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Sample records for net co2 source

  1. Diurnal and Seasonal Variations in the Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange of a Pasture in the Three-River Source Region of the Qinghai?Tibetan Plateau

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Bin; Jin, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Chen, Dongdong; Zhao,Liang; Tang, Yanhong; Kato, Tomomichi; Gu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between the atmosphere and grassland ecosystems is very important for the global carbon balance. To assess the CO2 flux and its relationship to environmental factors, the eddy covariance method was used to evaluate the diurnal cycle and seasonal pattern of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of a cultivated pasture in the Three-River Source Region (TRSR) on the Qinghai?Tibetan Plateau from January 1 to December 31, 2008. The diurnal variations in the NEE and eco...

  2. Diurnal and Seasonal Variations in the Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange of a Pasture in the Three-River Source Region of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 exchange between the atmosphere and grassland ecosystems is very important for the global carbon balance. To assess the CO2 flux and its relationship to environmental factors, the eddy covariance method was used to evaluate the diurnal cycle and seasonal pattern of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE of a cultivated pasture in the Three-River Source Region (TRSR on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau from January 1 to December 31, 2008. The diurnal variations in the NEE and ecosystem respiration (Re during the growing season exhibited single-peak patterns, the maximum and minimum CO2 uptake observed during the noon hours and night; and the maximum and minimum Re took place in the afternoon and early morning, respectively. The minimum hourly NEE rate and the maximum hourly Re rate were -7.89 and 5.03 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1, respectively. The NEE and Re showed clear seasonal variations, with lower values in winter and higher values in the peak growth period. The highest daily values for C uptake and Re were observed on August 12 (-2.91 g C m-2 d-1 and July 28 (5.04 g C m-2 day-1, respectively. The annual total NEE and Re were -140.01 and 403.57 g C m-2 year-1, respectively. The apparent quantum yield (α was -0.0275 μmol μmol-1 for the entire growing period, and the α values for the pasture's light response curve varied with the leaf area index (LAI, air temperature (Ta, soil water content (SWC and vapor pressure deficit (VPD. Piecewise regression results indicated that the optimum Ta and VPD for the daytime NEE were 14.1°C and 0.65 kPa, respectively. The daytime NEE decreased with increasing SWC, and the temperature sensitivity of respiration (Q10 was 3.0 during the growing season, which was controlled by the SWC conditions. Path analysis suggested that the soil temperature at a depth of 5 cm (Tsoil was the most important environmental factor affecting daily variations in NEE during the growing season, and the photosynthetic photon

  3. Framework for Assessing Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    This revision of the 2011 report, Accounting Framework for Biogenic CO2 Emissions from Stationary Sources, evaluates biogenic CO2 emissions from stationary sources, including a detailed study of the scientific and technical issues associated with assessing biogenic carbon dioxide...

  4. CO2 and CO simulations and their source signature indicated by CO/CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Bian, H.

    2004-12-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS_4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes from the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  5. CO2 and CO Simulations and Their Source Signature Indicated by CO/CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Randy; Huisheng, Bian

    2004-01-01

    Three years (2000-2002) atmospheric CO2 and CO fields are simulated by a Chemistry Transport Model driven by the assimilated meteorological fields from GEOS-4. The simulated CO2 and CO are evaluated by measurements from surface (CMDL), satellite (MOPITT/CO), and aircraft. The model-observation comparisons indicate reasonable agreement in both source and remote regions, and in the lower and upper troposphere. The simulation also captures the seasonality of CO2 and CO variations. The ratios of CO/CO2 are analyzed over different representative regions to identify the source signature, since the anthropogenic CO comes fiom the same combustion processes as CO2. This work enables us to improve satellite inversion estimates of CO2 sources and sinks by simultaneously using satellite CO measurement.

  6. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A.W.; Andres, R.J.; Davis, K.J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, D.J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, W.A.; McGuire, A. David; Vargas, Rodrigo I.; Wei, Y.; West, Tristram O.; Woodall, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land–atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990–2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from −890 to −280 Tg C yr−1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, "best" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are −472 ± 281 Tg C yr−1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and −360 Tg C yr−1 (with an interquartile range of −496 to −337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990–2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr−1 and assuming the estimate of −472 Tg C yr−1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was

  7. Mapping Daily Net CO2 Flux From Grasslands Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holifield, C.; Emmerich, W.; Moran, M. S.; Bryant, R.; Verdugo, C.

    2003-12-01

    The daily net carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from extensive grassland ecosystems is an important component of the global carbon cycle. In previous studies, instantaneous net CO2 flux was estimated using a Water Deficit Index (WDI) determined from the relation between surface reflectance and temperature. The mean absolute difference between measured and WDI-derived CO2 flux was 0.23 over a range of CO2 flux values from -0.10 to 1.10 (mg m-2 s-1). The objective of this study was to determine daily net CO2 flux from instantaneous estimates for a semiarid grassland site in Southeast Arizona. This objective was reached through two main steps. First, a linear relationship (R2 = 0.95) was found between instantaneous net CO2 flux and net daytime (6 a.m. to 6 p.m.) flux and used to generate maps of daytime CO2 flux. Second, a field study was conducted to relate night time flux measurements to daytime measurements. These relations made it possible to map daily (24-hour) net CO2 flux from a single satellite image and basic meteorological information. A limitation of this approach is the dependence upon empirical relations for deriving daytime and night time estimates from instantaneous measurements. On the other hand, the empirical relations derived at this location were strong and consistent for the six-year study period.

  8. Atmospheric measurement of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, W. T.; Brailsford, G.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M.; Zondervan, A.

    2013-11-01

    We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes CO2 from locally extracted natural gas and vents that CO2 to the atmosphere, at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. The plant is located in a rural dairy farming area, with no other significant CO2ff sources nearby, but large, diurnally varying, biospheric CO2 fluxes from the surrounding highly productive agricultural grassland. We made flask measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 (from which we derive the CO2ff component) and in situ measurements of CO2 downwind of the Kapuni plant, using a Helikite to sample transects across the emission plume from the surface up to 100 m a.g.l. We also determined the surface CO2ff content averaged over several weeks from the 14CO2 content of grass samples collected from the surrounding area. We use the WindTrax plume dispersion model to compare the atmospheric observations with the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant, and to determine how well atmospheric measurements can constrain the emissions. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the fluctuations and short-term variability in the Helikite samples, but does quite well in representing the observed CO2ff in 15 min averaged surface flask samples and in ~1 week integrated CO2ff averages from grass samples. In this pilot study, we found that using grass samples, the modeled and observed CO2ff emissions averaged over one week agreed to within 30%. The results imply that greater verification accuracy may be achieved by including more detailed meteorological observations and refining 14CO2 sampling strategies.

  9. CARVE: Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange and Regional Carbon Budgets for Alaska, 2012-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides estimates of 3-hourly net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) at 0.5-degree resolution over the state of Alaska for 2012-2014. The NEE estimates are...

  10. Atmospheric measurement of point source fossil CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Keller, E. D.; Baisden, T.; Brailsford, G.; Bromley, T.; Norris, M.; Zondervan, A.

    2014-05-01

    We use the Kapuni Gas Treatment Plant to examine methodologies for atmospheric monitoring of point source fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions. The Kapuni plant, located in rural New Zealand, removes CO2 from locally extracted natural gas and vents that CO2 to the atmosphere, at a rate of ~0.1 Tg carbon per year. The plant is located in a rural dairy farming area, with no other significant CO2ff sources nearby, but large, diurnally varying, biospheric CO2 fluxes from the surrounding highly productive agricultural grassland. We made flask measurements of CO2 and 14CO2 (from which we derive the CO2ff component) and in situ measurements of CO2 downwind of the Kapuni plant, using a Helikite to sample transects across the emission plume from the surface up to 100 m above ground level. We also determined the surface CO2ff content averaged over several weeks from the 14C content of grass samples collected from the surrounding area. We use the WindTrax plume dispersion model to compare the atmospheric observations with the emissions reported by the Kapuni plant, and to determine how well atmospheric measurements can constrain the emissions. The model has difficulty accurately capturing the fluctuations and short-term variability in the Helikite samples, but does quite well in representing the observed CO2ff in 15 min averaged surface flask samples and in ~ one week integrated CO2ff averages from grass samples. In this pilot study, we found that using grass samples, the modeled and observed CO2ff emissions averaged over one week agreed to within 30%. The results imply that greater verification accuracy may be achieved by including more detailed meteorological observations and refining 14C sampling strategies.

  11. CO2NET: Red Europea del Dióxido de Carbono

    OpenAIRE

    Arenillas, A.

    2006-01-01

    CO2NET es una red temática Europea constituida por distintas Instituciones, entros de Investigación y Desarrollo y empresas involucradas en tecnologías para la itigación del CO2. Entre sus actividades se encuentra facilitar la colaboración entre sus miembros en el marco de proyectos europeos sobre captura y almacenamiento de CO2.

  12. CO2 Sink/Source in the Indonesian Seas

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya R.

    2015-04-01

    Two distinct CO2 sink/source characteristics appeared from the compiled observed data 1984-2013 in the tropical Indonesian seas. The western part persistently emits CO2 to the atmosphere, while the eastern is rather dynamic which emits and absorbs smaller amount of CO2 to and from atmosphere, respectively. The segregation is proximal to the virtual Wallace line, where in the continental shelf is located. Lower salinity and higher silicate condition in the western part influenced the higher pCO2 condition in Java Sea. Temperature is found to have a limited influence to control different characteristic in the west and east, but SST change of 2.0 0C during La Ninã condition effectively reduced the source amount of CO2 by 50% compared to Normal year condition. Yet, during La Ninã, higher wind speed increases CO2 flux twice compared to Normal year. In the continental shelf area where CO2 sink area is found, 29 years data showed that pCO2 trend is increasing ±0.6-3.8 μatm/year. From this study, the overall areas have a significant source of CO2 of approximately 10 - 24 μatm.

  13. Tundra ecosystems observed to be CO2 sources due to differential amplification of the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshe, E F; Schuur, E A G; Bolker, B M

    2013-10-01

    Are tundra ecosystems currently a carbon source or sink? What is the future trajectory of tundra carbon fluxes in response to climate change? These questions are of global importance because of the vast quantities of organic carbon stored in permafrost soils. In this meta-analysis, we compile 40 years of CO2 flux observations from 54 studies spanning 32 sites across northern high latitudes. Using time-series analysis, we investigated if seasonal or annual CO2 fluxes have changed over time, and whether spatial differences in mean annual temperature could help explain temporal changes in CO2 flux. Growing season net CO2 uptake has definitely increased since the 1990s; the data also suggest (albeit less definitively) an increase in winter CO2 emissions, especially in the last decade. In spite of the uncertainty in the winter trend, we estimate that tundra sites were annual CO2 sources from the mid-1980s until the 2000s, and data from the last 7 years show that tundra continue to emit CO2 annually. CO2 emissions exceed CO2 uptake across the range of temperatures that occur in the tundra biome. Taken together, these data suggest that despite increases in growing season uptake, tundra ecosystems are currently CO2 sources on an annual basis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  14. Decomposition of Net CO2 Emission in the Wuhan Metropolitan Area of Central China

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    Xin Yang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Policy-makers have been sharing growing concerns that climate change has significant impacts on human society and economic activates. Knowledge of the influencing factors of CO2 emission is the crucial step to reduce it. In this paper, both CO2 emission and CO2 sink on a city-level of the nine cities in Wuhan Metropolitan Area are calculated using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change approach. Moreover, the logarithmic mean Divisia index (LMDI model was employed to decompose the net CO2 emission from 2001 to 2009. Results showed that (1 the largest amount of CO2 emission comes from energy while the largest amount CO2 sink comes from cropland; (2 economic level (S was the largest positive driving factor for net CO2 emission growth in the Wuhan Metropolitan Area, population (P also played a positive driving role, but with very weak contribution; and as negative inhibiting factors, energy structure (E and energy efficiency (C significantly reduced the net CO2 emission.

  15. Continuous measurements of net CO2 exchange by vegetation and soils in a suburban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emily B.; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2012-09-01

    In a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA, we simultaneously measured net CO2 exchange of trees using sap flow and leaf gas exchange measurements, net CO2exchange of a turfgrass lawn using eddy covariance from a portable tower, and total surface-atmosphere CO2 fluxes (FC) using an eddy covariance system on a tall tower. Two years of continuous measurements showed that net CO2exchange varied among vegetation types, with the largest growing-season (Apr-Nov) net CO2 uptake on a per cover area basis from evergreen needleleaf trees (-603 g C m-2), followed by deciduous broadleaf trees (-216 g C m-2), irrigated turfgrass (-211 g C m-2), and non-irrigated turfgrass (-115 g C m-2). Vegetation types showed seasonal patterns of CO2exchange similar to those observed in natural ecosystems. Scaled-up net CO2 exchange from vegetation and soils (FC(VegSoil)) agreed closely with landscape FC measurements from the tall tower at times when fossil fuel emissions were at a minimum. Although FC(VegSoil) did not offset fossil fuel emissions on an annual basis, the temporal pattern of FC(VegSoil) did significantly alter the seasonality of FC. Total growing season FC(VegSoil)in recreational land-use areas averaged -165 g C m-2 and was dominated by turfgrass CO2 exchange (representing 77% of the total), whereas FC(VegSoil) in residential areas averaged -124 g C m-2 and was dominated by trees (representing 78% of the total). Our results suggest urban vegetation types can capture much of the variability required to predict seasonal patterns and differences in FC(VegSoil) that could result from changes in land use or vegetation composition in temperate cities.

  16. Net Heterotrophy in the Amazon Continental Shelf Changes Rapidly to a Sink of CO2 in the Outer Amazon Plume

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    Nathalie Lefèvre

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon continental shelf and adjacent oceanic area were sampled for inorganic and organic carbon parameters in order to improve data coverage and understanding of carbon cycling dynamics within this important region. Seasonal coverage of the Amazon plume on the French Guiana continental shelf further north, was provided by CO2 monitoring using a merchant ship sailing from France to French Guiana (2006–2016. Salinity ranged from 1 to 36 (transects in April 2013, and May 2014. At salinity below 10, strong outgassing was observed with fugacity of CO2 (fCO2 over 2,000 μatm. This region displayed net heterotrophy, fueled by organic matter with terrestrial origin, as shown by δ13C and δ15N values of suspended particles. A δ13C cross shelf average of −31% was measured during May 2014, contrasting with oceanic values in excess of −20%. The reactivity of this terrestrial material resulted in the local production of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon as well as fluorescent humic compounds. Further offshore, the dilution of freshwater by ocean waters created a sink for CO2, enhanced by biological activity. The strongest CO2 drawdowns, associated with high chlorophyll a concentrations, were observed on the French Guiana continental shelf in the outer Amazon plume, with fCO2 values below 150 μatm. Here, a CO2 sink was present almost throughout the year, with a seasonal maximum of −9.2 mmol CO2 m−2d−1 observed in June 2015. However, both the CO2 and salinity distributions could vary significantly within a few days, confirming the presence of many eddies in this region. The Amazon continental shelf hence behaved as a transition zone between an inshore source of CO2 to the atmosphere and an offshore sink. Some marine phytoplankton production was detected but occurred mainly close to the French Guiana shelf. A mean net CO2 outgassing of 44 ± 43.6 mmol m−2d−1 was estimated for the area. Quantifying the CO2 flux for the entire Amazon

  17. Temporally-resolved Study of Atmosphere-lake Net CO2 Exchange at Lochaber Lake, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spafford, L. A.; Risk, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Lakes are carbon gateways with immense processing capacity, acting as either sinks or sources for CO2. As climate change exacerbates weather extremes, carbon stored within permafrost and soils is liberated to water systems, altering aquatic carbon budgets and light availability for photosynthesis. The functional response of lakes to climate change is uncertain, and continuous data of lake respiration and its drivers are lacking. This study used high-frequency measurements of CO2 exchange during a growing season by a novel technique to quantify the net flux of carbon at a small deep oligotrophic lake in eastern Nova Scotia, Canada, and to examine the influence of environmental forcings. We installed 3 floating Forced Diffusion dynamic membrane chambers on the lake, coupled to a valving multiplexer and a single Vaisala GMP 343 CO2 analyzer. This low-power system sampled lake-atmosphere CO2 exchange at several points from shore every hour for over 100 days in the growing season. At the same frequency we also collected automated measurements of wind velocity, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), dissolved CO2, air and water temperature. Manual measurement campaigns measured chlorophyll `a', DOC, surface methane (CH4), and CO2 flux by manual static floating chamber to confirm the automated measurements. The lake was a net source for carbon, on average emitting 0.038 µmol CO2/m2/s or 4.967 g CO2/s over the entire lake, but we did observe significant temporal variation across diel cycles, and along with changing weather. Approximately 48 hours after every rain event, we observed an increase in littoral CO2 release by the lake. Wind speed, air temperature, and distance from shore were also drivers of variation, as the littoral zone tended to release less CO2 during the course of our study. This work shows the variable influence of environmental drivers of lake carbon flux, as well as the utility of low-power automated chambers for observing aquatic net CO2 exchange.

  18. Rain events decrease boreal peatland net CO2 uptake through reduced light availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Limpens, Juul; Metselaar, Klaas; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M; Berendse, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Boreal peatlands store large amounts of carbon, reflecting their important role in the global carbon cycle. The short-term exchange and the long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in these ecosystems are closely associated with the permanently wet surface conditions and are susceptible to drought. Especially, the single most important peat forming plant genus, Sphagnum, depends heavily on surface wetness for its primary production. Changes in rainfall patterns are expected to affect surface wetness, but how this transient rewetting affects net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) remains unknown. This study explores how the timing and characteristics of rain events during photosynthetic active periods, that is daytime, affect peatland NEE and whether rain event associated changes in environmental conditions modify this response (e.g. water table, radiation, vapour pressure deficit, temperature). We analysed an 11-year time series of half-hourly eddy covariance and meteorological measurements from Degerö Stormyr, a boreal peatland in northern Sweden. Our results show that daytime rain events systematically decreased the sink strength of peatlands for atmospheric CO2 . The decrease was best explained by rain associated reduction in light, rather than by rain characteristics or drought length. An average daytime growing season rain event reduced net ecosystem CO2 uptake by 0.23-0.54 gC m(-2) . On an annual basis, this reduction of net CO2 uptake corresponds to 24% of the annual net CO2 uptake (NEE) of the study site, equivalent to a 4.4% reduction of gross primary production (GPP) during the growing season. We conclude that reduced light availability associated with rain events is more important in explaining the NEE response to rain events than rain characteristics and changes in water availability. This suggests that peatland CO2 uptake is highly sensitive to changes in cloud cover formation and to altered rainfall regimes, a process hitherto largely

  19. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  20. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.W. King; R.J. Andres; K J. Davis; M. Hafer; D.J. Hayes; D.N. Huntzinger; B. de Jong; W.A. Kurz; A.D. McGuire; R. Vargas; Y. Wei; T.O. West; C.W. Woodall

    2015-01-01

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net...

  1. Regional atmospheric CO2 inversion reveals seasonal and geographic differences in Amazon net biome exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alden, Caroline B.; Miller, John B.; Gatti, Luciana V.; Gloor, Manuel M.; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M.; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid T.; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana S.; Correia, Caio S. C.; Domingues, Lucas G.; Joiner, Joanna; Krol, Maarten C.; Lyapustin, Alexei I.; Peters, Wouter; Shiga, Yoichi P.; Thoning, Kirk; van der Velde, Ivar R.; van Leeuwen, Thijs T.; Yadav, Vineet; Diffenbaugh, Noah S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with

  2. [Net CO2 exchange and carbon isotope flux in Acacia mangium plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lu-Liu; Sun, Gu-Chou; Zhao, Ping; Cai, Xi-An; Zeng, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Quan

    2009-11-01

    By using stable carbon isotope technique, the leaf-level 13C discrimination was integrated to canopy-scale photosynthetic discrimination (Deltacanopy) through weighted the net CO2 assimilation (Anet) of sunlit and shaded leaves and the stand leaf area index (L) in an A. mangium plantation, and the carbon isotope fluxes from photosynthesis and respiration as well as their net exchange flux were obtained. There was an obvious diurnal variation in Deltacanopy, being lower at dawn and at noon time (18.47 per thousand and 19.87 per thousand, respectively) and the highest (21.21 per thousand) at dusk. From the end of November to next May, the Deltacanopy had an increasing trend, with an annual average of (20.37 +/- 0.29) per thousand. The carbon isotope ratios of CO2 from autotrophic respiration (excluding daytime foliar respiration) and heterotrophic respiration were respectively (- 28.70 +/- 0.75) per thousand and (- 26.75 +/- 1.3) per thousand in average. The delta13 C of nighttime ecosystem-respired CO2 in May was the lowest (-30.14 per thousand), while that in November was the highest (-28.01 per thousand). The carbon isotope flux of CO2 between A. mangium forest and atmosphere showed a midday peak of 178.5 and 217 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) x per thousand in May and July, with the daily average of 638.4 and 873.2 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) x per thousand, respectively. The carbon isotope flux of CO2 absorbed by canopy leaves was 1.6-2.5 times higher than that of CO2 emitted from respiration, suggesting that a large sum of CO2 was absorbed by A. mangium, which decreased the atmospheric CO2 concentration and improved the environment.

  3. High net CO2 and CH4 release at a eutrophic shallow lake on a formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Daniela; Koebsch, Franziska; Larmanou, Eric; Augustin, Jürgen; Sachs, Torsten

    2016-05-01

    Drained peatlands often act as carbon dioxide (CO2) hotspots. Raising the groundwater table is expected to reduce their CO2 contribution to the atmosphere and revitalise their function as carbon (C) sink in the long term. Without strict water management rewetting often results in partial flooding and the formation of spatially heterogeneous, nutrient-rich shallow lakes. Uncertainties remain as to when the intended effect of rewetting is achieved, as this specific ecosystem type has hardly been investigated in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange. In most cases of rewetting, methane (CH4) emissions increase under anoxic conditions due to a higher water table and in terms of global warming potential (GWP) outperform the shift towards CO2 uptake, at least in the short term.Based on eddy covariance measurements we studied the ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CH4 and CO2 at a shallow lake situated on a former fen grassland in northeastern Germany. The lake evolved shortly after flooding, 9 years previous to our investigation period. The ecosystem consists of two main surface types: open water (inhabited by submerged and floating vegetation) and emergent vegetation (particularly including the eulittoral zone of the lake, dominated by Typha latifolia). To determine the individual contribution of the two main surface types to the net CO2 and CH4 exchange of the whole lake ecosystem, we combined footprint analysis with CH4 modelling and net ecosystem exchange partitioning.The CH4 and CO2 dynamics were strikingly different between open water and emergent vegetation. Net CH4 emissions from the open water area were around 4-fold higher than from emergent vegetation stands, accounting for 53 and 13 g CH4 m-2 a-1 respectively. In addition, both surface types were net CO2 sources with 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1 respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions in terms of a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates. In sum, even after 9

  4. Net primary production and seasonal CO2 and CH4 fluxes in a Trapa natans L. meadow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco BARTOLI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The main hypothesis of this work is that Trapa natans L. and similar floating leaved macrophytes are only temporary sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide and that they favour water hypoxia and large methane efflux from sediment to the atmosphere, due to their shading effect and scarce ability to transfer oxygen to submerged tissues. For this purpose, from April to August 2005, T. natans production, dissolved O2, CO2 and CH4 concentrations in the water column and CO2 and CH4 fluxes across the wateratmosphere interface were measured in an oxbow lake (Lanca di Po, Northern Italy where a monospecific floating mat of water chestnut develops. Net primary production by T. natans was determined via biomass harvesting while gas fluxes were determined via short-term incubations of light and dark floating chambers. From July onwards, when the water surface of the oxbow lake was entirely colonized by the plant, the dense canopy resulted in a physical barrier for light and water reareation. As a consequence of sediment and plant respiration, persistent hypoxia and often anoxia, and CO2 and CH4 supersaturation occurred in the water column. Net primary production of T. natans, calculated at peak biomass, was 13.05 ± 0.32 mol CO2 m-2. The T. natans mat was a net sink for atmospheric CO2 from mid June to mid August, with an uptake peak measured at the beginning of July (229 mmol m-2 d-1; estimated net ecosystem metabolism was ≤10.09 ± 1.90 mol CO2 m-2. Contextually, during the vegetative period of T. natans, the oxbow lake was a net source of methane (9.52 ± 2.10 mol m-2, and the resulting CH4 to CO2 flux ratio across the water-atmosphere interface was ≥0.94. The large methane release was probably due to the persistent hypoxia and anoxia induced by the T. natans meadow, which uncoupled methane production from methane oxidation.

  5. Elevated CO2 maintains grassland net carbon uptake under a future heat and drought extreme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jacques; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Augusti, Angela; Benot, Marie-Lise; Thiery, Lionel; Darsonville, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Devidal, Sébastien; Escape, Christophe; Ravel, Olivier; Fromin, Nathalie; Volaire, Florence; Milcu, Alexandru; Bahn, Michael; Soussana, Jean-François

    2016-05-31

    Extreme climatic events (ECEs) such as droughts and heat waves are predicted to increase in intensity and frequency and impact the terrestrial carbon balance. However, we lack direct experimental evidence of how the net carbon uptake of ecosystems is affected by ECEs under future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2). Taking advantage of an advanced controlled environment facility for ecosystem research (Ecotron), we simulated eCO2 and extreme cooccurring heat and drought events as projected for the 2050s and analyzed their effects on the ecosystem-level carbon and water fluxes in a C3 grassland. Our results indicate that eCO2 not only slows down the decline of ecosystem carbon uptake during the ECE but also enhances its recovery after the ECE, as mediated by increases of root growth and plant nitrogen uptake induced by the ECE. These findings indicate that, in the predicted near future climate, eCO2 could mitigate the effects of extreme droughts and heat waves on ecosystem net carbon uptake.

  6. Daily variation in net primary production and net calcification in coral reef communities exposed to elevated pCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, Steeve; Edmunds, Peter J.; Lantz, Coulson A.; Carpenter, Robert C.

    2017-07-01

    The threat represented by ocean acidification (OA) for coral reefs has received considerable attention because of the sensitivity of calcifiers to changing seawater carbonate chemistry. However, most studies have focused on the organismic response of calcification to OA, and only a few have addressed community-level effects, or investigated parameters other than calcification, such as photosynthesis. Light (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR) is a driver of biological processes on coral reefs, and the possibility that these processes might be perturbed by OA has important implications for community function. Here we investigate how CO2 enrichment affects the relationships between PAR and community net O2 production (Pnet), and between PAR and community net calcification (Gnet), using experiments on three coral communities constructed to match (i) the back reef of Mo'orea, French Polynesia, (ii) the fore reef of Mo'orea, and (iii) the back reef of O'ahu, Hawaii. The results were used to test the hypothesis that OA affects the relationship between Pnet and Gnet. For the three communities tested, pCO2 did not affect the Pnet-PAR relationship, but it affected the intercept of the hyperbolic tangent curve fitting the Gnet-PAR relationship for both reef communities in Mo'orea (but not in O'ahu). For the three communities, the slopes of the linear relationships between Pnet and Gnet were not affected by OA, although the intercepts were depressed by the inhibitory effect of high pCO2 on Gnet. Our result indicates that OA can modify the balance between net calcification and net photosynthesis of reef communities by depressing community calcification, but without affecting community photosynthesis.

  7. Daily variation in net primary production and net calcification in coral reef communities exposed to elevated pCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Comeau

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The threat represented by ocean acidification (OA for coral reefs has received considerable attention because of the sensitivity of calcifiers to changing seawater carbonate chemistry. However, most studies have focused on the organismic response of calcification to OA, and only a few have addressed community-level effects, or investigated parameters other than calcification, such as photosynthesis. Light (photosynthetically active radiation, PAR is a driver of biological processes on coral reefs, and the possibility that these processes might be perturbed by OA has important implications for community function. Here we investigate how CO2 enrichment affects the relationships between PAR and community net O2 production (Pnet, and between PAR and community net calcification (Gnet, using experiments on three coral communities constructed to match (i the back reef of Mo'orea, French Polynesia, (ii the fore reef of Mo'orea, and (iii the back reef of O'ahu, Hawaii. The results were used to test the hypothesis that OA affects the relationship between Pnet and Gnet. For the three communities tested, pCO2 did not affect the Pnet–PAR relationship, but it affected the intercept of the hyperbolic tangent curve fitting the Gnet–PAR relationship for both reef communities in Mo'orea (but not in O'ahu. For the three communities, the slopes of the linear relationships between Pnet and Gnet were not affected by OA, although the intercepts were depressed by the inhibitory effect of high pCO2 on Gnet. Our result indicates that OA can modify the balance between net calcification and net photosynthesis of reef communities by depressing community calcification, but without affecting community photosynthesis.

  8. Metal-CO2 Batteries on the Road: CO2 from Contamination Gas to Energy Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhaojun; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Zhang; Zhou, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Rechargeable nonaqueous metal-air batteries attract much attention for their high theoretical energy density, especially in the last decade. However, most reported metal-air batteries are actually operated in a pure O2 atmosphere, while CO2 and moisture in ambient air can significantly impact the electrochemical performance of metal-O2 batteries. In the study of CO2 contamination on metal-O2 batteries, it has been gradually found that CO2 can be utilized as the reactant gas alone; namely, metal-CO2 batteries can work. On the other hand, investigations on CO2 fixation are in focus due to the potential threat of CO2 on global climate change, especially for its steadily increasing concentration in the atmosphere. The exploitation of CO2 in energy storage systems represents an alternative approach towards clean recycling and utilization of CO2 . Here, the aim is to provide a timely summary of recent achievements in metal-CO2 batteries, and inspire new ideas for new energy storage systems. Moreover, critical issues associated with reaction mechanisms and potential directions for future studies are discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire: field measurements and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, Alexander; Volkova, Elena; Karataeva, Tatiana; Zatsarinnaya, Dina; Novenko, Elena

    2014-05-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia (54.06N, 37.59E, 260 m a.s.l.) was described using results of field measurements and simulations with Mixfor-3D model. The area of the mire is about 1.2 ha and it is surrounded by a broadleaved forest stand. It is a typical peat mire according to water and mineral supply as well as to vegetation composition. The vegetation of the peripheral parts of the mire is typical eutrophic whereas the vegetation in its central part is represented by meso-oligothrophic plant communities. To describe the spatial variability of NEE and ET within the mire a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2 and H2O analyzer LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) was used. The measurements were provided along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and from May 2013 to October 2013. The chamber method was used for measurements of NEE and ET fluxes because of small size of the mire, a very uniform surrounding forest stand and the mosaic mire vegetation. All these factors promote very heterogeneous exchange conditions within the mire and make it difficult to apply, for example, an eddy covariance method that is widely used for flux measurements in the field. The results of the field measurements showed a significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation, air temperature and ground water level. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere (up to 6.8±4.2 µmol m-2 s-1 in June) whereas its peripheral part, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was mainly a source of

  10. How do land management practices affect net ecosystem CO2 exchange of an invasive plant infestation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnentag, O.; Detto, M.; Runkle, B.; Kelly, M.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Ecosystem gas and energy exchanges of invasive plant infestations under different land management practices have been subject of few studies and thus little is known. Our goal is to characterize seasonal changes in net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) through the processes of photosynthesis (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) of a grassland used as pasture yet infested by perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. We analyze eddy-covariance supported by environmental and canopy-scale hyperspectral reflectance measurements acquired in 2007-2009. Our study covers three summer drought periods with slightly different land management practices. Over the study period the site was subject to year-round grazing, and in 2008 the site was additionally mowed. Specific questions we address are a) how does pepperweed flowering affect GEP, b) does a mowing event affect NEE mainly through GEP or Reco, and c) can the combined effects of phenology and mowing on pepperweed NEE potentially be tracked using routinely applied remote sensing techniques? Preliminary results indicate that pepperweed flowering drastically decreases photosynthetic CO2 uptake due to shading by the dense arrangement of white flowers at the canopy top, causing the infestation to be almost CO2 neutral. In contrast, mowing causes the infestation to act as moderate net CO2 sink, mainly due to increased CO2 uptake during regrowth. We demonstrate that spectral regions other than commonly-used red and near-infrared might be more promising for pepperweed monitoring because of its spectral uniqueness during the flowering phase. Our results have important implications for land-use land-cover (LULC) change studies when biological invasions and their management alter ecosystem structure and functioning but not necessarily the respective LULC class.

  11. Drought Rapidly Diminishes the Large Net CO2 Uptake in 2011 Over Semi-Arid Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuanlong; Huete, Alfredo; Cleverly, James; Eamus, Derek; Chevallier, Frederic; Joiner, Joanna; Poulter, Benjamin; Zhang, Yongguang; Guanter, Luis; Meyer, Wayne; hide

    2016-01-01

    Each year, terrestrial ecosystems absorb more than a quarter of the anthropogenic carbon emissions, termed as land carbon sink. An exceptionally large land carbon sink anomaly was recorded in 2011, of which more than half was attributed to Australia. However, the persistence and spatially attribution of this carbon sink remain largely unknown. Here we conducted an observation-based study to characterize the Australian land carbon sink through the novel coupling of satellite retrievals of atmospheric CO2 and photosynthesis and in-situ flux tower measures. We show the 2010-11 carbon sink was primarily ascribed to savannas and grasslands. When all biomes were normalized by rainfall, shrublands however, were most efficient in absorbing carbon. We found the 2010-11 net CO2 uptake was highly transient with rapid dissipation through drought. The size of the 2010-11 carbon sink over Australia (0.97 Pg) was reduced to 0.48 Pg in 2011-12, and was nearly eliminated in 2012-13 (0.08 Pg). We further report evidence of an earlier 2000-01 large net CO2 uptake, demonstrating a repetitive nature of this land carbon sink. Given a significant increasing trend in extreme wet year precipitation over Australia, we suggest that carbon sink episodes will exert greater future impacts on global carbon cycle.

  12. Drought rapidly diminishes the large net CO2 uptake in 2011 over semi-arid Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuanlong; Huete, Alfredo; Cleverly, James; Eamus, Derek; Chevallier, Frédéric; Joiner, Joanna; Poulter, Benjamin; Zhang, Yongguang; Guanter, Luis; Meyer, Wayne; Xie, Zunyi; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Each year, terrestrial ecosystems absorb more than a quarter of the anthropogenic carbon emissions, termed as land carbon sink. An exceptionally large land carbon sink anomaly was recorded in 2011, of which more than half was attributed to Australia. However, the persistence and spatially attribution of this carbon sink remain largely unknown. Here we conducted an observation-based study to characterize the Australian land carbon sink through the novel coupling of satellite retrievals of atmospheric CO2 and photosynthesis and in-situ flux tower measures. We show the 2010–11 carbon sink was primarily ascribed to savannas and grasslands. When all biomes were normalized by rainfall, shrublands however, were most efficient in absorbing carbon. We found the 2010–11 net CO2 uptake was highly transient with rapid dissipation through drought. The size of the 2010–11 carbon sink over Australia (0.97 Pg) was reduced to 0.48 Pg in 2011–12, and was nearly eliminated in 2012–13 (0.08 Pg). We further report evidence of an earlier 2000–01 large net CO2 uptake, demonstrating a repetitive nature of this land carbon sink. Given a significant increasing trend in extreme wet year precipitation over Australia, we suggest that carbon sink episodes will exert greater future impacts on global carbon cycle. PMID:27886216

  13. Summer extreme climatic event in the future: impact on the net CO2 and water fluxes of an upland grassland and buffering impact of elevated atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jacques; Ravel, Olivier; Landais, Damien; Piel, Clément; Defossez, Marc; Escape, Christophe; Devidal, Sébastien; Didier, Philippe; Bahn, Michael; Volaire, Florence; Augusti, Angela; Soussana, Jean-François; Picon-Cochard, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    Extreme climatic events are expected to be more frequent and intense in a few decades, but they will also occur in a climatic context different from the current one. In the Montpellier Ecotron, we studied the response of intact grassland monoliths (1m², 60 cm deep) sampled in an upland grassland of the French Massif Central. The first year the grasslands were acclimated to the average climatic conditions of the years around 2050 (+ 4 °C and - 56 mm for summer precipitations). The second year, the same climate was maintained but in half of the experimental units we imposed a summer drought and heat wave (50 % reduction of precipitations for a month and then 100 % precipitation reduction combined with a 3,4 °C increase in temperature for two weeks). A CO2 treatment (520 vs 380 µmol/mol) was crossed with the climatic treatment. Net CO2 fluxes were measured continuously during the second year of the experiment. The extreme climatic event induced a total senescence of the canopy whatever the CO2 treatment. The interactive effect of elevated CO2 with the drought treatment was significant at the onset of the drought and particularly large in the fall after the recovery period, with a net photosynthesis twice as high in the (extreme climate+ CO2) treatment compared to the control. Integrated over the year, elevated CO2 totally buffered the impact of the extreme climatic event on net CO2 exchanges. These results are discussed together with the evapotranspiration and soil humidity data.

  14. Comparison of CO2 Laser Cutting with Different Laser Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketting, Hans-Ole; Olsen, Flemmming Ove

    1996-01-01

    This paper contains CO2 laser cutting results in mild and stainless steel with different laser sources. The main factors which affect the cutting speed and quality are the power, the cutting gas and focal point conditions. Keeping the power and cutting gas constant, the focal point conditions have...... size,for the maximum cutting speed. One of the 7 laser sources with different focal length and thus different minimum spot size, was then used to investigate more in details the importance of the focal spot size cutting stainless steel with high pressure nitrogen. It looks as if there is a strong...... been varied with respect to size and power density.In the introduction a theoretical model is presented, showing that the cutting speed is inverse proportional to the width of the cut kerf in a given material, and the definition of the Beam Quality Factor is introduced.In the next chapter this theory...

  15. Analysing net CO2 exchanges over an arable crop across multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blei, Emanuel; Toet, Sylvia; Revill, Andrew; Solis Parejo, Jose; Keane, Ben; Vallack, Harry; Stockdale, James; Ineson, Phil; Levy, Pete; Skiba, Ute; Drewer, Julia; Famulari, Daniela; Williams, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    There is a critical need to better understand and up-scale greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural activities to support adaptation and mitigation activities at national scales. A major unknown is the intrinsic scale of variability in fluxes from chamber to field scales. This variation is linked to heterogeneity in management, soils and microclimate. We made greenhouse gas fluxes measurements on a commercially operated rapeseed-oil field in the east of England for a month from the start of the growing season until the second fertiliser application (18th March to 16th April 2014). Our methods included using (1) sporadic box chamber measurements of light response curves of CO2 exchanges; (2) a novel automated cable-operated chamber system (SkyLine) developed by the University of York to measure CO2 fluxes continuously from 18 chambers in the field; (3) an Eddy covariance system measuring CO2 fluxes from a larger area on another part of the same field. For each data set a simple model resolving gross primary production and ecosystem respiration, and using LAI, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and air temperature as drivers, was tuned to estimate net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for rapeseed oil. We assess the model performance and parameter estimates across the three methods and discuss the implications for scaling fluxes and correcting biases in upscaling.

  16. Conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake - implications for net CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebsch, Franziska; Glatzel, Stephan; Hofmann, Joachim; Forbrich, Inke; Jurasinski, Gerald

    2013-04-01

    Extensive rewetting projects to re-establish the natural carbon (C) sequestration function of degraded peatlands are currently taking place in Europe and North-America. Year-round flooding provides a robust measure to prevent periods of drought that are associated with ongoing peat mineralization and to initiate the accumulation of new organic matter. Here, we present measurements of net carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange during the gradual conversion of a moderately rewetted fen to a shallow lake. When we started our measurements in 2009, mean growing season water level (MWGL) was 0 cm. In 2010 the site was flooded throughout the year with MWGL of 36 cm. Extraordinary strong rainfalls in July 2011 resulted in a further increase of MWGL to 56 cm. Measurements of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were conducted during growing seasons (May-October) using the Eddy Covariance method. Information about vegetation vitality was deduced from the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) based on MODIS data. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were high during vegetation period 2009 (1273.4 and -1572.1 g CO2-C m-2), but decreased by 61 and 46% respectively when the fen was flooded throughout 2010. Under water-logged conditions, heterotrophic respiration declines and gas exchange is limited. Moreover, flooding is a severe stress factor for plants and decreases autotrophic respiration and photosynthesis. However, in comparison to 2010, rates of Reco and GEP doubled during the beginning of growing season 2011, indicating plastic response strategies of wetland plants to flooding. Presumably, plants were not able to cope with the further increase of water levels to up to 120 cm in June/July 2011, resulting in another drop of GEP and Reco. The effects of plant vitality on GEP were confirmed by the remote sensed vegetation index. Throughout all three growing seasons, the fen was a distinct net CO2 sink (2009: -333.3±12.3, 2010: -294.1±8.4, -352.4±5.1 g CO2-C m-2

  17. Net energy payback and CO2 emissions from three midwestern wind farms: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S.W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper updates a life-cycle net energy analysis and carbon dioxide emissions analysis of three Midwestern utility-scale wind systems. Both the Energy Payback Ratio (EPR) and CO2 analysis results provide useful data for policy discussions regarding an efficient and low-carbon energy mix. The EPR is the amount of electrical energy produced for the lifetime of the power plant divided by the total amount of energy required to procure and transport the materials, build, operate, and decommission the power plants. The CO2 analysis for each power plant was calculated from the life-cycle energy input data. A previous study also analyzed coal and nuclear fission power plants. At the time of that study, two of the three wind systems had less than a full year of generation data to project the life-cycle energy production. This study updates the analysis of three wind systems with an additional four to eight years of operating data. The EPR for the utility-scale wind systems ranges from a low of 11 for a two-turbine system in Wisconsin to 28 for a 143-turbine system in southwestern Minnesota. The EPR is 11 for coal, 25 for fission with gas centrifuge enriched uranium and 7 for gaseous diffusion enriched uranium. The normalized CO2 emissions, in tonnes of CO2 per GW eh, ranges from 14 to 33 for the wind systems, 974 for coal, and 10 and 34 for nuclear fission using gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion enriched uranium, respectively. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  18. Effects of winter temperature and summer drought on net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a temperate peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Campbell, Claire; Dinsmore, Kerry; Drewer, Julia; Coyle, Mhairi; Anderson, Margaret; Skiba, Ute; Nemitz, Eiko; Billett, Michael; Sutton, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the most important global sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); their ability to sequester C is a natural feedback mechanism controlled by climatic variables such as precipitation, temperature, length of growing season and period of snow cover. In the UK it has been predicted that peatlands could become a net source of carbon in response to climate change with climate models predicting a rise in global temperature of ca. 3oC between 1961-1990 and 2100. Land-atmosphere exchange of CO2in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variations, which have significant short- and long-term effects on carbon sink strength. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance (EC) at Auchencorth Moss (55° 47'32 N, 3° 14'35 W, 267 m a.s.l.), a temperate peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Auchencorth Moss is a low-lying, ombrotrophic peatland situated ca. 20 km south-west of Edinburgh. Peat depth ranges from 5 m and the site has a mean annual precipitation of 1155 mm. The vegetation present within the flux measurement footprint comprises mixed grass species, heather and substantial areas of moss species (Sphagnum spp. and Polytrichum spp.). The EC system consists of a LiCOR 7000 closed-path infrared gas analyser for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and water vapour and of a Gill Windmaster Pro ultrasonic anemometer. Over the 10 year period, the site was a consistent yet variable sink of CO2 ranging from -34.1 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -69.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing seasons and mean winter air temperature explained 93% of the variability in summertime sink strength, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant development and productivity were stunted by colder winters causing a net reduction in the annual carbon sink strength of this peatland where autotrophic processes are thought to be

  19. Inferring CO2 Fluxes from OCO-2 for Assimilation into Land Surface Models to Calculate Net Ecosystem Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, R.; Radov, A.; Halem, M.; Nearing, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations of mid to high latitude atmospheric CO2 show a growing seasonal amplitude. Land surface models poorly predict net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and are unable to substantiate these sporadic observations. An investigation of how the biosphere has reacted to changes in atmospheric CO2 is essential to our understanding of potential climate-vegetation feedbacks. A global, seasonal investigation of CO2-flux is then necessary in order to assimilate into land surface models for improving the prediction of annual NEE. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) of DOE collects CO2-flux measurements (in addition to CO2 concentration and various other meteorological quantities) at several towers located around the globe at half hour temporal frequencies. CO2-fluxes are calculated via the eddy covariance technique, which utilizes CO2-densities and wind velocities to calculate CO2-fluxes. The global coverage of CO2 concentrations as provided by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) provide satellite-derived CO2 concentrations all over the globe. A framework relating the satellite-inferred CO2 concentrations collocated with the ground-based ARM as well as Ameriflux stations would enable calculations of CO2-fluxes far from the station sites around the entire globe. Regression techniques utilizing deep-learning neural networks may provide such a framework. Additionally, meteorological reanalysis allows for the replacement of the ARM multivariable meteorological variables needed to infer the CO2-fluxes. We present the results of inferring CO2-fluxes from OCO-2 CO2 concentrations for a two year period, Sept. 2014- Sept. 2016 at the ARM station located near Oklahoma City. A feed-forward neural network (FFNN) is used to infer relationships between the following data sets: F([ARM CO2-density], [ARM Meteorological Data]) = [ARM CO2-Flux] F([OCO-2 CO2-density],[ARM Meteorological Data]) = [ARM CO2-Flux] F([ARM CO2-density],[Meteorological Reanalysis]) = [ARM CO2-Flux

  20. Regional Atmospheric CO2 Inversion Reveals Seasonal and Geographic Differences in Amazon Net Biome Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, Caroline B.; Miller, John B.; Gatti, Luciana V.; Gloor, Manuel M.; Guan, Kaiyu; Michalak, Anna M.; van der Laan-Luijkx, Ingrid; Touma, Danielle; Andrews, Arlyn; Basso, Luana G.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest carbon exchange and its response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net biome exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NBE), which represents nonfire carbon fluxes into and out of biomass and soils. Subannual and sub-Basin Amazon NBE estimates have relied heavily on process-based biosphere models, despite lack of model agreement with plot-scale observations. We present a new analysis of airborne measurements that reveals monthly, regional-scale (Approx.1-8 x 10(exp -6) km2) NBE variations. We develop a regional atmospheric CO2 inversion that provides the first analysis of geographic and temporal variability in Amazon biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange and that is minimally influenced by biosphere model-based first guesses of seasonal and annual mean fluxes. We find little evidence for a clear seasonal cycle in Amazon NBE but do find NBE sensitivity to aberrations from long-term mean climate. In particular, we observe increased NBE (more carbon emitted to the atmosphere) associated with heat and drought in 2010, and correlations between wet season NBE and precipitation (negative correlation) and temperature (positive correlation). In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NBE persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of 2010 heat and drought. We also identify regional differences in postdrought NBE that appear related to long-term water availability. We examine satellite proxies and find evidence for higher gross primary productivity (GPP) during a pulse of increased carbon uptake in 2011, and lower GPP during a period of increased NBE in the 2010 dry season drought, but links between GPP and NBE changes are not conclusive. These results provide novel evidence of NBE sensitivity to short-term temperature and moisture extremes in the Amazon, where monthly and sub

  1. Biophysical controls on net ecosystem CO2 exchange over a semiarid shrubland in northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, X.; Zha, T. S.; Wu, B.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Gong, J. N.; Qin, S. G.; Chen, G. P.; Qian, D.; Kellomäki, S.; Peltola, H.

    2014-09-01

    The carbon (C) cycling in semiarid and arid areas remains largely unexplored, despite the wide distribution of drylands globally. Rehabilitation practices have been carried out in many desertified areas, but information on the C sequestration capacity of recovering vegetation is still largely lacking. Using the eddy-covariance technique, we measured the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) over a recovering shrub ecosystem in northwest China throughout 2012 in order to (1) quantify NEE and its components and to (2) examine the dependence of C fluxes on biophysical factors at multiple timescales. The annual budget showed a gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) of 456 g C m-2 yr-1 (with a 90% prediction interval of 449-463 g C m-2 yr-1) and an ecosystem respiration (Re) of 379 g C m-2 yr-1 (with a 90% prediction interval of 370-389 g C m-2 yr-1), resulting in a net C sink of 77 g C m-2 yr-1 (with a 90% prediction interval of 68-87 g C m-2 yr-1). The maximum daily NEE, GEP and Re were -4.7, 6.8 and 3.3 g C m-2 day-1, respectively. Both the maximum C assimilation rate (i.e., at the optimum light intensity) and the quantum yield varied over the growing season, being higher in summer and lower in spring and autumn. At the half-hourly scale, water deficit exerted a major control over daytime NEE, and interacted with other stresses (e.g., heat and photoinhibition) in constraining C fixation by the vegetation. Low soil moisture also reduced the temperature sensitivity of Re (Q10). At the synoptic scale, rain events triggered immediate pulses of C release from the ecosystem, followed by peaks of CO2 uptake 1-2 days later. Over the entire growing season, leaf area index accounted for 45 and 65% of the seasonal variation in NEE and GEP, respectively. There was a linear dependence of daily Re on GEP, with a slope of 0.34. These results highlight the role of abiotic stresses and their alleviation in regulating C cycling in the face of an increasing frequency and intensity of extreme

  2. Sea-ice melt CO2-carbonate chemistry in the western Arctic Ocean: meltwater contributions to air-sea CO2 gas exchange, mixed layer properties and rates of net community production under sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N. R.; Garley, R.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Mathis, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt and co-located, contemporaneous seawater has rarely been studied in sea ice covered oceans. Here, we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt (both above sea ice as "melt ponds" and below sea ice as "interface waters") and mixed layer properties in the western Arctic Ocean in the early summer of 2010 and 2011. At nineteen stations, the salinity (~ 0.5 to 1500 μatm) with the majority of melt ponds acting as potentially strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pH of melt pond waters was also highly variable ranging from mildly acidic (6.1 to 7) to slightly more alkaline than underlying seawater (8 to 10.7). All of observed melt ponds had very low (pH/Ωaragonite than the co-located mixed layer beneath. Sea-ice melt thus contributed to the suppression of mixed layer pCO2 enhancing the surface ocean's capacity to uptake CO2 from the atmosphere. Meltwater contributions to changes in mixed-layer DIC were also used to estimate net community production rates (mean of 46.9 ±29.8 g C m-2 for the early-season period) under sea-ice cover. Although sea-ice melt is a transient seasonal feature, above-ice melt pond coverage can be substantial (10 to > 50%) and under-ice interface melt water is ubiquitous during this spring/summer sea-ice retreat. Our observations contribute to growing evidence that sea-ice CO2-carbonate chemistry is highly variable and its contribution to the complex factors that influence the balance of CO2 sinks and sources (and thereby ocean acidification) is difficult to predict in an era of rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean.

  3. Theoretical predictions of source rates for exospheric CO 2 on icy satellites of the outer planets due to sublimation of deep subsurface CO 2 ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephen E.

    2016-10-01

    The abundances of CO2 observed in the exospheres of Callisto and, more recently, Rhea and Dione are difficult to explain. The previously proposed sources for the CO2 either have production rates well below the expected rates of escape/destruction or should produce other species (e.g. CO) that are not observed.We consider a potential source that has not been previously investigated - CO2 vapor originating from crustal CO2 ice and driven upward by the endogenic heat flux - and have developed a model to make quantitative estimates of the corresponding global subsurface vapor flux.Our model is based on previous theoretical work by Clifford (1993) and Mellon et al. (1997) for equatorial ground ice on Mars, who showed that in times or places where subsurface pore ice is undergoing long-term sublimation and diffusive loss, the ice table (the shallowest depth where any pore ice exists) will not continue to recede indefinitely. Beyond a certain, predictable depth, the linear diffusive profile of vapor density between the ice table and the surface will become supersaturated with respect to the local temperature and recondense as pore ice. This is true for any planetary body with a non-negligible interior heat source (e.g. radiogenic, tidal, etc) and is due to the fact that, while the ice temperature increases ~linearly with depth, the corresponding equilibrium vapor density increases exponentially.Once this occurs, a steady-state profile of ice volume fraction, f_ice(z), develops, with net mass loss only occurring from the retreating pore-filling ice layer. The rate of vapor flux to the surface is then determined only by the vapor density and temperature gradient at the ice table depth. We use a 1-D thermal model coupled with an analytic physical model for regolith thermal conductivity (including its depth- and T-dependence), to calculate the zonally-integrated global CO2 vapor flux corresponding to the range of expected heat flow values. Our preliminary results show

  4. Elevated Nitrogen Deposition Enhances the Net CO2 Sink Strength in Alberta Bogs along a Post-fire Chronosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.; Albright, C. M.; Scott, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    About 30% of the landscape of northern Alberta, Canada is occupied by peatlands, which persist at the low end range of both mean annual precipitation (pattern emerged that N additions enhanced the net CO2 sink strength of the bogs, with no effect on ecosystem respiration. Net primary production of Sphagnum fuscum, the dominant peat-forming moss, was not affected by N addition, suggesting that the overall response of NEE to N addition is the result of enhanced growth of ericaceous shrubs. These findings suggest that while elevated N deposition in the AOSR may enhance the strength of the overall CO2 sink of bogs in the short term, in the longer term, increased shrub growth has the potential to shade Sphagnum mosses, compromising the future bog CO2sink strength across the region.

  5. Land use affects the net ecosystem CO2 exchange and its components in mountain grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M.; Bahn, M.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Tappeiner, U.; Cernusca, A.

    2010-08-01

    Changes in land use and management have been strongly affecting mountain grassland, however, their effects on the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) and its components have not yet been well documented. We analysed chamber-based estimates of NEE, gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (R) and light use efficiency (LUE) of six mountain grasslands differing in land use and management, and thus site fertility, for the growing seasons of 2002 to 2008. The main findings of the study are that: (1) land use and management affected seasonal NEE, GPP and R, which all decreased from managed to unmanaged grasslands; (2) these changes were explained by differences in leaf area index (LAI), biomass and leaf-area-independent changes that were likely related to photosynthetic physiology; (3) diurnal variations of NEE were primarily controlled by photosynthetically active photon flux density and soil and air temperature; seasonal variations were associated with changes in LAI; (4) parameters of light response curves were generally closely related to each other, and the ratio of R at a reference temperature/ maximum GPP was nearly constant across the sites; (5) similarly to our study, maximum GPP and R for other grasslands on the globe decreased with decreasing land use intensity, while their ratio remained remarkably constant. We conclude that decreasing intensity of management and, in particular, abandonment of mountain grassland lead to a decrease in NEE and its component processes. While GPP and R are generally closely coupled during most of the growing season, GPP is more immediately and strongly affected by land management (mowing, grazing) and season. This suggests that management and growing season length, as well as their possible future changes, may play an important role for the annual C balance of mountain grassland.

  6. Land use affects the net ecosystem CO2 exchange and its components in mountain grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cernusca

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in land use and management have been strongly affecting mountain grassland, however, their effects on the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE and its components have not yet been well documented. We analysed chamber-based estimates of NEE, gross primary productivity (GPP, ecosystem respiration (R and light use efficiency (LUE of six mountain grasslands differing in land use and management, and thus site fertility, for the growing seasons of 2002 to 2008. The main findings of the study are that: (1 land use and management affected seasonal NEE, GPP and R, which all decreased from managed to unmanaged grasslands; (2 these changes were explained by differences in leaf area index (LAI, biomass and leaf-area-independent changes that were likely related to photosynthetic physiology; (3 diurnal variations of NEE were primarily controlled by photosynthetically active photon flux density and soil and air temperature; seasonal variations were associated with changes in LAI; (4 parameters of light response curves were generally closely related to each other, and the ratio of R at a reference temperature/ maximum GPP was nearly constant across the sites; (5 similarly to our study, maximum GPP and R for other grasslands on the globe decreased with decreasing land use intensity, while their ratio remained remarkably constant. We conclude that decreasing intensity of management and, in particular, abandonment of mountain grassland lead to a decrease in NEE and its component processes. While GPP and R are generally closely coupled during most of the growing season, GPP is more immediately and strongly affected by land management (mowing, grazing and season. This suggests that management and growing season length, as well as their possible future changes, may play an important role for the annual C balance of mountain grassland.

  7. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 and carbon balance for eight temperate organic soils under agricultural management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars; Görres, C.-M.; Hoffmann, Carl Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study presents the first annual estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and net ecosystem carbon balances (NECB) of contrasting Danish agricultural peatlands. Studies were done at eight sites representing permanent grasslands (PG) and rotational (RT) arable soils cropped to barley......) sites, NEE (mean ± standard error, SE) was 5.1 ± 0.9 and 8.6 ± 2.0 Mg C ha−1 yr−1, respectively, but with the overall lowest value observed for potato cropping (3.5 Mg C ha−1 yr−1). This was partly attributed to a short-duration vegetation period and drying of the soil especially in potato ridges. NECB...... and temperate climate zones. It was stressed that evaluation of emission factors should explicitly differentiate between data representing net C balance from a soil perspective and CO2-C balance from an atmospheric perspective. Modelling of inter-annual variability in NEE for three selected sites during a 21...

  8. Net mineralization of N at deeper soil depths as a potential mechanism for sustained forest production under elevated [CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Hooker, Toby [Utah State University (USU); Classen, Aimee T [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] is projected to increase forest production, which could increase ecosystem carbon (C) storage. However, sustained forest production will depend on the nutrient balance of the forested ecosystem. Our aim was to examine the causes and consequences of increased fine-root production and mortality throughout the soil profile under elevated CO2 with respect to potential gross nitrogen (N) cycling rates. Our study was conducted in a CO2-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) plantation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. We used isotope pool dilution methodology to measure potential gross N cycling rates in laboratory incubations of soil from four depth increments to 60 cm. Our objectives were two-fold: (1) determine whether N is available for root acquisition in deeper soil, and (2) determine whether increased inputs of labile C from greater fine-root mortality at depth under elevated [CO2] had altered N cycling rates. While gross N fluxes declined with soil depth, we found that N is potentially available for roots to access, especially below 15 cm depth where microbial consumption of mineral N was reduced. Overall, up to 60% of potential gross N mineralization, and 100% of potential net N mineralization, occurred below 15-cm depth at this site. This finding was supported by in situ measurements from ion-exchange resins, where total inorganic N availability at 55 cm depth was equal to or greater than N availability at 15 cm depth. While it is likely that trees grown under elevated [CO2] are accessing a larger pool of inorganic N by mining deeper soil, we found no effect of elevated [CO2] on potential gross or net N cycling rates. Thus, increased root exploration of the soil volume under elevated [CO2] may be more important than changes in potential gross N cycling rates in sustaining forest responses to rising atmospheric CO2.

  9. Carbon cycling of Lake Kivu (East Africa: net autotrophy in the epilimnion and emission of CO2 to the atmosphere sustained by geogenic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto V Borges

    Full Text Available We report organic and inorganic carbon distributions and fluxes in a large (>2000 km2 oligotrophic, tropical lake (Lake Kivu, East Africa, acquired during four field surveys, that captured the seasonal variations (March 2007-mid rainy season, September 2007-late dry season, June 2008-early dry season, and April 2009-late rainy season. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 in surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu showed modest spatial (coefficient of variation between 3% and 6%, and seasonal variations with an amplitude of 163 ppm (between 579±23 ppm on average in March 2007 and 742±28 ppm on average in September 2007. The most prominent spatial feature of the pCO2 distribution was the very high pCO2 values in Kabuno Bay (a small sub-basin with little connection to the main lake ranging between 11,213 ppm and 14,213 ppm (between 18 and 26 times higher than in the main basin. Surface waters of the main basin of Lake Kivu were a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere at an average rate of 10.8 mmol m(-2 d(-1, which is lower than the global average reported for freshwater, saline, and volcanic lakes. In Kabuno Bay, the CO2 emission to the atmosphere was on average 500.7 mmol m(-2 d(-1 (∼46 times higher than in the main basin. Based on whole-lake mass balance of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC bulk concentrations and of its stable carbon isotope composition, we show that the epilimnion of Lake Kivu was net autotrophic. This is due to the modest river inputs of organic carbon owing to the small ratio of catchment area to lake surface area (2.15. The carbon budget implies that the CO2 emission to the atmosphere must be sustained by DIC inputs of geogenic origin from deep geothermal springs.

  10. Environment or development? Lifetime net CO2 exchange and control of the expression of Crassulacean acid metabolism in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2007-01-01

    The relative influence of plant age and environmental stress signals in triggering a shift from C(3) photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the annual halophytic C(3)-CAM species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was explored by continuously monitoring net CO(2) exchange of whole shoots from the seedling stage until seed set. Plants exposed to high salinity (400 mm NaCl) in hydroponic culture solution or grown in saline-droughted soil acquired between 11% and 24% of their carbon via net dark CO(2) uptake involving CAM. In contrast, plants grown under nonsaline, well-watered conditions were capable of completing their life cycle by operating in the C(3) mode without ever exhibiting net CO(2) uptake at night. These observations are not consistent with the widely expressed view that the induction of CAM by high salinity in M. crystallinum represents an acceleration of preprogrammed developmental processes. Rather, our study demonstrates that the induction of the CAM pathway for carbon acquisition in M. crystallinum is under environmental control.

  11. Modelling effects of seasonal variation in water table depth on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a tropical peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezbahuddin, M.; Grant, R. F.; Hirano, T.

    2014-02-01

    Seasonal variation in water table depth (WTD) determines the balance between aggradation and degradation of tropical peatlands. Longer dry seasons together with human interventions (e.g. drainage) can cause WTD drawdowns making tropical peatland C storage highly vulnerable. Better predictive capacity for effects of WTD on net CO2 exchange is thus essential to guide conservation of tropical peat deposits. Mathematical modelling of basic eco-hydrological processes under site-specific conditions can provide such predictive capacity. We hereby deploy a process-based mathematical model ecosys to study effects of seasonal variation in WTD on net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of a drainage affected tropical peat swamp forest at Palangkaraya, Indonesia. Simulated NEP suggested that the peatland was a C source (NEP ~ -2 g C m-2 d-1, where a negative sign represents a C source and a positive sign a C sink) during rainy seasons with shallow WTD, C neutral or a small sink (NEP ~ +1 g C m-2 d-1) during early dry seasons with intermediate WTD and a substantial C source (NEP ~ -4 g C m-2 d-1) during late dry seasons with deep WTD from 2002 to 2005. These values were corroborated by regressions (P 0.8, intercepts approaching 0 and slopes approaching 1. We also simulated a gradual increase in annual NEP from 2002 (-609 g C m-2) to 2005 (-373 g C m-2) with decreasing WTD which was attributed to declines in duration and intensity of dry seasons following the El Niño event of 2002. This increase in modelled NEP was corroborated by EC-gap filled annual NEP estimates. Our modelling hypotheses suggested that (1) poor aeration in wet soils during shallow WTD caused slow nutrient (predominantly phosphorus) mineralization and consequent slow plant nutrient uptake that suppressed gross primary productivity (GPP) and hence NEP (2) better soil aeration during intermediate WTD enhanced nutrient mineralization and hence plant nutrient uptake, GPP and NEP and (3) deep WTD suppressed NEP through a

  12. Partitioning net ecosystem carbon exchange into net assimilation and respiration using 13CO2 measurements: A cost-effective sampling strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    OgéE, J.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Bariac, T.; Brunet, Y.; Berbigier, P.; Roche, C.; Richard, P.; Bardoux, G.; Bonnefond, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    The current emphasis on global climate studies has led the scientific community to set up a number of sites for measuring the long-term biosphere-atmosphere net CO2 exchange (net ecosystem exchange, NEE). Partitioning this flux into its elementary components, net assimilation (FA), and respiration (FR), remains necessary in order to get a better understanding of biosphere functioning and design better surface exchange models. Noting that FR and FA have different isotopic signatures, we evaluate the potential of isotopic 13CO2 measurements in the air (combined with CO2 flux and concentration measurements) to partition NEE into FR and FA on a routine basis. The study is conducted at a temperate coniferous forest where intensive isotopic measurements in air, soil, and biomass were performed in summer 1997. The multilayer soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model MuSICA is adapted to compute 13CO2 flux and concentration profiles. Using MuSICA as a "perfect" simulator and taking advantage of the very dense spatiotemporal resolution of the isotopic data set (341 flasks over a 24-hour period) enable us to test each hypothesis and estimate the performance of the method. The partitioning works better in midafternoon when isotopic disequilibrium is strong. With only 15 flasks, i.e., two 13CO2 nighttime profiles (to estimate the isotopic signature of FR) and five daytime measurements (to perform the partitioning) we get mean daily estimates of FR and FA that agree with the model within 15-20%. However, knowledge of the mesophyll conductance seems crucial and may be a limitation to the method.

  13. Net photosynthesis in Sphagnum mosses has increased in response to the last century's 100 ppm increase in atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serk, Henrik; Nilsson, Mats; Schleucher, Jurgen

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands store >25% of the global soil C pool, corresponding to 1/3 of the contemporary CO2-C in the atmosphere. The majority of the accumulated peat is made up by remains of Sphagnum peat mosses. Thus, understanding how various Sphagnum functional groups respond, and have responded, to increasing atmospheric CO2 and temperature constitutes a major challenge for our understanding of the role of peatlands under a changing climate. We have recently demonstrated (Ehlers et al., 2015, PNAS) that the abundance ratio of two deuterium isotopomers (molecules carrying D at specific intramolecular positions, here D6R/S) of photosynthetic glucose reflects the ratio of oxygenation to carboxylation metabolic fluxes at Rubisco. The photosynthetic glucose is prepared from various plant carbohydrates including cellulose. This finding has been established in CO2 manipulation experiments and observed in carbohydrate derived glucose isolated from herbarium samples of all investigated C-3 species. The isotopomer ratio is connected to specific enzymatic processes thus allowing for mechanistic implicit interpretations. Here we demonstrate a clear increase in net photosynthesis of Sphagnum fuscum in response to the increase of 100 ppm CO2 during the last century as deduced from analysis on S. fuscum remains from peat cores. The D6R/S ratio declines from bottom to top in peat cores, indicating CO2-driven reduction of photorespiration in contemporary moss biomass. In contrast to the hummock-forming S. fuscum, hollow-growing species, e.g. S. majus did not show this response or gave significantly weaker response, suggesting important ecological consequences of rising CO2 on peatland ecosystem services. We hypothesize that photosynthesis in hollow-growing species under water saturation is fully or partly disconnected from the atmospheric CO2 partial pressure and thus showing weaker or no response to increased atmospheric CO2. To further test the field observations we grow both hummock and

  14. Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in abrine aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

    2006-12-10

    Continuous crosswell seismic monitoring of a small-scale CO2injection was accomplished with the development of a noveltubing-deployed piezoelectric borehole source. This piezotube source wasdeployed on the CO2 injection tubing, near the top of the saline aquiferreservoir at 1657-m depth, and allowed acquisition of crosswellrecordings at 15-minute intervals during the multiday injection. Thechange in traveltime recorded at various depths in a nearby observationwell allowed hour-by-hour monitoring of the growing CO2 plume via theinduced seismic velocity change. Traveltime changes of 0.2 to 1.0 ms ( upto 8 percent ) were observed, with no change seen at control sensorsplaced above the reservoir. The traveltime measurements indicate that theCO2 plume reached the top of the reservoir sand before reaching theobservation well, where regular fluid sampling was occuring during theinjection, thus providing information about the in situ buoyancy ofCO2.

  15. What drives the seasonal pattern of δ13C in the net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczka, B. M.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C. T.; Pataki, D. E.; Saleska, S. R.; Torn, M. S.; Vaughn, B. H.; Wehr, R. A.; Bowling, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    The seasonal pattern of δ13C of atmospheric CO2 depends upon both local and non-local land-atmosphere exchange and atmospheric transport. It has been suggested that the seasonal pattern is driven primarily from local variation in the δ13C of the net CO2 flux (exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere) as a result of variation of stomatal conductance of the vegetation. Here we study local variation of δ13C of the land-atmosphere exchange at 7 sites across the United States representing forests (Harvard, Howland, Niwot Ridge, Wind River), grasslands (Southern Great Plains, Rannell Prairie) and an urban center (Salt Lake City). Using a simple 2-part mixing model with background corrections we find that the δ13C of the net exchange of CO2 was most enriched at the grassland sites (-18.9 o/oo), and most depleted at the urban site (-29.6 o/oo) due to the contribution of C4 photosynthesis and fossil fuel emissions, respectively. The amplitude of the seasonal cycle was most pronounced at the C3/C4 grassland and the urban sites. In contrast, the forested sites have a reduced seasonal cycle, and remain almost constant during the growing season (0.49 o/oo change). Furthermore, by accounting for relatively fast δ13C variations in non-local sources at Niwot Ridge we find that the seasonal pattern in δ13C of net exchange is eliminated altogether. These results support the idea that a coherent, global seasonal pattern in δ13C of net exchange is influenced by seasonal transitions in C3/C4 grass, and the intensity and seasonal timing of fossil fuel emissions. This will have important implications for studies that use δ13C to constrain large-scale carbon fluxes.

  16. CO2 Sink/Source Characteristics in the Tropical Indonesian Seas

    KAUST Repository

    Kartadikaria, Aditya R.

    2015-11-05

    Two distinct CO2 sink/source characteristics are found in the tropical Indonesian seas from the compilation of observed data for the period 1984-2013. The western region persistently emits CO2 to the atmosphere, whereas the eastern region is dynamic and acts either as a small source or sink of CO2 to the atmosphere, depending on sites. The segregation is proximal to the Makassar Strait, which is located over the continental shelf and is one of the main routes of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Lower salinity and higher silicate were found in the western region, suggesting a terrestrial influence in this area. Temperature has a limited influence in controlling different CO2 sink/source characteristics in the west and east. However, an SST change of -2.0°C during La Niña events effectively reduces the pCO2 difference between the atmosphere and surface seawater by 50% compared to normal year conditions. During La Niña events, higher wind speeds double the CO2 flux from the ocean to the atmosphere compared to that of a normal year. In the continental shelf area where the CO2 sink area was found, data of over 29 years show that the seawater pCO2 increased by 0.6-3.8 μatm yr−1. Overall, the seawater pCO2 of the Indonesian Seas is supersaturated relative to the atmosphere by 15.9 ± 8.6 μatm and thus acts as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of advanced technologies for CO2 capture from industrial sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, M.C. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milano (Italy); Anantharaman, R. [SINTEF Energy Research, Sem Saelands vei 11, 7465 Trondheim (Norway); Arasto, A. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Ozcan, D.C.; Ahnd, Hyungwoong [IMP-SEE, The University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JL (United Kingdom); Dijkstra, J.W.; Carbo, M. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Boavida, D. [LNEG - Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 22 Edif J, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-07-01

    The great majority of the research on CO2 capture worldwide is today devoted to the integration of new technologies in power plants, which are responsible for about 80% of the worldwide CO2 emission from large stationary sources. The remaining 20% are emitted from industrial sources, mainly cement production plants ({approx}7% of the total emission), refineries ({approx}6%) and iron and steel industry ({approx}5%). Despite their lower overall contribution, the CO2 concentration in flue gas and the average emission per source can be higher than in power plants. Therefore, application of CO2 capture processes on these sources can be more effective and can lead to competitive cost of the CO2 avoided with respect to power plants. Furthermore, industrial CO2 capture could be an important early-opportunity application, or a facilitate demonstration of capture technology at a relative small scale or in a side stream. This paper results from a collaborative activity carried out within the Joint Programme on Carbon Capture and Storage of the European Energy Research Alliance (EERA CCS-JP) and aims at investigating the potentiality of new CO2 technologies in the application on the major industrial emitters.

  18. Partitioning of Urban CO2ff Emissions By Source Sector: Results from the Influx Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Karion, A.; Sweeney, C.; Newberger, T.; Lehman, S.; Davis, K. J.; Lauvaux, T.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. O. L.; Gurney, K. R.; Patarasuk, R.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Urban areas contribute ~75% of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions, and city governments are often leading the way in emission reduction efforts. As emissions are regulated and assigned a price, there is an increasing need to independently evaluate the reported bottom-up emissions and to attribute them to specific source sectors (e.g. electricity production, industry, vehicles). We demonstrate how multispecies atmospheric observations can be used to achieve this. The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX) aims to develop and evaluate methods for detection and attribution of urban GHG fluxes. The INFLUX observation network includes twelve towers measuring in situ CO2 and CO and flask measurements of another 50 species. 14CO2 measurements have shown that in winter, the total CO2 enhancement over Indianapolis approximates the CO2ff added. This somewhat surprising result allows us to use the wintertime in situ total CO2 and CO measurements to determine the observed CO:CO2ff ratio (RCO) at high resolution. First, we demonstrate that the USEPA CO inventory for Indianapolis overestimates CO emissions by a factor of about 2.5. Then we use the Hestia bottom-up CO2ff data product and revised characteristic RCO values for each CO2ff source sector to predict the diurnal cycle in RCO for Indianapolis. The tower observations and bottom-up RCO estimates are consistent during the daytime, but the observed RCO is significantly higher than the bottom-up estimate during the night. We show how the bottom-up and top-down methods can be used together to determine the cause of this discrepancy and improve CO2ff estimates from both methods.

  19. Biotic, abiotic, and management controls on the net ecosystem CO2 exchange of European mountain grassland ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Friborg, Thomas; Johansson et.al., Paul Torbjörn

    2008-01-01

    The net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange (NEE) of nine European mountain grassland ecosystems was measured during 2002-2004 using the eddy covariance method. Overall, the availability of photosynthetically active radiation (PPFD) was the single most important abiotic influence factor for NEE....... Its role changed markedly during the course of the season, PPFD being a better predictor for NEE during periods favorable for CO2 uptake, which was spring and autumn for the sites characterized by summer droughts (southern sites) and (peak) summer for the Alpine and northern study sites. This general...... pattern was interrupted by grassland management practices, that is, mowing and grazing, when the variability in NEE explained by PPFD decreased in concert with the amount of aboveground biomass (BMag). Temperature was the abiotic influence factor that explained most of the variability in ecosystem...

  20. Australian net (1950s-1990) soil organic carbon erosion: implications for CO2 emission and land-atmosphere modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The debate remains unresolved about soil erosion substantially offsetting fossil fuel emissions and acting as an important source or sink of CO2. There is little historical land use and management context to this debate, which is central to Australia's recent past of European settlement, agricultura...

  1. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange of an invasive plant infestation: new insights on the effects of phenology and management practices on structure and functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnentag, Oliver; Detto, Matteo; Runkle, Benjamin; Hatala, Jaclyn; Vargas, Rodrigo; Kelly, Maggi; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2010-05-01

    effects of measurement year and flowering/ mowing on the variable parameters of the non-linear responses of FA to light and FAR to air temperature. We address two specific questions with our research. First, how do year-round grazing and spring mowing affect the timing (i.e., onset) of pepperweed's key phenological phases? Second, we focus on pepperweed flowering, the spectrally most notable phenological phase. Thus we ask does the onset of flowering trigger changes in structural canopy development (i.e., z0m) and functioning (i.e., FA; FAR)? Over the summers (1 May - 30 September) of 2007 and 2009 the site was either almost neutral with respect to CO2 (-26 g C m-2 period-1 in 2007) or a moderate net CO2 source (89 g C m-2 period-1 in 2009). In contrast, the pepperweed infestation acted as a net CO2 sink (-162 g C m-2 period-1) over the summer of 2008 when the site was mowed once in May during flowering to reduce the reproductive success of pepperweed. Preliminary results show that year-round grazing inhibited the accumulation of dead stalks causing earlier pepperweed green-up. The onset of flowering had no substantial impact on z0m. In contrast, the onset of flowering significantly reduced maximum photosynthetic capacity compared to non-flowering pepperweed, resulting in reduced photosynthetic CO2 uptake. Similarly, FAR was slightly reduced in response to flowering, most likely due to the due to the close coupling of growth respiration to FA. In contrast, mowing early during flowering prevented the decrease in photosynthetic CO2 uptake and the associated decrease in FAR due to immediate pepperweed regrowth. Our study highlights the impact of invasive plants' unique ecophysiological features and applied management practices on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of infested ecosystems.

  2. Forest productivity under elevated CO2 and O3: positive feedbacks to soil N cycling sustain decade-long net primary productivity enhancement by CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald R. Zak; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Mark E. Kubiske; Andrew J. Burton

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the Earth's atmosphere, and hence the rate of climate warming, is sensitive to stimulation of plant growth by higher concentrations of atmospheric CO2. Here, we synthesise data from a field experiment in which three developing northern forest communities have been exposed to...

  3. Methane and CO2 fluxes of moving point sources - Beyond or within the limits of eddy covariance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felber, Raphael; Neftel, Albrecht; Münger, Andreas; Ammann, Christof

    2014-05-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used for CO2 and energy exchange measurements over different ecosystems. For some years, it has been also becoming widely used to investigate CH4 and N2O exchange over ecosystems including grazing systems. EC measurements represent a spatially integrated flux over an upwind area (footprint). Whereas for extended homogenous areas EC measurements work well, the animals in a grazing system are a challenge as they represent moving point sources that create inhomogeneous conditions in space and time. The main issues which have to be taken into account when applying EC flux measurements over a grazed system are: i) In the presence of animals the high time resolution concentration measurements show large spikes in the signal. These spikes may be filtered/reduced by standard quality control software in order to avoid wrong measurements. ii) Data on the position of the animals relative to the flux footprint is needed to quantify the contribution of the grazing animals to the measured flux. For one grazing season we investigated the ability of EC flux measurements to reliably quantify the contribution of the grazing animals to the CH4 and CO2 exchange over pasture systems. For this purpose, a field experiment with a herd of twenty dairy cows in a full-day rotational grazing system was carried out on the Swiss central plateau. Net CH4 and CO2 exchange of the pasture system was measured continuously by the eddy covariance technique (Sonic Anemometer HS-50, Gill Instruments Ltd; FGGA, Los Gatos Research Inc.). To quantify the contribution of the animals to the net flux, the position of the individual cows was recorded using GPS (5 s time resolution) on each animal. An existing footprint calculation tool (ART footprint tool) was adapted and CH4 emissions of the cows were calculated. CH4 emissions from cows could be used as a tracer to investigate the quality of the evaluation of the EC data, since the background exchange of

  4. Age-dependent impacts of peatland restoration on the net ecosystem CO2 exchange of blanket bogs in Northern Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambley, Graham; Hill, Timothy; Saunders, Matthew; Arn Teh, Yit

    2015-04-01

    The Flow Country of Northern Scotland is the largest area of contiguous blanket bog in the UK covering an area in excess of 400 km2. This region is the single largest peat and soil C repository in the UK, and plays a key role in mediating regional atmospheric exchanges of greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapour (H2O). However, these peatlands were subject to significant afforestation in the 1980s, where large areas of blanket bog were drained and planted with Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) and Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta), resulting in modifications to micro-topographic features, vegetation composition and soil properties such as bulk density and water holding capacity, all of which are known to influence the production and emission of key GHGs. Since the late 1990s restoration work has been undertaken to remove forest plantations and to restore the peatland areas by raising the water table, predominantly by drain and furrow blocking, in order to encourage the recolonisation of Sphagnum species. Here we report findings from an eddy covariance study of CO2 and H2O exchange from an unmanaged peatland and a chronosequence of restored peatland sites, which were felled in 1998 and 2004. Located within the Forsinard Flows National Nature Reserve in Northern Scotland, these sites are being studied to better understand the key drivers of carbon dynamics in these ecosystems and also assess the age-dependent impacts of peatland restoration on the net CO2 sink strength. Preliminary data show rates of CO2 uptake increased with time since restoration, with peak assimilation rates of -9.9 and -14.4 micro mol CO2 m-2 s-1 measured at the 10 and 16 year old restoration sites, respectively. Carbon losses through ecosystem respiration followed a similar pattern. The data collected to date indicates that while peatland restoration is actively increasing CO2 uptake at each of the sites, more long-term observational data is required to

  5. Greater deciduous shrub abundance extends tundra peak season and increases modeled net CO2 uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Shannan K; Griffin, Kevin L; Steltzer, Heidi; Gough, Laura; Boelman, Natalie T

    2015-06-01

    Satellite studies of the terrestrial Arctic report increased summer greening and longer overall growing and peak seasons since the 1980s, which increases productivity and the period of carbon uptake. These trends are attributed to increasing air temperatures and reduced snow cover duration in spring and fall. Concurrently, deciduous shrubs are becoming increasingly abundant in tundra landscapes, which may also impact canopy phenology and productivity. Our aim was to determine the influence of greater deciduous shrub abundance on tundra canopy phenology and subsequent impacts on net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) during the growing and peak seasons in the arctic foothills region of Alaska. We compared deciduous shrub-dominated and evergreen/graminoid-dominated community-level canopy phenology throughout the growing season using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). We used a tundra plant-community-specific leaf area index (LAI) model to estimate LAI throughout the green season and a tundra-specific NEE model to estimate the impact of greater deciduous shrub abundance and associated shifts in both leaf area and canopy phenology on tundra carbon flux. We found that deciduous shrub canopies reached the onset of peak greenness 13 days earlier and the onset of senescence 3 days earlier compared to evergreen/graminoid canopies, resulting in a 10-day extension of the peak season. The combined effect of the longer peak season and greater leaf area of deciduous shrub canopies almost tripled the modeled net carbon uptake of deciduous shrub communities compared to evergreen/graminoid communities, while the longer peak season alone resulted in 84% greater carbon uptake in deciduous shrub communities. These results suggest that greater deciduous shrub abundance increases carbon uptake not only due to greater leaf area, but also due to an extension of the period of peak greenness, which extends the period of maximum carbon uptake. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Net sea–air CO2 flux uncertainties in the Bay of Biscay based on the choice of wind speed products and gas transfer parameterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Otero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of sea–air CO2 fluxes is largely dependent on wind speed through the gas transfer velocity parameterization. In this paper, we quantify uncertainties in the estimation of the CO2 uptake in the Bay of Biscay resulting from the use of different sources of wind speed such as three different global reanalysis meteorological models (NCEP/NCAR 1, NCEP/DOE 2 and ERA-Interim, one high-resolution regional forecast model (HIRLAM-AEMet, winds derived under the Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform (CCMP project, and QuikSCAT winds in combination with some of the most widely used gas transfer velocity parameterizations. Results show that net CO2 flux estimations during an entire seasonal cycle (September 2002–September 2003 may vary by a factor of ~ 3 depending on the selected wind speed product and the gas exchange parameterization, with the highest impact due to the last one. The comparison of satellite- and model-derived winds with observations at buoys advises against the systematic overestimation of NCEP-2 and the underestimation of NCEP-1. In the coastal region, the presence of land and the time resolution are the main constraints of QuikSCAT, which turns CCMP and ERA-Interim in the preferred options.

  7. Does vapor pressure deficit drive the seasonality of δ13C of the net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange across the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczka, B.; Biraud, S. C.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Lai, C.-T.; Miller, J. B.; Pataki, D. E.; Saleska, S. R.; Torn, M. S.; Vaughn, B. H.; Wehr, R.; Bowling, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    The seasonal pattern of the carbon isotope content (δ13C) of atmospheric CO2 depends on local and nonlocal land-atmosphere exchange and atmospheric transport. Previous studies suggested that the δ13C of the net land-atmosphere CO2 flux (δsource) varies seasonally as stomatal conductance of plants responds to vapor pressure deficit of air (VPD). We studied the variation of δsource at seven sites across the United States representing forests, grasslands, and an urban center. Using a two-part mixing model, we calculated the seasonal δsource for each site after removing background influence and, when possible, removing δ13C variation of nonlocal sources. Compared to previous analyses, we found a reduced seasonal (March-September) variation in δsource at the forest sites (0.5‰ variation). We did not find a consistent seasonal relationship between VPD and δsource across forest (or other) sites, providing evidence that stomatal response to VPD was not the cause of the global, coherent seasonal pattern in δsource. In contrast to the forest sites, grassland and urban sites had a larger seasonal variation in δsource (5‰) dominated by seasonal transitions in C3/C4 grass productivity and in fossil fuel emissions, respectively. Our findings were sensitive to the location used to account for atmospheric background variation within the mixing model method that determined δsource. Special consideration should be given to background location depending on whether the intent is to understand site level dynamics or regional scale impacts of land-atmosphere exchange. The seasonal amplitude in δ13C of land-atmosphere CO2 exchange (δsource) varied across land cover types and was not driven by seasonal changes in vapor pressure deficit. The largest seasonal amplitudes of δsource were at grassland and urban sites, driven by changes in C3/C4 grass productivity and fossil fuel emissions, respectively. Mixing model approaches may incorrectly calculate δsource when

  8. Stable carbon isotopes to monitor the CO2 source mix in the urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, F. R.; Wu, L.; Ramonet, M.; Broquet, G.; Worthy, D. E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Urban areas are said to be responsible for approximately 71% of fossil fuel CO2 emissions while comprising only two percent of the land area [IEA, 2008]. This limited spatial expansion could facility a monitoring of anthropogenic GHGs from atmospheric observations. As major sources of emissions, cities also have a huge potential to drive emissions reductions. To effectively manage emissions, cities must however, first establish techniques to validate their reported emission statistics. A pilot study which includes continues 13CO2 data from calibrated cavity ring-down spectrometers [Vogel et al. 2013] of two "sister sites" in the vicinity of Toronto, Canada is contrasted to recent observations of 13CO2 observations in Paris during significant pollution events. Using Miller-Tans plots [Miller and Tans, 2003] for our multi-season observations reveals significant changes of the source signatures of night time CO2 emissions which reflect the importance of natural gas burning in Megacities (up to 80% of fossil fuel sources) and show-case the potential of future isotope studies to determine source sectors. Especially the winter data this approach seems suitable to determine the source contribution of different fuel types (natural gas, liquid fuels and coal) which can inform the interpretation of other Greenhouse Gases and air pollution levels.

  9. Point-source CO2 emission estimation from airborne sampled CO2 mass density: a case study for an industrial plant in Biganos, Southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Toscano, Piero; Zaldei, Alessandro; Miglietta, Franco

    2013-04-01

    One interesting aspect in the airborne sampling of ground emissions of all types (from CO2 to particulate matter) is the ability to understand the source from which these emissions originated and, therefore, obtain an estimation of that ground source's strength. Recently an aerial campaign has been conducted in order to sample emissions coming from a paper production plant in Biganos (France). The campaign made use of a Sky Arrow ERA (Environmental Research Aircraft) equipped with a mobile flux platform system. This latter system couples (among the various instrumentation) a turbulence probe (BAT) and a LICOR 7500 open-path infra-red gas analyzer that also enables the estimation of high-resolution fluxes of different scalars via the spatial-integrated eddy-covariance technique. Aircraft data showed a marked increase in CO2 mass density downwind the industrial area, while vertical profiles samplings showed that concentrations were changing with altitude. The estimation of the CO2 source was obtained using a simple mass balance approach, that is, by integrating the product of CO2 concentration and the mass flow rate through a cross-sectional area downwind of the point source. The results were compared with those obtained by means of a "forward-mode" Lagrangian dispersion model operated iteratively. CO2 source strength were varied at each iteration to obtain an optimal convergence between the modeled atmospheric concentrations and the concentration data observed by the aircraft. The procedure makes use of wind speed and atmospheric turbulence data which are directly measured by the BAT probe at different altitudes. The two methods provided comparable estimates of the CO2 source thus providing a substantial validation of the model-based iterative dispersion procedure. We consider that this data-model integration approach involving aircraft surveys and models may substantially enhance the estimation of point and area sources of any scalar, even in more complex

  10. Statistical partitioning of a three-year time series of direct urban net CO2 flux measurements into biogenic and anthropogenic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzer, Olaf; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2017-12-01

    Eddy covariance flux measurements are increasingly used to quantify the net carbon dioxide exchange (FC) in urban areas. FC represents the sum of anthropogenic emissions, biogenic carbon release from plant and soil respiration, and carbon uptake by plant photosynthesis. When FC is measured in natural ecosystems, partitioning into respiration and photosynthesis is a well-established procedure. In contrast, few studies have partitioned FC at urban flux tower sites due to the difficulty of accounting for the temporal and spatial variability of the multiple sources and sinks. Here, we partitioned a three-year time series of flux measurements from a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA. We segregated FC into one subset that captured fluxes from a residential neighborhood and into another subset that covered a golf course. For both land use types we modeled anthropogenic flux components based on winter data and extrapolated them to the growing season, to estimate gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) at half-hourly, daily, monthly and annual scales. During the growing season, GPP had the largest magnitude (up to - 9.83 g C m-2 d-1) of any component CO2 flux, biogenic or anthropogenic, and both GPP and Reco were more dynamic seasonally than anthropogenic fluxes. Owing to the balancing of Reco against GPP, and the limitations of the growing season in a cold temperate climate zone, the net biogenic flux was only 1.5%-4.5% of the anthropogenic flux in the dominant residential land use type, and between 25%-31% of the anthropogenic flux in highly managed greenspace. Still, the vegetation sink at our site was stronger than net anthropogenic emissions on 16-20 days over the residential area and on 66-91 days over the recreational area. The reported carbon flux sums and dynamics are a critical step toward developing models of urban CO2 fluxes within and across cities that differ in vegetation cover.

  11. Comparison of volatiles and mosquito capture efficacy for three carbohydrate sources in a yeast-fermentation CO2 generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquito surveillance in remote areas with limited access to canisters of CO2 or dry ice will benefit from an effective alternative CO2 source. In this study, we document the differences in mosquito and non-mosquito capture rates from CO2 baited (dry ice or yeast fermentation of carbohydrates) CDC t...

  12. EDGAR CO2 purity. Type and quantities of impurities related to CO2 point source and capture technology. A Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walspurger, S.; Van Dijk, H.A.J. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an important tool that will contribute significantly to CO2 emissions abatement both in power and industrial sectors. Capture technologies as well as transport and distribution infrastructure development need to be carried out to ensure efficient CO2 separation and safe transport to storage sites. This study aimed at identifying, and when possible quantifying, the impurities present in CO2 streams resulting from various CO2 capture plants, such that challenges in development of appropriate materials and cleaning technologies for future CCS infrastructure may be anticipated. In its first part, the study provides a description of the characteristics of the different CO2 capture technologies with respect to their response to different type and quantity of impurities, striving for describing realistic combinations of point sources and capture technologies. Composition of CO2 gaseous streams was found to be highly dependent upon the type of CO2 point source and the removal technology selected. In most of the capture processes, most impurities concentration may be minimised by fine tuning of process operation. However plant economics eventually govern the impurity level in the CO2 stream. For mature technologies such as absorption by chemical or physical solvents lower impurity levels were found to be theoretically quite low, but when energy spent for regeneration is lowered, or when second generation capture with lower energy requirement are considered, the impurity level in CO2 stream increases. Accordingly, the report also addresses the conditioning technologies that are available or need to be developed for removal of traces elements such as mercury, volatile compounds and other condensable and points at technologies to be developed, especially in the sulphur compounds removal from CO2. In its final part the report addresses the quantification of future specification and concludes based on literature study that pipeline

  13. Tundra is a consistent source of CO2 at a site with progressive permafrost thaw during 6 years of chamber and eddy covariance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Gerardo; Mauritz, Marguerite; Bracho, Rosvel; Salmon, Verity G.; Webb, Elizabeth E.; Hutchings, Jack; Natali, Susan M.; Schädel, Christina; Crummer, Kathryn G.; Schuur, Edward A. G.

    2017-06-01

    Current and future warming of high-latitude ecosystems will play an important role in climate change through feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. This study compares 6 years of CO2 flux measurements in moist acidic tundra using autochambers and eddy covariance (Tower) approaches. We found that the tundra was an annual source of CO2 to the atmosphere as indicated by net ecosystem exchange using both methods with a combined mean of 105 ± 17 g CO2 C m-2 y-1 across methods and years (Tower 87 ± 17 and Autochamber 123 ± 14). The difference between methods was largest early in the observation period, with Autochambers indicated a greater CO2 source to the atmosphere. This discrepancy diminished through time, and in the final year the Autochambers measured a greater sink strength than tower. Active layer thickness was a significant driver of net ecosystem carbon exchange, gross ecosystem primary productivity, and Reco and could account for differences between Autochamber and Tower. The stronger source initially attributed lower summer season gross primary production (GPP) during the first 3 years, coupled with lower ecosystem respiration (Reco) during the first year. The combined suppression of GPP and Reco in the first year of Autochamber measurements could be the result of the experimental setup. Root damage associated with Autochamber soil collar installation may have lowered the plant community's capacity to fix C, but recovered within 3 years. While this ecosystem was a consistent CO2 sink during the summer, CO2 emissions during the nonsummer months offset summer CO2 uptake each year.

  14. Sea-ice melt CO2-carbonate chemistry in the western Arctic Ocean: meltwater contributions to air-sea CO2 gas exchange, mixed-layer properties and rates of net community production under sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N. R.; Garley, R.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Mathis, J. T.

    2014-12-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt and co-located, contemporaneous seawater has rarely been studied in sea-ice-covered oceans. Here, we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt (both above sea-ice as "melt ponds" and below sea-ice as "interface waters") and mixed-layer properties in the western Arctic Ocean in the early summer of 2010 and 2011. At 19 stations, the salinity (∼0.5 to 1500 μatm) with the majority of melt ponds acting as potentially strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pH of melt pond waters was also highly variable ranging from mildly acidic (6.1 to 7) to slightly more alkaline than underlying seawater (>8.2 to 10.8). All of the observed melt ponds had very low (pH/Ωaragonite than the co-located mixed layer beneath. Sea-ice melt thus contributed to the suppression of mixed-layer pCO2, thereby enhancing the surface ocean's capacity to uptake CO2 from the atmosphere. Our observations contribute to growing evidence that sea-ice CO2-carbonate chemistry is highly variable and its contribution to the complex factors that influence the balance of CO2 sinks and sources (and thereby ocean acidification) is difficult to predict in an era of rapid warming and sea-ice loss in the Arctic Ocean.

  15. High energy optical parametric source for multi-wavelength CO2 dial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos-Barria, Jessica; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Raybaut, Myriam; Godard, Antoine; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Lefebvre, Michel

    2017-11-01

    In the scope of the preparation of spaceborne lidar missions to measure the concentration of greenhouse gases with differential absorption LIDAR techniques, we report on the development of a high energy 2.05 μm optical parametric source based on a versatile architecture enabling multiple wavelengths generation in the vicinity of the R30 absorption line of CO2. The multi-wavelength configuration is under study for a few greenhouse gas active detection missions, such as Ascend.

  16. Carbon cycling in the epilimnion of Lake Kivu (East Africa): surface net autotrophy and emission of CO2 to the atmosphere sustained by geogenic inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alberto V.; Bouillon, Steven; Morana, Cédric D. T.; Servais, Pierre; Descy, Jean-Pierre; Darchambeau, François

    2013-04-01

    Lake Kivu [2.50°S 1.59°S 29.37°E 28.83°E] is one of the East African great lakes (2370 km2 surface area, 550 km3 volume). It is a deep (maximum depth of 485 m) meromictic lake, with an oxic mixolimnion down to 70 m maximum, and a deep monolimnion rich in dissolved gases and nutrients. Lake Kivu is permanently stratified (meromictic) and deep layers receive heat, salts, and CO2 from deep geothermal springs. Seasonality of the physical and chemical vertical structure and biological activity in surface waters of Lake Kivu is driven by the oscillation between the dry season (June-September) and the rainy season (October-May), the former characterized by a deepening of the mixolimnion. This seasonal mixing favours the input of dissolved nutrients and the development of diatoms, while, during the rest of the year, the phytoplankton assemblage is dominated by cyanobacteria, chrysophytes and cryptophytes. Huge amounts of CO2 and methane (CH4) (300 km3 and 60 km3, respectively, at 0°C and 1 atm] are dissolved in the deep layers of Lake Kivu. The CO2 is mainly geogenic. Large scale industrial extraction of CH4 from the deep layers of Lake Kivu is planned which could affect the ecology and biogeochemical cycling of C of the lake and change for instance the emission of greenhouse gases such as CH4 and CO2. Here, we report a data set covering the seasonality of CO2 dynamics and fluxes, in conjunction with mass balances of C, and process rate measurements (primary production and bacterial production). In order to capture the seasonal variations of the studied quantities, four cruises were carried out in Lake Kivu on 15/03-29/03/2007 (mid rainy season), 28/08-10/09/2007 (late dry season), 21/06-03/07/2008 (early dry season) and 21/04-05/05/2009 (late rainy season). We show that the lake is a modest source of CO2 to the atmosphere but which is sustained by geogenic inputs from depth rather than net heterotrophy as reported in lakes in general. Indeed we provide several lines

  17. Mobile source CO2 mitigation through smart growth development and vehicle fleet hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brian; Mednick, Adam C; Holloway, Tracey; Spak, Scott N

    2009-03-15

    This paper presents the results of a study on the effectiveness of smart growth development patterns and vehicle fleet hybridization in reducing mobile source emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) across 11 major metropolitan regions of the Midwestern U.S. over a 50-year period. Through the integration of a vehicle travel activity modeling framework developed by researchers atthe Oak Ridge National Laboratory with small area population projections, we model mobile source emissions of CO2 associated with alternative land development and technology change scenarios between 2000 and 2050. Our findings suggest that under an aggressive smart growth scenario, growth in emissions expected to occur under a business as usual scenario is reduced by 34%, while the full dissemination of hybrid-electric vehicles throughout the light vehicle fleet is found to offset the expected growth in emissions by 97%. Our results further suggest that high levels of urban densification could achieve reductions in 2050 CO2 emissions equivalent to those attainable through the full dissemination of hybrid-electric vehicle technologies.

  18. Strategies for satellite-based monitoring of CO2 from distributed area and point sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Miller, Charles E.; Duren, Riley M.; Natraj, Vijay; Eldering, Annmarie; Gunson, Michael R.; Crisp, David

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric CO2 budgets are controlled by the strengths, as well as the spatial and temporal variabilities of CO2 sources and sinks. Natural CO2 sources and sinks are dominated by the vast areas of the oceans and the terrestrial biosphere. In contrast, anthropogenic and geogenic CO2 sources are dominated by distributed area and point sources, which may constitute as much as 70% of anthropogenic (e.g., Duren & Miller, 2012), and over 80% of geogenic emissions (Burton et al., 2013). Comprehensive assessments of CO2 budgets necessitate robust and highly accurate satellite remote sensing strategies that address the competing and often conflicting requirements for sampling over disparate space and time scales. Spatial variability: The spatial distribution of anthropogenic sources is dominated by patterns of production, storage, transport and use. In contrast, geogenic variability is almost entirely controlled by endogenic geological processes, except where surface gas permeability is modulated by soil moisture. Satellite remote sensing solutions will thus have to vary greatly in spatial coverage and resolution to address distributed area sources and point sources alike. Temporal variability: While biogenic sources are dominated by diurnal and seasonal patterns, anthropogenic sources fluctuate over a greater variety of time scales from diurnal, weekly and seasonal cycles, driven by both economic and climatic factors. Geogenic sources typically vary in time scales of days to months (geogenic sources sensu stricto are not fossil fuels but volcanoes, hydrothermal and metamorphic sources). Current ground-based monitoring networks for anthropogenic and geogenic sources record data on minute- to weekly temporal scales. Satellite remote sensing solutions would have to capture temporal variability through revisit frequency or point-and-stare strategies. Space-based remote sensing offers the potential of global coverage by a single sensor. However, no single combination of orbit

  19. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Patra, Prabir K.; Rödenbeck, Christian; Nemani, Rama; Bi, Jian; Piper, Stephen C.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2016-07-01

    Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear. Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena). Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W-63° E), neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50-60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8-11 Tg C yr-2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170-230 Tg C yr-1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by increased fall CO2 release, resulting in a net neutral

  20. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Welp

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear. Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena. Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W–63° E, neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50–60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8–11 Tg C yr−2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170–230 Tg C yr−1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by

  1. [Characteristics of atmospheric CO2 concentration and variation of carbon source & sink at Lin'an regional background station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Jing-Jiao; Xu, Hong-Hui; Kang, Li-Li; Ma, Qian-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characteristics of Atmospheric CO2 concentration obtained by Flask measurements were analyzed at Lin'an regional background station from August 2006 to July 2009. According to the simulation results of carbon tracking model, the impact of carbon sources and sinks on CO2 concentration was evaluated in Yangtze River Delta. The results revealed that atmospheric CO2 concentrations at Lin'an regional background station were between 368.3 x 10(-6) and 414.8 x 10(-6). The CO2 concentration varied as seasons change, with maximum in winter and minimum in summer; the annual difference was about 20.5 x 10(-6). The long-term trend of CO2 concentration showed rapid growth year by year; the average growth rate was about 3.2 x 10(-6)/a. CO2 flux of Yangtze River Delta was mainly contributed by fossil fuel burning, terrestrial biosphere exchange and ocean exchange, while the contribution of fire emission was small. CO2 flux from fossil fuel burning played an important role in carbon source; terrestrial biosphere and ocean were important carbon sinks in this area. Seasonal variations of CO2 concentration at Lin'an regional background station were consistent with CO2 fluxes from fossil fuel burning and terrestrial biosphere exchange.

  2. Environment or Development? Lifetime Net CO2 Exchange and Control of the Expression of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The relative influence of plant age and environmental stress signals in triggering a shift from C3 photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in the annual halophytic C3-CAM species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum was explored by continuously monitoring net CO2 exchange of whole shoots from the seedling stage until seed set. Plants exposed to high salinity (400 mm NaCl) in hydroponic culture solution or grown in saline-droughted soil acquired between 11% and 24% of their carbon via net dark CO2 uptake involving CAM. In contrast, plants grown under nonsaline, well-watered conditions were capable of completing their life cycle by operating in the C3 mode without ever exhibiting net CO2 uptake at night. These observations are not consistent with the widely expressed view that the induction of CAM by high salinity in M. crystallinum represents an acceleration of preprogrammed developmental processes. Rather, our study demonstrates that the induction of the CAM pathway for carbon acquisition in M. crystallinum is under environmental control. PMID:17056756

  3. Stimulated Respiration and Net Photosynthesis in Cassiopeia sp. during Glucose Enrichment Suggests in hospite CO2 Limitation of Algal Endosymbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Rädecker

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The endosymbiosis between cnidarians and dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium is key to the high productivity of tropical coral reefs. In this endosymbiosis, Symbiodinium translocate most of their photosynthates to their animal host in exchange for inorganic nutrients. Among these, carbon dioxide (CO2 derived from host respiration helps to meet the carbon requirements to sustain photosynthesis of the dinoflagellates. Nonetheless, recent studies suggest that productivity in symbiotic cnidarians such as corals is CO2-limited. Here we show that glucose enrichment stimulates respiration and gross photosynthesis rates by 80 and 140%, respectively, in the symbiotic upside-down jellyfish Cassiopeia sp. from the Central Red Sea. Our findings show that glucose was rapidly consumed and respired within the Cassiopeia sp. holobiont. The resulting increase of CO2 availability in hospite in turn likely stimulated photosynthesis in Symbiodinium. Hence, the increase of photosynthesis under these conditions suggests that CO2 limitation of Symbiodinium is a common feature of stable cnidarian holobionts and that the stimulation of holobiont metabolism may attenuate this CO2 limitation.

  4. Atmospheric CO2 at Waliguan station in China: Transport climatology, temporal patterns and source-sink region representativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Siyang; An, Xingqin; Zhou, Lingxi; Tans, Pieter P.; Jacobson, Andy

    2017-06-01

    In order to explore where the source and sink have the greatest impact on CO2 background concentration at Waliguan (WLG) station, a statistical method is here proposed to calculate the representative source-sink region. The key to this method is to find the best footprint threshold, and the study is carried out in four parts. Firstly, transport climatology, expressed by total monthly footprint, was simulated by FLEXPART on a 7-day time scale. Surface CO2 emissions in Eurasia frequently transported to WLG station. WLG station was mainly influenced by the westerlies in winter and partly controlled by the Southeast Asian monsoon in summer. Secondly, CO2 concentrations, simulated by CT2015, were processed and analyzed through data quality control, screening, fitting and comparing. CO2 concentrations displayed obvious seasonal variation, with the maximum and minimum concentration appearing in April and August, respectively. The correlation of CO2 fitting background concentrations was R2 = 0.91 between simulation and observation. The temporal patterns were mainly correlated with CO2 exchange of biosphere-atmosphere, human activities and air transport. Thirdly, for the monthly CO2 fitting background concentrations from CT2015, a best footprint threshold was found based on correlation analysis and numerical iteration using the data of footprints and emissions. The grid cells where monthly footprints were greater than the best footprint threshold were the best threshold area corresponding to representative source-sink region. The representative source-sink region of maximum CO2 concentration in April was primarily located in Qinghai province, but the minimum CO2 concentration in August was mainly influenced by emissions in a wider region. Finally, we briefly presented the CO2 source-sink characteristics in the best threshold area. Generally, the best threshold area was a carbon sink. The major source and sink were relatively weak owing to less human activities and

  5. Emergent climate and CO2sensitivities of net primary productivity in ecosystem models do not agree with empirical data in temperate forests of eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollinson, Christine R; Liu, Yao; Raiho, Ann; Moore, David J P; McLachlan, Jason; Bishop, Daniel A; Dye, Alex; Matthes, Jaclyn H; Hessl, Amy; Hickler, Thomas; Pederson, Neil; Poulter, Benjamin; Quaife, Tristan; Schaefer, Kevin; Steinkamp, Jörg; Dietze, Michael C

    2017-07-01

    Ecosystem models show divergent responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle to global change over the next century. Individual model evaluation and multimodel comparisons with data have largely focused on individual processes at subannual to decadal scales. Thus far, data-based evaluations of emergent ecosystem responses to climate and CO 2 at multidecadal and centennial timescales have been rare. We compared the sensitivity of net primary productivity (NPP) to temperature, precipitation, and CO 2 in ten ecosystem models with the sensitivities found in tree-ring reconstructions of NPP and raw ring-width series at six temperate forest sites. These model-data comparisons were evaluated at three temporal extents to determine whether the rapid, directional changes in temperature and CO 2 in the recent past skew our observed responses to multiple drivers of change. All models tested here were more sensitive to low growing season precipitation than tree-ring NPP and ring widths in the past 30 years, although some model precipitation responses were more consistent with tree rings when evaluated over a full century. Similarly, all models had negative or no response to warm-growing season temperatures, while tree-ring data showed consistently positive effects of temperature. Although precipitation responses were least consistent among models, differences among models to CO 2 drive divergence and ensemble uncertainty in relative change in NPP over the past century. Changes in forest composition within models had no effect on climate or CO 2 sensitivity. Fire in model simulations reduced model sensitivity to climate and CO 2 , but only over the course of multiple centuries. Formal evaluation of emergent model behavior at multidecadal and multicentennial timescales is essential to reconciling model projections with observed ecosystem responses to past climate change. Future evaluation should focus on improved representation of disturbance and biomass change as well as the

  6. Coupled eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms enable the simulation of water table depth effects on boreal peatland net CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezbahuddin, Mohammad; Grant, Robert F.; Flanagan, Lawrence B.

    2017-12-01

    Water table depth (WTD) effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of boreal peatlands are largely mediated by hydrological effects on peat biogeochemistry and the ecophysiology of peatland vegetation. The lack of representation of these effects in carbon models currently limits our predictive capacity for changes in boreal peatland carbon deposits under potential future drier and warmer climates. We examined whether a process-level coupling of a prognostic WTD with (1) oxygen transport, which controls energy yields from microbial and root oxidation-reduction reactions, and (2) vascular and nonvascular plant water relations could explain mechanisms that control variations in net CO2 exchange of a boreal fen under contrasting WTD conditions, i.e., shallow vs. deep WTD. Such coupling of eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms in a process-based ecosystem model, ecosys, was tested against net ecosystem CO2 exchange measurements in a western Canadian boreal fen peatland over a period of drier-weather-driven gradual WTD drawdown. A May-October WTD drawdown of ˜ 0.25 m from 2004 to 2009 hastened oxygen transport to microbial and root surfaces, enabling greater microbial and root energy yields and peat and litter decomposition, which raised modeled ecosystem respiration (Re) by 0.26 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. It also augmented nutrient mineralization, and hence root nutrient availability and uptake, which resulted in improved leaf nutrient (nitrogen) status that facilitated carboxylation and raised modeled vascular gross primary productivity (GPP) and plant growth. The increase in modeled vascular GPP exceeded declines in modeled nonvascular (moss) GPP due to greater shading from increased vascular plant growth and moss drying from near-surface peat desiccation, thereby causing a net increase in modeled growing season GPP by 0.39 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. Similar increases in GPP and Re caused no significant WTD effects on modeled

  7. Coupled eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms enable the simulation of water table depth effects on boreal peatland net CO2 exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mezbahuddin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Water table depth (WTD effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of boreal peatlands are largely mediated by hydrological effects on peat biogeochemistry and the ecophysiology of peatland vegetation. The lack of representation of these effects in carbon models currently limits our predictive capacity for changes in boreal peatland carbon deposits under potential future drier and warmer climates. We examined whether a process-level coupling of a prognostic WTD with (1 oxygen transport, which controls energy yields from microbial and root oxidation–reduction reactions, and (2 vascular and nonvascular plant water relations could explain mechanisms that control variations in net CO2 exchange of a boreal fen under contrasting WTD conditions, i.e., shallow vs. deep WTD. Such coupling of eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms in a process-based ecosystem model, ecosys, was tested against net ecosystem CO2 exchange measurements in a western Canadian boreal fen peatland over a period of drier-weather-driven gradual WTD drawdown. A May–October WTD drawdown of  ∼  0.25 m from 2004 to 2009 hastened oxygen transport to microbial and root surfaces, enabling greater microbial and root energy yields and peat and litter decomposition, which raised modeled ecosystem respiration (Re by 0.26 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. It also augmented nutrient mineralization, and hence root nutrient availability and uptake, which resulted in improved leaf nutrient (nitrogen status that facilitated carboxylation and raised modeled vascular gross primary productivity (GPP and plant growth. The increase in modeled vascular GPP exceeded declines in modeled nonvascular (moss GPP due to greater shading from increased vascular plant growth and moss drying from near-surface peat desiccation, thereby causing a net increase in modeled growing season GPP by 0.39 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. Similar increases in

  8. A theoretical framework for the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux and its implications in the definition of "emissions from land-use change"

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    T. Gasser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theoretical framework and analysis of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux in order to discuss possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change". The terrestrial biosphere is affected by two perturbations: the perturbation of the global carbon-climate-nitrogen system (CCN with elevated atmospheric CO2, climate change and nitrogen deposition; and the land-use change perturbation (LUC. Here, we progressively establish mathematical definitions of four generic components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux. The two first components are the fluxes that would be observed if only one perturbation occurred. The two other components are due to the coupling of the CCN and LUC perturbations, which shows the non-linear response of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Thanks to these four components, we introduce three possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change" that are indeed used in the scientific literature, often without clear distinctions, and we draw conclusions as for their absolute and relative behaviors. Thanks to the OSCAR v2 model, we provide quantitative estimates of the differences between the three definitions, and we find that comparing results from studies that do not use the same definition can lead to a bias of up to 20% between estimates of those emissions. After discussion of the limitations of the framework, we conclude on the three major points of this study that should help the community to reconcile modeling and observation of emissions from land-use change. The appendix mainly provides more detailed mathematical expressions of the four components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux.

  9. A theoretical framework for the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux and its implications in the definition of "emissions from land-use change"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, T.; Ciais, P.

    2013-06-01

    We develop a theoretical framework and analysis of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux in order to discuss possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change". The terrestrial biosphere is affected by two perturbations: the perturbation of the global carbon-climate-nitrogen system (CCN) with elevated atmospheric CO2, climate change and nitrogen deposition; and the land-use change perturbation (LUC). Here, we progressively establish mathematical definitions of four generic components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux. The two first components are the fluxes that would be observed if only one perturbation occurred. The two other components are due to the coupling of the CCN and LUC perturbations, which shows the non-linear response of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Thanks to these four components, we introduce three possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change" that are indeed used in the scientific literature, often without clear distinctions, and we draw conclusions as for their absolute and relative behaviors. Thanks to the OSCAR v2 model, we provide quantitative estimates of the differences between the three definitions, and we find that comparing results from studies that do not use the same definition can lead to a bias of up to 20% between estimates of those emissions. After discussion of the limitations of the framework, we conclude on the three major points of this study that should help the community to reconcile modeling and observation of emissions from land-use change. The appendix mainly provides more detailed mathematical expressions of the four components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux.

  10. Constraining the subsoil carbon source to cave-air CO2 and speleothem calcite in central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergel, Shelly J.; Carlson, Peter E.; Larson, Toti E.; Wood, Chris T.; Johnson, Kathleen R.; Banner, Jay L.; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-11-01

    Canonical models for speleothem formation and the subsurface carbon cycle invoke soil respiration as the dominant carbon source. However, evidence from some karst regions suggests that belowground CO2 originates from a deeper, older source. We therefore investigated the carbon sources to central Texas caves. Drip-water chemistry of two caves in central Texas implies equilibration with calcite at CO2 concentrations (PCO2_sat) higher than the maximum CO2 concentrations observed in overlying soils. This observation suggests that CO2 is added to waters after they percolate through the soils, which requires a subsoil carbon source. We directly evaluate the carbon isotope composition of the subsoil carbon source using δ13C measurements on cave-air CO2, which we independently demonstrate has little to no contribution from host rock carbon. We do so using the oxidative ratio, OR, defined as the number of moles of O2 consumed per mole of CO2 produced during respiration. However, additional belowground processes that affect O2 and CO2 concentrations, such as gas-water exchange and/or diffusion, may also influence the measured oxidative ratio, yielding an apparent OR (ORapparent). Cave air in Natural Bridge South Cavern has ORapparent values (1.09 ± 0.06) indistinguishable from those expected for respiration alone (1.08 ± 0.06). Pore space gases from soils above the cave have lower values (ORapparent = 0.67 ± 0.05) consistent with respiration and gas transport by diffusion. The simplest explanation for these observations is that cave air in NB South is influenced by respiration in open-system bedrock fractures such that neither diffusion nor exchange with water influence the composition of the cave air. The radiocarbon activities of NB South cave-air CO2 suggest the subsoil carbon source is hundreds of years old. The calculated δ13C values of the subsoil carbon source are consistent with tree-sourced carbon (perhaps decomposing root matter), the δ13C values of which

  11. Effect of the Availability of Nitrate Nitrogen and Carbon Source on N2O and CO2 Emission from Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Xiao-li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the availability of nitrate nitrogen and different carbon sources on N2O and CO2 emission from soil of typical farmland in the North China were studied. The static culture systems were adopted in an indoor experiment. The results illustrated that, compared with single nitrate nitrogen fertilizer, combined different carbon sources and nitrate nitrogen fertilizer increased the emission of N2O from soil, except for cellulose; combined different carbon sources and nitrate nitrogen fertilizer increased the accumulated emission of CO2 from soil. The emission flux of N2O by treatment of pectin peaked 1383.42μg N·kg-1·d-1 on day 1.The emission flux of CO2 by treatment of glucose peaked 370.13 mg C·kg-1·d-1 on day 1, and the accumulated emission of CO2 order was:glucose >pectin >straw >cellulose >starch >lignin. It showed a highly signifcant positive correlation between the content of NO3--N and emission of N2O. Overall, combined cellulose and nitrate nitrogen fertilizer suppressed the N2O emission, improved the CO2 emission, and increased NO3--N content; combined other carbon sources and nitrate nitrogen fertilizer promoted the N2O and CO2 emission.

  12. Sources and transport of Δ14C in CO2 within the Mexico City Basin and vicinity

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    H. B. Singh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Radiocarbon samples taken over Mexico City and the surrounding region during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006 exhibited an unexpected distribution: (1 relatively few samples (23% were below the North American free tropospheric background value (57±2‰ despite the fossil fuel emissions from one of the world's most highly polluted environments; and (2 frequent enrichment well above the background value was observed. Correlate source tracer species and air transport characteristics were examined to elucidate influences on the radiocarbon distribution. Our analysis suggests that a combination of radiocarbon sources biased the "regional radiocarbon background" above the North American value thereby decreasing the apparent fossil fuel signature. Likely sources include the release of 14C-enhanced carbon from bomb 14C sequestered in plant carbon pools via the ubiquitous biomass burning in the region as well as the direct release of radiocarbon as CO2 from other "hot" sources. Plausible perturbations from local point "hot" sources include the burning of hazardous waste in cement kilns; medical waste incineration; and emissions from the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. These observations provide insight into the use of Δ14CO2 to constrain fossil fuel emissions in the megacity environment, indicating that underestimation of the fossil fuel contribution to the CO2 flux is likely wherever biomass burning coexists with urban emissions and is unaccounted for as a source of the elevated CO2 observed above local background. Our findings increase the complexity required to quantify fossil fuel-derived CO2 in source-rich environments characteristic of megacities, and have implications for the use of Δ14CO2 observations in evaluating bottom-up emission inventories and their reliability as a tool for validating national emission claims of CO2 within the framework of the Kyoto Protocol.

  13. The effects of clouds and aerosols on net ecosystem CO2 exchange over semi-arid Loess Plateau of Northwest China

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    T. Wang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of clouds and atmospheric aerosols on the terrestrial carbon cycle at semi-arid Loess Plateau in Northwest China are investigated, by using the observation data obtained at the SACOL (Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University site. Daytime (solar elevation angles of larger than 50° net ecosystem exchange (NEE of CO2 obtained during the midgrowing season (July–August are analyzed with respect to variations in the diffuse radiation, cloud cover and aerosol optical depth (AOD. Results show a significant impact by clouds on the CO2 uptake by the grassland (with smaller LAI values located in a semi-arid region, quite different from areas covered by forests and crops. The light saturation levels in the canopy are low, with a value of about 434.8 W m−2. Thus, under overcast conditions of optically thick clouds, the CO2 uptake increases with increasing clearness index (the ratio of global solar radiation received at the Earth surface to the extraterrestrial irradiance at a plane parallel to the Earth surface, and a maximum CO2 uptake and light use efficiency of vegetation occur with the clearness index of about 0.37 and lower air temperature. Under other sky conditions, CO2 uptake decreases with cloudiness but light use efficiency is enhanced, due to increased diffuse fraction of PAR. Additionally, under cloudy conditions, changes in the NEE of CO2 also result from the interactions of many environmental factors, especially the air temperature. In contrast to its response to changes in solar radiation, the carbon uptake shows a slightly negative response to increased AOD. The reason for the difference in the response of the semi-arid grassland from that of the forest and crop lands may be due to the difference in the canopy's architectural structure.

  14. Current net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a young mixed forest: any heritage from the previous ecosystem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violette, Aurélie; Heinesch, Bernard; Erpicum, Michel; Carnol, Monique; Aubinet, Marc; François, Louis

    2013-04-01

    For 15 years, networks of flux towers have been developed to determine accurate carbon balance with the eddy-covariance method and determine if forests are sink or source of carbon. However, for prediction of the evolution of carbon cycle and climate, major uncertainties remain on the ecosystem respiration (Reco, which includes the respiration of above ground part of trees, roots respiration and mineralization of the soil organic matter), the gross primary productivity (GPP) and their difference, the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of forests. These uncertainties are consequences of spatial and inter-annual variability, driven by previous and current climatic conditions, as well as by the particular history of the site (management, diseases, etc.). In this study we focus on the carbon cycle in two mixed forests in the Belgian Ardennes. The first site, Vielsalm, is a mature stand mostly composed of beeches (Fagus sylvatica) and douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) from 80 to 100 years old. The second site, La Robinette, was covered before 1995 with spruces. After an important windfall and a clear cutting, the site was replanted, between 1995 and 2000, with spruces (Piceas abies) and deciduous species (mostly Betula pendula, Aulnus glutinosa and Salix aurita). The challenge here is to highlight how initial conditions can influence the current behavior of the carbon cycle in a growing stand compared to a mature one, where initial conditions are supposed to be forgotten. A modeling approach suits particularly well for sensitivity tests and estimation of the temporal lag between an event and the ecosystem response. We use the forest ecosystem model ASPECTS (Rasse et al., Ecological Modelling 141, 35-52, 2001). This model predicts long-term forest growth by calculating, over time, hourly NEE. It was developed and already validated on the Vielsalm forest. Modelling results are confronted to eddy-covariance data on both sites from 2006 to 2011. The main difference between both

  15. Isotopic characterisation of CO2 sources during regional pollution events using isotopic and radiocarbon analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, A; Meijer, HAJ

    At the station Kollumerwaard (The Netherlands), for monitoring tracers in the troposphere, air is sampled in 16 containers for off-line C-13, O-18 and C-14 isotopic analysis of CO2. The timing of the sampling is chosen such that CO2 variations correlating with pollutants like CO and CH4 are

  16. Analysis, simulation, and experimental studies of YAG and CO2 laser-produced plasma for EUV lithography sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, V.; Harilal, S. S.; Sizyuk, T.

    2010-04-01

    Efficient laser systems are essential for the realization of high volume manufacturing in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). Solid-state Nd:YAG lasers usually have lower efficiency and source suppliers are alternatively investigating the use of high power CO2 laser systems. However, CO2 laser-produced plasmas (LPP) have specific characteristics and features that should be taken into account when considering them as the light source for EUVL. The analysis of recent experimental and theoretical work showed significant differences in the properties of plasma plumes produced by CO2 and the Nd:YAG lasers including EUV radiation emission, source formation, debris generation, and conversion efficiency. The much higher reflectivity of CO2 laser from liquid, vapor, and plasma of a tin target results in the production of optically thinner plumes with higher velocity and in a better formation of plasma properties (temperature and density values) towards more efficient EUV source. However, the spikes in the temporal profiles of current CO2 laser will additionally affect the properties of the produced plasma. We have developed unique combination of state-of-the-art experimental facilities (CMUXE Laboratory) and advanced computer simulation (HEIGHTS) package for studying and optimizing various lasers, discharge produced plasmas (DPP), and target parameters as well as the optical collection system regarding EUV lithography. In this work, detailed characteristics of plasmas produced by CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers were analyzed and compared both experimentally and theoretically for optimizing EUV from LPP sources. The details of lower overheating of plasma produced by CO2 laser are given with time and explain how to utilize the high reflectivity of such lasers in plasmas produced in different target geometries to significantly enhance the conversion efficiency of EUV radiation.

  17. Process coupling and control over the response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange to climate variability and insect disturbance in subalpine forests of the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, R. K.; Moore, D. J.; Trahan, N. A.; Scott-Denton, L.; Burns, S. P.; Hu, J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Following ten years of studies in subalpine forest ecosystems of the Western US, we have concluded that the tight coupling between gross primary productivity (GPP) and the autotrophic component of soil respiration (Ra) drives responses of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) to climate variability and insect disturbance. This insight has been gained through long-term eddy flux observations, manipulative plot experiments, analyses of dynamics in the stable isotope compositions of CO2 and H2O, and chamber gas-exchange measurements. Using past observations from these studies, we deployed model-data assimilation techniques and forecast weather/climate modeling to estimate how the coupling between GPP and Ra is likely to affect future (Year 2100) dynamics in NEE. The amount of winter snow and its melting dynamics in the spring represents the dominant control over interannual variation in GPP. Using the SIPNET ecosystem process model, combined with knowledge about the stable isotope content of different water sources, we estimated that approximately 75% of growing season GPP is coupled to the use of snowmelt water, whereas approximately 25% is coupled to summer rain. The tight coupling between GPP and winter snow pack drives a similar tight coupling between soil respiration (Rs) and winter snow pack. Manipulation of snow pack on forest plots has shown that Rs increases with increased snow pack, and this effect disappears when trees are girdled, which stops the transfer of GPP to roots and the soil rhizosphere. Higher-than-normal winter snowpacks cause the carbon isotope ratios of soil-respired CO2 to be depleted in 13C, reflecting a signal of lower photosynthetic water-use efficiency in the GPP that is transferred to the soil rhizosphere. Large-scale forest disturbance due to catastrophic tree mortality from mountain pine beetle attack causes an initial (2-3 year) reduction in Rs, which is attributable to the loss of GPP and its effect on Ra. This near-term reduction in Rs

  18. Feasibility of Monitoring the Hontomín (Burgos, Spain) CO2 Storage Site Using a Deep EM Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilamajó, Eloi; Queralt, Pilar; Ledo, Juanjo; Marcuello, Alex

    2013-07-01

    Geophysical methods have been used experimentally during the last decade, a period of strong development, being adopted as complementary techniques for characterizing and monitoring hydrocarbon and gas reservoirs. In this study, we evaluated the ability of the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method to monitor the storage of CO2 at the Research Laboratory on Geological Storage of CO2 at Hontomín (Burgos, Spain). Two aspects of the CSEM monitoring were examined considering the geoelectrical structure at the site, the technological constraints and the noise conditions of the Hontomín area. Borehole-to-surface simulations were performed to evaluate the detectability of the resistivity changes in the reservoir and the capacity to determine the location of the CO2 plume. The synthetic time-lapse study explores the possibilities of CSEM monitoring with a deep electric source. Three depths of the source are analyzed: above the plume, inside the plume, and beneath the stored CO2. In terms of the Hontomín storage site, the study confirmed that a deep electric source located beneath the injection depth can provide valuable information on the behavior of the stored CO2.

  19. Natural Gas Hydrates as CH4 Source and CO2 Sink - What do SO2 Impurities do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeskow-Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2009-04-01

    The large amounts of gas hydrates stored in natural reservoirs are thought to be a promising future energy source. The recently discussed idea of methane extraction from these formations, together with the subsequent storage of CO2 in form of gas hydrates is an elegant approach to bring forward. A number of experiments have been performed on lab scale showing the replacement of CH4 by CO2 and vice versa. For instance, Graue and Kvamme (2006) demonstrated with Magnetic Resonance Images of core plug experiments the possibility of CH4 extraction by using liquid CO2. Laser Raman investigations of Schicks et al. (2007) showed, on the other hand, the ineffectiveness and slowness of the CH4 exchange reaction with gaseous CO2. After 120 hours, only 20% CH4 were exchanged for CO2. Natural methane hydrates which include often higher hydrocarbons tend to be even more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al., 2006). Contrary to lab conditions, industrial emitted CO2 contains - despite much effort to clean it - traces of impurities. For instance, CO2 emitted from the state-of-the-art Vattenfall Oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe should reach a quality of >99.7% CO2 but still contains small amounts of N2, Ar, O2, SOx and NOx (pers. comm. Dr. Rolland). Here we present a microscopic and laser Raman study in a p-T range of 1 to 4 MPa and 271 to 280K focussing on CO2 hydrate formation and CH4-exchange reaction in the presence of 1% SO2. The experiments have been performed in a small-scale cryocell. The Raman spectra show that CO2 and SO2 occupy both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. SO2 occurs strongly enriched in the hydrate clathrate, compared to its concentration in the feed gas which causes a strong acidification of the liquid phase after hydrate dissociation. Our study reveals that the hydrate formation rate from impure CO2 is similar to that of pure CO2 hydrate but that the stability of the CO2-SO2-hydrate exceeds that of pure CO2 hydrate. The improved

  20. CO2-neutral fuels

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    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  1. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  2. Contribution of various carbon sources toward isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves mediated by altered atmospheric CO2 concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Trowbridge

    Full Text Available Biogenically released isoprene plays important roles in both tropospheric photochemistry and plant metabolism. We performed a (13CO(2-labeling study using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS to examine the kinetics of recently assimilated photosynthate into isoprene emitted from poplar (Populus × canescens trees grown and measured at different atmospheric CO(2 concentrations. This is the first study to explicitly consider the effects of altered atmospheric CO(2 concentration on carbon partitioning to isoprene biosynthesis. We studied changes in the proportion of labeled carbon as a function of time in two mass fragments, M41(+, which represents, in part, substrate derived from pyruvate, and M69(+, which represents the whole unlabeled isoprene molecule. We observed a trend of slower (13C incorporation into isoprene carbon derived from pyruvate, consistent with the previously hypothesized origin of chloroplastic pyruvate from cytosolic phosphenolpyruvate (PEP. Trees grown under sub-ambient CO(2 (190 ppmv had rates of isoprene emission and rates of labeling of M41(+ and M69(+ that were nearly twice those observed in trees grown under elevated CO(2 (590 ppmv. However, they also demonstrated the lowest proportion of completely labeled isoprene molecules. These results suggest that under reduced atmospheric CO(2 availability, more carbon from stored/older carbon sources is involved in isoprene biosynthesis, and this carbon most likely enters the isoprene biosynthesis pathway through the pyruvate substrate. We offer direct evidence that extra-chloroplastic rather than chloroplastic carbon sources are mobilized to increase the availability of pyruvate required to up-regulate the isoprene biosynthesis pathway when trees are grown under sub-ambient CO(2.

  3. Data Sources for NetZero Ft Carson Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Table of values used to parameterize and evaluate the Ft Carson NetZero integrated Model with published reference sources for each value. This dataset is associated...

  4. Complex climatic and CO2 controls on net primary productivity of temperate dryland ecosystems over central Asia during 1980-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Ren, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Central Asia covers a large land area of 5 × 106 km2 and has unique temperate dryland ecosystems, with over 80% of the world's temperate deserts, which has been experiencing dramatic warming and drought in the recent decades. How the temperate dryland responds to complex climate change, however, is still far from clear. This study quantitatively investigates terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) in responses to temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric CO2 during 1980-2014, by using the Arid Ecosystem Model, which can realistically predict ecosystems' responses to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2 according to model evaluation against 28 field experiments/observations. The simulation results show that unlike other middle-/high-latitude regions, NPP in central Asia declined by 10% (0.12 × 1015 g C) since the 1980s in response to a warmer and drier climate. The dryland's response to warming was weak, while its cropland was sensitive to the CO2 fertilization effect (CFE). However, the CFE was inhibited by the long-term drought from 1998 to 2008 and the positive effect of warming on photosynthesis was largely offset by the enhanced water deficit. The complex interactive effects among climate drivers, unique responses from diverse ecosystem types, and intensive and heterogeneous climatic changes led to highly complex NPP changing patterns in central Asia, of which 69% was dominated by precipitation variation and 20% and 9% was dominated by CO2 and temperature, respectively. The Turgay Plateau in northern Kazakhstan and southern Xinjiang in China are hot spots of NPP degradation in response to climate change during the past three decades and in the future.

  5. Isolating and Quantifying the Effects of Climate and CO2 Changes (1980–2014 on the Net Primary Productivity in Arid and Semiarid China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Fang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the net primary productivity (NPP of arid/semiarid ecosystem is generally thought to be controlled by precipitation, other factors like CO2 fertilization effect and temperature change may also have important impacts, especially in the cold temperate areas of the northern China, where significant warming was reported in the recent decades. However, the impacts of climate and atmospheric CO2 changes to the NPP dynamics in the arid and semiarid areas of China (ASA-China is still unclear, hindering the development of climate adaptation strategy. Based on numeric experiments and factorial analysis, this study isolated and quantified the effects of climate and CO2 changes between 1980–2014 on ASA-China’s NPP, using the Arid Ecosystem Model (AEM that performed well in predicting ecosystems’ responses to climate/CO2 change according to our evaluation based on 21 field experiments. Our results showed that the annual variation in NPP was dominated by changes in precipitation, which reduced the regional NPP by 10.9 g·C/(m2·year. The precipitation-induced loss, however, has been compensated by the CO2 fertilization effect that increased the regional NPP by 14.9 g·C/(m2·year. The CO2 fertilization effect particularly benefited the extensive croplands in the Northern China Plain, but was weakened in the dry grassland of the central Tibetan Plateau due to suppressed plant activity as induced by a drier climate. Our study showed that the climate change in ASA-China and the ecosystem’s responses were highly heterogeneous in space and time. There were complex interactive effects among the climate factors, and different plant functional types (e.g., phreatophyte vs. non-phreatophyte could have distinct responses to similar climate change. Therefore, effective climate-adaptive strategies should be based on careful analysis of local climate pattern and understanding of the characteristic responses of the dominant species. Particularly, China

  6. Liming induces carbon dioxide (CO2) emission in PSB inoculated alkaline soil supplemented with different phosphorus sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Shah, Zahir; Sharif, Muhammad; Rahman, Hidayatur

    2018-01-20

    Agricultural land is a major sink of global organic carbon (C). Its suitable management is crucial for improving C sequestration and reducing soil CO 2 emission. Incubation experiments were performed to assess the impact of phosphate solubilizing bacterial (PSB) inoculation (inoculated and uninoculated) and soil calcification (4.78, 10, 15, and 20% crushed CaCO 3 ) with phosphorus (P) sources [single superphosphate (SSP), rock phosphate (RP), farm yard manure (FYM), and poultry manure (PM)] in experiment 1 and with various rates of PM (4, 8, and 12 kg ha -1 ) in experiment 2 on cumulative soil respiration. These experiments were arranged in three factorial, complete randomize design (CRD) with three replications. Interactively, lime with P sources (at day 1 and 3) and lime with PSB (at day 1) significantly expedited soil respiration. Mainly, PSB inoculation, liming, PM fertilization, and its various rates significantly enhanced soil respiration with time over control/minimum in alkaline soil at all incubation periods. Higher CO 2 emission was detected in soil supplemented with organic P sources (PM and FYM) than mineral sources (SSP and RP). CO 2 emission was noted to increase with increasing PM content. Since liming intensified CO 2 discharge from soil, therefore addition of lime to an alkaline soil should be avoided; instead, integrated approaches must be adopted for P management in alkaline calcareous soils for climate-smart agriculture.

  7. Experimental Study on the Performance of Water Source Trans-Critical CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater

    OpenAIRE

    Xiufang Liu; Changhai Liu; Ze Zhang; Liang Chen; Yu Hou

    2017-01-01

    The effect of the discharge pressure on the performance of the trans-critical CO2 heat pump with a low gas-cooler outlet temperature is experimentally investigated on a test rig of water source heat-pump water heater. The optimal discharge pressure of the trans-critical CO2 heat pump is investigated under different external operation conditions. When the tap-water temperature is low, the characteristic of the S-shape isotherm at the supercritical region has little effect on the occurrence of ...

  8. A greenhouse gas source of surprising significance: anthropogenic CO2emissions from use of methanol in sewage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, John L; Al-Omari, Ahmed; Bastian, Robert; Brower, Bill; DeBarbadillo, Christine; Murthy, Sudhir; Peot, Christopher; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2017-05-01

    The impact of methanol (CH 3 OH) as a source of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in denitrification at wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) has never been quantified. CH 3 OH is the most commonly purchased carbon source for sewage denitrification. Until recently, greenhouse gas (GHG) reporting protocols consistently ignored the liberation of anthropogenic CO 2 attributable to CH 3 OH. This oversight can likely be attributed to a simplifying notion that CO 2 produced through activated-sludge-process respiration is biogenic because most raw-sewage carbon is un-sequestered prior to entering a WWTP. Instead, a biogenic categorization cannot apply to fossil-fuel-derived carbon sources like CH 3 OH. This paper provides a summary of how CH 3 OH use at DC Water's Blue Plains Advanced Wastewater Treatment Plant (AWTP; Washington, DC, USA) amounts to 60 to 85% of the AWTP's Scope-1 emissions. The United States Environmental Protection Agency and Water Environment Federation databases suggest that CH 3 OH CO 2 likely represents one quarter of all Scope-1 GHG emissions attributable to sewage treatment in the USA. Finally, many alternatives to CH 3 OH use exist and are discussed.

  9. Local Proton Source in Electrocatalytic CO2 Reduction with [Mn(bpy-R)(CO)3 Br] Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Federico; Cometto, Claudio; Nencini, Luca; Barolo, Claudia; Sordello, Fabrizio; Minero, Claudio; Fiedler, Jan; Robert, Marc; Gobetto, Roberto; Nervi, Carlo

    2017-04-06

    The electrochemical behavior of fac-[Mn(pdbpy)(CO)3 Br] (pdbpy=4-phenyl-6-(phenyl-2,6-diol)-2,2'-bipyridine) (1) in acetonitrile under Ar, and its catalytic performances for CO2 reduction with added water, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE), and phenol are discussed in detail. Preparative-scale electrolysis experiments, carried out at -1.5 V versus the standard calomel electrode (SCE) in CO2 -saturated acetonitrile, reveal that the process selectivity is extremely sensitive to the acid strength, producing CO and formate in different faradaic yields. A detailed spectroelectrochemical (IR and UV/Vis) study under Ar and CO2 atmospheres shows that 1 undergoes fast solvolysis; however, dimer formation in acetonitrile is suppressed, resulting in an atypical reduction mechanism in comparison with other reported MnI catalysts. Spectroscopic evidence of Mn hydride formation supports the existence of different electrocatalytic CO2 reduction pathways. Furthermore, a comparative investigation performed on the new fac-[Mn(ptbpy)(CO)3 Br] (ptbpy=4-phenyl-6-(phenyl-3,4,5-triol)-2,2'-bipyridine) catalyst (2), bearing a bipyridyl derivative with OH groups in different positions to those in 1, provides complementary information about the role that the local proton source plays during the electrochemical reduction of CO2 . © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Developments in greenhouse gas emissions and net energy use in Danish agriculture - How to achieve substantial CO2 reduction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tommy; Olesen, Jørgen E; Petersen, Søren O

    2011-01-01

    emissions in the form of methane, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide (including carbon sources and sinks, and the impact of energy consumption/bioenergy production) from Danish agriculture in the years 1990–2010. An analysis of possible measures to reduce the GHG emissions indicated that a 50–70% reduction...

  11. An analysis of the global spatial variability of column-averaged CO2 from SCIAMACHY and its implications for CO2 sources and sinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Hong; Liu, Jinxun; Zhang, Xiuying; Huang, Chunlin; Lu, Xuehe; Jin, Jiaxin; Zhou, Guomo

    2014-01-01

    Satellite observations of carbon dioxide (CO2) are important because of their potential for improving the scientific understanding of global carbon cycle processes and budgets. We present an analysis of the column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 (denoted XCO2) of the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography (SCIAMACHY) retrievals, which were derived from a satellite instrument with relatively long-term records (2003–2009) and with measurements sensitive to the near surface. The spatial-temporal distributions of remotely sensed XCO2 have significant spatial heterogeneity with about 6–8% variations (367–397 ppm) during 2003–2009, challenging the traditional view that the spatial heterogeneity of atmospheric CO2 is not significant enough (2 and surface CO2 were found for major ecosystems, with the exception of tropical forest. In addition, when compared with a simulated terrestrial carbon uptake from the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) and the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) carbon emission inventory, the latitudinal gradient of XCO2 seasonal amplitude was influenced by the combined effect of terrestrial carbon uptake, carbon emission, and atmospheric transport, suggesting no direct implications for terrestrial carbon sinks. From the investigation of the growth rate of XCO2 we found that the increase of CO2 concentration was dominated by temperature in the northern hemisphere (20–90°N) and by precipitation in the southern hemisphere (20–90°S), with the major contribution to global average occurring in the northern hemisphere. These findings indicated that the satellite measurements of atmospheric CO2 improve not only the estimations of atmospheric inversion, but also the understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics and its feedback to atmospheric CO2.

  12. A new method to estimate photosynthetic parameters through net assimilation rate-intercellular space CO2 concentration (A-Ci ) curve and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualeu-Ngangue, Dany P; Chen, Tsu-Wei; Stützel, Hartmut

    2017-02-01

    Gas exchange (GE) and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) measurements are widely used to noninvasively study photosynthetic parameters, for example the rates of maximum Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax ), electron transport rate (J), daytime respiration (Rd ) and mesophyll conductance (gm ). Existing methods for fitting GE data (net assimilation rate-intercellular space CO2 concentration (A-Ci ) curve) are based on two assumptions: gm is unvaried with CO2 concentration in the intercellular space (Ci ); and light absorption (α) and the proportion of quanta absorbed by photosystem II (β) are constant in the data set. These may result in significant bias in estimating photosynthetic parameters. To avoid the above-mentioned hypotheses, we present a new method for fitting A-Ci curves and CF data simultaneously. This method was applied to a data set obtained from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) leaves of various leaf ages and grown under eight different light conditions. The new method had significantly lower root mean square error and a lower rate of failures compared with previously published methods (6.72% versus 24.1%, respectively) and the effect of light conditions on Vcmax and J was better observed. Furthermore, the new method allows the estimation of a new parameter, the fraction of incoming irradiance harvested by photosystem II, and the dependence of gm on Ci . © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Malate as a key carbon source of leaf dark-respired CO2 across different environmental conditions in potato plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marco M.; Rinne, Katja T.; Blessing, Carola; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.; Buchmann, Nina; Werner, Roland A.

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilation of carbon sources during plant respiration in support of metabolic processes results in the continuous release of CO2. The carbon isotopic composition of leaf dark-respired CO2 (i.e. δ 13 C R) shows daily enrichments up to 14.8‰ under different environmental conditions. However, the reasons for this 13C enrichment in leaf dark-respired CO2 are not fully understood, since daily changes in δ13C of putative leaf respiratory carbon sources (δ 13 C RS) are not yet clear. Thus, we exposed potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to different temperature and soil moisture treatments. We determined δ 13 C R with an in-tube incubation technique and δ 13 C RS with compound-specific isotope analysis during a daily cycle. The highest δ 13 C RS values were found in the organic acid malate under different environmental conditions, showing less negative values compared to δ 13 C R (up to 5.2‰) and compared to δ 13 C RS of soluble carbohydrates, citrate and starch (up to 8.8‰). Moreover, linear relationships between δ 13 C R and δ 13 C RS among different putative carbon sources were strongest for malate during daytime (r2=0.69, P≤0.001) and nighttime (r2=0.36, P≤0.001) under all environmental conditions. A multiple linear regression analysis revealed δ 13 C RS of malate as the most important carbon source influencing δ 13 C R. Thus, our results strongly indicate malate as a key carbon source of 13C enriched dark-respired CO2 in potato plants, probably driven by an anapleurotic flux replenishing intermediates of the Krebs cycle. PMID:26139821

  14. Experimental Study on the Performance of Water Source Trans-Critical CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the discharge pressure on the performance of the trans-critical CO2 heat pump with a low gas-cooler outlet temperature is experimentally investigated on a test rig of water source heat-pump water heater. The optimal discharge pressure of the trans-critical CO2 heat pump is investigated under different external operation conditions. When the tap-water temperature is low, the characteristic of the S-shape isotherm at the supercritical region has little effect on the occurrence of the optimal discharge pressure; while the mass flow rate of CO2, the suction pressure and the gas-cooler outlet temperature play a significant role in determining the emergence of the optimal discharge pressure. At the optimal discharge pressure, the COP reaches the peak; however, the corresponding heating capacity is still lower than its maximum, which is reached as the discharge pressure is slightly above the optimal discharge pressure. Reducing the tap-water flowrate or increasing the water-source temperature can increase the optimal discharge pressure. The COP is positively dependent on both the tap-water flowrate and the water-source temperature. In addition, the tap-water flowrate has a negligible influence on the maximum heating capacity while increasing the water-source temperature can greatly enhance the heating capacity.

  15. Response of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of boreal forest ecosystems to projected future climate changes: results of a modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olchev, Alexander; Kurbatova, Julia

    2014-05-01

    It is presented the modeling results describing the possible response of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE), gross (GPP) and net (NPP) primary production, as well as evapotranspiration (ET) of spruce forest ecosystems situated at central part of European part of Russia at the southern boundary of boreal forest community to projected future changes of climatic conditions and forest species composition. A process-based MixFor-SVAT model (Olchev et al 2002, 2008, 2009) has been used to describe the CO2 and H2O fluxes under present and projected future climate conditions. The main advantage of MixFor-SVAT is its ability not only to describe seasonal and daily dynamics of total CO2 and H2O fluxes at an ecosystem level, but also to adequately estimate the contributions of soil, forest understorey, and various tree species in overstorey into total ecosystem fluxes taking into account their individual responses to changes in environmental conditions as well as the differences in structure and biophysical properties. Results of modeling experiments showed that projected changes of climate conditions (moderate scenario A1B IPCC) and forest species composition at the end of 21 century can lead to small increase of annual evapotranspiration as well as to growth of NEE, GPP and NPP of the forests in case if the projected increase in temperature and elevated CO2 in the atmosphere in future will be strictly balanced with growth of available nutrients and water in plant and soil. It is obvious that any deficit of e.g. nitrogen in leaves (due to reduced transpiration, nitrogen availability in soil, etc.) may lead to decreases in the photosynthesis and respiration rates of trees and, as a consequence, to decreases in the GPP and NEE of entire forest ecosystem. Conducted modeling experiments have demonstrated that a 20% reduction of available nitrogen in tree leaves in a monospesific spruce forest stand may result in a 14% decrease in NEE, a 8% decrease in NPP, and a 4% decrease in

  16. Watershed geomorphology interacts with precipitation to influence the magnitude and source of CO2 emissions from Alaskan streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Adrianne P.; Schindler, Daniel E.; Holtgrieve, Gordon W.; Jankowski, Kathi Jo; French, David W.

    2017-08-01

    Boreal ecosystems contain a large fraction of the world's soil carbon and are warming rapidly, prompting efforts to understand the role of freshwaters in carbon export from these regions. We examined geomorphic controls on the magnitude of stream CO2 emissions and sources of stream dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) across a heterogeneous river basin in SW Alaska. We found that watershed slope and precipitation interact to control gaseous carbon fluxes from streams, with the highest flux from low-gradient watersheds following rainstorms. Watershed slope influences C loading and stream CO2 fluxes by controlling carbon accumulation in watersheds and to a lesser extent by determining gas transfer velocity across the stream air-water interface. Low gas transfer velocity in flat streams offsets some of the effects of higher terrestrial C loading at those sites, resulting in lower than expected vertical CO2 fluxes. While the isotopic composition of stream DIC (Δ14C and δ13C) was highly variable across space and time, shifts toward contemporary, terrestrial sources after precipitation were most pronounced in flat watersheds. At base flow DIC was a mixture of modern and aged sources of biogenic and geologic origin (Δ14C, -198.3‰ to 27.9‰, n = 23). Aged (Δ14C-depleted) C sources contributed to food webs via a pathway from DIC to algae to invertebrate grazers. We observed coherent changes in stream carbon chemistry after large rainstorms despite considerable physical heterogeneity among watersheds. These patterns provide a way to extrapolate across boreal landscapes by constraining CO2 concentration and flux estimates by local geomorphic features.

  17. A virtual tall tower network for understanding continental sources and sinks of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

    2007-03-09

    Our understanding of the North American terrestrial carbon cycle is limited by both a lack of continental atmospheric CO2 data, and by a need for methods to interpret these and other continental data with confidence. In response to this challenge a rapid expansion of the N. American carbon cycle observational network is underway. This expansion includes a network of continuous, continental CO2 mixing ratio observations being collected at a subset of AmeriFlux towers. Progress in developing this resource includes instrument development, site installation, calibration and intercalibration efforts, and initiation of a uniform data product. Progess in applying these data include proposed methods for interpreting surface layer measurements in atmospheric inversions (the virtual tall towers approach), examination of coherence patterns in continental mixing ratios in response to weather and climate, and application of these mixing ratio measurements in formal atmospheric inversions. Future work will merge these methods with interpretation of flux towers observations of terrestrial carbon fluxes in an effort to create a single coherent diagnosis of North American terrestrial carbon fluxes over a multi-year period.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations on the density profile of CO2 laser-produced Sn plasma for an EUVL source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Ueno, Y.; Yuspeh, S.; Burdt, R. A.; Amin, N.; Shaikh, N. M.; Tillack, M. S.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-04-01

    Experimentally observed density profile of CO2 laser-produced Sn plasma was compared with that predicted by one dimensional hydrodynamic radiation numerical code. Experimental data showed a much smaller corona and a much shorter shift distance of the critical density from the initial target surface as compared with those predicted by an isothermal model and the numerical simulation. The possible reason may come from thin localized laser deposition region, less energy transport into the corona and into the dense region beyond the critical density. This research suggests that more efforts to understand the fundamental dominating the interaction of CO2 laser with high Z plasma are necessary to form a more solid foundation for the application of numerical method to the development of the EUVL source.

  19. Estimating the CO2 mitigation potential of horizontal Ground Source Heat Pumps in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, R.; Verhoef, A.; Vidale, P. L.; Gan, G.; Chong, A.; Clark, D.

    2012-04-01

    By 2020, the UK will need to generate 15% of its energy from renewables to meet our contribution to the EU renewable energy target. Heating and cooling systems of buildings account for 30%-50% of the global energy consumption; thus, alternative low-carbon technologies such as horizontal Ground Couple Heat Pumps (GCHPs) can contribute to the reduction of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Horizontal GCHPs currently represent a small fraction of the total energy generation in the UK. However, the fact that semi-detached and detached dwellings represent approximately 40% of the total housing stocks in the UK could make the widespread implementation of this technology particularly attractive in the UK and so could significantly increase its renewable energy generation potential. Using a simulation model, we analysed the dynamic interactions between the environment, the horizontal GCHP heat exchanger and typical UK dwellings, as well as their combined effect on heat pump performance and CO2 mitigation potential. For this purpose, a land surface model (JULES, Joint UK Land Environment Simulator), which calculates coupled soil heat and water fluxes, was combined with a heat extraction model. The analyses took into account the spatio-temporal variability of soil properties (thermal and hydraulic) and meteorological variables, as well as different horizontal GCHP configurations and a variety of building loads and heat demands. Sensitivity tests were performed for four sites in the UK with different climate and soil properties. Our results show that an installation depth of 1.0m would give us higher heat extractions rates, however it would be preferable to install the pipes slightly deeper to avoid the seasonal influence of variable meteorological conditions. A value of 1.5m for the spacing between coils (S) for a slinky configuration type is recommended to avoid thermal disturbances between neighbouring coils. We also found that for larger values of the spacing between the coils

  20. Impact of CO2 trade on electricity producers depending on the use of different energy sources in Estonia. CO2 kaubanduse mõju elektritootjatele erinevate energiaallikate kasutamisel Eesti tingimustes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Kleesmaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to identify the main circumstances related to the Estonian energy sector and economy and the facts which are important for development of the research conducted by the author and for clarification of the main viewpoints. The paper provides the principal facts on the first (2005-2007 and second (2008-2012 period of CO2 (carbon dioxide trade in Estonia; describes electricity production in Estonia on the basis of the electricity development plan effective in the reference year 2007 and proceeding from that – calculations of CO2 emissions by kind of fuel used. The paper will touch upon the main legislative provisions concerning renewable energy support, which essentially influence the development of renewable energy generation and indirectly the CO2 trade. Analogously with the reference year 2007 methods of calculation, CO2 emissions have been calculated for 2020. The electricity production prognosis for the year 2020 is based on the interpretation of the electricity sector development plan. Computation according to the CO2 calculation methodology shows that the CO2 emission amount will be ca 5.7 Mt (million tonnes in 2020. In 2020 compared to 2007, the domestic consumption of electricity is estimated to grow: in 2007 the domestic consumption of electricity was ca 8200 GWh, in 2020 it is estimated to be ca 10480 GWh, i.e. the growth is ca 22%. Decrease in the emission amount of CO2 will be gained due to the expected use of different energy sources, compared to those used in 2007, in the designed power plants based on renewable energy sources or gas. The share of oil shale-based energy production will decrease from 83% to 44% resulting in a further reduction of CO2 emissions from 12 Mt to 4 Mt. In view of the fact that, during consumption, the CO2 emissions comprise nearly 60% of the gross consumption of electricity production, the research reveals that raising consumer awareness of the use of various energy saving

  1. Gas Hydrates as a CH4 Source and a CO2 Sink: New Approaches Based on Fundamental Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Erzinger, J.

    2007-12-01

    The huge amount of methane, stored in the gas hydrate reservoirs of the world suggests that natural gas hydrates may be used in the future as a source of energy. A first production test was performed during the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program, showing that the thermal stimulation of natural gas hydrates successfully results in methane production (Dallimore et al. 2005). However, regarding the energy balance, the most efficient method for methane production from hydrates still needs to be developed. From another point of view, the sequestration of CO2 in form of gas hydrates in (marine) sediments is an interesting idea. A combination of methane production from natural gas hydrates on the one hand and CO2 - sequestration on the other hand seems to be an obvious and ideal solution. Different studies on possible methods - e.g. the exchange of CH4 with CO2 in gas hydrates (Lee et al, 2003, Graue and Kvamme, 2006) - have been published recently and demonstrated that this could be a possible way, in principle. Our own investigations on the exchange of CH4 with gaseous CO2 showed that this reaction is much too slow and inefficient to be a reasonable approach. The exchange of only 20 percent CH4 with CO2 could be detected in stable structure I hydrate crystals after 120 hours. In addition, multicomponent hydrates containing higher hydrocarbons beside methane tend to be more stable than pure methane hydrates (Schicks et al, 2006). Therefore, the application of an additional and controlled method for CH4 -hydrate destabilization seems to be necessary and might lead to an efficient release of CH4 from and CO2 inclusion into hydrates. In any case, the question of process optimization still remains. In this contribution the chances and challenges of a combination of these two processes based on experimental data will be examined. Different kinds of experiments have been performed on natural marine and permafrost gas hydrates and synthesized clathrate

  2. CO2 emission factors for waste incineration: Influence from source separation of recyclable materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Warberg; Astrup, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    variations between emission factors for different incinerators, but the background for these variations has not been thoroughly examined. One important reason may be variations in collection of recyclable materials as source separation alters the composition of the residual waste incinerated. The objective...... of this study was to quantify the importance of source separation for determination of emission factors for incineration of residual household waste. This was done by mimicking various source separation scenarios and based on waste composition data calculating resulting emission factors for residual waste...... waste; however the fossil carbon ratio of the waste after source separation was found to be appropriately correlated with the emission factor. Based on the results, it is recommended to carefully evaluate the source separation and collection systems behind reported literature values when comparing...

  3. Comparison of Source Partitioning Methods for CO2 and H2O Fluxes Based on High Frequency Eddy Covariance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterhalfen, Anne; Moene, Arnold; Schmidt, Marius; Ney, Patrizia; Graf, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Source partitioning of eddy covariance (EC) measurements of CO2 into respiration and photosynthesis is routinely used for a better understanding of the exchange of greenhouse gases, especially between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The most frequently used methods are usually based either on relations of fluxes to environmental drivers or on chamber measurements. However, they often depend strongly on assumptions or invasive measurements and do usually not offer partitioning estimates for latent heat fluxes into evaporation and transpiration. SCANLON and SAHU (2008) and SCANLON and KUSTAS (2010) proposed an promising method to estimate the contributions of transpiration and evaporation using measured high frequency time series of CO2 and H2O fluxes - no extra instrumentation necessary. This method (SK10 in the following) is based on the spatial separation and relative strength of sources and sinks of CO2 and water vapor among the sub-canopy and canopy. Assuming that air from those sources and sinks is not yet perfectly mixed before reaching EC sensors, partitioning is estimated based on the separate application of the flux-variance similarity theory to the stomatal and non-stomatal components of the regarded fluxes, as well as on additional assumptions on stomatal water use efficiency (WUE). The CO2 partitioning method after THOMAS et al. (2008) (TH08 in the following) also follows the argument that the dissimilarities of sources and sinks in and below a canopy affect the relation between H2O and CO2 fluctuations. Instead of involving assumptions on WUE, TH08 directly screens their scattergram for signals of joint respiration and evaporation events and applies a conditional sampling methodology. In spite of their different main targets (H2O vs. CO2), both methods can yield partitioning estimates on both fluxes. We therefore compare various sub-methods of SK10 and TH08 including own modifications (e.g., cluster analysis) to each other, to established

  4. Source and meteorological influences on air quality (CO, CH4 & CO2) at a Southern Hemisphere urban site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, R. R.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Kubistin, D.; Caldow, C.; Fisher, J. A.; Deutscher, N. M.; Kettlewell, G.; Riggenbach, M.; Macatangay, R.; Krummel, P. B.; Langenfelds, R. L.

    2016-02-01

    Wollongong, Australia is an urban site at the intersection of anthropogenic, biomass burning, biogenic and marine sources of atmospheric trace gases. The location offers a valuable opportunity to study drivers of atmospheric composition in the Southern Hemisphere. Here, a record of surface carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) was measured with an in situ Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser between April 2011 and August 2014. Clean air was found to arrive at Wollongong in approximately 10% of air masses. Biomass burning influence was evident in the average annual cycle of clean air CO during austral spring. A significant negative short-term trend was found in clean air CO (-1.5 nmol mol-1 a-1), driven by a reduction in northern Australian biomass burning. Significant short-term positive trends in clean air CH4 (5.4 nmol mol-1 a-1) and CO2 (1.9 μmol mol-1 a-1) were consistent with the long-term global average trends. Polluted Wollongong air was investigated using wind-direction/wind-speed clustering, which revealed major influence from local urban and industrial sources from the south. High values of CH4, with anthropogenic ΔCH4/ΔCO2 enhancement ratio signatures, originated from the northwest, in the direction of local coal mining. A pollution climatology was developed for the region using back trajectory analysis and ΔO3/ΔCO enhancement ratios. Ozone production environments in austral spring and summer were associated with anticyclonic meteorology on the east coast of Australia, while ozone depletion environments in autumn and winter were associated with continental transport, or fast moving trajectories from southern latitudes. This implies the need to consider meteorological conditions when developing policies for controlling air quality.

  5. $CO_{2}$ laser ion source Comparison between mode-locked and free- running laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lisi, N; Scrivens, R

    2001-01-01

    The production of highly charged ions in a CO/sub 2/ laser-generated plasma is compared for different laser pulse-time structures. The work was performed at the CERN Laser Ion Source, which has the aim of developing a high current, high charge-state ion source for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). When an intense laser pulse is focused onto a high-Z metal target, the ions expanding in the plasma plume are suitable for extraction from the plasma and matching into a synchrotron. For the first time, a comparison is made between free- running pulses with randomly fluctuating intensity, and mode-locked pulse trains with a reproducible structure and the same energy. Despite the lower power density with respect to the mode-locked pulse train, the free-running pulse provides higher charge states and higher yield. (10 refs).

  6. Chemical Formation of Methanol and Hydrocarbon ("Organic") Derivatives from CO2 and H2-Carbon Sources for Subsequent Biological Cell Evolution and Life's Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Mathew, Thomas; Prakash, G K Surya

    2017-01-18

    Formation of methanol and hydrocarbon derivatives from CO2 and H2, their simplest molecular building blocks, under biocompatible conditions is proposed. Alternate panspermia of similar extraterrestrially formed and observed hydrocarbons to earth is also discussed. The simple molecular building blocks derived from CO2 and H2 are carbon sources in the initial stage of biological evolution of cells leading to life's origin.

  7. On the difference in the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 between deciduous and evergreen forests in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Kimberly A; Oishi, A Christopher; Ward, Eric J; Siqueira, Mario B S; Juang, Jehn-Yih; Stoy, Paul C

    2015-02-01

    The southeastern United States is experiencing a rapid regional increase in the ratio of pine to deciduous forest ecosystems at the same time it is experiencing changes in climate. This study is focused on exploring how these shifts will affect the carbon sink capacity of southeastern US forests, which we show here are among the strongest carbon sinks in the continental United States. Using eight-year-long eddy covariance records collected above a hardwood deciduous forest (HW) and a pine plantation (PP) co-located in North Carolina, USA, we show that the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was more variable in PP, contributing to variability in the difference in NEE between the two sites (ΔNEE) at a range of timescales, including the interannual timescale. Because the variability in evapotranspiration (ET) was nearly identical across the two sites over a range of timescales, the factors that determined the variability in ΔNEE were dominated by those that tend to decouple NEE from ET. One such factor was water use efficiency, which changed dramatically in response to drought and also tended to increase monotonically in nondrought years (P temperate climates. Additional variability in the fluxes at long-time scales may be attributable to slowly evolving factors, including canopy structure and increases in dormant season air temperature. Taken together, study results suggest that the carbon sink in the southeastern United States may become more variable in the future, owing to a predicted increase in drought frequency and an increase in the fractional cover of southern pines. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Climate Adaptivity and Field Test of the Space Heating Used Air-Source Transcritical CO2 Heat Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yulong; Ye, Zuliang; Cao, Feng

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an innovation of air-sourced transcritical CO2 heat pump which was employed in the space heating application was presented and discussed in order to solve the problem that the heating performances of the transcritical CO2 heat pump water heater deteriorated sharply with the augment in water feed temperature. An R134a cycle was adopted as a subcooling device in the proposed system. The prototype of the presented system was installed and supplied hot water for three places in northern China in winter. The field test results showed that the acceptable return water temperature can be increased up to 55°C, while the supply water temperature was raised rapidly by the presented prototype to up to 70°C directly, which was obviously appropriate to the various conditions of heating radiator in space heating application. Additionally, though the heating capacity and power dissipation decreased with the decline in ambient temperature or the augment in water temperature, the presented heat pump system performed efficiently whatever the climate and water feed temperature were. The real time COP of the presented system was generally more than 1.8 in the whole heating season, while the seasonal performance coefficient (SPC) was also appreciable, which signified that the economic efficiency of the presented system was more excellent than other space heating approaches such as fuel, gas, coal or electric boiler. As a result, the novel system will be a promising project to solve the energy issues in future space heating application.

  9. Point source emission rate estimates from MAMAP airborne remote sensing total column observations of atmospheric CO2 and CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Thomas; Gerilowski, Konstantin; Buchwitz, Michael; Hartmann, Jörg; Sachs, Torsten; Erzinger, Jörg; Burrows, John P.; Bovensmann, Heinrich

    2013-04-01

    Large parts of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions of CO2 and CH4 are released from localised and point sources such as power plants or as fugitive emissions from fossil fuel mining and production sites. These emissions, however, are often not readily assessed by current measurement systems and networks. A tool developed to better understand point sources of CO2 and CH4 is the optical remote sensing instrument MAMAP (Methane Airborne MAPer), operated from aircraft. After a recent instrument modification, retrievals of the column averaged dry air mole fractions for methane XCH4 (or for carbon dioxide XCO2) derived from MAMAP observations in the short-wave infrared, have a precision of about 0.4% significantly improving data quality. MAMAP total column data also serve as a testbed for inversion concepts for greenhouse gas emissions from point sources using total column atmospheric concentration measurements. As information on wind speed is an important input parameter for the inference of emission rates using MAMAP data, recent measurement campaigns comprised an in-situ wind probe operated onboard the same aircraft. Incorporation of these wind measurements in combination with model data leads to a large reduction of uncertainties on the inversion result. Using the examples of two coal mine ventilation shafts in Western Germany as well as other anthropogenic targets, the value of high resolution total column data to obtain emission rate estimates is demonstrated. MAMAP has also been tested in sunglint geometry over the ocean and has therefore the potential for application also to offshore emission sites.

  10. A very high-resolution (1 km?1 km) global fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory derived using a point source database and satellite observations of nighttime lights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. Oda; S. Maksyutov

    2011-01-01

    .... We developed a global 1 km×1 km annual fossil fuel CO 2 emission inventory for the years 1980-2007 by combining a worldwide point source database and satellite observations of the global nightlight distribution...

  11. Magnetotelluric and Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Pre-Injection Study of Aquistore CO2 Sequestration Site, Near Estevan, Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, J.; McLeod, J.; Ferguson, I. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Aquistore project is a large-scale CO2 sequestration operation at Estevan, southeast Saskatchewan, Canada. CO2 is being captured from the Boundary Dam power station, and injected to the base of the Phanerozoic Williston Basin, to be stored in a saline aquifer at 3.4 km depth. In this study, magnetotelluric (MT) and surface controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) methods are tested in a pre-injection setting at Aquistore for their applicability to sequestration monitoring goals. The MT and CSEM methods are complimentary in their ability to resolve structures at different scales using different current systems. Pre-injection MT soundings were conducted in 2013, 2014 and 2015 over a 2.5 km × 8.5 km area surrounding the Aquistore injection well. The Phanerozoic MT response is spatially uniform across the survey area. The resistivity structure of the Phanerozoic is one-dimensional from 0.001 to 10 s: the apparent resistivity decreases from 8 Ωm to 2 Ωm in this period range. Spectral and polarization analyses indicate that broadband noise in period bands of 0.05 to 1 s and 0.0077 to 0.0125 s recorded in 2014 is associated with a CO2 pipeline. At frequencies outside these bands, the MT responses define small differences between surveys (response from these datasets and constraints from a resistivity well-log, a representative 18-layer 1D resistivity model for the Williston Basin sedimentary sequence has been recovered. CSEM surveys in 2013 and 2015 used a 1 km, 30 A electric horizontal dipole source. Recordings of the radial electric field component were made along an inline receiver profile from 3.5 to 9.5 km offsets. Preliminary characterization of these recordings indicates that the transmitted signals are observable at each of the profile locations. Fréchet derivatives of the CSEM response indicate that response sensitivity to changes in the Williston Basin electrical properties is attainable at the level of the reservoir. Low induction number soundings

  12. Atmospheric 14CO2 Constraints on and Modeling of Net Carbon Fluxes 06-ERD-031 An LLNL Exploratory Research in the Directorate's Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilderson, T P; Cameron-Smith, P; Bergmann, D; Graven, H D; Keeling, R; Boering, K; Caldeira, K

    2009-03-18

    A critical scientific question is: 'what are the present day sources and sinks of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the natural environment, and how will these sinks evolve under rising CO{sub 2} concentrations and expected climate change and ecosystem response'? Sources and sinks of carbon dioxide impart their signature on the distribution, concentration, and isotopic composition of CO{sub 2}. Spatial and temporal trends (variability) provide information on the net surface (atmosphere to ocean, atmosphere to terrestrial biosphere) fluxes. The need to establish more reliable estimates of sources and sinks of CO{sub 2} has lead to an expansion of CO{sub 2} measurement programs over the past decade and the development of new methodologies for tracing carbon flows. These methodologies include high-precision pCO{sub 2}, {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2}, and [O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}] measurements on atmospheric constituents that, when combined, have allowed estimates of the net terrestrial and oceanic fluxes at decadal timescales. Major gaps in our understanding remain however, and resulting flux estimates have large errors and are comparatively unconstrained. One potentially powerful approach to tracking carbon flows is based on observations of the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. This ratio can be used to explicitly distinguish fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} from other sources of CO{sub 2} and also provide constraints on the mass and turnover times of carbon in land ecosystems and on exchange rates of CO{sub 2} between air and sea. Here we demonstrated measurement of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratios at 1-2{per_thousand} on archived and currently collected air samples. In parallel we utilized the LLNL-IMPACT global atmospheric chemistry transport model and the TransCom inversion algorithm to utilize these data in inversion estimates of carbon fluxes. This project has laid the foundation for a more expanded effort in the future, involving collaborations with other air

  13. Long Wavelength Electromagnetic Light Bullets Generated by a 10.6 micron CO2 Ultrashort Pulsed Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    studying atmospheric propagation of a high energy Joule-level few picosecond to sub-picosecond pulsed CO2 laser system being planned within a new DOD... high energy Joule- level few picosecond to sub-picosecond pulsed CO2 laser system being planned within a new DOD joint initiative of AFOSR, AFRL and...provide a basic research support infrastructure for, a high energy Joule-level few picosecond to sub-picosecond pulsed few cycle CO2 laser system

  14. Divergent NEE balances from manual-chamber CO2 fluxes linked to different measurement and gap-filling strategies: A source for uncertainty of estimated terrestrial C sources and sinks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huth, Vytas; Vaidya, Shrijana; Hoffmann, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    -study comparisons and meta analyses. The aim of this study was to compare common approaches for quantifying CO2 exchange at three methodological levels. (1) The first level included two different CO2 flux measurement methods: one via measurements during mid-day applying net coverages (mid-day approach) and one via......Manual closed-chamber measurements are commonly used to quantify annual net CO2 ecosystem exchange (NEE) in a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems. However, differences in both the acquisition and gap filling of manual closed-chamber data are large in the existing literature, complicating inter...... of the agricultural field diverged strongly (–200 to 425 g CO2-C m−2). NEE balances were most similar to previous studies when derived from sunrise measurements and indirect GPP modeling. Overall, the large variation in NEE balances resulting from different data-acquisition or gap-filling strategies indicates...

  15. Effects of nitrogen fertilizer sources and temperature on soil CO2 efflux in Italian ryegrass crop under Mediterranean conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Lai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of a study that aimed to assess the dynamics of total and heterotrophic soil respiration and its relationships with soil temperature or soil moisture of an Italian ryegrass haycrop managed with different nitrogen (N fertilizer sources. The field experiment was carried out in the Nitrate Vulnerable Zone of the dairy district of Arborea, a reclaimed wetland in central-western Sardinia, Italy. This is an area characterized by sandy soils, shallow water table and intensive dairy cattle farming systems. Italian ryegrass is grown for hay production in the context of a double cropping rotation with silage maize. We analyzed the effects of N fertilizer treatments on soil carbon dioxide (CO2 efflux, soil water content and soil temperature: i farmyard manure; ii cattle slurry; iii mineral fertilizer; iv 70 kg ha-1 from slurry and 60 kg ha-1 from mineral fertilizer that corresponds to the prescriptions of the vulnerable zone management plan. During the monitoring period, soil water content never fell below 8.6% vol., corresponding to approximately -33 kPa matric potential. Total and heterotrophic soil respiration dynamics were both influenced by soil temperature over winter and early spring, reaching a maximum in the first ten days of April in manure and slurry treatments. In the last 30 days of the Italian ryegrass crop cycle, total soil respiration decreased and seemed not to be affected by temperature. The analysis of covariance with soil temperature as covariate showed that average respiration rates were significantly higher under the manure treatment and lower with mineral fertilizer than the slurry and slurry+mineral treatments, but with similar rates of respiration per unit increase of soil temperature for all treatments. The average soil respiration rates were significantly and positively related to the soil carbon (C inputs derived from fertilizers and preceding crop residuals. We concluded that: i the fertilizer source

  16. Challenges regarding the start-up of an anaerobic biological sulphate reactor using H2 and CO2 as electron donor and carbon sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, SP

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available and energy source. Synthesis gas, comprise of H2 the preferred electron donor of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), CO2 a carbon source and CO and is available from coal-burning processes. Biological sulphate reduction technology using synthesis gas should...

  17. Response of Rates and Sources of Ecosystem CO2 Efflux to Increasing Levels of Winter Snow Depth in the High Arctic of Northwest Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. S.; Lupascu, M.; Xu, X.; Maseyk, K. S.; Welker, J. M.; Czimczik, C. I.

    2011-12-01

    Arctic soils contain vast amounts of organic carbon (C) that range in age from modern to ancient. These soil C pools may be especially vulnerable to changes in conditions; especially increases in winter snowfall, as deeper snow will insulate soils in winter, and add moisture in summer. While, snowfall is increasing in many parts of the Arctic, how increases in winter precipitation affect C cycling in the High Arctic is largely unknown. In this project, we used a long-term snowpack manipulation to develop a better understanding of current and future soil C cycling under conditions of deep winter snow pack and the associated feedbacks to future atmospheric CO2 levels. We examined the effects of three levels of winter snowpack (ambient (0.25 m), ×2, ×4) on the timing, magnitude and sources of ecosystem CO2 efflux and soil microclimate in prostrate dwarf-shrub tundra on patterned ground in the High Arctic of NW Greenland. From June to August 2010 and 2011 we monitored ecosystem CO2 efflux and soil CO2 concentrations (LI-COR 800 & 840) together with soil temperature and moisture daily and the radiocarbon (14C) content of CO2 monthly. The 14C content of CO2 can be used to infer the dominant source of CO2 (plant vs. microbially-respired) as well as the age of microbially-respired CO2. Initial results indicate that during the 2010 sampling period (Jun 28 - Aug 16), daily CO2 emissions from vegetated areas were higher under ×4 ambient snowpack relative to ambient snowpack (84.9 vs. 53.1 mmol m-2 d-1), but lower under ×2 ambient snowpack (56.7 mmol m-2 d-1). CO2 emissions from bare areas increased with snowpack depth from ambient (8.6 mmol m-2 d-1) to ×2 ambient snowpack (16.5 mmol m-2 d-1) to x4 ambient snowpack (18.9 mmol m-2 d-1). Midsummer ecosystem CO2 emissions were dominated by modern C; additional 14C measurements are in progress. Our findings indicate that increases in snowpack may stimulate C loss from this high arctic ecosystem - probably facilitated by

  18. Shifts in microbial use of carbon sources after 8 years of elevated CO2 and warming simulation in a semiarid grassland: linkages to soil C stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Y.; Dijkstra, F. A.; Pendall, E.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and temperature will continue to increase in the future, potentially generating feedbacks to climate change. There is a high degree of uncertainty on the combined effects of CO2 and climate warming and on soil organic matter (SOM), which stores most terrestrial C. Although C input is an important driver of soil C dynamics, the use of this C by decomposer communities ultimately determines if inputs are retained in the ecosystem or lost to the atmosphere. We investigated impacts of eCO2 and warming on microbial assimilation and respiration of C at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment in Wyoming, USA. We exposed this grassland to 8 years of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) and 7 years of warming. In this system, plant aboveground and belowground biomass were stimulated by eCO2 and this effect was enhanced by warming -with interannual variation. However, no changes in soil C have been detected. We evaluated microbial communities, heterotrophic respiration, susceptibility to priming when exposed to labile C, microbial N cycling and use of FACE-labelled C and pre-experimental soil C by individual microbial groups using 13C-PLFA.After 8 years of experimental manipulation we found main effects of both warming and eCO2, but mainly eCO2 the composition of the microbial community, specifically, an increase in the fungi to bacteria ratio. eCO2 led to greater soil respiration which was explained by a greater amount of substrate for decomposition as well as microbial biomass, both consistent with greater plant inputs. However, eCO2 led to lower susceptibility of C to priming, thus potentially counteracting enhanced respiration. Warming did not appear to have impacts on short-term total respiration or priming. However, it modified microbial use of C sources. Under eCO2 warming increased microbial use of FACE C (plant-derived C from the start of the CO2 treatment). We determined that this was explained by ca. 30% increase in the use of FACE-C by

  19. Single crystal silicon filaments fabricated in SOI: A potential IR source for a microfabricated photometric CO2 sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Juliana; Smith, Rosemary L.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this project was to design, fabricate, and test single crystal silicon filaments as potential black body IR sources for a spectrophotometric CO2 sensing microsystem. The design and fabrication of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) filaments are summarized and figures showing the composite layout of the filament die (which contains four filaments of different lengths -- 500 microns, 1 mm, 1.5 mm and 2 mm -- and equal widths of 15 microns) are presented. The composite includes four mask layers: (1) silicon - defines the filament dimensions and contact pads; (2) release pit - defines the oxide removed from under the filament and hence, the length of the released filament; (3) Pyrex pit - defines the pit etched in the Pyrex cap (not used); and (4) metal - defines a metal pattern on the contact pads or used as a contact hole etch. I/V characteristics testing of the fabricated SOI filaments is described along with the nitride-coating procedures carried out to prevent oxidation and resistance instability.

  20. Tracing the sources of gaseous components (222Rn, CO2 and its carbon isotopes) in soil air under a cool-deciduous stand in Sapporo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Haraki, Yukihide; Sumiyoshi, Takashi; Amano, Hikaru; Kobal, Ivan; Vaupotic, Janja

    2010-02-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and carbon dioxide were monitored simultaneously in soil air under a cool-temperate deciduous stand on the campus of Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. Both (222)Rn and CO(2) concentrations in soil air varied with atmospheric (soil) temperature in three seasons, except for winter when the temperature in soil air remained constant at 2-3 degrees C at depth of 80 cm. In winter, the gaseous components were influenced by low-pressure region passing through the observation site when the ground surface was covered with snow of ~1 m thickness. Carbon isotopic analyses of CO(2) suggested that CO(2) in soil air may result from mixing of atmospheric air and soil components of different origins, i.e. CO(2) from contemporary soil organic matter and old carbon from deeper source, to varying degrees, depending on seasonal meteorological and thus biological conditions.

  1. Decarboxylation of Carbon Compounds as a Potential Source for CO2 and CO Observed by SAM at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigenbrode, J. L.; Bower, H.; Archer, P. Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Martian carbon was detected in the Sheepbed mudtsone at Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument onboard Curiosity, the rover of the Mars Science Laboratory missio]. The carbon was detected as CO2 thermally evolved from drilled and sieved rock powder that was delivered to SAM as a <150-micron-particle- size fraction. Most of the CO2 observed in the Cumberland (CB) drill hole evolved between 150deg and 350deg C. In the John Klein (JK) drill hole, the CO2 evolved up to 500deg C. Hypotheses for the source of the the CO2 include the breakdown of carbonate minerals reacting with HCl released from oxychlorine compounds, combustion of organic matter by O2 thermally evolved from the same oxychlorine minerals, and the decarboxylation of organic molecules indigenous to the martian rock sample. Here we explore the potential for the decarboxylation hypothesis.

  2. CO2 emissions from German drinking water reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Helmi; Koschorreck, Matthias

    2017-03-01

    Globally, reservoirs are a significant source of atmospheric CO2. However, precise quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from drinking water reservoirs on the regional or national scale is still challenging. We calculated CO2 fluxes for 39 German drinking water reservoirs during a period of 22years (1991-2013) using routine monitoring data in order to quantify total emission of CO2 from drinking water reservoirs in Germany and to identify major drivers. All reservoirs were a net CO2 source with a median flux of 167gCm-2y-1, which makes gaseous emissions a relevant process for the carbon budget of each reservoir. Fluxes varied seasonally with median fluxes of 13, 48, and 201gCm-2y-1 in spring, summer, and autumn respectively. Differences between reservoirs appeared to be primarily caused by the concentration of CO2 in the surface water rather than by the physical gas transfer coefficient. Consideration of short term fluctuations of the gas transfer coefficient due to varying wind speed had only a minor effect on the annual budgets. High CO2 emissions only occurred in reservoirs with pHemissions correlated exponentially with pH but not with dissolved organic carbon (DOC). There was significant correlation between land use in the catchment and CO2 emissions. In total, German drinking water reservoirs emit 44000t of CO2 annually, which makes them a negligible CO2 source (emissions) in Germany. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Above- and Below-ground Biomass, Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange, and Soil Respiration in a Poplar Populus deltoides Bartr.) stand : Changes after 3 years of Growth under Elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Grieve, K.; Bil, K.; Kudeyarov, V.; Handley, L.; Murthy, R.

    2003-12-01

    Stands of cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) trees were grown as a coppiced system under ambient (40 Pa), twice ambient (80 Pa), and three times ambient (120 Pa) partial pressure CO2 for the past three years in the Intensively-managed Forest Mesocosm (IFM) of the Biosphere 2 Center. Over three years Net Ecosystem CO2 exchange (NECE) was measured continuously and in the third year, nine whole trees were harvested from each CO2 treatment over the growing season. Both above- and below-ground parameters were measured. Three years of growth under elevated CO2 showed the expected stimulation in foliar biomass (8.7, 11.9, and 13.1 kg for the 40, 80, and 120 Pa treatments, respectively). Rates of NECE also followed an expected increase with elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, with maximum CO2 uptake rates reaching 10.5, 15.6, and 19.6 μ moles m-2 s-1 in the 40, 80, and 120 Pa treatments, respectively. However, above ground woody biomass and root biomass were not much stimulated beyond 80 Pa CO2. Wood/foliage and above/below ground biomass ratios reflect this decline. Under conditions of non-limiting nutrients and water, we found consistent increases in the above/below ground biomass ratio and wood to foliage biomass ratios in the 80 compared to the 40 Pa pCO2. Woody biomass production and the above/below ground biomass ratio were lower under the 120 Pa than any other treatment. Although biomass production did not change appreciably between 80 and 120 Pa CO2 treatments, both substrate induced and in-situ soil respiration values are also significantly higher in the 120Pa treatment, though no differences were present prior to CO2 treatments (Murthy et al. 2003). The unique closed-system operation of the IFM allowed for measures of soil CO2 efflux to be measured at both the soil collar and stand scales using a box model that takes into account all inputs and outputs from the stand. In-situ soil respiration rates increased significantly with increased atmospheric CO2

  4. CH4 production via CO2 reduction in a temperate bog - A source of (C-13)-depleted CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdown, J. M.; Quay, P. D.; King, S. L.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports measurements, taken over two annual cycles, of the flux and delta(C-13) of CH4 released from an acidic peat bog located in the foothills of the Cascade Range in Washington state, U.S. Measurements of the rate of aceticlastic methanogenesis and CO2 reduction in peat soil, using (C-14)-labeled acetate and sodium bicarbonate, show that acetate was not an important CH4 precursor and that CO2 reduction could account for all of the CH4 production. The in situ kinetic isotope effect for CO2 reduction, calculated using the delta-(C-13) of soil water CO2 and CH4 flux, was 0.932 +/- 0.007.

  5. CO2NSL (Datalogger)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sune Sick

    ,1500 street lamps around Copenhagen will be changed for light sources with low power consumption. Technical and Environmental turn down the energy as a part of Copenhagen goal of reducing the citys CO2 emissions by 20 percent by the end of year 2015. But how much power will the new lamps comsume? And can...

  6. The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2, version 2016 (ODIAC2016): a global monthly fossil fuel CO2 gridded emissions data product for tracer transport simulations and surface flux inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Tomohiro; Maksyutov, Shamil; Andres, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    The Open-source Data Inventory for Anthropogenic CO2 (ODIAC) is a global high-spatial-resolution gridded emissions data product that distributes carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion. The emissions spatial distributions are estimated at a 1 × 1 km spatial resolution over land using power plant profiles (emissions intensity and geographical location) and satellite-observed nighttime lights. This paper describes the year 2016 version of the ODIAC emissions data product (ODIAC2016) and presents analyses that help guide data users, especially for atmospheric CO2 tracer transport simulations and flux inversion analysis. Since the original publication in 2011, we have made modifications to our emissions modeling framework in order to deliver a comprehensive global gridded emissions data product. Major changes from the 2011 publication are (1) the use of emissions estimates made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by fuel type (solid, liquid, gas, cement manufacturing, gas flaring, and international aviation and marine bunkers); (2) the use of multiple spatial emissions proxies by fuel type such as (a) nighttime light data specific to gas flaring and (b) ship/aircraft fleet tracks; and (3) the inclusion of emissions temporal variations. Using global fuel consumption data, we extrapolated the CDIAC emissions estimates for the recent years and produced the ODIAC2016 emissions data product that covers 2000-2015. Our emissions data can be viewed as an extended version of CDIAC gridded emissions data product, which should allow data users to impose global fossil fuel emissions in a more comprehensive manner than the original CDIAC product. Our new emissions modeling framework allows us to produce future versions of the ODIAC emissions data product with a timely update. Such capability has become more significant given the CDIAC/ORNL's shutdown. The ODIAC data product could play an important

  7. Comparison of net CO2 fluxes measured with open- and closed-path infrared gas analyzers in an urban complex environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvi, L.; Mammarella, I.; Eugster, W.

    2009-01-01

    and their suitability to accurately measure CO2 exchange in such non-ideal landscape. In addition, this study examined the effect of open-path sensor heating on measured fluxes in urban terrain, and these results were compared with similar measurements made above a temperate beech forest in Denmark. The correlation...... improved the performance of the open-path analyzer by reducing discrepancies in NSE at the urban site to 2% and decreasing the difference in NSE from 67% to 7% at the forest site. Overall, the site-specific approach gave the best results at both sites and, if possible, it should be preferred in the sensor...

  8. Production of Chlorella vulgaris as a source of essential fatty acids in a tubular photobioreactor continuously fed with air enriched with CO2 at different concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Montoya, Erika Y; Casazza, Alessandro A; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Perego, Patrizia; Converti, Attilio; de Carvalho, João C Monteiro

    2014-01-01

    To reduce CO2 emissions and simultaneously produce biomass rich in essential fatty acids, Chlorella vulgaris CCAP 211 was continuously grown in a tubular photobioreactor using air alone or air enriched with CO2 as the sole carbon source. While on one hand, nitrogen-limited conditions strongly affected biomass growth, conversely, they almost doubled its lipid fraction. Under these conditions using air enriched with 0, 2, 4, 8, and 16% (v/v) CO2 , the maximum biomass concentration was 1.4, 5.8, 6.6, 6.8, and 6.4 gDB L(-1) on a dry basis, the CO2 consumption rate 62, 380, 391, 433, and 430 mgCO2 L(-1) day(-1) , and the lipid productivity 3.7, 23.7, 24.8, 29.5, and 24.4 mg L(-1) day(-1) , respectively. C. vulgaris was able to grow effectively using CO2 -enriched air, but its chlorophyll a (3.0-3.5 g 100gDB (-1) ), chlorophyll b (2.6-3.0 g 100gDB (-1) ), and lipid contents (10.7-12.0 g 100gDB (-1) ) were not significantly influenced by the presence of CO2 in the air. Most of the fatty acids in C. vulgaris biomass were of the saturated series, mainly myristic, palmitic, and stearic acids, but a portion of no less than 45% consisted of unsaturated fatty acids, and about 80% of these were high added-value essential fatty acids belonging to the ω3 and ω6 series. These results highlight that C. vulgaris biomass could be of great importance for human health when used as food additive or for functional food production. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Doubling the CO2 Concentration Enhanced the Activity of Carbohydrate-Metabolism Enzymes, Source Carbohydrate Production, Photoassimilate Transport, and Sink Strength for Opuntia ficus-indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Nobel, P. S.

    1996-03-01

    After exposure to a doubled CO2 concentration of 750 [mu]mol mol-1 air for about 3 months glucose and starch in the chlorenchyma of basal cladodes of Opuntia ficus-indica increased 175 and 57%, respectively, compared with the current CO2 concentration of 370 [mu]mol mol-1, but sucrose content was virtually unaffected. Doubling the CO2 concentration increased the nocturnal malate production in basal cladodes by 75%, inorganic phosphate (Pi) by 32%, soluble starch synthase activity by 30%, and sucrose-Pi synthase activity by 146%, but did not affect the activity of hexokinase. Doubling CO2 accelerated phloem transport of sucrose out of the basal cladodes, resulting in a 73% higher dry weight for the daughter cladodes. Doubling CO2 increased the glucose content in 14-d-old daughter cladodes by 167%, increased nocturnal malate production by 22%, decreased total amino acid content by 61%, and increased soluble starch synthase activity by 30% and sucrose synthase activity by 62%. No downward acclimation of photosynthesis during long-term exposure to elevated CO2 concentrations occurs for O. ficus-indica (M. Cui, P.M. Miller, P.S. Nobel [1993] Plant Physiol 103: 519-524; P.S. Nobel, A.A. Israel [1994] J Exp Bot 45: 295-303), consistent with its higher source capacity and sink strength than under current CO2. These changes apparently do not result in Pi limitation of photosynthesis or suppression of genes governing photosynthesis for this perennial Crassulacean acid metabolism species, as occur for some annual crops.

  10. Effects of rhizopheric nitric oxide (NO) on N uptake in Fagus sylvatica seedlings depend on soil CO2 concentration, soil N availability and N source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fang; Simon, Judy; Rienks, Michael; Lindermayr, Christian; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    Rhizospheric nitric oxide (NO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) are signalling compounds known to affect physiological processes in plants. Their joint influence on tree nitrogen (N) nutrition, however, is still unknown. Therefore, this study investigated, for the first time, the combined effect of rhizospheric NO and CO2 levels on N uptake and N pools in European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) seedlings depending on N availability. For this purpose, roots of seedlings were exposed to one of the nine combinations (i.e., low, ambient, high NO plus CO2 concentration) at either low or high N availability. Our results indicate a significant effect of rhizospheric NO and/or CO2 concentration on organic and inorganic N uptake. However, this effect depends strongly on NO and CO2 concentration, N availability and N source. Similarly, allocation of N to different N pools in the fine roots of beech seedlings also shifted with varying rhizospheric gas concentrations and N availability. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Fuel from Wastewater - Harnessing a Potential Energy Source in Canada through the Co-location of Algae Biofuel Production to Sources of Effluent, Heat and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klise, G. T.; Roach, J. D.; Passell, H. D.; Moreland, B. D.; O'Leary, S. J.; Pienkos, P. T.; Whalen, J.

    2010-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the “production” footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada’s NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific

  12. Integrated Path Detection of Co2 and CH4 Using a Waveform Driven Electro-Optic Single Sideband Laser Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated path concentrations of ambient levels of carbon dioxide and methane have been measured during nighttime periods at NIST, Boulder (CO, USA, using a ground-based, eyesafe laser system. In this contribution, we describe the transmitter and receiver system, demonstrate measurements of CO2 and CH4 in comparison with an in situ point sensor measurement using a commercial cavity ring-down instrument, and demonstrate a speckle noise reduction method.

  13. Structure of the transport uncertainty in mesoscale inversions of CO2 sources and sinks using ensemble model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Noilhan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the characteristics of a statistical ensemble of mesoscale simulations in order to estimate the model error in the simulation of CO2 concentrations. The ensemble consists of ten members and the reference simulation using the operationnal short range forecast PEARP, perturbed using the Singular Vector technique. We then used this ensemble of simulations as the initial and boundary conditions for the meso scale model (Méso-NH simulations, which uses CO2 fluxes from the ISBA-A-gs land surface model. The final ensemble represents the model dependence to the boundary conditions, conserving the physical properties of the dynamical schemes, but excluding the intrinsic error of the model. First, the variance of our ensemble is estimated over the domain, with associated spatial and temporal correlations. Second, we extract the signal from noisy horizontal correlations, due to the limited size ensemble, using diffusion equation modelling. The computational cost of such ensemble limits the number of members (simulations especially when running online the carbon flux and the atmospheric models. In the theory, 50 to 100 members would be required to explore the overall sensitivity of the ensemble. The present diffusion model allows us to extract a significant part of the noisy error, and makes this study feasable with a limited number of simulations. Finally, we compute the diagonal and non-diagonal terms of the observation error covariance matrix and introduced it into our CO2 flux matrix inversion for 18 days of the 2005 intensive campaign CERES over the South West of France. Variances are based on model-data mismatch to ensure we treat model bias as well as ensemble dispersion, whereas spatial and temporal covariances are estimated with our method. The horizontal structure of the ensemble variance manifests the discontinuities of the mesoscale structures during the day, but remains locally driven during the night. On the vertical, surface layer

  14. Efficient electrochemical CO2 conversion powered by renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Douglas R; Thakkar, Jay; Siva, Rajan; Matranga, Christopher; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Zeng, Chenjie; Jin, Rongchao

    2015-07-22

    The catalytic conversion of CO2 into industrially relevant chemicals is one strategy for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. Along these lines, electrochemical CO2 conversion technologies are attractive because they can operate with high reaction rates at ambient conditions. However, electrochemical systems require electricity, and CO2 conversion processes must integrate with carbon-free, renewable-energy sources to be viable on larger scales. We utilize Au25 nanoclusters as renewably powered CO2 conversion electrocatalysts with CO2 → CO reaction rates between 400 and 800 L of CO2 per gram of catalytic metal per hour and product selectivities between 80 and 95%. These performance metrics correspond to conversion rates approaching 0.8-1.6 kg of CO2 per gram of catalytic metal per hour. We also present data showing CO2 conversion rates and product selectivity strongly depend on catalyst loading. Optimized systems demonstrate stable operation and reaction turnover numbers (TONs) approaching 6 × 10(6) molCO2 molcatalyst(-1) during a multiday (36 h total hours) CO2 electrolysis experiment containing multiple start/stop cycles. TONs between 1 × 10(6) and 4 × 10(6) molCO2 molcatalyst(-1) were obtained when our system was powered by consumer-grade renewable-energy sources. Daytime photovoltaic-powered CO2 conversion was demonstrated for 12 h and we mimicked low-light or nighttime operation for 24 h with a solar-rechargeable battery. This proof-of-principle study provides some of the initial performance data necessary for assessing the scalability and technical viability of electrochemical CO2 conversion technologies. Specifically, we show the following: (1) all electrochemical CO2 conversion systems will produce a net increase in CO2 emissions if they do not integrate with renewable-energy sources, (2) catalyst loading vs activity trends can be used to tune process rates and product distributions, and (3) state-of-the-art renewable-energy technologies are sufficient

  15. Water balance and N-metabolism in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) plants depending on nitrogen source under salt stress and elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghdoud, Chokri; Carvajal, Micaela; Ferchichi, Ali; Del Carmen Martínez-Ballesta, María

    2016-11-15

    Elevated [CO2] and salinity in the soils are considered part of the effects of future environmental conditions in arid and semi-arid areas. While it is known that soil salinization decreases plant growth, an increased atmospheric [CO2] may ameliorate the negative effects of salt stress. However, there is a lack of information about the form in which inorganic nitrogen source may influence plant performance under both conditions. Single factor responses and the interactive effects of two [CO2] (380 and 800ppm), three different NO3(-)/NH4(+) ratios in the nutrient solution (100/0, 50/50 and 0/100, with a total N concentration of 3.5mM) and two NaCl concentrations (0 and 80mM) on growth, leaf gas exchange parameters in relation to root hydraulic conductance and N-assimilating enzymes of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) plants were determined. The results showed that a reduced NO3(-) or co-provision of NO3(-) and NH4(+) could be an optimal source of inorganic N for broccoli plants. In addition, elevated [CO2] ameliorated the effect of salt exposure on the plant growth through an enhanced rate of photosynthesis, even at low N-concentration. However, NO3(-) or NO3(-)/NH4(+) co-provision display differential plant response to salt stress regarding water balance, which was associated to N metabolism. The results may contribute to our understanding of N-fertilization modes under increasing atmospheric [CO2] to cope with salt stress, where variations in N nutrition significantly influenced plant response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Control of the mid-summer net community production and nitrogen fixation in the central Baltic Sea: An approach based on pCO2 measurements on a cargo ship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, B.; Gustafsson, E.; Sadkowiak, B.

    2014-08-01

    Automated measurements of the surface CO2 partial pressure, pCO2, were performed since 2003 on a cargo ship along a transect between Helsinki in the Gulf of Finland and Lübeck/Gdynia in the southwest of the Baltic Sea. The temporal and spatial resolution of the measurements amounted to 2-4 days and about 2 nautical miles, respectively. Based on temperature and salinity records and on the mean alkalinity, the total CO2 concentrations, CT, were calculated from the mean pCO2 in the northeastern Gotland Sea. The CT data were used to establish a CO2 mass balance for the period from mid-June to the beginning of August in 2005, 2008, 2009 and 2011. Taking into account the air-sea CO2 gas exchange, the mass balance yielded the net organic matter (Corg) production which is fuelled by nitrogen fixation at this time of the year. Several production events were detected with rates up to 8 μmol-C L- 1 d- 1. The production rates were not related to temperature, but showed a distinct correlation with the rate of the temperature increase. This led to the conclusion that the exposure of nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria to irradiance is the dominating control for the Corg production. Therefore, we suggest using the ratio of irradiance to the mixed layer depth as a variable for the parameterization of nitrogen fixation in biogeochemical models. The Corg production and thus the nitrogen fixation rates remained almost constant as long as continuous rising temperatures indicated favorable irradiation conditions. A limitation of the rates by phosphate or any other factor could not be detected. Based on the C/N ratio of particulate organic matter during a cyanobacteria bloom, the Corg production was used to estimate the mid-summer nitrogen fixation. The values varied from 102 mmol m- 2 to 214 mmol m- 2 (mean: 138 mmol m- 2) for the different years and did not show any correlation with the phosphate excess after the spring nitrate depletion.

  17. High-brightness picosecond ion beam source based on BNL Terawatt CO2 laser: Proof-of-principle experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkolnikov, Peter

    2012-10-04

    Under the continuing DOE support, we have: o assembled the basic experiment setup and then continued expanding it to include diverse diagnostics and to accommodate gas jet targets in addition to metal foils; o conducted an extensive study of our novel laser, significantly enhanced laser beam diagnostics, and improved relevant laser parameters; o turned our experiments into a truly international endeavor with active collaboration of close to 20 researchers in US, UK, and Germany; o conducted the first ever experiments with proton and ion acceleration by lasers interacting with overcritical plasma of gas jets; o for the first time directly observed radiation pressure acceleration of protons, including quasi-monoenergetic spectra promising for future applications; o for the first time directly observed quasi-stable, bubble-like plasma structures that likely evolved from relativistic laser-plasma solitons (post-solitons). Thus, we have confirmed a strong potential of a picosecond TW CO2 laser as a research tool in laser-plasma science and as a promising vehicle for future applications of laser ion acceleration. This has led to apparent increase of the interest in mid-IR laser ion acceleration. In particular, another major research group began extensive proton acceleration experiments with their own CO2 laser at UCLA. As a result, the mechanisms responsible for laser proton acceleration in gas jets have become somewhat clearer. It is also important to note that modest DOE funding played the role of a seed support ensuring the formation of a multinational research team, whose members contributed its time and equipment with value well in excess of that seed amount.

  18. CO2 blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum; Acidosis - CO2; Alkalosis - CO2 ... The CO2 test is most often done as part of an electrolyte or basic metabolic panel. Changes in your ...

  19. Natural bog pine ecosystem in southern Germany is a steady and robust sink of CO2 but a minor source of CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommeltenberg, Janina; Schmid, Hans Peter; Droesler, Matthias; Werle, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Natural peatland ecosystems sequester carbon dioxide. They do this slowly but steadily, but also emit methane in small rates. Thus peatlands have both positive and negative greenhouse gas balance impacts on the climate system due to their influence on atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentration. We present data of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of almost three years (July 2010 to March 2013) and of methane fluxes over a period of nine months (July 2012 to March 2013), measured by eddy covariance technique in the bog forest "Schechenfilz". The site (47°48' N; 11°19' E, 590 m a.s.l.) is an ICOS-ecosystems associate site, located in the pre-alpine region of southern Germany, where a natural Pinus mugo rotundata forest grows on an undisturbed, almost 6 m thick peat layer. The slow growing bog pines and their low rates of carbon sequestration, in combination with high water table and thus low availability of oxygen, lead to low carbon dioxide fluxes. Photosynthesis as well as soil respiration are considerably attenuated compared to upland sites. Additionally, the high soil water content is damping the impact of dry and hot periods on CO2 exchange. Thus the CO2 balance is very robust to changing environmental parameters. While the CO2 exchange is clearly related to soil temperature and photosynthetic active radiation, we have not yet identified a parameter that governs variations in methane exchange. Various environmental parameters appear to be related to methane emissions (including soil moisture, soil and air temperature and wind direction), but the scatter with respect to half hourly methane fluxes is too large to be useful for gap modeling. Analysis of daily averages reduces the scatter, but since methane exchange exhibits considerable daily variation, daily averages are not useful to fill data gaps of half hourly fluxes. In consequence, as the daily course is the summary result of all environmental parameters having influence on the methane exchange at the half

  20. Towards space based verification of CO2 emissions from strong localized sources: fossil fuel power plant emissions as seen by a CarbonSat constellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krings

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 is the most important man-made greenhouse gas (GHG that cause global warming. With electricity generation through fossil-fuel power plants now being the economic sector with the largest source of CO2, power plant emissions monitoring has become more important than ever in the fight against global warming. In a previous study done by Bovensmann et al. (2010, random and systematic errors of power plant CO2 emissions have been quantified using a single overpass from a proposed CarbonSat instrument. In this study, we quantify errors of power plant annual emission estimates from a hypothetical CarbonSat and constellations of several CarbonSats while taking into account that power plant CO2 emissions are time-dependent. Our focus is on estimating systematic errors arising from the sparse temporal sampling as well as random errors that are primarily dependent on wind speeds. We used hourly emissions data from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA combined with assimilated and re-analyzed meteorological fields from the National Centers of Environmental Prediction (NCEP. CarbonSat orbits were simulated as a sun-synchronous low-earth orbiting satellite (LEO with an 828-km orbit height, local time ascending node (LTAN of 13:30 (01:30 p.m. LT and achieves global coverage after 5 days. We show, that despite the variability of the power plant emissions and the limited satellite overpasses, one CarbonSat has the potential to verify reported US annual CO2 emissions from large power plants (≥5 Mt CO2 yr−1 with a systematic error of less than ~4.9% and a random error of less than ~6.7% for 50% of all the power plants. For 90% of all the power plants, the systematic error was less than ~12.4% and the random error was less than ~13%. We additionally investigated two different satellite configurations using a combination of 5 CarbonSats. One achieves global coverage everyday but only samples the targets at fixed local times. The other

  1. Photoassimilation, Assimilate Translocation and Plasmodesmal Biogenesis in the Source Leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana Grown Under an Increased Atmospheric CO2 Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Zhongrui; Homma, Ayumi; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Kaneko, Yasuko; Fujiki, Yuki; Nishida, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Using 18-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown under increased (780 p.p.m., experimental plants) or ambient (390 p.p.m., control plants) CO2 conditions, we evaluated 14CO2 photoassimilation in and translocation from representative source leaves. The total 14CO2 photoassimilation amounts increased in the third leaves of the experimental plants in comparison with that found for the third leaves of the control plants, but the rates were comparable for the first leaves of the two groups. In contrast, translocation of labeled assimilates doubled in the first leaves of the experimental group, whereas translocation was, at best, passively enhanced even though photoassimilation increased in their third leaves. The transcript levels of the companion cell-specific sucrose:H+ symporter gene SUC2 were not significantly affected in the two groups of plants, whereas those of the sucrose effluxer gene SWEET12 and the sieve element-targeted sucrose:H+ symporter gene SUT4 were up-regulated in the experimental plants, suggesting up-regulation of SUT4-dependent apoplastic phloem loading. Compared with SUC2, SUT4 is a minor component that is expressed in companion cells but functions in sieve elements after transfer through plasmodesmata. The number of aniline blue-stained spots for plasmodesma-associated callose in the midrib wall increased in the first leaf of the experimental plants but was comparable in the third leaf between the experimental and control plants. These results suggest that A. thaliana responds to greater than normal concentrations of CO2 differentially in the first and third leaves in regards to photoassimilation, assimilate translocation and plasmodesmal biogenesis. PMID:24406629

  2. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  3. Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualitative changes in floral pollen protein have been shown to be an important aspect of pollinator health. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.), provides an essential autumnal source of floral pollen for wild bee and honeybee populations prior to winter, with tall or Canada gol...

  4. Regulation of nitrogen uptake and assimilation: Effects of nitrogen source, root-zone pH, and aerial CO2 concentration on growth and productivity of soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raper, C. D.; Tolley-Henry, L.

    1989-01-01

    An important feature of controlled-environment crop production systems such as those to be used for life support of crews during space exploration is the efficient utilization of nitrogen supplies. Making decisions about the best sources of these supplies requires research into the relationship between nitrogen source and the physiological processes which regulate vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Work done in four areas within this research objective is reported: (1) experiments on the effects of root-zone pH on preferential utilization of NO3(-) versus NH4(+) nitrogen; (2) investigation of processes at the whole-plant level that regulate nitrogen uptake; (3) studies of the effects of atmospheric CO2 and NO3(-) supply on the growth of soybeans; and (4) examination of the role of NO3(-) uptake in enhancement of root respiration.

  5. Tropical forests are a net carbon source based on aboveground measurements of gain and loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, A.; Walker, W.; Carvalho, L.; Farina, M.; Sulla-Menashe, D.; Houghton, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    The carbon balance of tropical ecosystems remains uncertain, with top-down atmospheric studies suggesting an overall sink and bottom-up ecological approaches indicating a modest net source. Here we use 12 years (2003 to 2014) of MODIS pantropical satellite data to quantify net annual changes in the aboveground carbon density of tropical woody live vegetation, providing direct, measurement-based evidence that the world’s tropical forests are a net carbon source of 425.2 ± 92.0 teragrams of carbon per year (Tg C year–1). This net release of carbon consists of losses of 861.7 ± 80.2 Tg C year–1 and gains of 436.5 ± 31.0 Tg C year–1. Gains result from forest growth; losses result from deforestation and from reductions in carbon density within standing forests (degradation or disturbance), with the latter accounting for 68.9% of overall losses.

  6. A Synthesized Model-Observation Approach to Constraining Gross Urban CO2 Fluxes Using 14CO2 and carbonyl sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFranchi, B. W.; Campbell, J. E.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Bambha, R.; Michelsen, H. A.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanized regions are responsible for a disproportionately large percentage (30-40%) of global anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, despite covering only 2% of the Earth's surface area [Satterthwaite, 2008]. As a result, policies enacted at the local level in these urban areas can, in aggregate, have a large global impact, both positive and negative. In order to address the scientific questions that are required to drive these policy decisions, methods are needed that resolve gross CO2 flux components from the net flux. Recent work suggests that the critical knowledge gaps in CO2 surface fluxes could be addressed through the combined analysis of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) and radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 (14CO2) [e.g. Campbell et al., 2008; Graven et al., 2009]. The 14CO2 approach relies on mass balance assumptions about atmospheric CO2 and the large differences in 14CO2 abundance between fossil and natural sources of CO2 [Levin et al., 2003]. COS, meanwhile, is a potentially transformative tracer of photosynthesis because its variability in the atmosphere has been found to be influenced primarily by vegetative uptake, scaling linearly will gross primary production (GPP) [Kettle et al., 20027]. Taken together, these two observations provide constraints on two of the three main components of the CO2 budget at the urban scale: photosynthesis and fossil fuel emissions. The third component, respiration, can then be determined by difference if the net flux is known. Here we present a general overview of our synthesized model-observation approach for improving surface flux estimates of CO2 for the upwind fetch of a ~30m tower located in Livermore, CA, USA, a suburb (pop. ~80,000) at the eastern edge of the San Francisco Bay Area. Additionally, we will present initial results from a one week observational intensive, which includes continuous CO2, CH4, CO, SO2, NOx, and O3 observations in addition to measurements of 14CO2 and COS from air samples

  7. Constraints on the Use of 18O in CO2 as a Tracer to Partition Gross Carbon Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, W. J.; Still, C. J.

    2003-12-01

    Measurements of 18O in atmospheric CO2 can be used to partition measured net CO2 ecosystem fluxes into photosynthesis and respiration. However, uncertainties and temporal variability in the δ 18O value of the soil-surface CO2 flux (δ Fs) and the retro-diffused CO2 flux (δ Fr) can lead to substantial errors in partitioning estimates. We will discuss an integrated isotope and ecosystem model (ISOLSM) that simulates exchanges of 18O in H2O and CO2 in soil and plants, and will apply the model to identify critical factors associated with CO2 flux partitioning. Modeling results, regression analysis of model predictions, and an analysis of characteristic times of relevant processes indicate that, in contrast to previous reports, the δ 18O value of soil water (δ sw) in the top few cm of soil strongly impacts δ Fs. Thus, accurately characterizing near-surface δ sw is critical to the CO2 flux partitioning approach. We also discuss the impact of the soil CO2 source distribution within the column, soil temperature, and the δ 18O value of atmospheric CO2 on predictions of δ Fs. Disequilibrium between CO2 and leaf water, which may be common in C4 grasses, will impact δ Fr and therefore the partitioning of the measured net ecosystem CO2 flux. Finally, temporal variability in δ Fr, in particular, can lead to errors in flux partitioning when measurements of the δ 18O value of leaf water and of 18O in atmospheric CO2 and are not made concurrently. We will present results demonstrating the impact of these factors on partitioning estimates and discuss measurement protocol necessary to accurately partition measured net ecosystem CO2 fluxes into their component gross fluxes. We will also briefly discuss the relative merits of 18O versus 13C as a tracer for partitioning net fluxes.

  8. CO2 Capture for Cement Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar

    Production of cement is an energy intensive process and is the source of considerable CO2emissions. Itis estimated that the cement industry contributes around 8% of total global CO2emissions. CO2is oneof the major greenhouse gases. In the atmosphere, the CO2concentration has increased from 310...... ppmvin 1960 to 390 ppmv in 2012, probably due to human activity. A lot of research is being carried out forreducing CO2emissions from large stationary sources. Ofwhich, the carbonate looping process is anew process and has the potential to reduce CO2emissions with lower energy penalties. Most of thework...... performed recently has focused on CO2capture from fossil fuel-based power plants. Inherently,this process is especially suitablefor cement plants, as CaO used for CO2capture is also a majoringredient for clinker production. Thus, a detailed investigation was carried outto study the applicationof...

  9. The terrestrial biosphere as a net source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Ciais, Philippe; Michalak, Anna M; Canadell, Josep G; Saikawa, Eri; Huntzinger, Deborah N; Gurney, Kevin R; Sitch, Stephen; Zhang, Bowen; Yang, Jia; Bousquet, Philippe; Bruhwiler, Lori; Chen, Guangsheng; Dlugokencky, Edward; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Melillo, Jerry; Pan, Shufen; Poulter, Benjamin; Prinn, Ronald; Saunois, Marielle; Schwalm, Christopher R; Wofsy, Steven C

    2016-03-10

    The terrestrial biosphere can release or absorb the greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and therefore has an important role in regulating atmospheric composition and climate. Anthropogenic activities such as land-use change, agriculture and waste management have altered terrestrial biogenic greenhouse gas fluxes, and the resulting increases in methane and nitrous oxide emissions in particular can contribute to climate change. The terrestrial biogenic fluxes of individual greenhouse gases have been studied extensively, but the net biogenic greenhouse gas balance resulting from anthropogenic activities and its effect on the climate system remains uncertain. Here we use bottom-up (inventory, statistical extrapolation of local flux measurements, and process-based modelling) and top-down (atmospheric inversions) approaches to quantify the global net biogenic greenhouse gas balance between 1981 and 2010 resulting from anthropogenic activities and its effect on the climate system. We find that the cumulative warming capacity of concurrent biogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions is a factor of about two larger than the cooling effect resulting from the global land carbon dioxide uptake from 2001 to 2010. This results in a net positive cumulative impact of the three greenhouse gases on the planetary energy budget, with a best estimate (in petagrams of CO2 equivalent per year) of 3.9 ± 3.8 (top down) and 5.4 ± 4.8 (bottom up) based on the GWP100 metric (global warming potential on a 100-year time horizon). Our findings suggest that a reduction in agricultural methane and nitrous oxide emissions, particularly in Southern Asia, may help mitigate climate change.

  10. Atmospheric boundary layer CO2remote sensing with a direct detection LIDAR instrument based on a widely tunable optical parametric source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadiou, Erwan; Mammez, Dominique; Dherbecourt, Jean-Baptiste; Gorju, Guillaume; Pelon, Jacques; Melkonian, Jean-Michel; Godard, Antoine; Raybaut, Myriam

    2017-10-15

    We report on the capability of a direct detection differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for range resolved and integrated path (IPDIAL) remote sensing of CO 2 in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The laser source is an amplified nested cavity optical parametric oscillator (NesCOPO) emitting approximately 8 mJ at the two measurement wavelengths selected near 2050 nm. Direct detection atmospheric measurements are taken from the ground using a 30 Hz frequency switching between emitted wavelengths. Results show that comparable precision measurements are achieved in DIAL and IPDIAL modes (not better than a few ppm) on high SNR targets such as near range ABL aerosol and clouds, respectively. Instrumental limitations are analyzed and degradation due to cloud scattering variability is discussed to explain observed DIAL and IPDIAL limitations.

  11. Application of trajectory clustering and source attribution methods for investigating regional CO2 and CH4 concentrations at Germany's highest mountain site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giemsa, Esther; Jacobeit, Jucundus; Ries, Ludwig; Frank, Gabriele; Hachinger, Stephan; Meyer-Arnek, Julian

    2017-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) represent the most important contributors to increased radiative forcing enhancing it together by contemporary 2.65 W/m2 on the global average (IPCC 2013). The unbroken increase of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHG) has been unequivocally attributed to human emissions mainly coming from fossil fuel burning and land-use changes, while the oceans and terrestrial ecosystems slightly attenuate this rise with seasonally varying strength. Short-term fluctuations in the GHG concentrations that superimpose the seasonal cycle and the climate change driven trend reflect the presence of regional sources and sinks. A perfect place for investigating the comprehensive influence of these regional emissions is provided by the Environmental Research Station Schneefernerhaus (47.42°N, 10.98°E, 2.650m a.s.l.) situated in the eastern Alps at the southern side of Zugspitze mountain. Located just 300m below the highest peak of the German Alps, the exposed site is one of the currently 30 global core sites of the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme and thus provides ideal conditions to study source-receptor relationships for greenhouse gases. We propose a stepwise statistical methodology for examining the relationship between synoptic-scale atmospheric transport patterns and climate gas mole fractions to finally receive a characterization of the sampling site with regard to the key processes driving CO2 and CH4 concentration levels. The first step entails a reliable radon-based filtering approach to subdivide the detected air masses according to their regional or 'background' origin. Simultaneously, a large number of ten-day back-trajectories from Schneefernerhaus every two hours over the entire study period 2011 - 2015 is calculated with the Lagrangian transport and dispersion model FLEXPART (Stohl et al. 2005) and subjected to cluster analysis. The weather- and emission strength-related (short

  12. Riverine CO2 emissions in the Wuding River catchment on the Loess Plateau: Environmental controls and dam impoundment impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Lishan; Li, Lingyu; Tian, Mingyang; Yang, Xiankun; Yu, Ruihong; Zhao, Ji; Wang, Lixin; Lu, X. X.

    2017-06-01

    River ecosystems contribute significantly to CO2 emissions. However, estimates of global riverine CO2 emissions remain greatly uncertain owing to the absence of a comprehensive and spatially resolved CO2 emission measurement. Based on intensive field measurements using floating chambers, riverine CO2 evasion in the Wuding River catchment on the Loess Plateau was investigated. Lateral carbon derived from soil respiration and chemical weathering played a central role in controlling the variability of riverine CO2 partial pressure (pCO2). In addition, in-stream processing of allochthonous organic carbon was an also important source of CO2 excess, modulating the influence of lateral carbon inputs. All the surveyed streams were net CO2 sources, exhibiting pronounced spatial and seasonal variabilities. The mean CO2 efflux was 172, 116, and 218 mmol m-2 d-1 in spring, summer, and autumn, respectively. Unlike the commonly observed strongest CO2 emissions in headwater streams, the increasing CO2 efflux with stream order in the Wuding River catchment reflects its unique geomorphologic landscape in controlling CO2 emissions. While in reservoirs, the pCO2 was more controlled by primary production with aquatic photosynthetic assimilation constraining it to a lower level. Both the magnitude and direction of CO2 evasion from reservoirs have been greatly altered. Contrast to streams with large CO2 effluxes, reservoirs were small carbon sources and even carbon sinks, due primarily to greatly reduced turbulence and enhanced photosynthesis. In view of the large number of reservoirs on the Loess Plateau, assessing the resulting changes to CO2 emissions and their implications for regional carbon budgets warrants further research.

  13. [The spectra of a laser-produced plasma source with CO2, O2 and CF4 liquid aerosol spray target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-Liang; Chen, Bo

    2008-11-01

    A laser-produced plasma (LPP) source with liquid aerosol spray target and nanosecond laser was developed, based on both soft X-ray radiation metrology and extreme ultraviolet projection lithography (EUVL). The LPP source is composed of a stainless steel solenoid valve whose temperature can be continuously controlled, a Nd : YAG laser with pulse width, working wavelength and pulse energy being 7 ns, 1.064 microm and 1J respectively, and a pulse generator which can synchronously control the valve and the laser. A standard General Valve Corporation series 99 stainless steel solenoid valve with copper gasket seals and a Kel-F poppet are used in order to minimize leakage and poppet deformation during high-pressure cryogenic operation. A close fitting copper cooling jacket surrounds the valve body. The jacket clamps a copper coolant carrying tube 3 mm in diameter, which is fed by an automatically pressurized liquid nitrogen-filled dewar. The valve temperature can be controlled between 77 and 473 K. For sufficiently high backing pressure and low temperature, the valve reservoir gas can undergo a gas-to-liquid phase transition. Upon valve pulsing, the liquid is ejected into a vacuum and breaks up into droplets, which is called liquid aerosol spray target. For the above-mentioned LPP source, firstly, by the use of Cowan program on the basis of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the authors computed the radiative transition wavelengths and probabilities in soft X-ray region for O4+, O5+, O6+, O7+, F5+, F6+ and F7+ ions which were correspondingly produced from the interaction of the 10(11)-10(12) W x cm(-2) power laser with liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray targets. Secondly, the authors measured the spectra of liquid O2, CO2 and CF4 aerosol spray target LPP sources in the 6-20 nm band for the 8 x 10(11) W x cm(-2) laser irradiance. The measured results were compared with the Cowan calculated results ones, and the radiative transition wavelength and probability for the

  14. CO2NNIE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a system for calculating the personalized annual fuel consumption and CO2 emissions from transportation. The system, named CO2NNIE, estimates the fuel consumption on the fastest route between the frequent destinations of the user. The travel time and fuel consumption estimated are based......% of the actual fuel consumption (4.6% deviation on average). We conclude, that the system provides new detailed information on CO2 emissions and fuel consumption for any make and model....

  15. CO2 laser resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, R E

    2001-07-01

    The CO2 Laser offers a variety of unique features in resurfacing facial photodamage and acne scarring. These include hemostasis, efficient removal of the epidermis in a single pass, thermally induced tissue tightening, and safe, predictable tissue interaction. Knowledge of these mechanisms will result in the capability of using the CO2 laser effectively and safely whether the goal is superficial or deep treatment.

  16. CO2 uit buitenlucht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, van P.A.; Vanthoor, B.H.E.

    2016-01-01

    The supply of additional CO2 in a greenhouse will be restricted in the future. The concentration in outside air has risen above 400 ppm. This may open the possibility to blow this air through the canopy to increase growth. In this project, the vertical CO2 concentration was measured in a vertical

  17. Effect of Injecting Hydrogen Peroxide into Heavy Clay Loam Soil on Plant Water Status, NET CO2 Assimilation, Biomass, and Vascular Anatomy of Avocado Trees Efecto de la Inyección de Peróxido de Hidrógeno en Suelo Franco Arcilloso Pesado, sobre el Estado Hídrico, Asimilación Neta de CO2, Biomasa y Anatomía Vascular de Paltos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M Gil M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In Chile, avocado (Persea americana Mill. orchards are often located in poorly drained, low-oxygen soils, situation which limits fruit production and quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of injecting soil with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 as a source of molecular oxygen, on plant water status, net CO2 assimilation, biomass and anatomy of avocado trees set in clay loam soil with water content maintained at field capacity. Three-year-old ‘Hass’ avocado trees were planted outdoors in containers filled with heavy loam clay soil with moisture content sustained at field capacity. Plants were divided into two treatments, (a H2O2 injected into the soil through subsurface drip irrigation and (b soil with no H2O2 added (control. Stem and root vascular anatomical characteristics were determined for plants in each treatment in addition to physical soil characteristics, net CO2 assimilation (A, transpiration (T, stomatal conductance (gs, stem water potential (SWP, shoot and root biomass, water use efficiency (plant biomass per water applied [WUEb]. Injecting H2O2 into the soil significantly increased the biomass of the aerial portions of the plant and WUEb, but had no significant effect on measured A, T, gs, or SWP. Xylem vessel diameter and xylem/phloem ratio tended to be greater for trees in soil injected with H2O2 than for controls. The increased biomass of the aerial portions of plants in treated soil indicates that injecting H2O2 into heavy loam clay soils may be a useful management tool in poorly aerated soil.En Chile, los huertos de palto (Persea americana Mill. se ubican comúnmente en suelos pobremente drenados con bajo contenido de oxígeno, lo que limita producción y calidad de fruta. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el efecto de la inyección de peróxido de hidrógeno (H2O2 al suelo como fuente de O2, sobre el estado hídrico, asimilación de CO2, biomasa y anatomía de paltos en suelo franco arcilloso con

  18. A review of net metering mechanism for electricity renewable energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas; Kourtis, George; Hadjipaschalis, Ioannis [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, an overview of the net metering mechanism for renewable energy sources for power generation (RES-E) systems is carried out. In particular, the net metering concept is examined with its benefits and misconceptions. Furthermore, a survey of the current operational net metering schemes in different countries in the world, such as, in Europe, USA, Canada, Thailand and Australia, is carried out. The survey indicated that there are different net metering mechanisms depending on the particularities of each country (or state in the case of USA). Especially, in Europe, only five countries are using net metering in a very simple form, such as, any amount of energy produced by the eligible RES-E technology is compensated from the energy consumed by the RES-E producer, which results to either a less overall electricity bill or to an exception in payment energy taxes. In the USA and the USA territories, any customer’s net excess generation is credited to the customer’s next electricity bill for a 12-month billing cycle at various rates or via a combination between rates. The actual type of net excess generation (NEG) credit is decided by a number of set criteria, such as the type of RES-E technology, the RES-E capacity limit, the type of customer and the type of utility. Regarding any excess credit at the end of the 12-month billing cycle, this is either granted to the utilities, or carries over indefinitely to the customer’s next electricity bill, or is reconciled annually at any rate, or provides an option to the customer to choose between the last two options.

  19. Transient nature of CO2 fertilization in arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter C. Oechel; Sid Cowles; Nancy Grulke; Steven J. Hastings; Bill Lawrence; Tom Prudhomme; George Riechers; Boyd Strain; David Tissue; George. Vourlitis

    1994-01-01

    There has been much debate about the effect of increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant net primary production1,3 and on net ecosystem CO2 flux3–10. Apparently conflicting experimental findings could be the result of differences in genetic potential11–15...

  20. Outsourcing CO2 Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. J.; Caldeira, K. G.

    2009-12-01

    CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels are the primary cause of global warming. Much attention has been focused on the CO2 directly emitted by each country, but relatively little attention has been paid to the amount of emissions associated with consumption of goods and services in each country. This consumption-based emissions inventory differs from the production-based inventory because of imports and exports of goods and services that, either directly or indirectly, involved CO2 emissions. Using the latest available data and reasonable assumptions regarding trans-shipment of embodied carbon through third-party countries, we developed a global consumption-based CO2 emissions inventory and have calculated associated consumption-based energy and carbon intensities. We find that, in 2004, 24% of CO2 emissions are effectively outsourced to other countries, with much of the developed world outsourcing CO2 emissions to emerging markets, principally China. Some wealthy countries, including Switzerland and Sweden, outsource over half of their consumption-based emissions, with many northern Europeans outsourcing more than three tons of emissions per person per year. The United States is both a big importer and exporter of emissions embodied in trade, outsourcing >2.6 tons of CO2 per person and at the same time as >2.0 tons of CO2 per person are outsourced to the United States. These large flows indicate that CO2 emissions embodied in trade must be taken into consideration when considering responsibility for increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations.

  1. Time series pCO2 at a coastal mooring: Internal consistency, seasonal cycles, and interannual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Xue, Liang; Vargas, Rodrigo; Noakes, Scott; Hu, Xinping; Signorini, Sergio R.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Feely, Richard A.; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Sabine, Christopher; Musielewicz, Sylvia; Chen, Baoshan; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2017-08-01

    Marine carbonate system monitoring programs often consist of multiple observational methods that include underway cruise data, moored autonomous time series, and discrete water bottle samples. Monitored parameters include all, or some of the following: partial pressure of CO2 of the water (pCO2w) and air, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and pH. Any combination of at least two of the aforementioned parameters can be used to calculate the others. In this study at the Gray's Reef (GR) mooring in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) we: examine the internal consistency of pCO2w from underway cruise, moored autonomous time series, and calculated from bottle samples (DIC-TA pairing); describe the seasonal to interannual pCO2w time series variability and air-sea flux (FCO2), as well as describe the potential sources of pCO2w variability; and determine the source/sink for atmospheric pCO2. Over the 8.5 years of GR mooring time series, mooring-underway and mooring-bottle calculated-pCO2w strongly correlate with r-values > 0.90. pCO2w and FCO2 time series follow seasonal thermal patterns; however, seasonal non-thermal processes, such as terrestrial export, net biological production, and air-sea exchange also influence variability. The linear slope of time series pCO2w increases by 5.2 ± 1.4 μatm y-1 with FCO2 increasing 51-70 mmol m-2 y-1. The net FCO2 sign can switch interannually with the magnitude varying greatly. Non-thermal pCO2w is also increasing over the time series, likely indicating that terrestrial export and net biological processes drive the long term pCO2w increase.

  2. The carbon dioxide system on the Mississippi River-dominated continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico: 1. Distribution and air-sea CO2 flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Jen; Cai, Wei-Jun; Wang, Yongchen; Lohrenz, Steven E; Murrell, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    River-dominated continental shelf environments are active sites of air-sea CO2 exchange. We conducted 13 cruises in the northern Gulf of Mexico, a region strongly influenced by fresh water and nutrients delivered from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River system. The sea surface partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) was measured, and the air-sea CO2 flux was calculated. Results show that CO2 exchange exhibited a distinct seasonality: the study area was a net sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring and early summer, and it was neutral or a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during midsummer, fall, and winter. Along the salinity gradient, across the shelf, the sea surface shifted from a source of CO2 in low-salinity zones (0≤SCO2 sink in the middle-to-high-salinity zones (17≤Smixing processes, dominated pCO2 variation along the salinity gradient. In addition, extreme or unusual weather events were observed to alter the alongshore pCO2 distribution and to affect regional air-sea CO2 flux estimates. Overall, the study region acted as a net CO2 sink of 0.96 ± 3.7 mol m-2 yr-1 (1.15 ± 4.4 Tg C yr-1).

  3. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... the concentration and flux fields against those of a uniform forested surface. We use an atmospheric boundary layer two-equation closure model that accounts for the flow dynamics and vertical divergence of CO2 sources/sinks within a plant canopy. This paper characterizes the spatial variation of CO2 fluxes...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...

  4. The effects of ecological restoration on CO2 fluxes from a climatically marginal upland blanket bog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Simon; Qassim, Suzane; Rowson, James; Worrall, Fred; Evans, Martin

    2013-04-01

    A legacy of gully incision, deposition of industrially-derived aerial pollutants, inappropriate management and wildfire has left large expanses of the topographic Bleaklow Plateau (Peak District National Park, England, UK) bare of vegetation and susceptible to massive erosion of the peat soils. The consequence of such degradation has been to decrease the capacity of the peatland on the plateau to provide important ecosystem services including; loss of net C sink function, discolouration of surface waters, mobilisation to surface waters of stored heavy metals and infilling of upland reservoirs with peat-derived sediment. In response to on-going and worsening degradation a programme of ecological restoration has been undertaken. Restoration methods include: seeding with a lawn grass mix; liming; fertilisation; slope stabilisation; and gully blocking. This talk will present data from a five-year, observational-study of CO2 fluxes from eight sites, with four sites sampling different restoration treatments and four sampling bare and least disturbed areas. The results of the analysis reveal that sites with revegetation alongside slope stabilisation were most productive and were the largest net (daylight hours) sinks of CO2. Unrestored, bare sites, while having relatively low gross fluxes of CO2 were the largest net sources of CO2. Revegetation without slope stabilisation took longer (~18 months) to show an impact on CO2 flux in comparison to the sites with slope stabilisation. Binary logistic regression indicated that a ten centimetre increase in water table depth decreases the odds of observing a net CO2 sink, on a given site, by up to 30%. Sites with slope stabilisation were between 5-8x more likely to be net CO2 sinks than the bare sites. Sites without slope stabilisation were only 2-2.3x more likely to be net CO2 sinks compared to the bare sites. The most important conclusion of this research is that revegetation appears to be effective at increasing the likelihood

  5. Climatic variability, hydrologic anomaly, and methane emission can turn productive freshwater marshes into net carbon sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Housen; Gottgens, Johan F; Chen, Jiquan; Sun, Ge; Desai, Ankur R; Ouyang, Zutao; Shao, Changliang; Czajkowski, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Freshwater marshes are well-known for their ecological functions in carbon sequestration, but complete carbon budgets that include both methane (CH4 ) and lateral carbon fluxes for these ecosystems are rarely available. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first full carbon balance for a freshwater marsh where vertical gaseous [carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and CH4 ] and lateral hydrologic fluxes (dissolved and particulate organic carbon) have been simultaneously measured for multiple years (2011-2013). Carbon accumulation in the sediments suggested that the marsh was a long-term carbon sink and accumulated ~96.9 ± 10.3 (±95% CI) g C m(-2)  yr(-1) during the last ~50 years. However, abnormal climate conditions in the last 3 years turned the marsh to a source of carbon (42.7 ± 23.4 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) ). Gross ecosystem production and ecosystem respiration were the two largest fluxes in the annual carbon budget. Yet, these two fluxes compensated each other to a large extent and led to the marsh being a CO2 sink in 2011 (-78.8 ± 33.6 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) ), near CO2 -neutral in 2012 (29.7 ± 37.2 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) ), and a CO2 source in 2013 (92.9 ± 28.0 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) ). The CH4 emission was consistently high with a three-year average of 50.8 ± 1.0 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) . Considerable hydrologic carbon flowed laterally both into and out of the marsh (108.3 ± 5.4 and 86.2 ± 10.5 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) , respectively). In total, hydrologic carbon fluxes contributed ~23 ± 13 g C m(-2)  yr(-1) to the three-year carbon budget. Our findings highlight the importance of lateral hydrologic inflows/outflows in wetland carbon budgets, especially in those characterized by a flow-through hydrologic regime. In addition, different carbon fluxes responded unequally to climate variability/anomalies and, thus, the total carbon budgets may vary drastically among years. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from CO/CO2/H2/H2O Mixtures: the Source of C in Methanol and the Role of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Mei, Donghai; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, Charles T.

    2013-02-01

    The low temperature (403 – 453K) conversions of CO:hydrogen and CO2:hydrogen mixtures (6 bar total pressure) to methanol over copper catalysts are both assisted by the presence of small amounts of water (mole fraction ~0.04%-0.5%). For CO2:hydrogen reaction mixtures, the water product from both methanol synthesis and reverse water gas shift serves to initiate both reactions in an autocatalytic manner. In the case of CO:D2 mixtures, very little methanol is produced until small amounts of water are added. The effect of water on methanol production is more immediate than in CO2:D2, yet the steady state rates are similar. Tracer experiments in 13CO:12CO2:hydrogen (with or without added water), show that the dominant source of C in the methanol product gradually shifts from CO2 to CO as the temperature is lowered. Cu-bound formate, the major IR visible surface species under CO2:hydrogen, is not visible in CO:moist hydrogen. Though formate is visible in the tracer experiments, the symmetric stretch is absent. These results, in conjunction with recent DFT calculations on Cu(111), point to carboxyl as a common intermediate for both methanol synthesis and reverse water gas shift, with formate playing a spectator co-adsorbate role.

  7. Sources of error and their correction in the measurement of carbon dioxide elimination using the Siemens-Elema CO2 Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, R; Werner, O; Nordström, L; Jonson, B

    1983-02-01

    The Siemens-Elema CO2 Analyzer 930 allows calculation of carbon dioxide elimination from the instantaneous measurement of expired gas flow (VE) and carbon dioxide fraction (FECO2). VE is measured in the ventilator and FECO2 at the Y-piece. The most important source of error in the measurement of carbon dioxide elimination is rebreathing, which corresponds to about 24 ml of end-expiratory gas per breath with the standard Y-piece and tubing. This problem may be decreased by the use of non-return valves in the Y-piece. Allowance must be made for the effects of intermolecular interaction between carbon dioxide and the carrier gas, as the reading is about 20% greater with nitrous oxide than with oxygen. This problem can be largely circumvented by calibration with appropriate gas mixtures. Errors resulting from analyser delay are small, and are eliminated completely by the inclusion of fast electronic components. Carbon dioxide analysis is linear with air as carrier gas, but slightly alinear with nitrous oxide in oxygen mixtures. This error can be minimized by using calibration gases with a carbon dioxide content close to that of expired gas. The expiratory flow meter is linear if kept in good condition. Variations in temperature and water content of expired gas cause overestimation of mean expired carbon dioxide fraction (FECO2) by a factor of 1.01-1.02. Compressed gas in the tubing causes a small error which may be neglected at normal airway pressures with tubing of low compliance. Carbon dioxide measurement is slightly affected by barometric pressure. During mechanical ventilation of the lungs in 10 patients with air, FECO2 obtained after corrections for known errors agreed well with Scholander analysis of mixed expired gas.

  8. CO2 Emission Factors for Coals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Orlović-Leko

    2015-03-01

    (calcite and siderite directly contribute CO2 when they decompose during coal combustion. Variations in the maceral content can also influence CO2 emissions; high inertinite contents increase CO2 emissions. Sulphur in coal reduces EF(CO2. Fuel analysis is very important when estimating greenhouse gas emissions and emission factors. In this preliminary study, based on the results of the fuel analysis, CO2 emission factors for coals and peat from Livno, B&H have been calculated. EF(CO2 is defined as the amount of carbon dioxide emission per unit net calorific values of the fuel. Net calorific value (the lower heating value corresponds to the heat produced by combustion where total water in the combustion products exists as water vapour. The EF(CO2 obtained for sub-bituminous coal, lignite and peat were: 98.7, 109.5, and 147.9 t TJ−1, respectively, which correspond to the following net calorific values: 20.6, 11.5 and 3.6 MJ kg−1. The heating value is generally known to increase with the increase in carbon content (this parameter is connected with the degree of coalification, coal age. The other indispensable parameters are hydrogen, which has a positive effect on the net calorific value, and oxygen and water which impact the net calorific value negatively. The differences in net calorific values can be explained in part by the difference of total moisture content among the different fuel types. The CO2 emission factors calculated in this study were compared with those of IPCC. A significant difference was observed for peat (39.5 %, followed by lignite (8.2 % and sub-bituminous coal (4.3 %.

  9. The CO2nnect activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2014-05-01

    Climate change is one of the biggest challenges we face today. A first step is the understanding the problem, more exactly what is the challenge and the differences people can make. Pupils need a wide competencies to meet the challenges of sustainable development - including climate change. The CO2nnect activities are designed to support learning which can provide pupils the abilities, skills, attitudes and awareness as well as knowledge and understanding of the issues. The project "Together for a clean and healthy world" is part of "The Global Educational Campaign CO2nnect- CO2 on the way to school" and it was held in our school in the period between February and October 2009. It contained a variety of curricular and extra-curricular activities, adapted to students aged from 11 to 15. These activities aimed to develop in students the necessary skills to understanding man's active role in improving the quality of the environment, putting an end to its degrading process and to reducing the effects of climate changes caused by the human intervention in nature, including transport- a source of CO2 pollution. The activity which I propose can be easily adapted to a wide range of age groups and linked to the curricula of many subjects: - Investigate CO2 emissions from travel to school -Share the findings using an international database -Compare and discuss CO2 emissions -Submit questions to a climate- and transport expert -Partner with other schools -Meet with people in your community to discuss emissions from transport Intended learning outcomes for pupils who participate in the CO2nnect campaign are: Understanding of the interconnected mobility- and climate change issue climate change, its causes and consequences greenhouse-gas emissions from transport and mobility the interlinking of social, environmental, cultural and economic aspects of the local transport system how individual choices and participation can contribute to creating a more sustainable development

  10. China's grazed temperate grasslands are a net source of atmospheric methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ping; Song, Yang; Gulledge, Jay; Yu, Qiang; Liu, Hong-Sheng; Han, Xing-Guo

    A budget for the methane (CH 4) cycle in the Xilin River basin of Inner Mongolia is presented. The annual CH 4 budget in this region depends primarily on the sum of atmospheric CH 4 uptake by upland soils, emission from small wetlands, and emission from grazing ruminants (sheep, goats, and cattle). Flux rates for these processes were averaged over multiple years with differing summer rainfall. Although uplands constitute the vast majority of land area, they consume much less CH 4 per unit area than is emitted by wetlands and ruminants. Atmospheric CH 4 uptake by upland soils was -3.3 and -4.8 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1 in grazed and ungrazed areas, respectively. Average CH 4 emission was 791.0 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1 from wetlands and 8.6 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1 from ruminants. The basin area-weighted average of all three processes was 6.8 kg CH 4 ha -1 y -1, indicating that ruminant production has converted this basin to a net source of atmospheric CH 4. The total CH 4 emission from the Xilin River basin was 7.29 Gg CH 4 y -1. The current grazing intensity is about eightfold higher than that which would result in a net zero CH 4 flux. Since grazing intensity has increased throughout western China, it is likely that ruminant production has converted China's grazed temperate grasslands to a net source of atmospheric CH 4 overall.

  11. CO2 flux from Javanese mud volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queißer, M.; Burton, M. R.; Arzilli, F.; Chiarugi, A.; Marliyani, G. I.; Anggara, F.; Harijoko, A.

    2017-06-01

    Studying the quantity and origin of CO2 emitted by back-arc mud volcanoes is critical to correctly model fluid-dynamical, thermodynamical, and geochemical processes that drive their activity and to constrain their role in the global geochemical carbon cycle. We measured CO2 fluxes of the Bledug Kuwu mud volcano on the Kendeng Fold and thrust belt in the back arc of Central Java, Indonesia, using scanning remote sensing absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the expelled gas is rich in CO2 with a volume fraction of at least 16 vol %. A lower limit CO2 flux of 1.4 kg s-1 (117 t d-1) was determined, in line with the CO2 flux from the Javanese mud volcano LUSI. Extrapolating these results to mud volcanism from the whole of Java suggests an order of magnitude total CO2 flux of 3 kt d-1, comparable with the expected back-arc efflux of magmatic CO2. After discussing geochemical, geological, and geophysical evidence we conclude that the source of CO2 observed at Bledug Kuwu is likely a mixture of thermogenic, biogenic, and magmatic CO2, with faulting controlling potential pathways for magmatic fluids. This study further demonstrates the merit of man-portable active remote sensing instruments for probing natural gas releases, enabling bottom-up quantification of CO2 fluxes.

  12. CO2 flux from Javanese mud volcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queißer, M; Burton, M R; Arzilli, F; Chiarugi, A; Marliyani, G I; Anggara, F; Harijoko, A

    2017-06-01

    Studying the quantity and origin of CO2 emitted by back-arc mud volcanoes is critical to correctly model fluid-dynamical, thermodynamical, and geochemical processes that drive their activity and to constrain their role in the global geochemical carbon cycle. We measured CO2 fluxes of the Bledug Kuwu mud volcano on the Kendeng Fold and thrust belt in the back arc of Central Java, Indonesia, using scanning remote sensing absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the expelled gas is rich in CO2 with a volume fraction of at least 16 vol %. A lower limit CO2 flux of 1.4 kg s-1 (117 t d-1) was determined, in line with the CO2 flux from the Javanese mud volcano LUSI. Extrapolating these results to mud volcanism from the whole of Java suggests an order of magnitude total CO2 flux of 3 kt d-1, comparable with the expected back-arc efflux of magmatic CO2. After discussing geochemical, geological, and geophysical evidence we conclude that the source of CO2 observed at Bledug Kuwu is likely a mixture of thermogenic, biogenic, and magmatic CO2, with faulting controlling potential pathways for magmatic fluids. This study further demonstrates the merit of man-portable active remote sensing instruments for probing natural gas releases, enabling bottom-up quantification of CO2 fluxes.

  13. Southern Ocean CO2 sink: the contribution of the sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delille, B.; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    undersaturation while the underlying oceanic waters remains slightly oversaturated. The decrease from winter to summer of pCO2 in the brines is driven by dilution with melting ice, dissolution of carbonate crystals, and net primary production. As the ice warms, its permeability increases, allowing CO2 transfer......We report first direct measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) within Antarctic pack sea ice brines and related CO2 fluxes across the air-ice interface. From late winter to summer, brines encased in the ice change from a CO2 large oversaturation, relative to the atmosphere, to a marked...... at the air-sea ice interface. The sea ice changes from a transient source to a sink for atmospheric CO2. We upscale these observations to the whole Antarctic sea ice cover using the NEMO-LIM3 large-scale sea ice-ocean and provide first esti- mates of spring and summer CO2 uptake from the atmosphere...

  14. Capnography: monitoring CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Georgina

    2015-10-01

    MONITORING RESPIRATORY and metabolic function by using capnography to measure end tidal carbon dioxide is standard practice in anaesthesia. It is also becoming more common in intensive care units and during procedural sedation. End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) monitoring may also be used to assess effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Capnography is now emerging in general medical and surgical wards to monitor respiratory depression in patients using opioid analgesics. Using EtCO2 to monitor respiratory function offers many benefits over pulse oximetry. It is important to understand the differences between these two monitoring methods, and why capnography is increasingly favoured in many situations. An understanding of the physiological processes involved in CO2 excretion allows nurses to use capnography in a safe and meaningful way, while monitoring at-risk patients in acute care.

  15. CO2-strategier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    I 2007 henvendte Lyngby-Taarbæk kommunens Agenda 21 koordinator sig til Videnskabsbutikken og spurgte om der var interesse for at samarbejde om CO2-strategier. Da Videnskabsbutikken DTU er en åben dør til DTU for borgerne og deres organisationer, foreslog Videnskabsbutikken DTU at Danmarks...... Naturfredningsforening’s lokalkomité for Lyngby blev en del af samarbejdet for at få borgerne i kommunen involveret i arbejdet med at udvikle strategier for reduktion af CO2. Siden sommeren 2007 har Videnskabsbutikken DTU, Lyngby-Taarbæk kommune og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening i Lyngby-Taarbæk samarbejdet om analyse...... og innovation i forhold til CO2-strategier....

  16. CO2 cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Timothy N.; Byrne, Shane; Colaprete, Anthony; Forget, Francois; Michaels, Timothy I.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses the use of models, observations, and laboratory experiments to understand the cycling of CO2 between the atmosphere and seasonal Martian polar caps. This cycle is primarily controlled by the polar heat budget, and thus the emphasis here is on its components, including solar and infrared radiation, the effect of clouds (water- and CO2-ice), atmospheric transport, and subsurface heat conduction. There is a discussion about cap properties including growth and regression rates, albedos and emissivities, grain sizes and dust and/or water-ice contamination, and curious features like cold gas jets and araneiform (spider-shaped) terrain. The nature of the residual south polar cap is discussed as well as its long-term stability and ability to buffer atmospheric pressures. There is also a discussion of the consequences of the CO2 cycle as revealed by the non-condensable gas enrichment observed by Odyssey and modeled by various groups.

  17. CO2 Capture by Cement Raw Meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pathi, Sharat Kumar; Lin, Weigang; Illerup, Jytte Boll

    2013-01-01

    The cement industry is one of the major sources of CO2 emissions and is likely to contribute to further increases in the near future. The carbonate looping process has the potential to capture CO2 emissions from the cement industry, in which raw meal for cement production could be used...... as the sorbent. Cyclic experiments were carried out in a TGA apparatus using industrial cement raw meal and synthetic raw meal as sorbents, with limestone as the reference. The results show that the CO2 capture capacities of the cement raw meal and the synthetic raw meal are comparable to those of pure limestone....... The CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the raw meal is lower than for pure limestone. The difference in the CO2 capture capacity decreases with an increase in cycle number. The calcination conditions and composition are major factors that influence the CO2 capture capacity of limestone. At 850 °C in N2...

  18. Bi-reforming of methane from any source with steam and carbon dioxide exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for methanol and hydrocarbon synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Prakash, G K Surya

    2013-01-16

    A catalyst based on nickel oxide on magnesium oxide (NiO/MgO) thermally activated under hydrogen is effective for the bi-reforming with steam and CO(2) (combined steam and dry reforming) of methane as well as natural gas in a tubular flow reactor at elevated pressures (5-30 atm) and temperatures (800-950 °C). By adjusting the CO(2)-to-steam ratio in the gas feed, the H(2)/CO ratio in the produced syn-gas could be easily adjusted in a single step to the desired value of 2 for methanol and hydrocarbon synthesis.

  19. Carbon sequestration by afforestation and revegetation as a means of limiting net-CO2 emissions in Iceland. COST E21 Workshop. Contribution of forests and forestry to mitigate greenhouse effects. Joensuu (Finland. 28-30 Sep 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigurdsson B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Iceland has lost about 95/ of its woodlands and 50/ of its vegetative cover during the 1,100 years of human settlement. Efforts to reclaim lost woodlands and herbaceous ecosystems have been continuing since the early 20th century. It is emphasised that for Icelandic conditions, effective carbon sequestration can be achieved by restoring (reclaiming herbaceous ecosystems on carbon-poor soils. Since 1990, about 4,000 ha per year have been afforested or revegetated. In 1995, the estimated C-sequestration of those areas was 65,100 t CO2, or 2.9/ of the national emissions for that year. In 1999, the estimated sequestration was up in 127,600 t CO2, or 4.7/ of the predicted CO2 emissions for the year 2000.

  20. The ins and outs of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3(-). The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3(-) use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3(-) active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3(-) can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3(-) pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3(-). Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. The ins and outs of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3 –. The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3 – use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3 – active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3 – can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3 – pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3 –. Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  2. Iron-rich Carbonates as the Potential Source of Evolved CO2 Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument in Gale Crater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Stern, J. C.; Mertzman, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected at least 4 distinct CO2 release during the pyrolysis of a sample scooped from the Rocknest (RN) eolian deposit. The highest peak CO2 release temperature (478-502°C) has been attributed to either a Fe-rich carbonate or nano-phase Mg-carbonate. The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the thermal evolved gas analysis (T/EGA) characteristics of a series of terrestrial Fe-rich carbonates under analog SAM operating conditions to compare with the RN CO2 releases. Natural Fe-rich carbonates (Gale Crater and elsewhere on Mars (e.g., Gusev Crater, Meridiani) suggests that up to 1 wt. % Fe-rich carbonate may occur throughout the Gale Crater region and could be widespread on Mars. The Rocknest Fe-carbonate may have formed from the interaction of reduced Fe phases (e.g., Fe2+ bearing olivine) with atmospheric CO2 and transient water. Alternatively, the Rocknest Fe-carbonate could be derived by eolian processes that have eroded distally exposed deep crustal material that possesses Fe-carbonate that may have formed through metamorphic and/or metasomatic processes.

  3. Iron-Rich Carbonates as the Potential Source of Evolved CO2 Detected by the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument in Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, B.; Heil, E.; Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Archer, P. D.; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Franz, H. B.; Glavin, D. P.; McAdam, A. C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument detected at least 4 distinct CO2 release during the pyrolysis of a sample scooped from the Rocknest (RN) eolian deposit. The highest peak CO2 release temperature (478-502 C) has been attributed to either a Fe-rich carbonate or nano-phase Mg-carbonate. The objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the thermal evolved gas analysis (T/EGA) characteristics of a series of terrestrial Fe-rich carbonates under analog SAM operating conditions to compare with the RN CO2 releases. Natural Fe-rich carbonates (Gale Crater and elsewhere on Mars (e.g., Gusev Crater, Meridiani) suggests that up to 1 wt. % Fe-rich carbonate may occur throughout the Gale Crater region and could be widespread on Mars. The Rocknest Fe-carbonate may have formed from the interaction of reduced Fe phases (e.g., Fe2+ bearing olivine) with atmospheric CO2 and transient water. Alternatively, the Rocknest Fe-carbonate could be derived by eolian processes that have eroded distally exposed deep crustal material that possesses Fe-carbonate that may have formed through metamorphic and/or metasomatic processes.

  4. Regional CO2 flux estimates for 2009-2010 based on GOSAT and ground-based CO2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksyutov, S.; Takagi, H.; Valsala, V. K.; Saito, M.; Oda, T.; Saeki, T.; Belikov, D. A.; Saito, R.; Ito, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Morino, I.; Uchino, O.; Andres, R. J.; Yokota, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present the application of a global carbon cycle modeling system to the estimation of monthly regional CO2 fluxes from the column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2) retrieved from spectral observations made by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). The regional flux estimates are to be publicly disseminated as the GOSAT Level 4 data product. The forward modeling components of the system include an atmospheric tracer transport model, an anthropogenic emissions inventory, a terrestrial biosphere exchange model, and an oceanic flux model. The atmospheric tracer transport was simulated using isentropic coordinates in the stratosphere and was tuned to reproduce the age of air. We used a fossil fuel emission inventory based on large point source data and observations of nighttime lights. The terrestrial biospheric model was optimized by fitting model parameters to observed atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle, net primary production data, and a biomass distribution map. The oceanic surface pCO2 distribution was estimated with a 4-D variational data assimilation system based on reanalyzed ocean currents. Monthly CO2 fluxes of 64 sub-continental regions, between June 2009 and May 2010, were estimated from GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals (ver. 02.00) gridded to 5° × 5° cells and averaged on a monthly basis and monthly-mean GLOBALVIEW-CO2 data. Our result indicated that adding the GOSAT XCO2 retrievals to the GLOBALVIEW data in the flux estimation brings changes to fluxes of tropics and other remote regions where the surface-based data are sparse. The uncertainties of these remote fluxes were reduced by as much as 60% through such addition. Optimized fluxes estimated for many of these regions, were brought closer to the prior fluxes by the addition of the GOSAT retrievals. In most of the regions and seasons considered here, the estimated fluxes fell within the range of natural flux variabilities estimated with the component models.

  5. Regional CO2 flux estimates for 2009–2010 based on GOSAT and ground-based CO2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maksyutov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the application of a global carbon cycle modeling system to the estimation of monthly regional CO2 fluxes from the column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 (XCO2 retrieved from spectral observations made by the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. The regional flux estimates are to be publicly disseminated as the GOSAT Level 4 data product. The forward modeling components of the system include an atmospheric tracer transport model, an anthropogenic emissions inventory, a terrestrial biosphere exchange model, and an oceanic flux model. The atmospheric tracer transport was simulated using isentropic coordinates in the stratosphere and was tuned to reproduce the age of air. We used a fossil fuel emission inventory based on large point source data and observations of nighttime lights. The terrestrial biospheric model was optimized by fitting model parameters to observed atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle, net primary production data, and a biomass distribution map. The oceanic surface pCO2 distribution was estimated with a 4-D variational data assimilation system based on reanalyzed ocean currents. Monthly CO2 fluxes of 64 sub-continental regions, between June 2009 and May 2010, were estimated from GOSAT FTS SWIR Level 2 XCO2 retrievals (ver. 02.00 gridded to 5° × 5° cells and averaged on a monthly basis and monthly-mean GLOBALVIEW-CO2 data. Our result indicated that adding the GOSAT XCO2 retrievals to the GLOBALVIEW data in the flux estimation brings changes to fluxes of tropics and other remote regions where the surface-based data are sparse. The uncertainties of these remote fluxes were reduced by as much as 60% through such addition. Optimized fluxes estimated for many of these regions, were brought closer to the prior fluxes by the addition of the GOSAT retrievals. In most of the regions and seasons considered here, the estimated fluxes fell within the range of natural flux variabilities estimated with the component models.

  6. The role of vegetation in the CO2 flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S. H.; Quak, M.; Nabarro, S. D. A.; Norford, L.

    2013-10-01

    Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO2. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is extensive and/or evergreen. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is difficult due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the CO2 flux from a residential neighbourhood in Singapore using two different approaches. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance are compared with emissions estimated from emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should approximate the flux associated with the aboveground vegetation. In addition, a tree survey was conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations and an alternative model of the metabolic theory of ecology for tropical forests. Palm trees, banana plants and turfgrass were also included in the survey with their annual CO2 uptake obtained from published growth rates. Both approaches agree within 2% and suggest that vegetation sequesters 8% of the total emitted CO2 in the residential neighbourhood studied. An uptake of 1.4 ton km-2 day-1 (510 ton km-2 yr-1) was estimated as the difference between assimilation by photosynthesis minus the aboveground biomass respiration during daytime (4.0 ton km-2 day-1) and release by plant respiration at night (2.6 ton km-2 day-1). However, when soil respiration is added to the daily aboveground flux, the biogenic component becomes a net source amounting to 4% of the total CO2 flux and represents the total contribution of urban vegetation to the carbon flux to the atmosphere.

  7. The role of vegetation in the CO2 flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Velasco

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO2. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is extensive and/or evergreen. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is difficult due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the CO2 flux from a residential neighbourhood in Singapore using two different approaches. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance are compared with emissions estimated from emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should approximate the flux associated with the aboveground vegetation. In addition, a tree survey was conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations and an alternative model of the metabolic theory of ecology for tropical forests. Palm trees, banana plants and turfgrass were also included in the survey with their annual CO2 uptake obtained from published growth rates. Both approaches agree within 2% and suggest that vegetation sequesters 8% of the total emitted CO2 in the residential neighbourhood studied. An uptake of 1.4 ton km−2 day−1 (510 ton km−2 yr−1 was estimated as the difference between assimilation by photosynthesis minus the aboveground biomass respiration during daytime (4.0 ton km−2 day−1 and release by plant respiration at night (2.6 ton km−2 day−1. However, when soil respiration is added to the daily aboveground flux, the biogenic component becomes a net source amounting to 4% of the total CO2 flux and represents the total contribution of urban vegetation to the carbon flux to the atmosphere.

  8. The use of open source electronic health records within the federal safety net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwater, Jason C; Kwon, Nancy J; Nathanson, Ashley; Muckle, Alison E; Brown, Alexa; Cornejo, Kerri

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a federally funded study that examines the acquisition, implementation and operation of open source electronic health records (EHR) within safety net medical settings, such as federally qualified health centers (FQHC). The study was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago from April to September 2010. The NORC team undertook a comprehensive environmental scan, including a literature review, a dozen key informant interviews using a semistructured protocol, and a series of site visits to West Virginia, California and Arizona FQHC that were currently using an open source EHR. Five of the six sites that were chosen as part of the study found a number of advantages in the use of their open source EHR system, such as utilizing a large community of users and developers to modify their EHR to fit the needs of their provider and patient communities, and lower acquisition and implementation costs as compared to a commercial system. Despite these advantages, many of the informants and site visit participants felt that widespread dissemination and use of open source was restrained due to a negative connotation regarding this type of software. In addition, a number of participants stated that there is a necessary level of technical acumen needed within the FQHC to make an open source EHR effective. An open source EHR provides advantages for FQHC that have limited resources to acquire and implement an EHR, but additional study is needed to evaluate its overall effectiveness.

  9. Projecting the CO2 and Climatic Change Effects on the Net Primary Productivity of the Urban Ecosystems in Phoenix, AZ in the 21st Century under Multiple RCP (Representative Concentration Pathway) Scenarios

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chunbo Chen; Chi Zhang

    2017-01-01

    .... As a key indicator of ecological health, net primary productivity (NPP) provides valuable information about the performance of urban ecosystem in response to the changes in urban climate and atmosphere in the 21st century...

  10. Anoxic groundwaters as a source of CO2 and PO4 for the coastal southern Baltic Sea: The role of an iron curtain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Marko; Schneider, Jonas; Schmiedinger, Iris; Westphal, Julia; Escher, Peter; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Dellwig, Olaf; Winde, Vera; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2017-04-01

    Submarine ground water discharge (SGD) into coastal ecosystems is perceived as an important source of fresh water and solutes (nutrients, metabolites, trace elements) in marine biogeochemical cycles. Less is known about its significance for the German coastal zone. We present here the results of hydrogeochemical and stable isotope geochemical studies in an area that is affected by SGD into the southern Baltic Sea. Anoxic groundwaters emerging as springs at the shore zone of the southern Baltic Sea are windows into the composition of subterrestrial ground water composition. They were investigated on a seasonal base for about five years. Water samples were analyzed for the concentrations of major and trace elements, pH, and the stable isotope ratios of water, DIC and sulfate. Newly formed precipitates in the stream bed were characterized via SEM-EDX and the stable isotope composition, as well as chemically extracted for the determination of the solid composition. The springs emerge in small pits yielding discharges of about 10 l/min each. Surrounding sediments are sandy with gravels found at depth and corresponding high permeabilities. The positions of different springs on the shore zone were geostationary during the investigation period while their shape varied due to wind- and wave action. The 2H and 18O contents of the spring waters indicate the ground water to originate from relatively young mixed meteoric waters. Dating by means of tritium and noble gases (3H, 3He, 4He, Ne) yields an age of the spring waters of about 25-32 years, with different mixing proportions of tritium-free waters. The springs are hydrogeochemically characterized by dissolved Ca, Mg, Na, bicarbonate, and sulfate, mainly reflecting the water-rock interaction with aquifer material in the recharge area. The isotope signature of DIC indicates the uptake of biogenic CO2 in the soil zone followed by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in the soil/ aquifer system. The oxygen-free ground water is

  11. Coastal CO2 climatology of Oahu, Hawaii: Six years of high resolution time-series data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlouw, G. J.; Drupp, P. S.; De Carlo, E. H.; Tomlinson, M.

    2014-12-01

    Six years of high resolution pCO2, water quality, and meteorological data were used to calculate air-sea CO2 fluxes on yearly, seasonal and monthly timescales, and relate the temporal and spatial variation in CO2 fluxes to meteorological events and land derived inputs. Three MAPCO2 buoys are deployed in coastal waters of Oahu as part of the NOAA/PMEL Carbon Program, that autonomously collects CO2 and water quality data at 3-hour intervals. The buoys are located on a backreef in Kaneohe Bay and two fringing reef sites on Oahu's south shore, the latter two in open ocean like conditions but with one also influenced by fluvial inputs. Data for this study were collected from June 2008 to July 2014. Mean pCO2 values at the Ala Wai, Kilo Nalu and CRIMP2 buoys were 396, 381 and 447μatm, respectively, with mean daily ranges of 51, 32 and 190 μatm, respectively. The daily range in pCO2 is largest at CRIMP2, reflecting a combination of higher primary production and respiration, vigorous calcification and longer water residence time within the barrier reef environment. Net annualized air-sea CO2 fluxes of the entire study period were 0.083, -0.014 and 1.167 mol C m-2 year-1 for Ala Wai, Kilo Nalu and CRIMP2, respectively. Positive values indicate a CO2 flux from the water to the atmosphere (source behavior), and negative values from the atmosphere to the water (sink behavior). This presentation will also discuss the effects physical and biogeochemical processes on the magnitude and variability of air-sea CO2 fluxes. We observe a negative correlation between CO2 flux and rainfall over monthly, seasonal, and annual timescales. This correlation however, can partly be explained by temperature, because increased rainfall is more common during the colder winter months. Nevertheless, rainfall affects CO2 fluxes, both by rain-induced nutrient and organic matter runoff, as well as the physical effect of raindrops on air-sea gas exchange and the dilution of the air-sea boundary layer

  12. Large CO2 and CH4 release from a flooded formerly drained fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, T.; Franz, D.; Koebsch, F.; Larmanou, E.; Augustin, J.

    2016-12-01

    Drained peatlands are usually strong carbon dioxide (CO2) sources. In Germany, up to 4.5 % of the national CO2 emissions are estimated to be released from agriculturally used peatlands and for some peatland-rich northern states, such as Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, this share increases to about 20%. Reducing this CO2 source and restoring the peatlands' natural carbon sink is one objective of large-scale nature protection and restoration measures, in which 37.000 ha of drained and degraded peatlands in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania are slated for rewetting. It is well known, however, that in the initial phase of rewetting, a reduction of the CO2 source strength is usually accompanied by an increase in CH4 emissions. Thus, whether and when the intended effects of rewetting with regard to greenhouse gases are achieved, depends on the balance of CO2 and CH4 fluxes and on the duration of the initial CH4 emission phase. In 2013, a new Fluxnet site went online at a flooded formerly drained river valley fen site near Zarnekow, NE Germany (DE-Zrk), to investigate the combined CO2 and CH4 dynamics at such a heavily degraded and rewetted peatland. The site is dominated by open water with submerged and floating vegetation and surrounding Typha latifolia.Nine year after rewetting, we found large CH4 emissions of 53 g CH4 m-2 a-1 from the open water area, which are 4-fold higher than from the surrounding vegetation zone (13 g CH4 m-2 a-1). Surprisingly, both the open water and the vegetated area were net CO2 sources of 158 and 750 g CO2 m-2 a-1, respectively. Unusual meteorological conditions with a warm and dry summer and a mild winter might have facilitated high respiration rates, particularly from temporally non-inundated organic mud in the vegetation zone.

  13. Quantitative Risk Assessment of CO2 Sequestration in a commerical-scale EOR Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.; Dai, Z.; Jia, W.; Lee, S. Y.; Ampomah, W.; Viswanathan, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    Enhanced Oil Recovery with CO2 (CO2-EOR) is perhaps the most feasible option for geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), if only due to existing infrastructure and economic opportunities of associated oil production. Probably the most significant source of uncertainty of CO2 storage forecasts is heterogeneity of reservoir properties. Quantification of storage forecast uncertainty is critical for accurate assessment of risks associated with GCS in EOR fields. This study employs a response surface methodology (RSM) to quantify uncertainties of CO2 storage associated with oil production in an active CO2-EOR field. Specifically, the Morrow formation, a clastic reservoir within the Farnsworth EOR Unit (FWU) in Texas, was selected as a case study. Four uncertain parameters (i.e., independent variables) are reservoir permeability, anisotropy ratio of permeability, water-alternating-gas (WAG) time ratio, and initial oil saturation. Cumulative oil production and net CO2 injection are the output dependent variables. A 3-D FWU reservoir model, including a representative 5-spot well pattern, was constructed for CO2-oil-water multiphase flow analysis. A total of 25 permutations of 3-D reservoir simulations were executed using Eclipse simulator. After performing stepwise regression analysis, a series of response surface models of the output variables at each step were constructed and verified using appropriate goodness-of-fit measures. The R2 values are larger than 0.9 and NRMSE values are less than 5% between the simulated and predicted oil production and net CO2 injection, suggesting that the response surface (or proxy) models are sufficient for predicting CO2-EOR system behavior for FWU case. Given the range of uncertainties in the independent variables, the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of dependent variables were estimated using the proxy models. The predicted cumulative oil production and net CO2 injection at 95th percentile after 5 years are about 3.65 times, and 1

  14. Non-CO2 Greenhouse Gases: International Emissions and Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA August 2011 report on global non-CO2 emissions projections (1990-2030) for emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases (methane, nitrous oxide, and fluorinated greenhouse gases) from more than twenty emissions sources.

  15. Recent development of capture of CO2

    CERN Document Server

    Chavez, Rosa Hilda

    2014-01-01

    "Recent Technologies in the capture of CO2" provides a comprehensive summary on the latest technologies available to minimize the emission of CO2 from large point sources like fossil-fuel power plants or industrial facilities. This ebook also covers various techniques that could be developed to reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere. The contents of this book include chapters on oxy-fuel combustion in fluidized beds, gas separation membrane used in post-combustion capture, minimizing energy consumption in CO2 capture processes through process integration, characterization and application of structured packing for CO2 capture, calcium looping technology for CO2 capture and many more. Recent Technologies in capture of CO2 is a valuable resource for graduate students, process engineers and administrative staff looking for real-case analysis of pilot plants. This eBook brings together the research results and professional experiences of the most renowned work groups in the CO2 capture field...

  16. Responses of Gmelina arborea, a tropical deciduous tree species, to elevated atmospheric CO2: growth, biomass productivity and carbon sequestration efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasineni, Girish K; Guha, Anirban; Reddy, Attipalli R

    2011-10-01

    The photosynthetic response of trees to rising CO(2) concentrations largely depends on source-sink relations, in addition to differences in responsiveness by species, genotype, and functional group. Previous studies on elevated CO(2) responses in trees have either doubled the gas concentration (>700 μmol mol(-1)) or used single large addition of CO(2) (500-600 μmol mol(-1)). In this study, Gmelina arborea, a fast growing tropical deciduous tree species, was selected to determine the photosynthetic efficiency, growth response and overall source-sink relations under near elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentration (460 μmol mol(-1)). Net photosynthetic rate of Gmelina was ~30% higher in plants grown in elevated CO(2) compared with ambient CO(2)-grown plants. The elevated CO(2) concentration also had significant effect on photochemical and biochemical capacities evidenced by changes in F(V)/F(M), ABS/CSm, ET(0)/CSm and RuBPcase activity. The study also revealed that elevated CO(2) conditions significantly increased absolute growth rate, above ground biomass and carbon sequestration potential in Gmelina which sequestered ~2100 g tree(-1) carbon after 120 days of treatment when compared to ambient CO(2)-grown plants. Our data indicate that young Gmelina could accumulate significant biomass and escape acclimatory down-regulation of photosynthesis due to high source-sink capacity even with an increase of 100 μmo lmol(-1) CO(2). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CO2 and CH4 fluxes across a Nuphar lutea (L. Sm. stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. Neubauer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Floating-leaved rhizophytes can significantly alter net carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 exchanges with the atmosphere in freshwater shallow environments. In particular, CH4 efflux can be enhanced by the aerenchyma-mediated mass flow, while CO2 release from supersaturated waters can be reversed by the plant uptake. Additionally, the floating leaves bed can hamper light penetration and oxygen (O2 diffusion from the atmosphere, thus altering the dissolved gas dynamics in the water column. In this study, net fluxes of CO2 and CH4 were measured seasonally across vegetated [Nuphar lutea (L. Sm.] and free water surfaces in the Busatello wetland (Northern Italy. Concomitantly, dissolved gas concentrations were monitored in the water column and N. lutea leaf production was estimated by means of biomass harvesting. During the vegetative period (May-August, the yellow waterlily stand resulted a net sink for atmospheric carbon (from 97.5 to 110.6 g C-CO2 m-2, while the free water surface was a net carbon source (166.3 g C-CO2 m-2. Both vegetated and plant-free areas acted as CH4 sources, with an overall carbon release comprised between 71.6 and 113.3 g C-CH4 m-2. On the whole, water column chemistry was not affected by the presence of the floating leaves; moreover, no significant differences in CH4 efflux were evidenced between the vegetated and plant-free areas. In general, this study indicates that the colonization of shallow aquatic ecosystems by N. lutea might not have the same drastic effect reported for free-floating macrophytes.

  18. Shadow netWorkspace: An open source intranet for learning communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Laffey

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Shadow netWorkspace (SNS is a web application system that allows a school or any type of community to establish an intranet with network workspaces for all members and groups. The goal of SNS has been to make it easy for schools and other educational organizations to provide network services in support of implementing a learning community. SNS is open source software using the GNU General Public License (GPL. The software is freely available, and can be downloaded and distributed under the terms of the GPL. SNS is an ongoing project and this instructional development report describes the system, some ways that it is being used, and some key lessons learned from the development and initial deployment of SNS.

  19. Nitrogen Limitation is Reducing the Enhancement of NPP by Elevated CO2 in a Deciduous Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, R. J.; Warren, J. M.; Iversen, C. M.; Medlyn, B. E.; McMurtrie, R. E.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2008-12-01

    Accurate model representation of the long-term response of forested ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is important for predictions of future concentrations of CO2. For biogeochemical models that predict the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to eCO2, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments provide the only source of data for comparison. A synthesis of forest FACE experiments reported a 23% increase in NPP in eCO2, and this result has been used as a model benchmark. Here, we provide new evidence from a FACE experiment in a deciduous forest in Tennessee that N limitation has significantly reduced the stimulation of NPP by eCO2, consistent with predictions from ecosystem and global models that incorporate N feedbacks. The Liquidambar styraciflua stand has been exposed to current ambient atmospheric CO2 or air enriched with CO2 to 550 ppm since 1998. Results from the first 6 years of the experiment indicated that NPP was significantly enhanced by eCO2 and that this was a consistent and sustained response. Now, with 10 years of data, our analysis must be revised. The response of NPP to eCO2 has declined from 24% in 2001-2003 to 9% in 2007. The diminishing response to eCO2 since 2004 coincides with declining NPP in ambient CO2 plots. Productivity of this forest stand is limited by N availability, and the steady decline in forest NPP is closely related to changes in the N economy, as evidenced by declining foliar N concentrations. There is a strong linear relationship between foliar [N] and NPP, and the steeper slope in eCO2 indicates that the NPP response to eCO2 should diminish as foliar N declines. Increased fine-root production and root proliferation deeper in the soil have sustained N uptake, but not to an extent sufficient to benefit aboveground production. The mechanistic basis of the N effect on NPP resides in the photosynthetic machinery. The linear relationships between Jmax and Vcmax with foliar [N] did not change from 1998

  20. Nitrogen Limitation is Reducing the Enhancement of NPP by Elevated CO2 in a Deciduous Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Medlyn, Belinda [Macquarie University; McMurtrie, Ross [University of New South Wales; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Accurate model representation of the long-term response of forested ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (eCO2) is important for predictions of future concentrations of CO2. For biogeochemical models that predict the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to eCO2, free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments provide the only source of data for comparison. A synthesis of forest FACE experiments reported a 23% increase in NPP in eCO2, and this result has been used as a model benchmark. Here, we provide new evidence from a FACE experiment in a deciduous forest in Tennessee that N limitation has significantly reduced the stimulation of NPP by eCO2, consistent with predictions from ecosystem and global models that incorporate N feedbacks. The Liquidambar styraciflua stand has been exposed to current ambient atmospheric CO2 or air enriched with CO2 to 550 ppm since 1998. Results from the first 6 years of the experiment indicated that NPP was significantly enhanced by eCO2 and that this was a consistent and sustained response. Now, with 10 years of data, our analysis must be revised. The response of NPP to eCO2 has declined from 24% in 2001-2003 to 9% in 2007. The diminishing response to eCO2 since 2004 coincides with declining NPP in ambient CO2 plots. Productivity of this forest stand is limited by N availability, and the steady decline in forest NPP is closely related to changes in the N economy, as evidenced by declining foliar N concentrations. There is a strong linear relationship between foliar [N] and NPP, and the steeper slope in eCO2 indicates that the NPP response to eCO2 should diminish as foliar N declines. Increased fine-root production and root proliferation deeper in the soil have sustained N uptake, but not to an extent sufficient to benefit aboveground production. The mechanistic basis of the N effect on NPP resides in the photosynthetic machinery. The linear relationships between Jmax and Vcmax with foliar [N] did not change from 1998

  1. Sustained effects of atmospheric [CO2] and nitrogen availability on forest soil CO2 efflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Christopher Oishi; Sari Palmroth; Kurt H. Johnsen; Heather R. McCarthy; Ram. Oren

    2014-01-01

    Soil CO2 efflux (Fsoil) is the largest source of carbon from forests and reflects primary productivity as well as how carbon is allocated within forest ecosystems. Through early stages of stand development, both elevated [CO2] and availability of soil nitrogen (N; sum of mineralization, deposition, and fixation) have been shown to increase gross primary productivity,...

  2. Using WordNet synonym substitution to enhance UMLS source integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Chuan; Geller, James; Halper, Michael; Perl, Yehoshua; Xu, Junchuan

    2009-06-01

    Synonym-substitution algorithms have been developed for the purpose of matching source vocabulary terms with existing Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) terms during the integration process. A drawback is the possible explosion in the number of newly generated (potential) synonyms, which can tax computational and expert review resources. Experiments are run using a synonym-substitution approach based on WordNet to see how constraining two methodological parameters, namely, "maximum number of substitutions per term" and "maximum term length," affects performance. Our hypothesis is that these values can be constrained rather tightly--thus greatly speeding up the methodology--without a marked decline in the additional matches produced. Furthermore, we investigate whether a limitation on only the first of the two parameters is sufficient to achieve the same results. A four-stage synonym-substitution methodology using WordNet is presented. A group of experiments is carried out in which the two methodological parameters "maximum number of substitutions per term" and "maximum term length" are varied. The purpose is to examine their effect on the growth in the number of potential synonyms generated and the associated loss of results. The experiments are based on the re-integration of the "Minimal Standard Terminology" (MST) into the UMLS. Synonym-substitution matches found to be inconsistent with the current content of the UMLS and thus deemed to be incorrect are further manually scrutinized as an audit of the original integration of the MST. An increase of 11% in the number of "MST term/UMLS term" matches was achieved using the synonym-substitution methodology. Importantly, this result prevailed when tight threshold values (such as a maximum of two synonym substitutions per term) were imposed on the parameters. Furthermore, it was found that limiting only the "maximum number of substitutions per term" parameter was sufficient to obtain the performance enhancement

  3. A very high-resolution (1 km×1 km global fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory derived using a point source database and satellite observations of nighttime lights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maksyutov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of CO2 from fossil fuel combustion are a critical quantity that must be accurately given in established flux inversion frameworks. Work with emerging satellite-based inversions requires spatiotemporally-detailed inventories that permit analysis of regional natural sources and sinks. Conventional approaches for disaggregating national emissions beyond the country and city levels based on population distribution have certain difficulties in their application. We developed a global 1 km×1 km annual fossil fuel CO2 emission inventory for the years 1980–2007 by combining a worldwide point source database and satellite observations of the global nightlight distribution. In addition to estimating the national emissions using global energy consumption statistics, emissions from point sources were estimated separately and were spatially allocated to exact locations indicated by the point source database. Emissions from other sources were distributed using a special nightlight dataset that had fewer saturated pixels compared with regular nightlight datasets. The resulting spatial distributions differed in several ways from those derived using conventional population-based approaches. Because of the inherent characteristics of the nightlight distribution, source regions corresponding to human settlements and land transportation were well articulated. Our distributions showed good agreement with a high-resolution inventory across the US at spatial resolutions that were adequate for regional flux inversions. The inventory can be extended to the future using updated data, and is expected to be incorporated into models for operational flux inversions that use observational data from the Japanese Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT.

  4. Toward verifying fossil fuel CO2 emissions with the CMAQ model: motivation, model description and initial simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P; Pinto, Joseph P; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A

    2014-04-01

    Motivated by the question of whether and how a state-of-the-art regional chemical transport model (CTM) can facilitate characterization of CO2 spatiotemporal variability and verify CO2 fossil-fuel emissions, we for the first time applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to simulate CO2. This paper presents methods, input data, and initial results for CO2 simulation using CMAQ over the contiguous United States in October 2007. Modeling experiments have been performed to understand the roles of fossil-fuel emissions, biosphere-atmosphere exchange, and meteorology in regulating the spatial distribution of CO2 near the surface over the contiguous United States. Three sets of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) fluxes were used as input to assess the impact of uncertainty of NEE on CO2 concentrations simulated by CMAQ. Observational data from six tall tower sites across the country were used to evaluate model performance. In particular, at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO), a tall tower site that receives urban emissions from Denver CO, the CMAQ model using hourly varying, high-resolution CO2 fossil-fuel emissions from the Vulcan inventory and Carbon Tracker optimized NEE reproduced the observed diurnal profile of CO2 reasonably well but with a low bias in the early morning. The spatial distribution of CO2 was found to correlate with NO(x), SO2, and CO, because of their similar fossil-fuel emission sources and common transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the potential of using a regional CTM to help interpret CO2 observations and understand CO2 variability in space and time. The ability to simulate a full suite of air pollutants in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of their use as tracers for CO2 source attribution. This work serves as a proof of concept and the foundation for more comprehensive examinations of CO2 spatiotemporal variability and various uncertainties in the future. Atmospheric CO2 has long been modeled

  5. Distribution of sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Patagonian Sea: Seasonal, biological and thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Lucía C.; Bianchi, Alejandro A.; Osiroff, Ana Paula; Pino, Diana Ruiz; Piola, Alberto R.

    2017-07-01

    Sea-air CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in the Patagonian Sea (PS) were studied using observations collected in 2000-2006. Based on the PS frontal structures and the thermal and biological contributions to FCO2 we present a regional subdivision between distinct regimes that provide new insights on the processes that control these fluxes. The coastal regime (CR) is a net source of atmospheric CO2 (4.9 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1) while the open shelf regime (SHR) is a net CO2 sink (-6.0 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1). The interface between these two regions closely follows the location of along-shore fronts. In addition, based on the nature of the processes that drive the FCO2, the PS is subdivided between northern (NR) and southern (SR) regions. Both, NR and SR are CO2 sinks, but the CO2 uptake is significantly higher in NR (-6.4 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1) than in SR (-0.5 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1). The data reveal a strong seasonality in FCO2. The mean CO2 capture throughout the PS in austral spring is -5.8 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1, reaching values lower than -50 × 10-3 mol m-2 d-1 in NR, while in winter FCO2 is close to equilibrium in SR. The analysis of the biological and thermal effects (BE and TE, respectively) on seasonal pCO2 variability indicates that regions of CO2 emission are dominated by the TE while regions of CO2 uptake are dominated by the BE. Our results indicate that the biological pump is the dominant process determining the sea-air CO2 flux in the PS.

  6. Sensitivity of the boreal forest-mire ecotone CO2, CH4, and N2O global warming potential to rainy and dry weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ťupek, Boris; Minkkinen, Kari; Vesala, Timo; Nikinmaa, Eero

    2015-04-01

    In a mosaic of well drained forests and poorly drained mires of boreal landscape the weather events such as drought and rainy control greenhouse gas dynamics and ecosystem global warming potential (GWP). In forest-mire ecotone especially in ecosystems where CO2 sink is nearly balanced with CO2 source, it's fairly unknown whether the net warming effect of emissions of gases with strong radiative forcing (CH4 and N2O) could offset the net cooling effect of CO2 sequestration. We compared the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) estimated from the carbon sequestrations of forest stands and forest floor CO2 fluxes against CH4 and N2O fluxes of nine forest/mire site types along the soil moisture gradient in Finland. The ground water of nine sites changed between 10 m in upland forests and 0.1 m in mires, and weather during three years ranged between exceptionally wet and dry for the local climate. The NEE of upland forests was typically a sink of CO2, regardless the weather. Though, xeric pine forest was estimated to be a source of CO2 during wet and intermediate year and became a weak sink only in dry year. The NEE of forest-mire transitions ranged between a sink in dry year, while increased stand carbon sequestration could offset the reduced forest floor CO2 emission, and a source in wet year. The NEE of two sparsely forested mires strongly differed. The lawn type mire was balanced around zero and the hummock type mire was relatively strong NEE sink, regardless the weather. Generally, nearly zero N2O emission could not offset the cooling effect of net CH4 sink and net CO2 sink of upland forest and forest-mire transitions. However in sparsely forested mires, with N2O emission also nearly zero, the CH4 emission during wet and intermediate year played important role in turning the net cooling effect of NEE into a net warming. When evaluating GWP of boreal landscapes, undisturbed forest-mire transitions should be regarded as net cooling ecosystems instead of hotspots of net

  7. Anomalously Low pCO2 Measured in the San Francisco Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, J. R.; Wilkerson, F.; Parker, A. E.; Marchi, A.

    2008-12-01

    Estuaries have been identified as potential net sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. Bacterial respiration of organic matter entering the estuary leads to supersaturated levels of pCO2. The southern embayment of the San Francisco Estuary (SFE) is no exception due in part to wastewater treatment practices. Persistently high levels of pCO2 between 600 and 1000 μatm have been reported for this embayment by the U.S. Geological Survey over the period 1976-1980 and more recently (2007-2008) by the authors. However, both studies also found notable exceptions to the high pCO2 levels during the spring phytoplankton bloom. An average level of 375 μatm, slightly above the contemporary atmospheric level, was observed during an April 1980 transect. Our recent measurements over the same transect have observed an even greater drawdown of pCO2 to as low as 175 μatm. In addition the pCO2 drawdown persisted from early March 2008 until the end of May. These anomalously low levels correspond directly with an algal bloom as evidenced by high concentrations of chlorophyll a and supersaturated dissolved oxygen. To our knowledge these are the lowest levels reported for the SFE and they indicate that portions of the estuary are a sink for atmospheric CO2 during bloom conditions. The hydrology of the southern embayment is dominated at times by the input of wastewater which is often treated to the advanced secondary level with inorganic nitrate as the product. This possibly contributes to a healthy estuarine algal population that helps to maintain current pCO2 levels in the SFE to those of 30 years ago despite significant urban growth around the estuary over that period. These findings have major implications both to estuarine management and to estimates of the estuarine component in global air-sea CO2 exchange

  8. Toward Verifying Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions with the CMAQ Model: Motivation, Model Description and Initial Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P.; Pinto, Joseph P.; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2014-03-14

    Motivated by the urgent need for emission verification of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, we have developed regional CO2 simulation with CMAQ over the contiguous U.S. Model sensitivity experiments have been performed using three different sets of inputs for net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and two fossil fuel emission inventories, to understand the roles of fossil fuel emissions, atmosphere-biosphere exchange and transport in regulating the spatial and diurnal variability of CO2 near the surface, and to characterize the well-known ‘signal-to-noise’ problem, i.e. the interference from the biosphere on the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 observations. It is found that differences in the meteorological conditions for different urban areas strongly contribute to the contrast in concentrations. The uncertainty of NEE, as measured by the difference among the three different NEE inputs, has notable impact on regional distribution of CO2 simulated by CMAQ. Larger NEE uncertainty and impact are found over eastern U.S. urban areas than along the western coast. A comparison with tower CO2 measurements at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) shows that the CMAQ model using hourly varied and high-resolution CO2 emission from the Vulcan inventory and CarbonTracker optimized NEE reasonably reproduce the observed diurnal profile, whereas switching to different NEE inputs significantly degrades the model performance. Spatial distribution of CO2 is found to correlate with NOx, SO2 and CO, due to their similarity in emission sources and transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the power of a state-of-the art CTM in helping interpret CO2 observations and verify fossil fuel emissions. The ability to simulate CO2 in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of the utility of traditionally regulated pollutants and other species as tracers to CO2 source attribution.

  9. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion - 2012 Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Doha, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2010; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; and CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information.

  10. CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion 2011: Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    How much CO2 are countries emitting? Where is it coming from? In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Durban, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process the IEA is making available for free download the 'Highlights' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion. This annual publication contains: - estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2009; - selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; - CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information. These estimates have been calculated using the IEA energy databases and the default methods and emission factors from the Revised 1996 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories.

  11. Harvesting Energy from CO2 Emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamelers, H.V.M.; Schaetzle, O.; Paz-García, J.M.; Biesheuvel, P.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2014-01-01

    When two fluids with different compositions are mixed, mixing energy is released. This holds true for both liquids and gases, though in the case of gases, no technology is yet available to harvest this energy source. Mixing the CO2 in combustion gases with air represents a source of energy with a

  12. Can elevated CO(2) improve salt tolerance in olive trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Juan Carlos; Syvertsen, James P; García-Sánchez, Francisco

    2008-04-18

    We compared growth, leaf gas exchange characteristics, water relations, chlorophyll fluorescence, and Na(+) and Cl(-) concentration of two cultivars ('Koroneiki' and 'Picual') of olive (Olea europaea L.) trees in response to high salinity (NaCl 100mM) and elevated CO(2) (eCO(2)) concentration (700microLL(-1)). The cultivar 'Koroneiki' is considered to be more salt sensitive than the relatively salt-tolerant 'Picual'. After 3 months of treatment, the 9-month-old cuttings of 'Koroneiki' had significantly greater shoot growth, and net CO(2) assimilation (A(CO(2))) at eCO(2) than at ambient CO(2), but this difference disappeared under salt stress. Growth and A(CO(2)) of 'Picual' did not respond to eCO(2) regardless of salinity treatment. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) and leaf transpiration were decreased at eCO(2) such that leaf water use efficiency (WUE) increased in both cultivars regardless of saline treatment. Salt stress increased leaf Na(+) and Cl(-) concentration, reduced growth and leaf osmotic potential, but increased leaf turgor compared with non-salinized control plants of both cultivars. Salinity decreased A(CO(2)), g(s), and WUE, but internal CO(2) concentrations in the mesophyll were not affected. eCO(2) increased the sensitivity of PSII and chlorophyll concentration to salinity. eCO(2) did not affect leaf or root Na(+) or Cl(-) concentrations in salt-tolerant 'Picual', but eCO(2) decreased leaf and root Na(+) concentration and root Cl(-) concentration in the more salt-sensitive 'Koroneiki'. Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulation was associated with the lower water use in 'Koroneiki' but not in 'Picual'. Although eCO(2) increased WUE in salinized leaves and decreased salt ion uptake in the relatively salt-tolerant 'Koroneiki', growth of these young olive trees was not affected by eCO(2).

  13. Biological soil crusts as key drivers for CO2 fluxes in semiarid ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Miralles, Isabel; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Ortega, Raúl; Ladrón de Guevara, Mónica; Luna, Lourdes; Cantón, Yolanda

    2014-05-01

    The quantification of carbon (C) fluxes for the different ecosystems and the knowledge of whether they act as sources or sinks of C has acquired especial importance during the last years. This is particularly demanding for arid and semiarid ecosystems, for which the available information is very scarce. In these ecosystems, the interplant spaces are commonly covered by a thin layer of organisms including cyanobacteria, green algae, lichens and mosses, which are known as biological soil crusts (BSCs) and, though practically negligible, play a fundamental role in regulating gas exchange into and from soil. BSCs represent the main organisms capable of respiration and photosynthesis in the interplant spaces and are considered the main source of organic carbon in many arid and semiarid areas. Although several studies have pointed to the predominant role of BSCs as sources of CO2, on the contrary, other studies have emphasized their important role as sinks of CO2, being required to establish their precise effect regulating CO2 fluxes. The main purpose of this study was to enlighten the role of BSCs on CO2 fluxes. With this aim, CO2 fluxes were measured on different BSC types (cyanobacteria-, lichen- and moss-dominated BSCs) after several rainfalls and periods of soil drying in two semiarid ecosystems of SE Spain. CO2 exchange was measured using infrared gas analyzers (IRGA): net flux was measured with a transparent custom chamber attached to a Licor Li-6400, and respiration with a respirometer EGM-4 (PPsystems). Photosynthesis was determined as the difference between both measurements. Our results showed that moisture was the major factor controlling CO2 fluxes in BSCs. During the summer season, when soil was dry, all BSCs showed CO2 fluxes close to 0. However, once it rains and BSCs become active, a significant increase in photosynthesis and respiration rates was found. Whereas respiration was the main CO2 flux in bare soils, in BSCs regardless respiration was higher

  14. CO2-Water-Rock Wettability: Variability, Influencing Factors, and Implications for CO2Geostorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglauer, Stefan

    2017-05-16

    Carbon geosequestration (CGS) has been identified as a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and thus significantly mitigate climate change. In CGS, CO 2 is captured from large point-source emitters (e.g., coal fired power stations), purified, and injected deep underground into geological formations for disposal. However, the CO 2 has a lower density than the resident formation brine and thus migrates upward due to buoyancy forces. To prevent the CO 2 from leaking back to the surface, four trapping mechanisms are used: (1) structural trapping (where a tight caprock acts as a seal barrier through which the CO 2 cannot percolate), (2) residual trapping (where the CO 2 plume is split into many micrometer-sized bubbles, which are immobilized by capillary forces in the pore network of the rock), (3) dissolution trapping (where CO 2 dissolves in the formation brine and sinks deep into the reservoir due to a slight increase in brine density), and (4) mineral trapping (where the CO 2 introduced into the subsurface chemically reacts with the formation brine or reservoir rock or both to form solid precipitates). The efficiency of these trapping mechanisms and the movement of CO 2 through the rock are strongly influenced by the CO 2 -brine-rock wettability (mainly due to the small capillary-like pores in the rock which form a complex network), and it is thus of key importance to rigorously understand CO 2 -wettability. In this context, a substantial number of experiments have been conducted from which several conclusions can be drawn: of prime importance is the rock surface chemistry, and hydrophilic surfaces are water-wet while hydrophobic surfaces are CO 2 -wet. Note that CO 2 -wet surfaces dramatically reduce CO 2 storage capacities. Furthermore, increasing pressure, salinity, or dissolved ion valency increases CO 2 -wettability, while the effect of temperature is not well understood. Indeed theoretical understanding of CO 2 -wettability and the

  15. Sustainable Process Networks for CO2 Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Kongpanna, P.; Pavarajam, V.

    that are thermodynamically feasible, including the co-reactants, catalysts, operating conditions and reactions. Research has revealed that there are a variety of reactions that fulfill the aforementioned criteria. The products that are formed fall into categories: fuels, bulk chemicals and specialty chemicals. While fuels...... the emissions is the conversion of CO2 into useful products, such as methanol [3]. In this work, through a computer-aided framework for process network synthesis-design, a network of feasible conversion processes that all use emitted CO2 is investigated. CO2 is emitted into the environment from various sources......, such as methanol (MeOH) have the largest market, this network will include a variety of thermodynamically feasible conversion paths [4]. From reviews of work previously done, there are ranges of possible products that are formed from CO2 and another co-reactant directly. Methanol, dimethyl ether, dimethyl...

  16. CO2 emissions in the steel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kundak

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Global CO2 emissions caused by the burning of fossil fuels over the past century are presented. Taking into consideration the total world production of more than 1,3 billion tons of steel, the steel industry produces over two billion tons of CO2. Reductions in CO2 emissions as a result of technological improvements and structural changes in steel production in industrialized countries during the past 40 years are described. Substantial further reductions in those emissions will not be possible using conventional technologies. Instead, a radical cutback may be achieved if, instead of carbon, hydrogen is used for direct iron ore reduction. The cost and the ensuing CO2 generation in the production of hydrogen as a reducing agent from various sources are analysed.

  17. Measurements of CO 2 fluxes from the Mexico City urban landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Erik; Pressley, Shelley; Allwine, Eugene; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian

    In a densely populated section of Mexico City, an eddy covariance (EC) flux system was deployed on a tall urban tower to obtain direct measurements of CO 2 emissions from an urban neighborhood located in a subtropical megacity. The measured fluxes and boundary layer conditions satisfy EC assumptions of stationarity, and cospectral analyses of the turbulence measurements exhibit the required boundary layer patterns for acceptable flux measurements. Results from a field experiment conducted during April 2003 show that the urban surface is a net source of CO 2. The CO 2 flux measurements showed a clear diurnal pattern, with the highest emissions during the morning (up to 1.60 mg m -2 s -1), and the lowest emissions during nighttime. The measured fluxes were closely correlated to traffic patterns in the area. The mean daily flux was 0.41 mg m -2 s -1, which is similar to that observed in European and US cities.

  18. Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

    2010-06-16

    This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporation’s Econamine Plus™ carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOE’s Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately

  19. Ocean-Atmosphere CO2 Fluxes in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre: Association with Biochemical and Physical Factors during Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Burgos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 was measured continuously in a transect of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre between Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (18.1° N, 68.5° W and Vigo, Spain (41.9° N, 11.8° W during spring 2011. Additional biogeochemical and physical variables measured to identify factors controlling the surface pCO2 were analyzed in discrete samples collected at 16 sites along the transect at the surface and to a depth of 200 m. Sea surface pCO2 varied between 309 and 662 μatm, and showed differences between the western and eastern subtropical gyre. The subtropical gyre acted as a net CO2 sink, with a mean flux of −5.5 ± 2.2 mmol m−2 day−1. The eastern part of the transect, close to the North Atlantic Iberian upwelling off the Galician coast, was a CO2 source with an average flux of 33.5 ± 9.0 mmol m−2 day−1. Our results highlight the importance of making more surface pCO2 observations in the area located east of the Azores Islands since air-sea CO2 fluxes there are poorly studied.

  20. Global CO2 fluxes estimated from GOSAT retrievals of total column CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present one of the first estimates of the global distribution of CO2 surface fluxes using total column CO2 measurements retrieved by the SRON-KIT RemoTeC algorithm from the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT. We derive optimized fluxes from June 2009 to December 2010. We estimate fluxes from surface CO2 measurements to use as baselines for comparing GOSAT data-derived fluxes. Assimilating only GOSAT data, we can reproduce the observed CO2 time series at surface and TCCON sites in the tropics and the northern extra-tropics. In contrast, in the southern extra-tropics GOSAT XCO2 leads to enhanced seasonal cycle amplitudes compared to independent measurements, and we identify it as the result of a land–sea bias in our GOSAT XCO2 retrievals. A bias correction in the form of a global offset between GOSAT land and sea pixels in a joint inversion of satellite and surface measurements of CO2 yields plausible global flux estimates which are more tightly constrained than in an inversion using surface CO2 data alone. We show that assimilating the bias-corrected GOSAT data on top of surface CO2 data (a reduces the estimated global land sink of CO2, and (b shifts the terrestrial net uptake of carbon from the tropics to the extra-tropics. It is concluded that while GOSAT total column CO2 provide useful constraints for source–sink inversions, small spatiotemporal biases – beyond what can be detected using current validation techniques – have serious consequences for optimized fluxes, even aggregated over continental scales.

  1. Acid rain mitigation experiment shifts a forested watershed from a net sink to a net source of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi-Marshall, Emma J; Bernhardt, Emily S; Buso, Donald C; Driscoll, Charles T; Likens, Gene E

    2016-07-05

    Decades of acid rain have acidified forest soils and freshwaters throughout montane forests of the northeastern United States; the resulting loss of soil base cations is hypothesized to be responsible for limiting rates of forest growth throughout the region. In 1999, an experiment was conducted that reversed the long-term trend of soil base cation depletion and tested the hypothesis that calcium limits forest growth in acidified soils. Researchers added 1,189 kg Ca(2+) ha(-1) as the pelletized mineral wollastonite (CaSiO3) to a 12-ha forested watershed within the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Significant increases in the pH and acid-neutralizing capacity of soils and streamwater resulted, and the predicted increase in forest growth occurred. An unanticipated consequence of this acidification mitigation experiment began to emerge a decade later, with marked increases in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) exports in streamwater from the treated watershed. By 2013, 30-times greater DIN was exported from this base-treated watershed than from adjacent reference watersheds, and DIN exports resulting from this experiment match or exceed earlier reports of inorganic N losses after severe ice-storm damage within the study watershed. The discovery that CaSiO3 enrichment can convert a watershed from a sink to a source of N suggests that numerous potential mechanisms drive watershed N dynamics and provides new insights into the influence of acid deposition mitigation strategies for both carbon cycling and watershed N export.

  2. Comparison of Dry Gas Seasonal Storage with CO2 Storage and Re-Use Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Killerud, Marie

    2013-01-01

    To make large-scale CO2 storage economic, many groups have proposed using CO2in EOR projects to create value for CO2 storage. However, CO2 EOR projectsgenerally require a large and variable supply of CO2 and consequently may requiretemporary storage of CO2 in geological formations. In order to store CO2 atoffshore sites as a source for CO2 EOR projects, the CO2 needs to be extractedfrom a storage site to a certain extent. Alternatively, CO2 EOR projects maybe developed alongside saline aquife...

  3. Forecasting global atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustí-Panareda, A.; Massart, S.; Chevallier, F.; Boussetta, S.; Balsamo, G.; Beljaars, A.; Ciais, P.; Deutscher, N. M.; Engelen, R.; Jones, L.; Kivi, R.; Paris, J.-D.; Peuch, V.-H.; Sherlock, V.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wunch, D.

    2014-11-01

    A new global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) real-time forecast is now available as part of the pre-operational Monitoring of Atmospheric Composition and Climate - Interim Implementation (MACC-II) service using the infrastructure of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Integrated Forecasting System (IFS). One of the strengths of the CO2 forecasting system is that the land surface, including vegetation CO2 fluxes, is modelled online within the IFS. Other CO2 fluxes are prescribed from inventories and from off-line statistical and physical models. The CO2 forecast also benefits from the transport modelling from a state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction (NWP) system initialized daily with a wealth of meteorological observations. This paper describes the capability of the forecast in modelling the variability of CO2 on different temporal and spatial scales compared to observations. The modulation of the amplitude of the CO2 diurnal cycle by near-surface winds and boundary layer height is generally well represented in the forecast. The CO2 forecast also has high skill in simulating day-to-day synoptic variability. In the atmospheric boundary layer, this skill is significantly enhanced by modelling the day-to-day variability of the CO2 fluxes from vegetation compared to using equivalent monthly mean fluxes with a diurnal cycle. However, biases in the modelled CO2 fluxes also lead to accumulating errors in the CO2 forecast. These biases vary with season with an underestimation of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle both for the CO2 fluxes compared to total optimized fluxes and the atmospheric CO2 compared to observations. The largest biases in the atmospheric CO2 forecast are found in spring, corresponding to the onset of the growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. In the future, the forecast will be re-initialized regularly with atmospheric CO2 analyses based on the assimilation of CO2 products retrieved from satellite measurements and

  4. Air-sea CO2 fluxes along the coast of Chile: From CO2 outgassing in central northern upwelling waters to CO2 uptake in southern Patagonian fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Pantoja, Silvio; Harada, Naomi; GonzáLez, Humberto E.; Daneri, Giovanni; Frangopulos, MáXimo; Rutllant, José A.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Rúiz-Halpern, Sergio; Mayol, Eva; Fukasawa, Masao

    2011-09-01

    Carbon system parameters measured during several expeditions along the coast of Chile (23°S-56°S) have been used to show the main spatial and temporal trends of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the coastal waters of the eastern South Pacific. Chilean coastal waters are characterized by strong pCO2 gradients between the atmosphere and the surface water, with high spatial and temporal variability. On average, the direction of the carbon flux changes from CO2 outgassing at the coastal upwelling region to CO2 sequestering at the nonupwelling fjord region in Chilean Patagonia. Estimations of surface water pCO2 along the Patagonian fjord region showed that, while minimum pCO2 levels (strong CO2 undersaturation) occurs during the spring and summer period, maximum levels (including CO2 supersaturation) occur during the austral winter. CO2 uptake in the Patagonia fjord region during spring-summer is within the order of -5 mol C m-2 yr-1, indicating a significant regional sink of atmospheric CO2 during that season. We suggest that the CO2 sink at Patagonia most probably exceeds the CO2 source exerted by the coastal upwelling system off central northern Chile.

  5. Global carbon - nitrogen - phosphorus cycle interactions: A key to solving the atmospheric CO2 balance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B. J.; Mellillo, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    If all biotic sinks of atmospheric CO2 reported were added a value of about 0.4 Gt C/yr would be found. For each category, a very high (non-conservative) estimate was used. This still does not provide a sufficient basis for achieving a balance between the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. The bulk of the discrepancy lies in a combination of errors in the major terms, the greatest being in a combination of errors in the major terms, the greatest being in the net biotic release and ocean uptake segments, but smaller errors or biases may exist in calculations of the rate of atmospheric CO2 increase and total fossil fuel use as well. The reason why biotic sinks are not capable of balancing the CO2 increase via nutrient-matching in the short-term is apparent from a comparison of the stoichiometry of the sources and sinks. The burning of fossil fuels and forest biomass releases much more CO2-carbon than is sequestered as organic carbon.

  6. Climate-dependent CO2 emissions from lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosten, Sarian; Roland, FáBio; da Motta Marques, David M. L.; van Nes, Egbert H.; Mazzeo, NéStor; Sternberg, Leonel Da S. L.; Scheffer, Marten; Cole, Jon J.

    2010-06-01

    Inland waters, just as the world's oceans, play an important role in the global carbon cycle. While lakes and reservoirs typically emit CO2, they also bury carbon in their sediment. The net CO2 emission is largely the result of the decomposition or preservation of terrestrially supplied carbon. What regulates the balance between CO2 emission and carbon burial is not known, but climate change and temperature have been hypothesized to influence both processes. We analyzed patterns in carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in 83 shallow lakes over a large climatic gradient in South America and found a strong, positive correlation with temperature. The higher pCO2 in warmer lakes may be caused by a higher, temperature-dependent mineralization of organic carbon. This pattern suggests that cool lakes may start to emit more CO2 when they warm up because of climate change.

  7. 17O Correction and Ion Source Effects on the Measurement of Δ47 on CO2 and on Carbonate Clumped Isotope Thermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olack, G.; Colman, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The measurement δ13C or clumped isotope compositions (Δ47 values) on CO2 derived from acid digestion of carbonate minerals requires an 17O correction. The typical assumption is that the amount of 17O scales with 18O abundance. A formal recommendation by the IAEA was presented in 1995 by Gonfiantini et al.[1], which was used in part by Huntington et al., 2009 [2] in calculating Δ47. A new set of recommendations was released in 2010 (Brand et al.[3]). We tested the different parameter sets using model data and re-analysis of a suite of samples and equilibrated water standards. The model shows that samples that have the same δ47 and true Δ47 values, but different δ13C and δ18O values, can shift in calculated Δ47 values by up to 30 per meg simply by shifting parameter sets. There is a correlation between shifts in Δ47 values and the quantity (δ13C - δ18O) if the "wrong" parameter set is used. The equilibrated gas data indicates the 17O parameter set that best removes this bulk compositional dependence for Δ47 values may be slightly different during different tune intervals. Therefore it is important for individual labs to test explicitly for the optimal 17O correction. Inaccurate 17O correction coupled to systematic variation in bulk isotopic composition of equilibrated and heated gases used in standardization of Δ47 measurements in the "absolute reference frame", also known as the "carbon dioxide equilibrium scale", can cause small but significant calibration problems. This, when coupled with the variations in the bulk composition of carbonate minerals used for paleothermometric calibrations, can shift the slope of Δ47 paleothermometers. [1] R. Gonfiantini et al. (1995) In Reference and Intercomparison Materials for Stable Isotopes of Light Elements (ed. IAEA). International Atomic Energy Agency, pp. 13-29. [2] K. W. Huntington et al. (2009) J. Mass Spectrom. 44, 1318. [3] W. A. Brand et al. (2010) Pure Appl. Chem., 82, No. 8, pp. 1719-1733.

  8. Non-photosynthetic enhancement of growth by high CO2 level in the nitrophilic seaweed Ulva rigida C. Agardh (Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, F J; Niell, F X; Figueroa, F L

    2001-05-01

    The effects of increased CO2 levels (10,000 microl l(-1)) in cultures of the green nitrophilic macroalga Ulva rigida C. Agardh were tested under conditions of N saturation and N limitation, using nitrate as the only N source. Enrichment with CO2 enhanced growth, while net photosynthesis, gross photosynthesis, dark respiration rates and soluble protein content decreased. The internal C pool remained constant at high CO2, while the assimilated C that was released to the external medium was less than half the values obtained under ambient CO2 levels. This higher retention of C provided the source for extra biomass production under N saturation. In N-sufficient thalli, nitrate-uptake rate and the activity of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) increased under high CO2 levels. This did not affect the N content or the internal C:N balance, implying that the extra N-assimilation capacity led to the production of new biomass in proportion to C. Growth enhancement by increased level of CO2 was entirely dependent on the enhancement effect of CO2 on N-assimilation rates. The increase in nitrate reductase activity at high CO2 was not related to soluble carbohydrates or internal C. This indicates that the regulation of N assimilation by CO2 in U. rigida might involve a different pathway from that proposed for higher plants. The role of organic C release as an effective regulatory mechanism maintaining the internal C:N balance in response to different CO2 levels is discussed.

  9. Year-round CH4 and CO2 flux dynamics in two contrasting freshwater ecosystems of the subarctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jammet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lakes and wetlands, common ecosystems of the high northern latitudes, exchange large amounts of the climate-forcing gases methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 with the atmosphere. The magnitudes of these fluxes and the processes driving them are still uncertain, particularly for subarctic and Arctic lakes where direct measurements of CH4 and CO2 emissions are often of low temporal resolution and are rarely sustained throughout the entire year. Using the eddy covariance method, we measured surface–atmosphere exchange of CH4 and CO2 during 2.5 years in a thawed fen and a shallow lake of a subarctic peatland complex. Gas exchange at the fen exhibited the expected seasonality of a subarctic wetland with maximum CH4 emissions and CO2 uptake in summer, as well as low but continuous emissions of CH4 and CO2 throughout the snow-covered winter. The seasonality of lake fluxes differed, with maximum CO2 and CH4 flux rates recorded at spring thaw. During the ice-free seasons, we could identify surface CH4 emissions as mostly ebullition events with a seasonal trend in the magnitude of the release, while a net CO2 flux indicated photosynthetic activity. We found correlations between surface CH4 emissions and surface sediment temperature, as well as between diel CO2 uptake and diel solar input. During spring, the breakdown of thermal stratification following ice thaw triggered the degassing of both CH4 and CO2. This spring burst was observed in 2 consecutive years for both gases, with a large inter-annual variability in the magnitude of the CH4 degassing. On the annual scale, spring emissions converted the lake from a small CO2 sink to a CO2 source: 80 % of total annual carbon emissions from the lake were emitted as CO2. The annual total carbon exchange per unit area was highest at the fen, which was an annual sink of carbon with respect to the atmosphere. Continuous respiration during the winter partly counteracted the fen summer sink by accounting for

  10. Year-round CH4 and CO2 flux dynamics in two contrasting freshwater ecosystems of the subarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammet, Mathilde; Dengel, Sigrid; Kettner, Ernesto; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Wik, Martin; Crill, Patrick; Friborg, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Lakes and wetlands, common ecosystems of the high northern latitudes, exchange large amounts of the climate-forcing gases methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) with the atmosphere. The magnitudes of these fluxes and the processes driving them are still uncertain, particularly for subarctic and Arctic lakes where direct measurements of CH4 and CO2 emissions are often of low temporal resolution and are rarely sustained throughout the entire year. Using the eddy covariance method, we measured surface-atmosphere exchange of CH4 and CO2 during 2.5 years in a thawed fen and a shallow lake of a subarctic peatland complex. Gas exchange at the fen exhibited the expected seasonality of a subarctic wetland with maximum CH4 emissions and CO2 uptake in summer, as well as low but continuous emissions of CH4 and CO2 throughout the snow-covered winter. The seasonality of lake fluxes differed, with maximum CO2 and CH4 flux rates recorded at spring thaw. During the ice-free seasons, we could identify surface CH4 emissions as mostly ebullition events with a seasonal trend in the magnitude of the release, while a net CO2 flux indicated photosynthetic activity. We found correlations between surface CH4 emissions and surface sediment temperature, as well as between diel CO2 uptake and diel solar input. During spring, the breakdown of thermal stratification following ice thaw triggered the degassing of both CH4 and CO2. This spring burst was observed in 2 consecutive years for both gases, with a large inter-annual variability in the magnitude of the CH4 degassing. On the annual scale, spring emissions converted the lake from a small CO2 sink to a CO2 source: 80 % of total annual carbon emissions from the lake were emitted as CO2. The annual total carbon exchange per unit area was highest at the fen, which was an annual sink of carbon with respect to the atmosphere. Continuous respiration during the winter partly counteracted the fen summer sink by accounting for, as both CH4 and CO2, 33

  11. Simulating the integrated summertime Δ14CO2 signature from anthropogenic emissions over Western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozhinova, D.; van der Molen, M. K.; van der Velde, I. R.; Krol, M. C.; van der Laan, S.; Meijer, H. A. J.; Peters, W.

    2014-01-01

    Radiocarbon dioxide (14CO2, reported in Δ14CO2) can be used to determine the fossil fuel CO2 addition to the atmosphere, since fossil fuel CO2 no longer contains any 14C. After the release of CO2 at the source, atmospheric transport causes dilution of strong local signals into the background and

  12. Biological methanogenesis and the CO2 greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well established that plants tend to increase net photosynthesis under increased carbon dioxide. It is also well established that a large fraction of atmospheric methane is produced by microbial metabolism of organic sediments in paddies and freshwater wetlands, where a major source of organic debris is local plant growth. As CO2 increases, it may lead to increased methane production and a resulting enhancement of the expected greenhouse warming. A rough estimate of the present rate of this biologically mediated feedback on the climate system indicates that it might account for as much as 30 percent of the observed methane increase and speed up the greenhouse forcing by as much as 15 percent.

  13. CO2 as a refrigerant

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    A first edition, the IIR guide “CO2 as a Refrigerant” highlights the application of carbon dioxide in supermarkets, industrial freezers, refrigerated transport, and cold stores as well as ice rinks, chillers, air conditioning systems, data centers and heat pumps. This guide is for design and development engineers needing instruction and inspiration as well as non-technical experts seeking background information on a specific topic. Written by Dr A.B. Pearson, a well-known expert in the field who has considerable experience in the use of CO2 as a refrigerant. Main topics: Thermophysical properties of CO2 – Exposure to CO2, safety precautions – CO2 Plant Design – CO2 applications – Future prospects – Standards and regulations – Bibliography.

  14. Direct CO2-Methanation of flue gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Klaus; Fleige, Michael; Rachow, Fabian; Israel, Johannes; Schmeißer, Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Already discovered by Paul Sabatier in 1902 the Hydrogenation according to CO2 + 4H2 ->CH4 + 2H2O nowadays is discussed in the course of the "Power-to-Gas" approach to utilize excess energy from renewable electricity generation in times of oversupply of electricity. We investigate the behavior of this process in a simulated flue gas atmosphere of conventional base load power plants, which could be used as constant sources of the reactant CO2. In relation to an approach related to carbon capture and cycling, the conversion of CO2 directly from the flue gas of a conventional power plant is a new aspect and has several advantages: The conversion of CO2 into methane could be integrated directly into the combustion process. Even older power plants could be upgraded and used as a possible source for CO2, in the same sense as the amine cleaning of flue gas, as a post combustion process. Further, waste heat of the power plant could be used as process energy for the catalytic reaction. Therefore the influence of different flue gas compositions such as varying contents of nitrogen and residual oxygen are tested in a laboratory scale. The heterogeneous catalysis process is investigated with regard to conversion rates, yield and selectivity and long-term stability of the Ni-catalyst. Also the influence of typical contaminations like SO2 is investigated and will be presented.

  15. Transient nature of CO2 fertilization in Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechel, Walter C.; Cowles, Sid; Grulke, Nancy; Hastings, Steven J.; Lawrence, Bill; Prudhomme, Tom; Riechers, George; Strain, Boyd; Tissue, David; Vourlitis, George

    1994-10-01

    THERE has been much debate about the effect of increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant net primary production1,3 and on net ecosystem CO2 flux3-10. Apparently conflicting experimental findings could be the result of differences in genetic potential11-15 and resource availability16-20, different experimental conditions21-24 and the fact that many studies have focused on individual components of the system2,21,25-27 rather than the whole ecosystem. Here we present results of an in situ experiment on the response of an intact native ecosystem to elevated CO2. An undisturbed patch of tussock tundra at Toolik Lake, Alaska, was enclosed in greenhouses in which the CO2 level, moisture and temperature could be controlled28, and was subjected to ambient (340 p.p.m.) and elevated (680 p.p.m.) levels of CO2 and temperature (+4 °C). Air humidity, precipitation and soil water table were maintained at ambient control levels. For a doubled CO2 level alone, complete homeostasis of the CO2 flux was re-established within three years, whereas the regions exposed to a combination of higher temperatures and doubled CO2 showed persistent fertilization effect on net ecosystem carbon sequestration over this time. This difference may be due to enhanced sink activity from the direct effects of higher temperatures on growth16,29-33 and to indirect effects from enhanced nutrient supply caused by increased mineralization10,11,19,27,34. These results indicate that the responses of native ecosystems to elevated CO2 may not always be positive, and are unlikely to be straightforward. Clearly, CO2 fertilization effects must always be considered in the context of genetic limitation, resource availability and other such factors.

  16. From chemolithoautotrophs to electrolithoautotrophs: CO2 fixation by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria coupled with direct uptake of electrons from solid electron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takumi; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Hirotaka; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2015-01-01

    At deep-sea vent systems, hydrothermal emissions rich in reductive chemicals replace solar energy as fuels to support microbial carbon assimilation. Until recently, all the microbial components at vent systems have been assumed to be fostered by the primary production of chemolithoautotrophs; however, both the laboratory and on-site studies demonstrated electrical current generation at vent systems and have suggested that a portion of microbial carbon assimilation is stimulated by the direct uptake of electrons from electrically conductive minerals. Here we show that chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, switches the electron source for carbon assimilation from diffusible Fe(2+) ions to an electrode under the condition that electrical current is the only source of energy and electrons. Site-specific marking of a cytochrome aa3 complex (aa3 complex) and a cytochrome bc1 complex (bc1 complex) in viable cells demonstrated that the electrons taken directly from an electrode are used for O2 reduction via a down-hill pathway, which generates proton motive force that is used for pushing the electrons to NAD(+) through a bc1 complex. Activation of carbon dioxide fixation by a direct electron uptake was also confirmed by the clear potential dependency of cell growth. These results reveal a previously unknown bioenergetic versatility of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria to use solid electron sources and will help with understanding carbon assimilation of microbial components living in electronically conductive chimney habitats.

  17. From Chemolithoautotrophs to Electrolithoautotrophs: CO2 Fixation by Fe(II-Oxidizing Bacteria Coupled with Direct Uptake of Electrons from Solid Electron Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi eIshii

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available At deep-sea vent systems, hydrothermal emissions rich in reductive chemicals replace solar energy as fuels to support microbial carbon assimilation. Until recently, all the microbial components at vent systems have been assumed to be fostered by the primary production of chemolithoautotrophs; however, both the laboratory and on-site studies demonstrated electrical current generation at vent systems and have suggested that a portion of microbial carbon assimilation is stimulated by the direct uptake of electrons from electrically conductive minerals. Here we show that chemolithoautotrophic Fe(II-oxidizing bacterium, Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, switches the electron source for carbon assimilation from diffusible Fe2+ ions to an electrode under the condition that electrical current is the only source of energy and electrons. Site-specific marking of a cytochrome aa3 complex (aa3 complex and a cytochrome bc1 complex (bc1 complex in viable cells demonstrated that the electrons taken directly from an electrode are used for O2 reduction via a down-hill pathway, which generates proton motive force that is used for pushing the electrons to NAD+ through a bc1 complex. Activation of carbon dioxide fixation by a direct electron uptake was also confirmed by the clear potential dependency of cell growth. These results reveal a previously unknown bioenergetic versatility of Fe(II-oxidizing bacteria to use solid electron sources and will help with understanding carbon assimilation of microbial components living in electronically conductive chimney habitats.

  18. PhysioNet: physiologic signals, time series and related open source software for basic, clinical, and applied research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, George B; Mark, Roger G; Goldberger, Ary L

    2011-01-01

    PhysioNet provides free web access to over 50 collections of recorded physiologic signals and time series, and related open-source software, in support of basic, clinical, and applied research in medicine, physiology, public health, biomedical engineering and computing, and medical instrument design and evaluation. Its three components (PhysioBank, the archive of signals; PhysioToolkit, the software library; and PhysioNetWorks, the virtual laboratory for collaborative development of future PhysioBank data collections and PhysioToolkit software components) connect researchers and students who need physiologic signals and relevant software with researchers who have data and software to share. PhysioNet's annual open engineering challenges stimulate rapid progress on unsolved or poorly solved questions of basic or clinical interest, by focusing attention on achievable solutions that can be evaluated and compared objectively using freely available reference data.

  19. Air-Sea CO2 fluxes on the Scotian Shelf: seasonal to multi-annual variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Salisbury

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We develop an algorithm to compute pCO2 in the Scotian Shelf region (NW Atlantic from satellite-based estimates of chlorophyll-a concentration, sea-surface temperature, and observed wind speed. This algorithm is based on a high-resolution time-series of pCO2 observations from an autonomous mooring. At the mooring location (44.3° N and 63.3° W, the surface waters act as a source of CO2 to the atmosphere over the annual scale, with an outgassing of −1.1 mol C m−2 yr−1 in 2007/2008. A hindcast of air-sea CO2 fluxes from 1999 to 2008 reveals significant variability both spatially and from year to year. Over the decade, the shelf-wide annual air-sea fluxes range from an outgassing of −1.70 mol C m−2 yr−1 in 2002, to −0.02 mol C m−2 yr−1 in 2006. There is a gradient in the air-sea CO2 flux between the northeastern Cabot Strait region which acts as a net sink of CO2 with an annual uptake of 0.50 to 1.00 mol C m−2 yr−1, and the southwestern Gulf of Maine region which acts as a source ranging from −0.80 to −2.50 mol C m−2 yr−1. There is a decline, or a negative trend, in the air-sea pCO2 gradient of 23 μatm over the decade, which can be explained by a cooling of 1.3 °C over the same period. Regional conditions govern spatial, seasonal, and interannual variability on the Scotian Shelf, while multi-annual trends appear to be influenced by larger scale processes.

  20. 76 FR 15249 - Deferral for CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 51, 52, 70, and 71 RIN 2060-AQ79 Deferral for CO2 Emissions From Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Under the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Title V Programs: Proposed...

  1. Holiday CO2: Inference from the Salt Lake City data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, J.; Fung, I. Y.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Stephens, B. B.

    2013-12-01

    A network of high-frequency CO2 sensors has been established in Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah (http://co2.utah.edu/), and the annual/monthly pattern of CO2 variability is consistent with a priori estimates of CO2 fluxes (McKain et al., 2012). Here we ask if short-term changes in anthropogenic sources can be detected, and present a case study of Thanksgiving holiday, when traffic and energy use patterns are expected to be different from that during the rest of the month. CO2 mole fraction is much higher during the Thanksgiving holidays than the other days in November 2008 for all 5 sites in SLC, and a similar pattern is found in other years. Taking into account that the wind speed is relatively low in downtown SLC compared to the other SLC sites, the downtown site is further investigated to minimize the meteorological influence on CO2. In order to understand the relative contributions to the high level of CO2 during the Thanksgiving holidays, we carried out a multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis of the rate of CO2 change against various sources. Mobile CO2 sources are assumed to be proportional to local traffic data and residential CO2 sources are assumed to depend exponentially on temperature. Vulcan data were used to specify the other anthropogenic sources (commercial, industrial, nonroad, electricity, aircraft, and cement). The MLR analysis shows that during the Thanksgiving holidays CO2 contributions from residential and commercial CO2 are larger than that during the rest of November, and mobile sources represent only a relatively small contribution. The study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting changes in urban source contributions using high-frequency measurements in combination with daily PBL height and local traffic volume data.

  2. Determining CO2 storage potential during miscible CO2 enhanced oil recovery: Noble gas and stable isotope tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Jenna L.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.; Hunt, Andrew; Beebe, Thomas L; Parker, Andrew D; Warwick, Peter D.; Drake, Ronald; McCray, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are fueling anthropogenic climate change. Geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs is one option for reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere while enhancing oil recovery. In order to evaluate the feasibility of using enhanced oil recovery (EOR) sites in the United States for permanent CO2 storage, an active multi-stage miscible CO2flooding project in the Permian Basin (North Ward Estes Field, near Wickett, Texas) was investigated. In addition, two major natural CO2 reservoirs in the southeastern Paradox Basin (McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon) were also investigated as they provide CO2 for EOR operations in the Permian Basin. Produced gas and water were collected from three different CO2 flooding phases (with different start dates) within the North Ward Estes Field to evaluate possible CO2 storage mechanisms and amounts of total CO2retention. McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon were sampled for produced gas to determine the noble gas and stable isotope signature of the original injected EOR gas and to confirm the source of this naturally-occurring CO2. As expected, the natural CO2produced from McElmo Dome and Doe Canyon is a mix of mantle and crustal sources. When comparing CO2 injection and production rates for the CO2 floods in the North Ward Estes Field, it appears that CO2 retention in the reservoir decreased over the course of the three injections, retaining 39%, 49% and 61% of the injected CO2 for the 2008, 2010, and 2013 projects, respectively, characteristic of maturing CO2 miscible flood projects. Noble gas isotopic composition of the injected and produced gas for the flood projects suggest no active fractionation, while δ13CCO2 values suggest no active CO2dissolution into formation water, or mineralization. CO2 volumes capable of dissolving in residual formation fluids were also estimated along with the potential to store pure-phase supercritical CO2. Using a combination

  3. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  4. Enzymes in CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Gladis, Arne; Thomsen, Kaj

    The enzyme Carbonic Anhydrase (CA) can accelerate the absorption rate of CO2 into aqueous solutions by several-fold. It exist in almost all living organisms and catalyses different important processes like CO2 transport, respiration and the acid-base balances. A new technology in the field...... of carbon capture is the application of enzymes for acceleration of typically slow ternary amines or inorganic carbonates. There is a hidden potential to revive currently infeasible amines which have an interesting low energy consumption for regeneration but too slow kinetics for viable CO2 capture. The aim...... of this work is to discuss the measurements of kinetic properties for CA promoted CO2 capture solvent systems. The development of a rate-based model for enzymes will be discussed showing the principles of implementation and the results on using a well-known ternary amine for CO2 capture. Conclusions...

  5. CO2 Sequestration short course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Cole, David R [The Ohio State University; Navrotsky, Alexandra [University of California-Davis; Bourg, Ian C [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  6. CO2 utilization: Developments in conversion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdogan Alper

    2017-03-01

    The potential utilization of CO2, captured at power plants, should also been taken into consideration for sustainability. This CO2 source, which is potentially a raw material for the chemical industry, will be available at sufficient quality and at gigantic quantity upon realization of on-going tangible capture projects. Products resulting from carboxylation reactions are obvious conversions. In addition, provided that enough supply of energy from non-fossil resources, such as solar [1], is ensured, CO2 reduction reactions can produce several valuable commodity chemicals including multi-carbon compounds, such as ethylene and acrylic acid, in addition to C1 chemicals and polymers. Presently, there are only few developing technologies which can find industrial applications. Therefore, there is a need for concerted research in order to assess the viability of these promising exploratory technologies rationally.

  7. Contributions of Understory and Overstory to Ecosystem CO2 Fluxes in a Temperate Mixed Forest in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Limoges, E.; Wolf, S.; Hörtnagl, L. J.; Eugster, W.; Buchmann, N. C.

    2015-12-01

    Forests play an important role in the global carbon cycle by sequestering large amounts of atmospheric CO2. The CO2 sequestered by a forest varies depending on many factors including climate, species composition, growth strategy, stand age and structure. Forests are structurally complex ecosystems, both horizontally and vertically. In many cases, several canopy layers with distinct functional properties and sun exposure contribute differently to the ecosystem CO2exchange. Only a few studies thus far have investigated the contribution of understory to overstory fluxes, and large variations have been found among sites. Our study focused on partitioning the net ecosystem CO2 flux of a mixed deciduous forest in Switzerland into its understory and overstory components using below and above canopy eddy-covariance (EC) measurements over two years. CO2 concentration profile measurements made at eight levels within the canopy complemented those measurements. We quantified the CO2flux contribution from the understory to the overstory, both in terms of photosynthesis and respiration, and assessed the differences between understory and overstory functional responses to environmental drivers. On an annual basis, the understory was a CO2 source, while the overstory was a CO2 sink. The understory was a CO2 sink only in spring with the early emergence of understory plants before overstory canopy leaf-out. Overall, the understory contributed 54% to annual ecosystem respiration but only 7% to annual ecosystem photosynthesis. Moreover, understory and overstory fluxes became decoupled at full canopy closure, thus leading to unaccounted EC fluxes when measured only above the canopy. CO2 concentration profile measurements supported this finding. Our results showed that understory EC measurements are essential in this mixed deciduous forest, and likely in many other forests, to fully understand the carbon dynamics within structurally complex ecosystems.

  8. CARNOL PROCESS FOR CO2 MITIGATION FROM POWER PLANTS AND THE TRANSFORMATION SECTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes an alternative mitigation process that would convert waste carbon dioxide (CO2) to carbon an methanol using natural gas as process feedstock. The process yields 1 mole of methanol from each mole of CO2 recovered, resulting in a net zero CO2 emission when the ...

  9. CO2 laser cutting

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John

    1998-01-01

    The laser has given manufacturing industry a new tool. When the laser beam is focused it can generate one of the world's most intense energy sources, more intense than flames and arcs, though similar to an electron beam. In fact the intensity is such that it can vaporise most known materials. The laser material processing industry has been growing swiftly as the quality, speed and new manufacturing possibilities become better understood. In the fore of these new technologies is the process of laser cutting. Laser cutting leads because it is a direct process substitu­ tion and the laser can usually do the job with greater flexibility, speed and quality than its competitors. However, to achieve these high speeds with high quality con­ siderable know how and experience is required. This information is usually carefully guarded by the businesses concerned and has to be gained by hard experience and technical understanding. Yet in this book John Powell explains in lucid and almost non­ technical language many o...

  10. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of air-sea CO 2 fluxes and seawater carbonate chemistry in the Southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gypens, N.; Lacroix, G.; Lancelot, C.; Borges, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    A 3D coupled biogeochemical-hydrodynamic model (MIRO-CO 2&CO) is implemented in the English Channel (ECH) and the Southern Bight of the North Sea (SBNS) to estimate the present-day spatio-temporal distribution of air-sea CO 2 fluxes, surface water partial pressure of CO 2 (pCO 2) and other components of the carbonate system (pH, saturation state of calcite ( Ωca) and of aragonite ( Ωar)), and the main drivers of their variability. Over the 1994-2004 period, air-sea CO 2 fluxes show significant inter-annual variability, with oscillations between net annual CO 2 sinks and sources. The inter-annual variability of air-sea CO 2 fluxes simulated in the SBNS is controlled primarily by river loads and changes of biological activities (net autotrophy in spring and early summer, and net heterotrophy in winter and autumn), while in areas less influenced by river inputs such as the ECH, the inter-annual variations of air-sea CO 2 fluxes are mainly due to changes in sea surface temperature and in near-surface wind strength and direction. In the ECH, the decrease of pH, of Ωca and of Ωar follows the one expected from the increase of atmospheric CO 2 (ocean acidification), but the decrease of these quantities in the SBNS during the considered time period is faster than the one expected from ocean acidification alone. This seems to be related to a general pattern of decreasing nutrient river loads and net ecosystem production (NEP) in the SBNS. Annually, the combined effect of carbon and nutrient loads leads to an increase of the sink of CO 2 in the ECH and the SBNS, but the impact of the river loads varies spatially and is stronger in river plumes and nearshore waters than in offshore waters. The impact of organic and inorganic carbon (C) inputs is mainly confined to the coast and generates a source of CO 2 to the atmosphere and low pH, of Ωca and of Ωar values in estuarine plumes, while the impact of nutrient loads, highest than the effect of C inputs in coastal nearshore

  11. Land Use Effects on Atmospheric C-13 Imply a Sizable Terrestrial CO2 Sink in Tropical Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Tans, Pieter P.; White, James W. C.

    2000-01-01

    Records of atmospheric CO2 and 13-CO2, can be used to distinguish terrestrial vs. oceanic exchanges of CO2 with the atmosphere. However, this approach has proven difficult in the tropics, partly due to extensive land conversion from C-3 to C-4 vegetation. We estimated the effects of such conversion on biosphere-atmosphere C-13 exchange for 1991 through 1999, and then explored how this 'land-use disequilibrium' altered the partitioning of net atmospheric CO2 exchanges between ocean and land using NOAA-CMDL data and a 2D, zonally averaged atmospheric transport model. Our results show sizable CO2 uptake in C-3-dominated tropical regions in seven of the nine years; 1997 and 1998, which included a strong ENSO event, are near neutral. Since these fluxes include any deforestation source, our findings imply either that such sources are smaller than previously estimated, and/or the existence of a large terrestrial CO2 sink in equatorial latitudes.

  12. Recycling CO 2 ? Computational Considerations of the Activation of CO 2 with Homogeneous Transition Metal Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Drees, Markus

    2012-08-10

    Faced with depleting fossil carbon sources, the search for alternative energy carriers and energy storage possibilities has become an important issue. Nature utilizes carbon dioxide as starting material for storing sun energy in plant hydrocarbons. A similar approach, storing energy from renewable sources in chemical bonds with CO 2 as starting material, may lead to partial recycling of CO 2 created by human industrial activities. Unfortunately, currently available routes for the transformation of CO 2 involve high temperatures and are often not selective. With the development of more sophisticated methods and better software, theoretical studies have become both increasingly widespread and useful. This concept article summarizes theoretical investigations of the current state of the feasibility of CO 2 activation with molecular transition metal catalysts, highlighting the most promising reactions of CO 2 with olefins to industrially relevant acrylic acid/acrylates, and the insertion of CO 2 into metal-element bonds, particularly for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates and polymers. Rapidly improving computational power and methods help to increase the importance and accuracy of calculations continuously and make computational chemistry a useful tool helping to solve some of the most important questions for the future. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Harvesting Duke FACE: improving estimates of productivity and biomass under elevated CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, H. R.; Oren, R.; Kim, D.; Tor-ngern, P.; Johnsen, K. H.; Maier, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Free air CO2 enrichment experiments (FACE) have greatly advanced our knowledge on the impacts of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations in developing and mature ecosystems. These experiments have provided years of data on changes in physiology and ecosystem functions, such as photosynthesis, water use, net primary productivity (NPP), ecosystem carbon storage, and nutrient cycling. As these experiments come to a close, there has also been the opportunity to add critically lacking biometric data, which can be obtained only through destructive measurements. After 15 years of CO2 elevation at the Duke Forest FACE, a 28 year old pine plantation with a hardwood understory, a vast array of biometric data was obtained through harvesting of >1150 trees in both elevated and ambient CO2 plots. Harvested trees included pines and hardwoods, understory and overstory trees. The harvest provided direct assessments of leaf, stem and branch biomass, as well as the vertical distribution of these masses. In combination with leaf and wood level properties (e.g. specific leaf area, wood density), it was possible to explore potential CO2 effects on allometric relationships between plant parts, and stem and canopy shape and distribution. Although stimulatory effects of elevated CO2 on NPP are well established in this forest (averaging 27%), harvest results thus far indicate few changes in basic allometric relationships, such as height-diameter relationships, proportion of mass contained in different plant parts (stems vs. leaves vs. branches), distribution of leaves within the canopy and stem shape. The coupling of site-specific biometric relationships with long-term data on tree growth and mortality will reduce current sources of uncertainty in estimates of NPP and carbon storage under future increased CO2 conditions. Recent efforts in data-model synthesis have demonstrated the critical need for such data as constraints and initial values in ecosystem and earth system models; these

  14. Simulating Remediation of CO2 Leakage from Geological Storage Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Oldenburg, C. M.; Benson, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    One strategy to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) deep into subsurface formations where presumably it would be stored indefinitely. Although geologic storage formations will be carefully selected, CO2 injected into a target formation may unexpectedly migrate upwards and ultimately seep out at the ground surface, creating a potential hazard to human beings and ecosystems. In this case, CO2 that has leaked from the geologic storage site is considered a contaminant, and remediation strategies such as passive venting and active pumping are needed. The purpose of this study is to investigate remediation strategies for CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. We use the integral finite-difference code TOUGH2 to simulate the remediation of CO2 in subsurface systems. We consider the components of water, CO2 and air, and model flow and transport in aqueous and gas phases subject to a variety of initial and boundary conditions including passive venting and active pumping. We have investigated the time it takes for a gas plume of CO2 to be removed from the vadose zone both by natural attenuation processes and by active extraction wells. The time for removal is parameterized in terms of a CO2 plume half-life, defined as the time required for one-half of the CO2 mass to be removed. Initial simulations show that barometric pressure fluctuations enhance the removal of CO2 from the vadose zone, but that CO2 trapped near the water table is difficult to remove by either passive or active remediation approaches. This work was supported by a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between BP Corporation North America, as part of the CO2 Capture Project (CCP), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technologies Laboratory (NETL), and by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098.

  15. Mathematical programming (MP) model to determine optimal transportation infrastructure for geologic CO2 storage in the Illinois basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmer, Donald E.

    Analysis of results from a mathematical programming model were examined to 1) determine the least cost options for infrastructure development of geologic storage of CO2 in the Illinois Basin, and 2) perform an analysis of a number of CO2 emission tax and oil price scenarios in order to implement development of the least-cost pipeline networks for distribution of CO2. The model, using mixed integer programming, tested the hypothesis of whether viable EOR sequestration sites can serve as nodal points or hubs to expand the CO2 delivery infrastructure to more distal locations from the emissions sources. This is in contrast to previous model results based on a point-to- point model having direct pipeline segments from each CO2 capture site to each storage sink. There is literature on the spoke and hub problem that relates to airline scheduling as well as maritime shipping. A large-scale ship assignment problem that utilized integer linear programming was run on Excel Solver and described by Mourao et al., (2001). Other literature indicates that aircraft assignment in spoke and hub routes can also be achieved using integer linear programming (Daskin and Panayotopoulos, 1989; Hane et al., 1995). The distribution concept is basically the reverse of the "tree and branch" type (Rothfarb et al., 1970) gathering systems for oil and natural gas that industry has been developing for decades. Model results indicate that the inclusion of hubs as variables in the model yields lower transportation costs for geologic carbon dioxide storage over previous models of point-to-point infrastructure geometries. Tabular results and GIS maps of the selected scenarios illustrate that EOR sites can serve as nodal points or hubs for distribution of CO2 to distal oil field locations as well as deeper saline reservoirs. Revenue amounts and capture percentages both show an improvement over solutions when the hubs are not allowed to come into the solution. Other results indicate that geologic

  16. Development of sustainable CO2 conversion processes for the methanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roh, Kosan; Nguyen, Tuan B.H.; Suriyapraphadilok, Uthaiporn

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of CO2 feedstock through CO2 conversion for producing valuable chemicals as an alternative to sequestration of the captured CO2 is attracting increasing attention in recent studies. Indeed, the methanol production process via thermochemical CO2 conversion reactions is considered a prime...... considered. The two methanol plants are developed using Aspen Plus®, the commercial process simulator. The net CO2 flows and methanol production costs are evaluated using ECON® and compared with those of the conventional methanol plant, which uses two-stage reforming. It is verified that the combined...... reforming process has to be integrated with the existing conventional methanol plant to obtain a reduced CO2 emission as well as lowered production costs. On the other hand, the CO2 hydrogenation based methanol plant could achieve a reduction of net CO2 emission at a reasonable production cost only...

  17. Extraction of stevia glycosides with CO2 + water, CO2 + ethanol, and CO2 + water + ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pasquel

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Stevia leaves are an important source of natural sugar substitute. There are some restrictions on the use of stevia extract because of its distinctive aftertaste. Some authors attribute this to soluble material other than the stevia glycosides, even though it is well known that stevia glycosides have to some extent a bitter taste. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to develop a process to obtain stevia extract of a better quality. The proposed process includes two steps: i Pretreatment of the leaves by SCFE; ii Extraction of the stevia glycosides by SCFE using CO2 as solvent and water and/or ethanol as cosolvent. The mean total yield for SCFE pretreatment was 3.0%. The yields for SCFE with cosolvent of stevia glycosides were below 0.50%, except at 120 bar, 16°C, and 9.5% (molar of water. Under this condition, total yield was 3.4%. The quality of the glycosidic fraction with respect to its capacity as sweetener was better for the SCFE extract as compared to extract obtained by the conventional process. The overall extraction curves were well described by the Lack extended model.

  18. Connecting CO2. Feasibility study CO2 network Southwest Netherlands; Connecting CO2. Haalbaarheidsstudie CO2-netwerk Zuidwest-Nederland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, M.

    2009-06-10

    An overview is given of supply and demand of CO2 in the region Southwest Netherlands and the regions Antwerp and Gent in Belgium. Also attention is paid to possible connections between these regions [Dutch] Een inventarisatie wordt gegeven van vraag en aanbod van CO2 in de regio Zuidwest- Nederland en de regios Antwerpen en Gent in Belgie. Ook worden mogelijke koppelingen tussen de regios besproken.

  19. Inverse modeling of CO2 sources and sinks using satellite data: a synthetic inter-comparison of measurement techniques and their performance as a function of space and time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Houweling

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently two polar orbiting satellite instruments measure CO2 concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere, while other missions are planned for the coming years. In the future such instruments might become powerful tools for monitoring changes in the atmospheric CO2 abundance and to improve our quantitative understanding of the leading processes controlling this. At the moment, however, we are still in an exploratory phase where first experiences are collected and promising new space-based measurement concepts are investigated. This study assesses the potential of some of these concepts to improve CO2 source and sink estimates obtained from inverse modelling. For this purpose the performance of existing and planned satellite instruments is quantified by synthetic simulations of their ability to reduce the uncertainty of the current source and sink estimates in comparison with the existing ground-based network of sampling sites. Our high resolution inversion of sources and sinks (at 8°x10° allows us to investigate the variation of instrument performance in space and time and at various temporal and spatial scales. The results of our synthetic tests clearly indicate that the satellite performance increases with increasing sensitivity of the instrument to CO2 near the Earth's surface, favoring the near infra-red technique. Thermal infrared instruments, on the contrary, reach a better global coverage, because the performance in the near infrared is reduced over the oceans owing to a low surface albedo. Near infra-red sounders can compensate for this by measuring in sun-glint, which will allow accurate measurements over the oceans, at the cost, however, of a lower measurement density. Overall, the sun-glint pointing near infrared instrument is the most promising concept of those tested. We show that the ability of satellite instruments to resolve fluxes at smaller temporal and spatial scales is also related to surface sensitivity. All the satellite

  20. A new approach to measure gross CO2 fluxes in leaves. Gross CO2 assimilation, photorespiration, and mitochondrial respiration in the light in tomato under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt-Herting, S; Klug, K; Fock, H P

    2001-05-01

    We developed a new method using 13CO2 and mass spectrometry to elucidate the role of photorespiration as an alternative electron dissipating pathway under drought stress. This was achieved by experimentally distinguishing between the CO2 fluxes into and out of the leaf. The method allows us to determine the rates of gross CO2 assimilation and gross CO2 evolution in addition to net CO2 uptake by attached leaves during steady-state photosynthesis. Furthermore, a comparison between measurements under photorespiratory and non-photorespiratory conditions may give information about the contribution of photorespiration and mitochondrial respiration to the rate of gross CO2 evolution at photosynthetic steady state. In tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Moneymaker) leaves, drought stress decreases the rates of net and gross CO2 uptake as well as CO2 release from photorespiration and mitochondrial respiration in the light. However, the ratio of photorespiratory CO2 evolution to gross CO2 assimilation rises with water deficit. Also the contribution of re-assimilation of (photo) respiratory CO2 to gross CO2 assimilation increases under drought.

  1. Reducing CO2 from shipping – do non-CO2 effects matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Eide

    2013-04-01

    yr. The major ship types show significant differences in the short-term radiative forcing. For instance, the direct SO4 forcing from tankers is 30% higher than for container and bulk. The net long-term effects on RF are similar due to similar CO2 forcing. We assess an emission scenario where the reduction inventory is sustained on the fleet as it steadily diminishes over time due to scrapping and disappears in 2040. We find a net temperature increase lasting until approximately 2080. We conclude that changes in non-CO2 emission does matter significantly if reductions of CO2 emissions are made on the year 2010 cargo shipping fleet. In sum, we find that emission changes motivated by CO2 reductions in shipping will be beneficial from a long-term climate perspective, and that there are positive environmental and health effects identified as concentrations of key short-lived pollutants are reduced.

  2. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01

    One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources into deep geological formations such as brine formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted to improve understanding of factors affecting particular aspects of geological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safety and environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2 capture and related p...

  3. Method for tracing simulated CO2 leak in terrestrial environment with a 13CO2 tracer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Christophe; Rasse, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    recorded at the surface following a (60 x 60 cm) grid sampling pattern. Finally, at the end of the growing season the oats crop was harvested following a (50x50 cm) grid sampling pattern and each collected cereal bundle was tested for its isotopic signature. Results showed that the isotopic monitoring of the simulated CO2 leaks enabled to characterize finely the 3 dimensional extent of the leak within the soil-atmosphere continuum, including the assimilation of leaking CO2 by the vegetation. Acknowlegment RISCS is funded by the EC 7th Framework Programme and by industry partners ENEL I&I, Statoil, Vattenfall AB, E.ON and RWE. R&D partners are BGS, CERTH, IMARES, OGS, PML, SINTEF, University of Nottingham, Sapienza Università di Roma, Quintessa, CO2GeoNet, Bioforsk, BGR and ZERO. Four R&D institutes outside Europe participate in RISCS: CO2CRC from Australia, University of Regina from Canada and Montana State and Stanford Universities from the USA. For more information please go to the website (www.riscs-co2.eu) or contact the project coordinator David Jones (e-mail: dgj@bgs.ac.uk tel. + 44 (0)115 936 3576).

  4. Land Use Effects on Net Greenhouse Gas Fluxes in the US Great Plains: Historical Trends and Model Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grosso, S. J.; Parton, W. J.; Ojima, D. S.; Mosier, A. R.; Mosier, A. R.; Paustian, K.; Peterson, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present maps showing regional patterns of land use change and soil C levels in the US Great Plains during the 20th century and time series of net greenhouse gas fluxes associated with different land uses. Net greenhouse gas fluxes were calculated by accounting for soil CO2 fluxes, the CO2 equivalents of N2O emissions and CH4 uptake, and the CO2 costs of N fertilizer production. Both historical and modern agriculture in this region have been net sources of greenhouse gases. The primary reason for this, prior to 1950, is that agriculture mined soil C and resulted in net CO2 emissions. When chemical N fertilizer became widely used in the 1950's agricultural soils began to sequester CO2-C but these soils were still net greenhouse gas sources if the effects of increased N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake are included. The sensitivity of net greenhouse gas fluxes to conventional and alternative land uses was explored using the DAYCENT ecosystem model. Model projections suggest that conversion to no-till, reduction of the fallow period, and use of nitrification inhibitors can significantly decrease net greenhouse gas emissions in dryland and irrigated systems, while maintaining or increasing crop yields.

  5. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from hybrid poplar depend on CO2 concentration and genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, A. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid poplar is a fast-growing tree species that is likely to be an important source of biomass for the production of cellulose-based biofuels and may influence regional atmospheric chemistry through the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We used proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry to measure VOC emissions from the leaves of four different hybrid poplar genotypes grown under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (650 ppm) carbon dioxide concentration (CO2). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether VOC emissions are different among genotypes and whether these emissions are likely to change as atmospheric CO2 rises. Methanol and isoprene made up over 90% of the VOC emissions and were strongly dependent on leaf age, with young leaves producing primarily methanol and switching to isoprene production as they matured. Monoterpene emissions were small, but tended to be higher in young leaves. Plants grown under elevated CO2 emitted smaller quantities of both methanol and isoprene, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on genotype. Isoprene emission rates from mature leaves dropped from ~35 to ~28 nmol m-2 s-1 when plants were grown under elevated CO2. Emissions from individuals grown under ambient CO2 varied more based on genotype than those grown under elevated CO2, which means that we might expect smaller differences between genotypes in the future. Genotype and CO2 also affected how much carbon (C) individuals allocated to the production of VOCs. The emission rate of C from VOCs was 0.5 - 2% of the rate at which C was assimilated via net photosynthesis. The % C emitted was strongly related to genotype; clones from crosses between Populus deltoides and P. trichocarpa (T x D) allocated a greater % of their C to VOC emissions than clones from crosses of P. deltoids and P. nigra (D x N). Individuals from all four genotypes allocated a smaller % of their C to the emission of VOCs when they were grown under elevated CO2. These results

  6. Atmospheric CO2 observations and models suggest strong carbon uptake by forests in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, Kay; Mikaloff Fletcher, Sara E.; Brailsford, Gordon; Smale, Dan; Moore, Stuart; Keller, Elizabeth D.; Baisden, W. Troy; Mukai, Hitoshi; Stephens, Britton B.

    2017-01-01

    A regional atmospheric inversion method has been developed to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of CO2 sinks and sources across New Zealand for 2011-2013. This approach infers net air-sea and air-land CO2 fluxes from measurement records, using back-trajectory simulations from the Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment (NAME) Lagrangian dispersion model, driven by meteorology from the New Zealand Limited Area Model (NZLAM) weather prediction model. The inversion uses in situ measurements from two fixed sites, Baring Head on the southern tip of New Zealand's North Island (41.408° S, 174.871° E) and Lauder from the central South Island (45.038° S, 169.684° E), and ship board data from monthly cruises between Japan, New Zealand, and Australia. A range of scenarios is used to assess the sensitivity of the inversion method to underlying assumptions and to ensure robustness of the results. The results indicate a strong seasonal cycle in terrestrial land fluxes from the South Island of New Zealand, especially in western regions covered by indigenous forest, suggesting higher photosynthetic and respiratory activity than is evident in the current a priori land process model. On the annual scale, the terrestrial biosphere in New Zealand is estimated to be a net CO2 sink, removing 98 (±37) Tg CO2 yr-1 from the atmosphere on average during 2011-2013. This sink is much larger than the reported 27 Tg CO2 yr-1 from the national inventory for the same time period. The difference can be partially reconciled when factors related to forest and agricultural management and exports, fossil fuel emission estimates, hydrologic fluxes, and soil carbon change are considered, but some differences are likely to remain. Baseline uncertainty, model transport uncertainty, and limited sensitivity to the northern half of the North Island are the main contributors to flux uncertainty.

  7. A Quantitative Investigation of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have led to a substantial increase in carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas (GHG), contributing to heightened concerns of global warming. In the last decade alone CO2 emissions increased by 2.0 ppm/yr. globally. In the year 2009, United States and China contributed up to 43.4% of global CO2 emissions. CO2 capture and sequestration have been recognized as promising solutions to mitigate CO2 emissions from fossil fuel based power plants. Typical techniques for carbon capture include post-combustion capture, pre-combustion capture and oxy-combustion capture, which are under active research globally. Mineral carbonation has been investigated as a suitable technique for long term storage of CO2. Sequestration is a highly energy intensive process and the additional energy is typically supplied by the power plant itself. This leads to a reduction in net amount of CO2 captured because of extra CO2 emitted. This paper presents a quantitative analysis of the energy consumption during sequestra...

  8. Artificial photosynthesis - CO2 towards methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, D.; Czech, B.

    2011-03-01

    The new insight into the problem of carbon dioxide utilization into valuable compound - methanol and then its transformation into fuel is presented. Because the highly endothermic requirements of the reaction of CO2 hydrogenation a photocatalytic route is applied. Combining of the two reactions: water splitting and CO2 hydrogenation using H2O as a source of hydrogen at the same time and place are proposed. The studies over modified TiO2 catalysts supported on Al2O3 were conducted in a self-designed circulated photocatalytic reaction system under at room temperature and constant pressure. Experimental results indicated that the highest yield of the photoreduction of CO2 with H2O were obtained using TiO2 with the active anatase phase modified by Ru and WO3 addition. The conversion was very high - almost 97% of CO2 was transformed mainly into methanol (14%vol.) and into small amount of formic and acetic acid and ester.

  9. Natural Analogues of CO2 Geological Storage; Analogos Naturales del Almacenamiento Geologico de CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez del Villar, L.; Pelayo, M.; Recreo, F.

    2007-07-20

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide is nowadays, internationally considered as the most effective method for greenhouse gas emission mitigation, in order to minimize the global climate change universally accepted. Nevertheless, the possible risks derived of this long-term storage have a direct influence on its public acceptance. Among the favourable geological formations to store CO2, depleted oil and gas fields, deep saline reservoirs, and unamiable coal seams are highlighted. One of the most important objectives of the R and D projects related to the CO2 geological storage is the evaluation of the CO2 leakage rate through the above mentioned geological formations. Therefore, it is absolutely necessary to increase our knowledge on the interaction among CO2, storage and sealing formations, as well as on the flow paths and the physical resistance of the sealing formation. The quantification of the CO2 leakage rate is essential to evaluate the effects on the human and animal health, as well as for the ecosystem and water quality. To achieve these objectives, the study of the natural analogues is very useful in order to know the natural leakage rate to the atmosphere, its flow paths, the physical, chemical and mineralogical modifications due to the long term interaction processes among the CO2 and the storage and sealing formations, as well as the effects on the groundwaters and ecosystems. In this report, we have tried to summarise the main characteristics of the natural reservoirs and surficial sources of CO2, which are both natural analogues of the geological storage and CO2 leakage, studied in EEUU, Europe and Australia. The main objective of this summary is to find the possible applications for long-term risk prediction and for the performance assessment by means of conceptual and numerical modelling, which will allow to validate the predictive models of the CO2 storage behaviour, to design and develop suitable monitoring techniques to control the CO2 behaviour

  10. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land−atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G. L.; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land−atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y−1 of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y−1, equivalent to 8–37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the “hotspots,” largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m−2⋅y−1), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty. PMID:27247397

  11. Lateral transport of soil carbon and land-atmosphere CO2 flux induced by water erosion in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yao; Ni, Jinren; Ciais, Philippe; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Tao; Huang, Mengtian; Borthwick, Alistair G L; Li, Tianhong; Wang, Yichu; Chappell, Adrian; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-06-14

    Soil erosion by water impacts soil organic carbon stocks and alters CO2 fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere. The role of erosion as a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 remains highly debated, and little information is available at scales larger than small catchments or regions. This study attempts to quantify the lateral transport of soil carbon and consequent land-atmosphere CO2 fluxes at the scale of China, where severe erosion has occurred for several decades. Based on the distribution of soil erosion rates derived from detailed national surveys and soil carbon inventories, here we show that water erosion in China displaced 180 ± 80 Mt C⋅y(-1) of soil organic carbon during the last two decades, and this resulted a net land sink for atmospheric CO2 of 45 ± 25 Mt C⋅y(-1), equivalent to 8-37% of the terrestrial carbon sink previously assessed in China. Interestingly, the "hotspots," largely distributed in mountainous regions in the most intensive sink areas (>40 g C⋅m(-2)⋅y(-1)), occupy only 1.5% of the total area suffering water erosion, but contribute 19.3% to the national erosion-induced CO2 sink. The erosion-induced CO2 sink underwent a remarkable reduction of about 16% from the middle 1990s to the early 2010s, due to diminishing erosion after the implementation of large-scale soil conservation programs. These findings demonstrate the necessity of including erosion-induced CO2 in the terrestrial budget, hence reducing the level of uncertainty.

  12. Potential gains from CO2 trading in the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Gert Tinggaard; Vesterdal, Morten

    2003-01-01

    the EU could reduce the total abatement costs by 32 % compared to a system with no trading. In comparison, a Community-wide system containing only the electricity and steam sector would reduce the total abatement costs by 13 % only. Though a tradable CO2 permit market for the power and steam sector can......A new Green Paper from the European Commission on emissions trading foresees the setting-up of a CO2 trading system within the EU for the energy sector. Because any such international environmental agreement is self-enforcing, the participants must have an economic net gain from joining...... the proposed system. Our contribution is therefore to follow the Green Paper proposal and investigate whether member countries and the largest industrial boilers in the electricity sector actually will get significant net gains from CO2 trade in the European Union rather than undertaking domestic actions...

  13. A practical CO2 flux remote sensing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Manuel; Burton, Mike

    2017-04-01

    An accurate quantification of CO2 flux from both natural and anthropogenic sources is of great interest in various areas of the Earth, environmental and atmospheric sciences. As emitted excess CO2 quickly dilutes into the 400 ppm ambient CO2 concentration and degassing often occurs diffusively, measuring CO2 fluxes is challenging. Therefore, fluxes are usually derived from grids of in-situ measurements, which are labour intensive measurements. Other than a safe measurement distance, remote sensing offers quick, spatially integrated and thus a more thorough measurement of gas fluxes. Active remote sensing combines these merits with operation independent of sunlight or clear sky conditions. Due to their weight and size, active remote sensing platforms for CO2, such as LIDAR, cannot easily be applied in the field or transported overseas. Moreover, their complexity requires a rather lengthy setup procedure to be undertaken by skilled personal. To meet the need for a rugged, practical CO2 remote sensing technique to scan volcanic plumes, we have developed the CO2 LIDAR. It measures 1-D column densities of CO2 with sufficient sensitivity to reveal the contribution of magmatic CO2. The CO2 LIDAR has been mounted inside a small aircraft and used to measure atmospheric column CO2 concentrations between the aircraft and the ground. It was further employed on the ground, measuring CO2 emissions from mud volcanism. During the measurement campaign the CO2 LIDAR demonstrated reliability, portability, quick set-up time (10 to 15 min) and platform independence. This new technique opens the possibility of rapid, comprehensive surveys of point source, open-vent CO2 emissions, as well as emissions from more diffuse sources such as lakes and fumarole fields. Currently, within the proof-of-concept ERC project CarbSens, a further reduction in size, weight and operational complexity is underway with the goal to commercialize the platform. Areas of potential applications include fugitive

  14. Selective Electrocatalytic CO2 Conversion on Metal Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, M.

    2017-01-01

    The electrocatalytic conversion of CO2 into fuel and valuable chemicals by coupling with a renewable electricity source is a promising strategy for closing the anthropogenic carbon cycle. The critical step for achieving this practical CO2 utilization is to find a suitable electrocatalyst that is

  15. Costs, safety and uncertainties of CO2 infrastructure development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoope, M.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/364248149

    2015-01-01

    To avoid drastic climate change, strong reductions in CO2 emissions are required. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a potential mitigation measure. With CCS, CO2 from industrial and energy related sources is captured from flue gases and subsequently transported with pipelines and / or ships to

  16. Effects of permafrost melting on CO2 and CH4 exchange of a poorly drained black spruce lowland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickland, K.P.; Striegl, R.G.; Neff, J.C.; Sachs, T.

    2006-01-01

    Permafrost melting is occurring in areas of the boreal forest region where large amounts of carbon (C) are stored in organic soils. We measured soil respiration, net CO2 flux, and net CH4 flux during May-September 2003 and March 2004 in a black spruce lowland in interior Alaska to better understand how permafrost thaw in poorly drained landscapes affects land-atmosphere CO2 and CH4 exchange. Sites included peat soils underlain by permafrost at ???0.4 m depth (permafrost plateau, PP), four thermokarst wetlands (TW) having no permafrost in the upper 2.2 m, and peat soils bordering the thermokarst wetlands having permafi7ost at ???0.5 in depth (thermokarst edges, TE). Soil respiration rates were not significantly different among the sites, and 5-cm soil temperature explained 50-91% of the seasonal variability in soil respiration within the sites. Groundcover vegetation photosynthesis (calculated as net CO2 minus soil respiration) was significantly different among the sites (TW > TE > PP), which can be partly attributed to the difference in photosynthetically active radiation reaching the ground at each site type. Methane emission rates were 15 to 28 times greater fi7om TW than from TE and PP. We modeled annual soil respiration and groundcover vegetation photosynthesis using soil temperature and radiation data, and CH4 flux by linear interpolation. We estimated all sites as net C gas sources to the atmosphere (not including tree CO2 uptake at PP and TE), although the ranges in estimates when accounting for errors were large enough that TE and TW may have been net C sinks. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Quantifying the magnitude and spatiotemporal variation of aquatic CO2 fluxes in a sub-tropical karst catchment, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hu; Waldron, Susan; Newton, Jason; Garnett, Mark H.

    2017-04-01

    The role played by rivers in regional and global C budgets is receiving increasing attention. A large portion of the carbon transported via inland waters is returned to the atmosphere by carbon dioxide evasion from rivers and lakes. Karst landscapes represent an important C store on land, and are also considered to play an important role in climate regulation by consuming atmospheric CO2 during chemical weathering. However, we cannot be certain how effective this sink is if we do not know how efficiently the rivers draining karst landscapes remobilise weathered C to the atmosphere as CO2. pCO2 in karst waters is generally greater than atmospheric equilibrium, indicating that there can be a net CO2 efflux to the atmosphere. However, measurement confirming this and quantifying flux rates has been rarely conducted. Using a floating chamber method, in 2016 we directly measured CO2 fluxes from spatially distributed freshwaters (springs, sinkholes, streams and reservoirs/ponds) in the Houzhai Catchment, a karst region in SW China. Fluxes ranged from -0.5 to +267.4 μmol CO2 m-2s-1, and most sites showed seasonal variations with higher CO2 efflux rates in the wet (April - September) than dry season (October - March). There was a significant positive relationship between CO2 efflux and flow velocity, indicating that hydraulic controls on CO2 efflux from flowing water are important, while for water with little movement (sinkholes and reservoirs/ponds), pCO2 appears a more important control on efflux rates. Conditions similar to this study area may exist in many sub-tropical rivers that drain karst landscapes in South China. These waters are rich in DIC which can be an order of magnitude greater than some non-karst catchments. The large DIC pool has the potential to be a considerable source of free CO2 to the atmosphere. Considering that carbonate lithology covers a significant part of the Earth's surface, CO2 evasion in fluvial water from these regions is expected to

  18. Impact of reduced atmospheric CO2 and varied potassium supply on carbohydrate and potassium distribution in grapevine and grape berries (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Zelmari A; Walker, Rob R; Deloire, Alain J; Barril, Célia; Clarke, Simon J; Rogiers, Suzy Y

    2017-11-01

    To assess the robustness of the apparent sugar-potassium relationship during ripening of grape berries, a controlled-environment study was conducted on Shiraz vines involving ambient and reduced (by 34%) atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and standard and increased (by 67%) soil potassium applications from prior to the onset of ripening. The leaf net photoassimilation rate was decreased by 35% in the reduced CO2 treatment. The reduction in CO2 delayed the onset of ripening, but at harvest the sugar content of the berry pericarp was similar to that of plants grown in ambient conditions. The potassium content of the berry pericarp in the reduced CO2 treatment was however higher than for the ambient CO2. Berry potassium, sugar and water content were strongly correlated, regardless of treatments, alluding to a ternary link during ripening. Root starch content was lower under reduced CO2 conditions, and therefore likely acted as a source of carbohydrates during berry ripening. Root carbohydrate reserve replenishment could also have been moderated under reduced CO2 at the expense of berry ripening. Given that root potassium concentration was less in the vines grown in the low CO2 atmosphere, these results point toward whole-plant fine-tuning of carbohydrate and potassium partitioning aimed at optimising fruit ripening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Growth, reproductive phenology and yield responses of a potential biofuel plant, Jatropha curcas grown under projected 2050 levels of elevated CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sumit; Chaitanya, Bharatula S K; Ghatty, Sreenivas; Reddy, Attipalli R

    2014-11-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas) is a non-edible oil producing plant which is being advocated as an alternative biofuel energy resource. Its ability to grow in diverse soil conditions and minimal requirements of essential agronomical inputs compared with other oilseed crops makes it viable for cost-effective advanced biofuel production. We designed a study to investigate the effects of elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]) (550 ppm) on the growth, reproductive development, source-sink relationships, fruit and seed yield of J. curcas. We report, for the first time that elevated CO(2) significantly influences reproductive characteristics of Jatropha and improve its fruit and seed yields. Net photosynthetic rate of Jatropha was 50% higher in plants grown in elevated CO(2) compared with field and ambient CO(2) -grown plants. The study also revealed that elevated CO(2) atmosphere significantly increased female to male flower ratio, above ground biomass and carbon sequestration potential in Jatropha (24 kg carbon per tree) after 1 year. Our data demonstrate that J. curcas was able to sustain enhanced rate of photosynthesis in elevated CO(2) conditions as it had sufficient sink strength to balance the increased biomass yields. Our study also elucidates that the economically important traits including fruit and seed yield in elevated CO(2) conditions were significantly high in J. curcas that holds great promise as a potential biofuel tree species for the future high CO(2) world. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Non-CO2 greenhouse gases and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montzka, S A; Dlugokencky, E J; Butler, J H

    2011-08-03

    Earth's climate is warming as a result of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO(2)) from fossil fuel combustion. Anthropogenic emissions of non-CO(2) greenhouse gases, such as methane, nitrous oxide and ozone-depleting substances (largely from sources other than fossil fuels), also contribute significantly to warming. Some non-CO(2) greenhouse gases have much shorter lifetimes than CO(2), so reducing their emissions offers an additional opportunity to lessen future climate change. Although it is clear that sustainably reducing the warming influence of greenhouse gases will be possible only with substantial cuts in emissions of CO(2), reducing non-CO(2) greenhouse gas emissions would be a relatively quick way of contributing to this goal.

  1. CO2 Emissions From Fuel Combustion. Highlights. 2013 Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-07-01

    In the lead-up to the UN climate negotiations in Warsaw, the latest information on the level and growth of CO2 emissions, their source and geographic distribution will be essential to lay the foundation for a global agreement. To provide input to and support for the UN process, the IEA is making available for free download the ''Highlights'' version of CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion now for sale on IEA Bookshop. This annual publication contains, for more than 140 countries and regions: estimates of CO2 emissions from 1971 to 2011; selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh; a decomposition of CO2 emissions into driving factors; and CO2emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, key sources, and other relevant information. The nineteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Climate Change Convention (COP-19), in conjunction with the ninth meeting of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (CMP 9), met in Warsaw, Poland from 11 to 22 November 2013. This volume of ''Highlights'', drawn from the full-scale study, was specially designed for delegations and observers of the meeting in Warsaw.

  2. Coupling Hyporheic Nitrification-Denitrification: Evaluating Net Nitrate Source-Sink Dynamics as a Function of Transport and Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnetske, J. P.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.; Bokil, V. A.; Gonzalez Pinzon, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The fate of biologically-available nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in stream ecosystems is controlled by the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical reaction kinetics. However, determining the relative role of physical and biogeochemical controls at different temporal and spatial scales is difficult. Hyporheic and riparian zones, where ground waters and stream waters mix, can be important locations controlling N and C transformations because they create strong gradients in both the physical and biogeochemical conditions that control redox biogeochemistry. We evaluated the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical redox reactions by linking an advection, dispersion, and residence time model with a multiple Monod kinetics model simulating the concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The model successfully simulated the O2, NH4, NO3 and DOC concentration profiles observed in the hyporheic zone at our study site. We then used global Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses with a nondimensional form of the model to examine coupled nitrification-denitrification dynamics across many scales of transport and reaction conditions. Results demonstrated that the residence time of water in hyporheic systems and the uptake rate of O2 from either respiration and/or nitrification determined whether a hyporheic system was a source or a sink of NO3 to the stream. We further show that the net NO3 source or sink function of a hyporheic system is determined by the ratio of characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where hyporheic systems with DaO2 > 1 will be net denitrification environments. Our coupling of the hydrologic and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different temporal and spatial scales within hyporheic zones allows us to explain the widely contrasting results of previous investigations of hyporheic N dynamics which variously

  3. Effect of impurities in captured CO2 on liquid-vapor equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Gernert, Johannes; Wilbers, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    The capture of large amounts of CO2 from power plants and other large CO2 point sources has become relevant within the concept to mitigate CO2 emissions via carbon capture and storage. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of some major impurities found in the CO2 stream captured

  4. Assessing model sensitivity and uncertainty across multiple Free-Air CO2 Enrichment experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdery, E.; Dietze, M.

    2015-12-01

    As atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide levels continue to increase, it is critical that terrestrial ecosystem models can accurately predict ecological responses to the changing environment. Current predictions of net primary productivity (NPP) in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations are highly variable and contain a considerable amount of uncertainty. It is necessary that we understand which factors are driving this uncertainty. The Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments have equipped us with a rich data source that can be used to calibrate and validate these model predictions. To identify and evaluate the assumptions causing inter-model differences we performed model sensitivity and uncertainty analysis across ambient and elevated CO2 treatments using the Data Assimilation Linked Ecosystem Carbon (DALEC) model and the Ecosystem Demography Model (ED2), two process-based models ranging from low to high complexity respectively. These modeled process responses were compared to experimental data from the Kennedy Space Center Open Top Chamber Experiment, the Nevada Desert Free Air CO2 Enrichment Facility, the Rhinelander FACE experiment, the Wyoming Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment Experiment, the Duke Forest Face experiment and the Oak Ridge Experiment on CO2 Enrichment. By leveraging data access proxy and data tilling services provided by the BrownDog data curation project alongside analysis modules available in the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), we produced automated, repeatable benchmarking workflows that are generalized to incorporate different sites and ecological models. Combining the observed patterns of uncertainty between the two models with results of the recent FACE-model data synthesis project (FACE-MDS) can help identify which processes need further study and additional data constraints. These findings can be used to inform future experimental design and in turn can provide informative starting point for data assimilation.

  5. A uniform, quality controlled Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pfeil

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A well-documented, publicly available, global data set of surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2 parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC. Many additional CO2 data, not yet made public via the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC, were retrieved from data originators, public websites and other data centres. All data were put in a uniform format following a strict protocol. Quality control was carried out according to clearly defined criteria. Regional specialists performed the quality control, using state-of-the-art web-based tools, specially developed for accomplishing this global team effort. SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data points from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968–2007. Three types of data products are available: individual cruise files, a merged complete data set and gridded products. With the rapid expansion of marine CO2 data collection and the importance of quantifying net global oceanic CO2 uptake and its changes, sustained data synthesis and data access are priorities.

  6. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  7. Improving soil CO2 efflux estimates from in-situ soil CO2 sensors with gas transport measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Canete, E. P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Scott, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    Correctly estimating soil carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes emitted to the atmosphere is essential because they are a large component of the ecosystem carbon balance. Continuous estimates of soil CO2 flux, especially when paired with eddy covariance measurements of whole-ecosystem CO­2 exchange, help to disaggregate net ecosystem CO2 exchange. Most researchers estimate soil CO2 fluxes by applying the gradient method; however, this is only appropriate in the absence of advective or convective processes. Given the rarity of such static states, we must move toward measurement techniques that will allow us to quantify the dynamic soil efflux system with gas transport by convective, advective and molecular diffusion processes. Convective processes are mainly relevant in caves, where values of relative humidity, temperature and CO2 molar fraction determine the buoyancy of the external-internal air masses. These convective processes also are important in large fractures when temperature differences between surface and depth can generate convection, transporting CO2 from deep layers to the atmosphere. Advective processes occur both in caves and in soils, and the CO2 exchanges are mainly due to three factors: wind, changes in atmospheric pressure, and changes in the water table. Molecular diffusion processes are being widely applied in the determination of soil-atmosphere gas exchanges by applying the gradient method. However, the use of the gradient method can yield inappropriate flux estimates due to the uncertainties mainly associated with the inappropriate determination of the soil diffusion coefficient. Therefore, in-situ methods to determine diffusion coefficient are necessary to obtain accurate CO2 fluxes. If this is resolved, the gradient method has great potential to become the most used technique to monitor atmosphere-soil CO2 exchanges within the next few years. Here we review the state of the science and describe a series of field measurements for significantly

  8. Annual CO2 budget and seasonal CO2 exchange signals at a High Arctic permafrost site on Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüers, J.; Westermann, S.; Piel, K.; Boike, J.

    2014-01-01

    The annual variability of CO2 exchange in most ecosystems is primarily driven by the activities of plants and soil microorganisms. However, little is known about the carbon balance and its controlling factors outside the growing season in arctic regions dominated by soil freeze/thaw-processes, long-lasting snow cover, and several months of darkness. This study presents a complete annual cycle of the CO2 net ecosystem exchange (NEE) dynamics for a High Arctic tundra area on the west coast of Svalbard based on eddy-covariance flux measurements. The annual cumulative CO2 budget is close to zero grams carbon per square meter per year, but shows a very strong seasonal variability. Four major CO2 exchange seasons have been identified. (1) During summer (ground snow-free), the CO2 exchange occurs mainly as a result of biological activity, with a predominance of strong CO2 assimilation by the ecosystem. (2) The autumn (ground snow-free or partly snow-covered) is dominated by CO2 respiration as a result of biological activity. (3) In winter and spring (ground snow-covered), low but persistent CO2 release occur, overlain by considerable CO2 exchange events in both directions associated with changes of air masses and air and atmospheric CO2 pressure. (4) The snow melt season (pattern of snow-free and snow-covered areas), where both, meteorological and biological forcing, resulting in a visible carbon uptake by the high arctic ecosystem. Data related to this article are archived under: http://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.809507.

  9. An estimate of monthly global emissions of anthropogenic CO2: Impact on the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, D [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mills, R [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gregg, J [University of Maryland; Blasing, T J [ORNL; Hoffman, F [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Devries, M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Zhu, Z [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Kawa, S [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    2008-01-01

    Monthly estimates of the global emissions of anthropogenic CO2 are presented. Approximating the seasonal CO2 emission cycle using a 2-harmonic Fourier series with coefficients as a function of latitude, the annual fluxes are decomposed into monthly flux estimates based on data for the United States and applied globally. These monthly anthropogenic CO2 flux estimates are then used to model atmospheric CO2 concentrations using meteorological fields from the NASA GEOS-4 data assimilation system. We find that the use of monthly resolved fluxes makes a significant difference in the seasonal cycle of atmospheric CO2 in and near those regions where anthropogenic CO2 is released to the atmosphere. Local variations of 2-6 ppmv CO2 in the seasonal cycle amplitude are simulated; larger variations would be expected if smaller source-receptor distances could be more precisely specified using a more refined spatial resolution. We also find that in the midlatitudes near the sources, synoptic scale atmospheric circulations are important in the winter and that boundary layer venting and diurnal rectifier effects are more important in the summer. These findings have implications for inverse-modeling efforts that attempt to estimate surface source/sink regions especially when the surface sinks are colocated with regions of strong anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  10. CO2 Flux Estimation Errors Associated with Moist Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, N. C.; Denning, A. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Pawson, S.; Lokupitiya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Vertical transport by moist sub-grid scale processes such as deep convection is a well-known source of uncertainty in CO2 source/sink inversion. However, a dynamical link between vertical transport, satellite based retrievals of column mole fractions of CO2, and source/sink inversion has not yet been established. By using the same offline transport model with meteorological fields from slightly different data assimilation systems, we examine sensitivity of frontal CO2 transport and retrieved fluxes to different parameterizations of sub-grid vertical transport. We find that frontal transport feeds off background vertical CO2 gradients, which are modulated by sub-grid vertical transport. The implication for source/sink estimation is two-fold. First, CO2 variations contained in moist poleward moving air masses are systematically different from variations in dry equatorward moving air. Moist poleward transport is hidden from orbital sensors on satellites, causing a sampling bias, which leads directly to small but systematic flux retrieval errors in northern mid-latitudes. Second, differences in the representation of moist sub-grid vertical transport in GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 meteorological fields cause differences in vertical gradients of CO2, which leads to systematic differences in moist poleward and dry equatorward CO2 transport and therefore the fraction of CO2 variations hidden in moist air from satellites. As a result, sampling biases are amplified and regional scale flux errors enhanced, most notably in Europe (0.43+/-0.35 PgC /yr). These results, cast from the perspective of moist frontal transport processes, support previous arguments that the vertical gradient of CO2 is a major source of uncertainty in source/sink inversion.

  11. Supported Catalysts for CO2 Methanation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Frontera

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CO2 methanation is a well-known reaction that is of interest as a capture and storage (CCS process and as a renewable energy storage system based on a power-to-gas conversion process by substitute or synthetic natural gas (SNG production. Integrating water electrolysis and CO2 methanation is a highly effective way to store energy produced by renewables sources. The conversion of electricity into methane takes place via two steps: hydrogen is produced by electrolysis and converted to methane by CO2 methanation. The effectiveness and efficiency of power-to-gas plants strongly depend on the CO2 methanation process. For this reason, research on CO2 methanation has intensified over the last 10 years. The rise of active, selective, and stable catalysts is the core of the CO2 methanation process. Novel, heterogeneous catalysts have been tested and tuned such that the CO2 methanation process increases their productivity. The present work aims to give a critical overview of CO2 methanation catalyst production and research carried out in the last 50 years. The fundamentals of reaction mechanism, catalyst deactivation, and catalyst promoters, as well as a discussion of current and future developments in CO2 methanation, are also included.

  12. Temporal variability and spatial dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations and fluxes in the Zambezi River system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoru, Cristian; Borges, Alberto; Bouillon, Steven; Nyoni, Frank; Nyambe, Imasiku

    2014-05-01

    Spanning over 2900 km in length and with a catchment of approximately 1.4 million km2, the Zambezi River is the fourth largest river in Africa and the largest flowing into the Indian Ocean from the African continent. Yet, there is surprisingly little or no information on carbon (C) cycling in this large river system. As part of a broader study on the riverine biogeochemistry in the Zambezi River basin, we present here mainstream dissolved CO2 and CH4 data collected during 2012 and 2013 over two climatic seasons (dry and wet) to constrain the interannual variability, seasonality and spatial heterogeneity of partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and CH4 concentrations and fluxes along the aquatic continuum, in relation to physico-chemical parameters (temperature, conductivity, oxygen, and pH) and various carbon pools (dissolved and particulate, organic and inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, primary production, respiration and net aquatic metabolism). Both pCO2 and CH4 variability was high, ranging from minimal values of 150 ppm and 7 nM, respectively, mainly in the two large reservoirs (the Kariba and the Cabora Bassa characterized by high pH and oxygen and low DOC), up to maximum values of 12,500 ppm and 12,130 nM, CO2 and CH4, respectively, mostly below floodplains/wetlands (low pH and oxygen levels, high DOC and POC concentrations). The interannual variability was relatively large for both CO2 and CH4 (mean pCO2: 2350 ppm in 2013 vs. 3180 ppm in 2013; mean CH4: 600 nM in 2012 vs. 1000 nM in 2013) and significantly higher (up to two fold) during wet season compared to dry season closely linked to distinct seasonal hydrological characteristics. Overall, no clear pattern was observed along the longitudinal gradient as river CO2 and CH4 concentrations are largely influenced by the presence of floodplains/wetlands, anthropogenic reservoirs or natural barriers (waterfalls/ rapids). Following closely the concentration patterns, river CO2 and CH4 mean fluxes of 3440 mg C-CO2 m

  13. Comparison of seawater CO2 system in summer between the East China Sea shelf and the Peter the Great Bay of the Japan (East) Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, K. Y.; Tishchenko, P. Y.; Gong, G. C.; Chou, W. C.; Tishchenko, P. P.; Shkirnikova, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    Continental shelves are active sites of air-sea CO2 exchange and represent an important component of the global carbon budget. In this study, we investigated the CO2 system and pertinent hydrographic parameters in two distinct continental shelf systems in the Northwest Pacific in summer 2014: the East China Sea shelf (ECSS) and the Peter the Great Bay (PGB) of the Japan/East Sea. The results show that the average temperature, pH, chlorophyll a and nutrients in the ECSS are higher, but salinity, dissolved inorganic carbon, and fugacity of CO2 are lower than those in the PGB. Meanwhile, the ECSS acted as a sink of atmospheric CO2, but the PGB was a source. We suggest that the observed divergent behaviors in terms of CO2 absorption between the ECSS and the PGB may be associated with their difference in riverine runoff. Under the influence of the Yangtze River, the nutrient discharge into the ECSS is much higher than that into the PGB, where only a few small rivers empty into. The high nutrient discharge into the ECSS may stimulate high biological production, which may drawdown CO2 and thereby driving the ECSS to act as a CO2 sink despite high temperature in summer. On the contrary, the warming effect may dominate over the effect of biological production in the PGB due to the limited nutrient discharge, and thus turn the PGB to be a source of atmospheric CO2. The results of this study imply that riverine nutrient discharge may exert a large control on net ecosystem productivity in shelf areas, which may subsequently play a critical role on determining whether a shelf system acts as a source or a sink of atmospheric CO2.

  14. Concentration profiles of CH4, CO2 and N2O in soils of a wheat-maize rotation ecosystem in North China Plain, measured weekly over a whole year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.Y.; Hu, C.S.; Ming, H.; Zhang, Y.M.; Li, X.X.; Dong, W.; Oenema, O.

    2013-01-01

    Agricultural soils are main sources and sinks of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). The source–sink function depends on soil characteristics, climate and management. Emission measurements usually quantify the net result of production, consumption and

  15. Monitoring and Modeling CO2 Dynamics in the Vadose Zone near an Abandoned Historic Oil Well: Implications for Detecting CO2 Leakage at Geological CO2 Sequestration Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Romanak, K.; Hovorka, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Trevino, R.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    Soil-gas monitoring is proposed for detecting CO2 leakage at geological CO2 sequestration sites. At the Cranfield oil field, about 25 km east of Natchez, Mississippi, an integrated near-surface monitoring program is being implemented where supercritical CO2 is being injected for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). The purpose of the study is to understand how natural factors may affect soil CO2 monitoring at geologic carbon storage sites. A near-surface observatory, constructed on an engineered well pad near a 1950’s era open pit and plugged and abandoned well, was used to monitor atmospheric parameters such as air temperature, relative humility, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, and precipitation. Soil temperature, soil CO2 concentrations, water content, and matric potential were also monitored at various depths to a maximum of 5 m in the vadose zone. The integrated monitoring system was installed in September 2009 and continued collecting data each half hour for about 240 days. CO2 concentrations measured at 1.5 m depth are about two times that of atmospheric CO2 concentrations and show daily fluctuations. However, CO2 concentrations measured at 3 m depth decreased from 11% in November 2009 to 9% in January 2010, then gradually increased to 10.5% in June 2010. There should be no CO2 contribution from root respiration because the engineered pad is bare of vegetation. Monitored CO2 in the vadose zone at this site most likely is derived from oxidation of methane with a suspected source related to the 1950’s era plugged and abandoned well. A 1-D numerical model was also used to simulate variably saturated water flow, CO2 transport, CH4 oxidation for understanding mechanisms that dominate CO2 transport at this site. Results of this study suggest that CO2 transport in the vadose zone is very complicated and can be affected by many factors including precipitation, barometric pressure, soil temperature, oxidation of methane, and therefore may

  16. Does Elevated CO2 Alter Silica Uptake in Trees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson W. Fulweiler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human activities have greatly altered global carbon (C and N (N cycling. In fact, atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2 have increased 40% over the last century and the amount of N cycling in the biosphere has more than doubled. In an effort to understand how plants will respond to continued global carbon dioxide fertilization, long-term free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE experiments have been conducted at sites around the globe. Here we examine how atmospheric CO2 enrichment and N fertilization affects the uptake of silicon (Si in the Duke Forest, North Carolina, a stand dominated by Pinus taeda (loblolly pine, and five hardwood species. Specifically, we measured foliar biogenic silica (BSi concentrations in five deciduous and one coniferous species across three treatments: CO2 enrichment, N enrichment, and N and CO2 enrichment. We found no consistent trends in foliar Si concentration under elevated CO2, N fertilization, or combined elevated CO2 and N fertilization. However, two-thirds of the tree species studied here have Si foliar concentrations greater than well-known Si accumulators, such as grasses. Based on net primary production values and aboveground Si concentrations in these trees, we calculated forest Si uptake rates under control and elevated CO2 concentrations. Due largely to increased primary production, elevated CO2 enhanced the magnitude of Si uptake between 20% and 26%, likely intensifying the terrestrial silica pump. This uptake of Si by forests has important implications for Si export from terrestrial systems, with the potential to impact C sequestration and higher trophic levels in downstream ecosystems.

  17. Fang CO2 med Aminosyrer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Benedicte Mai

    2010-01-01

    Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer.......Med såkaldte “carbon capture-teknikker” er det muligt at rense røgen fra kulfyrede kraftværker, således at den er næsten helt fri for drivhusgassen CO2. Kunsten er at gøre processen tilstrækkeligt billig. Et lovende fangstredskab i denne proces er aminosyrer....

  18. Surface Gas Geochemistry above the Natural CO2 Reservoir of Montmiral (Drôme, France, Source Tracking and Gas Exchange between the Soil, Biosphere and Atmosphere Échanges gazeux et géochimie des gaz à la surface du réservoir naturel profond de CO2 de Montmiral (Drôme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal F.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the options considered to mitigate greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere is underground storage of CO2. There is a strong need for enhancing and developing methods that would help throughout the duration life of such underground storage, to ensure the safety and able to monitor the evolution of the injected CO2 plume. Among these, geochemical methods can play an important role. Here, we describe results acquired under the research programme “Géocarbone-Monitoring”, partially funded by the French National Research Agency, on the Montmiral natural analogue in South-Eastern France. Other results obtained under the same research programme in the French Massif Central are reported elsewhere in this volume. Spot sampling methods allowing a great geographical coverage and continuous measurements on selected points were undertaken in 2006 and 2007, in order to determine soil gas concentrations and fluxes as well as carbon isotope ratio determinations. One important result is that without any evidence of deep CO2 leakage, both CO2 concentrations and fluxes appear to be higher than can be explained only by biological activities. Further investigations are thus needed to understand the gas evolution better throughout the year. Une des options envisagées pour réguler les concentrations de gaz à effet de serre dans l’atmosphère est le stockage souterrain du CO2. Dans ce domaine existe un fort besoin de renforcer et de développer des méthodes susceptibles d’être utilisées tout au long de la durée de vie de ces stockages souterrains, afin de s’assurer de leur sécurité et de pouvoir suivre l’évolution du panache de CO2 injecté. Parmi elles, les méthodes géochimiques peuvent jouer un rôle important. Nous décrivons ici les résultats acquis dans le cadre du programme de recherche « Géocarbone-Monitoring » financé en partie par l’Agence Nationale de la Recherche sur l’analogue naturel de Montmiral dans le Sud

  19. Responses of soil CO2 efflux to changes in plant CO2 uptake and transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, János; de Luca, Giulia; Mészáros, Ádám; Trieber, Júlia; Gecse, Bernadett; Fóti, Szilvia; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán

    2017-04-01

    Biotic drivers of soil respiration represent a significant supply-side (plant) control of the process. Those biotic drivers that integrate over longer time periods are useful in describing the phenological changes and physiological state of the vegetation, but they are not suitable to explain the diel variability of soil respiration. Two plant physiological processes, acting in opposite directions, could be relevant at diel timescale: (1) photosynthesis, and (2) transpiration. Firstly, it was recently found that photosynthesis has a time-lagged (a few hours) positive effect on the respiration of roots and root-associated microbes. This can be explainedby an increase in easily accessible non-structural hydrocarbon sources for the roots and root-associated organisms within this period. Secondly, it was found that the effect of transpiration could reduce root respiration due to CO2 transport through the transpiration stream, and this effect is expected to be immediate. Removing the effect of the abiotic drivers from the soil efflux signal could help to clarify the role of other driving variables. In the present study, we conducted manipulation measurements in lab environment to be able to detect the effects of the plant physiological variables (CO2 uptake, transpiration) on soil CO2 efflux. Plant individuals were planted into field soil samples in small pots. Transpiration manipulation was done by regulating vapour pressure of the air around the plant canopy and by inhibitors. Photosynthesis manipulation consisted of programmed absence of light. Isotopic signatures of soil respiration were used for estimating the contribution of the autotrophic and heterotrophic soil respiration components. 13CO2 concentration of the CO2 efflux of the different soil components was measured continuously in open system by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro G1101-i gas analyser). Keeling-plot approach was also used to calculate the isotopic signals of the sources. According to the

  20. Outsourcing CO2 within China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kuishuang; Davis, Steven J; Sun, Laixiang; Li, Xin; Guan, Dabo; Liu, Weidong; Liu, Zhu; Hubacek, Klaus

    2013-07-09

    Recent studies have shown that the high standard of living enjoyed by people in the richest countries often comes at the expense of CO2 emissions produced with technologies of low efficiency in less affluent, developing countries. Less apparent is that this relationship between developed and developing can exist within a single country's borders, with rich regions consuming and exporting high-value goods and services that depend upon production of low-cost and emission-intensive goods and services from poorer regions in the same country. As the world's largest emitter of CO2, China is a prominent and important example, struggling to balance rapid economic growth and environmental sustainability across provinces that are in very different stages of development. In this study, we track CO2 emissions embodied in products traded among Chinese provinces and internationally. We find that 57% of China's emissions are related to goods that are consumed outside of the province where they are produced. For instance, up to 80% of the emissions related to goods consumed in the highly developed coastal provinces are imported from less developed provinces in central and western China where many low-value-added but high-carbon-intensive goods are produced. Without policy attention to this sort of interprovincial carbon leakage, the less developed provinces will struggle to meet their emissions intensity targets, whereas the more developed provinces might achieve their own targets by further outsourcing. Consumption-based accounting of emissions can thus inform effective and equitable climate policy within China.

  1. Comparison of Surface and Column Variations of CO2 Over Urban Areas for Future Active Remote CO2 Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yonghoon; Yang, Melissa; Kooi, Susan; Browell, Edward

    2015-01-01

    High resolution in-situ CO2 measurements were recorded onboard the NASA P-3B during the DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) Field Campaign, to investigate the ability of space-based observations to accurately assess near surface conditions related to air quality. This campaign includes, Washington DC/Baltimore, MD (July 2011), San Joaquin Valley, CA (January - February 2013), Houston, TX (September 2013), and Denver, CO (July-August 2014). Each of these campaigns consisted of missed approaches and approximately two hundred vertical soundings of CO2 within the lower troposphere (surface to about 5 km). In this study, surface (0 - 1 km) and column-averaged (0 - 3.5 km) CO2 mixing ratio values from the vertical soundings in the four geographically different urban areas are used to investigate the temporal and spatial variability of CO2 within the different urban atmospheric emission environments. Tracers such as CO, CH2O, NOx, and NMHCs are used to identify the source of CO2 variations in the urban sites. Additionally, we apply nominal CO2 column weighting functions for potential future active remote CO2 sensors operating in the 1.57-microns and 2.05-microns measurement regions to convert the in situ CO2 vertical mixing ratio profiles to variations in CO2 column optical depths, which is what the active remote sensors actually measure. Using statistics calculated from the optical depths at each urban site measured during the DISCOVER-AQ field campaign and for each nominal weighting function, we investigate the natural variability of CO2 columns in the lower troposphere; relate the CO2 column variability to the urban surface emissions; and show the measurement requirements for the future ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) in the continental U.S. urban areas.

  2. CO2 post-combustion capture in coal-fired power plants integrated with solar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapellucci, R.; Giordano, L.; Vaccarelli, M.

    2015-11-01

    The majority of the World's primary energy consumption is still based on fossil fuels, representing the largest source of global CO2 emissions. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), such emissions must be significantly reduced in order to avoid the dramatic consequences of global warming. A potential way to achieve this ambitious goal is represented by the implementation of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) technologies. However, the significant amount of energy required by the CCS systems still represents one the major barriers for their deployment. Focusing on post-combustion capture based on amine absorption, several interesting options have been investigated to compensate the energy losses due to solvent regeneration, also using renewable energy sources. One of the most promising is based on the use of concentrating solar power (CSP), providing a part of the energy requirement of the capture island. In this study the integration of a CSP system into a coal-fired power plant with CO2 postcombustion capture is investigated. Basically, a CSP system is used to support the heat requirement for amine regeneration, by producing saturated steam at low temperature. This allows to reduce or even eliminate the conventional steam extraction from the main power plant, affecting positively net power production and efficiency. The energy analysis of the whole system is carried out using the GateCycle software to simulate the coal-fired power plant and ChemCad platform for the CO2 capture process based on amine absorption.

  3. Trends in global CO2 emissions. 2012 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, J.G.J.; Peters, J.A.H.W. [PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Den Haag (Netherlands); Janssens-Maenhout, G. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability IES, European Commission' s Joint Research Centre JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    This report discusses the results of a trend assessment of global CO2 emissions up to 2011 and updates last year's assessment. This assessment focusses on the changes in annual CO2 emissions from 2010 to 2011, and includes not only fossil fuel combustion on which the BP reports are based, but also incorporates all other relevant CO2 emissions sources including flaring of waste gas during oil production, cement clinker production and other limestone uses, feedstock and other non-energy uses of fuels, and several other small sources. After a short description of the methods used (Chapter 2), we first present a summary of recent CO2 emission trends, by region and by country, and of the underlying trend of fossil fuel use, non-fossil energy and of other CO2 sources (Chapter 3). To provide a broader context of the global trends we also assess the cumulative global CO2 emissions of the last decade, i.e. since 2000, and compare it with scientific literature that analyse global emissions in relation to the target of 2C maximum global warming in the 21st century, which was adopted in the UN climate negotiations (Chapter 4). Compared to last year's report, Annex 1 includes a more detailed and updated discussion of the uncertainty in national and global CO2 emission estimates.

  4. Eroding vs. Depositional Sites: Varying Sensitivity of CO2 Emissions to Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Du, Lanlan; Hu, Yaxian; Guo, Shengli

    2017-04-01

    Erosion induced lateral transport of soil particles not only geographically redistributes soil organic carbon (SOC) across landscapes, but also relocate them to different microclimate conditions, potentially experiencing distinctive biochemical processes. To fully understand the impacts of soil erosion to atmospheric CO2, it requires to identify individual contributions from different geographic positions. Apart from differentiated CO2 emission potentials on eroding and depositional sites, previous reports have also recognized that the extents of SOC mineralization during transport can shift erosion induced effects from net sink to net source. However, most of the research or modeling has been carried out under current climate conditions. With more variable temperature patterns in the future, it is essential to understand the varying sensitivity of CO2 emissions to temperature changes on eroding and depositional sites. To systematically investigate the potential effects of temperature changes to erosion-induced CO2 emissions, four erosion plots were set up on the Chinese Loess Plateau. Each of the four plots had an eroding slope (1 m * 5 m, inclined at 20) filled with dark loess soil, and a depositional site (water tank by 1 m * 1 m) at the lower end. Soil temperature, soil moisture and CO2 emissions from surface at upper, middle and lower positions on each plot were continuously monitored from July 2014 to September 2015 under natural precipitation. Our results show that: 1) The depositional sites had up to 31% greater CO2 emission rates than the eroding slopes (1.38 vs. 1.05 µmol m-2 s-1 on average). This was probably because the mineralization of the enriched SOC at the depositional sites (6% greater than the original soil of 6.83 g kg-1 ) was enhanced by the more favorable soil moisture contents (0.25 m3 m-3 vs. 0.21 m3 m-3 at the eroding slopes). 2) The CO2 emissions from the depositional sites were much more sensitive to seasonal temperature changes

  5. Seasonal and temporal CO2 dynamics in three tropical mangrove creeks - A revision of global mangrove CO2 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosentreter, Judith A.; Maher, D. T.; Erler, D. V.; Murray, R.; Eyre, B. D.

    2018-02-01

    Continuous high-resolution surface water pCO2 and δ13C-CO2 and 222Rn (dry season only) were measured over two tidal cycles in the wet and dry season in three tropical tidal mangrove creeks on the north-eastern coast of Queensland, Australia. Mangrove surface water pCO2 followed a clear tidal pattern (ranging from 387 to 13,031 μatm) with higher pCO2-values in the wet season than in the dry season. The δ13C-CO2 in the mangrove waters ranged from -21.7 to -8.8‰ and was rather indicative of a mixed source than a distinct mangrove signature. Surface water CO2 was likely driven by a combination of mangrove and external carbon sources, e.g. exchange with groundwater/pore water enriched in 13C, or terrestrial carbon inputs with a significant contribution of C4-vegetation (sugar cane) source. The kinetic and equilibrium fractionation during the gas exchange at the water-atmosphere interface may have further caused a 13C-enrichment of the CO2 pool in the mangrove surface waters. Average CO2 evasion rates (58.7-277.6 mmol m-2 d-1) were calculated using different empirical gas transfer velocity models. Using our high-resolution time series data and previously published data, the average CO2 flux rate in mangrove ecosystems was estimated to be 56.5 ± 8.9 mmol m-2 d-1, which corresponds to a revised global mangrove CO2 emission of 34.1 ± 5.4 Tg C per year.

  6. PSO 7171 - Oxyfuel Combustion for below zero CO2 emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard, Maja Bøg; Brix, Jacob; Hansen, Brian Brun

    are sought which will enable a significant reduction of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions during the transformation period from the use of fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has the potential to significantly reduce CO2 emissions from power stations while allowing...... conventional combustion in air by using a mixture of pure oxygen and recirculated flue gas as the combustion medium thereby creating a flue gas highly concentrated in CO2 making the capture process economically more feasible compared to technologies with capture from more dilute CO2 streams. This project has......, and the perspectives for the implementation of oxyfuel combustion s a CO2 sequestration solution in the Danish power production system. Regarding the fundamental combustion characteristics (combustion, emissions, and ash), the project has not identified any disqualifying characteristics. On the contrary, oxyfuel has...

  7. Linking gene expression to productivity to unravel long- and short-term responses of seagrasses exposed to CO2 in volcanic vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivé, Irene; Silva, João; Lauritano, Chiara; Costa, Monya M.; Ruocco, Miriam; Procaccini, Gabriele; Santos, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Ocean acidification is a major threat for marine life but seagrasses are expected to benefit from high CO2. In situ (long-term) and transplanted (short-term) plant incubations of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were performed near and away the influence of volcanic CO2 vents at Vulcano Island to test the hypothesis of beneficial effects of CO2 on plant productivity. We relate, for the first time, the expression of photosynthetic, antioxidant and metal detoxification-related genes to net plant productivity (NPP). Results revealed a consistent pattern between gene expression and productivity indicating water origin as the main source of variability. However, the hypothesised beneficial effect of high CO2 around vents was not supported. We observed a consistent long- and short-term pattern of gene down-regulation and 2.5-fold NPP decrease in plants incubated in water from the vents and a generalized up-regulation and NPP increase in plants from the vent site incubated with water from the Reference site. Contrastingly, NPP of specimens experimentally exposed to a CO2 range significantly correlated with CO2 availability. The down-regulation of metal-related genes in C. nodosa leaves exposed to water from the venting site suggests that other factors than heavy metals, may be at play at Vulcano confounding the CO2 effects.

  8. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment facilitates cation release from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Zhu, J; Chen, G; Zheng, X; Oh, N-H; Rufty, T W; Richter, D deB; Hu, S

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) enrichment generally stimulates plant photosynthesis and nutrient uptake, modifying the local and global cycling of bioactive elements. Although nutrient cations affect the long-term productivity and carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems, little is known about the effect of CO(2) enrichment on cation availability in soil. In this study, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of CO(2)-enhancement of cation release from soil in rice agricultural systems. Elevated CO(2) increased organic C allocation belowground and net H(+) excretion from roots, and stimulated root and microbial respiration, reducing soil redox potential and increasing Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in soil solutions. Increased H(+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+) promoted Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release from soil cation exchange sites. These results indicate that over the short term, elevated CO(2) may stimulate cation release from soil and enhance plant growth. Over the long-term, however, CO(2)-induced cation release may facilitate cation losses and soil acidification, negatively feeding back to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  9. Recent global CO2 flux inferred from atmospheric CO2 observations and its regional analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The net surface exchange of CO2 for the years 2002–2007 is inferred from 12 181 atmospheric CO2 concentration data with a time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversion scheme. Monthly CO2 fluxes are optimized for 30 regions of the North America and 20 regions for the rest of the globe. Although there have been many previous multiyear inversion studies, the reliability of atmospheric inversion techniques has not yet been systematically evaluated for quantifying regional interannual variability in the carbon cycle. In this study, the global interannual variability of the CO2 flux is found to be dominated by terrestrial ecosystems, particularly by tropical land, and the variations of regional terrestrial carbon fluxes are closely related to climate variations. These interannual variations are mostly caused by abnormal meteorological conditions in a few months in the year or part of a growing season and cannot be well represented using annual means, suggesting that we should pay attention to finer temporal climate variations in ecosystem modeling. We find that, excluding fossil fuel and biomass burning emissions, terrestrial ecosystems and oceans absorb an average of 3.63 ± 0.49 and 1.94 ± 0.41 Pg C yr−1, respectively. The terrestrial uptake is mainly in northern land while the tropical and southern lands contribute 0.62 ± 0.47, and 0.67 ± 0.34 Pg C yr−1 to the sink, respectively. In North America, terrestrial ecosystems absorb 0.89 ± 0.18 Pg C yr−1 on average with a strong flux density found in the south-east of the continent.

  10. Environmental Life Cycle Analysis of Water and CO2-Based Fracturing Fluids Used in Unconventional Gas Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Rodney; Menefee, Anne H; Clarens, Andres F

    2016-12-06

    Many of the environmental impacts associated with hydraulic fracturing of unconventional gas wells are tied to the large volumes of water that such operations require. Efforts to develop nonaqueous alternatives have focused on carbon dioxide as a tunable working fluid even though the full environmental and production impacts of a switch away from water have yet to be quantified. Here we report on a life cycle analysis of using either water or CO 2 for gas production in the Marcellus shale. The results show that CO 2 -based fluids, as currently conceived, could reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 400% (with sequestration credit) and water consumption by 80% when compared to conventional water-based fluids. These benefits are offset by a 44% increase in net energy use when compared to slickwater fracturing as well as logistical barriers resulting from the need to move and store large volumes of CO 2 . Scenario analyses explore the outlook for CO 2 , which under best-case conditions could eventually reduce life cycle energy, water, and greenhouse gas (GHG) burdens associated with fracturing. To achieve these benefits, it will be necessary to reduce CO 2 sourcing and transport burdens and to realize opportunities for improved energy recovery, averted water quality impacts, and carbon storage.

  11. CO2 and CH4 in sea ice from a subarctic fjord under influence of riverine input

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crabeck, O.; Delille, B.; Thomas, D. N.

    2014-01-01

    We present CH4 concentration [CH4] and the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in bulk sea ice from subarctic, land-fast sea ice in the Kapisillit fjord, Greenland. The bulk ice [CH4] ranged from 1.8 to 12.1 nmol L−1, which corresponds to a partial pressure range of 3 to 28 ppmv. This is markedly higher...... than the average atmospheric methane content of 1.9 ppmv. Most of the trapped methane within the sea ice was evidently contained inside bubbles, and only a minor portion was dissolved in the brine. The bulk ice pCO2 ranged from 60 to 330 ppmv showing that sea ice at temperatures above −4 °C is under......-saturated compared to the atmosphere (390 ppmv). Our study adds to the few existing studies of CH4 and CO2 in sea ice and concludes that sub-arctic sea can be a sink for atmospheric CO2, while being a net source of CH4. Processes related to the freezing and melting of sea ice represents large unknowns...

  12. LBA-ECO CD-01 Simulated Atmospheric Circulation, CO2 Variation, Tapajos: August 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set consists of a single NetCDF file containing simulated three dimensional winds and CO2 concentrations centered on the Tapajos National Forest...

  13. LBA-ECO CD-01 Simulated Atmospheric Circulation, CO2 Variation, Tapajos: August 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of a single NetCDF file containing simulated three dimensional winds and CO2 concentrations centered on the Tapajos National Forest in Brazil...

  14. High-Precision Instrumentation for CO2 Isotope Ratio Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Knowing atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 ratios precisely is important to understanding biogenic and anthroprogenic sources and sinks for carbon. Currently available field...

  15. Enhanced Process for Methanol Production by CO2 Hydrogenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, Anton Alexandru; Pragt, J.J.; Vos, H.J.; Bargeman, Gerrald; de Groot, M.T.

    2016-01-01

    In the quest for a green chemical industry, much effort is devoted to the development of technologies for methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO2 – available from many sources. Low-cost sources of H2 are less frequently found, but an additional source at industrial scale is the wet hydrogen

  16. Research on CO2 Quality Pipeline Transportation Based on Yanchang Oilfield CCUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yongchao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 capture,utilization and storage (CCUS is now recognized as an important technology in the global scope of CO2 emission reduction, pipeline transportation is the main center to connect the capture point and the use storage point, the first issue to CO2 pipeline transportation is to solve CO2 source quality research. Yanchang Oilfield has the advantages of CCUS, its coal chemical capture of CO2 contains different impurities. In the CO2 pipeline transportation, the impurity content in CO2 is based on its end use and the actual situation of pipeline. The impurities will affect the efficiency of CO2-EOR, the choice of CO2 state equation, the changes of CO2 phase diagram and the capacity of pipeline transportation.

  17. RODZAJE METOD SEKWESTRACJI CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia LUBAŃSKA

    Full Text Available Z pojęciem ochrony środowiska wiąże się bardzo szeroko w ostatnim czasie omawiane zagadnienie dotyczące ograniczenia emisji CO2. Konsekwencją globalnych zmian klimatu wywołanego przez ludzi jest wzrost stężenia atmosferycznego gazów cieplarnianych, które powodują nasilający się efekt cieplarniany. Wzrasta na świecie liczba ludności, a co za tym idzie wzrasta konsumpcja na jednego mieszkańca, szczególnie w krajach szeroko rozwiniętych gospodarczo. Protokół z Kioto ściśle określa działania jakie należy podjąć w celu zmniejszenia stężenia dwutlenku węgla w atmosferze. Pomimo maksymalnej optymalizacji procesu spalania paliw kopalnianych wykorzystywanych do produkcji energii, zastosowania odnawialnych źródeł energii zmiana klimatu jest nieunikniona i konsekwentnie będzie postępować przez kolejne dekady. Prognozuje się, że duże znaczenie odegra nowoczesna technologia, która ma za zadanie wychwycenie CO2 a następnie składowanie go w odpowiednio wybranych formacjach geologicznych (CCS- Carbon Capture and Storage. Eksperci są zgodni, że ta technologia w niedalekiej przyszłości stanie się rozwiązaniem pozwalającym ograniczyć ogromną ilość emisji CO2 pochodzącą z procesów wytwarzania energii z paliw kopalnych. Z analiz Raportu IPCC wynika, iż technologia CSS może się przyczynić do ok. 20% redukcji emisji dwutlenku węgla przewidzianej do 2050 roku [3]. Zastosowanie jej napotyka na wiele barier, nie tylko technologicznych i ekonomicznych, ale także społecznych. Inną metodą dającą ujemne źródło emisji CO2 jest możliwość wykorzystania obszarów leśnych o odpowiedniej strukturze drzewostanu. Środkiem do tego celu, oprócz ograniczenia zużycia emisjogennych paliw kopalnych (przy zachowaniu zasad zrównoważonego rozwoju może być intensyfikacja zalesień. Zwiększanie lesistości i prawidłowa gospodarka leśna należy do najbardziej efektywnych sposobów kompensowania

  18. Achieving Negative CO2 Emissions by Protecting Ocean Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannara, A.

    2016-12-01

    Industrial Age CO2 added 1.8 trillion tons to the atmosphere. About ¼ has dissolved in seas. The rest still dissolves, bolstered by present emissions of >30 gigatons/year. Airborne & oceanic CO2 have induced sea warming & ocean acidification*. This paper suggests a way to induce a negative CO2-emissions environment for climate & oceans - preserve the planet`s dominant CO2-sequestration system ( 1 gigaton/year via calcifying sea life**) by promptly protecting ocean chemistry via expansion of clean power for both lime production & replacement of CO2-emitting sources. Provide natural alkali (CaO, MgO…) to oceans to maintain average pH above 8.0, as indicated by marine biologists. That alkali (lime) is available from past calcifying life's limestone deposits, so can be returned safely to seas once its CO2 is removed & permanently sequestered (Carbfix, BSCP, etc.***). Limestone is a dense source of CO2 - efficient processing per mole sequestered. Distribution of enough lime is possible via cargo-ship transits - 10,000 tons lime/transit, 1 million transits/year. New Panamax ships carry 120,000 tons. Just 10,000/transit allows gradual reduction of present & past CO2 emissions effects, if coupled with combustion-power reductions. CO2 separation from limestone, as in cement plants, consumes 400kWHrs of thermal energy per ton of output lime (or CO2). To combat yearly CO2 dissolution in seas, we must produce & distribute about 10gigatons of lime/year. Only nuclear power produces the clean energy (thousands of terawatt hours) to meet this need - 1000 dedicated 1GWe reactors, processing 12 cubic miles of limestone/year & sequestering CO2 into a similar mass of basalt. Basalt is common in the world. Researchers*** report it provides good, mineralized CO2 sequestration. The numbers above allow gradual CO2 reduction in air and seas, if we return to President Kennedy's energy path: http://tinyurl.com/6xgpkfa We're on an environmental precipice due to failure to eliminate

  19. Analysis of the sources and dynamic processes leading to the increase of atmospheric CO2, black carbon and other trace species during recent urban pollution events in the Paris megacity region : a synergy of resources provided by the IPSL OCAPI platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xueref-Remy, I.; Foret, G.; Beekmann, M.; Brégonzio-Rozier, L.; Favez, O.; Gros, V.; Moreau-Guigon, E.; Vogel, F. R.; Belviso, S.; Ghersi, V.; Dupont, J. C.; Bodichon, R.; Cailteau-Fischbach, C.; Baisnee, D.; Peinado, F.; Haeffelin, M.; DeCola, P.; Turnbull, J. C.; Chelin, P.; Te, Y. V.; Formenti, P.; Doussin, J. F.; Gratien, A.; Desboeufs, K. V.; Ramage, K.; Jeseck, P.; Delmotte, M.; Ramonet, M.; Michoud, V.; Ravetta, F.

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, more than 50% of the global population leave in urban centers which activities generate large anthropogenic emissions of CO2 (more than 70% of fossil fuel CO2 comes from urbanized/industrialized areas) and reactive gases that endanger our climate, the health of human beings and surrounding ecosystems. The worst situations are encountered during urban pollution events that usually form under anticyclonic conditions. Analyzing the contribution of the local and regional sources of urban CO2 and co-emitted species vs the remote ones, as well as the nature of these sources and the dynamical processes that lead to the building of such events can provide interesting knowledge for helping urban policy makers to better identify the role of anthropogenic/biogenic sources on the urban air composition and to take proper decisions in matter of CO2 and pollutants sources mitigation. With 12 million of people, Paris (France) is the second megacity in Europe. In 2016, two pollution events occured in the Paris region during which the instrumental platform OCAPI (http://observations.ipsl.fr/composition-atmospherique-en-idf.html) from IPSL (Institut Pierre Simon Laplace) was mobilized in collaboration with air quality governing actors (AIRPARIF, INERIS) to collect a bunch of observations. Five sites located in the urban, peri-urban and rural areas of Paris were equiped with in-situ analyzers (CO2, CO, black carbon, 13CO2, COS) ; Fourier transform spectrometers for column measurements (XCO2, XCO, XCOS), particle filters (for aerosols size and content analysis) ; air samples (levoglucosan, 14CO2, VOCs) ; and Lidar profilers (boundary layer height ; wind profiles). These data, combined with a backtrajectories analysis, give information about the dynamical processes that lead to the formation of the pollution events and on the contribution of local, regional and remote sources. The analysis of the correlations between the trace species and of the isotopic content of carbon in

  20. Plant nutrient mobilization in temperate heathland responds to elevated CO2, temperature and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Louise C.; Michelsen, Anders; Jonasson, Sven

    2010-01-01

    when combined with CO2 and drought. Below Deschampsia, the net nitrification rate decreased in response to drought and, while phosphorus availability and microbial P immobilization decreased, but nitrification increased in response to elevated CO2. Furthermore, leaf litter decomposition of both species...

  1. Survey report of FY 1997 on the trends of novel CO2 fixation technology using bacteria and microalgae; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (saikin sorui wo riyoshita atarashii nisanka tanso kotei gijutsu no doko chosa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    For this survey, the latest technology trends relating to microbial functions are summarized to recover and effectively utilize CO2, typical greenhouse effect gas, using microbial functions. Systematic survey and analysis are conducted concerning the microorganisms useful for fixing CO2, CO2 uptake mechanism during the microbial reactions, utilization methods of solar light and useful energy sources except solar light, highly efficient production of useful materials, and usage of produced useful materials. Research has concentrated on use of biological activities for this purpose through design of bioreactors using microorganisms (bacteria and microalgae) for efficient CO2 fixation. For the process to have net CO2 fixation as assessed by its life cycle and to make the process economically feasible, it is essential not only to fix CO2 merely in the form of biomass but in addition to convert it to useful materials by the catalytic activities of the organisms. Three categories were set for the survey, i.e., microorganisms with CO2 fixation ability, available energy for CO2 fixation, and target CO2 fixation products. 169 refs., 49 figs., 14 tabs.

  2. Modeling Atmospheric CO2 Processes to Constrain the Missing Sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. R.; Denning, A. S.; Erickson, D. J.; Collatz, J. C.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We report on a NASA supported modeling effort to reduce uncertainty in carbon cycle processes that create the so-called missing sink of atmospheric CO2. Our overall objective is to improve characterization of CO2 source/sink processes globally with improved formulations for atmospheric transport, terrestrial uptake and release, biomass and fossil fuel burning, and observational data analysis. The motivation for this study follows from the perspective that progress in determining CO2 sources and sinks beyond the current state of the art will rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. The major components of this effort are: 1) Continued development of the chemistry and transport model using analyzed meteorological fields from the Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, with comparison to real time data in both forward and inverse modes; 2) An advanced biosphere model, constrained by remote sensing data, coupled to the global transport model to produce distributions of CO2 fluxes and concentrations that are consistent with actual meteorological variability; 3) Improved remote sensing estimates for biomass burning emission fluxes to better characterize interannual variability in the atmospheric CO2 budget and to better constrain the land use change source; 4) Evaluating the impact of temporally resolved fossil fuel emission distributions on atmospheric CO2 gradients and variability. 5) Testing the impact of existing and planned remote sensing data sources (e.g., AIRS, MODIS, OCO) on inference of CO2 sources and sinks, and use the model to help establish measurement requirements for future remote sensing instruments. The results will help to prepare for the use of OCO and other satellite data in a multi-disciplinary carbon data assimilation system for analysis and prediction of carbon cycle changes and carbodclimate interactions.

  3. CO2 leakage monitoring and analysis to understand the variation of CO2 concentration in vadose zone by natural effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joun, Won-Tak; Ha, Seung-Wook; Kim, Hyun Jung; Ju, YeoJin; Lee, Sung-Sun; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2017-04-01

    Controlled ex-situ experiments and continuous CO2 monitoring in the field are significant implications for detecting and monitoring potential leakage from CO2 sequestration reservoir. However, it is difficult to understand the observed parameters because the natural disturbance will fluctuate the signal of detections in given local system. To identify the original source leaking from sequestration reservoir and to distinguish the camouflaged signal of CO2 concentration, the artificial leakage test was conducted in shallow groundwater environment and long-term monitoring have been performed. The monitoring system included several parameters such as pH, temperature, groundwater level, CO2 gas concentration, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, borehole pressure, and rainfall event etc. Especially in this study, focused on understanding a relationship among the CO2 concentration, wind speed, rainfall and pressure difference. The results represent that changes of CO2 concentration in vadose zone could be influenced by physical parameters and this reason is helpful in identifying the camouflaged signal of CO2 concentrations. The 1-D column laboratory experiment also was conducted to understand the sparking-peak as shown in observed data plot. The results showed a similar peak plot and could consider two assumptions why the sparking-peak was shown. First, the trapped CO2 gas was escaped when the water table was changed. Second, the pressure equivalence between CO2 gas and water was broken when the water table was changed. These field data analysis and laboratory experiment need to advance due to comprehensively quantify local long-term dynamics of the artificial CO2 leaking aquifer. Acknowledgement Financial support was provided by the "R&D Project on Environmental Management of Geologic CO2 Storage" from the KEITI (Project Number: 2014001810003)

  4. [Differences and sources of CO2 concentration, carbon and oxygen stable isotope composition between inside and outside of a green space system and influencing factors in an urban area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-jia; Meng, Ping; Zhang, Jin-song; Shu, Jian-hua; Zheng, Ning

    2015-10-01

    The off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy technique was used to measure air CO2 concentration, stable carbon (δ13C) and oxygen (δ18C) isotope ratios on the Fourth Ring Road (FRR) and in the green space system of Beijing Institute of Landscape Architecture (BILA) in summer and winter seasons. The variations of CO2 concentration, δ13C value, δ18C value and the differences of them between the FRR and the BILA, which were correlated with traffic volume and meteorological factors, were analyzed at half-hour timescale. The results showed that traffic volume on the FRR was large both in summer and winter with obvious morning and evening rush hours, and more than 150 thousands vehicles were observed everyday during the observation periods. Diurnal variation of the CO2 concentration showed a two-peak curve both on the FRR and in the green space system of the BILA. In contrast, diurnal variation of δ13C value was a two-trough curve while diurnal variation of δ18O value was a single-trough curve. The differences of CO2 concentration, δ13C value and δ18O value between the FRR and the green space system of BILA in summer were greater than those in winter. The carbon isotope partitioning results showed that in summer vehicle exhaust contributed 64.9% to total atmospheric CO2 of the FRR during measurement time, while heterotrophic respiration contributed 56.3% to total atmospheric CO2 of the green space system in BILA. However, in winter atmospheric CO2 from both the FRR and green space system mostly came from vehicle exhaust. Stepwise regression analysis indicated that differences of CO2 concentration between the FRR and green space system were significantly related to vehicle volume and solar radiation at half-hour timescale, while solar radiation and relative humidity were the main meteorological factors causing δ13 and δ18O differences between the FRR and green space system. Plants in the green space system strongly assimilated CO2 from fossil fuel burning

  5. CO2 mitigation via capture and chemical conversion in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Greg H

    2011-02-01

    A lab-scale seawater/mineral carbonate gas scrubber was found to remove up to 97% of CO(2) in a simulated flue gas stream at ambient temperature and pressure, with a large fraction of this carbon ultimately converted to dissolved calcium bicarbonate. After full equilibration with air, up to 85% of the captured carbon was retained in solution, that is, it did not degas or precipitate. Thus, above-ground CO(2) hydration and mineral carbonate scrubbing may provide a relatively simple point-source CO(2) capture and storage scheme at coastal locations. Such low-tech CO(2) mitigation could be especially relevant for retrofitting to existing power plants and for deployment in the developing world, the primary source of future CO(2) emissions. Addition of the resulting alkaline solution to the ocean may benefit marine ecosystems that are currently threatened by acidification, while also allowing the utilization of the vast potential of the sea to safely sequester anthropogenic carbon. This approach in essence hastens Nature's own very effective but slow CO(2) mitigation process; carbonate mineral weathering is a major consumer of excess atmospheric CO(2) and ocean acidity on geologic times scales.

  6. Consumption of methane and CO2 by methanotrophic microbial mats from gas seeps of the anoxic Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, Tina; Orphan, Victoria; Knittel, Katrin; Gieseke, Armin; House, Christopher H; Boetius, Antje

    2007-04-01

    The deep anoxic shelf of the northwestern Black Sea has numerous gas seeps, which are populated by methanotrophic microbial mats in and above the seafloor. Above the seafloor, the mats can form tall reef-like structures composed of porous carbonate and microbial biomass. Here, we investigated the spatial patterns of CH(4) and CO(2) assimilation in relation to the distribution of ANME groups and their associated bacteria in mat samples obtained from the surface of a large reef structure. A combination of different methods, including radiotracer incubation, beta microimaging, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, was applied to sections of mat obtained from the large reef structure to locate hot spots of methanotrophy and to identify the responsible microbial consortia. In addition, CO(2) reduction to methane was investigated in the presence or absence of methane, sulfate, and hydrogen. The mat had an average delta(13)C carbon isotopic signature of -67.1 per thousand, indicating that methane was the main carbon source. Regions dominated by ANME-1 had isotope signatures that were significantly heavier (-66.4 per thousand +/- 3.9 per thousand [mean +/- standard deviation; n = 7]) than those of the more central regions dominated by ANME-2 (-72.9 per thousand +/- 2.2 per thousand; n = 7). Incorporation of (14)C from radiolabeled CH(4) or CO(2) revealed one hot spot for methanotrophy and CO(2) fixation close to the surface of the mat and a low assimilation efficiency (1 to 2% of methane oxidized). Replicate incubations of the mat with (14)CH(4) or (14)CO(2) revealed that there was interconversion of CH(4) and CO(2.) The level of CO(2) reduction was about 10% of the level of anaerobic oxidation of methane. However, since considerable methane formation was observed only in the presence of methane and sulfate, the process appeared to be a rereaction of anaerobic oxidation of methane rather than net

  7. Surface heat flow and CO2 emissions within the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissmann, C.; Christenson, B.; Werner, C.; Leybourne, M.; Cole, J.; Gravley, D.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions and heat flow have been determined from the Ohaaki hydrothermal field, Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand following 20a of production (116MW e). Soil CO2 degassing was quantified with 2663 CO2 flux measurements using the accumulation chamber method, and 2563 soil temperatures were measured and converted to equivalent heat flow (Wm -2) using published soil temperature heat flow functions. Both CO2 flux and heat flow were analysed statistically and then modelled using 500 sequential Gaussian simulations. Forty subsoil CO 2 gas samples were also analysed for stable C isotopes. Following 20a of production, current CO2 emissions equated to 111??6.7T/d. Observed heat flow was 70??6.4MW, compared with a pre-production value of 122MW. This 52MW reduction in surface heat flow is due to production-induced drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows (61.5MW) and steam-heated pools (8.6MW) within the Ohaaki West thermal area (OHW). The drying up of all alkali-Cl outflows at Ohaaki means that the soil zone is now the major natural pathway of heat release from the high-temperature reservoir. On the other hand, a net gain in thermal ground heat flow of 18MW (from 25MW to 43.3??5MW) at OHW is associated with permeability increases resulting from surface unit fracturing by production-induced ground subsidence. The Ohaaki East (OHE) thermal area showed no change in distribution of shallow and deep soil temperature contours despite 20a of production, with an observed heat flow of 26.7??3MW and a CO 2 emission rate of 39??3T/d. The negligible change in the thermal status of the OHE thermal area is attributed to the low permeability of the reservoir beneath this area, which has limited production (mass extraction) and sheltered the area from the pressure decline within the main reservoir. Chemistry suggests that although alkali-Cl outflows once contributed significantly to the natural surface heat flow (~50%) they contributed little (99% of the original CO 2

  8. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater Marsh ecosystems in the Florida everglades.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparkle L Malone

    Full Text Available This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO, water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2 exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009-2013 from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (-11 to -110 g CO2 m-2 yr-1 compared to El Niño and neutral years (-5 to -43.5 g CO2 m-2 yr-1. SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m-2 yr-1 except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (-16 g CO2 m-2 yr-1. Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades.

  9. El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) enhances CO2 exchange rates in freshwater Marsh ecosystems in the Florida everglades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Sparkle L; Staudhammer, Christina L; Oberbauer, Steven F; Olivas, Paulo; Ryan, Michael G; Schedlbauer, Jessica L; Loescher, Henry W; Starr, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the relationships between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), water level, precipitation patterns and carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange rates in the freshwater wetland ecosystems of the Florida Everglades. Data was obtained over a 5-year study period (2009-2013) from two freshwater marsh sites located in Everglades National Park that differ in hydrology. At the short-hydroperiod site (Taylor Slough; TS) and the long-hydroperiod site (Shark River Slough; SRS) fluctuations in precipitation patterns occurred with changes in ENSO phase, suggesting that extreme ENSO phases alter Everglades hydrology which is known to have a substantial influence on ecosystem carbon dynamics. Variations in both ENSO phase and annual net CO2 exchange rates co-occurred with changes in wet and dry season length and intensity. Combined with site-specific seasonality in CO2 exchanges rates, El Niño and La Niña phases magnified season intensity and CO2 exchange rates at both sites. At TS, net CO2 uptake rates were higher in the dry season, whereas SRS had greater rates of carbon sequestration during the wet season. As La Niña phases were concurrent with drought years and extended dry seasons, TS became a greater sink for CO2 on an annual basis (-11 to -110 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) compared to El Niño and neutral years (-5 to -43.5 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). SRS was a small source for CO2 annually (1.81 to 80 g CO2 m-2 yr-1) except in one exceptionally wet year that was associated with an El Niño phase (-16 g CO2 m-2 yr-1). Considering that future climate predictions suggest a higher frequency and intensity in El Niño and La Niña phases, these results indicate that changes in extreme ENSO phases will significantly alter CO2 dynamics in the Florida Everglades.

  10. Anomalous CO2 Emissions in Different Ecosystems Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Canete, E. P.; Moya Jiménez, M. R.; Kowalski, A. S.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; López-Ballesteros, A.; Oyonarte, C.; Domingo, F.

    2016-12-01

    As an important tool for understanding and monitoring ecosystem dynamics at ecosystem level, the eddy covariance (EC) technique allows the assessment of the diurnal and seasonal variation of the net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Despite the high temporal resolution data available, there are still many processes (in addition to photosynthesis and respiration) that, although they are being monitored, have been neglected. Only a few authors have studied anomalous CO2 emissions (non biological), and have related them to soil ventilation, photodegradation or geochemical processes. The aim of this study is: 1) to identify anomalous short term CO2 emissions in different ecosystems distributed around the world, 2) to determine the meteorological variables that are influencing these emissions, and 3) to explore the potential processes that can be involved. We have studied EC data together with other meteorological ancillary variables obtained from the FLUXNET database (version 2015) and have found more than 50 sites with anomalous CO2 emissions in different ecosystem types such as grasslands, croplands or savannas. Data were filtered according to the FLUXNET quality control flags (only data with quality control flag equal to 0 was used) and correlation analysis were performed with NEE and ancillary data. Preliminary results showed strong and highly significant correlations between meteorological variables and anomalous CO2 emissions. Correlation results showed clear differing behaviors between ecosystems types, which could be related to the different processes involved in the anomalous CO2 emissions. We suggest that anomalous CO2 emissions are happening globally and therefore, their contribution to the global net ecosystem carbon balance requires further investigation in order to better understand its drivers.

  11. Soil CO2 emissions in terms of irrigation management in an agricultural soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Acosta, José A.; María de la Rosa, José; Faz, Ángel; Domingo, Rafael; Pérez-Pastor, Alejandro; Ángeles Muñoz, María

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation water restrictions in the Mediterranean area are reaching worrying proportions and represent a serious threat to traditional crops and encourage the movement of people who choose to work in other activities. This situation has created a growing interest in water conservation, particularly among practitioners of irrigated agriculture, the main recipient of water resources (>80%). For these and other reasons, the scientific and technical irrigation scheduling of water use to maintain and even improve harvest yield and quality has been and will remain a major challenge for irrigated agriculture. Apart from environmental and economic benefits by water savings, deficit irrigation may contribute to reduce soil CO2 emissions and enhance C sequestration in soils. The reduction of soil moisture levels decreases microbial activity, with the resulting slowing down of organic matter mineralization. Besides, the application of water by irrigation may increment the precipitation rate of carbonates, favoring the storage of C, but depending on the source of calcium or bicarbonate, the net reaction can be either storage or release of C. Thus, the objective of this study was to assess if deficit irrigation, besides contributing to water savings, can reduce soil CO2 emissions and favor the accumulation of C in soils in stable forms. The experiment was carried out along 2012 in a commercial orchard from southeast Spain cultivated with nectarine trees (Prunus persica cv. 'Viowhite'). The irrigation system was drip localized. Three irrigation treatments were assayed: a control (CT), irrigated to satisfy the total hydric needs of the crop; a first deficit irrigation (DI1), irrigated as CT except for postharvest period (16 June - 28 October) were 50% of CT was applied; and a second deficit irrigation (DI2), irrigated as DI1, except for two periods in which irrigation was suppressed (16 June-6 July and 21 July-17 August). Each treatment was setup in triplicate, randomly

  12. Program NetMoment; Simultaneous Calculation of Moment, Source Corner Frequency, and Site Specific t* from Network Recordings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchings, L

    2001-12-12

    The purpose of computer program NetMoment (Appendix I) is to utilize fundamental knowledge of earthquake sources, propagation attenuation, and site response in a simultaneous inversion of network data to determine the moment and source corner frequency of earthquakes, and site specific t*. The source parameters are especially difficult to determine for small earthquakes. A fundamental problem in determining the source corner frequencies of small earthquakes is that site response can result in spectral corner frequencies in the range that may be expected from the earthquakes themselves. Several authors have identified this as fmax (Hanks, 1982), a constant corner frequency for small events so that below threshold moment (about 1.0 x 10{sup 21} dyne-cm) the corner frequency remains constant the size of events diminishes. Hutchings and Wu (1990) found that for the southern California region, events with moment less than about 1.5 x 10{sup 21} dyne-cm (about magnitude 3.4) show no source effect in their spectra. Hanks (1982) found the threshold to be about 1.0 x l0{sup 21} dyne-cm for other southern California sites. Baise et al. (2002) found borehole recordings on Yerba Buena Island, in San Francisco Bay, to have corner frequencies limited to about 3-5 Hz for M < 4.0 earthquakes in the region. Some authors have attributed this to a minimum source dimension for earthquakes, which results in a decrease in stress drop for smaller events (Archuleta et al., 1982; Papageorgiou and Aki, 1983). alternative explanation is that the constant corner frequencies result from whole path or near site attenuation and/or amplifications due to soil response. This is supported by a wide body of literature (Anderson and Hough, 1984, Hutchings and Wu, 1990, Blakeslee and Malin, 1991; Aster and Shearer, 1991; Abercrombie, 1995). Abercrombie, for example, estimated source corner frequencies from events recorded in granite at a depth of 2.5 Km in the Cajon Pass scientific drill hole and

  13. CO2-Reduction Primary Cell for Use on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Narayanan, Sekhanipuram

    2007-01-01

    A document proposes a CO2-reduction primary electrochemical cell as a building block of batteries to supply electric power on the surface of Venus. The basic principle of the proposed cell is similar to that of terrestrial Zn-air batteries, the major differences being that (1) the anode metal would not be Zn and (2) CO2, which is about 96.5 mole percent of the Venusian atmosphere, would be used, instead of O2, as the source of oxygen.

  14. Effects of Long-Term CO2 Enrichment on Soil-Atmosphere CH4 Fluxes and the Spatial Micro-Distribution of Methanotrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbin, Saeed; Guillet, Cécile; Kammann, Claudia I; Niklaus, Pascal A

    2015-01-01

    Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant growth and associated C cycling have intensively been studied, but less is known about effects on the fluxes of radiatively active trace gases other than CO2. Net soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes are determined by the balance of soil microbially-driven methane (CH4) oxidation and methanogenesis, and both might change under elevated CO2. Here, we studied CH4 dynamics in a permanent grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 14 years. Soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4 were measured using large static chambers, over a period of four years. The ecosystem was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 for most of the time except summer to fall when net CH4 emissions occurred. We did not detect any elevated CO2 effects on CH4 fluxes, but emissions were difficult to quantify due to their discontinuous nature, most likely because of ebullition from the saturated zone. Potential methanotrophic activity, determined by incubation of fresh sieved soil under standardized conditions, also did not reveal any effect of the CO2 treatment. Finally, we determined the spatial micro-distribution of methanotrophic activity at less than 5× atmospheric (10 ppm) and elevated (10000 ppm) CH4 concentrations, using a novel auto-radiographic technique. These analyses indicated that domains of net CH4 assimilation were distributed throughout the analyzed top 15 cm of soils, with no dependence on CH4 concentration or CO2 treatment. Our investigations suggest that elevated CO2 exerts no or only minor effects on CH4 fluxes in the type of ecosystem we studied, at least as long as soil moisture differences are small or absent as was the case here. The autoradiographic analyses further indicate that the spatial niche of CH4 oxidation does not shift in response to CO2 enrichment or CH4 concentration, and that the same type of methanotrophs may oxidize CH4 from atmospheric and soil-internal sources.

  15. Effects of Long-Term CO2 Enrichment on Soil-Atmosphere CH4 Fluxes and the Spatial Micro-Distribution of Methanotrophic Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Karbin

    Full Text Available Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations on plant growth and associated C cycling have intensively been studied, but less is known about effects on the fluxes of radiatively active trace gases other than CO2. Net soil-atmosphere CH4 fluxes are determined by the balance of soil microbially-driven methane (CH4 oxidation and methanogenesis, and both might change under elevated CO2.Here, we studied CH4 dynamics in a permanent grassland exposed to elevated CO2 for 14 years. Soil-atmosphere fluxes of CH4 were measured using large static chambers, over a period of four years. The ecosystem was a net sink for atmospheric CH4 for most of the time except summer to fall when net CH4 emissions occurred. We did not detect any elevated CO2 effects on CH4 fluxes, but emissions were difficult to quantify due to their discontinuous nature, most likely because of ebullition from the saturated zone. Potential methanotrophic activity, determined by incubation of fresh sieved soil under standardized conditions, also did not reveal any effect of the CO2 treatment. Finally, we determined the spatial micro-distribution of methanotrophic activity at less than 5× atmospheric (10 ppm and elevated (10000 ppm CH4 concentrations, using a novel auto-radiographic technique. These analyses indicated that domains of net CH4 assimilation were distributed throughout the analyzed top 15 cm of soils, with no dependence on CH4 concentration or CO2 treatment.Our investigations suggest that elevated CO2 exerts no or only minor effects on CH4 fluxes in the type of ecosystem we studied, at least as long as soil moisture differences are small or absent as was the case here. The autoradiographic analyses further indicate that the spatial niche of CH4 oxidation does not shift in response to CO2 enrichment or CH4 concentration, and that the same type of methanotrophs may oxidize CH4 from atmospheric and soil-internal sources.

  16. Plasma Arc Augmented CO2 laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Andersen, Mikkel; Frederiksen, Niels

    2001-01-01

    In order to reduce the hardness of laser beam welded 2.13 mm medium strength steel CMn 250, a plasma arc has been used simultaneously with a 2.6 kW CO2 laser source. In a number of systematic laboratory tests, the plasma arc current, plasma gas flow and distance to the laser source were varied...... with all laser parameters fixed. The welds were quality assessed and hardness measured transversely to the welding direction in the top, middle and root of the seam. In the seams welded by laser alone, hardness values between 275 and 304 HV1 were measured, about the double of the base material, 150 HV1...

  17. Contribution of seagrass plants to CO2 capture in a tropical seagrass meadow under experimental disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Deyanova

    Full Text Available Coastal vegetative habitats are known to be highly productive environments with a high ability to capture and store carbon. During disturbance this important function could be compromised as plant photosynthetic capacity, biomass, and/or growth are reduced. To evaluate effects of disturbance on CO2 capture in plants we performed a five-month manipulative experiment in a tropical seagrass (Thalassia hemprichii meadow exposed to two intensity levels of shading and simulated grazing. We assessed CO2 capture potential (as net CO2 fixation using areal productivity calculated from continuous measurements of diel photosynthetic rates, and estimates of plant morphology, biomass and productivity/respiration (P/R ratios (from the literature. To better understand the plant capacity to coping with level of disturbance we also measured plant growth and resource allocation. We observed substantial reductions in seagrass areal productivity, biomass, and leaf area that together resulted in a negative daily carbon balance in the two shading treatments as well as in the high-intensity simulated grazing treatment. Additionally, based on the concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and starch in the rhizomes, we found that the main reserve sources for plant growth were reduced in all treatments except for the low-intensity simulated grazing treatment. If permanent, these combined adverse effects will reduce the plants' resilience and capacity to recover after disturbance. This might in turn have long-lasting and devastating effects on important ecosystem functions, including the carbon sequestration capacity of the seagrass system.

  18. Physiographic position modulates the influence of temperature and precipitation as controls over leaf and ecosystem level CO2 flux in shrubland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron-Gafford, G. A.; Scott, R. L.; Jenerette, G. D.; Hamerlynck, E. P.; Huxman, T. E.

    2010-12-01

    Conversion of semiarid grasslands to shrublands may alter the sensitivity of CO2 exchange of both the dominant plants and the entire ecosystem to variation in air temperature and precipitation. We used a combination of leaf-level gas exchange experimentation and ecosystem-level eddy covariance monitoring techniques to quantify the temperature sensitivity of a riparian and upland shrubland across seasonal periods of differing precipitation input in southeastern Arizona, USA. Maximum rates of net CO2 uptake were estimated from a Lorentzian peak function fitted to net uptake plotted against air temperature, with optimum temperature being that at which maximum uptake occurred. The convexity of the temperature response function was quantified by the range of temperatures over which a leaf or an ecosystem assimilated 50% and 75% of maximum net CO2 uptake. We quantified the temperature response of both the dominant vegetative components within both semiarid shrublands of differing physiographic position and the ecosystems themselves to examine how temperature sensitivity varies with access to stable groundwater. By repeatedly measuring CO2 uptake across a wide range of temperatures and estimating soil respiration, we quantified the temperature sensitivity of these systems, computed changes in those responses due to periods of precipitation input, and estimated the role of component fluxes in driving ecosystem-scale responses. We found that having a connectivity to stable groundwater sources decoupled leaf-and ecosystem-scale temperature sensitivity relative to comparable sites lacking such access. Access to groundwater not only resulted in the temperature sensitivity of the riparian shrubland being nearly half that of the upland throughout all seasonal periods, but also actual rates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) being 1.5X greater when precipitation was relatively abundant and five times greater when it was not. Maxima rates of NEP were nine times more responsive to

  19. Microbial dissolution of calcite at T = 28 °C and ambient pCO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Andrew D.; Wu, Lingling

    2009-04-01

    This study used batch reactors to quantify the mechanisms and rates of calcite dissolution in the presence and absence of a single heterotrophic bacterial species ( Burkholderia fungorum). Experiments were conducted at T = 28°C and ambient pCO 2 over time periods spanning either 21 or 35 days. Bacteria were supplied with minimal growth media containing either glucose or lactate as a C source, NH 4+ as an N source, and H 2PO 4- as a P source. Combining stoichiometric equations for microbial growth with an equilibrium mass-balance model of the H 2O-CO 2-CaCO 3 system demonstrates that B. fungorum affected calcite dissolution by modifying pH and alkalinity during utilization of ionic N and C species. Uptake of NH 4+ decreased pH and alkalinity, whereas utilization of lactate, a negatively charged organic anion, increased pH and alkalinity. Calcite in biotic glucose-bearing reactors dissolved by simultaneous reaction with H 2CO 3 generated by dissolution of atmospheric CO 2 (H 2CO 3 + CaCO 3 → Ca 2+ + 2HCO 3-) and H + released during NH 4+ uptake (H + + CaCO 3 → Ca 2+ + HCO 3-). Reaction with H 2CO 3 and H + supplied ˜45% and 55% of the total Ca 2+ and ˜60% and 40% of the total HCO 3-, respectively. The net rate of microbial calcite dissolution in the presence of glucose and NH 4+ was ˜2-fold higher than that observed for abiotic control experiments where calcite dissolved only by reaction with H 2CO 3. In lactate bearing reactors, most H + generated by NH 4+ uptake reacted with HCO 3- produced by lactate oxidation to yield CO 2 and H 2O. Hence, calcite in biotic lactate-bearing reactors dissolved by reaction with H 2CO 3 at a net rate equivalent to that calculated for abiotic control experiments. This study suggests that conventional carbonate equilibria models can satisfactorily predict the bulk fluid chemistry resulting from microbe-calcite interactions, provided that the ionic forms and extent of utilization of N and C sources can be constrained. Because

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O' Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  1. A Study of the Short-term Variability of Seawater pCO2 near Östergarnsholm

    OpenAIRE

    Persson Söderman, Jennie

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an analysis of upwelling and biological activities impact on the seawater pCO2 variability was done to improve the knowledge about the pCO2 variability in seawater in the Baltic Sea. During upwelling activity, CO2 rich waters are upwelled to the surface. This influences air-sea CO2 flux and thus the net uptake/emission of CO2 by the sea. pCO2 and SST measurements from a SAMI sensor, located at the Östergarnsholm site in the Baltic Sea, and SST satellite data, was used to ident...

  2. Technical insight on the requirements for CO2-saturated growth of microalgae in photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvraj; Padmanabhan, Padmini

    2017-06-01

    Microalgal cultures are usually sparged with CO 2 -enriched air to preclude CO 2 limitation during photoautotrophic growth. However, the CO 2 vol% specifically required at operating conditions to meet the carbon requirement of algal cells in photobioreactor is never determined and 1-10% v/v CO 2 -enriched air is arbitrarily used. A scheme is proposed and experimentally validated for Chlorella vulgaris that allows computing CO 2 -saturated growth feasible at given CO 2 vol% and volumetric O 2 mass-transfer coefficient (k L a) O . CO 2 sufficiency in an experiment can be theoretically established to adjust conditions for CO 2 -saturated growth. The methodology completely eliminates the requirement of CO 2 electrode for online estimation of dissolved CO 2 to determine critical CO 2 concentration (C crit ), specific CO 2 uptake rate (SCUR), and volumetric CO 2 mass-transfer coefficient (k L a) C required for the governing CO 2 mass-transfer equation. C crit was estimated from specific O 2 production rate (SOPR) measurements at different dissolved CO 2 concentrations. SCUR was calculated from SOPR and photosynthetic quotient (PQ) determined from the balanced stoichiometric equation of growth. Effect of light attenuation and nutrient depletion on biomass estimate is also discussed. Furthermore, a simple design of photosynthetic activity measurement system was used, which minimizes light attenuation by hanging a low depth (ca. 10 mm) culture over the light source.

  3. Passive CO2 concentration in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Rowan F; Khoshravesh, Roxana

    2016-06-01

    Photorespiratory limitations on C3 photosynthesis are substantial in warm, low CO2 conditions. To compensate, certain plants evolved mechanisms to actively concentrate CO2 around Rubisco using ATP-supported CO2 pumps such as C4 photosynthesis. Plants can also passively accumulate CO2 without additional ATP expenditure by localizing the release of photorespired and respired CO2 around Rubisco that is diffusively isolated from peripheral air spaces. Passive accumulation of photorespired CO2 occurs when glycine decarboxylase is localized to vascular sheath cells in what is termed C2 photosynthesis, and through forming sheaths of chloroplasts around the periphery of mesophyll cells. The peripheral sheaths require photorespired CO2 to re-enter chloroplasts where it can be refixed. Passive accumulation of respiratory CO2 is common in organs such as stems, fruits and flowers, due to abundant heterotrophic tissues and high diffusive resistance along the organ periphery. Chloroplasts within these organs are able to exploit this high CO2 to reduce photorespiration. CO2 concentration can also be enhanced passively by channeling respired CO2 from roots and rhizomes into photosynthetic cells of stems and leaves via lacunae, aerenchyma and the xylem stream. Through passive CO2 concentration, C3 species likely improved their carbon economy and maintained fitness during episodes of low atmospheric CO2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental potential of the use of CO2 from alcoholic fermentation processes. The CO2-AFP strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Moreno, Carlos; García-Yuste, Santiago

    2016-10-15

    A novel Carbon Dioxide Utilization (CDU) approach from a relatively minor CO2 emission source, i.e., alcoholic fermentation processes (AFP), is presented. The CO2 produced as a by-product from the AFP is estimated by examining the EtOH consumed per year reported by the World Health Organization in 2014. It is proposed that the extremely pure CO2 from the AFP is captured in NaOH solutions to produce one of the Top 10 commodities in the chemical industry, Na2CO3, as a good example of an atomic economy process. The novel CDU strategy could yield over 30.6Mt of Na2CO3 in oversaturated aqueous solution on using ca. 12.7Mt of captured CO2 and this process would consume less energy than the synthetic methodology (Solvay ammonia soda process) and would not produce low-value by-products. The quantity of Na2CO3 obtained by this strategy could represent ca. 50% of the world Na2CO3 production in one year. In terms of the green economy, the viability of the strategy is discussed according to the recommendations of the CO2Chem network, and an estimation of the CO2negative emission achieved suggests a capture of around 280.0Mt of CO2 from now to 2020 or ca. 1.9Gt from now to 2050. Finally, the results obtained for this new CDU proposal are discussed by considering different scenarios; the CO2 production in a typical winemaking corporation, the CO2 released in the most relevant wine-producing countries, and the use of CO2 from AFP as an alternative for the top Na2CO3-producing countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of experimental water table and temperature manipulations on ecosystem CO2 fluxes in an Alaskan rich fen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Waddington, J.M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Peatlands store 30% of the world's terrestrial soil carbon (C) and those located at northern latitudes are expected to experience rapid climate warming. We monitored growing season carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes across a factorial design of in situ water table (control, drought, and flooded plots) and soil warming (control vs. warming via open top chambers) treatments for 2 years in a rich fen located just outside the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in interior Alaska. The drought (lowered water table position) treatment was a weak sink or small source of atmospheric CO2 compared to the moderate atmospheric CO2 sink at our control. This change in net ecosystem exchange was due to lower gross primary production and light-saturated photosynthesis rather than increased ecosystem respiration. The flooded (raised water table position) treatment was a greater CO2 sink in 2006 due largely to increased early season gross primary production and higher light-saturated photosynthesis. Although flooding did not have substantial effects on rates of ecosystem respiration, this water table treatment had lower maximum respiration rates and a higher temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration than the control plot. Surface soil warming increased both ecosystem respiration and gross primary production by approximately 16% compared to control (ambient temperature) plots, with no net effect on net ecosystem exchange. Results from this rich fen manipulation suggest that fast responses to drought will include reduced ecosystem C storage driven by plant stress, whereas inundation will increase ecosystem C storage by stimulating plant growth. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  6. The Value of CO2-Geothermal Bulk Energy Storage to Reducing CO2 Emissions Compared to Conventional Bulk Energy Storage Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogland-Hand, J.; Bielicki, J. M.; Buscheck, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Sedimentary basin geothermal resources and CO2 that is captured from large point sources can be used for bulk energy storage (BES) in order to accommodate higher penetration and utilization of variable renewable energy resources. Excess energy is stored by pressurizing and injecting CO2 into deep, porous, and permeable aquifers that are ubiquitous throughout the United States. When electricity demand exceeds supply, some of the pressurized and geothermally-heated CO2 can be produced and used to generate electricity. This CO2-BES approach reduces CO2 emissions directly by storing CO2 and indirectly by using some of that CO2 to time-shift over-generation and displace CO2 emissions from fossil-fueled power plants that would have otherwise provided electricity. As such, CO2-BES may create more value to regional electricity systems than conventional pumped hydro energy storage (PHES) or compressed air energy storage (CAES) approaches that may only create value by time-shifting energy and indirectly reducing CO2 emissions. We developed and implemented a method to estimate the value that BES has to reducing CO2 emissions from regional electricity systems. The method minimizes the dispatch of electricity system components to meet exogenous demand subject to various CO2 prices, so that the value of CO2 emissions reductions can be estimated. We applied this method to estimate the performance and value of CO2-BES, PHES, and CAES within real data for electricity systems in California and Texas over the course of a full year to account for seasonal fluctuations in electricity demand and variable renewable resource availability. Our results suggest that the value of CO2-BES to reducing CO2 emissions may be as much as twice that of PHES or CAES and thus CO2-BES may be a more favorable approach to energy storage in regional electricity systems, especially those where the topography is not amenable to PHES or the subsurface is not amenable to CAES.

  7. The CO2 emission registries; De CO2 registers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Witt Wijnen, H.R. [De Brauw Blackstone Westbroek, Den Haag (Netherlands)

    2004-02-01

    The European Commission has made a first draft available of the Regulation for a standardized and secured system of CO2 -emissions registries. Transactions under the European emissions trading scheme will be settled in accordance with the rules of this Regulation. This article gives a summary of the Regulation and describes the way emissions transactions are going to take place. Any person can open an account in an emissions register. The relation between the Kyoto Protocol and the Regulation is discussed, such as the role of the Commitment Period Reserve. Emission Reductions will not qualify as registered goods under Dutch law, as information on individual accounts will not be made public. [Dutch] Begin november van het vorig jaar heeft de Europese Commissie een concept voor commentaar laten circuleren van een verordening inzake een gestandaardiseerd en beveiligd stelsel van registers (de 'Register Verordening'). Aangezien er op dit moment hard gewerkt wordt aan een wijziging van de Wet milieubeheer in verband met de invoering van een hoofdstuk inzake de handel in emissierechten, lijkt het nuttig om de Register Verordening thans al te bespreken. De Wet milieubeheer zal de Register Verordening hebben te volgen. Bovendien zal kennismaking met de Register Verordening het begrip voor de beoogde werking van de toekomstige Europese emissiehandel vergroten. In dit artikel is mede gebruik gemaakt van wetenswaardigheden opgedaan tijdens een bijeenkomst met de opstellers van de Register Verordening in november 2003.

  8. Inventory of CO2 emissions driven by energy consumption in Hubei Province: a time-series energy input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiashuo; Luo, Ran; Yang, Qing; Yang, Haiping

    2016-12-01

    Based on an input-output analysis, this paper compiles inventories of fuel-related CO2 emissions of Hubei economy in the years of 2002, 2005, and 2007. Results show that calculated total direct CO2 emissions rose from 114,462.69 kt (2002) to 196,650.31 kt (2005), reaching 210,419.93 kt in 2007, with an average 22.50% rate of increase. Raw coal was the dominant source of the direct emissions throughout the three years. The sector of Electric Power, Heat Production, and Supply was the main direct emissions contributor, with the largest intensities observed from 2002 (1192.97 g/CNY) to 2007 (1739.15 g/ CNY). From the industrial perspective, the secondary industry, which is characterized as manufacture of finished products, was still the pillar of the Hubei economy during this period concerned, contributing more than 80% of the total direct emissions. As a net exporter of embodied CO2 emissions in 2002 and 2007, Hubei reported net-exported emissions of 4109.00 kt and 17,871.77 kt respectively; however, Hubei was once a net importer of CO2 emissions in 2005 (2511.93 kt). The CO2 emissions embodied in export and fixed capital formation had the two leading fractions of emissions embodied in the final use. The corresponding countermeasures, such as promoting renewable and clean energy and properly reducing the exports of low value added and carbon-intensive products are suggestions for reducing CO2 emissions in Hubei.

  9. Mesoscale modelling of atmospheric CO2 across Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansø, Anne Sofie

    2016-01-01

    It is scientifically well-established that the increase of atmospheric CO2 affects the entire globe and will lead to higher surface temperatures. Although anthropogenic CO2is emitted straight into the atmosphere, it does not all contribute to the existing atmospheric CO2 reservoir. Approximately 29......% is taken up by the global oceans, due to under-saturation of CO2 in the surface waters, while another 33 % is taken up by the terrestrial biosphere, via photosynthesis. In order to estimate the effects of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO2 more accurately in the future, it is essential to understand...... the processes controlling the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. This PhD dissertation attempts to increase our understanding of the importance of accounting for high spatiotemporal variability in estimates of CO2 exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface. For this purpose, a mesoscale...

  10. Isentropic transport and the seasonal cycle amplitude of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazoo, N.; Barnes, E. A.; Orbe, C.; Denning, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon-concentration feedbacks and carbon-climate feedbacks constitute one of the largest sources of uncertainty in future climate. Since the beginning of the modern atmospheric CO2 record, seasonal variations in CO2 have been recognized as a signal of the metabolism of land ecosystems, and quantitative attribution of changes in the seasonal cycle amplitude (SCA) of CO2 to ecosystem processes is critical for understanding and projecting carbon-climate feedbacks far into the 21st Century. Here the impact of surface carbon fluxes on the SCA of CO2 throughout the Northern Hemisphere troposphere is investigated, paying particular attention to isentropic transport across latitudes. The analysis includes both a chemical transport model GOES-Chem and an idealized tracer in a gray-radiation aquaplanet. The results of the study can be summarized by two main conclusions: (1) the SCA of CO2 roughly follows surfaces of constant potential temperature, which can explain the observed increase in SCA with latitude along pressure surfaces and (2) increasing seasonal fluxes in lower latitudes have a larger impact on the SCA of CO2 throughout most of the troposphere compared to increasing seasonal fluxes in higher latitudes. These results provide strong evidence that recently observed changes in the SCA of CO2 at high northern latitudes (poleward of 60N) are likely driven by changes in midlatitude surface fluxes, rather than changes in Arctic fluxes.

  11. DESIGN AND MECHANICAL INTEGRITY OF CO2 INJECTION WELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nediljka Gaurina-Međimurec

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Geologic Sequestration (GS is part of a process known as “carbon capture and storage (CCS” and represents the process of injecting CO2, into deep subsurface rock formations for long-term storage. For injecting of CO2 existing wells are used as well as new drilled wells. A well represents the most likely route for leakage of CO2 from geologic carbon sequestration. Maintaining mechanical integrity helps prevent the well and wellbore from becoming conduits for CO2 migration out of the injection zone. The typical components of a CO2 injection well are casing, tubing, cement, and packer. These components are relevant for maintaining mechanical integrity and ensuring CO2 does not migrate upwards from the injection zone into underground source of drinking water (USDW; therefore helping to ensure zonal isolation of the injected carbon dioxide. In order to have the safe underground storage of CO2 well integrity considerations should be present during all phases of well life including design phase, drilling, completion, injection, workover (service and abandonment. The paper describes well design, well integrity and mechanical integrity tests (MITs as a means of measuring the adequacy of the construction of the injection well and as a way to detect problems within the well system.

  12. CO2 Fertilization: What Models Can Talk to Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Nemani, R. R.; Schaefer, K. M.; Schwalm, C. R.; Huntzinger, D. N.; Zhang, G.; Xiong, J.

    2013-12-01

    Of the nearly 10 PgC carbon human beings currently emit into the atmosphere every year, only ~50% stays in the air while the rest is absorbed by the world's oceans and lands. This so-called airborne ratio has stayed surprisingly stable in the past five decades, strongly suggesting that natural carbon sinks strengthening with the increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. For terrestrial carbon sinks, it implies the fertilization of CO2 on vegetation primary production. However, measurements on-the-ground seem to deliver inconsistent messages regarding the magnitude and the spatio-temporal extent of the fertilization effect, whose identification is likely obscured by concurrent changes in climate and human activities as well as other biological processes (e.g., respiration). In contrast, carefully designed ecosystem-model experiments provide a controlled environment to disentangle the different effects exerted by all the interacting processes. In this study, we use ensemble model results from the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) to evaluate the effect of CO2 fertilization on global terrestrial gross primary production (GPP). By comparing the model simulations sequentially with controlled climate, atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen deposition, and other factors, we find that a spatially rather homogenous fertilization of CO2 on in the model simulated GPP. However, the net effects of the CO2 fertilization are complicated, in particular, by different ecosystem responses to changes in temperature and precipitation at different geo-locations. As such, the model results coming out from MsTMIP may help in guiding a more reliable evaluation of the CO2 fertilization effect in the observations.

  13. Modelling the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 exchange in a semiarid ecosystem with high plant–interspace heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We used process-based modelling to investigate the roles of carbon-flux (C-flux components and plant–interspace heterogeneities in regulating soil CO2 exchanges (FS in a dryland ecosystem with sparse vegetation. To simulate the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of FS, the modelling considered simultaneously the CO2 production, transport and surface exchanges (e.g. biocrust photosynthesis, respiration and photodegradation. The model was parameterized and validated with multivariate data measured during the years 2013–2014 in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem in Yanchi, northwestern China. The model simulation showed that soil rewetting could enhance CO2 dissolution and delay the emission of CO2 produced from rooting zone. In addition, an ineligible fraction of respired CO2 might be removed from soil volumes under respiration chambers by lateral water flows and root uptakes. During rewetting, the lichen-crusted soil could shift temporally from net CO2 source to sink due to the activated photosynthesis of biocrust but the restricted CO2 emissions from subsoil. The presence of plant cover could decrease the root-zone CO2 production and biocrust C sequestration but increase the temperature sensitivities of these fluxes. On the other hand, the sensitivities of root-zone emissions to water content were lower under canopy, which may be due to the advection of water flows from the interspace to canopy. To conclude, the complexity and plant–interspace heterogeneities of soil C processes should be carefully considered to extrapolate findings from chamber to ecosystem scales and to predict the ecosystem responses to climate change and extreme climatic events. Our model can serve as a useful tool to simulate the soil CO2 efflux dynamics in dryland ecosystems.

  14. Modelling the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of soil CO2 exchange in a semiarid ecosystem with high plant-interspace heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jinnan; Wang, Ben; Jia, Xin; Feng, Wei; Zha, Tianshan; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli

    2018-01-01

    We used process-based modelling to investigate the roles of carbon-flux (C-flux) components and plant-interspace heterogeneities in regulating soil CO2 exchanges (FS) in a dryland ecosystem with sparse vegetation. To simulate the diurnal and seasonal dynamics of FS, the modelling considered simultaneously the CO2 production, transport and surface exchanges (e.g. biocrust photosynthesis, respiration and photodegradation). The model was parameterized and validated with multivariate data measured during the years 2013-2014 in a semiarid shrubland ecosystem in Yanchi, northwestern China. The model simulation showed that soil rewetting could enhance CO2 dissolution and delay the emission of CO2 produced from rooting zone. In addition, an ineligible fraction of respired CO2 might be removed from soil volumes under respiration chambers by lateral water flows and root uptakes. During rewetting, the lichen-crusted soil could shift temporally from net CO2 source to sink due to the activated photosynthesis of biocrust but the restricted CO2 emissions from subsoil. The presence of plant cover could decrease the root-zone CO2 production and biocrust C sequestration but increase the temperature sensitivities of these fluxes. On the other hand, the sensitivities of root-zone emissions to water content were lower under canopy, which may be due to the advection of water flows from the interspace to canopy. To conclude, the complexity and plant-interspace heterogeneities of soil C processes should be carefully considered to extrapolate findings from chamber to ecosystem scales and to predict the ecosystem responses to climate change and extreme climatic events. Our model can serve as a useful tool to simulate the soil CO2 efflux dynamics in dryland ecosystems.

  15. Effects of elevated CO2 and temperature on yield and fruit quality of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) at two levels of nitrogen application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Mantri, Nitin; Lou, Heqiang; Hu, Ya; Sun, Dan; Zhu, Yueqing; Dong, Tingting; Lu, Hongfei

    2012-01-01

    We investigated if elevated CO(2) could alleviate the negative effect of high temperature on fruit yield of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch. cv. Toyonoka) at different levels of nitrogen and also tested the combined effects of CO(2), temperature and nitrogen on fruit quality of plants cultivated in controlled growth chambers. Results show that elevated CO(2) and high temperature caused a further 12% and 35% decrease in fruit yield at low and high nitrogen, respectively. The fewer inflorescences and smaller umbel size during flower induction caused the reduction of fruit yield at elevated CO(2) and high temperature. Interestingly, nitrogen application has no beneficial effect on fruit yield, and this may be because of decreased sucrose export to the shoot apical meristem at floral transition. Moreover, elevated CO(2) increased the levels of dry matter-content, fructose, glucose, total sugar and sweetness index per dry matter, but decreased fruit nitrogen content, total antioxidant capacity and all antioxidant compounds per dry matter in strawberry fruit. The reduction of fruit nitrogen content and antioxidant activity was mainly caused by the dilution effect of accumulated non-structural carbohydrates sourced from the increased net photosynthetic rate at elevated CO(2). Thus, the quality of strawberry fruit would increase because of the increased sweetness and the similar amount of fruit nitrogen content, antioxidant activity per fresh matter at elevated CO(2). Overall, we found that elevated CO(2) improved the production of strawberry (including yield and quality) at low temperature, but decreased it at high temperature. The dramatic fluctuation in strawberry yield between low and high temperature at elevated CO(2) implies that more attention should be paid to the process of flower induction under climate change, especially in fruits that require winter chilling for reproductive growth.

  16. The ins and outs of CO2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    ...; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases...

  17. ISLSCP II Globalview: Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GlobalView Carbon Dioxide (CO2) data product contains synchronized and smoothed time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected sites that were created...

  18. CO2 Virtual Science Data Environment API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CO2 Virtual Data Environment is a comprehensive effort at bringing together the models, data, and tools necessary to perform research on atmospheric CO2.This...

  19. ISLSCP II Globalview: Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The GlobalView Carbon Dioxide (CO2) data product contains synchronized and smoothed time series of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected sites that...

  20. Environmental Impact and Nutritional Improvement of Elevated CO2 Treatment: A Case Study of Spinach Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuna Seo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The agriculture sector is known to be the one of the major contributors to global greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. At the same time, global climate changes have affected the agriculture sector. In order to strengthen the sustainable development of agriculture, it is important to promote environmentally friendly farming and simultaneously increase the economic value. To improve the productivity of agriculture, technical advancements have occurred. Among those, we have focused on CO2 treatment in cultivation. We aimed to clarify the effectiveness of the elevated CO2 treatment of spinach based on GHG emission and the economic value using the eco-efficiency score. We assumed that nutrition could represent the value of the vegetable. We measured weights, vitamin C, and CO2 emissions of elevated CO2 treatment and conventional production. We used life cycle assessment (LCA to estimate CO2 emissions. CO2 emissions of a 100-g bouquet of spinach were estimated from agricultural inputs, farming, transport, and distribution center processes at a model spinach farm in Japan. CO2 emission of elevated CO2 treatment was 29.0 g-CO2, and was 49.0 g-CO2 for conventional production. The net weight of a bouquet of elevated CO2-treated spinach was 1.69-fold greater than that of conventional production. Vitamin C per 100 g spinach produced via elevated CO2 treatment was 15.1 mg, and that of conventional production was 13.5 mg on average. Finally, based on the above results, we assessed the eco-efficiency scores of the elevated CO2 treatment and conventional production of spinach, enabling integration of the nutritional value and the environmental impact. The score showed that elevated CO2 treatment (0.76 was 2.9-fold more efficient than conventional production (0.26. This study suggested that elevated CO2 treatment could enhance growth and nutritional value of spinach, and further contribute to CO2 reduction.

  1. Global CO2 emissions from cement production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robbie M.

    2018-01-01

    The global production of cement has grown very rapidly in recent years, and after fossil fuels and land-use change, it is the third-largest source of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. The required data for estimating emissions from global cement production are poor, and it has been recognised that some global estimates are significantly inflated. Here we assemble a large variety of available datasets and prioritise official data and emission factors, including estimates submitted to the UNFCCC plus new estimates for China and India, to present a new analysis of global process emissions from cement production. We show that global process emissions in 2016 were 1.45±0.20 Gt CO2, equivalent to about 4 % of emissions from fossil fuels. Cumulative emissions from 1928 to 2016 were 39.3±2.4 Gt CO2, 66 % of which have occurred since 1990. Emissions in 2015 were 30 % lower than those recently reported by the Global Carbon Project. The data associated with this article can be found at https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.831455" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.831455.

  2. Trends in global CO2 emissions. 2013 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, J.G.J.; Peters, J.A.H.W. [PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Den Haag (Netherlands); Janssens-Maenhout, G. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability IES, European Commission' s Joint Research Centre JRC, Ispra (Italy); Muntean, M. [Institute for Environment and Sustainability IES, Joint Research Centre JRC, Ispra (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    This report discusses the results of a trend assessment of global CO2 emissions up to 2012 and updates last year's assessment. This assessment focuses on the changes in annual CO2 emissions from 2011 to 2012, and includes not only fossil-fuel combustion on which the BP reports are based, but also incorporates other relevant CO2 emissions sources including flaring of waste gas during gas and oil production, cement clinker production and other limestone uses, feedstock and other non-energy uses of fuels, and several other small sources. The report clarifies the CO2 emission sources covered, and describes the methodology and data sources. More details are provided in Annex 1 over the 2010-2012 period, including a discussion of the degree of uncertainty in national and global CO2 emission estimates. Chapter 2 presents a summary of recent CO2 emission trends, per main country or region, including a comparison between emissions per capita and per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP), and of the underlying trend in fossil-fuel production and use, non-fossil energy and other CO2 sources. Specific attention is given to developments in shale gas and oil production and oil sands production and their impact on CO2 emissions. To provide a broader context of global emissions trends, international greenhouse gas mitigation targets and agreements are also presented, including different perspectives of emission accounting per country. In particular, annual trends with respect to the Kyoto Protocol target and Cancun agreements and cumulative global CO2 emissions of the last decade are compared with scientific literature that analyses global emissions in relation to the target of 2{sup 0}C maximum global warming in the 21st century, which was adopted in the UN climate negotiations. In addition, we briefly discuss the rapid development and implementation of various emission trading schemes, because of their increasing importance as a cross-cutting policy instrument for mitigating

  3. Spatial distribution of Δ14CO2 across Eurasia: measurements from the TROICA-8 expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Miller, J. B.; Lehman, S. J.; Hurst, D.; Peters, W.; Tans, P. P.; Southon, J.; Montzka, S. A.; Elkins, J. W.; Mondeel, D. J.; Romashkin, P. A.; Elansky, N.; Skorokhod, A.

    2009-01-01

    Because fossil fuel derived CO2 is the only source of atmospheric CO2 that is devoid of 14C, atmospheric measurements of Δ14CO2 can be used to constrain fossil fuel emission estimates at local and regional scales. However, at the continental scale, uncertainties in atmospheric transport and other

  4. An inorganic CO2 diffusion and dissolution process explains negative CO2 fluxes in saline/alkaline soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Zhong-Yuan; Stevenson, Bryan A.; Zheng, Xin-Jun; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    An ‘anomalous' negative flux, in which carbon dioxide (CO2) enters rather than is released from the ground, was studied in a saline/alkaline soil. Soil sterilization disclosed an inorganic process of CO2 dissolution into (during the night) and out of (during the day) the soil solution, driven by variation in soil temperature. Experimental and modeling analysis revealed that pH and soil moisture were the most important determinants of the magnitude of this inorganic CO2 flux. In the extreme cases of air-dried saline/alkaline soils, this inorganic process was predominant. While the diurnal flux measured was zero sum, leaching of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the soil solution could potentially effect net carbon ecosystem exchange. This finding implies that an inorganic module should be incorporated when dealing with the CO2 flux of saline/alkaline land. Neglecting this inorganic flux may induce erroneous or misleading conclusions in interpreting CO2 fluxes of these ecosystems. PMID:23778238

  5. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/carbondioxideco2inblood.html Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Blood To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. What is a Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Blood Test? Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an odorless, ...

  6. Prognose CO2-emissie glastuinbouw 2020

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, van der Nico; Smit, Pepijn

    2016-01-01

    The greenhouse horticulture sector and government agreed in a covenant on a CO2 emission budget
    for 2020. It appeared that the 2014 CO2 emissions were considerably lower than this CO2 emission
    budget. The covenant signatories also agreed that an interim evaluation would be carried out

  7. Bench-Scale Testing and Process Performance Projections of CO2 Capture by CO2–Binding Organic Liquids (CO2BOLs) With and Without Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J.; Mathias, Paul M.; Koech, Phillip K.; Bhakta, Mukund; Freeman, Charles J.; Bearden, Mark D.; Zwoster, Andy

    2016-01-12

    This manuscript provides a detailed analysis of a continuous flow, bench scale study of the CO2BOL solvent platform with and without its Polarity Swing Assisted Regeneration (PSAR). This study encompassed four months of continuous flow testing of a candidate CO2BOL with a thermal regeneration and PSAR regeneration using decane antisolvent. In both regeneration schemes, steady state capture of >90 %CO2 was achieved using simulated flue gas at acceptable L/G ratios. Aspen Plus™ modeling was performed to assess process performance compared to previous equilibrium performance projections. This paper also includes net power projections, and comparisons to DOE’s Case 10 amine baseline.

  8. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  9. [CO2 sequestration coupled with industrial cultivation of microalgae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Wenzhou; Xiao, Bei; Chen, Pingyuan

    2012-11-04

    In order to reduce CO2 emission and lower the cost of microalgal industrial production at the same time, a technology was developed to combine CO2 sequestration with microalgal cultivation. The technology was based on rapid pH drift and high pH adaptability of two microalgal species, Chlorococcum alkaliphilus MC-1 and Spirulina platensis. A simple structure, CO2 leakage prevention covering-box, was designed to collect CO2 escaped from culture medium when CO2 gas was injected into the culture. In the small-scale outdoor cultivation of MC-1, CO2 escaped from culture was all absorbed by culture with the help of covering-box. Results from the pilot-scale cultivation of S. platensis (HS 331) combined with the CO2 addition technology show that the cost of carbon source was remarkably reduced and deposition of CaCO3 and MgCO3 was effectively avoided. In addition, the average productivity was rather high [9.54 g/( m2 x d1)]. In the large-scale cultivation of S. platensis, the annual yield was increased by 20% and high quality product was obtained with the CO2 addition technology. In addition, 66% of NaHCO3 was saved, more than 58% of carbon cost was reduced, and about 45 tons of CO2 was sequestrated. The technology was successfully applied in industrial production of S. platensis and the cost of producing S. platensis was dramatically reduced. The study would provide new insight into carbon dioxide sequestration.

  10. Co2 desorption from glycerol for reusable absorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindaryani, Aswati; Budhijanto, Wiratni; Narendratama, Roberto Delta

    2017-05-01

    Increasing demand of energy forces human to develop new energy sources. Biogas comes as a reliable option of sustainable energy fulfilment. Biogas consists of methane and some impurities such as CO2 and H2S. CO2 removal from biogas guarantees an elevation of biogas heating value. CO2 removal can be achieved by integrated absorption-desorption process using certain absorbent. Regeneration of absorbent is a necessity to recover CO2 absorption capability of used absorbent. This paper focuses on the study of CO2 desorption from glycerol absorbent using N2 as stripping gas. Effect of desorption temperature and N2 flow rate is studied. Three neck flask equipped with water bath is filled with 750 mL of glycerol. Waterbath temperature is set at 40°C. Absorption starts with flowing 1 LPM gas mixture of 40% CO2 to absorbent through sparger. CO2 concentration of outlet gas is analyzed using gas chromatograph every 10 seconds. Gas flow is stopped when outlet CO2 concentration reaches inlet concentration. Desorption process is conducted as follows, 0.1 LPM nitrogen is flowed through sparger to absorber. Samples of outlet gas are taken at several time. Samples are analyzed with gas chromatograph. The same experiments are conducted for temperature variation of 60°C and 80°C and nitrogen flow rate variation of 0.2 LPM and 0.3 LPM. The model of batch desorption process by gas stripping is developed. Mass transfer coefficient was determined by curve fitting. Result shows a noticeable increase of desorbed CO2 with increasing of temperature and N2 flow rate.

  11. Drone Detects Hotspots of Radiation and CO2 Outgassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takac, M.; Kletetschka, G.

    2016-12-01

    Market availability of environmental sensors and drones allow drones to become part of the education activities promoting environmental science both in high schools and grade schools. Here we provide one mode of drone operation for potential use in educational framework.Drone can carry devices that are capable of measuring various parameters of the environment. Commercial radiation and gas (CO2) sensors can be attached to the commercial drone. Our specific drone acquired data set of CO2 measurements over the natural outgassing of CO2 and another set of measurements over old uranium mine. Measurements of CO2 gave a poor signal to noise ratio. Its sensitivity, however, was enough to detect an increase in CO2 in the closed room with humans present compared to the fresh air outside. We could measure an increase of CO2 when directly over the source of natural CO2 outburst. Our data showed that CO2 concentration quickly dilutes in air few meters from the source to concentrations that are within the noise limit. However, the radiation measurements provided a map that correlates well with radiation survey obtained by ground measurements with more sophisticated instrument. We used the most common conventional drone, which is on the market and highly effective personal dosimeter, which can also be used for fire and rescue for its durability. Experimental field measurements were done at Třebsko site, where a map of radioactivity using standard spot measurements was already done. A field experiment was done in winter months when demand for the drone was higher due to cold and wet weather. We tested profiles and height versus the intensity of the recorded signal measurements. We consulted our results and ability to measure radioactivity with the regional fire-fighting units headquarters and verify the applicability and use of this technology for their needs.

  12. Integrating transient heterogeneity of non-photochemical quenching in shade-grown heterobaric leaves of avocado (Persea americana L.): responses to CO2 concentration, stomatal occlusion, dehydration and relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kotaro; King, Diana; Robinson, Sharon A; Osmond, Barry

    2013-11-01

    Long-lived shade leaves of avocado had extremely low rates of photosynthesis. Gas exchange measurements of photosynthesis were of limited use, so we resorted to Chl fluorescence imaging (CFI) and spot measurements to evaluate photosynthetic electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Imaging revealed a remarkable transient heterogeneity of NPQ during photosynthetic induction in these hypostomatous, heterobaric leaves, but was adequately integrated by spot measurements, despite long-lasting artifacts from repeated saturating flashes during assays. Major veins (mid-vein, first- and second-order veins) defined areas of more static large-scale heterogeneous NPQ, with more dynamic small-scale heterogeneity most strongly expressed in mesophyll cells between third- and fourth-order veins. Both responded to external CO2 concentration ([CO2]), occlusion of stomata with Vaseline™, leaf dehydration and relative humidity (RH). We interpreted these responses in terms of independent behavior of stomata in adjacent areoles that was largely expressed through CO2-limited photosynthesis. Heterogeneity was most pronounced and prolonged in the absence of net CO2 fixation in 100 p.p.m. [CO2] when respiratory and photorespiratory CO2 cycling constrained the inferred ETR to ~75% of values in 400 or 700 p.p.m. [CO2]. Likewise, sustained higher NPQ under Vaseline™, after dehydration or at low RH, also restricted ETR to ~75% of control values. Low NPQ in chloroplast-containing cells adjacent to major veins but remote from stomata suggested internal sources of high [CO2] in these tissues.

  13. Simultaneous in situ CO2 soil flux and isotopic analysis in a high CO2 flux environment at Mammoth Mountain, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogue, R. R.; Oze, C.; Horton, T. W.; Defliese, W.

    2016-12-01

    Areas proximal to Mammoth Mountain, CA, have been emitting anomalously high CO2 for nearly three decades. High CO2 flux rates in these areas have resulted in tree kills and are potentially attributed to a large shallow CO2 reservoir fed by the breakdown of metasedimentary rocks and/or degassing from a mid-crustal magma body. Previous studies have focused largely on providing estimates of total CO2 efflux and the origin of CO2 release in the area. However, the nature and complexity of the interface between high CO2 flux and adjacent ecosystem have not been explored. Here we assess the spatial and temporal transition of the high CO2 flux zone and tree kill area into the adjacent forest ecosystem. In June and July 2016 extensive in situ diffuse soil CO2 flux and 13CO2 isotope measurements were conducted with a coupled West Systems/LICOR and Picarro. Additionally, gas samples were collected for Δ47 clumped isotope analyses. Compared to previous studies, areas of high CO2 flux have progressed northeast into a forest ecosystem, with some of the highest flux areas less than 20 meters from live trees. 13CO2 values primarily mirror areas of high CO2 flux with 13CO2 magmatic signatures; however, magmatic 13CO2 values are present in low CO2 flux and heavily forested areas. Δ47 values are depleted relative to equilibrium at ambient air and soil temperatures, indicating a high-temperature source. Young trees were also observed growing in areas that were part of the initial tree kill, providing tangible evidence of the impact of the movement of the high CO2 flux areas.

  14. Spring Hydrology Determines Summer Net Carbon Uptake in Northern Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yonghong; Kimball, John; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2014-01-01

    Increased photosynthetic activity and enhanced seasonal CO2 exchange of northern ecosystems have been observed from a variety of sources including satellite vegetation indices (such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) and atmospheric CO2 measurements. Most of these changes have been attributed to strong warming trends in the northern high latitudes (greater than or equal to 50N). Here we analyze the interannual variation of summer net carbon uptake derived from atmospheric CO2 measurements and satellite NDVI in relation to surface meteorology from regional observational records. We find that increases in spring precipitation and snow pack promote summer net carbon uptake of northern ecosystems independent of air temperature effects. However, satellite NDVI measurements still show an overall benefit of summer photosynthetic activity from regional warming and limited impact of spring precipitation. This discrepancy is attributed to a similar response of photosynthesis and respiration to warming and thus reduced sensitivity of net ecosystem carbon uptake to temperature. Further analysis of boreal tower eddy covariance CO2 flux measurements indicates that summer net carbon uptake is positively correlated with early growing-season surface soil moisture, which is also strongly affected by spring precipitation and snow pack based on analysis of satellite soil moisture retrievals. This is attributed to strong regulation of spring hydrology on soil respiration in relatively wet boreal and arctic ecosystems. These results document the important role of spring hydrology in determining summer net carbon uptake and contrast with prevailing assumptions of dominant cold temperature limitations to high-latitude ecosystems. Our results indicate potentially stronger coupling of boreal/arctic water and carbon cycles with continued regional warming trends.

  15. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  16. CO2-induced seawater acidification affects physiological performance of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Riebesell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available CO2/pH perturbation experiments were carried out under two different pCO2 levels (39.3 and 101.3 Pa to evaluate effects of CO2-induced ocean acidification on the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. After acclimation (>20 generations to ambient and elevated CO2 conditions (with corresponding pH values of 8.15 and 7.80, respectively, growth and photosynthetic carbon fixation rates of high CO2 grown cells were enhanced by 5% and 12%, respectively, and dark respiration stimulated by 34% compared to cells grown at ambient CO2. The half saturation constant (Km for carbon fixation (dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC increased by 20% under the low pH and high CO2 condition, reflecting a decreased affinity for HCO3– or/and CO2 and down-regulated carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM. In the high CO2 grown cells, the electron transport rate from photosystem II (PSII was photoinhibited to a greater extent at high levels of photosynthetically active radiation, while non-photochemical quenching was reduced compared to low CO2 grown cells. This was probably due to the down-regulation of CCM, which serves as a sink for excessive energy. The balance between these positive and negative effects on diatom productivity will be a key factor in determining the net effect of rising atmospheric CO2 on ocean primary production.

  17. Continuous measurements of CO2 emission from cultivated peat soil - effect of tillage intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands process and transfer significant quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Most natural water-saturated peatlands sequester large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere and emit CH4. Drainage and cultivation of peat soils increase soil aeration and reverse the carbon flux into net CO2 emissions, while CH4 emissions decrease and cultivated peat soils may even act as sinks for CH4. Fertile peat soils are potential sources of N2O when drained. In this investigation we used automatic dark chambers (ADC BioScientific Ltd) to measure CO2 emissions from plots with different soil tillage intensities. The field trial is located on the island Gotland east of the Swedish main land (57.584825N 18.47691E) and the soil is a peat soil with high pH (7.5) and organic content of 46.4 % (loss on ignition). The set-up was 4 treatments repeated in 4 blocks. Each plot was 18 by 25 meters and the following treatments were tested: A. Ploughing every year B. Ploughing 1 out of 4 years C. Only stubble cultivation D. Permanent ley One chamber was put in each plot and connected to a master control unit to create a network with 16 chambers. Measurements were made every hour during most of 2012 (17/4- 6/11 with some gaps) and every second hour during 2013 (22/4-27/6). Higher emissions could be observed just after cultivation and that effect lasted for about one day. The average emission was highest from treatment D during 2012 (4.53 μmol m-2 s-1) and treatment C and D during 2013 (3.85 μmol m-2 s-1).

  18. [Error analysis of CO2 storage flux in a temperate deciduous broadleaved forest based on different scalar variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Xing-chang; Wang, Chuan-kuan

    2013-04-01

    Using the measurement data from an 8-level vertical profile of CO2/H2 0 in a temperate deciduous broadleaved forest at the Maoershan Forest Ecosystem Research Station, Northeast China, this paper quantified the errors of CO2 storage flux (Fs ) calculated with three scalar variables, i. e. , CO2 density (rho c), molar fraction (cc), and molar mixing ratio relative to dry air (Xc). The dry air storage in the control volume of flux measurement was not a constant, and thus, the fluctuation of the dry air storage could cause the CO2 molecules transporting out of or into the control volume, i. e. , the variation of the dry air storage adjustment term (Fsd). During nighttime and day-night transition periods, the relative magnitude of Fsd to eddy flux was larger, and ignoring the Fsd could introduce errors in calculating the net CO2 exchange between the forest ecosystem and the atmosphere. Three error sources in the Fs calculation could be introduced from the atmospheric hydrothermal processes, i. e. , 1) air temperature fluctuation, which could cause the largest error, with one order of magnitude larger than that caused by atmospheric pressure (P) , 2) water vapor, its effect being larger than that of P in warm and moist summer but smaller in cold and dry winter, and 3) P, whose effect was generally smaller throughout the year. In estimating the effective CO2 storage (Fs_E) , the Fs value calculated with rho c, cc, and Xc was overestimated averagely by 8. 5%, suggested that in the calculation of Fs, adopting the Xc conservation to atmospheric hydrothermal processes could be more appropriate to minimize the potential errors.

  19. CO2 clearance by membrane lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liqun; Kaesler, Andreas; Fernando, Piyumindri; Thompson, Alex J; Toomasian, John M; Bartlett, Robert H

    2017-10-01

    Commercial membrane lungs are designed to transfer a specific amount of oxygen per unit of venous blood flow. Membrane lungs are much more efficient at removing CO2 than adding oxygen, but the range of CO2 transfer is rarely reported. Commercial membrane lungs were studied with the goal of evaluating CO2 removal capacity. CO2 removal was measured in 4 commercial membrane lungs under standardized conditions. CO2 clearance can be greater than 4 times that of oxygen at a given blood flow when the gas to blood flow ratio is elevated to 4:1 or 8:1. The CO2 clearance was less dependent on surface area and configuration than oxygen transfer. Any ECMO system can be used for selective CO2 removal.

  20. Potential environmental impacts of offshore UK geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Kit; Wilkinson, Mark; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-04-01

    . The origin of the increased trace element concentrations was investigated using sequential leaching experiments. The analysis of the experimental results showed that prediction of trace element release from sandstones with weak CO2-acid leaching is difficult. However, the experiments did show that carbonate and feldspar mineral dissolution was a primary source of these elements, where mobilised, regardless of their abundance within the sandstone. While the environmental risks associated with future offshore CO2 storage are considered to be comparable with existing oil and gas operations, treatment of produced waters may be required to reduce the trace element load and should be assessed on a field-by-field basis.

  1. An Open-source Toolbox for Analysing and Processing PhysioNet Databases in MATLAB and Octave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ikaro; Moody, George B

    The WaveForm DataBase (WFDB) Toolbox for MATLAB/Octave enables integrated access to PhysioNet's software and databases. Using the WFDB Toolbox for MATLAB/Octave, users have access to over 50 physiological databases in PhysioNet. The toolbox provides access over 4 TB of biomedical signals including ECG, EEG, EMG, and PLETH. Additionally, most signals are accompanied by metadata such as medical annotations of clinical events: arrhythmias, sleep stages, seizures, hypotensive episodes, etc. Users of this toolbox should easily be able to reproduce, validate, and compare results published based on PhysioNet's software and databases.

  2. Efficiency enhancement for natural gas liquefaction with CO2 capture and sequestration through cycles innovation and process optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulkarem, Abdullah

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants are energy intensive. As a result, the power plants operating these LNG plants emit high amounts of CO2 . To mitigate global warming that is caused by the increase in atmospheric CO2, CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) using amine absorption is proposed. However, the major challenge of implementing this CCS system is the associated power requirement, increasing power consumption by about 15--25%. Therefore, the main scope of this work is to tackle this challenge by minimizing CCS power consumption as well as that of the entire LNG plant though system integration and rigorous optimization. The power consumption of the LNG plant was reduced through improving the process of liquefaction itself. In this work, a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to optimize a propane pre-cooled mixed-refrigerant (C3-MR) LNG plant modeled using HYSYS software. An optimization platform coupling Matlab with HYSYS was developed. New refrigerant mixtures were found, with savings in power consumption as high as 13%. LNG plants optimization with variable natural gas feed compositions was addressed and the solution was proposed through applying robust optimization techniques, resulting in a robust refrigerant which can liquefy a range of natural gas feeds. The second approach for reducing the power consumption is through process integration and waste heat utilization in the integrated CCS system. Four waste heat sources and six potential uses were uncovered and evaluated using HYSYS software. The developed models were verified against experimental data from the literature with good agreement. Net available power enhancement in one of the proposed CCS configuration is 16% more than the conventional CCS configuration. To reduce the CO2 pressurization power into a well for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications, five CO2 pressurization methods were explored. New CO2 liquefaction cycles were developed and modeled using HYSYS software. One of the developed

  3. How much CO2 does vegetation capture in tropical cities? Case study of a residential neighborhood in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, E.; Roth, M.; Tan, S.; Quak, M.; Seth, N.; Norford, L.

    2012-12-01

    Urban vegetation might have an important role in reducing the CO2 emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly in cities with extensive and/or evergreen vegetation. In a few urban sites negative daytime CO2 fluxes during the growing season have been observed. These sites correspond to suburban neighborhoods with abundant vegetation and low population density. Usually urban surfaces are net sources of CO2 modulated in some cases by vegetation during daytime. A direct and accurate estimation of carbon uptake by urban vegetation is a difficult task due to the particular characteristics of the urban ecosystem and high variability in tree distribution and species. Here, we investigate the role of urban vegetation in the CO2 flux from a residential neighborhood in Singapore using two different approaches. CO2 fluxes measured directly by eddy covariance were compared with emissions estimated by emissions factors and activity data. The latter includes contributions from vehicular traffic, household combustion, soil respiration and human breathing. The difference between estimated emissions and measured fluxes should primarily correspond to the biogenic flux. Independently, a tree survey was conducted to estimate the annual CO2 sequestration using allometric equations and an alternative model of the theory of metabolic ecology for tropical forests. This model predicts the biomass growth rate of woody trees as a function of their size. Palm trees were also included in the survey, but their annual CO2 uptake was obtained from growth curves/rates published in the literature. Both approaches suggest that vegetation captures between 5% and 8% of the CO2 emitted in this neighborhood. Annual uptakes of 510 and 324 ton km-2 were obtained from the difference between measured fluxes and estimated emissions, and the approach based on allometric equations, respectively. The difference between both approaches can be due to uncertainties in the emissions estimates and

  4. TideNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    query tide data sources in a desired geographic region of USA and its territories (Figure 1). Users can select a tide data source through t