at 0.816 V (P<0.05) and T4, T2, and Ti were 0.800, 0.797 and 0.747 V, respectively. The T3 was the lowest COD at 24.120 mg/L and T4 was 38.067 mg/L (P<0.05). The best model for electricity generation and community wastewater treatment by Microbial Fuel Cells was T3. This model generated highest voltage at 0.816 V, and reduction of COD at 46.215%.

  15. Ultimate - a new generation of gasoline and diesel fuels; Ultimate - eine neue Generation von Otto- und Dieselkraftstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strempel, G. [Aral Forschung/Global Fuels Technology, Bochum (Germany); Beckwith, P. [BP Fuels Management Group, Pangbourne (United Kingdom); Froehling, J. [Aral Forschung, Bochum (Germany). Labor/Analytik; Baron, U. [Aral Forschung, Bochum (Germany). Motor- und Fahrzeuglaboratorium; Sauermann, P.; Balfanz, U. [Aral Forschung, Bochum (Germany). Produktentwicklung; Doermer, W. [Aral Forschung, Bochum (Germany). Produktqualitaet

    2005-06-01

    With the launch of Ultimate 100 gasoline and Ultimate Diesel, motorists in Germany now have the opportunity to choose new advanced performance fuels designed to get the very best from their engines. This article gives details of the technical development behind these fuels, their wide range of benefits, and how it is possible to manufacture fuels which meet the considerable technical challenge of achieving both more performance and less pollution. (orig.)

  16. Flame structure and NO generation in oxy-fuel combustion at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas

    2009-01-01

    A numerical study of oxy-fuel combustion has been carried out in the pressure range of 0.1-3 MPa with methane as the fuel and carbondioxide-diluted oxygen with trace amount of nitrogen (termed here as c a ir) as the oxidant. The flame structure and NO generation rate have been calculated using the flamelet model with the detailed GRI 3.0 mechanism for two oxygen concentrations of 23.3% and 20% by weight in the oxidant at a strain rate of 40 s -1 (corresponding to a scalar dissipation rate of 1 s -1 ). It is observed that, for the reference case of 23.3 wt.% of oxygen, as the pressure increases, the peak temperature of the flame increases rapidly up to a pressure of 0.5 MPa, and more gradually at higher pressures. The concentrations of important intermediate radicals such as CH 3 , H and OH decrease considerably with increasing pressure while NO concentration follows the same trend as the temperature. Reducing the oxygen concentration to 20% by weight leads to an order of magnitude reduction in NO concentration. Also, for pressures greater than 0.3 MPa, the NO concentration decreases with increasing pressure in spite of the increasing peak flame temperatures. This can be attributed to the increasing domination of recombination reactions leading to less availability of the intermediate radicals H and OH which are necessary for the formation of NO by the thermal route. It is concluded that a stable, low NO x oxy-fuel flame can be obtained at high pressures at slightly increased dilution of oxygen

  17. Flame structure and NO generation in oxy-fuel combustion at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seepana, Sivaji; Jayanti, Sreenivas [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-04-15

    A numerical study of oxy-fuel combustion has been carried out in the pressure range of 0.1-3 MPa with methane as the fuel and carbondioxide-diluted oxygen with trace amount of nitrogen (termed here as c{sub a}ir) as the oxidant. The flame structure and NO generation rate have been calculated using the flamelet model with the detailed GRI 3.0 mechanism for two oxygen concentrations of 23.3% and 20% by weight in the oxidant at a strain rate of 40 s{sup -1} (corresponding to a scalar dissipation rate of 1 s{sup -1}). It is observed that, for the reference case of 23.3 wt.% of oxygen, as the pressure increases, the peak temperature of the flame increases rapidly up to a pressure of 0.5 MPa, and more gradually at higher pressures. The concentrations of important intermediate radicals such as CH{sub 3}, H and OH decrease considerably with increasing pressure while NO concentration follows the same trend as the temperature. Reducing the oxygen concentration to 20% by weight leads to an order of magnitude reduction in NO concentration. Also, for pressures greater than 0.3 MPa, the NO concentration decreases with increasing pressure in spite of the increasing peak flame temperatures. This can be attributed to the increasing domination of recombination reactions leading to less availability of the intermediate radicals H and OH which are necessary for the formation of NO by the thermal route. It is concluded that a stable, low NO{sub x} oxy-fuel flame can be obtained at high pressures at slightly increased dilution of oxygen. (author)

  18. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-02-01

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

  19. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps......, to location-based social networks and games, such as Foursquare and facebook. Warns of the threats these technologies, such as data surveillance, present to our sense of privacy, while also outlining the opportunities for pro-social developments. Provides a theory of the web in the context of the history...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  20. NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator with a volume-exchange fuel tank for small unmanned aerial vehicles powered by a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu

    2014-01-01

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system integrated with a NaBH 4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator was developed for small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The hydrogen generator was composed of a catalytic reactor, liquid pump and volume-exchange fuel tank, where the fuel and spent fuel exchange the volume within a single fuel tank. Co–B catalyst supported on a porous ceramic material was used to generate hydrogen from the NaBH 4 solution. Considering the power consumption according to the mission profile of a UAV, the power output of the fuel cell and auxiliary battery was distributed passively as an electrical load. A blended wing-body was selected considering the fuel efficiency and carrying capability of fuel cell components. First, the fuel cell stack and hydrogen generator were evaluated under the operating conditions, and integrated into the airframe. The ground test of the complete fuel cell UAV was performed under a range of load conditions. Finally, the fuel cell powered flight test was made for 1 h. The volume-exchange fuel tank minimized the fuel sloshing and the change in center of gravity due to fuel consumption during the flight, so that much stable operation of the fuel cell system was validated at different flight modes. - Highlights: • PEMFC system with a NaBH 4 hydrogen source was developed for small UAVs. • Volume-exchange fuel tank was used to reduce the size of the fuel cell system. • Passive power management was used for a stable power output during the flight. • BWB UAV was selected by taking the fuel cell integration into consideration. • Stable operation of the fuel cell system was verified from the flight test

  1. Electricity generation by direct oxidation of glucose in mediatorless microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Swades K; Lovley, Derek R

    2003-10-01

    Abundant energy, stored primarily in the form of carbohydrates, can be found in waste biomass from agricultural, municipal and industrial sources as well as in dedicated energy crops, such as corn and other grains. Potential strategies for deriving useful forms of energy from carbohydrates include production of ethanol and conversion to hydrogen, but these approaches face technical and economic hurdles. An alternative strategy is direct conversion of sugars to electrical power. Existing transition metal-catalyzed fuel cells cannot be used to generate electric power from carbohydrates. Alternatively, biofuel cells in which whole cells or isolated redox enzymes catalyze the oxidation of the sugar have been developed, but their applicability has been limited by several factors, including (i) the need to add electron-shuttling compounds that mediate electron transfer from the cell to the anode, (ii) incomplete oxidation of the sugars and (iii) lack of long-term stability of the fuel cells. Here we report on a novel microorganism, Rhodoferax ferrireducens, that can oxidize glucose to CO(2) and quantitatively transfer electrons to graphite electrodes without the need for an electron-shuttling mediator. Growth is supported by energy derived from the electron transfer process itself and results in stable, long-term power production.

  2. Multiple Model Predictive Hybrid Feedforward Control of Fuel Cell Power Generation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Wu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC is widely considered as an alternative solution among the family of the sustainable distributed generation. Its load flexibility enables it adjusting the power output to meet the requirements from power grid balance. Although promising, its control is challenging when faced with load changes, during which the output voltage is required to be maintained as constant and fuel utilization rate kept within a safe range. Moreover, it makes the control even more intractable because of the multivariable coupling and strong nonlinearity within the wide-range operating conditions. To this end, this paper developed a multiple model predictive control strategy for reliable SOFC operation. The resistance load is regarded as a measurable disturbance, which is an input to the model predictive control as feedforward compensation. The coupling is accommodated by the receding horizon optimization. The nonlinearity is mitigated by the multiple linear models, the weighted sum of which serves as the final control execution. The merits of the proposed control structure are demonstrated by the simulation results.

  3. Bioelectricity generation using two chamber microbial fuel cell treating wastewater from food processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoorian, Hossein Jafari; Mahvi, Amir Hossein; Jafari, Ahmad Jonidi; Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Rajabizadeh, Ahmad; Khanjani, Narges

    2013-05-10

    Electricity generation from microbial fuel cells which treat food processing wastewater was investigated in this study. Anaerobic anode and aerobic cathode chambers were separated by a proton exchange membrane in a two-compartment MFC reactor. Buffer solutions and food industry wastewater were used as electrolytes in the anode and cathode chambers, respectively. The produced voltage and current intensity were measured using a digital multimeter. Effluents from the anode compartment were tested for COD, BOD5, NH3, P, TSS, VSS, SO4 and alkalinity. The maximum current density and power production were measured 527mA/m(2) and 230mW/m(2) in the anode area, respectively, at operation organic loading (OLR) of 0.364g COD/l.d. At OLR of 0.182g COD/l.d, maximum voltage and columbic efficiency production were recorded 0.475V and 21%, respectively. Maximum removal efficiency of COD, BOD5, NH3, P, TSS, VSS, SO4 and alkalinity were 86, 79, 73, 18, 68, 62, 30 and 58%, respectively. The results indicated that catalysts and mediator-less microbial fuel cells (CAML-MFC) can be considered as a better choice for simple and complete energy conversion from the wastewater of such industries and also this could be considered as a new method to offset wastewater treatment plant operating costs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reversible solid oxide fuel cell for natural gas/renewable hybrid power generation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yu; Shi, Yixiang; Zheng, Yi; Cai, Ningsheng

    2017-02-01

    Renewable energy (RE) is expected to be the major part of the future energy. Presently, the intermittence and fluctuation of RE lead to the limitation of its penetration. Reversible solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) as the energy storage device can effectively store the renewable energy and build a bidirectional connection with natural gas (NG). In this paper, the energy storage strategy was designed to improve the RE penetration and dynamic operation stability in a distributed system coupling wind generators, internal combustion engine, RSOFC and lithium-ion batteries. By compromising the relative deviation of power supply and demand, RE penetration, system efficiency and capacity requirement, the strategy that no more than 36% of the maximum wind power output is directly supplied to users and the other is stored by the combination of battery and reversible solid oxide fuel cell is optimal for the distributed system. In the case, the RE penetration reached 56.9% and the system efficiency reached 55.2%. The maximum relative deviation of power supply and demand is also lower than 4%, which is significantly superior to that in the wind curtailment case.

  5. Advanced fuels with reduced actinide generation. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear energy can play an important future role in supplying the world population with energy. However, this form of energy will be successful only under certain conditions: it must meet very strict safety requirements, it must be economically competitive, and it must be acceptable to the public. Nuclear power produces radioactive wastes and in several countries the public raises concern about safety. Much development work on advanced nuclear power systems is going on in several countries, with participation of both governmental and private industries to meet these conditions. In the framework of this IAEA activity the Technical Committee Meeting on Advanced Fuels with Reduced Actinide Generation was organized. The aim of the meeting was to highlight current research activities and to identify new research areas and fields of possible co-operation. The scope of the meeting included advanced fuels for all types of nuclear reactors: light water reactors, heavy water reactors, high temperature reactors, fast reactors, molten salt reactors and for accelerator driven systems. Other topics covered a wide range of investigations made, or to be made in the Member States. Refs, figs, tabs

  6. Characterization of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell as a power generator based on a nickel electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Yaghmaei, Soheila

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the fabrication of a microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) using nickel as a novel alternative for conventional electrodes and a non-phatogenic strain of Escherichia coli as the biocatalyst. The feasibility of a microfluidic MFC as an efficient power generator for production of bioelectricity from glucose and urea as organic substrates in human blood and urine for implantable medical devices (IMDs) was investigated. A maximum open circuit potential of 459 mV was achieved for the batch-fed microfluidic MFC. During continuous mode operation, a maximum power density of 104 Wm(-3) was obtained with nutrient broth. For the glucose-fed microfluidic MFC, the maximum power density of 5.2 μW cm(-2) obtained in this study is significantly greater than the power densities reported previously for microsized MFCs and glucose fuel cells. The maximum power density of 14 Wm(-3) obtained using urea indicates the successful performance of a microfluidic MFC using human excreta. It features high power density, self-regeneration, waste management and a low production cost (microfluidic MFC as a power supply was characterized based on polarization behavior and cell potential in different substrates, operational modes, and concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Solar fuels generation and molecular systems: is it homogeneous or heterogeneous catalysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero, Vincent; Fontecave, Marc

    2013-03-21

    Catalysis is a key enabling technology for solar fuel generation. A number of catalytic systems, either molecular/homogeneous or solid/heterogeneous, have been developed during the last few decades for both the reductive and oxidative multi-electron reactions required for fuel production from water or CO(2) as renewable raw materials. While allowing for a fine tuning of the catalytic properties through ligand design, molecular approaches are frequently criticized because of the inherent fragility of the resulting catalysts, when exposed to extreme redox potentials. In a number of cases, it has been clearly established that the true catalytic species is heterogeneous in nature, arising from the transformation of the initial molecular species, which should rather be considered as a pre-catalyst. Whether such a situation is general or not is a matter of debate in the community. In this review, covering water oxidation and reduction catalysts, involving noble and non-noble metal ions, we limit our discussion to the cases in which this issue has been directly and properly addressed as well as those requiring more confirmation. The methodologies proposed for discriminating homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis are inspired in part by those previously discussed by Finke in the case of homogeneous hydrogenation reaction in organometallic chemistry [J. A. Widegren and R. G. Finke, J. Mol. Catal. A, 2003, 198, 317-341].

  8. Experimental study of new generation WWER-1000 fuel assemblies at JSC NCCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enin, A.; Rozhkov, V.; Sinikov, Y.; Ustimenko, A.; Shustov, M.

    2003-01-01

    An experimental program for the study of fuel assembly thermomechanical stability has been established together with RF SSC IPPE and Russian Scientific Center Kurchatov Institute. Assembly fragments and small dummy models of fuel assembly skeletons and fuel rod bundles have been used for the tests. The test results are used for the design selection, verification of the design codes and substantiation of operating capacity of fuel assemblies with a rigid skeleton. The mechanical characteristics of units make it possible to perform fuel assembly strength and rigidity calculations, including the cases of abnormal operation. The mechanical characteristics of the skeleton and fuel rod bundle dummy models make it possible to check for the adequacy of the fuel assembly design model. The mechanical characteristics obtained during fuel rods bundle push through experiments make it possible to substantiate the fuel assembly serviceability under the conditions of fuel rods bundle and skeleton interaction

  9. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebersorger, S; Beigl, P

    2011-01-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Progress and challenges in utilization of palm oil biomass as fuel for decentralized electricity generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazmi, Aqeel Ahmed [Process Systems Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor Bahru, JB (Malaysia); Biomass Conversion Research Center (BCRC), Department of Chemical Engineering, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Zahedi, Gholamreza; Hashim, Haslenda [Process Systems Engineering Centre (PROSPECT), Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor Bahru, JB (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    It has been broadly accepted worldwide that global warming, indeed, is the greatest threat of the time to the environment. Renewable energy (RE) is expected as a perfect solution to reduce global warming and to endorse sustainable development. Progressive release of greenhouse gases (GHG) from increasing energy-intensive industries has eventually caused human civilization to suffer. Realizing the exigency of reducing emissions and simultaneously catering to needs of industries, researchers foresee the RE as the perfect entrant to overcome these challenges. RE provides an effective option for the provision of energy services from the technical point of view while biomass, a major source of energy in the world until before industrialization when fossil fuels become dominant, appears an important renewable source of energy and researches have proven from time to time its viability for large-scale production. Being a widely spread source, biomass offers the execution of decentralized electricity generation gaining importance in liberalized electricity markets. The decentralized power is characterized by generation of electricity nearer to the demand centers, meeting the local energy needs. Researchers envisaged an increasing decentralization of power supply, expected to make a particular contribution to climate protection. This article investigates the progress and challenges for decentralized electricity generation by palm oil biomass according to the overall concept of sustainable development. (author)

  11. Efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation: Data selection and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzi, Elisa [Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (Italy); Verdolini, Elena, E-mail: elena.verdolini@feem.it [Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (Italy); Universita Cattolica, del Sacro Cuore di Milano (Italy); Hascic, Ivan [OECD Environment Directorate (France)

    2011-11-15

    This paper studies patenting dynamics in efficiency improving electricity generation technologies as an important indicator of innovation activity. We build a novel database of worldwide patent applications in efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation and then analyse patenting trends over time and across countries. We find that patenting has mostly been stable over time, with a recent decreasing trend. OECD countries represent the top innovators and the top markets for technology. Some non-OECD countries, and particularly China, are also very active in terms of patenting activity in this sector. The majority of patents are first filed in OECD countries and only then in BRIC and other non-OECD countries. BRIC and other non-OECD countries apply for patents that are mostly marketed domestically, but BRIC countries represent important markets for patent duplication of OECD inventions. These results are indicative of significant technology transfer in the field of efficiency-improving technologies for electricity production. - Highlights: > We study innovation in efficiency-improving electricity generation technologies. > Relevant patents are identified and used as an indicator of innovation. > We show that there is significant technology transfer in this field. > Most patents are first filed in OECD countries and then in non-OECD countries. > Patents in non-OECD countries are mostly marketed domestically.

  12. Combining hybrid cars and synthetic fuels with electricity generation and carbon capture and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vliet, Oscar van; Broek, Machteld van den; Turkenburg, Wim; Faaij, Andre

    2011-01-01

    We examined the co-evolution of the transportation, and electricity and heat generation sectors in the Netherlands until 2040 using a MARKAL bottom-up cost optimisation model. All scenario variants investigated indicate a switch away from crude oil-based diesel and petrol for transportation. Lowest overall CO 2 abatement cost is achieved by accommodating transportation first and using relatively expensive options for emissions reduction in electricity generation if needed. Biomass and carbon capture and storage (CCS) are used to full potential. Transportation CO 2 emissions are reduced by switching to ethanol or bio-based synthetic fuels combined with CCS, and series hybrid cars if needed. Depending on the availability of biomass and carbon storage capacity, electricity is produced from biomass, coal with CCS, or wind complemented with natural gas. Indirect greenhouse gas emissions rise to 34-54% of national emissions in 2040. The difference in annual investment required between the scenario variants with and without CO 2 emissions reductions of 68% by 2040 is 4-7 billion euro/year, or 0.5-1.2% of projected GDP. Investment costs are mostly determined by the cost of cars and electricity generation capacity. We observe competition for limited biomass supply and CO 2 storage capacity between the transportation and power sectors.

  13. Efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation: Data selection and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzi, Elisa; Verdolini, Elena; Hascic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies patenting dynamics in efficiency improving electricity generation technologies as an important indicator of innovation activity. We build a novel database of worldwide patent applications in efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation and then analyse patenting trends over time and across countries. We find that patenting has mostly been stable over time, with a recent decreasing trend. OECD countries represent the top innovators and the top markets for technology. Some non-OECD countries, and particularly China, are also very active in terms of patenting activity in this sector. The majority of patents are first filed in OECD countries and only then in BRIC and other non-OECD countries. BRIC and other non-OECD countries apply for patents that are mostly marketed domestically, but BRIC countries represent important markets for patent duplication of OECD inventions. These results are indicative of significant technology transfer in the field of efficiency-improving technologies for electricity production. - Highlights: → We study innovation in efficiency-improving electricity generation technologies. → Relevant patents are identified and used as an indicator of innovation. → We show that there is significant technology transfer in this field. → Most patents are first filed in OECD countries and then in non-OECD countries. → Patents in non-OECD countries are mostly marketed domestically.

  14. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebersorger, S.; Beigl, P.

    2011-01-01

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

  15. Progress and challenges in utilization of palm oil biomass as fuel for decentralized electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazmi, Aqeel Ahmed; Zahedi, Gholamreza; Hashim, Haslenda

    2011-01-01

    It has been broadly accepted worldwide that global warming, indeed, is the greatest threat of the time to the environment. Renewable energy (RE) is expected as a perfect solution to reduce global warming and to endorse sustainable development. Progressive release of greenhouse gases (GHG) from increasing energy-intensive industries has eventually caused human civilization to suffer. Realizing the exigency of reducing emissions and simultaneously catering to needs of industries, researchers foresee the RE as the perfect entrant to overcome these challenges. RE provides an effective option for the provision of energy services from the technical point of view while biomass, a major source of energy in the world until before industrialization when fossil fuels become dominant, appears an important renewable source of energy and researches have proven from time to time its viability for large-scale production. Being a widely spread source, biomass offers the execution of decentralized electricity generation gaining importance in liberalized electricity markets. The decentralized power is characterized by generation of electricity nearer to the demand centers, meeting the local energy needs. Researchers envisaged an increasing decentralization of power supply, expected to make a particular contribution to climate protection. This article investigates the progress and challenges for decentralized electricity generation by palm oil biomass according to the overall concept of sustainable development. (author)

  16. Assessment of the implementation issues for fuel cells in domestic and small scale stationary power generation and CHP applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G.; Cruden, A.; Hart, J.

    2002-07-01

    This report discusses implementation issues associated with the use of fuel cells in <10 kW domestic, small-scale power generation and combined heat and power (CHP) operations in the UK. The report examines the key issues (fuel cell system standards and certification, fuel infrastructure, commercial issues and competing CHP technologies), before discussing non-technical issues including finance, ownership, import and export configuration, pricing structure, customer acceptability, installation, operation and training of servicing and commissioning personnel. The report goes on to discuss market and technical drivers, grid connection issues and solutions, operations and maintenance. Recommendations for the future are made.

  17. Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator for Maximum Power Output in Micro-CHP Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse; Mortensen, Paw Vestergård; Enkeshafi, Ali A.

    2011-01-01

    and market segments which are not yet quantified. This paper quantifies a micro-CHP system based on a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a high-performance TE generator. Based on a 3 kW fuel input, the hybrid SOFC implementation boosts electrical output from 945 W to 1085 W, with 1794 W available for heating...... the electricity production in micro-CHP systems by more than 15%, corresponding to system electrical efficiency increases of some 4 to 5 percentage points. This will make fuel cell-based micro-CHP systems very competitive and profitable and will also open opportunities in a number of other potential business...

  18. The International conference on fast reactors and related fuel cycles: next generation nuclear systems for sustainable development. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The materials of the International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles (June 26-29, 2017, Yekaterinburg) are presented. The forum was organized by the IAEA with the assistance of Rosatom State Corporation. The theme of the conference: “The New Generation of Nuclear Systems for Sustainable Development”. About 700 specialists from more than 30 countries took part in the conference. The state and prospects for the development of the direction of fast reactors in countries dealing with this topic were discussed. A wide range of scientific issues covered the concepts of prospective reactors, reactor cores, fuel and fuel cycles, operation and decommissioning, safety, licensing, structural materials, industrial implementation [ru

  19. Fuel cycle: the transition between the third and the fourth generation of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Many challenges arrive today for the french research and development on the fuel cycle: promote the industrial technologies, improve the world increase of the nuclear and adapt the fuel cycle technologies to the future reactors. In this framework the report presents after a recall on the fuel cycle, the researches on the fuel, the optimization of the recycling, the wastes management, the simulation and Phenix an experimentation tool for the fuel. (A.L.B.)

  20. Proposal and analysis of the benchmark problem suite for reactor physics study of LWR next generation fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    In order to investigate the calculation accuracy of the nuclear characteristics of LWR next generation fuels, the Research Committee on Reactor Physics organized by JAERI has established the Working Party on Reactor Physics for LWR Next Generation Fuels. The next generation fuels mean the ones aiming for further extended burn-up such as 70 GWd/t over the current design. The Working Party has proposed six benchmark problems, which consists of pin-cell, PWR fuel assembly and BWR fuel assembly geometries loaded with uranium and MOX fuels, respectively. The specifications of the benchmark problem neglect some of the current limitations such as 5 wt% {sup 235}U to achieve the above-mentioned target. Eleven organizations in the Working Party have carried out the analyses of the benchmark problems. As a result, status of accuracy with the current data and method and some problems to be solved in the future were clarified. In this report, details of the benchmark problems, result by each organization, and their comparisons are presented. (author)

  1. Health risks of nuclear and coal fuel cycles in electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayes, R.J.; Taylor, P.J.

    1984-12-01

    A report has been prepared by the Political Ecology Research Group in which the field of comparative risk assessment of electricity generation from nuclear and coal fuel cycles is critically reviewed. Section 2 gives an introduction to risk assessments and points out the limitations of the numerical assessments that are so widely quoted. Section 3 critically reviews the major study of the UK situation, the remaining minor British studies and two American studies. Section 4 examines in detail certain areas of controversy and significance that arise in the previous section. It relates the numerical values of risk derived in Section 3 to risks in other sectors of society. Section 5 considers the significance of these estimates of risk and the conclusions are presented in section 6. (U.K.)

  2. Prediction of requirements on labor force in the fuel and power generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaveckova, R.

    1990-01-01

    One of the aspects of socio-economic assessment of development is quantification of the expected requirements on the number of personnel. Predictions are discussed for the period before the year 2005 for solid fuel mining and treatment, gas production and bitumen mining, power and heat generation and also for the production of electricity and heat by nuclear power plants. They are based on an analysis of past development and the present state, on presumed implementation of various concept variants, on the type structure of nuclear power plants, on the rules of the electric power supply system, and also on foreign materials. It is expected that in 2005, nuclear power will employ 15,654 personnel. (M.D.). 4 tabs., 16 refs

  3. Coupling a PEM fuel cell and the hydrogen generation from aluminum waste cans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Susana Silva; Albanil Sanchez, Loyda; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. CP 62210 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia y Sustentabilidad, UPCH, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    High purity hydrogen was generated from the chemical reaction of aluminum and sodium hydroxide. The aluminum used in this study was obtained from empty soft drink cans and treated with concentrated sulfuric acid to remove the paint and plastic film. One gram of aluminum was reacted with a solution of 2moldm{sup -3} of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen produced from aluminum cans and oxygen obtained from a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer or air, was fed to a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell to produce electricity. Yields of 44 mmol of hydrogen contained in a volume of 1.760dm{sup 3} were produced from one gram of aluminum in a time period of 20 min. (author)

  4. Ionic liquids in proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Efficient systems for energy generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilha, Janine C.; Basso, Juliana; da Trindade, Leticia G.; Martini, Emilse M.A.; de Souza, Michele O.; de Souza, Roberto F. [Institute of Chemistry, UFRGS, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970, P.O. Box 15003 (Brazil)

    2010-10-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are used in portable devices to generate electrical energy; however, the efficiency of the PEMFC is currently only 40%. This study demonstrates that the efficiency of a PEMFC can be increased to 61% when 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI.BF{sub 4}) ionic liquid (IL) is used together with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The results for ionic liquids (ILs) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMI.Cl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMI.BF{sub 4}) in aqueous solutions are better than those obtained with pure water. The current and the power densities with IL are at least 50 times higher than those obtained for the PEMFC wetted with pure water. This increase in PEMFC performance can greatly facilitate the use of renewable energy sources. (author)

  5. Comparison of hydrogen generation for TVSM and TVSA fuel assemblies for water water energy reactor (VVER)-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanova, A.E.; Groudev, P.P.; Atanasova, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results received during investigation of hydrogen generation for both types fuel assemblies-the old modernistic type of fuel assemblies (TVSM) and recently installed new one alternative type of fuel assemblies (TVSA) in case of severe accident. There are some differences between both types FAs. They have different geometry as well as different burnable poisons. To investigate behavior of new fuel assemblies during the severe conditions it have been performed comparison of fuel behavior of old type TVSM fuel assembly to new one TVSA. To perform this investigation it has been used MELCOR 'input model' for Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP) VVER 1000. The model was developed by Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy-Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (INRNE-BAS) for investigation of severe accident scenarios and Probabilistic Safety Analyses (PSA) level 2. The model provides a significant analytical capability for the Bulgarian technical specialists, working in the field of the NPP safety, for analysis of core and containment damaged states and the estimation of radionuclides release outside fuel cladding. It was accepted criteria for vessel integrity about hydrogen concentration to be 8%. This criterion was based on the decision of RSK (Germany commission for reactor safety). Generally based on the received results it was made conclusion that using both types of fuel assemblies it was not disturbance safety conditions of NPP

  6. Entropy generation analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a fermat spiral as a flow distributor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel-Hernandez, V.H.; Damian-Ascencio, C.; Juarez-Robles, D.; Gallegos-Munoz, A.; Zaleta-Aguilar, A.; Plascencia-Mora, H.

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims at investigating the main sources of irreversibility in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) using a Fermat spiral as flow distributor and also to direct possible improvements in its design. The numerical analysis is based on a finite volume technique with a SIMPLE algorithm as numerical procedure. In order to have a more complete and rigorous analysis a new dimensionless parameter is proposed here. The parameter represents the ratio of the entropy generation due to mass transfer to the total entropy generation is proposed here. Results demonstrate that the main sources of irreversibility in a fuel cell are the concentration losses for the most part of the operational domain, whereas the heat transfer effect is not dominant. -- Highlights: → PEM Fuel Cell with Fermat Spiral as distributor. → Causes of irreversibilities. → A new dimensionless parameter to determine contribution of mass transfer in entropy generation.

  7. Combined Thermal Management and Power Generation Concept for the Spent Fuel Dry Storage Cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Guk; Bang, In Cheol

    2017-01-01

    The management of the spent nuclear fuel generated by nuclear power plants is a major issue in Korea due to insufficient capacity of the wet storage pools. Therefore, it is considered that dry storage system is the one possible solution for storing spent fuel. A dual-purpose metal cask (transportation and storage) is currently developing in Korea. This cask has 21 of fuel assemblies and 16.8 kW of maximum decay heat. To evaluate the critical safety in normal/off normal and accident conditions, critical stabilities were conducted by using CSAS 6.0. The experimental investigation of heat removal of a concrete storage cask was also conducted under normal, off normal and accident conditions. The results of the evaluation showed a good safety of the dry storage cask. The results showed the enhanced thermal performance according to modification of flow rate. To verify combined thermal management and power generation concept, a new type of test facility for dry storage cask was designed in 1/10 scale of concrete dry storage cask. The experimental study involved the cooling methods that are an integrated system on the top of the dry cask and air flow path on the canister wall. The results showed the temperature distribution of the wall and inside of the dry cask at the normal condition. The influence of the change of the heat load and cooling system were investigated. The heat removal by the integrated system is approximately 20% of the total heat removal of the dry cask with reduced wall temperature. In these tests, economic analysis is conducted by applying the concept of the cost and efficiency. Under different decay power cases, the energy efficiency of the heat pipe and Stirling engine are determined and compared based on experimental results. The average efficiencies of the Stirling engine were the range of 2.375 to 3.247% under the power range of 35– 65W. These results showed that advanced dry storage concept had a better cooling performance in comparison with

  8. Prediction of Non-Equilibrium Kinetics of Fuel-Rich Kerosene/LOX Combustion in Gas Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Jung Min; Lee, Chang Jin

    2007-01-01

    Gas generator is the device to produce high enthalpy gases needed to drive turbo-pump system in liquid rocket engine. And, the combustion temperature in gas generator should be controlled below around 1,000K to avoid any possible thermal damages to turbine blade by using either fuel rich combustion or oxidizer rich combustion. Thus, nonequilibrium chemical reaction dominates in fuel-rich combustion of gas generator. Meanwhile, kerosene is a compounded fuel with various types of hydrocarbon elements and difficult to model the chemical kinetics. This study focuses on the prediction of the non-equilibrium reaction of fuel rich kerosene/LOX combustion with detailed kinetics developed by Dagaut using PSR (Perfectly Stirred Reactor) assumption. In Dagaut's surrogate model for kerosene, chemical kinetics of kerosene consists of 1,592 reaction steps with 207 chemical species. Also, droplet evaporation time is taken into account in the PSR calculation by changing the residence time of droplet in the gas generator. Frenklach's soot model was implemented along with detailed kinetics to calculate the gas properties of fuel rich combustion efflux. The results could provide very reliable and accurate numbers in the prediction of combustion gas temperature,species fraction and material properties

  9. Environmental aspects of ethanol-based fuels from Brassica carinata. A case study of second generation ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, Sara; Moreira, M'a Teresa; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Gasol, Carles M.; Gabarrell, Xavier; Rieradevall, Joan

    2009-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by mankind in the 21st century is to meet the increasing demand for energy requirements by means of a more sustainable energy supply. In countries that are net fossil fuel importers, expectation about the benefit of using alternative fuels on reducing oil imports is the primary driving force behind efforts to promote its production and use. Spain is scarce in domestic energy sources and more than 50% of the energy used is fossil fuel based. The promotion of renewable energies use is one of the principal vectors in the Spanish energy policy. Selected herbaceous crops such as Brassica carinata are currently under study as potential energy sources. Its biomass can be considered as potential feedstock to ethanol conversion by an enzymatic process due to the characteristics of its composition, rich in cellulose and hemicellulose. This paper aims to analyse the environmental performance of two ethanol-based fuel applications (E10 and E85) in a passenger car (E10 fuel: a mixture of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline by volume; E85 fuel: a mixture of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume) as well as their comparison with conventional gasoline as transport fuel. Two types of functional units are applied in this study: ethanol production oriented and travelling distance oriented functional units in order to reflect the availability or not of ethanol supply. E85 seems to be the best alternative when ethanol production based functional unit is considered in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and E10 in terms of non-renewable energy resources use. Nevertheless, E85 offers the best environmental performance when travelling distance oriented functional unit is assumed in both impacts. In both functional unit perspectives, the use of ethanol-based fuels reduces the global warming and fossil fuels consumption. However, the contributions to other impact indicators (e.g. acidification, eutrophication and photochemical oxidants formation) were lower

  10. Population dynamics and current-generation mechanisms in cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kazuya [ERATO/JST, Tokyo (Japan). Hashimoto Light Energy Conversion Project; Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology; Tokyo Univ. of Pharmacy and Life Sciences (Japan). School of Life Sciences; Miyahara, Morio [ERATO/JST, Tokyo (Japan). Hashimoto Light Energy Conversion Project; Shimoyama, Takefumi [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology; Hashimoto, Kazuhito [ERATO/JST, Tokyo (Japan). Hashimoto Light Energy Conversion Project; Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    2011-12-15

    Cassette-electrode microbial fuel cells (CE-MFCs) have been demonstrated useful to treat biomass wastes and recover electric energy from them. In order to reveal electricity-generation mechanisms in CE-MFCs, the present study operated a bench-scale reactor (1 l in capacity; approximately 1,000 cm{sup 2} in anode and cathode areas) for treating a high-strength model organic wastewater (comprised of starch, peptone, and fish extract). Approximately 1 month was needed for the bench reactor to attain a stable performance, after which volumetric maximum power densities persisted between 120 and 150 mW/l throughout the experiment (for over 2 months). Temporal increases in the external resistance were found to induce subsequent increases in power outputs. After electric output became stable, electrolyte and anode were sampled from the reactor for evaluating their current-generation abilities; it was estimated that most of current (over 80%) was generated by microbes in the electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry of an electrolyte supernatant detected several electron shuttles with different standard redox potentials at high concentrations (equivalent to or more than 100 {mu}M 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone). Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative real-time PCR of 16S ribosomal RNA gene fragments showed that bacteria related to the genus Dysgonomonas occurred abundantly in association with the increases in power outputs. These results suggest that mediated electron transfer was the main mechanism for electricity generation in CE-MFC, where high-concentration electron shuttles and Dysgonomonas bacteria played important roles. (orig.)

  11. Calculus of radiolytic products generation in water due to alpha radiation. Determination of the spent nuclear fuels matrix alteration rate Determination of velocity of spent fuel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones, J.; Serrano, J.; Diaz Arocas, P.; Rodriguez Almazan, J. L.; Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Merino, J.; Esteban, J. A.; Martinez-Esparza, A.

    2000-01-01

    The generation of radiolytic products as a result of alpha radiation in the surface of the spent fuel is a key process in order to understand how the it becomes degraded in repository conditions. The present work has established a radiolytic model based on a set of reactions involving fuel oxidation-dissolution and radiolytic products recombination. It also includes the decrease of the dose rates as the main alpha emitters decay away. Four cases, with varying parameters of the system, have been assessed. The results show a decrease in both the concentration of the radiolytic products in the gap water and the degradation of the fuel matrix. It has been estimated that in the period of the evaluation (10''6 years) up to 52% of the pellet is altered in the conservative cases, whereas only 11% is altered in the realistic cases. No significant differences were observed when the carbonates reactions were included in the system. (Author)

  12. Electricity generation using white and red wine lees in air cathode microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe Sciarria, Tommy; Merlino, Giuseppe; Scaglia, Barbara; D'Epifanio, Alessandra; Mecheri, Barbara; Borin, Sara; Licoccia, Silvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a useful biotechnology to produce electrical energy from different organic substrates. This work reports for the first time results of the application of single chamber MFCs to generate electrical energy from diluted white wine (WWL) and red wine (RWL) lees. Power obtained was of 8.2 W m-3 (262 mW m-2; 500 Ω) and of 3.1 W m-3 (111 mW m-2; 500Ω) using white and red wine lees, respectively. Biological processes lead to a reduction of chemical oxygen (TCOD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD5) of 27% and 83% for RWL and of 90% and 95% for WWL, respectively. These results depended on the degradability of organic compounds contained, as suggest by BOD5/TCOD of WWL (0.93) vs BOD5/TCOD of RWL (0.33), and to the high presence of polyphenols in RWL that inhibited the process. Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 15 ± 0%, for WWL, was in line with those reported in the literature for other substrates, i.e. CE of 14.9 ± 11.3%. Different substrates led to different microbial consortia, particularly at the anode. Bacterial species responsible for the generation of electricity, were physically connected to the electrode, where the direct electron transfer took place.

  13. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover Biomass Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xin

    2009-08-01

    Corn stover is usually treated by an energy-intensive or expensive process to extract sugars for bioenergy production. However, it is possible to directly generate electricity from corn stover in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) through the addition of microbial consortia specifically acclimated for biomass breakdown. A mixed culture that was developed to have a high saccharification rate with corn stover was added to singlechamber, air-cathode MFCs acclimated for power production using glucose. The MFC produced a maximum power of 331 mW/ m 2 with the bioaugmented mixed culture and corn stover, compared to 510 mW/m2 using glucose. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed the communities continued to evolve on both the anode and corn stover biomass over 60 days, with several bacteria identified including Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The use of residual solids from the steam exploded corn stover produced 8% more power (406 mW/m2) than the raw corn stover. These results show that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using naturally occurring bacteria. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  14. Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to generate electricity from fermented primary sludge. Fermentation (30°C, 9days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1-16.5g/L), volatile suspended solids (24.1-15.3g/L) and pH (5.7-4.5), and increased conductivity (2.4-4.7mS/cm), soluble COD (2.66-15.5g/L), and volatile fatty acids (1.9-10.1g/L). To lower the COD and increase pH, fermentation supernatant was diluted with primary effluent before being used in the MFCs. The maximum power density was 0.32±0.01W/m2, compared to 0.24±0.03W/m2 with only primary effluent. Power densities were higher with phosphate buffer added to the supernatant (1.03±0.06W/m2) or the solution (0.87±0.05W/m2). Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 18% to 57%, and sCOD removals from 84% to 94%. These results demonstrated that sludge can effectively be used for power generation when fermented and then diluted with only primary effluent. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pKa of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Electricity generation in low cost microbial fuel cell made up of earthenware of different thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, M; Ghangrekar, M M

    2011-01-01

    Performance of four microbial fuel cells (MFC-1, MFC-2, MFC-3 and MFC-4) made up of earthen pots with wall thicknesses of 3, 5, 7 and 8.5 mm, respectively, was evaluated. The MFCs were operated in fed batch mode with synthetic wastewater having sucrose as the carbon source. The power generation decreased with increase in the thickness of the earthen pot which was used to make the anode chamber. MFC-1 generated highest sustainable power density of 24.32 mW/m(2) and volumetric power of 1.04 W/m(3) (1.91 mA, 0.191 V) at 100 Ω external resistance. The maximum Coulombic efficiencies obtained in MFC-1, MFC-2, MFC-3 and MFC-4 were 7.7, 7.1, 6.8 and 6.1%, respectively. The oxygen mass transfer and oxygen diffusion coefficients measured for earthen plate of 3 mm thickness were 1.79 × 10(-5) and 5.38 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s, respectively, which implies that earthen plate is permeable to oxygen as other polymeric membranes. The internal resistance increased with increase in thickness of the earthen pot MFCs. The thickness of the earthen material affected the overall performance of MFCs.

  17. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers are used in laboratory media, but the effects of these buffers and their inherent electrolyte conductivities have not been examined relative to current generation in MFCs. We investigated the effect of several common buffers (phosphate, MES, HEPES, and PIPES) on power production in single chambered MFCs compared to a non-buffered control. At the same concentrations the buffers produced different solution conductivities which resulted in different ohmic resistances and power densities. Increasing the solution conductivities to the same values using NaCl produced comparable power densities for all buffers. Very large increases in conductivity resulted in a rapid voltage drop at high current densities. Our results suggest that solution conductivity at a specific pH for each buffer is more important in MFC studies than the buffer itself given relatively constant pH conditions. Based on our analysis of internal resistance and a set neutral pH, phosphate and PIPES are the most useful buffers of those examined here because pH was maintained close to the pK(a) of the buffer, maximizing the ability of the buffer to contribute to increase current generation at high power densities. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Combustion, performance and emissions of a diesel power generator fueled with biodiesel-kerosene and biodiesel-kerosene-diesel blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayındır, Hasan; Işık, Mehmet Zerrakki; Argunhan, Zeki; Yücel, Halit Lütfü; Aydın, Hüseyin

    2017-01-01

    High percentages of biodiesel blends or neat biodiesel cannot be used in diesel engines due to high density and viscosity, and poor atomization properties that lead to some engine operational problems. Biodiesel was produced from canola oil by transesterification process. Test fuels were prepared by blending 80% of the biodiesel with 20% of kerosene (B80&K20) and 80% of the biodiesel with 10% of kerosene and 10% diesel fuel (B80&K10&D10). Fuels were used in a 4 cylinders diesel engine that was loaded with a generator. Combustion, performance and emission characteristics of the blend fuels and D2 in the diesel engine for certain loads of 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 kW output power and 1500 rpm constant engine speed were experimented and deeply analyzed. It was found that kerosene contained blends had quite similar combustion characteristics with those of D2. Mass fuel consumption and Bscf were slightly increased for blend fuels. HC emissions slightly increased while NOx emissions considerably reduced for blends. It was resulted that high percentages of biodiesel can be a potential substitute for diesel fuel provided that it is used as blending fuel with certain amounts of kerosene. - Highlights: • Effects of kerosene and diesel addition to biodiesel in a diesel engine were investigated. • B80&K10 and B80&K10&D10 were tested and comparisons have been made with D2. • Similar fuel properties and combustion parameters have been found for all fuels. • Heat release initiated earlier for B80&K10 and B80&K10&D10. • CO and NOx emissions are lowered for B80&K10 and B80&K10&D10.

  19. Status of thermal power generation in India-Perspectives on capacity, generation and carbon dioxide emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Subhodip

    2010-01-01

    India's reliance on fossil-fuel based electricity generation has aggravated the problem of high carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from combustion of fossil fuels, primarily coal, in the country's energy sector. The objective of this paper is to analyze thermal power generation in India for a four-year period and determine the net generation from thermal power stations and the total and specific CO 2 emissions. The installed generating capacity, net generation and CO 2 emissions figures for the plants have been compared and large generators, large emitters, fuel types and also plant vintage have been identified. Specific emissions and dates of commissioning of plants have been taken into account for assessing whether specific plants need to be modernized. The focus is to find out areas and stations which are contributing more to the total emissions from all thermal power generating stations in the country and identify the overall trends that are emerging.

  20. Thorium based fuel options for the generation of electricity: Developments in the 1990s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-05-01

    The IAEA has maintained an interest in the thorium fuel cycle and its worldwide utilization within its framework of activities. Periodic reviews have assessed the current status of this fuel cycle, worldwide applications, economic benefits, and perceived advantages with respect to other nuclear fuel cycles. Since 1994, the IAEA convened a number of technical meetings on the thorium fuel cycle and related issues. Between 1995 and 1997 individual contributions on the thorium fuel cycle were elicited from experts from France, Germany, India, Japan, the Russian Federation and the USA. These contributions included evaluations of the status of the thorium fuel cycle worldwide; the new incentives to use thorium due to large stockpiles of plutonium produced in nuclear reactors; new reactor concepts utilizing thorium; strategies for thorium use; and an evaluation of toxicity of the thorium fuel cycle waste compared to that from other fuel cycles. The results of this updated evaluation are summarized in this publication

  1. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  2. KM3NeT

    CERN Multimedia

    KM3NeT is a large scale next-generation neutrino telescope located in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea, optimized for the discovery of galactic neutrino sources emitting in the TeV energy region.

  3. Low NO sub x heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1A: Combustion technology generation coal gas fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    Combustion tests of two scaled burners using actual coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are described. The two combustor configurations studied were a ceramic lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannual swirl burner (MASB). The tests were conducted over a range of temperature and pressures representative of current industrial combustion turbine inlet conditions. Tests on the rich lean burner were conducted at three levels of product gas heating values: 104, 197 and 254 btu/scf. Corresponding levels of NOx emissions were 5, 20 and 70 ppmv. Nitrogen was added to the fuel in the form of ammonia, and conversion efficiencies of fuel nitrogen to NOx were on the order of 4 percent to 12 percent, which is somewhat lower than the 14 percent to 18 percent conversion efficiency when src-2 liquid fuel was used. The MASB was tested only on medium btu gas (220 to 270 btu/scf), and produced approximately 80 ppmv NOx at rated engine conditions. Both burners operated similarly on actual coal gas and erbs fuel, and all heating values tested can be successfully burned in current machines.

  4. Development of U-Mo Research Reactor Fuel for Next Generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Man; Lee, Y. S.; Yang, J. H.; Ryu, H. J.; Kim, C. K.; Chae, H. T.; Seo, C. G.

    2010-08-01

    - Exportation of centrifugal atomized U-Mo powder - Completion of post irradiation examination for KOMO-3 irradiated fuel rods. - Select the dispersion fuel rod candidates for KOMO-4 irradiation test. - Irradiation test to solve the problems of interaction layer formation (KOMO-4) - Set the post irradiation examination of KOMO-4 irradiated fuel rods. - Development and characterization of innovative high U density fuel rods - Obtain and analyze foreign new irradiation test D

  5. Basic research in support of innovative fuels design for the Generation IV systems (F-BRIDGE project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, Carole; Bertolus, Marjorie; Konings, Rudy; Somers, Joe; Groot, Sander de

    2010-01-01

    F-BRIDGE (Basic Research in support of Innovative Fuels Design for the GEN IV systems) is a 4-year project which started in 2008. It seeks to bridge the gap between basic research and technological applications for generation IV nuclear reactor systems. One of the challenges for the next generation of reactors is to significantly increase the efficiency in designing innovative fuels. The object of the F-BRIDGE project is to complement the empirical approach by a physically-based description of fuel and cladding materials to enable a rationalization of the design process and a better selection of promising fuel systems. Advanced modelling and separate effects experiments are carried out in order to obtain more exact physical descriptions of ceramic fuels and cladding, at relevant scales from the atomic to the macroscopic scale. Research is also focused on assessing and improving 'sphere-pac' fuel, a composite-ceramics concept which has shown promise. The project activities can be broken down into four main areas: (i) Basic research investigations using a multi-scale approach in both experimentation and modelling to enable the generation of missing basic data, the identification of relevant mechanisms and the development of appropriate models; (ii) Transfer between technological issues and basic research by bringing together within the same project materials scientists, engineers and end-users; (iii) Assessment of the drawbacks and benefits of the sphere-pac fuel application to various Generation IV systems; (iv) Education and training to promote research in the field of fuel materials, to ensure the exchange of results and ideas among the participants and to link the project with other related European or international initiatives. The project relies on the complementary expertise of 19 partners: nuclear and non nuclear research organisations, universities, a nuclear engineering company, as well as technology and project management consultancy small and medium

  6. Perchlorate remediation using packed-bed bioreactors and electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Booki

    Two pilot-scale fixed bed bioreactors were operated in continuous mode in order to treat groundwater contaminated by perchlorate. The bioreactors were constructed and operated side-by-side at the Texas Street Well Facility in Redlands, California. Each reactor was packed with either sand or plastic media. A perchlorate-reducing bacterium, Dechlorosoma sp. KJ, was used to inoculate the bioreactors. Perchlorate was successfully removed down to a non-detectable level (microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which were run either in batch or continuous mode. In batch experiments, both a pure culture (Geobactor metallireducens) and a mixed culture (wastewater inoculum) were used as the biocatalyst, and acetate was added as substrate in the anode chamber of the MFC. Power output in a membrane MFC with either inoculum was essentially the same, with 40 +/- 1 mW/m2 for G. metallireducens and 38 +/- 1 mW/m2 for mixed culture. A different type of the MFC containing a salt bridge instead of a membrane system was examined to generate power using the same substrate and pure culture as used in the membrane MFC. Power output in the salt bridge MFC was 2.2 mW/m 2. It was found that the lower power output was directly attributed to the higher internal resistance of the salt bridge system (19920 +/- 50 O) in comparison with that of the membrane system (1286 +/- 1 O). Continuous electricity generation was examined in a flat plate microbial fuel cell (FPMFC) using domestic wastewater and specific organic substrates. The FPMFC, containing a combined electrode/proton exchange membrane (PEM), was initially acclimated for one month to domestic wastewater, and then was operated as a plug flow reactor system. Power density using domestic wastewater as a substrate was 72 +/- 1 mW/m2 at a liquid flow rate of 0.39 mL/min (1.1 hr hydraulic retention time, HRT), and COD removal was 42%. At a longer HRT of 4.0 hr, the COD removal increased to 79%, and power density was 43 mW/m2. Several organic compounds

  7. Complete biocycle for solar energy conversion, storage, fuel and power generation, and coal conservation for future use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1993-01-01

    A complete carbon biocycle has been described, starting from coal in in situ condition in coal seams underground. Various steps involved are: (i) Biogasification of coal to methane, using a consortia of bacteria, has been reported. A group of bacteria degrades complex structure of coal to simpler structure. This simpler structure of coal, is then converted to methane by methanogens; (ii) Biophotolysis of methane and associated biodegradation, results in products, such as hydrogen and oxygen for use in fuel cells for power generation; (iii) Bioconversion of products so obtained is carried out to produce methanol or methane that could be used as fuel or recycled; (iv) In complete biocycle some methane is converted to biomass. In order to replace this methane, coal is converted to methane using group of bacteria, only to the extent methane has been converted to biomass; (v) The biomass so produced could be dumped underground from where coal has been gasified. Alternatively it could be burnt as fuel or else used as substitute of protein in animal food. Detailed concept of proposed technology for: (a) an alternative to conventional coal mining, (b) generation of power using products of bioconversion in fuel cell, and (c) conversation of solar energy for generation of alternative source of fuel and power, has been discussed. Possibility of developing a biofuel cell for conversion of solar energy through bioelectrochemical route has been suggested. (author). 48 refs., 3 figs

  8. Hybrid fuel cell/diesel generation total energy system, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, C. F.

    1982-11-01

    Meeting the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex (DGSCC) electrical and thermal requirements with the existing system was compared with using fuel cells. Fuel cell technology selection was based on a 1985 time frame for installation. The most cost-effective fuel feedstock for fuel cell application was identified. Fuels considered included diesel oil, natural gas, methanol and coal. These fuel feedstocks were considered not only on the cost and efficiency of the fuel conversion process, but also on complexity and integration of the fuel processor on system operation and thermal energy availability. After a review of fuel processor technology, catalytic steam reformer technology was selected based on the ease of integration and the economics of hydrogen production. The phosphoric acid fuel cell was selected for application at the GDSCC due to its commercial readiness for near term application. Fuel cell systems were analyzed for both natural gas and methanol feedstock. The subsequent economic analysis indicated that a natural gas fueled system was the most cost effective of the cases analyzed.

  9. High temperature phase transitions in nuclear fuels of the fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Bruycker, F.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents, relevant to the general objectives of nuclear safety research. The main purpose of this thesis is the study of high temperature phase transitions in nuclear materials, with special attention to the candidate fuel materials for the reactors of the 4. Generation. In this framework, material properties need to be investigated at temperatures higher than 2500 K, where equilibrium conditions are difficult to obtain. Laser heating combined with fast pyrometer is the method used at the European Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC - ITU). It is associated to a novel process used to determine phase transitions, based on the detection, via a suited low-power (mW) probe laser, of changes in surface reflectivity that may accompany solid/liquid phase transitions. Fast thermal cycles, from a few ms up to the second, under almost container-free conditions and control atmosphere narrow the problem of vaporisation and sample interactions usually meet with traditional method. This new experimental approach has led to very interesting results. It confirmed earlier research for material systems known to be stable at high temperature (such as U-C) and allowed a refinement of the corresponding phase diagrams. But it was also feasible to apply this method to materials highly reactive, thus original results are presented on PuO 2 , NpO 2 , UO 2 -PuO 2 and Pu-C systems. (author)

  10. Validation of a Waste Heat Recovery Model for a 1kW PEM Fuel Cell using Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saufi Sulaiman, M.; Mohamed, W. A. N. W.; Singh, B.; Fitrie Ghazali, M.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel cell is a device that generates electricity through electrochemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen. A major by-product of the exothermic reaction is waste heat. The recovery of this waste heat has been subject to research on order to improve the overall energy utilization. However, nearly all of the studies concentrate on high temperature fuel cells using advanced thermodynamic cycles due to the high quality of waste heat. The method, characteristics and challenges in harvesting waste heat from a low temperature fuel cell using a direct energy conversion device is explored in this publication. A heat recovery system for an open cathode 1kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) was developed using a single unit of thermoelectric generator (TEG) attached to a heat pipe. Power output of the fuel cell was varied to obtain the performance of TEG at different stack temperatures. Natural and forced convections modes of cooling were applied to the TEG cold side. This is to simulate the conditions of a mini fuel cell vehicle at rest and in motion. The experimental results were analysed and a mathematical model based on the thermal circuit analogy was developed and compared. Forced convection mode resulted in higher temperature difference, output voltage and maximum power which are 3.3°C, 33.5 mV, and 113.96mW respectively. The heat recovery system for 1 kW Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEM FC) using single TEG was successfully established and improved the electrical production of fuel cell. Moreover, the experimental results obtained was in a good agreement with theoretical results.

  11. Fuel prices scenario generation based on a multivariate GARCH model for risk analysis in a wholesale electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batlle, C.; Barquin, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a fuel prices scenario generator in the frame of a simulation tool developed to support risk analysis in a competitive electricity environment. The tool feeds different erogenous risk factors to a wholesale electricity market model to perform a statistical analysis of the results. As the different fuel series that are studied, such as the oil or gas ones, present stochastic volatility and strong correlation among them, a multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroskedastic (GARCH) model has been designed in order to allow the generation of future fuel prices paths. The model makes use of a decomposition method to simplify the consideration of the multidimensional conditional covariance. An example of its application with real data is also presented. (author)

  12. Comparison based on energy and exergy analyses of the potential cogeneration efficiencies for fuel cells and other electricity generation devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M A [Ryerson Polytechnical Inst., Toronto, (CA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1990-01-01

    Comparisons of the potential cogeneration efficiencies are made, based on energy and exergy analyses, for several devices for electricity generation. The investigation considers several types of fuel cell system (Phosphoric Acid, Alkaline, Solid Polymer Electrolyte, Molten Carbonate and Solid Oxide), and several fossil-fuel and nuclear cogeneration systems based on steam power plants. In the analysis, each system is modelled as a device for which fuel and air enter, and electrical- and thermal-energy products and material and thermal-energy wastes exit. The results for all systems considered indicate that exergy analyses should be used when analysing the cogeneration potential of systems for electricity generation, because they weigh the usefulnesses of heat and electricity on equivalent bases. Energy analyses tend to present overly optimistic views of performance. These findings are particularly significant when large fractions of the heat output from a system are utilized for cogeneration. (author).

  13. Process Developed for Generating Ceramic Interconnects With Low Sintering Temperatures for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered as premium future power generation devices because they have demonstrated high energy-conversion efficiency, high power density, and extremely low pollution, and have the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuel. The Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and private industries, is leading the development and commercialization of SOFCs for low-cost stationary and automotive markets. The targeted power density for the initiative is rather low, so that the SECA SOFC can be operated at a relatively low temperature (approx. 700 C) and inexpensive metallic interconnects can be utilized in the SOFC stack. As only NASA can, the agency is investigating SOFCs for aerospace applications. Considerable high power density is required for the applications. As a result, the NASA SOFC will be operated at a high temperature (approx. 900 C) and ceramic interconnects will be employed. Lanthanum chromite-based materials have emerged as a leading candidate for the ceramic interconnects. The interconnects are expected to co-sinter with zirconia electrolyte to mitigate the interface electric resistance and to simplify the processing procedure. Lanthanum chromites made by the traditional method are sintered at 1500 C or above. They react with zirconia electrolytes (which typically sinter between 1300 and 1400 C) at the sintering temperature of lanthanum chromites. It has been envisioned that lanthanum chromites with lower sintering temperatures can be co-fired with zirconia electrolyte. Nonstoichiometric lanthanum chromites can be sintered at lower temperatures, but they are unstable and react with zirconia electrolyte during co-sintering. NASA Glenn Research Center s Ceramics Branch investigated a glycine nitrate process to generate fine powder of the lanthanum-chromite-based materials. By simultaneously doping calcium on the lanthanum site, and cobalt and aluminum on the

  14. Generation of Electricity and Analysis of Microbial Communities in Wheat Straw Biomass-Powered Microbial Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yifeng; Min, Booki; Huang, L.

    2009-01-01

    Electricity generation from wheat straw hydrolysate and the microbial ecology of electricity producing microbial communities developed in two chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated. Power density reached 123 mW/m2 with an initial hydrolysate concentration of 1000 mg-COD/L while...

  15. Performance Evaluation of Electrochem's PEM Fuel Cell Power Plant for NASA's 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Michael C.; Hoberecht, Mark

    2003-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program is being developed to meet national needs for civil and commercial space access with goals of reducing the launch costs, increasing the reliability, and reducing the maintenance and operating costs. To this end, NASA is considering an all- electric capability for NGLT vehicles requiring advanced electrical power generation technology at a nominal 20 kW level with peak power capabilities six times the nominal power. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell has been identified as a viable candidate to supply this electrical power; however, several technology aspects need to be assessed. Electrochem, Inc., under contract to NASA, has developed a breadboard power generator to address these technical issues with the goal of maximizing the system reliability while minimizing the cost and system complexity. This breadboard generator operates with dry hydrogen and oxygen gas using eductors to recirculate the gases eliminating gas humidification and blowers from the system. Except for a coolant pump, the system design incorporates passive components allowing the fuel cell to readily follow a duty cycle profile and that may operate at high 6:1 peak power levels for 30 second durations. Performance data of the fuel cell stack along with system performance is presented to highlight the benefits of the fuel cell stack design and system design for NGLT vehicles.

  16. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  17. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, Joesph W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Klebanoff, Leonard E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Munoz-Ramos, Karina [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Akhil, Abbas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Curgus, Dita B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schenkman, Benjamin L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today’s technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

  18. Impacts of nuclear fuel cycle costs on nuclear power generating costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertel, E.; Naudet, G.

    1989-01-01

    Fuel cycle costs are one of the main parameters to evaluate the competitiveness of various nuclear strategies. The historical analysis based on the French case shows the good performances yet achieved in mastering elementary costs in order to limit global fuel cycle cost escalation. Two contrasted theoretical scenarios of costs evolution in the middle and long term have been determined, based upon market analysis and technological improvements expected. They are used to calculate the global fuel cycle costs for various fuel management options and for three strategies of nuclear deployment. The results illustrate the stability of the expected fuel cycle costs over the long term, to be compared to the high incertainty prevailing for fossil fueled plants. The economic advantages of advanced technologies such as MOX fueled PWRs are underlined

  19. Thermal-hydraulic performance analysis of a subchannel with square and triangle fuel rod arrangements using the entropy generation approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Talebi; M.M.Valoujerdi

    2017-01-01

    The present paper discusses entropy generation in fully developed turbulent flows through a subchannel,arranged in square and triangle arrays.Entropy generation is due to contribution of both heat transfer and pressure drop.Our main objective is to study the effect of key parameters such as spacer grid,fuel rod power distribution,Reynolds number Re,dimensionless heat power ω,lengthto-fuel-diameter ratio λ,and pitch-to-diameter ratio ξ on subchannel entropy generation.The analysis explicitly shows the contribution of heat transfer and pressure drop to the total entropy generation.An analytical formulation is introduced to total entropy generation for situations with uniform and sinusoidal rod power distribution.It is concluded that power distribution affects entropy generation.A smoother power profile leads to less entropy generation.The entropy generation of square rod array bundles is more efficient than that of triangular rod arrays,and spacer grids generate more entropy.

  20. Application of cascading thermoelectric generator and cooler for waste heat recovery from solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Houcheng; Kong, Wei; Dong, Feifei; Xu, Haoran; Chen, Bin; Ni, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Cascading thermoelectric devices are proposed to recover waste heat from SOFCs. • A theoretical model is developed to analyze the new hybrid system performance. • Performance parameters for evaluating the hybrid system are specified. • Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system are demonstrated. • Effects of some important parameters on the system performance are discussed. - Abstract: Besides electricity generation, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produce a significant amount of waste heat, which needs to be immediately removed to ensure the normal operation of SOFCs. If the waste heat is recovered through bottoming thermal devices, the global efficiency of SOFCs can be improved. In this study, a new hybrid system mainly consisting of a thermoelectric generator, a thermoelectric cooler and an SOFC is proposed to recover the waste heat from SOFC for performance enhancement. The thermodynamic and electrochemical irreversible losses in each component are fully considered. An analytical relationship between the SOFC operating current density and the thermoelectric devices dimensionless electric current is derived, from which the range of SOFC operating current density that permits the thermoelectric devices to effectively work is determined. The equivalent power output and efficiency for the hybrid system are specified under different operating current density regions. The feasibility and effectiveness are illustrated by comparing the proposed hybrid system with the stand-alone SOFC. It is found that the power density and efficiency of the proposed system allow 2.3% and 4.6% larger than that of the stand-alone SOFC, respectively. Finally, various parametric analyses are performed to discuss the effects of some design and operation parameters on the hybrid system performance.

  1. Electricity generation of single-chamber microbial fuel cells at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment will require operation of these systems over a wide range of wastewater temperatures. MFCs at room or higher temperatures (20-35°C) are relatively well studied compared those at lower temperatures. MFC performance was examined here over a temperature range of 4-30°C in terms of startup time needed for reproducible power cycles, and performance. MFCs initially operated at 15°C or higher all attained a reproducible cycles of power generation, but the startup time to reach stable operation increased from 50h at 30°C to 210h at 15°C. At temperatures below 15°C, MFCs did not produce appreciable power even after one month of operation. If an MFC was first started up at temperature of 30°C, however, reproducible cycles of power generation could then be achieved at even the two lowest temperatures of 4°C and 10°C. Power production increased linearly with temperature at a rate of 33±4mW°C-1, from 425±2mWm-2 at 4°C to 1260±10mWm-2 at 30°C. Coulombic efficiency decreased by 45% over this same temperature range, or from CE=31% at 4°C to CE=17% at 30°C. These results demonstrate that MFCs can effectively be operated over a wide range of temperatures, but our findings have important implications for the startup of larger scale reactors where low wastewater temperatures could delay or prevent adequate startup of the system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  2. BioTfueL Project: Targeting the Development of Second-Generation Bio-diesel and Bio-jet Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguie, J.C.; Ullrich, N.; Porot, P.; Bournay, L.; Hecquet, M.; Rousseau, J.

    2013-01-01

    2. generation biofuels will have an important part to take in the energy transition as far as fuels are concerned. Using non edible biomass, they will avoid any direct competition with food usage. Within second generation biofuels, the BTL route consists in the production of middle distillates (Diesel and jet fuel) via gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. These fuels are called 'drop in' fuels; this means that to be used they technically do not request any modification in the vehicle whatever the blending rate with conventional fuels. This route is currently at the pre-industrial phase where demonstration is required. This article presents the BioTfueL project which has been created by Axens, CEA, IFP Energies Nouvelles, Sofiproteol, ThyssenKrupp Uhde and Total. This project is focused on the original concept of co-processing (biomass can be gasified together with fossil feedstock) and proposes to develop and demonstrate a full process chain to be commercialized worldwide via licensing. (authors)

  3. Thermal conductivity of U–Mo/Al dispersion fuel. Effects of particle shape and size, stereography, and heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Tae Won; Sohn, Dong-Seong; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of particle sphericity, interfacial thermal resistance, stereography, and heat generation on the thermal conductivity of U–Mo/Al dispersion fuel. The ABAQUS finite element method (FEM) tool was used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of U–Mo/Al dispersion fuel by implementing fuel particles. For U–Mo/Al, the particle sphericity effect was insignificant. However, if the effect of the interfacial thermal resistance between the fuel particles and Al matrix was considered, the thermal conductivity of U–Mo/Al was increased as the particle size increases. To examine the effect of stereography, we compared the two-dimensional modeling and three-dimensional modeling. The results showed that the two-dimensional modeling predicted lower than the three-dimensional modeling. We also examined the effect of the presence of heat sources in the fuel particles and found a decrease in thermal conductivity of U–Mo/Al from that of the typical homogeneous heat generation modeling. (author)

  4. Generation of floor response spectra for mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, D.F.; Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    Floor or amplified response spectra are generally used as input motion for seismic analysis of critical equipment and piping in nuclear power plants and related facilities. The floor spectra are normally the result of a time-history calculation of building response to ground shaking. However, alternate approximate methods have been suggested by both Kapur and Biggs. As part of a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission horizontal floor response spectra were generated and compared by all three methods. The dynamic analyses were performed on a model of the Westinghouse Recycle Fuels Plant Manufacturing Building (MOFFP). Input to the time-history calculations was a synthesized accelerogram whose response spectrum is similar to that in Regulatory Guide 1.60. The response spectrum of the synthetic ground motion was used as input to the Kapur and Biggs methods. Calculations were performed for both hard (3500 fps) and soft (1500 fps) foundation soils. Results of comparison of the three methods indicate that although the approximate methods could easily be made acceptable from a safety standpoint, they would be overly conservative. The time-history method will yield floor spectra which are less uncertain and less conservative for a relatively modest additional effort. (auth)

  5. ACQUISITION AS A GENERATOR STRATEGY FROM COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES IN THE BRAZILIAN MARKET OF FUELS DISTRIBUITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Fernandes Pereira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject from this work is about acquisitions as organizational strategies and it is guided by the general objective on identifying if the acquisition of Texaco by Ultra Group, in Brazil, could generate competitive advantages. Thus, the main aim is to characterize, specifically, the fuel distribution sector in Brazil, presenting characteristics, strategies, classification of resources and the competitive advantage’s identification in the buying process of Texaco by Ultra Group. The methodology used for this research is a case study of qualitative nature. Data collection has been performed through literature review, documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews. In the analysis of collected data, specific objectives have been met. It was clear, therefore, the presence of features such as scale earnings, brand exposure, better management practices, synergies, tangible and intangible assets and market growth. So, those resources are classified according to the competitive implications. Then, it might be concluded that Texaco´s acquisition could bring competitive advantages for Ultra / Ipiranga Group. Respondents believe the sector is growing and businesses tend to grow despite the world crisis. They also confirmed that, in a highly competitive market, strategic alliances and market growing are factors that may ensure success to each company.

  6. Bioelectricity generation and microcystins removal in a blue-green algae powered microbial fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yong; Chen Qing; Zhou Shungui; Zhuang Li; Hu Pei

    2011-01-01

    Bioelectricity production from blue-green algae was examined in a single chamber tubular microbial fuel cell (MFC). The blue-green algae powered MFC produced a maximum power density of 114 mW/m 2 at a current density of 0.55 mA/m 2 . Coupled with the bioenergy generation, high removal efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrogen were also achieved in MFCs. Over 78.9% of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD), 80.0% of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD), 91.0% of total nitrogen (total-N) and 96.8% ammonium-nitrogen (NH 3 -N) were removed under closed circuit conditions in 12 days, which were much more effective than those under open circuit and anaerobic reactor conditions. Most importantly, the MFC showed great ability to remove microcystins released from blue-green algae. Over 90.7% of MC-RR and 91.1% of MC-LR were removed under closed circuit conditions (500 Ω). This study showed that the MFC could provide a potential means for electricity production from blue-green algae coupling algae toxins removal.

  7. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires a better understanding the importance of the different factors such as electrode surface area and reactor geometry relative to solution conditions such as conductivity and substrate concentration. It is shown here that the substrate concentration has significant effect on anode but not cathode performance, while the solution conductivity has a significant effect on the cathode but not the anode. The cathode surface area is always important for increasing power. Doubling the cathode size can increase power by 62% with domestic wastewater, but doubling the anode size increases power by 12%. Volumetric power density was shown to be a linear function of cathode specific surface area (ratio of cathode surface area to reactor volume), but the impact of cathode size on power generation depended on the substrate strength (COD) and conductivity. These results demonstrate the cathode specific surface area is the most critical factor for scaling-up MFCs to obtain high power densities. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Development of top nozzle holddown spring for 17x17 next generation fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Kim, H. K.; Lee, J. N.; Jeon, K. R.

    2002-01-01

    Two conceptual holddown spring designs were developed for 17x17 Next Generation Fuel(NGF) top nozzle. One spring pack concept uses three 0.175 inch thick leaves. The other uses four 0.155 inch thick leaves. The room temperature elastic-plastic properties of each spring pack are calculated using the elastic-plastic model derived from classic beam theory and the exiting spring characteristics test. The stress analysis and spring characteristics of each spring pack are also analyzed using FEM(ANSYS 5.7) to verify the elastic-plastic model. The results of the elastic-plastic model have a good agreement to the results of finite element analysis. It is concluded that the 3-leaf 0.175 inch spring pack concept and 4-leaf 0.155 inch spring pack concept are both viable candidates for 17x17 NGF. A series of load-deflection tests will be used to verify the elastic-plastic model and finite element model

  9. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676±93mW/m2, followed by semi-coke (376±47mW/m2), graphite (122±14mW/m2) and carbon felt (60±43mW/m2). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ≥15g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (~3 or ~6cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-03-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires a better understanding the importance of the different factors such as electrode surface area and reactor geometry relative to solution conditions such as conductivity and substrate concentration. It is shown here that the substrate concentration has significant effect on anode but not cathode performance, while the solution conductivity has a significant effect on the cathode but not the anode. The cathode surface area is always important for increasing power. Doubling the cathode size can increase power by 62% with domestic wastewater, but doubling the anode size increases power by 12%. Volumetric power density was shown to be a linear function of cathode specific surface area (ratio of cathode surface area to reactor volume), but the impact of cathode size on power generation depended on the substrate strength (COD) and conductivity. These results demonstrate the cathode specific surface area is the most critical factor for scaling-up MFCs to obtain high power densities. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Two-stage pretreatment of excess sludge for electricity generation in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Yang-Guo; Guo, Liang; Gao, Mengchun

    2018-01-12

    Thermophiles hydrolysis and acidogens fermentation were sequentially adopted to pretreat excess sludge for microbial fuel cell (MFC) electricity production. The results indicated that MFC fed with the thermophiles-acidogens pretreated sludge (MFC AB), reached a higher removal of ammonia nitrogen than the MFC fed with the heating hydrolysis and acidogens fermentation pretreated sludge (MFC NB). However, compared with the MFC AB, MFC NB presented a better performance for removal of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) (90.08%) and protein (82.42%). As for the electricity production, MFC NB obtained higher voltage of 0.632 V and maximum power density with 1.05 W/m 3 while MFC AB reached maximum voltage of 0.373 V and maximum power density of 0.58 W/m 3 . Bacterial 16S rRNA-based molecular microbial techniques showed that microbial communities on both MFC anode biofilms was diverse and different. The cooperation of fermentation bacteria and electricigen Shewanella baltica in the MFC NB may have contributed towards the improvement of electricity generation.

  12. Fiscal 2000 survey of refuse-fueled power generation introduction technology, etc. Survey of industrial refuse-fueled power generation (Industrial refuse-fueled power generation case study implementation - 1); 2000 nendo chosa haikibutsu hatsuden donyu gijutsu chosa to - Sangyo haikibutsu hatsuden chosa (Sangyo haikibutsu hatsuden case study no jisshi - 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Case studies were conducted of industrial refuse-fueled power generation using plastic waste, paper waste, and wood chips, and the same using the excretions of cattle. In the study of power generation fueled by mixed waste containing plastic waste, 325t/d, 220t/d, and 130t/d incinerators having the lower calorific value of 5,960-6,401 kcal/kg were taken up, and steam conditions, generator output, generating-end efficiency, station service power ratio, sending-end efficiency, etc., were tentatively calculated. As for cost efficiency, a manufacturer's estimate indicated that commercialization would be impossible in all the cases unless the construction cost was cut down. In the study of excretion-fueled power generation, cases were taken up where medium-temperature fermentation proceeded for the excretions of 620-29,853 dairy cows (32-1,576 t/d). A calculation was performed on conditions that the construction cost and maintenance/utility costs were as estimated by the manufacturer, that the excretion treatment and power generation facilities were covered by subsidies, and that personnel expenses of 6-million yen were necessary. It was then found that there would be commercial viability in case the yield was 790t/d or higher. (NEDO)

  13. Spent fuel generated by the Kozloduy nuclear power plant within the period 1974 - 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peev, P.

    1994-01-01

    The spent fuel management during the 20-year operation of Kozloduy NPP is described. Formally this period is divided into two stages. The first one covers 1977 - 1988 when the spent fuel after short-term (3 years) storage in the reactor building was dispatched to the former Soviet Union. Within this period 21 shipments of spent fuel (about 3086 fuel assemblies) with various level of enrichment and burnup were performed. The second stage covers the period 1988 - 1994. In that period the authorities responsible for the safe operation of Kozloduy NPP faced a number of problems related to necessity of on-site spent-fuel storage commissioning. A reassessment of the seismic risk after Vrancha earthquake and the Russia's attitude towards the former Soviet Union policy of spent fuel storage was discussed

  14. Spent fuel generated by the Kozloduy nuclear power plant within the period 1974 - 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peev, P [National Electricity Company, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1994-12-31

    The spent fuel management during the 20-year operation of Kozloduy NPP is described. Formally this period is divided into two stages. The first one covers 1977 - 1988 when the spent fuel after short-term (3 years) storage in the reactor building was dispatched to the former Soviet Union. Within this period 21 shipments of spent fuel (about 3086 fuel assemblies) with various level of enrichment and burnup were performed. The second stage covers the period 1988 - 1994. In that period the authorities responsible for the safe operation of Kozloduy NPP faced a number of problems related to necessity of on-site spent-fuel storage commissioning. A reassessment of the seismic risk after Vrancha earthquake and the Russia`s attitude towards the former Soviet Union policy of spent fuel storage was discussed.

  15. Energy Conversion Efficiency Potential for Forward-Deployed Generation Using Direct Carbon Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    fuel cells vs. DCFCs. PEMFC PAFC MCFC SOFC DCFC Electrolyte Polymer Phosphoric acid Molten car- bonate salt Ceramic Fused KNO3 Operating...air O2/air CO2/O2/air O2/air Humidified air Efficiency (Higher Heating Value [HHV]) 30–35% 40–50% 50–60% 45–55% 80% PEMFC : Proton Exchange... PEMFC proton-exchange membrane fuel cell SOFC solid oxide fuel cell SRI Statistical Research, Inc. TR technical report TRL technology readiness level

  16. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  17. SAF: the next generation process for radiotoxic material handling in the nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyman, D.H.; Graham, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 1980 the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Project was established with the goal to design, build, and operate a remote process for manufacturing breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line will be housed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at the Hanford site. The fabrication system and supporting operations are designed for computer-controlled operation from a centralized control room. In addition to improved worker protection, remote and automated fuel fabrication operations will result in enhanced safeguards and accountability of fuel material, improved product quality, and increased productivity. Installation of the SAF line equipment has started. Qualification runs are scheduled to begin in 1986 with production commencing in 1987

  18. Economic evaluation of methods to substitute consumption of fossil fuel for nuclear one in power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veretennikov, G.A.; Boldyrev, V.M.; Sigal, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    Technical-and-economic indices of separate and combind processes of thermal and electric power production are compared for different energy sources (heat-only nuclear stations power and heat nuclear stations condensation nuclear power plants, fossil-fuel condensation power plants, fossil-fuel power and heat nuclear stations and fossil-fuel boiler houses). The data on capital outlays, fuel expenses and total reduced costs are presented. The analysis has shown that all versions of nuclear energy development with the use of heat-only nuclear stations in different combinations prove to be less preferable than the version of cogeneration of heat and electric power at power and heat nuclear stations

  19. Electricity generation from palm oil tree empty fruit bunch (EFB) using dual chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, N. F.; Mahmood, N. A. B. N.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Muhammad, S. A. F. S.; Amalina, N. S.

    2017-06-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been discovered and utilized in laboratory scale for electricity production based on microbial degradation of organic compound. However, various source of fuel has been tested and recently complex biomass such as lignocellulose biomass has been focused on. In the present research, oil palm tree empty fruit bunch (EFB) has been tested for power production using dual chamber MFC and power generation analysis has been conducted to address the performance of MFC. In addition, two microorganisms (electric harvesting microbe and cellulose degrading microbe) were used in the MFC operation. The analysis include voltage produced, calculated current and power. The first section in your paper

  20. Method for controlling a nuclear fueled electric power generating unit and interfacing the same with a load dispatching system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, N.P.; Meyer, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    A pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear fueled, electric power generating unit is controlled through the use of on-line calculations of the rapid, step and ramp, power change capabilities of the unit made from measured values of power level, axial offset, coolant temperature and rod position taking into account operator generated, safety and control, and balance of plant limits. The power change capabilities so generated may be fed to an automatic dispatch system which provides closed loop control of a power grid system. (author)

  1. Steam-treated wood pellets: Environmental and financial implications relative to fossil fuels and conventional pellets for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, Jon; Saville, Brad; MacLean, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam-treated pellets can greatly reduce greenhouse gas emissions relative to coal. • Cost advantage is seen relative to conventional pellets. • Higher pellet cost is more than balanced by reduced retrofit capital requirements. • Low capacity factors further favour steam-treated pellets over conventional pellets. - Abstract: Steam-treated pellets can help to address technical barriers that limit the uptake of pellets as a fuel for electricity generation, but there is limited understanding of the cost and environmental impacts of their production and use. This study investigates life cycle environmental (greenhouse gas (GHG) and air pollutant emissions) and financial implications of electricity generation from steam-treated pellets, including fuel cycle activities (biomass supply, pellet production, and combustion) and retrofit infrastructure to enable 100% pellet firing at a generating station that previously used coal. Models are informed by operating experience of pellet manufacturers and generating stations utilising coal, steam-treated and conventional pellets. Results are compared with conventional pellets and fossil fuels in a case study of electricity generation in northwestern Ontario, Canada. Steam-treated pellet production has similar GHG impacts to conventional pellets as their higher biomass feedstock requirement is balanced by reduced process electricity consumption. GHG reductions of more than 90% relative to coal and ∼85% relative to natural gas (excluding retrofit infrastructure) could be obtained with both pellet options. Pellets can also reduce fuel cycle air pollutant emissions relative to coal by 30% (NOx), 97% (SOx), and 75% (PM 10 ). Lesser retrofit requirements for steam-treated pellets more than compensate for marginally higher pellet production costs, resulting in lower electricity production cost compared to conventional pellets ($0.14/kW h vs. $0.16/kW h). Impacts of retrofit infrastructure become increasingly

  2. Ceria-Based Anodes for Next Generation Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirfakhraei, Behzad

    Mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials (MIECs) have been suggested to represent the next generation of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anodes, primarily due to their significantly enhanced active surface area and their tolerance to fuel components. In this thesis, the main focus has been on determining and tuning the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of ceria-based MIECs in the versatile perovskite or fluorite crystal structures. In one direction, BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.1 M0.1O3-delta (M = Fe, Ni, Co and Yb) (BZCY-M) perovskites were synthesized using solid-state or wet citric acid combustion methods and the effect of various transition metal dopants on the sintering behavior, crystal structure, chemical stability under CO2 and H 2S, and electrical conductivity, was investigated. BZCY-Ni, synthesized using the wet combustion method, was the best performing anode, giving a polarization resistance (RP) of 0.4 O.cm2 at 800 °C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that this was due to the exsolution of catalytic Ni nanoparticles onto the oxide surface. Evolving from this promising result, the effect of Mo-doped CeO 2 (nCMO) or Ni nanoparticle infiltration into a porous Gd-doped CeO 2 (GDC) anode (in the fluorite structure) was studied. While 3 wt. % Ni infiltration lowered RP by up to 90 %, giving 0.09 O.cm2 at 800 °C and exhibiting a ca. 5 times higher tolerance towards 10 ppm H2, nCMO infiltration enhanced the H2 stability by ca. 3 times, but had no influence on RP. In parallel work, a first-time study of the Ce3+ and Ce 4+ redox process (pseudocapacitance) within GDC anode materials was carried out using cyclic voltammetry (CV) in wet H2 at high temperatures. It was concluded that, at 500-600 °C, the Ce3+/Ce 4+ reaction is diffusion controlled, probably due to O2- transport limitations in the outer 5-10 layers of the GDC particles, giving a very high capacitance of ca. 70 F/g. Increasing the temperature ultimately

  3. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  4. Benchmarking the expected stack manufacturing cost of next generation, intermediate-temperature protonic ceramic fuel cells with solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Alexis; Ricote, Sandrine; Braun, Robert J.

    2017-11-01

    Recent progress in the performance of intermediate temperature (500-600 °C) protonic ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs) has demonstrated both fuel flexibility and increasing power density that approach commercial application requirements. These developments may eventually position the technology as a viable alternative to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs). The PCFCs investigated in this work are based on a BaZr0.8Y0.2O3-δ (BZY20) thin electrolyte supported by BZY20/Ni porous anodes, and a triple conducting cathode material comprised of BaCo0.4Fe0.4Zr0.1Y0.1O3-δ (BCFZY0.1). These cells are prepared using a low-cost solid-state reactive sintering (SSRS) process, and are capable of power densities of 0.156 W cm-2 at 500 °C operating directly from methane fuel. We develop a manufacturing cost model to estimate the Nth generation production costs of PCFC stack technology using high volume manufacturing processes and compare them to the state-of-the-art in SOFC technology. The low-cost cell manufacturing enabled by the SSRS technique compensates for the lower PCFC power density and the trade-off between operating temperature and efficiency enables the use of lower-cost stainless steel materials. PCFC stack production cost estimates are found to be as much as 27-37% lower at 550 °C than SOFCs operating at 800 °C.

  5. Driving cycle characterization and generation, for design and control of fuel cell buses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tazelaar, E.; Bruinsma, J.; Veenhuizen, P.A.; Bosch, van den P.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    Optimization routines for battery, supercap and fuel cell stack in a fuel cell based propulsion system face two problems: the tendency to cycle beating and the necessity to maintain identical amounts of stored energy in battery and supercap at the start and end of the driving cycle used in the

  6. Wood wastes and residues generated along the Colorado Front Range as a potential fuel source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie E. Ward; Kurt H. Mackes; Dennis L. Lynch

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the United States there is interest in utilizing renewable fuel sources as an alternative to coal and nat-ural gas. This project was initiated to determine the availability of wood wastes and residues for use as fuel in ce-ment kilns and power plants located along the Colorado Front Range. Research was conducted through literature searches, phone surveys,...

  7. Generator module architecture for a large solid oxide fuel cell power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett, James E.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Riggle, Matthew W.; Litzinger, Kevin P.

    2013-06-11

    A solid oxide fuel cell module contains a plurality of integral bundle assemblies, the module containing a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion receiving air inlet feed and containing a base support, the base supports dense, ceramic exhaust manifolds which are below and connect to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the fuel cells comprise a fuel cell stack bundle all surrounded within an outer module enclosure having top power leads to provide electrical output from the stack bundle, where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all 100% of the weight of the stack, and each bundle assembly has its own control for vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control.

  8. Genotoxic potential of diesel exhaust particles from the combustion of first- and second-generation biodiesel fuels-the FuelHealth project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Magdalena; Wegierek-Ciuk, Aneta; Brzoska, Kamil; Wojewodzka, Maria; Meczynska-Wielgosz, Sylwia; Gromadzka-Ostrowska, Joanna; Mruk, Remigiusz; Øvrevik, Johan; Kruszewski, Marcin; Lankoff, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) from traffic emissions is associated with higher risk of morbidity and mortality related to cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, accelerated progression of atherosclerotic plaques, and possible lung cancer. While the impact of DEPs from combustion of fossil diesel fuel on human health has been extensively studied, current knowledge of DEPs from combustion of biofuels provides limited and inconsistent information about its mutagenicity and genotoxicity, as well as possible adverse health risks. The objective of the present work was to compare the genotoxicity of DEPs from combustion of two first-generation fuels, 7% fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) (B7) and 20% FAME (B20), and a second-generation 20% FAME/hydrotreated vegetable oil (SHB: synthetic hydrocarbon biofuel) fuel. Our results revealed that particulate engine emissions from each type of biodiesel fuel induced genotoxic effects in BEAS-2B and A549 cells, manifested as the increased levels of single-strand breaks, the increased frequencies of micronuclei, or the deregulated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling pathways. We also found that none of the tested DEPs showed the induction of oxidative DNA damage and the gamma-H2AX-detectable double-strand breaks. The most pronounced differences concerning the tested particles were observed for the induction of single-strand breaks, with the greatest genotoxicity being associated with the B7-derived DEPs. The differences in other effects between DEPs from the different biodiesel blend percentage and biodiesel feedstock were also observed, but the magnitude of these variations was limited.

  9. Simulation of the Argentine electric generation park and its possible expansion under the restriction of availability of fossil fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giubergia, Jorge H.; Coppari, Norberto R.; Rey, Carlos F.

    2003-01-01

    MESSAGE program was used to simulate the Argentine electric generation park for 25 years, taking as a base the year 2000 and different scenarios of internal and external demand. As the Argentine electric system is strongly dependent on natural gas, the increase of the demand has been analyzed with, and without, the assumption of shortage of this fuel during the winter periods. Equipment and fuels already available have been selected to cover the increase of the demand taking into account technical and economic factors. The completion of Atucha II nuclear power plant, the increase of the water level of the hydroelectric Yacireta plant and natural gas combined-cycle plants are necessary even if no restrictions in the gas supply are foreseen. On the other hand new nuclear plants, new hydroelectric projects and gas oils fueled turbines will be necessary if natural gas shortage is assumed

  10. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study

  11. Policy schemes, operational strategies and system integration of residential co-generation fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise-Lotte Pade; Schröder, Sascha Thorsten; Münster, Marie

    2013-01-01

    a heat-driven strategy, with and without time-differentiated tariffs, and an electricity price driven strategy for the operation as a virtual power plant. The corresponding support schemes identified cover feed-in tariffs, net metering and feed-in premiums. Additionally, the interplay of the micro......CHP units with the national energy systems has been analysed. Our main findings are that net metering would be an appropriate tool to support FC based microCHP in Denmark, whereas a price premium would be the preferable tool in France and Portugal. Copyright © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC....... Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Resistance welding of ODS cladding fuel a nuclear reactor of the fourth generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corpace, F.

    2011-01-01

    ODS steels (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR), one of the studied concepts for the fourth generation of nuclear power plants. These materials possess good mechanical properties at high temperatures due to a dispersion of nano-meter-sized oxides into the matrix. Previous studies have shown that melting can induce a decrease in mechanical properties at high temperatures due to modifications of the nano-meter-sized oxide dispersion. Therefore the fusion welding techniques are not recommended and the solid state bonding has to be evaluated. This study is focused on resistance upset welding. Welding experiments and numerical simulations of the process are coupled in this thesis. All laboratory tests (experimental and numerical) are built using the experimental design method to evaluate the effects of the process parameters on the welding and on the weld. A 20Cr ODS steel is used for the experimental protocol. The first part is dedicated to the study of the influence of the process parameters on the welding process. The numerical simulations show that the welding steps can be divided in three stages. First, the contact temperature between the faying surfaces increases. The process is then driven in the second stage by the pieces geometry and especially the current constriction due to the thinness of the clad compared to the massive plug. Therefore, the heat generation is mainly located in the clad part out of the electrode leading to its collapse which is the third stage of the welding step. The evaluation of the process parameters influence on the physical phenomena (thermal, mechanical...) occurring during the welding step, allows adjusting them in order to influence thermal and mechanical solicitations undergone by the pieces during the welding process. The second part consists in studying the influence of physical phenomena on the welds. In the process parameter range, some welds exhibit compactness

  13. Contribution to the modelling of reversible electrolyser and hydrogen fuel cell for coupling to the photovoltaic generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabih, S.

    2008-10-01

    A response to concerns raised by an energy mix which mainly consists of exhaustible fossil fuels harmful to the environment is to gradually substitute them by renewable energy sources, including solar or wind power. However, these intermittent flow energies set a recovery problem. They are often the source of electricity which inherits their fluctuations, which requires a transport network and which is an energy carrier not easy to store. In this context hydrogen synthesized from this renewable electricity, storing, it is considered as a stock carrier promising for the future. Various components and electrochemical processes are associated with this perspective: electrolysers, fuel cells, associations of these two functions combined in the system or integrated into a unitised reversible component. Our work is set in this perspective. It contributed to the development of advanced models of electrochemical components of electrolyser or fuel cells type, integrating reversibility for the study of their coupling to the photovoltaic generators. The models developed following a unified energetic approach use bond graph representation. After an analysis of the energy context, a state of the art of electrochemical components coupling hydrogen and electricity is presented, particularly on electrolysers and regenerative or unitised reversible fuel cells. Then, after a reminder of the principles of the Bond Graph representation, we exploit this formalism to develop an energetic model of a reversible component 'electrolyser and / or fuel cell' representative at macroscopic level of conversion reaction and dissipation phenomena, coupled in chemical, thermodynamic, electrical, thermal and fluid fields. Tests for characterization and validation conducted on small experimental devices are then described. They can illustrate the influence of operating parameters on the performance of these components. Finally, the Bond Graph model is used to study the modularity of components

  14. Solid oxide fuel cells, SOFC, in future power generation; Fastoxidbraensleceller, SOFC, i framtida kraftgenerering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Kent; Baafaelt, M

    1997-02-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, SOFC, is a very promising technological area for generating electricity in the future. Especially for small scale cogeneration. SOFC is an excellent choice due to its high efficiencies at small power plant sizes. The expected size of the power plants is 10-20 MWe but larger ones might be built. An important part of the assumptions in this report is the SOFC electric efficiency dependence of the pressure in the process. The electric efficiency is assumed to be 50% at atmospheric pressure and 55% at 10 atmospheres. These assumptions lead to a formula that describes the electric efficiency as a function of the pressure. The parametric study shows that the pressure has a very large influence of the electric efficiency. At low pressure and high Turbine Inlet Temperature (TIT) the electric efficiency will be higher than at high pressure and low TIT. The post intercooler temperature and the pressure drop over the SOFC unit have a moderate effect on the electric efficiency. In the process calculations the TIT is shown to have a very small influence on the plant efficiencies. Consequently, by lowering the TIT, the need for blade cooling and tougher materials can be avoided, with only a small electric efficiency decrease. The recuperator is a central part of the process. It evens out the influence from other parts in the process. This is one of the reasons why the polytropic efficiencies of the compressor and the expander have such a low influence on the process efficiency. The report shows that to receive high efficiencies in a SOFC/GT power plant, the points mentioned below should be taken into consideration: The pressure in the process should be approximately 4 bar; The compressor should have an intercooler; The TIT should be below the temperature where blade cooling is needed; No steam cycle should be connected after the gas turbine at sizes of 5-20 MW. 32 refs, 67 figs, 9 tabs, 15 appendices

  15. A novel pilot-scale stacked microbial fuel cell for efficient electricity generation and wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shijia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Xuechen; Liang, Peng; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Jiang, Yong; Huang, Xia

    2016-07-01

    A novel stacked microbial fuel cell (MFC) which had a total volume of 72 L with granular activated carbon (GAC) packed bed electrodes was constructed and verified to present remarkable power generation and COD removal performance due to its advantageous design of stack and electrode configuration. During the fed-batch operation period, a power density of 50.9 ± 1.7 W/m(3) and a COD removal efficiency of 97% were achieved within 48 h. Because of the differences among MFC modules in the stack, reversal current occurred in parallel circuit connection with high external resistances (>100 Ω). This reversal current consequently reduced the electrochemical performance of some MFC modules and led to a lower power density in parallel circuit connection than that in independent circuit connection. While increasing the influent COD concentrations from 200 to 800 mg/L at hydraulic retention time of 1.25 h in continuous operation mode, the power density of stacked MFC increased from 25.6 ± 2.5 to 42.1 ± 1.2 W/m(3) and the COD removal rates increased from 1.3 to 5.2 kg COD/(m(3) d). This study demonstrated that this novel MFC stack configuration coupling with GAC packed bed electrode could be a feasible strategy to effectively scale up MFC systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-Term Hydrocarbon Trade Options for the Maghreb Region and Europe—Renewable Energy Based Synthetic Fuels for a Net Zero Emissions World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Fasihi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about climate change and increasing emission costs are drivers for new sources of fuels for Europe. Sustainable hydrocarbons can be produced synthetically by power-to-gas (PtG and power-to-liquids (PtL facilities, for sectors with low direct electrification such as aviation, heavy transportation and chemical industry. Hybrid PV–Wind power plants can harvest high solar and wind potentials of the Maghreb region to power these systems. This paper calculates the cost of these fuels for Europe, and presents a respective business case for the Maghreb region. Calculations are hourly resolved to find the least cost combination of technologies in a 0.45° × 0.45° spatial resolution. Results show that, for 7% weighted average cost of capital (WACC, renewable energy based synthetic natural gas (RE-SNG and RE-diesel can be produced in 2030 for a minimum cost of 76 €/MWhHHV (0.78 €/m3SNG and 88 €/MWhHHV (0.85 €/L, respectively. While in 2040, these production costs can drop to 66 €/MWhHHV (0.68 €/m3SNG and 83 €/MWhHHV (0.80 €/L, respectively. Considering access to a WACC of 5% in a de-risking project, oxygen sales and CO2 emissions costs, RE-diesel can reach fuel-parity at crude oil prices of 101 and 83 USD/bbl in 2030 and 2040, respectively. Thus, RE-synthetic fuels could be produced to answer fuel demand and remove environmental concerns in Europe at an affordable cost.

  17. Fossil fuel-fired power generation. Case studies of recently constructed coal- and gas-fired plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, C. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-23

    To meet future energy demand growth and replace older or inefficient units, a large number of fossil fuel-fired plants will be required to be built worldwide in the next decade. Yet CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fired power generation are a major contributor to climate change. As a result, new plants must be designed and operated at highest efficiency both to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and to facilitate deployment of CO{sub 2} capture and storage in the future. The series of case studies in this report, which respond to a request to the IEA from the G8 Summit in July 2005, were conducted to illustrate what efficiency is achieved now in modern plants in different parts of the world using different grades of fossil fuels. The plants were selected from different geographical areas, because local factors influence attainable efficiency. The case studies include pulverized coal combustion (PCC) with both subcritical and supercritical (very high pressure and temperature) steam turbine cycles, a review of current and future applications of coal-fuelled integrated gasification combined cycle plants (IGCC), and a case study of a natural gas fired combined cycle plant to facilitate comparisons. The results of these analyses show that the technologies for high efficiency (low CO{sub 2} emission) and very low conventional pollutant emissions (particulates, SO{sub 2}, NOx) from fossil fuel-fired power generation are available now through PCC, IGCC or NGCC at commercially acceptable cost. This report contains comprehensive technical and indicative cost information for modern fossil fuel-fired plants that was previously unavailable. It serves as a valuable sourcebook for policy makers and technical decision makers contemplating decisions to build new fossil fuel-fired power generation plants.

  18. The applicability of detailed process for neutron resonance absorption to neutronics analyses in LWR next generation fuels to extend burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameyama, Takanori; Nauchi, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    Neutronics analyses with detail processing for neutron resonance absorption in LWR next generation UOX and MOX fuels to extend burnup were performed based on the neutronic transport and burnup calculation. In the detailed processing, ultra-fine energy nuclear library and collision probabilities between neutron and U, Pu nuclides (actinide nuclides) are utilized for two-dimension geometry. In the usual simple processing (narrow resonance approximation), shielding factors and compensation equations for neutron resonance absorption are utilized. The results with detailed and simple processing were compared to clarify where the detailed processing is needed. The two processing caused difference of neutron multiplication factor by 0.5% at the beginning of irradiation, while the difference became smaller as burnup increased and was not significant at high burnup. The nuclide compositions of the fuel rods for main actinide nuclides were little different besides Cm isotopes by the processing, since the neutron absorption rate of 244 Cm became different. The detail processing is needed to evaluate the neutron emission rate in spent fuels. In the fuel assemblies, the distributions of rod power rates were not different within 0.5%, and the peak rates of fuel rod were almost the same by the two processing at the beginning of irradiation when the peak rate is the largest during the irradiation. The simple processing is also satisfied for safety evaluation based on the peak rate of rod power. The difference of local power densities in fuel pellets became larger as burnup increased, since the neutron absorption rate of 238 U in the peripheral region of pellets were significantly different by the two processing. The detail processing is needed to evaluate the fuel behavior at high burnup. (author)

  19. Fuel cell systems and high-integrated combinations of internal combustion engines and generators for hybrid drives; Brennstoffzellensysteme und hoch integrierte Verbrennungsmotor/Generator-Kombinationen fueHybridantriebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treffinger, P.; Graef, M. [DLR Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V., Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. fuer Fahrzeugkonzepte

    2005-07-01

    So called fuel cell hybrid vehicles can be regarded in general as electrical driven vehicles, equipped with a fuel cell as current source, which is connected in parallel with an electrical energy storage. This power train configuration gives very high flexibility realizing the package, because the primary energy converter is not directly connected with the torque converter for propulsion. The studies 'Hy-Wire' and 'Sequel' of GM are adopting this approach as well as the modular vehicle concept of DLR Institute of Vehicle Concepts. The overall efficiency of the above described power train concept depends strongly on the efficiency of the current source. The efficiency potential of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) systems has been successfully demonstrated by several car manufacturers. However, some technical issues are still to be solved, e.g. operation at low temperatures and power densities of the complete system. There is also no satisfying solution for the on-board storage of hydrogen. A current source based on a free piston linear generator is an alternative to the PEFC system. The free piston linear generator can be realized in several configurations. The approach of DLR, which is explained in this paper, enables the stroke to be adjusted according to the actual load. This especially improves internal efficiency significantly in partial loading conditions and also reduces heat losses. On the base of detailed simulation, underlined by first experimental studies, efficiencies above 35% in a broad operation range are estimated. (orig.)

  20. The potential of using organic side-streams produced in Ghana for generation of bio-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laryea, G. N; Abdul-Samii, R.; Tottimeh, G.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-fuel can be generated from organic side-streams of maize, rice, millet, sorghum and groundnut by using fast pyrolysis technology. Data on side-streams of these crops were obtained from the Ministry of Food and Agriculture (MoFA) in 2010 for the study. The study shows that the estimated total crop side-streams generated was 3,475,413 t of which 2,345,903.5 of bio-fuel can be produced, given a potential energy equivalent of 42,226 PJ/y. The result shows a growth rate of 12.9 per cent in energy equivalent potential for synthetic fuel production as compared to the estimated production in 2009. Northern Region had the highest energy potential of 9,676 PJ/y (22.91%) of the total energy equivalent of bio-fuel, whereas, Greater Accra Region had the lowest with 183 PJ/y (0.43%). It is recommended that the available energy potential at the three northern regions of Ghana be utilised effectively when renewable energy policy is improved for a wider applications of side-streams from crops.(au)

  1. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  2. Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragusa, Jean; Vierow, Karen

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

  3. A simulation study of Solid Oxide fuel cell for IGCC power generation using Aspen Plus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudra, Souman; Kim, Hyung Taek

    2010-01-01

    operating conditions and using diverse fuels. The SOFC stack model developed using the chemical process flow sheet simulator Aspen Plus which is of equilibrium type and is based on Gibbs free energy minimization. The SOFC model performs heat and mass balances and considers the ohmic, activation...... with respect to a variety of SOFC inputs. SOFC stack operation on syn-gas is compared to operation on different coal properties and as expected there is a drop in performance, which is attributed to increased input fuel and air flow due to the lower quality of the fuel gas....

  4. Surface Area Expansion of Electrodes with Grass-like Nanostructures to Enhance Electricity Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Zhang, Yifeng; Noori, Jafar Safaa

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have applications possibilities for wastewater treatment, biotransformation, and biosensor, but the development of highly efficient electrode materials is critical for enhancing the power generation. Two types of electrodes modified with nanoparticles or grass-like nan......Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have applications possibilities for wastewater treatment, biotransformation, and biosensor, but the development of highly efficient electrode materials is critical for enhancing the power generation. Two types of electrodes modified with nanoparticles or grass...... of plain silicium showed a maximum power density of 86.0 mW/m2. Further expanding the surface area of carbon paper electrodes with gold nanoparticles resulted in a maximum stable power density of 346.9 mW/m2 which is 2.9 times higher than that achieved with conventional carbon paper. These results show...

  5. Exploring optimal supplement strategy of medicinal herbs and tea extracts for bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Yann; Liao, Jia-Hui; Hsu, An-Wei; Tsai, Po-Wei; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan

    2018-05-01

    This first-attempt study used extracts of appropriate antioxidant abundant Camellia and non-Camellia tea and medicinal herbs as model ESs to stably intensify bioelectricity generation performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). As electron shuttles (ESs) could stimulate electron transport phenomena by significant reduction of electron transfer resistance, the efficiency of power generation for energy extraction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could be appreciably augmented. Using environmentally friendly natural bioresource as green bioresource of ESs is the most promising to sustainable practicability. As comparison of power-density profiles indicated, supplement of Camellia tea extracts would be the most appropriate, then followed non-Camellia Chrysanthemum tea and medicinal herbs. Antioxidant activities, total phenolic contents and power stimulating activities were all electrochemically associated. In particular, the extract of unfermented Camellia tea (i.e., green tea) was the most promising ESs to augment bioenergy extraction compared to other refreshing medicinal herb extracts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, S. Blaine

    2009-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy's lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world's premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  7. Variation of power generation at different buffer types and conductivities in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Lim, Kyeong-Ho; Shin, Hang-Sik; Logan, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are operated with solutions containing various chemical species required for the growth of electrochemically active microorganisms including nutrients and vitamins, substrates, and chemical buffers. Many different buffers

  8. Electricity generation of single-chamber microbial fuel cells at low temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan; Xing, Defeng; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    Practical applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment will require operation of these systems over a wide range of wastewater temperatures. MFCs at room or higher temperatures (20-35°C) are relatively well studied compared

  9. Anode modification with formic acid: A simple and effective method to improve the power generation of microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan, E-mail: shaoancheng@zju.edu.cn; Guo, Jian

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Carbon cloth anode is modified with formic acid by a simple and reliable approach. • The modification significantly enhances the power output of microbial fuel cells. • The modified anode surface favors the bacterial attachment and growth on anode. • The electron transfer rate of anode is promoted. - Abstract: The physicochemical properties of anode material directly affect the anodic biofilm formation and electron transfer, thus are critical for the power generation of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, carbon cloth anode was modified with formic acid to enhance the power production of MFCs. Formic acid modification of anode increased the maximum power density of a single-chamber air-cathode MFC by 38.1% (from 611.5 ± 6 mW/m{sup 2} to 877.9 ± 5 mW/m{sup 2}). The modification generated a cleaner electrode surface and a reduced content of oxygen and nitrogen groups on the anode. The surface changes facilitated bacterial growth on the anode and resulted in an optimized microbial community. Thus, the electron transfer rate on the modified anodes was enhanced remarkably, contributing to a higher power output of MFCs. Anode modification with formic acid could be an effective and simple method for improving the power generation of MFCs. The modification method holds a huge potential for large scale applications and is valuable for the scale-up and commercialization of microbial fuel cells.

  10. Microbial fuel cells: a promising alternative for power generation and waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez-Larios, A. L.; Solorza-Feria, O.; Rinderknecht-Seijas, N.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-01-01

    The current energy crisis has launched a renewed interest on alternative energy sources and non-fossil fuels. One promising technology is the direct production of electricity from organic matter or wastes in microbial fuel cells (MFC). A MFC can be envisioned as an bio-electrochemical reactor that converts the chemical energy stored in chemical bonds into electrical energy via the catalytic activity of microorganisms under anoxic conditions. (Author)

  11. Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herling, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D [Kennewick, WA

    2008-10-14

    The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

  12. Addressing the supply security of the nuclear fuel cycle: a US merchant generator risk acceptance perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R. P.; Benavides, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    With the current rising markets across the nuclear fuel supply spectrum, understanding and managing nuclear fuel cycle supply security risk becomes an increasingly important consideration. In addressing this area, Constellation Energy is implementing an integrated multifaceted approach as consistent with a comprehensive risk profile covering the nuclear fuel supply industry. This approach is founded on use of a utility traditional procurement strategy, as dependent on the qualitative parameters of supply origination diversification, geopolitical stability, contracting duration and individual supplier financial bases. However, Constellation also adds an additional consideration into development of this nuclear fuel supply risk profile. To do such, qualitative assessments covering specific supplier risks, as based on the parameters of supplier management and organizational structure, design capacities (applicable to fabrication and enrichment only), operational history as applicable to forward-looking performance, regulatory or legal history and financial performance are also considered. Constellation overlays the risks of future availabilities, catastrophic occurrences and prices for each nuclear fuel material and service component onto a quantitative set of results. The overall focus of these assessments is the creation of a risk management perspective directed towards determining the potential loss or delay of nuclear fuel supply for our operating reactors. The conclusion of this effort is an integrated assessment of the nuclear fuel supply security as applicable to the Constellation-specific structured risk profile. Use of this assessment allows Constellation to target appropriate suppliers of interest in the marketplace and form the fundamental bases for the Constellation procurement strategy while managing risks associated with nuclear fuel cycle supply security. (authors)

  13. Development of a new-generation system for reloading of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimov, M.; Maslov, O.; Maisyan, I.

    1995-01-01

    The modern concept of development of nuclear power, which is also reflected in the new scientific and technical documentation, moves to the forefront the general systems aspects of performing operations with nuclear fuel. It is suggested that the organizational questions of delivering, accounting for, storing, monitoring, moving, calculating overloads and mechanisms, and devices which perform manipulation with nuclear fuel, be treated as a single system

  14. Accident-generated radioactive particle source term development for consequence assessment of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, S.L.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

    1983-04-01

    Consequences of nuclear fuel cycle facility accidents can be evaluated using aerosol release factors developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These experimentally determined factors are compiled and consequence assessment methods are discussed. Release factors can be used to estimate the fraction of material initially made airborne by postulated accident scenarios. These release fractions in turn can be used in models to estimate downwind contamination levels as required for safety assessments of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 20 references, 4 tables

  15. Development of uranium reduction system for incineration residue generated at LWR nuclear fuel fabrication plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampei, T.; Sato, T.; Suzuki, N.; Kai, H.; Hirata, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The major portion of combustible solid wastes generated at LWR nuclear fuel fabrication plants in Japan is incinerated and stored in a warehouse. The uranium content in the incineration residue is higher compared with other categories of wastes, although only a small amount of incineration residue is generated. Hence, in the future uranium should be removed from incineration residues before they are reduced to a level appropriate for the final disposal. A system for processing the incineration residue for uranium removal has been developed and tested based on the information obtained through laboratory experiments and engineering scale tests

  16. Reprocessing techniques of LWR spent fuel for reutilization in hybrid systems and IV generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruquipa, Wilmer; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Barros, Graiciany de P. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Since the era of nuclear technology begins, nuclear reactors have been produced spent fuel. This spent fuel contains material that could be recycle and reprocessed by different processes. All these processes aim to reduce the contribution to the final repository through the re-utilization of the nuclear material. Therefore, some new reprocessing options with non-proliferation characteristics have been proposed and the goal is to compare the different techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of the spent fuel utilization and to reduce the volume and long-term radiotoxicity of high-level waste by irradiation with neutron with high energy such as the ones created in hybrid reactors. In order to compare different recovery methods, the cross sections of fuels are calculated with de MCNP code, the first set consists of thorium-232 spiked with the reprocessed material and the second set in depleted uranium that containing 4.5% of U-235 spiked with the reprocessed material; These sets in turn are compared with the cross section of the UO{sub 2} in order to evaluate the efficiency of the reprocessed fuel as nuclear fuel. (author)

  17. Micro hydrogen for portable power : generating opportunities for hydrogen and fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    A new fuel cell technology for portable applications was reviewed. Success for the fuel cell industry will be achieved primarily by supplanting lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cells for portable applications have clear advantages to batteries in addition to their known environmental benefits. Micro hydrogen {sup TM} is the integrated combination of hydrogen fuel cell, hydrogen storage and delivery, fluidic interconnects and power conditioning electronics required for creating high energy density portable power sources. The small size, low heat production, environmental sustainability and refueling flexibility of the systems provides enormous economic opportunities for the use of micro hydrogen in cell phone technology, personal digital assistants and other electronic gadgets. Details of a trial to test and evaluate micro hydrogen fuel cell powered bike lights were presented. Further programs are planned for external demonstrations of high-beam search and rescue lighting, flashlights for security personnel and portable hydrogen power sources that will be used by multiple organizations throughout British Columbia. It was concluded that fuel cell technology must match the lithium-ion battery's performance by providing fast recharge, high energy density, and adaptability. Issues concerning refueling and portable and disposable cartridges for micro hydrogen systems were also discussed. 8 figs.

  18. Application of Thermoelectric Devices to Fuel Cell Power Generation: Demonstration and Evaluation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huston, John; Wyatt, Chris; Nichols, Chris; Binder, Michael J; Holcomb, Franklin H

    2004-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD) is concerned with reliable and cost-effective power generation of on-site power generators as well as minimizing the environment impact of these generators. Thermoelectric (TE...

  19. Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, R.E.H.; Rogner, H.-H.; Gregory, Ken

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation

  20. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).