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Sample records for nerve sheath meningioma

  1. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  2. A rare case of bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen Misra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female presented with gradual, painless, progressive diminution of vision, and progressive proptosis of left eye since 7 years. Ophthalmological examination revealed mild proptosis and total optic atrophy in the left eye. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT brain with orbit showed bilateral optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM involving the intracranial, intracanalicular, intraorbital part of the optic nerve extending up to optic chiasma and left cavernous sinus.

  3. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, Frank, E-mail: frank.paulsen@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Doerr, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wilhelm, Helmut [Department of Ophthalmology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Becker, Gerd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinik am Eichert, Goeppingen (Germany); Bamberg, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Classen, Johannes [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SFRT) in the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 109 patients (113 eyes) with primary (n = 37) or secondary (n = 76) ONSM were treated according to a prospective protocol with SFRT to a median dose of 54 Gy. All patients underwent radiographic, ophthalmologic, and endocrine analysis before and after SFRT. Radiographic response, visual control, and late side effects were endpoints of the analysis. Results: Median time to last clinical, radiographic, and ophthalmologic follow up was 30.2 months (n = 113), 42.7 months (n = 108), and 53.7 months (n = 91), respectively. Regression of the tumor was observed in 5 eyes and progression in 4 eyes, whereas 104 remained stable. Visual acuity improved in 12, deteriorated in 11, and remained stable in 68 eyes. Mean visual field defects reduced from 33.6% (n = 90) to 17.8% (n = 56) in ipsilateral and from 10% (n = 94) to 6.7% (n = 62) in contralateral eyes. Ocular motility improved in 23, remained stable in 65, and deteriorated in 3 eyes. Radiographic tumor control was 100% at 3 years and 98% at 5 years. Visual acuity was preserved in 94.8% after 3 years and in 90.9% after 5 years. Endocrine function was normal in 90.8% after 3 years and in 81.3% after 5 years. Conclusions: SFRT represents a highly effective treatment for ONSM. Interdisciplinary counseling of the patients is recommended. Because of the high rate of preservation of visual acuity we consider SFRT the standard approach for the treatment of ONSM. Prolonged observation is warranted to more accurately assess late visual impairment. Moderate de-escalation of the radiation dose might improve the preservation of visual acuity and pituitary gland function.

  4. Primary radiotherapy in progressive optic nerve sheath meningiomas: a long-term follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, P.; Blank, L.; Selva, D.; Wolbers, J.G.; Nowak, P.J.C.M.; Geskus, R.B.; Weis, E.; Mourits, M.P.; Rootman, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background/aims To report the outcome of primary radiotherapy in patients with progressive optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM). Methods The clinical records of all patients were reviewed in a retrospective, observational, multicentre study. Results Thirty-four consecutive patients were included.

  5. Optic nerve sheath meningioma treated with radiation conformal therapy. Clinical case report with long follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zomosa R, Gustavo; Cruz T, Sebastian; Miranda G, Gonzalo; Harbst S, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare tumors of the anterior visual pathway. Without treatment, tumor growth leads to progressive loss of visual acuity and blindness due to optic nerve compression. Case report: Patient, female, 42 years without other morbility , begins in 1992 with decreased visual acuity of the left eye, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the left optic nerve sheath, suggestive of ONSM. On that occasion, orbit exploration failed, so it was decided to follow up with annual clinical and imaging controls. About ten years later, begins with progressive deterioration of visual acuity and visual field , with ptosis and ocular motor palsy of the left eye, confirmed with neuro-ophthalmological examinations. MRI shows tumor progression. A new surgical approach was discarded by the risk of visual worsening. A conformal radiotherapy was performed with a fractionated 54 Gy dose. Today, at age 65, after 24 years of follow up,13 post radiation therapy. clinical and radiological stability of ONSM is confirmed. Discussion: Conformal radiotherapy has been shown as an effective therapy, with fewer complications and better outcomes in the preservation of visual function in the long term follow up Radio-fluoro guided surgery in high grade gliomas

  6. Visual Outcome and Tumor Control After Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvold, Nils D.; Lessell, Simmons; Bussiere, Marc; Beaudette, Kevin; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumor that almost uniformly leads to visual dysfunction and even blindness without intervention. Because surgical extirpation carries a high risk of postoperative blindness, vision-sparing treatment strategies are desirable. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 25 patients (25 optic nerves) with ONSM, treated at a single institution with conformal fractionated radiotherapy by either stereotactic photon or proton radiation. Primary endpoints were local control and visual acuity. Results: The patients presented with symptoms of visual loss (21) or orbital pain (3) or were incidentally diagnosed by imaging (3). The mean age was 44 years, and 64% were female patients. The indication for treatment was the development or progression of symptoms. Of the patients, 13 were treated with photons, 9 were treated with protons, and 3 received a combination of photons and protons. The median dose delivered was 50.4 gray equivalents (range, 45-59.4 gray equivalents). Median follow-up after radiotherapy was 30 months (range, 3-168 months), with 3 patients lost to follow-up. At most recent follow-up, 21 of 22 patients (95%) had improved (14) or stable (7) visual acuity. One patient had worsened visual acuity after initial postirradiation improvement. Of the 22 patients, 20 (95%) had no radiographic progression. Three patients had evidence of asymptomatic, limited retinopathy on ophthalmologic examination, and one had recurrent ONSM 11 years after treatment. Conclusions: Highly conformal, fractionated radiation therapy for symptomatic primary ONSM provides tumor control and improvement in visual function in most cases, with minimal treatment-induced morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess the durability of tumor control and treatment-related late effects.

  7. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouaf, Lucie [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Girard, Nicolas [Radiotherapy-Oncology Department, Lyon Sud Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Lefort, Thibaud [Neuro-Radiology Department, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); D' hombres, Anne [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain [Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Pierre-Wertheimer Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France); Mornex, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.mornex@chu-lyon.fr [Claude Bernard University, Lyon (France)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  8. Somatostatin Receptor SPECT/CT using 99mTc Labeled HYNIC-TOC Aids in Diagnosis of Primary Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Piyush; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Agrawal, Archi; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2017-01-01

    Primary optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) are rare, benign and slow growing tumor involving the intra-orbital/intra-canalicular segment of the optic nerve. Untreated, they can potentially lead to visual deterioration. Magnetic resonance (MR) is the gold standard imaging modality for diagnosing the entity. Often, a clinical dilemma exists to narrow the differential diagnosis of an enhancing intra-orbital mass on MR. Molecular imaging provides a high degree of precision in diagnosing meningioma in view of relatively high levels of somatostatin receptor expression by these tumors. The following case demonstrates the potential clinical utility of somatostatin receptor SPECT using 99m Tc- labeled HYNIC-TOC in clinical diagnosis of ONSM.

  9. Prior surgical intervention and tumor size impact clinical outcome after precision radiotherapy for the treatment of optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeberg, Sebastian; Welzel, Thomas; Rieken, Stefan; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed our long-term experience with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients with meningioma of the optic nerve sheath (ONSM). Between January 1991 and January 2010, 40 patients with ONSM were treated using FSRT. Of these, 19 patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment, and 21 patients were treated after surgical resection. The median target volume was 9.2 ml, median total dose was 54 Gy in median single fractions of 1,8 Gy. Local progression-free survival was 100%. Median survival after FSRT was 60 months (range 4-228 months). In all patients overall toleration of FSRT was very good. Acute toxicity was mild. Prior to RT, 29 patients complained about any kind of visual impairment including visual field deficits, diplopia or amaurosis. Prior surgical resection was identified as a negative prognostic factor for visual outcome, whereas patients with larger tumor volumes demonstrated a higher number of patients with improvement of pre-existing visual deficits. Long-term outcome after FSRT for ONSM shows improved vision in patients not treated surgically prior to RT; moreover, the best improvement of visual deficits are observed in patients with larger target volumes. The absence of tumor recurrences supports that FSRT is a strong alternative to surgical resection especially in small tumors without extensive compression of normal tissue structures

  10. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  11. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  12. Optic Nerve Sheath Meningocele: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, E.; Wavreille, O.; Rosenberg, R.; Bouacha, I.; Lejeune, J.-P.; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Isolated optic nerve sheath meningocele is a rare affection defined as the cystic enlargement of the optic nerve sheath filled with cerebrospinal fluid. We report the case of a 39-year-old woman presenting with bilateral meningocele uncovered during a routine examination for headache complaints. A 5-year follow-up validated the lesion’s clinical and imaging stability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an essential tool in the diagnosis of this pathology, alongside characteristic symptoms indicating that the meningocele might have progressively expanded into the orbit. In this case we present a therapeutic approach based on pathophysiological hypotheses and review of the literature. PMID:28163760

  13. Genetic instability in nerve sheath cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, Silvia Regina; Casartelli, Cacilda; Rainho, Claudia Aparecida

    1995-01-01

    After in vitro culture, we analyzed cytogenetically four acoustic nerve neurinomas, one intraspinal neurinoma and one neurofibroma obtainedfrom unrelated patients. Monosomy of chromosomes 22 and 16 was an abnormality common to all cases, followed in frequency by loss of chromosomes 18 (three cases...... by the presence of polyploid cells with inconsistent abnormalities, endoreduplications and telomeric associations resulting in dicentric chromosomes. It is probable that these cytogenetic abnormalities represent some kind of evolutionary advantage for the in vitro progression of nerve sheath tumors....

  14. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  15. Benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudry, N.U.; Zafar, S.; Haque, I.U.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors are a group of tumors, which originate from the mesenchymal stem cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Gastric schwannoma is a very rare gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumor, which represents only 0.2% of all gastric tumors and 4% of all benign gastric neoplasms. We report a 55 years old lady who suffered from pain epigastrium, vomiting, occasionally with blood, loss of appetite and weight loss. Endoscopic examination showed a round submucosal tumor with a central ulceration along the greater curvature of the stomach. The pathological examination revealed a picture of spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemical stain was strongly positive for S-100 protein stain, and non-reactive for CD34, CD117, consistent with benign nerve sheath tumor of stomach i.e. gastric schwannoma. (author)

  16. Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Jennifer A; Sokol, Jason A; Whittaker, Thomas J; Bernard, Benjamin; Farris, Bradley K

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to introduce the use of the Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. The procedure of optic nerve sheath fenestration was reviewed at our tertiary care teaching hospital, including the use of the Farris-Tang retractor. Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without a clear cause. Surgical treatment can be effective in cases in which medical therapy has failed and disc swelling with visual field loss progresses. Optic nerve sheath decompression surgery (ONDS) involves cutting slits or windows in the optic nerve sheath to allow cerebrospinal fluid to escape, reducing the pressure around the optic nerve. We introduce the Farris-Tang retractor, a retractor that allows for excellent visualization of the optic nerve sheath during this surgery, facilitating the fenestration of the sheath and visualization of the subsequent cerebrospinal fluid egress. Utilizing a medial conjunctival approach, the Farris-Tang retractor allows for easy retraction of the medial orbital tissue and reduces the incidence of orbital fat protrusion through Tenon's capsule. The Farris-Tang retractor allows safe, easy, and effective access to the optic nerve with good visualization in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. This, in turn, allows for greater surgical efficiency and positive patient outcomes.

  17. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Matt van de Rijn, M.D., Ph.D. Torsten...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 May 2006 –30 Apr 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve...Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0297 Title: Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis

  18. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour of the Maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puja Sahai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old man was diagnosed with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla. He was treated with total maxillectomy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed a close resection margin. The tumour was of high grade with an MIB-1 labelling index of almost 60%. At six weeks following the surgery, he developed local tumour relapse. The patient succumbed to the disease at five months from the time of diagnosis. The present report underlines the locally aggressive nature of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the maxilla which necessitates an early therapeutic intervention. A complete resection with clear margins is the most important prognostic factor for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour in the head and neck region. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be considered to improve the local control. Future research may demarcate the role of targeted therapy for patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour.

  19. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Mautner, V.F.; Derlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  20. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larque, Ana B.; Nielsen, G.P.; Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves. (orig.)

  1. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor: MRI and CT Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Kragha

    2015-01-01

    important in its diagnosis. A rare case of MPNST that produced urinary retention and bowel incontinence is presented that may aid clinicians in the diagnosis of this rare clinical entity. Motor weakness, central enhancement, and immunohistochemistry may assist in the diagnosis of MPNST and differentiation between benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor (BPNST and MPNST.

  2. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of the bladder associated with neurofibromatosis I.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Julie

    2008-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis is a hamartomatous disorder of autonomic peripheral nerve sheaths associated with peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Most tumours are neurofibromas; however, the genitourinary system is rarely involved. We present a rare case of a nerve sheath tumour of the bladder in a young patient, which was discovered to be malignant.

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  6. Meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windt, H.L. de.

    1981-01-01

    131 Cases of meningioma, of which 113 were intracranial and 18 intraspinal, are reviewed retrospectively on the basis of the clinical findings. In the first category the history and neurological findings are combined. In category II the following investigations are discussed. In evaluation of plain X-rays of sphenoid meningiomas, it appears that 66.7% are abnormal. The EEG investigation generally correlates with the hemisphere in which the tumor is located. The isotope investigation (test) appears to be of great value in screening for meningioma, and is almost 100% abnormal. The CT scan is a rather welcome contribution in the diagnostic procedure for evaluation of meningioma. Category III discusses findings upon operation. (Auth.)

  7. Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... meningioma is a tumor that arises from the meninges — the membranes that surround your brain and spinal ... know that something alters some cells in your meninges to make them multiply out of control, leading ...

  8. Retroperitoneal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deger, Ayse Nur; Bayar, Mehmet Akif; Caydere, Muzaffer; Deger, Hakki; Tayfur, Mahir

    2015-09-01

    Malignant nerve sheath tumours (MPNST) are rare neoplasias and retroperitoneal cases are fairly rare and clinically difficult to be detected, but they are very agressive neoplasias. MPNST are frequently seen in head, neck and upper extremities. In patients with NF1; MPNST, a poor-prognostic lesion, may result from a malignant degeneration of a former plexiform neurofibroma. It is necessary to be aware of a potential malignancy in patients diagnosed with plexiform neurofibroma. We present a 21-year-old female with a diagnosis of MPNST. The patient was admited to the hospital because of a tumour in the subcutaneous region on her left buttock. The surgeon's clinical diagnosis was lipoma. After the pathological examination of biopsy specimen, the lesion was identified as "plexiform neurofibroma" and then the patient was diagnosed with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1). Simultaneously, another mass on the retroperitoneal region was identified as malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST).

  9. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2003-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  10. Role of CD44 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Larry

    2001-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are aggressive, difficult to treat tumors that occur in type I neurofibromatosis patients with an increased incidence compared to the general population...

  11. Skull Base Meningiomas and Cranial Nerves Contrast Using Sodium Fluorescein: A New Application of an Old Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; da Silva, Vinicius Duval; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2014-08-01

    Objective The identification of cranial nerves is one of the most challenging goals in the dissection of skull base meningiomas. The authors present an application of sodium fluorescein (SF) in skull base meningiomas with the purpose of improving the identification of cranial nerves. Design A prospective study within-subjects design. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures Cranial nerve identification. Results The group of nine meningiomas was composed of one cavernous sinus, three petroclival, one tuberculum sellae, two sphenoid wing, one olfactory groove, and one temporal floor meningioma. The SF enhancement in all tumors was strong, and the contrast with cranial nerves clearly evident. There were one definite olfactory nerve deficit, one transient abducens deficit, and one definite hemiparesis. All lesions were resected (Simpson grades 1 and 2). The analysis of the difference of the delta SF wavelength between the meningiomas and cranial nerve contrast was performed by the Wilcoxon signed rank test and showed p = 0.011. Conclusions The contrast between the enhanced meningiomas and cranial nerves was evident and assisted in the visualization and microsurgical dissection of these structures. The anatomical preservation of these structures was improved using the contrast.

  12. Microgravity-Driven Optic Nerve/Sheath Biomechanics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. R.; Feola, A.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E.; Raykin, J.; Samuels, B.

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a concern for long-duration space flight. Current thinking suggests that the ocular changes observed in VIIP syndrome are related to cephalad fluid shifts resulting in altered fluid pressures [1]. In particular, we hypothesize that increased intracranial pressure (ICP) drives connective tissue remodeling of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS). We describe here finite element (FE) modeling designed to understand how altered pressures, particularly altered ICP, affect the tissues of the posterior eye and optic nerve sheath (ONS) in VIIP. METHODS: Additional description of the modeling methodology is provided in the companion IWS abstract by Feola et al. In brief, a geometric model of the posterior eye and optic nerve, including the ONS, was created and the effects of fluid pressures on tissue deformations were simulated. We considered three ICP scenarios: an elevated ICP assumed to occur in chronic microgravity, and ICP in the upright and supine positions on earth. Within each scenario we used Latin hypercube sampling (LHS) to consider a range of ICPs, ONH tissue mechanical properties, intraocular pressures (IOPs) and mean arterial pressures (MAPs). The outcome measures were biomechanical strains in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve and retina; here we focus on peak values of these strains, since elevated strain alters cell phenotype and induce tissue remodeling. In 3D, the strain field can be decomposed into three orthogonal components, denoted as first, second and third principal strains. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: For baseline material properties, increasing ICP from 0 to 20 mmHg significantly changed strains within the posterior eye and ONS (Fig. 1), indicating that elevated ICP affects ocular tissue biomechanics. Notably, strains in the lamina cribrosa and retina became less extreme as ICP increased; however, within the optic nerve, the occurrence of such extreme strains greatly increased as

  13. Primary malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor at unusual location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvagya Panigrahi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST is a rare soft tissue sarcoma. Most arise in association with major nerve trunks. Their most common anatomical sites are the proximal portions of the upper and lower extremities and the trunk. MPNSTs have rarely been reported in literature to occur in other unusual body parts. We review all such cases reported till now in terms of site of origin, surgical treatment, adjuvant therapy and outcome and shortly describe our experience with two of these cases. Both of our case presented with lump at unusual sites resembling neurofibroma, one at orbitotemporal area and other in the paraspinal region with characteristic feature of neurofibroma with the exception that both had very short history of progression. They underwent gross total removal of the tumor with adjuvant radiotherapy postoperatively. At 6-month follow-up both are doing well with no evidence of recurrence.

  14. Benign and malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin on FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, M. J.; Go, D. H.; Yoo, Y. H.; Shin, K. H.; Lee, J. D

    2004-01-01

    The differentiation between benign and malignant nerve sheath tumors is difficult based on conventional radiological imaging. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of FDG PET in distinguishing benign from malignant neurogenic tumors of nerve sheath origin. We performed a retrospective review of the medical record to select patients with nerve sheath tumors who had underdone FDG PET imaging. Fifteen patients (7F: 8M) with benign or malignant nerve sheath tumors were included in this study. Of the 15 patients, 9 were diagnosed with the known neurofibromatosis type I. A total of 19 nerve sheath tumors were included from the 15 patients. All patients had undergone FDG PET to evaluate for malignant potential of the known lesions. Images of FDG PET were semi-quantitatively analyzed and a region of interest (ROI) was placed over the area of the maximum FDG uptake and an average standardized uptake value was taken for final analysis. There were 5 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 5 schwannomas, and 9 neurofibromas. The mean SUV was 2 (ranged from 1.6 to 3.3) for schwannomas, 1.3 (0.7 to 2.5) for neurofibromas, and 8.4 (4.6 to 12.2) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Of 14 benign tumors, all except one schwannoma showed a SUV less than 3. When a cutoff SUV of 4 was used to differentiate the nerve sheath tumors, all tumors were correctly classified as benign or malignant, respectively. Among the 9 patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type I. 4 had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and FDG PET accurately detected all the 4 lesions with malignant transformation. According to our results, FDG PET seems to have a great potential for accurately characterizing benign versus malignant nerve sheath tumors. It appears to be extremely useful for patients with neurofibromatosis to localize the lesion with malignant transformation

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  1. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. Primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve: clinical and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majoie, C.B.L.M.; Hulsmans, F.J.H.; Sie, L.H.; Castelijns, J.A.; Valk, J.; Walter, A.; Albrecht, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical and MRI findings in primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records, imaging and histological specimens of 10 patients with 11 primary tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We assessed whether tumour site, size, morphology or signal characteristics were related to symptoms and signs or histological findings. Histological proof was available for 8 of 11 tumours: six schwannomas and two plexiform neurofibromas. The other three tumours were thought to be schwannomas, because they were present in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 and followed the course of the trigeminal nerve. Uncommon MRI appearances were observed in three schwannomas and included a large intratumoral haemorrhage, a mainly low-signal appearance on T2-weighted images and a rim-enhancing, multicystic appearance. Only four of nine schwannomas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms, including two with large cystic components, one haemorrhagic and one solid tumor. Of the five schwannomas which did not cause any trigeminal nerve symptoms, two were large. Only one of the plexiform neurofibromas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms. Additional neurological symptoms and signs, not related to the trigeminal nerve, could be attributed to the location of the tumour in three patients. (orig.)

  3. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics and Permeability in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykin, Julia; Best, Lauren; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  4. Biomechanics of the Optic Nerve Sheath in VIIP Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, C. Ross; Raykin, Julia; Gleason, Rudy; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Samuels, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration space flight carries the risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath (ONS), optic nerve kinking and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of VIIP, its chronic nature, and certain clinical features strongly suggest that biomechanical factors acting on the ONS play a role in VIIP. Here we measure several relevant ONS properties needed to model VIIP biomechanics. The ONS (meninges) of fresh porcine eyes (n7) was reflected, the nerve proper was truncated near the sclera, and the meninges were repositioned to create a hollow cylinder of meningeal connective tissue attached to the posterior sclera. The distal end was cannulated, sealed, and pressure clamped (mimicking cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] pressure), while the eye was also cannulated for independent control of intraocular pressure (IOP). The meninges were inflated (CSF pressure cycling 7-50 mmHg) while ONS outer diameter was imaged. In another set of experiments (n4), fluid permeation rate across the meninges was recorded by observing the drainage of an elevated fluid reservoir (30 mmHg) connected to the meninges. The ONS showed behavior typical of soft tissues: viscoelasticity, with hysteresis in early preconditioning cycles and repeatable behavior after 4 cycles, and nonlinear stiffening, particularly at CSF pressures 15 mmHg (Figure). Tangent moduli measured from the loading curve were 372 101, 1199 358, and 2050 379 kPa (mean SEM) at CSF pressures of 7, 15 and 30 mmHg, respectively. Flow rate measurements through the intact meninges at 30mmHg gave a permeability of 1.34 0.46 lmincm2mmHg (mean SEM). The ONS is a tough, strain-stiffening connective tissue that is surprisingly permeable. The latter observation suggests that there could be significant CSF drainage through the ONS into the orbit, likely important

  5. Benign Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in a Wild Toco Toucan ( Ramphastos toco ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marcelo P N; Fernandes, Natalia C C A; Nemer, Viviane C; Neto, Ramiro N Dias; Teixeira, Rodrigo H F; Miranda, Bruna S; Mamprim, Maria J; Catão-Dias, José L; Réssio, Rodrigo A

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that comprise neurofibromas, schwannomas, neurilemmomas, and perineuromas. In animals, peripheral nerve sheath neoplasms are most commonly diagnosed in dogs and cattle, followed by horses, goats, and cats, but their occurrence is uncommon in birds. An adult, free-living, male toco (common) toucan ( Ramphastos toco ) was admitted to the zoo animal clinic with weight loss, dehydration, and presence of a soft nodule adhered to the medial portion of the left pectoral muscle. Clinical, cytologic, and computed tomography scan results were indicative of a neoplasm. The toucan died during surgical resection of the mass. Necropsy, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the diagnosis of benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. To our knowledge, benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor has not previously been reported in a toucan or any other species in the order Piciformes.

  6. Genomic and Expression Profiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    DAMD17-03-1-0297 Title: Genomic and Expression Pr ofiling of Benign and Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Patients...have determined the gene expression signature for benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and found that the major trend in transformation...However, EGFR data in soft tissue neoplasms is limited. Using a variety of benign and malignant spindle cell neoplasms, we assessed EGFR status by

  7. Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    development of the principal discipline(s) of the project? • We have learned that the drug PEGPH20, which degrades a component of connective tissue called...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0114 TITLE: Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER NF140089 Targeting the ECM to Enhance Drug Delivery in Nf1-Associated Nerve Sheath Tumors 5b

  8. MRI of intraspinal nerve sheath tumours presenting with sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Chan, C.S.; Ma, H.T.G.; Ward, S.C.; Metreweli, C.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 14 intraspinal nerve sheath tumours (NST) presenting with sciatica were reviewed. The group comprised seven schwannomas, six neurofibromas and one perineuroma. The tumours were either iso- or hypointense with respect to spinal cord on T1-weighted (T1W) images; almost all tumours were hyperintense compared with spinal cord on T2-weighted (T2W) images. The tumours were all detectable on unenhanced T1 W images. Nine NST were scanned following Gadolinium-Diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) injection and all showed intense enhancement. This aids differentiation from sequestrated disc fragments. Tumours were more likely to show homogeneous enhancement unless they were recurrent tumours. Rim enhancement occurs more commonly in schwannomas and this can be used to differentiate these from neurofibromas. It is estimated that on unenhanced images, schwannomas cannot be distinguished from neurofibromas. Four tumours occurred at T1 1-T12. There was poor correlation of the site of the lesion with the clinical findings. It is recommended that the MRI studies in patients with sciatica should include the lower thoracic region especially if no protruded disc was found in the lumbar region. 15 refs., 4 figs

  9. MRI of intraspinal nerve sheath tumours presenting with sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loke, T.K.L.; Chan, C.S. [United Christian Hospital (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Ma, H.T.G. [St Teresa`s Hospital, Kowloon (Hong Kong). MRI and CT scanning Dept.; Ward, S.C.; Metreweli, C. [Prince of wales Hospital, New Territories (Hong Kong). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1995-08-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of 14 intraspinal nerve sheath tumours (NST) presenting with sciatica were reviewed. The group comprised seven schwannomas, six neurofibromas and one perineuroma. The tumours were either iso- or hypointense with respect to spinal cord on T1-weighted (T1W) images; almost all tumours were hyperintense compared with spinal cord on T2-weighted (T2W) images. The tumours were all detectable on unenhanced T1 W images. Nine NST were scanned following Gadolinium-Diethylenetriamine penta acetic acid (DTPA) injection and all showed intense enhancement. This aids differentiation from sequestrated disc fragments. Tumours were more likely to show homogeneous enhancement unless they were recurrent tumours. Rim enhancement occurs more commonly in schwannomas and this can be used to differentiate these from neurofibromas. It is estimated that on unenhanced images, schwannomas cannot be distinguished from neurofibromas. Four tumours occurred at T1 1-T12. There was poor correlation of the site of the lesion with the clinical findings. It is recommended that the MRI studies in patients with sciatica should include the lower thoracic region especially if no protruded disc was found in the lumbar region. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in inherited disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST are rare tumours known to occur at high frequency in neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1, but may also occur in other cancer prone syndromes. Methods The North West Regional Genetic Register covers a population of 4.1 million and was interrogated for incidence of MPNST in 12 cancer prone syndromes. Age, incidence and survival curves were generated for NF1. Results Fifty two of 1254 NF1 patients developed MPNST, with MPNST also occurring in 2/181 cases of schwannomatosis and 2/895 NF2 patients. Three cases were also noted in TP53 mutation carriers. However, there were no cases amongst 5727BRCA1/2 carriers and first degree relatives, 2029 members from Lynch syndrome families, nor amongst 447 Familial Adenomatous Polyposis, 202 Gorlin syndrome, nor 87 vHL cases. Conclusion MPNST is associated with schwannomatosis and TP53 mutations and is confirmed at high frequency in NF1. It appears to be only increased in NF2 amongst those that have been irradiated. The lifetime risk of MPNST in NF1 is between 9–13%.

  11. The anatomy of the first sacral nerve root sheath shown by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, N R; Dixon, A K; Freer, C E

    1989-08-01

    Analysis of 25 patients with normal computed tomographic appearances at the lumbosacral junction revealed wide variation in the anatomical level at which the first sacral nerve root sheaths were seen emerging from the theca. In nine patients (36%), the S1 nerve root sheaths were first recognized at the level of the lumbosacral disc. In 14 patients (56%), the sheaths emerged cranial to the disc; it is possible that these patients may be more prone to neurological complications related to disc or facet joint disease, especially if the sheath is laterally sited within the lateral recess. Conversely, that minority of patients (two, 8%) in whom the root sheaths emerge caudal to the disc level may be relatively protected from neurological complications.

  12. Tumor targeted delivery of doxorubicin in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Madhankumar

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve sheath tumors are benign tumors that have the potential to transform into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs. Interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2 is a cancer associated receptor expressed in glioblastoma and other invasive cancers. We analyzed IL13Rα2 expression in several MPNST cell lines including the STS26T cell line, as well as in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors to utilize the IL13Rα2 receptor as a target for therapy. In our studies, we demonstrated the selective expression of IL13Rα2 in several peripheral nerve sheath tumors by immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunoblots. We established a sciatic nerve MPNST mouse model in NIH III nude mice using a luciferase transfected STS26T MPNST cell line. Similarly, analysis of the mouse sciatic nerves after tumor induction revealed significant expression of IL13Rα2 by IHC when compared to a normal sciatic nerve. IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was formulated and shown to bind and internalized in the MPNST cell culture model demonstrating cytotoxic effect. Our subsequent in vivo investigation in the STS26T MPNST sciatic nerve tumor model indicated that IL13 conjugated liposomal doxorubicin (IL13LIPDXR was more effective in inhibiting tumor progression compared to unconjugated liposomal doxorubicin (LIPDXR. This further supports that IL13 receptor targeted nanoliposomes is a potential approach for treating MPNSTs.

  13. CASE SERIES: Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in the Course of the Mandibular Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monika, Probst; Steffen, Koerdt; Maximilian, Ritschl Lucas; Oliver, Bissinger; Friederike, Liesche; Jens, Gempt; Bernhard, Meyer; Egon, Burian; Nina, Lummel; Andreas, Kolk

    2018-06-05

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are infiltrating, aggressive tumors belonging to the group of soft tissue sarcomas. This report refers to three patients with a tumorous swelling in the entire inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) with similar disease courses suspect for a MPNST, which is particularly rare in the trigeminal nerve. Diagnostic tools, surgical proceedings and reconstructive procedures were highlighted. Three male patients (58-68 years), who suffered from numbness, pain and mild swelling in the sensation area served by the mental nerve presented at the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery and underwent diagnostic workup including CT, MRI, F18-PET-CT, as well as a biopsy of the clinical visible tumor mass with histopathological and molecular pathological analysis. MR imaging revealed the full extent of the tumor comprising the course of the entire mandibular nerve (one case bilateral) starting in the trigeminal ganglion through the IAN and ending in the mental foramen. Hence, both a neurosurgical and maxillofacial intervention with jaw replacement were necessary. Adjuvant radiation of the intracranial closed resection margins, and in one case of parts of the mandible was required. In order to reveal the full extent of tumor spread of MPNSTs sufficient preoperative imaging is crucial as it is an important step in therapy planning. MRI and PET-CT are the imaging modalities with the best prospect of success in depicting the whole extent of the disease. Radical surgical management is the treatment of choice whereas radiochemotherapy shows an ancillary part. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianta, Marcus; Chock, Eric; Schlicht, Stephen; McCombe, David

    2015-01-01

    This single-centre study retrospectively reviews the complications in patients that have occurred following peripheral nerve sheath tumour biopsy, and assesses whether there is an association with biopsy technique or underlying lesion characteristics. 41 consecutive core needle biopsies of proven peripheral nerve sheath tumours over a 2-year period in a tertiary teaching hospital were reviewed. Patient demographics and symptoms, tumour characteristics and radiological appearances were recorded. Biopsy and surgical histology were correlated, and post-biopsy and surgical complications analyzed. 41 biopsies were performed in 38 patients. 68 % schwannomas, 24 % neurofibromas and 7 % malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Biopsy histology correlated with surgery in all cases. 71 % of lesions were surgically excised. 60 % of patients reported pain related to their lesion. Following the biopsy, 12 % reported increased pain, which resolved in all cases. Pain exacerbation was noted in tumours smaller in size, more superficial and in closer proximity of the biopsy needle tip to the traversing nerve. Number of biopsy needle passes was not associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related pain. Core biopsy of a suspected peripheral nerve sheath tumour may be performed safely before excisional surgery to confirm lesion histology and assist prognosis. There is excellent correlation between core biopsy and excised surgical specimen histology. The most common complication of pain exacerbation is seen in a minority and is temporary, and more likely with smaller, more superficial lesions and a closer needle-tip to traversing nerve distance during biopsy. (orig.)

  15. Accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pianta, Marcus; Chock, Eric; Schlicht, Stephen [St Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); McCombe, David [St Vincent' s Hospital and Victorian Hand Surgery Associates, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    This single-centre study retrospectively reviews the complications in patients that have occurred following peripheral nerve sheath tumour biopsy, and assesses whether there is an association with biopsy technique or underlying lesion characteristics. 41 consecutive core needle biopsies of proven peripheral nerve sheath tumours over a 2-year period in a tertiary teaching hospital were reviewed. Patient demographics and symptoms, tumour characteristics and radiological appearances were recorded. Biopsy and surgical histology were correlated, and post-biopsy and surgical complications analyzed. 41 biopsies were performed in 38 patients. 68 % schwannomas, 24 % neurofibromas and 7 % malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Biopsy histology correlated with surgery in all cases. 71 % of lesions were surgically excised. 60 % of patients reported pain related to their lesion. Following the biopsy, 12 % reported increased pain, which resolved in all cases. Pain exacerbation was noted in tumours smaller in size, more superficial and in closer proximity of the biopsy needle tip to the traversing nerve. Number of biopsy needle passes was not associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related pain. Core biopsy of a suspected peripheral nerve sheath tumour may be performed safely before excisional surgery to confirm lesion histology and assist prognosis. There is excellent correlation between core biopsy and excised surgical specimen histology. The most common complication of pain exacerbation is seen in a minority and is temporary, and more likely with smaller, more superficial lesions and a closer needle-tip to traversing nerve distance during biopsy. (orig.)

  16. High-resolution CT of lesions of the optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Hoover, E.D.; Hershey, B.L.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The optic nerves are well demonstrated by high-resolution computed tomography. Involvement of the optic nerve by optic gliomas and optic nerve sheath meningiomas is well known. However, nonneoplastic processes such as increased intracranial pressure, optic neuritis, Grave ophthalmopathy, and orbital pseudotumor may also alter the appearance of the optic nerve/sheath on computed tomography. Certain clinical and computed tomographic features permit distinction of these nonneoplastic tumefactions from tumors

  17. Optic nerve sheath diameter: A novel way to monitor the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seelora Sahu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement and monitoring of intracranial pressure is pivotal in management of brain injured patients. As a rapid and easily done bed side measurement, ultrasonography of the optic nerve sheath diameter presents itself as a possible replacement of the conventional invasive methods of intracranial pressure management. In this review we go through the evolution of optic nerve sheath diameter measurement as a novel marker of predicting raised intracranial pressure, the modalities by which it can be measured as well as its correlation with the invasive methods of intracranial pressure monitoring.

  18. Ultrastructure of the extracellular matrix of bovine dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspanti, M; Marchini, M; Della Pasqua, V; Strocchi, R; Ruggeri, A

    1992-10-01

    The sclera, the outermost sheath of the optic nerve and the dura mater have been investigated histologically and ultrastructurally. Although these tissues appear very similar under the light microscope, being dense connective tissues mainly composed of collagen bundles and a limited amount of cells and elastic fibres, they exhibit subtle differences on electron microscopy. In the dura and sclera collagen appears in the form of large, nonuniform fibrils, similar to those commonly found in tendons, while in the optic nerve sheath the fibrils appear smaller and uniform, similar to those commonly observed in reticular tissues, vessel walls and skin. Freeze-fracture also reveals these fibrils to have different subfibrillar architectures, straight or helical, which correspond to 2 distinct forms of collagen fibril previously described (Raspanti et al. 1989). The other extracellular matrix components also vary with the particular collagen fibril structure. Despite their common embryological derivation, the dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera exhibit diversification of their extracellular matrix consistent with the mechanical loads to which these tissues are subjected. Our observations indicate that the outermost sheath of the optic nerve resembles the epineurium of peripheral nerves rather than the dura to which it is commonly likened.

  19. Evaluation of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and Cleaved Caspase-3 in Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors and Neurofibromas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KARIN S. CUNHA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To study the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, as well the presence of cleaved caspase-3 in neurofibromas and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-x and the presence of cleaved caspase 3 were compared to clinicopathological features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and their impact on survival rates were also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The evaluation of Bcl-2, Bcl-x and cleaved caspase-3 was performed by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays in 28 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and 38 neurofibromas. Immunoquantification was performed by computerized digital image analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis is altered in neurofibromas and mainly in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. High levels of cleaved caspase-3 are more common in tumors with more aggressive histological features and it is associated with lower disease free survival of patients with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

  20. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kundalić, Braca; Ugrenović, Slađana; Jovanović, Ivan; Stefanović, Natalija; Petrović, Vladimir; Kundalić, Jasen; Stojanović, Vesna; Živković, Vladimir; Antić, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphol...

  1. The MRI appearance of the optic nerve sheath following fenestration for benign intracranial hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallomi, D.; Taylor, H.; Hibbert, J.; Sanders, M.D.; Spalton, D.J.; Tonge, K. [Guys and St. Thomas` Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-09-01

    Optic nerve fenestration is carried out in cases of severe benign intracranial hypertension. This study aimed to monitor the optic nerve sheath appearances and orbital changes that occur following this procedure. The eight patients were all female with an average age of 37.3 years and a range of 20-58 years. The duration of symptoms was 2-6 years. Symptoms included headaches, diplopia and visual obscurations. Examination revealed severe papilledema. All investigations, including MRI, biochemical and immunological tests, were negative. Patients had fenestration of a 2 mm x 3 mm segment of the medial aspect of the optic nerve sheath. Imaging was obtained with a 1 T MRI machine using a head coil. Coronal, axial and sagittal 3 mm contiguous sections using STIR sequences with TR 4900 ms, IT 150 ms and TE 60 ms were obtained. Five patients showed clinical improvement. The post-operative MRI findings in four of these included a decreased volume of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) around the optic nerve sheaths and a localized collection of fluid within the orbit. There were no MRI changes in the three patients with no clinical improvement. Decreased CSF volume around the optic nerve and a fluid collection within the orbit may indicate a favorable outcome in optic nerve fenestration. (orig.) With 3 figs., 12 refs.

  2. Acute optic nerve sheath fenestration with the free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.; Joos, Karen M.; Shetlar, Debra J.; Robinson, Richard D.; Head, William S.; Mavity-Hudson, Julia A.; Nunnally, Amy H.

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the free electron laser (FEL) energy can be delivered to a small space to perform optic nerve sheath fenestration with minimal acute nerve damage. Methods: A 530 mm hollow waveguide probe was designed. Optic nerve sheath fenestration (1.0 mm diameter) was performed in 8 rabbits using either the FEL (4 eyes, 6.45mm, 10 Hz, 2 mJ) or a knife (4 eyes). Within 2 hours following surgery, the animals were perfused with aldehyde fixative. The integrity of the optic nerve and glial response at the site of fenestration were evaluated on tissue selections with H&E, and antibodies to S100β or GFAP. Results: Surgery using the FEL probe was found to be technically superior to the knife. The glial reaction was limited to a zone adjacent to the fenestration and was similar in both the FEL and knife incisions. Conclusions: The FEL appears capable of efficiently performing an optic nerve sheath fenestration in a small space with minimal acute damage. Both the FEL and knife incisions result in a rapid glial response at the site of fenestration even when optic nerve integrity is not compromised.

  3. Recurring intracranial malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: case report and systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Germans, Menno R.; Schouten-van Meeteren, Antoinette Y. N.; Oldenburger, Foppe; Troost, Dirk; Vandertop, W. Peter

    2011-01-01

    To report the clinical presentation and management of an intracranial frontoparietal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) and its recurrence in a 6-year-old girl, along with a systematic review of the literature. A previously healthy 6-year-old girl presented with severe signs of

  4. Comparative Oncogenomics for Peripheral Nerve Sheath Cancer Gene Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    and MPNSTs by determining whether these same genes are mutated in human tumors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nothing listed 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...sheath tumour (MPNST). In: Louis DNO, H.;Wiestler,O.D.;Cavenee,W.K., editor. WHO Classification of Tumours of the Central Nervous System. Lyon: IARC...Location Sex Major or Micro WHO Grade H6 DRG Male Major IV H9 Trigeminal ganglion Female Major III H17 Trigeminal ganglion Male Major II H19 Sciatic

  5. Scalp meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary extracranial meningiomas occur very rarely. We present a rare case of extracranial meningioma of the transitional variant which was excised satisfactorily. There was no suggestion of any connection to the intracranial compartment or cranial nerves. The underlying galea was uninvolved, suggesting the true extracranial nature of this tumour. This rare diagnosis should nonetheless be kept in the differential diagnosis of scalp tumors.

  6. Optic Nerve Atrophy Due to Long-Standing Compression by Planum Sphenoidale Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Alberto; Kaen, Ariel Matias; Cárdenas Ruiz-Valdepeñas, Eugenio; Cavallo, Luigi Maria

    2018-05-01

    In this study we report an uncommon endoscopic endonasal image of an atrophic optic nerve as seen after surgical removal of a suprasellar meningioma. The peculiarity of this case is the long-lasting underestimated ocular symptomatology of the patient who reported a 15-year history of impairment of vision on her left eye. A 51-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of a 15-year history of impairment of vision on her left eye. After making serendipitously the diagnosis of a suprasellar mass, we performed endoscopic endonasal surgery. The tumor was reached from below and removed safely, without manipulation of the optic pathways. At the end of tumor removal, the impressive left optic nerve atrophy due to enduring local tumor compression was visualized. To the best of our knowledge, no endoscopic endonasal image with such features has been provided in the pertinent literature. Possibly, this contribution will help identify damaged optic nerves during endoscopic endonasal surgery. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphometric Analysis of Connective Tissue Sheaths of Sural Nerve in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braca Kundalić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus is diabetic neuropathy. It may be provoked by metabolic and/or vascular factors, and depending on duration of disease, various layers of nerve may be affected. Our aim was to investigate influence of diabetes on the epineurial, perineurial, and endoneurial connective tissue sheaths. The study included 15 samples of sural nerve divided into three groups: diabetic group, peripheral vascular disease group, and control group. After morphological analysis, morphometric parameters were determined for each case using ImageJ software. Compared to the control group, the diabetic cases had significantly higher perineurial index (P<0.05 and endoneurial connective tissue percentage (P<0.01. The diabetic group showed significantly higher epineurial area (P<0.01, as well as percentage of endoneurial connective tissue (P<0.01, in relation to the peripheral vascular disease group. It is obvious that hyperglycemia and ischemia present in diabetes lead to substantial changes in connective tissue sheaths of nerve, particularly in peri- and endoneurium. Perineurial thickening and significant endoneurial fibrosis may impair the balance of endoneurial homeostasis and regenerative ability of the nerve fibers. Future investigations should focus on studying the components of extracellular matrix of connective tissue sheaths in diabetic nerves.

  8. Dural ectasia of the optic nerve sheath: is it always benign?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berker Bakbak

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Berker Bakbak1, Hava Dönmez2, Tülay Kansu3, Hayyam Kiratli41Hacettepe University Institute of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry, Neuro-ophthalmology Unit, Ankara, Turkey; 2Diskapi Yildirim Beyazid Education and Research Hospital Neurology Clinic, Ankara, Turkey; 3Hacettepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, Neuro-Ophthalmology Unit, Ankara, Turkey; 4Hacettepe University Medical Faculty, Department of Ophthalmology, Ocular Oncology Unit, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: A 36-year-old woman with a 3-month history of progressive visual loss had papilledema, dilatation of the optic nerve sheaths and normal cerebrospinal fluid pressures. She was diagnosed as dural ectasia of the optic nerve sheaths and surgical decompression was performed. In this case report, severe visual loss is described as a serious complication of this rare disease and the importance of early surgical intervention is emphasized.Keywords: optic nerve, dural ectasia, meningocele

  9. Epicardial Ablation: Prevention of Phrenic Nerve Damage by Pericardial Injection of Saline and the Use of a Steerable Sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kars Neven, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged.

  10. Retroperitoneal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Replacing an Absent Kidney in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Alavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs are nonrhabdomyosarcoma soft tissue sarcomas with rare occurrence in children specially in the retroperitoneum. We describe a young child who presented with an abdominal mass. Both ultrasound and computed tomography revealed a large right-sided abdominal mass in the anatomic place of right kidney, while no kidney or ureter was observed at that side. He underwent surgical resection of the tumor with a primary impression of Wilms tumor. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of retroperitoneal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and absent kidney. This case suggests the very rare probability of association of MPNSTs in children with genitourinary tract anomalies such as renal agenesis.

  11. Epithelioid variant of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (malignant schwannoma) of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoum, I A; Moore, R J; Cook, W; Crowe, D R; Rodgers, W H; Siegal, G P

    1999-10-01

    Sarcoma represents less than 2% of all neoplasms diagnosed or recognized in effusions. Epithelioid peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a rare tumor that is difficult to differentiate from other epithelioid tumors without the use of ancillary studies. A 39-year-old paraplegic man presented with hematuria and a bladder mass that extended to involve the pelvic peritoneum. Light microscopy using hematoxylin-eosin, Papanicolaou, and immunohistochemical stains as well as transmission electron microscopy showed features of epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdoid features and an accompanying eosinophilic infiltrate. Cytologic smears confirmed the similarities between the primary tumor in the bladder and the cells in the pelvic fluid and excluded the possibility of reactive changes related to postsurgical radiation. Ancillary studies were critical in narrowing the differential diagnoses and reaching the final conclusion.

  12. Ultrastructure of the extracellular matrix of bovine dura mater, optic nerve sheath and sclera.

    OpenAIRE

    Raspanti, M; Marchini, M; Della Pasqua, V; Strocchi, R; Ruggeri, A

    1992-01-01

    The sclera, the outermost sheath of the optic nerve and the dura mater have been investigated histologically and ultrastructurally. Although these tissues appear very similar under the light microscope, being dense connective tissues mainly composed of collagen bundles and a limited amount of cells and elastic fibres, they exhibit subtle differences on electron microscopy. In the dura and sclera collagen appears in the form of large, nonuniform fibrils, similar to those commonly found in tend...

  13. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernthal, Nicholas M., E-mail: Nicholas.bernthal@hsc.utah.edu; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J. [Sarcoma Services, Department of Orthopaedics, Huntsman Cancer Institute and Primary Childrens Medical Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Liu, Ting [Department of Pathology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Viskochil, David [Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Randall, R. Lor, E-mail: Nicholas.bernthal@hsc.utah.edu [Sarcoma Services, Department of Orthopaedics, Huntsman Cancer Institute and Primary Childrens Medical Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2013-05-08

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance.

  14. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J.; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance

  15. Description of a neural sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve: immunohistochemical and electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Khademi, Bijan; Owji, Seied Mohammad; Khosh, Khadije Jamshidi; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Gandomi, Behrooz

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Malignant neural sheath tumors of the trigeminal nerve affecting the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses are extremely rare. With conventional optical microscopy, their identification is difficult, and it is necessary to confirm them by means of electron microscopy and immunohistochemical techniques. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 41-year-old woman with a ten-month progressive history of pain followed by painful edema in the left facial region, and with symptoms of bleeding, secre...

  16. [Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation (malignant perineurinoma) of the cervix uteri].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolzhikov, A A; Mukhina, T S

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes a case of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with perineural differentiation and at the rare site of the cervix uteri in a 57-year-old patient. The diagnosis was established on the basis of extensive immunohistochemical examination, by excluding the similar neoplasms and detecting an immunophenotype characteristic of perineural differentiation. There are data available in the literature on the morphological and immunophenotypical characteristics of this tumor.

  17. Incidence of enhancement of the optic nerve/sheath complex in fat-suppression orbit MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Kyu; Yoon, Kwon Ha; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-04-15

    To elucidate the incidence of Gd-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve/sheath complex (ONC) in patients with various ophthalmopathies using fat-suppression MRI. Orbit MRI with fat-suppression technique (ChemSat) was performed in 58 patients with normal and various orbital lesions. The fat-suppression MR was done with and without Gd-DTPA injection in all cases. MR findings were reviewed retrospectively in a blind fashion with respect to presence or absence of contrast enhancement of the ONC. Contrast enhancement of the ONC was seen in 86% (6/7) of cavernous sinus lesions, 80% (8/10) of intraconal lesions excluding the ONC, 57% (16/28) of ONC lesions, 38% (3/8) of ocular lesions, and 2% (1/55) of normal orbits. The ONC enhancement was the most common in optic nerve/sheath tumors (10/10), and pseudotumors (6/6), cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous malformations (3/3) and cavernous sinus thrombosis (2/2), and less frequently seen in optic neuritis (3/14). Enhancement of the ONC may be seen in lesions of the cavernous sinus and orbit other than optic nerve/sheath lesion.

  18. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors; Multimodale Bildgebung bei Neurofibromatose-Typ-1-assoziierten Nervenscheidentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Mautner, V.F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Derlin, T. [Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2015-12-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  19. MR imaging of benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederlund, V.; Goeranson, H.; Bauer, H.C.F.

    1994-01-01

    In a retrospective, nonblind review of MR imaging of 15 benign peripheral nerve neoplasms in 13 patients, the signal pattern of the tumors (including contrast-enhanced images) and stage were assessed. One lesion was subcutaneous, 9 intramuscular, 2 intermuscular and 3 extracompartmental. One lesion was located to the trunk, 5 to the upper extremity and 9 to the lower. The signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images was homogeneous isointense compared to adjacent muscle in 11 lesions and in 2 slightly hyper- and in 2 slightly hypointense. T2-weighted spin-echo images, acquired in all but one examination, showed a hyperintense signal, homogeneous in 8 and centrally inhomogeneous in 6 lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images of 11 lesions, showed a strong signal, with an inhomogeneous enhancement in the center of the lesion similar to that obtained in T2-weighted images. In 2 cases there were signal characteristics indicating bleeding in the tumor. In one lesion both the nonenhanced and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed a hypointense signal in the tumor center suggestive of intramuscular myxoma. All lesions were well delineated without reactive edema. In all cases, anatomic tumor location was correctly assessed. Although the findings were not pathognomonic for neurinoma, MR imaging provided valuable information confirming the clinical and cytologic assessments. (orig.)

  20. Histological methods for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in human nerve trunks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, T L; Gschmeissner, S E

    1994-03-01

    Although there are many histological techniques for assessing myelin sheaths and axons in paraffin embedded or frozen sections of the peripheral nervous system, modern approaches usually use plastic embedded material. Although plastic embedding is superior for small cutaneous branches, this method has limited value for histological assessment of nerve trunks. We report three methods which together yield a comprehensive approach for thorough and detailed investigation of human nerve trunks. The rapid osmication method permitted assessment of myelinated nerve fibers from frozen sections at operation, thus providing the surgeon with guidance on the extent of nerve resection. The modification presented here resulted in permanent slides, allowing comparison of results with those of the other two procedures. The new osmium-hematoxylin technique could be performed on paraffin embedded nerves. Paraffin, unlike plastic, permitted the study of the whole cross sectional area of the nerve in single sections. Moreover, the sharp image of the myelin permitted computerized morphometry. The significantly modified axonal silver impregnation technique was performed on frozen sections mounted on glass slides, as opposed to the time-consuming impregnation of free-floating sections. The latter technique had a high success rate and permitted semiquantitative assessment of axons in nerve trunks. These methods can be performed in any routine histology laboratory and resulted in greater accuracy compared to conventional methods.

  1. Magnetic resonance findings in 32 tumors of the nerve sheaths of the musculoskeletal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galant, J.; Marti-Bonmati, L.M.; Soler, R.; Saez, F.

    1996-01-01

    To define the MR features of nerve sheath tumors (NST) located in soft tissue and to evaluate the parameters that aid in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. We have studied retrospectively the clinical features and MR images corresponding to 32 NST of the musculoskeletal system detected in 22 patients. Among the 32 NST, there were 12 neurofibromas, 11 neurilemmonas, 8 malignant tumors and 1 neuropithelioma. All the patients presented palpable mass, with neurological symptoms as the most common accompanying sign. Pain was most frequent in the malignant lesions. Seven lesions were located in subcutis. MR revealed the relationship between tumor and nerve in 11 cases (7 neurilemmomas and 4 neurofibromas). Most of the neurilemmomas were round-shaped tumors that were extrinsic to the nerve, displacing it. The neurofibromas were usually oval or irregularly-shaped and expanded the nerve. NST were generally found to have well-defined margins. They were isointense or slightly hyperintense with respect to muscle in T1-weighted images and hyperintense in T2 images, with heterogeneous frequency. A target-like aspect was observed in 11 lesions, all benign. NST present a number of common features. The presence of pain, the site of the nerve upon which they depend and the target-like appearance are characteristics that help to differentiate between benign and malignant lesions. 19 refs

  2. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the tongue with an unusual pattern of recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumyajit Roy, MD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST of oral cavity is an extremely uncommon malignancy. Less than 15 cases have been reported since 1973 though none of them describes a distant metastasis. We present a rare case of MPNST of the tongue who presented with features of hypoglossal nerve palsy. Incisional biopsy showed a malignant spindle cell tumor in the sub-epithelial connective tissue. The tumor cells were immune-positive for S-100. He underwent surgery followed by adjuvant chemo-radiation. Later the disease recurred in the form of isolated pelvic bone metastasis. Palliative chemotherapy was offered to him. With this case report we intend to refer to such unusual presentation and pattern of recurrence in a MPNST of tongue.

  3. Optic pathway glioma associated with orbital rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia in a child with neurofibromatosis-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikas, Ioannis; Theofanopoulou, Maria; Lampropoulou, Penelope; Hadjigeorgi, Christiana; Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Kosmidis, Helen

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) is a multisystem disorder presenting with a variety of clinical and imaging manifestations. Neural and non-neural tumours, and unusual benign miscellaneous conditions, separately or combined, are encountered in variable locations. We present a 21/2-year-old boy with NF-1 who demonstrated coexisting optic pathway glioma with involvement of the chiasm and optic nerve, orbital alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and bilateral optic nerve sheath dural ectasia. (orig.)

  4. Expression patterns of cell cycle components in sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-related malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agesen, Trude Holmeide; Florenes, Viva Ann; Molenaar, Willemina M.; Lind, Guro E.; Berner, Jeane-Marie; Plaat, Boudewijn E.C.; Komdeur, Rudy; Myklebost, Ola; van den Berg, Eva; Lothe, Ragnhild A.

    The molecular biology underlying the development of highly malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) remains mostly unknown. In the present study, the expression pattern of 10 selected cell cycle components is investigated in a series of 15 MPNSTs from patients with (n = 9) or without (n =

  5. Malignant transformation in a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma: Addition to the spectrum of a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Rekhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign nerve sheath tumors include schwannomas, neurofibromas and perineuriomas. The malignant counterpart of a nerve sheath tumor is designated as a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST. Lately, benign nerve sheath tumors comprising more than one component have been described, including hybrid schwannomas/perineuriomas. However, malignant transformation in a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma has not been documented so far. Herein, we present a rare case of a young adult male who presented with a soft tissue mass in his right thigh that was excised elsewhere and submitted to us for histopathological review. One of the tissue sections displayed histopathological features of a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma, including alternate arrangement of benign schwann and perineurial cells, reinforced with S100-P and epithelial membrane antigen positivity, respectively, along with low MIB1 and negative p53 immunostaining. The other two tissue sections showed a spindly sarcomatous tumor that was immunohistochemically positive for S100-P, CD34, p53 and exhibited high MIB1 (30-40%. Diagnosis of a MPNST arising in a hybrid schwannoma/perineurioma was made. This unusual case forms yet another addition to the spectrum of a MPNST.

  6. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors in 4 dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Parent, Joane M.; Dobson, Howard; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Holmberg, David; Duque, M. Carolina; Poma, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration was used in establishing the diagnosis in 4 cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Sonographic and cytologic characteristics are discussed. Because of its availability and ease of use, axillary ultrasonography with fine needle aspiration can be an initial diagnostic step for suspected brachial plexus tumors. PMID:18320983

  7. Leiomyosarcoma, embrionary rhabdomyosarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: report of three cases of atypical retroperitoneal sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, Julian; Justino Junior, Reinaldo Ottero; Tjioe Tjia Min; Lima, Ana Carolina Mori; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Goncalves, Carlos Marcelo

    2005-01-01

    We report three cases of atypical retroperitoneal sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, embrionary rhabdomyosarcoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (previously known as neuro sarcoma and neuro fibrosarcoma). These lesions, which are characterized by large and heterogeneous retroperitoneal masses, are uncommon and usually diagnosed late. Intravenous contrast enhanced computerized tomography is a useful method for the evaluation of these tumors and their relationship with adjacent structures. (author)

  8. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor arisen from plexiform Neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Penkov, M.; Hadjidekov, G.; Parvanova, V.

    2005-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is multisystemic neurocutaneous disorder involving both neuroectodermal and mesenchymal texture and the most common familial cancer predisposing syndrome in humans. Tumors occurring in patients with NF1 are primarily peripheral neurofibromas. They can continue to develop throughout life and the rate of appearance may vary greatly from year to year. At the same time any new and rapid change noted at clinical examination - increase volume, pain or neurological deficit, requires biopsy because of potential malignant transformation of the neurofibroma into neurofibrosarcoma. The definitive treatment depends on the respectable character of the tumor. In this case the authors document two cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor occurring in the association with NF type l

  9. Intracerebellar malignant nerve sheath tumor in a child: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Krishna Chaitanya; Chakravarthy, Hariprakash; Subramanian, Nirmala

    2015-05-01

    Intracerebellar malignant nerve sheath tumor (ICMNST) is an extremely rare entity, only two cases have been reported previously, and this is the first case to be reported in a child. The histogenesis, diagnosis, and management of this entity are very ambiguous, and natural history in a child is unknown. The authors report a 7-year-old girl who presented with ataxia and signs of raised intracranial pressure and discuss the challenges in diagnosis, surgical strategy, and treatment. Following gross total resection and radiation to tumor bed, the patient had unremarkable recovery and is recurrence free at 1-year follow-up. ICMNSTs are extremely rare tumors of the cerebellum. Preoperative radiological diagnosis is not possible due to its close radiological resemblance to other common posterior fossa tumors. Immunohistochemistry plays a pivotal role in clinching the diagnosis. Though the reported adult counterparts have shown dismal prognosis, the pediatric counterparts may fare better with good surgical resection followed by radiotherapy.

  10. Posterior fossa meningioma (surgical experiences) | Moussa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptoms included headache (75%), cerebellar manifestations (60%), cranial nerve affection (40%) and hearing disturbances (15%). Most of the cases (50%) were cerebellopontine angle meningioma while the least (5%) were foramen magnum meningioma. Surgical approaches used included retrosigmoid approach ...

  11. High resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve and the optic nerve sheath: anatomic correlation and clinical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinborn, M; Fiegler, J; Kraus, V; Denne, C; Hapfelmeier, A; Wurzinger, L; Hahn, H

    2011-12-01

    We performed a cadaver study to evaluate the accuracy of measurements of the optic nerve and the optic nerve sheath for high resolution US (HRUS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Five Thiel-fixated cadaver specimens of the optic nerve were examined with HRUS and MRI. Measurements of the optic nerve and the ONSD were performed before and after the filling of the optic nerve sheath with saline solution. Statistical analysis included the calculation of the agreement of measurements and the evaluation of the intraobserver and interobserver variation. Overall a good correlation of measurement values between HRUS and MRI can be found (mean difference: 0.02-0.97 mm). The repeatability coefficient (RC) and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) values were good to excellent for most acquisitions (RC 0.2-1.11 mm; CCC 0.684-0.949). The highest variation of measurement values was found for transbulbar sonography (RC 0.58-1.83 mm; CCC 0.615/0.608). If decisive anatomic structures are clearly depicted and the measuring points are set correctly, there is a good correlation between HRUS and MRI measurements of the optic nerve and the ONSD even on transbulbar sonography. As most of the standard and cut-off values that have been published for ultrasound are significantly lower than the results obtained with MRI, a reevaluation of sonographic ONSD measurement with correlation to MRI is necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Nobuhito

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A rare case is presented of a 61-year-old man with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, with metastasis to the heart. The primary tumor originated in the right thigh in 1982. Since then, the patient has had repeated local recurrences in spite of repeated surgical treatment and adjuvant chemotherapy. He has developed previous metastases of the lung and heart. The patient died of cardiac involvement.

  13. Survivin expression and prognostic significance in pediatric malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Alaggio

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST are very aggressive malignancies comprising approximately 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas. In this study, we focused on pediatric MPNST arising in the first 2 decades of life, as they represent one the most frequent non-rhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcomas in children. In MPNST, several genetic alterations affect the chromosomal region 17q encompassing the BIRC5/SURVIVIN gene. As cancer-specific expression of survivin has been found to be an effective marker for cancer detection and outcome prediction, we analyzed survivin expression in 35 tumor samples derived from young patients affected by sporadic and neurofibromatosis type 1-associated MPNST. Survivin mRNA and protein expression were assessed by Real-Time PCR and immunohistochemical staining, respectively, while gene amplification was analyzed by FISH. Data were correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of patients. Survivin mRNA was overexpressed in pediatric MPNST and associated to a copy number gain of BIRC5; furthermore, increased levels of transcripts correlated with a higher FNCLCC tumor grade (grade 1 and 2 vs. 3, p = 0.0067, and with a lower survival probability (Log-rank test, p = 0.0038. Overall, these data support the concept that survivin can be regarded as a useful prognostic marker for pediatric MPNST and a promising target for therapeutic interventions.

  14. Assessment of intra-interobserver reliability of the sonographic optic nerve sheath diameter measurement

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    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and measuring the level of increase in intracranial pressure (ICP is critical, especially for the management of trauma patients in the emergency department and intensive care unit. However, measurements are operator-dependent as in all of the sonographic diagnoses. The aim of this study is to assess the operator variations in the measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD. There were four emergency medicine specialists involved in the study. Each had at least 1 year of experience of ultrasound scans and performed at least 25 prior ocular scans examining the ONSD. Two measurements were made 1 week apart from both axial and longitudinal planes. Sixty healthy adults were involved in the study and every investigator obtained four measurements from each. Intra-interobserver reliabilities were tested. The investigators performed 60 ocular ultrasounds on individual healthy adults and obtained two measurements in axial and longitudinal planes 1 week apart. Therefore, 960 measurements were analyzed. The levels of compatibilities for most of the measurements were found at acceptable levels statistically. However, it is not possible to say that there was a perfect compatibility among the sonographers according to the previously conducted reliability studies of ultrasound measurements. According to our results, it is hard to say that sonographic measurement of the ONSD is a highly reliable method both in longitudinal and transverse planes.

  15. Impacts of Simulated Weightlessness by Dry Immersion on Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter and Cerebral Autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Kermorgant

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry immersion (DI is used to simulate weightlessness. We investigated in healthy volunteers if DI induces changes in ONSD, as a surrogate marker of intracranial pressure (ICP and how these changes could affect cerebral autoregulation (CA. Changes in ICP were indirectly measured by changes in optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD. 12 healthy male volunteers underwent 3 days of DI. ONSD was indirectly assessed by ocular ultrasonography. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV of the middle cerebral artery was gauged using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. CA was evaluated by two methods: (1 transfer function analysis was calculated to determine the relationship between mean CBFV and mean arterial blood pressure (ABP and (2 correlation index Mxa between mean CBFV and mean ABP.ONSD increased significantly during the first day, the third day and the first day of recovery of DI (P < 0.001.DI induced a reduction in Mxa index (P < 0.001 and an elevation in phase shift in low frequency bandwidth (P < 0.05. After DI, Mxa and coherence were strongly correlated with ONSD (P < 0.05 but not before DI. These results indicate that 3 days of DI induces significant changes in ONSD most likely reflecting an increase in ICP. CA was improved but also negatively correlated with ONSD suggesting that a persistent elevation ICP favors poor CA recovery after simulated microgravity.

  16. Controversies: Optic nerve sheath fenestration versus shunt placement for the treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Spitze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH has been increasing in prevalence in the past decade, following the obesity epidemic. When medical treatment fails, surgical treatment options must be considered. However, controversy remains as to which surgical procedure is the preferred surgical option - optic nerve sheath fenestration (ONSF or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shunting - for the long-term treatment of this syndrome. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of ONSF versus shunt placement for the treatment of IIH. Design: This was a retrospective review of the current literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: The authors conducted a PubMed search using the following terms: Idiopathic IIH, pseudotumor cerebri, ONSF, CSF shunts, vetriculo-peritoneal shunting, and lumbo-peritoneal shunting. The authors included pertinent and significant original articles, review articles, and case reports, which revealed the new aspects and updates in these topics. Results: The treatment of IIH remains controversial and lacks randomized controlled clinical trial data. Treatment of IIH rests with the determination of the severity of IIH-related visual loss and headache. Conclusion: The decision for ONSF versus shunting is somewhat institution and surgeon dependent. ONSF is preferred for patients with visual symptoms whereas shunting is reserved for patients with headache. There are positive and negative aspects of both procedures, and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is needed (currently underway. This article will hopefully be helpful in allowing the reader to make a more informed decision until that time.

  17. A case of desmoplastic melanoma that was difficult to distinguish from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yorita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and pathological diagnosis of desmoplastic melanoma is difficult, because almost 50% of desmoplastic melanoma cases involve non-pigmented lesions and the tumor cells can resemble fibroblasts or Schwannian cells based on their frequent amelanotic features. Moreover, desmoplastic melanoma typically has low positive rates for melanoma markers, with the exception of the S-100 protein. We report the case of an 81-year-old Japanese man with an 8-mm desmoplastic melanoma. He initially noticed a painless and non-pigmented skin lesion that did not grow noticeably for 6 months. It was unlikely that he had von Recklinghausen disease, and the mass was initially considered a dermatofibroma. Excisional biopsy revealed an intradermal mass, with the superficial portion mimicking neurofibroma and the deeper portion exhibiting nodular growth of sarcomatoid spindle cells. The tumor region lacked intradermal proliferation of atypical melanocytic cells, intracytoplasmic melanin, and expression of melanoma markers (except S-100 protein and Sox10. Although a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor derived from neurofibroma was possible, the slow growth with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity to the S-100 protein and Sox10 favored a diagnosis of desmoplastic melanoma. Pathologists should recognize that desmoplastic melanoma may not involve in situ lesions or the immunohistochemical expression of standard melanoma markers.

  18. A Case of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor with Rhabdomyoblastic Differentiation: Malignant Triton Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichiro Mae

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST constitute a rare variety of soft tissue sarcomas thought to originate from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of the neural crest. Malignant triton tumor (MTT, a very rare, highly aggressive soft tissue tumor, is a subgroup of MPNST and is comprised of malignant Schwann cells coexisting with malignant rhabdomyoblasts. We herein report the case of a 24-year-old man who presented a subcutaneous mass in his right thigh. The mass was removed surgically in its entirety and radiation therapy was applied locally to prevent tumor regrowth. Nonetheless, the patient died 10 months after surgery from metastases to the lung and brain. He presented neither cafe-au-lait spots nor cutaneous neurofibromas. The histopathology showed a transition from a neurofibroma to an MTT, making this the second report of an MTT arising from a neurofibroma without neurofibromatosis type 1, an autosomal dominant disorder with which 50-70% of tumors reported in previous studies were associated. A histopathological examination using immunostaining with desmin confirmed this diagnosis. MTT has a poorer prognosis than MPNST and should therefore be regarded as a distinct clinical entity.

  19. Optic nerve sheath diameter remains constant during robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Verdonck

    Full Text Available During robot assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP, a CO2 pneumoperitoneum (CO2PP is applied and the patient is placed in a head-down position. Intracranial pressure (ICP is expected to acutely increase under these conditions. A non-invasive method, the optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD measurement, may warn us that the mechanism of protective cerebrospinal fluid (CSF shifts becomes exhausted.After obtaining IRB approval and written informed consent, ONSD was measured by ocular ultrasound in 20 ASA I-II patients at various stages of the RALRP procedure: baseline awake, after induction, after applying the CO2PP, during head-down position, after resuming the supine position, in the postoperative anaesthesia care unit, and on day one postoperatively. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP was calculated as the mean arterial (MAP minus central venous pressure (CVP.The ONSD did not change during head-down position, although the CVP increased from 4.2(2.5 mm Hg to 27.6(3.8 mm Hg. The CPP was decreased 70 min after assuming the head-down position until 15 min after resuming the supine position, but remained above 60 mm Hg at all times.Even though ICP has been documented to increase during CO2PP and head-down positioning, we did not find any changes in ONSD during head-down position. These results indicate that intracranial blood volume does not increase up to a point that CSF migration as a compensation mechanism becomes exhausted, suggesting any increases in ICP are likely to be small.

  20. Malignant Trigeminal Nerve Sheath Tumor and Anaplastic Astrocytoma Collision Tumor with High Proliferative Activity and Tumor Suppressor P53 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Kurdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The synchronous development of two primary brain tumors of distinct cell of origin in close proximity or in contact with each other is extremely rare. We present the first case of collision tumor with two histological distinct tumors. Case Presentation. A 54-year-old woman presented with progressive atypical left facial pain and numbness for 8 months. MRI of the brain showed left middle cranial fossa heterogeneous mass extending into the infratemporal fossa. At surgery, a distinct but intermingled intra- and extradural tumor was demonstrated which was completely removed through left orbitozygomatic-temporal craniotomy. Histopathological examination showed that the tumor had two distinct components: malignant nerve sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve and temporal lobe anaplastic astrocytoma. Proliferative activity and expressed tumor protein 53 (TP53 gene mutations were demonstrated in both tumors. Conclusions. We describe the first case of malignant trigeminal nerve sheath tumor (MTNST and anaplastic astrocytoma in collision and discuss the possible hypothesis of this rare occurrence. We propose that MTNST, with TP53 mutation, have participated in the formation of anaplastic astrocytoma, or vice versa.

  1. Assessing the permeability of the rat sciatic nerve epineural sheath against compounds with local anesthetic activity: an ex vivo electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagiava, Alexia; Theophilidis, George

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Studies have shown that the sciatic nerve epineural sheath acts as a barrier and has a delaying effect on the diffusion of local anesthetics into the nerve fibers and endoneurium. The purpose of this work is to assess and to quantify the permeability of the epineural sheath. For this purpose, we isolated the rat sciatic nerve in a three-chamber recording bath that allowed us to monitor the constant in amplitude evoked nerve compound action potential (nCAP) for over 24 h. For nerves exposed to the compounds under investigation, we estimated the IT50 the time required to inhibit the nCAP to 50% of its initial value. For desheathed nerves, the half-vitality time was denoted as IT50(-) and for the ensheath normal nerves as IT50(+). There was no significant difference between the IT50 of desheathed and ensheathed nerves exposed to normal saline. The IT50(-) for nerves exposed to 40 mM lidocaine was 12.1 ± 0.95 s (n=14) and the IT50(+) was 341.4 ± 2.49 s (n=6). The permeability (P) coefficient of the epineural sheath was defined as the ratio IT50(+)/IT50(-). The P coefficient for 40 mM lidocaine and linalool was 28.2 and 3.48, correspondingly, and for 30 mM 2-heptanone was 4.87. This is an indication that the epineural sheath provided a stronger barrier against lidocaine, compared to natural local anesthetics, linalool and 2-heptanone. The methodology presented here is a useful tool for studying epineural sheath permeability to compounds with local anesthetic properties.

  2. Analysis of petrous apex meningocele associated with meningioma. Is there any relation with chronic intracranial hypertension?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wan-Qun; Huang, Biao; Liang, Chang-Hong [Southern Medical University, The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Feng, Jie-Ying [Nanhai Hospital Affiliated Southern Medical University, Department of Radiology, Foshan, Guangdong (China); Liu, Hong-Jun [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2018-02-15

    Petrous apex meningocele (PAM) is an uncommon cystic lesion involving the petrous apex. The underlying cause of PAM may be related to chronic elevated intracranial pressure. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between PAM and meningioma and between PAM and other intracranial hypertension findings. Two hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients with meningiomas were retrospectively studied. Fifty age- and gender-matched controls were also enrolled in this study. The incidence of PAM, empty sella, tortuosity of the optic nerve, and hydrops of optic nerve sheath was evaluated. The maximum width, area, volume of each PAM, or Meckel's cave and volume of meningioma were measured in controls and patients, separately. One hundred fifty-nine (57.19%) patients were detected with coexistent PAMs. One hundred twenty-five patients had bilateral PAMs, 34 had unilateral lesions, and the remaining 119 did not have PAM. Two subjects (4/50) had unilateral PAMs in normal controls. The maximum width, area, volume of PAM, or Meckel's cave were significantly larger in the patients with bilateral PAM group than those in the unilateral PAM group, in the group without PAM, and those in control group (p = 0.000). The volume of meningioma was positively correlated with the PAM volume (r = 0.48). There was a positive correlation for the incidence between PAM and (1) empty sella (r = 0.901) and (2) tortuosity of the optic nerves and hydrops of the optic sheath (r = 0.825). Coexistence of PAMs with meningiomas is not rare in incidence, and it suggests a potential role for chronically elevated intracranial pressure and disturbance of CSF circulation in their pathophysiology. (orig.)

  3. Analysis of petrous apex meningocele associated with meningioma. Is there any relation with chronic intracranial hypertension?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wan-Qun; Huang, Biao; Liang, Chang-Hong; Feng, Jie-Ying; Liu, Hong-Jun

    2018-01-01

    Petrous apex meningocele (PAM) is an uncommon cystic lesion involving the petrous apex. The underlying cause of PAM may be related to chronic elevated intracranial pressure. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between PAM and meningioma and between PAM and other intracranial hypertension findings. Two hundred seventy-eight consecutive patients with meningiomas were retrospectively studied. Fifty age- and gender-matched controls were also enrolled in this study. The incidence of PAM, empty sella, tortuosity of the optic nerve, and hydrops of optic nerve sheath was evaluated. The maximum width, area, volume of each PAM, or Meckel's cave and volume of meningioma were measured in controls and patients, separately. One hundred fifty-nine (57.19%) patients were detected with coexistent PAMs. One hundred twenty-five patients had bilateral PAMs, 34 had unilateral lesions, and the remaining 119 did not have PAM. Two subjects (4/50) had unilateral PAMs in normal controls. The maximum width, area, volume of PAM, or Meckel's cave were significantly larger in the patients with bilateral PAM group than those in the unilateral PAM group, in the group without PAM, and those in control group (p = 0.000). The volume of meningioma was positively correlated with the PAM volume (r = 0.48). There was a positive correlation for the incidence between PAM and (1) empty sella (r = 0.901) and (2) tortuosity of the optic nerves and hydrops of the optic sheath (r = 0.825). Coexistence of PAMs with meningiomas is not rare in incidence, and it suggests a potential role for chronically elevated intracranial pressure and disturbance of CSF circulation in their pathophysiology. (orig.)

  4. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1: MRI supports the diagnosis of malignant plexiform neurofibroma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mautner, V.F. [Department of Neurology, Klinikum Nord Hamburg, Langenhorner Chaussee 560, 22419, Hamburg (Germany); Friedrich, R.E. [Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Deimling, A. von [Department of Neuropathology, Charite, Berlin (Germany); Hagel, C. [Department of Neuropathology, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Korf, B. [Center for Human Genetics, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Knoefel, M.T. [Department of Surgery, Universitaetsklinikum Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Wenzel, R.; Fuensterer, C. [MRI-Institute Hamburg Othmarschen, Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-09-01

    Plexiform neurofibroma (PNF) is a typical feature of neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). About 10% of patients with NF1 develop malignant peripheral nerve-sheath tumours (MPNST), usually arising from PNF, and this is the major cause of poor survival. A better prognosis can be achieved if the tumours are diagnosed at an early stage. Our objective was to establish MRI criteria for MPNST and to test their usefulness in detecting early malignant change in PNF. MRI was performed on 50 patients with NF1 and nerve-sheath tumours, of whom seven had atypical pain, tumour growth or neurological deficits indicative of malignancy; the other 43 were asymptomatic. On MRI all seven symptomatic patients had inhomogeneous lesions, due to necrosis and haemorrhage and patchy contrast enhancement. In one patient, the multiplicity of confluent tumours with inhomogeneous areas in addition to central lesions did not allow exclusion of malignancy. Only three of the 43 asymptomatic patients had comparable changes; the other 40 patients had tumours being of relatively homogeneous structure on T1- and T2-weighted images before and after contrast enhancement. All three asymptomatic patients with inhomogeneous lesions were shown to have MPNST. (orig.)

  5. Estimating the accuracy of optic nerve sheath diameter measurement using a pocket-sized, handheld ultrasound on a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Garrett G R J; Zeiler, Frederick A; Unger, Bertram; Hansen, Gregory; Karakitsos, Dimitrios; Gillman, Lawrence M

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasound measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) appears to be a promising, rapid, non-invasive bedside tool for identification of elevated intra-cranial pressure. With improvements in ultrasound technology, machines are becoming smaller; however, it is unclear if these ultra-portable handheld units have the resolution to make these measurements precisely. In this study, we estimate the accuracy of ONSD measurement in a pocket-sized ultrasound unit. Utilizing a locally developed, previously validated model of the eye, ONSD was measured by two expert observers, three times with two machines and on five models with different optic nerve sheath sizes. A pocket ultrasound (Vscan, GE Healthcare) and a standard portable ultrasound (M-Turbo, SonoSite) were used to measure the models. Data was analyzed by Bland-Altman plot and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The ICC between raters for the SonoSite was 0.878, and for the Vscan was 0.826. The between-machine agreement ICC was 0.752. Bland-Altman agreement analysis between the two ultrasound methods showed an even spread across the range of sheath sizes, and that the Vscan tended to read on average 0.33 mm higher than the SonoSite for each measurement, with a standard deviation of 0.65 mm. Accurate ONSD measurement may be possible utilizing pocket-sized, handheld ultrasound devices despite their small screen size, lower resolution, and lower probe frequencies. Further study in human subjects is warranted for all newer handheld ultrasound models as they become available on the market.

  6. The occurrence of IgM and complement factors along myelin sheaths of peripheral nerves An immunohistochemical study of the Guillain-Barre syndrome : Preliminary communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijten, J.A.F.M.; Baart de la Faille-Kuyper, E.H.

    In nerve biopsies from 4 of 6 patients with the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), IgM and complement factors were found, probably localized along myelin sheaths. The possible significance of this phenomenon has been discussed. No such findings were obtained in control subjects.

  7. Meningioma Causing Visual Impairment: Outcomes and Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclean, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.maclean@uclh.nhs.uk [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Fersht, Naomi [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [Neuro-Ophthalmology Department, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom); Stacey, Chris; Sivabalasingham, Suganya [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Short, Susan [Radiotherapy Department, University College London Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, St James University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate ophthalmologic outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in patients with meningiomas causing visual deficits. Methods and Materials: A prospective observational study with formal ophthalmologic and clinical assessment of 30 consecutive cases of meningioma affecting vision treated with IMRT from 2007 to 2011. Prescriptions were 50.4 Gy to mean target dose in 28 daily fractions. The median follow-up time was 28 months. Twenty-six meningiomas affected the anterior visual pathway (including 3 optic nerve sheath meningiomas); 4 were posterior to the chiasm. Results: Vision improved objectively in 12 patients (40%). Improvements were in visual field (5/16 patients), color vision (4/9 patients), acuity (1/15 patients), extraocular movements (3/11 patients), ptosis (1/5 patients), and proptosis (2/6 patients). No predictors of clinical response were found. Two patients had minor reductions in tumor dimensions on magnetic resonance imaging, 1 patient had radiological progression, and the other patients were stable. One patient experienced grade 2 keratitis, 1 patient had a minor visual field loss, and 5 patients had grade 1 dry eye. Conclusion: IMRT is an effective method for treating meningiomas causing ophthalmologic deficits, and toxicity is minimal. Thorough ophthalmologic assessment is important because clinical responses often occur in the absence of radiological change.

  8. Asymmetric optic nerve sheath diameter as an outcome factor following cranioplasty in patients harboring the 'syndrome of the trephined'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Santos de Araujo Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Decompressive craniectomy (DC is gaining an increasing role in the neurosurgical treatment of intractable intracranial hypertension, but not without complications. A rare complication is the “syndrome of the trephined” (ST. It occurs when the forces of gravity overwhelm intracranial pressures, leading the brain to become sunken. Objective To determine the usefulness of asymmetric optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD as an outcome factor after cranioplasty. Method We followed-up 5 patients submitted to DC and diagnosed with ST. All were submitted to brain MRI to calculate the ONSD. Results Only two patients presented an asymmetric ONSD, being ONSD larger at the site of craniectomy. Surprisingly these patients had a marked neurological improvement after cranioplasty. They became independent a week after and statistically earlier than others. Conclusion It is presumed that the presence of an asymmetric ONSD in trephined patients is an independent factor of good outcome after cranioplasty.

  9. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the uterine cervix expressing both S-100 protein and HMB-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Rae; Chung, Dong-Hae; Park, Chan Yong; Ha, Seung Yeon

    2009-12-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with a large cervical polypoid mass. Grossly, the mass occupied a substantial proportion of the cervical canal, measuring 6 cm. Histologically, the mass showed a spindle cell malignancy arranged in large fascicles that penetrated deeply into the fibromuscular wall of the cervix. The spindle cells were immunoreactive for both S-100 protein and HMB-45 antigen, but were negative for Melan-A. Electron microscopy showed that cytoplasmic processes of the spindle to oval tumor cells contained microtubules and were lined by basal lamina and abundant intercellular collagen spacing with no melanosomes in any stage. As far as we are aware, this is the ninth reported case of cervical malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST), and the second reported case of MPNST expressing HMB-45 antigen.

  10. Intracranial pressure-induced optic nerve sheath response as a predictive biomarker for optic disc edema in astronauts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wostyn, Peter; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2017-11-01

    A significant proportion of the astronauts who spend extended periods in microgravity develop ophthalmic abnormalities. Understanding this syndrome, called visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP), has become a high priority for National Aeronautics and Space Administration, especially in view of future long-duration missions (e.g., Mars missions). Moreover, to ensure selection of astronaut candidates who will be able to complete long-duration missions with low risk of the VIIP syndrome, it is imperative to identify biomarkers for VIIP risk prediction. Here, we hypothesize that the optic nerve sheath response to alterations in intracranial pressure may be a potential predictive biomarker for optic disc edema in astronauts. If confirmed, this biomarker could be used for preflight identification of astronauts at risk for developing VIIP-associated optic disc edema.

  11. Growth Factor and Laminin Effect with Muscular Fiber Sheath on Repairing of the Sciatica Nerve

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    S Torabi

    2014-01-01

    Background & aim: Peripheral nerve injuries which can lead to a physical disability. If the defect is very low, direct suture without tension on both ends of the cut nerve regeneration is considered as a standard procedure. Otherwise, to reconstruct the axons, the gap must be filled by graft material in order to the guidance. Due to the similarity of the matrix tubular skeletal muscle and nerve muscles graft was used to repair in this study. Methods: In the present experimental study, 42 female Wistar rats were divided into three groups and underwent surgery. In the first group a narrow strip of muscle was prepared by freezing – thawing, and later sutured between the distal and proximal sciatic nerve. In the second group, the gap caused by muscle graft was regenerated and the nerve growth factor and laminin was injected into the graft. In the control group, the two ends of the cut nerve were hidden beneath the adjacent muscles. Next, a group of rats with sciatic functional index was investigated for the behavioral. On the other group were examined for histological studies after two months. Results: Sciatic functional index and Mean counts of myelinated fibers in two graft groups compared with the control group was significant p<0.05. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA test. Conclusion: co-axially aligned muscle grafts were an appropriate alternative substitute for repairing. It seems that the nerve growth factor and laminin have a positive role in axonal regeneration and functional recovery acceleration. Key words: Sciatic Functional Index, muscle graft, NGF, Laminin

  12. Epithelioid Sarcoma of the Forearm Arising from Perineural Sheath of Median Nerve Mimicking Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

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    Hiromasa Fujii

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of epithelioid sarcoma in the forearm of a 33-year-old male presenting with symptoms and signs of carpal tunnel syndrome originating from the direct involvement of the median nerve. Due to the slow growing of the tumor, the patient noticed the presence of tumor mass in his forearm after several months from the initial onset of the symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an 8×4 cm mass involving the median nerve in the middle part of the forearm, and histological analysis of the biopsy specimen revealed the diagnosis of epithelioid sarcoma. Radical surgical resection was performed in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy. The function of the flexors were restored by the multiple tendon transfers (EIP→FDS; ECRL→FDP; BrR→FPL; EDM→opponens with superficial cutaneous branch of radial nerve transfer to the resected median nerve. The function of the affected hand showed excellent with the DASH disability/symptom score of 22.5, and both the grasp power and sensory of the median nerve area has recovered up to 50% of the normal side. The patient returned to his original vocation and alive with continuous disease free at 3.5-year follow-up since initial treatment.

  13. [Multiple meningiomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, L-M; François, P

    2016-06-01

    Multiple meningiomas (MMs) or meningiomatosis are defined by the presence of at least 2 lesions that appear simultaneously or not, at different intracranial locations, without the association of neurofibromatosis. They present 1-9 % of meningiomas with a female predominance. The occurrence of multiple meningiomas is not clear. There are 2 main hypotheses for their development, one that supports the independent evolution of these tumors and the other, completely opposite, that suggests the propagation of tumor cells of a unique clone transformation, through cerebrospinal fluid. NF2 gene mutation is an important intrinsic risk factor in the etiology of multiple meningiomas and some exogenous risk factors have been suspected but only ionizing radiation exposure has been proven. These tumors can grow anywhere in the skull but they are more frequently observed in supratentorial locations. Their histologic types are similar to unique meningiomas of psammomatous, fibroblastic, meningothelial or transitional type and in most cases are benign tumors. The prognosis of these tumors is eventually good and does not differ from the unique tumors except for the cases of radiation-induced multiple meningiomas, in the context of NF2 or when diagnosed in children where the outcome is less favorable. Each meningioma lesion should be dealt with individually and their multiple character should not justify their resection at all costs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Intraosseous meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daffner, R.H.; Yakulis, R.; Maroon, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old woman with a long history of slowly progressive proptosis was found to have an intraosseous meningioma of the right sphenoid bone. Radiologically, the lesion resembled fibrous dysplasia. The key to the diagnosis is irregularity of the inner table of the skull. The histologic appearance is characteristic. Intraosseous meningioma is one part of the spectrum of diseases known as primary extraneuraxial meningioma. In this paper we discuss the theories of cellular origin as well as the radiologic differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Long-term progress of six cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the mediastinum that underwent surgical treatment: Case report series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Discussion and conclusions: Nerve sheath tumors localized within the membrane offer good long-term prognosis even if malignant. Furthermore, long-term survival is possible even if the tumor has invaded neighboring organs, provided it can be completely excised. In cases where complete excision is difficult, a multidisciplinary approach including radiotherapy and anti-cancer drug treatment may contribute to improved prognosis but this is a subject that requires further study.

  16. P02.05 Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Epidemiology in the South Central Hospital of High Specialty from PEMEX in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Mora, J.; Cordoba Mosqueda, M.; Hernandez Resendiz, R.; Loya Aguilar, I.; Vicuña Gonzalez, R.; Garcia Gonzalez, U.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The peripheral sheath tumors are part of a large group of neoplasms that range from biologically benign with minimal disorders in life quality to highly malign with life quality deterioration and high mortality. There are subtypes with high prevalence like Schwannomas and some much rarer like the intracranial peripheral nerve sheath tumor which happen to have very bad prognosis. The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of patients with peripheral nerve sheat tumors in a hospital of high specialty. Method and materials: Observational study with patients from March 1999 to March 2016 with confirmed diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumor in the electronic files of the South Central Hospital of High Specialty PEMEX. A statistical analysis is made through the SPSS Statistics of the disease in this Institution program. Results: There were 84 patients with the diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumor with a median age of 48.04 years, 65.5% were males, the most common histological type found was the Schwannoma with a 72.6%, followed by senescent Schwannoma 13.1%, neurofibroma 8.3%, and malign peripheral nerve sheath tumor 2.4%. The most frequent location was at the site of cranial nerves, followed by cervical level 27.4%, lumbar 16.7% and thoracic 9.5%. The most common initial symptom was pain in 23.8% of the patients, and the time of the onset of symptoms to the diagnosis was 31.6 months. From the total of patients 8.3% had neurofibromatosis type 1, 6.0% neurofibromatosis type 2. Conclusions: We realized in our series of reported cases that the frequency is similar to those reported in worldwide population; nevertheless the time between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis is much higher in our cases as well as the population of patients with neurofibromatosis. This study justifies the need of attention quality improvement and the knowledge of this information the medical doctor of first

  17. Ultrasonographic Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter as a Surrogate Measure of Raised Intracranial Pressure in Severe Pregnancy-induced Hypertension Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Bhatia, Kiran

    2018-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that severe pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) can be disastrous at times as it can cause a lot of complications to both pregnant women and her baby. Hence, it is always desirable to know the extent of severity by a real-time and easily accessible modality like ultrasound. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) in severe preeclampsia and eclampsia patients using ocular ultrasonography with optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) measurement. This study design was a prospective and clinically controlled blinded observational study. After taking necessary permissions from the Institution Ethical Committee, 75 patients were enrolled for the study. However, finally, 25 patients in severe preeclampsia and 24 in eclampsia group were compared with 25 normal term antenatal women. Demographic profiles, hemodynamic parameters, laboratory markers for severity of PIH, and ultrasonographic OSND were measured. They were statistically analyzed and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test. Value of P surrogate marker for raised ICP in severe PIH patients. It is a rapid, bedside, noninvasive, and readily accessible tool and could be a part of a holistic approach for managing such patients.

  18. Multiple Bowen's disease and epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a patient who experienced chronic arsenic poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-En Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Southwest coastal plain of Taiwan is an endemic area of arsenic contamination. Residents who lived there before the 1970s and who used raw groundwater for drinking have a higher risk of arsenic poisoning. In 1968, Tseng et al. described Blackfoot disease as a peripheral vascular disease caused by chronic exposure to arsenic, thereby introducing the concept of arsenic-induced systemic illness in Taiwan. Multiple Bowen's disease (BD is one of the characteristic consequences of chronic arsenic poisoning and it usually presents as cutaneous carcinoma in situ. Multiple BD can also be associated with squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma of the skin, as well as lung, liver, gastrointestinal, and bladder cancers. We encountered a 79-year-old male from Yun-Lin, a county in Southwest Taiwan, who presented with a progressing tumor in his right anterior chest wall. In addition, numerous keratoses and scaly skin lesions were noted on his trunk and extremities, some of which were combined with erosions. The patient was diagnosed with chronic arsenic poisoning with multiple BD and the huge tumor was confirmed as an epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

  19. Optic nerve sheath diameter on fat-saturated T2-weighted orbital MR imaging reflects intracranial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Arata; Kinouchi, Hiroyuki; Horikoshi, Toru; Uchida, Mikito; Sakatsume, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Although dilated optic nerve sheath (ONS) is observed in the setting of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension or hydrocephalus, the relationship between ONS diameter and ICP is unclear. We analyzed the relationship between subdural pressure measured during surgery in patients with chronic subdural fluid collections and ONS diameter measured on MR images. Orbital thin slice fat-saturated MR images were obtained within 24 hours before surgery and ONS diameters were measured just behind the optic globe. Subdural pressure was measured using a manometer before opening the dura mater during surgery. Significant correlation was found between the ONS diameter and subdural pressure (y=0.0618x+4.8219. y: ONS diameter (mm), x: subdural pressure (cmH 2 O), correlation coefficient: 0.505). The ONS diameter before surgery (6.1±0.7 mm) was significantly reduced after surgery (4.8±0.9 mm, p=0.003). Increased ONS diameter on MR images is a strong indicator of increased ICP we propose 6 mm as the normal limit of diameter just behind the eyeball because this value corresponds to the upper normal limit of ICP of around 20 cmH 2 O with above mentioned approximate curve. (author)

  20. Prognostic relevance of FDG PET in patients with neurofibromatosis type-1 and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, Winfried; Buchert, Ralph; Clausen, Malte; Friedrich, Reinhard E.; Mautner, Victor F.; Gawad, Karim A.; Hagel, Christian; Deimling, Andreas von; Wit, Maike de

    2006-01-01

    In patients with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs), survival rates are low and time to death is often less than 2 years. However, there are patients with a more favourable prognosis who develop metastases rather late or not at all. Since histopathology and tumour grading are not well correlated with prognosis, we aimed to evaluate the potential of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) for prediction of patient outcome in MPNST. FDG PET was performed in 16 patients with NF1 and MPNSTs. Standardised uptake values (SUVs) were calculated for each tumour and correlated to tumour grade and patient outcome in terms of survival or death. Three patients with tumour grade II had an SUV 3. Only one of these patients is still alive after 20 months; the remaining 12 died within 4-33 months. SUV predicted long-term survival with an accuracy of 94%, compared with 69% for tumour grade. In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, patients with an SUV >3 had a significantly shorter mean survival time, 13 months, than patients with an SUV <3, in whom the mean survival time was 52 months. Tumour grading did not reveal differences in survival time (15 vs 12 months). Tumour SUV obtained by FDG PET was a significant parameter for prediction of survival in NF1 patients with MPNSTs while histopathological tumour grading did not predict outcome. (orig.)

  1. The urogenital-hypogastric sheath: an anatomical observation on the relationship between the inferomedial extension of renal fascia and the hypogastric nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Luo, G H; Ding, Z H; Li, G X; Chen, X W; Zhong, S Z

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed to perform an anatomical observation on the inferomedial extension of the renal fascia (RF) to the pelvis and explore its relationship with the hypogastric nerves (HGNs). Gross anatomy was performed on 12 formalin-fixed and 12 fresh cadavers. Sectional anatomy was performed on four formalin-fixed cadavers. Different from the traditional concept, both the anterior and posterior RF included the outer and inner layer with different inferomedial extensions. The multiple layers of RF extended downward to form a sandwich-like and compound fascia sheath with potential and expandable spaces which was named as "the urogenital-hypogastric sheath." Below the level of the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery, the bilateral urogenital-hypogastric sheath communicated with the counterpart in front of the great vessels in the midline and the superior hypogastric plexus ran into the urogenital-hypogastric sheath which carried the HGNs, ureters, and genital vessels downward to their terminations in the pelvis. In the retrorectal space, the urogenital-hypogastric sheath surrounded the fascia propria of the rectum posterolaterally as a layer of coat containing HGNs. The multiple layers of RF with different extensions are the anatomical basis of the formation of the urogenital-hypogastric sheath. As a special fascial structure in the retroperitoneal space and the pelvis, emphasis on its formation and morphology may be helpful for not only unifying the controversies about the relationship between the pelvic fascia and HGNs but also improving the intraoperative preservation of the HGNs by dissecting in the correct surgical plane.

  2. Can sonographic measurement of optic nerve sheath diameter be used to detect raised intracranial pressure in patients with tuberculous meningitis? A prospective observational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangani, Shruti V; Parikh, Samira

    2015-01-01

    CNS Tuberculosis can manifest as meningitis, arachnoiditis and a tuberculoma. The rupture of a tubercle into the subarachnoid space leads to Tuberculosis Meningitis (TBME); the resulting hypersensitivity reaction can lead to an elevation of the intracranial pressure and hydrocephalus. While bedside optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) ultrasonography (USG) can be a sensitive screening test for elevated intracranial pressure in adult head injury, little is known regarding ONSD measurements in Tuberculosis Meningitis. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with TBME had dilation of the optic nerve sheath, as detected by ocular USG performed in the emergency department (ED). We conducted a prospective, observational study on adult ED patients with suspected TBME. Patients underwent USG measurements of the optic nerve followed by MRI. The ONSD was measured 3 mm behind the globe in each eye. MRI evidence of basilar meningeal enhancement and any degree of hydrocephalus was suggestive of TBME. Those patients without evidence of hydrocephalus subsequently underwent a lumbar puncture to confirm the diagnosis. Exclusion criteria were age less than 18 and obvious ocular pathology. In total, the optic nerve sheath diameters of 25 adults with confirmed TBME were measured. These measurements were compared with 120 control patients. The upper limit of normal ONSD was 4.37 mm in control group. Those patients with TBME had a mean ONSD of 5.81 mm (SD 0.42). These results confirm that patients with tuberculosis meningitis have an ONSD in excess of the control data (P < 0.001). The evaluation of the ONSD is a simple non-invasive and potentially useful tool in the assessment of adults suspected of having TBME

  3. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Macapinlac, Homer A.; Chuang, Hubert H. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Lev, Dina; Al Sannaa, Ghadah [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Cancer Biology, Houston, TX (United States); McCutcheon, Ian E. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Houston, TX (United States); Slopis, John M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Wei, Wei [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Our objective was to determine how positron emission tomography (PET)/CT had been used in the clinical treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) patients at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. We reviewed a database of MPNST patients referred to MD Anderson Cancer Center during 1995-2011. We enrolled 47 patients who underwent PET/CT imaging. Disease stage was based on conventional imaging and PET/CT findings using National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Treatment strategies based on PET/CT and conventional imaging were determined by chart review. The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), change in SUV{sub max}, change in MTV, and change in TLG were calculated from the PET/CT studies before and after treatment. Response prediction was based on imaging studies performed before and after therapy and categorized as positive or negative for residual tumor. Clinical outcome was determined from chart review. PET/CT was performed for staging in 16 patients, for restaging in 29 patients, and for surveillance in 2 patients. Of the patients, 88 % were correctly staged with PET/CT, whereas 75 % were correctly staged with conventional imaging. The sensitivity to detect local recurrence and distant metastasis at restaging was 100 and 100 % for PET/CT compared to 86 and 83 % for conventional imaging, respectively. PET/CT findings resulted in treatment changes in 31 % (5/16) and 14 % (4/29) of patients at staging and restaging, respectively. Recurrence, MTV, and TLG were prognostic factors for survival, whereas SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were not predictive. For 21 patients who had imaging studies performed both before and after treatment, PET/CT was better at predicting outcome (overall survival, progression-free survival) than conventional imaging. A decreasing SUV{sub max} ≥ 30 % and decrease in TLG and MTV were significant

  4. Evaluation of 18F-FDG PET and MRI in differentiating benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broski, Stephen M.; Howe, Benjamin M.; Nathan, Mark A.; Wenger, Doris E.; Johnson, Geoffrey B.; Spinner, Robert J.; Amrami, Kimberly K.

    2016-01-01

    To compare 18F-FDG PET/CT and MRI for differentiating benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (BPNSTs and MPNSTs) and correlate imaging characteristics with histopathology. Patients with pathologically proven PNSTs undergoing 18F-FDG PET/CT were retrospectively reviewed. PET/CTs and, if available, MRIs were analyzed, noting multiple imaging characteristics and likely pathology (benign or malignant). Thirty-eight patients with 23 BPNSTs and 20 MPNSTs were analyzed. MPNSTs had higher SUVmax (10.1 ± 1.0, 4.2 ± 0.4, p < 0.0001), metabolic tumor volume (146.5 ± 39.4, 21.7 ± 6.6 cm 3 , p = 0.01), total lesion glycolysis (640.7 ± 177.5, 89.9 ± 23.2 cm 3 *g/ml, p = 0.01), and SUVmax/LiverSUVmean (5.3 ± 0.5, 2.0 ± 0.2, p < 0.0001). All lesions with SUVmax < 4.3 were benign. All lesions with SUVmax > 8.1 were malignant. SUVmax cutoff of 6.1 yielded 90.0 % sensitivity and 78.3 % specificity for MPNSTs. SUVmax/LiverSUVmean cutoff of 3.0 yielded 90.0 % sensitivity and 82.6 % specificity. MPNSTs more commonly had heterogeneous FDG activity (p < 0.0001), perilesional edema (p = 0.004), cystic degeneration/necrosis (p = 0.015), and irregular margins (p = 0.004). There was no difference in lesion size, MRI signal characteristics, or enhancement. Expertly interpreted MRI had 62.5-81.3 % sensitivity and 94.1-100.0 % specificity while PET had 90.0-100.0 % sensitivity and 52.2-82.6 % specificity for diagnosing MPNSTs. FDG PET and MRI play a complementary role in PNST evaluation. Multiple metabolic parameters and MRI imaging characteristics are useful in differentiating BPNSTs from MPNSTs. This underscores the potential critical role of PET/MRI in these patients. (orig.)

  5. Characterisation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis-1 using heterogeneity analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Gary J.R.; Siddique, Muhammad; Goh, Vicky; Warbey, Victoria S. [King' s College London, Cancer Imaging Department, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Lovat, Eitan [King' s College London, Guy' s, Kings and St Thomas' Medical School, London (United Kingdom); Ferner, Rosalie [Guys and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, National Neurofibromatosis Service, Department of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    Measurement of heterogeneity in {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images is reported to improve tumour phenotyping and response assessment in a number of cancers. We aimed to determine whether measurements of {sup 18}F-FDG heterogeneity could improve differentiation of benign symptomatic neurofibromas from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs). {sup 18}F-FDG PET data from a cohort of 54 patients (24 female, 30 male, mean age 35.1 years) with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1), and clinically suspected malignant transformation of neurofibromas into MPNSTs, were included. Scans were performed to a standard clinical protocol at 1.5 and 4 h post-injection. Six first-order [including three standardised uptake value (SUV) parameters], four second-order (derived from grey-level co-occurrence matrices) and four high-order (derived from neighbourhood grey-tone difference matrices) statistical features were calculated from tumour volumes of interest. Each patient had histological verification or at least 5 years clinical follow-up as the reference standard with regards to the characterisation of tumours as benign (n = 30) or malignant (n = 24). There was a significant difference between benign and malignant tumours for all six first-order parameters (at 1.5 and 4 h; p < 0.0001), for second-order entropy (only at 4 h) and for all high-order features (at 1.5 h and 4 h, except contrast at 4 h; p < 0.0001-0.047). Similarly, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves was high (0.669-0.997, p < 0.05) for the same features as well as 1.5-h second-order entropy. No first-, second- or high-order feature performed better than maximum SUV (SUVmax) at differentiating benign from malignant tumours. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in MPNSTs is higher than benign symptomatic neurofibromas, as defined by SUV parameters, and more heterogeneous, as defined by first- and high-order heterogeneity parameters. However, heterogeneity analysis

  6. Ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Young Jin; Jeong, Hae Woong [Dept. of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Schwannomas are benign slow-growing nerve sheath tumors, which can develop in any peripheral or central nerve that contains Schwann cells. Schwannomas located near the olfactory groove are extremely rare and radiological diagnosis can be difficult. Moreover, ancient schwannoma is an uncommon variant, and radiologic findings are rarely reported. Herein, we reported a surgically confirmed case of ancient schwannoma at the olfactory groove in a 44-year-old woman presenting with headache and visual disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a solid and cystic extra-axial mass located in the subfrontal area mimicking an olfactory groove meningioma. Histopathologic diagnosis of ancient schwannoma was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining for S100, CD56, vimentin, and other markers. Furthermore, we described the clinical manifestations, MRI characteristics, and histopathologic findings of the case, and presented a review of related literature.

  7. Imaging cellularity in benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors: Utility of the "target sign" by diffusion weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fayad, Laura M

    2018-05-01

    To determine the utility of "target sign" on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping for peripheral nerve sheath tumor (PNST) characterization. This IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging (comprised of T2- FS, DWI (b-values 50, 400, 800 s/mm 2 and ADC mapping), and static contrast-enhanced (CE) T1-W imaging) of 42 patients (mean age: 40 years (range 8-68 years), 48% (20/42) females) with 15 malignant PNSTs (MPNSTs) and 33 benign PNSTs (BPNSTs). MPNSTs were histologically confirmed while BPNSTs were histologically-proven or with stable clinical and imaging appearance for at least 12 months. Two radiologists assessed imaging characteristics (size, signal intensity, heterogeneity, perilesional edema or enhancement) and the presence or absence of "target sign," on each sequence. A "target sign" was defined as a biphasic pattern of peripheral hyperintensity and homogeneous central hypointensity. Descriptive statistics are reported. Cohen's κ statistic or interclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate interobserver agreement between two observers. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to identify MRI features with predictive values. MPNSTs were larger than BPNSTs (6.3 ± 2.5 cm vs 3.5 ± -2.1 cm, p = 0.0002), had perilesional edema (87%(13/15) vs 18%(6/33), p target sign" was present in: 24%(8/33) BPNSTs vs 0/15 MPNST on T2-FS (p = 0.26); 39%(13/33) BPNSTs vs 20%(3/15) MPNST on DWI using b-value = 50 s/mm 2 (p = 0.5); 55%(18/33) BPNSTs vs 6%(1/15) MPNST on DWI using b-value = 400 s/mm 2 (p = 0.002); 48%(16/33) BPNSTs vs 6%(1/15) MPNST on DWI using b-value = 800 s/mm 2 (p = 0.005) and 64%(21/33) benign vs 0/15 MPNST on ADC mapping(p target sign(p = 0.07). The odds of an MPNST in cases with minimum ADC ≤ 1.0 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s are 150 times higher than in cases with ADC > 1

  8. Carbon Ion irradiation in the treatment of grossly incomplete or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheaths tumors: acute toxicity and preliminary outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Alexandra D; Uhl, Matthias; Chaudhri, Naved; Herfarth, Klaus K; Debus, Juergen; Roeder, Falk

    2015-01-01

    To report our early experience with carbon ion irradiation in the treatment of gross residual or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). We retrospectively analysed 11 patients (pts) with MPNST, who have been treated with carbon ion irradiation (C12) at our institution between 2010 and 2013. All pts had measurable gross disease at the initiation of radiation treatment. Median age was 47 years (29-79). Tumors were mainly located in the pelvic/sacral (5 pts) and sinunasal/orbital region (5 pts). 5 pts presented already in recurrent situation, 3 pts had been previously irradiated, and in 3 pts MPNST were neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) associated. Median cumulative dose was 60 GyE. Treatment was carried out either as a combination of IMRT plus C12 boost (4 pts) or C12 only (7 pts). Median follow-up was 17 months (3-31 months). We observed 3 local progressions, translating into estimated 1- and 2-year local control rates of 65%. One patient developed distant failure, resulting in estimated 1- and 2-year PFS rates of 56%. Two patients have died, therefore the estimated 1- and 2-year OS rates are 75%. Acute radiation related toxicities were generally mild, no grade 3 side effects were observed. Severe late toxicity (grade 3) was scored in 2 patients (trismus, wound healing delays). Carbon ion irradiation yields very promising short term local control and overall survival rates with low morbidity in patients suffering from gross residual or unresectable malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and should be further investigated in a prospective trial

  9. Olfactory groove meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, Stephen J; DeMonte, Franco

    2003-06-15

    Olfactory groove meningiomas (OGMs) arise over the cribriform plate and may reach very large sizes prior to presentation. They can be differentiated from tuberculum sellae meningiomas because OGMs arise more anterior in the skull base and displace the optic nerve and chiasm inferiorly rather than superiorly. The authors searched the neurosurgery database at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for cases of OGM treated between 1993 and 2003. The records of these patients were then reviewed retrospectively for details regarding clinical presentation, imaging findings, surgical results and complications, and follow-up status. Thirteen patients, (12 women and one man, mean age 56 years) harbored OGMs (mean size 5.7 cm). All patients underwent bifrontal craniotomies and biorbital osteotomies. There were 11 complete resections (including the hyperostotic bone and dura of the cribriform plate and any extension into the ethmoid sinuses) and two subtotal resections with minimal residual tumor left in patients with recurrent lesions. No complication directly due to the surgery occurred in any patient. There were no recurrences in a mean follow-up period of 2 years (range 0-5 years). With current microsurgical techniques, the results of OGM resection are excellent, with a high rate of total resection and a low incidence of complications. All hyperostotic bone should be removed with the dura of the anterior skull base to minimize the risk of recurrence.

  10. Introduction: surgical management of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zada, Gabriel; Başkaya, Mustafa K; Shah, Mitesh V

    2017-10-01

    Meningiomas represent the most common primary intracranial neoplasm treated by neurosurgeons. Although multimodal treatment of meningiomas includes surgery, radiation-based treatments, and occasionally medical therapy, surgery remains the mainstay of treatment for most symptomatic meningiomas. Because of the intricate relationship of the dura mater and arachnoid mater with the central nervous system and cranial nerves, meningiomas can arise anywhere along the skull base or convexities, and occasionally even within the ventricular system, thereby mandating a catalog of surgical approaches that neurosurgeons may employ to individualize treatment for patients. Skull base meningiomas represent some of the most challenging pathology encountered by neurosurgeons, on account of their depth, invasion, vascularity, texture/consistency, and their relationship to bony anatomy, cranial nerves, and blood vessels. Resection of complex skull base meningiomas often mandates adequate bony removal to achieve sufficient exposure of the tumor and surrounding region, in order to minimize brain retraction and optimally identify, protect, control, and manipulate sensitive neurovascular structures. A variety of traditional skull base approaches has evolved to address complex skull base tumors, of which meningiomas are considered the paragon in terms of both complexity and frequency. In this supplemental video issue of Neurosurgical Focus, contributing authors from around the world provide instructional narratives demonstrating resection of a variety of skull base meningiomas arising from traditionally challenging origins, including the clinoid processes, tuberculum sellae, dorsum sellae, petroclival region, falco-tentorial region, cerebellopontine angle, and foramen magnum. In addition, two cases of extended endoscopic endonasal approaches for tuberculum sellae and dorsum sellae meningiomas are presented, representing the latest evolution in accessing the skull base for selected tumors

  11. 微小后组脑神经鞘瘤七例报告%Clinical study of 7 cases of missed diagnosis of micro-tumor of cranial nerve sheath and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵奎明; 杨冬; 袁越; 张哲; 张黎; 于炎冰

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析临床罕见的微小后组脑神经鞘瘤的临床特点,探讨其临床症状、早期诊断、手术方法和疗效.方法 回顾性分析1999年9月至2009年8月我院治疗的7例临床漏诊的微小后组脑神经鞘瘤病例,总结其临床症状、早期诊断、手术方法及疗效,并结合文献进行分析.结果 本组病例中共有舌咽神经鞘瘤5例、迷走神经鞘瘤1例、舌下神经鞘瘤1例.肿瘤均完全切除.术后并发症包括一过性轻度面瘫、声音嘶哑2例、吞咽困难1例.结论 对出现后组脑神经症状的患者应考虑到后组脑神经鞘瘤的可能,尽快明确诊断并积极手术治疗可获得优良疗效,有利于患者的治疗和康复.%Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics of the rare micro-lower cranial nerve sheath tumor,and investigate the clinical symptoms,early treatment options,as well as surgical elements/effectiveness.Methods Seven missed diagnoses of micro-lower cranial nerve sheath tumor admitted to our department from October 1999 to August 2009 were analyzed retrospectively.Diagnosis,clinical characteristics,early treatment options,surgical elements and effectiveness were summarized and analyzed in combined with literature review.Results In this group of patients,there were 5 glossopharyngeal nerve sheath tumors,1 vagus nerve sheath tumor and 1 hypoglossal nerve sheath tumor.Total resections were achieved in all of the patients.Postoperative complications included 1 case of transient mild paralysis,2 cases of hoarseness and 1 case of dysphagia.Conclusions For patient with lower cranial nerve symptoms,nerve sheath tumors should be taken into consideration.Early diagnosis and effective surgery will contribute to patient's treatment and rehabilitation.

  12. Multiple meningiomas CASE SERIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    masses in the right parietal and parasagittal region (Figs 1a and b). Case 2: A ... scan showed hyperdense parasagittal and left cerebellopontine angle meningiomas (Figs ... Meningiomas are the most common primary non-glial brain tumours.

  13. Meningioma of the scapula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llauger, Jaume; Aixut, Sonia; Canete, Noemi; Palmer, Jaume; Sola, Marta [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Bague, Silvia [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pathology, Hospital de la Santa Creu I Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-02-15

    Meningiomas account for approximately 15% of all intracranial tumors and are the most common non-glial primary tumors of the central nervous system. Most meningiomas are benign neoplasms with characteristic imaging features. Primary extradural meningiomas account for only 1-2% of all meningiomas. They must be differentiated from intradural meningiomas with secondary extradural extension and/or metastases. The vast majority of extradural meningiomas are found in the skull or in the head and neck region. We report on an extremely rare case of primary extradural meningioma that was located in the scapula. The lesion was resected. Radiographic findings and pathologic features are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this form of presentation of an extradural meningioma has not been previously described. (orig.)

  14. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha is a poor prognostic factor and potential therapeutic target in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Fukushima

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST is a rare soft tissue sarcoma with poor prognosis. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 plays a crucial role in the cellular response to hypoxia and regulates the expression of multiple genes involved in tumor progression in various cancers. However, the importance of the expression of HIF-1α in MPNSTs is unclear.The expression of HIF-1α was examined immunohistochemically in 82 MPNST specimens. Cell culture assays of human MPNST cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions were used to evaluate the impact of anti-HIF-1α-specific siRNA inhibition on cell survival. A screening kit was employed to identify small molecules that inhibited HIF-1α.The nuclear expression of HIF-1α was positive in 75.6% of MPNST samples (62/82 cases. Positivity for HIF-1α was a significant poor prognostic factor both in univariate (P = 0.048 and multivariate (P ≤ 0.0001 analyses. HIF-1α knockdown abrogated MPNST cell growth, inducing apoptosis. Finally, chetomin, an inhibitor of HIF-1α, effectively inhibited the growth of MPNST cells and induced their apoptosis.Inhibition of HIF-1α signaling is a potential treatment option for MPNSTs.

  15. SARC006: Phase II Trial of Chemotherapy in Sporadic and Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Associated Chemotherapy-Naive Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

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    Christine S. Higham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Worse chemotherapy response for neurofibromatosis type 1- (NF1- associated compared to sporadic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST has been reported. Methods. We evaluated the objective response (OR rate of patients with AJCC Stage III/IV chemotherapy-naive NF1 MPNST versus sporadic MPNST after 4 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 2 cycles of ifosfamide/doxorubicin, and 2 cycles of ifosfamide/etoposide. A Simon optimal two-stage design was used (target response rate 40%. Results. 34 NF1 (median age 33 years and 14 sporadic (median age 40 years MPNST patients enrolled. Five of 28 (17.9% evaluable NF1 MPNST patients had a partial response (PR, as did 4 of 9 (44.4% patients with sporadic MPNST. Stable disease (SD was achieved in 22 NF1 and 4 sporadic MPNST patients. In both strata, results in the initial stages met criteria for expansion of enrollment. Only 1 additional PR was observed in the expanded NF1 stratum. Enrollment was slower than expected and the trial closed before full accrual. Conclusions. This trial was not powered to detect differences in response rates between NF1 and sporadic MPNST. While the OR rate was lower in NF1 compared to sporadic MPNST, qualitative responses were similar, and disease stabilization was achieved in most patients.

  16. MENINGIOMAS: A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY

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    Shri Lakshmi S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Meningiomas are tumors that arise from the meningothelial cells. Most of these tumors are intracranial; some are intraspinal and few extra cranial. There are many histological variants classified into three grades depending on clinical behavior. Classification is important for determining the modality of treatment. Objectives: To study the incidence, location, sex and age predilection, histological variants and grading of meningiomas based on WHO 2007 classification and recurrence if present. Materials and methods: All128 cases of meningiomas. Based on Histological features, typing and grading of meningiomas was done as per the WHO 2007 classification of Meningiomas. Age, Sex incidence, Location of meningiomas were studied. Results: Meningiomas comprised 25.25% of all CNS tumors during the study period. Of 507 CNS tumors, 128 were meningiomas. Most of them were intracranial, predominantly involving the convexities of brain, females and the 41 – 50 age group. Of these, 116 were benign grade I tumors, 9 were grade II and 3 were grade III. The most common histological variant was fibroblastic and meningothelial. Intraspinal meningiomas were 16 (12.5% cases with the psammomatous variant being more common. Grade II and Grade III tumors located in parafalcine or parasagittal area commonly recurred. Conclusion: Meningiomas are slow growing tumors arising from the meningothelial cells accounting for 25.25% of all CNS neoplasms showing a variety of histological patterns, more common in women, predominantly Grade I tumors. Recurrence of tumors depends on histological grade and extent of surgery.

  17. Jugular foramen meningiomas. Review of the major surgical series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakar, B.

    2010-01-01

    Primary jugular foramen meningiomas are uncommon, with 96 previous cases published between 1992 and 2007. Exact location and extent of tumor were determined on the basis of radiologic and operative findings and used to develop a staging system. The mean age of patients was 39.4 years. The lesion was located on the right in 14 patients and on the left in 11 patients. The series identified 23 males and 58 females. The most common presenting clinical symptoms were hearing loss and tinnitus. Most clinical findings were middle ear mass and neck mass. Most meningiomas were World Health Organization grade I. The most common postoperative complications were lower cranial nerve paresis and facial nerve paresis. Surgical planning should consider that meningiomas usually invade the dura mater, cranial nerves, and surrounding bone. The surgeon should carefully collect detailed data about the tumor, and consult an otolaryngologist preoperatively for lower cranial nerve functions and hearing levels.(author)

  18. Jugular foramen meningiomas. Review of the major surgical series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakar, B [Faculty of Medicine, Kirikkale Univ., Kirikkale (Turkey)

    2010-02-15

    Primary jugular foramen meningiomas are uncommon, with 96 previous cases published between 1992 and 2007. Exact location and extent of tumor were determined on the basis of radiologic and operative findings and used to develop a staging system. The mean age of patients was 39.4 years. The lesion was located on the right in 14 patients and on the left in 11 patients. The series identified 23 males and 58 females. The most common presenting clinical symptoms were hearing loss and tinnitus. Most clinical findings were middle ear mass and neck mass. Most meningiomas were World Health Organization grade I. The most common postoperative complications were lower cranial nerve paresis and facial nerve paresis. Surgical planning should consider that meningiomas usually invade the dura mater, cranial nerves, and surrounding bone. The surgeon should carefully collect detailed data about the tumor, and consult an otolaryngologist preoperatively for lower cranial nerve functions and hearing levels.(author)

  19. Primary Intraorbital Ectopic Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tetsuo; Nishizawa, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Kenji; Yokota, Noki; Ohta, Seiji; Uemura, Kenichi; Hinokuma, Kaoru; Inenaga, Chikanori

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of intraorbital meningioma. Operative findings and histopathological examination revealed the tumoc to be meningothelial meningloma and to be located entirely outside the optic dura. This case demonstrates the occurrence of primary intraorbital ectopic meningioma, and the tumor was removed through a modified Dolenc approach. The primary intraorbital ectopic meningioma is discussed and the surgical approach to the orbital apex region is reviewed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171081

  20. Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Assessment of Whole-Body Metabolic Tumor Burden Using F-18-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available To determine the metabolically active whole-body tumor volume (WB-MTV on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 using a three-dimensional (3D segmentation and computerized volumetry technique, and to compare PET WB-MTV between patients with benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs.Thirty-six NF1 patients (18 patients with malignant PNSTs and 18 age- and sex-matched controls with benign PNSTs were examined by F-18-FDG PET/CT. WB-MTV, whole-body total lesion glycolysis (WB-TLG and a set of semi-quantitative imaging-based parameters were analyzed both on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis.On a per-lesion basis, malignant PNSTs demonstrated both a significantly higher MTV and TLG than benign PNSTs (p < 0.0001. On a per-patient basis, WB-MTV and WB-TLG were significantly higher in patients with malignant PNSTs compared to patients with benign PNSTs (p < 0.001. ROC analysis showed that MTV and TLG could be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors.WB-MTV and WB-TLG may identify malignant change and may have the potential to provide a basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with metabolically active disease manifestations. Further evaluation will determine the potential clinical impact of these PET-based parameters in NF1.

  1. Congenital extracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, H.F.; Ng, S.H.; Wai, Y.Y.; Wan, Y.L.; Kong, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of congenital meningioma in a newborn. This tumour is extremely rare and only six cases have been reported in the literature. Those reported cases were mainly intracranial. This is the first case of a neonatal extracranial meningioma that was evaluated preoperatively by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  2. Anaplastic meningioma: The dark side of meningiomas

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    Andreea Cioca

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic meningioma is a rare malignant tumor of the meninges, with a very aggressive behavior and a grim prognosis. Here we report a case of a 64-year old man which presented to the neurosurgery department with motor deficit in the right hemi–body, loss of speech and disorientation. Magnetic resonance imaging detected a mass located in the left frontal lobe that measured 7/8/7 cm, leading to the conclusion that surgery is necessary. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed great number of hypercellular areas with a high mitotic index, and focal necrosis with psammoma bodies. Using a panel of antibodies such as EMA, vimentin, CD34 GFAP, pancytokeratin and Ki67, we concluded that he final diagnosis was anaplastic meningioma, WHO grade III. Due to its morphological similarity with other tumors, the diagnosis of anaplastic meningioma may be challenging.

  3. Surgery of petroclival meningiomas. Recent surgical results and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoi Mugurel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Petroclival meningiomas represent only 10% of all meningiomas located in the posterior fossa, but are some of the most formidable challenges in skull base surgery. We described our recent experience (2005-September2014 regarding the surgery of these tumors. We retrospectively analyzed surgical results and outcome in 11 cases of petroclival meningiomas. Most common symptoms in our series were headache and gait disturbance, while cranial nerves palsies represented the most common presenting signs. There were 8 females and 3 males, and the mean age was 52 years. Surgical approaches chosen for petroclival meningiomas in our series were retrosigmoid (9 patients and subtemporal transtentorial (2 patients. We achieved total tumor resection in 5 cases (45% and subtotal resection in 6 cases (55%. Overall outcome (total/subtotal resection was good in 6 cases, fair in 3 cases and poor in one case. One postoperative death occurred due to hemorrhagic midbrain infarction (9%. Complications were usually related to cranial nerve deficits: loss of hearing (2 patients, paresis of trochlear nerve (1 patient, trigeminal nerve (3 patients and facial nerve (1 patient. In 4 patients these cranial nerves deficits were transient. In one case, a patient developed postoperative hydrocephalus and needed shunt placement. Despite the fact that complications can be disastrous, we considered that an appropriate approach, combined with microsurgical techniques and a better understanding of the anatomy, greatly decrease the incidence and severity of complications and make feasible a total tumor resection.

  4. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

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    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  5. Characterisation of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis-1 using heterogeneity analysis of "1"8F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Gary J.R.; Siddique, Muhammad; Goh, Vicky; Warbey, Victoria S.; Lovat, Eitan; Ferner, Rosalie

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of heterogeneity in "1"8F-fluorodeoxyglucose ("1"8F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) images is reported to improve tumour phenotyping and response assessment in a number of cancers. We aimed to determine whether measurements of "1"8F-FDG heterogeneity could improve differentiation of benign symptomatic neurofibromas from malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs). "1"8F-FDG PET data from a cohort of 54 patients (24 female, 30 male, mean age 35.1 years) with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1), and clinically suspected malignant transformation of neurofibromas into MPNSTs, were included. Scans were performed to a standard clinical protocol at 1.5 and 4 h post-injection. Six first-order [including three standardised uptake value (SUV) parameters], four second-order (derived from grey-level co-occurrence matrices) and four high-order (derived from neighbourhood grey-tone difference matrices) statistical features were calculated from tumour volumes of interest. Each patient had histological verification or at least 5 years clinical follow-up as the reference standard with regards to the characterisation of tumours as benign (n = 30) or malignant (n = 24). There was a significant difference between benign and malignant tumours for all six first-order parameters (at 1.5 and 4 h; p < 0.0001), for second-order entropy (only at 4 h) and for all high-order features (at 1.5 h and 4 h, except contrast at 4 h; p < 0.0001-0.047). Similarly, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curves was high (0.669-0.997, p < 0.05) for the same features as well as 1.5-h second-order entropy. No first-, second- or high-order feature performed better than maximum SUV (SUVmax) at differentiating benign from malignant tumours. "1"8F-FDG uptake in MPNSTs is higher than benign symptomatic neurofibromas, as defined by SUV parameters, and more heterogeneous, as defined by first- and high-order heterogeneity parameters. However, heterogeneity analysis does not improve on

  6. Extension and origin of parasellar meningiomas. Evaluation on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Yoshie; Nakamura, Mitsugu; Asada, Masahiro; Tamaki, Norihiko

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated MRI of forty patients who had histologically confirmed meningiomas around the sella turcica. Coronal section of the spin-echo/fast spin-echo T 1 weighted imaging (with and without GD-DTPA enhancement) were mainly investigated. We precisely examined two points; the location of the bulk of tumor mass, the anatomical relationship between the tumor and the anterior clinoid process, superior orbital fissure, optic nerve, and the internal carotid artery (ICA). Based on MRI findings, we recognized five different tumor origins. Meningiomas originating lateral to the anterior clinoid process never extended medially into the cavernous sinus or the sella turcica, while tumors originating medial to the anterior clinoid process did not migrate laterally beyond the process. Tumors originating from the cavernous sinus tended to invade though the dura into the superior orbital fissure and involved the anterior clinoid process. Based upon the tumor origin and their extension investigated as revealed by MRI, we speculated that the anterior clinoid process and the tough dural folds attached to it (the anterior and posterior petroclinoid ligaments, and the interclinoid ligament) played important roles as barriers against the extension of meningiomas. These dural folds may be the unique part of the dura that most resists invasion of meningiomas from extracavernous regions. Meningiomas originated from the inferomedial surface of the anterior clinoid process may have been misdiagnosed as tuberculum sellae meningiomas; however, the close anatomical relation of the tumor origin and the distal carotid suggests their potential to directly invade the internal carotid artery. (K.H.)

  7. Intraparenchymal papillary meningioma of brainstem: case report and literature review

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    Jiang Xiao-Bing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Both intraparenchymal papillary meningioma and papillary meningioma with cyst formation of brainstem have never been reported. The authors present an extremely rare case of patient with intraparenchymal papillary meningioma of brainstem. A 23-year-old Chinese male presented with a 4-month history of progressive left upper limb and facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic-solid, heterogeneously enhancing mass in pons and right cerebral peduncle with no dural attachment. The tumor was totally removed via subtemporal approach. During surgery, the lesion was found to be completely intraparenchymal. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were compatible with the diagnosis of papillary meningioma. The lesion recurred nine months after primary surgery, a second surgery followed by radiotherapy was performed. Till to now (nearly 2 years after the treatment, the patient is tumor free survival. Intraparenchymal meningioma of brainstem with cystic formation is very rare, however, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of a brainstem neoplasm. The present case strongly recommended that postoperative radiotherapy was essential for the patients with papillary meningiomas.

  8. On the CT-diagnosis of optic nerve lesions. Differential diagnostic criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomograms of 166 optic nerve lesions were analyzed: 97 were mainly orbital and 69 mainly intracranial. The criteria were clinical course, size, density and delineation of the optic nerve shadow, orbital and cerebral soft tissue abnormalities, and bony changes in the optic canal. Characteristic CT features are described of individual disease entities such as optic gliomas, optic nerve sheath meningiomas, neoplastic and inflammatory infiltrations. The differential diagnostic importance of individual CT criteria is evaluated and discussed. Simultaneous visualization of orbital and intracranial soft tissue changes as well as bony changes in the optic canal allow the location and identification of the majority of optic nerve lesions based on the criteria mentioned above, and optic nerve tumors can be differentiated. In 9 patients with optic neuritis due to clinically proven encephalitis and in 17 patients with total optic atrophy, no changes in the size of the optic nerve could be found. CT evaluation of the intraorbital portion of the optic nerve requires special examination techniques. Oblique computer reformations through the optic canal provide excellent visualization of bony changes in the optic canal. The exclusion of intracranial causes of optic nerve lesions requires intravenous injection of contrast material. (orig.) [de

  9. Primary intraosseous meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, E.; Diaz, C.; Latorre, F.F.; Menor, F.; Revert, A.; Beltran, A.; Navarro, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the clinical, radiological and histological findings of 14 intraosseous meningiomas. Material and Methods: 14 histologically proved intraosseous meningiomas were studied with plain skull film and CT. Pathological records were reviewed. Results: We found 9 calvarial cases and 5 spheno-orbital ones. The most common symptom in the calvarial cases was a lump in the scalp, and in the spheno-orbital lesions it was exophtalmos. Hyperostosis was present in all 5 spheno-orbital cases and in 3 out of the 9 calvarial ones; in the other 6 cases it had a mixed pattern. Enhanced dura was present in 3 calvarial cases and in 2 sphenoidal ones. Dura was involved in 5 cases: 2 with inflammatory changes, 2 with a minimal intradural tumour and one with a subdural tumour. Conclusion: CT better detected both the bony reaction and the intraosseous extension of the tumour. The dural changes were not specific of tumoural involvement. The differential diagnosis comprises: fibrous dysplasia, osteomas, blastic metastasis and mainly meningioma en plaque (MEP). Comparing our findings with other series, we noticed that in some cases the term MEP was used for similar cases. As the name MEP is merely descriptive and both entities share a larger number of similarities than differences, we believe that a differentiation between hyperostotic en plaque meningioma and intraosseous meningioma can hardly be made. (orig.)

  10. Meningioma anaplásico Anaplastic meningioma

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    Arlines Alina Piña Tornés

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso clínico de un paciente que comenzó a presentar cefalea, vértigos, trastornos visuales y pérdida del equilibrio. Mediante la resonancia magnética se visualizó una imagen tumoral parietal izquierda de 3 cm diámetro, de localización extraaxial y contornos lobulados bien definidos, con gran captación no homogénea de contraste, rodeada de extenso edema perilesional. Se realizó angiotomografía, previa a la cirugía, en busca de irrigación y daño vascular. Se logró la resección de 95% de la lesión (grado II de Simpson, que incluyó duramadre adyacente infiltrada y respetó el seno longitudinal superior. Los resultados anatomopatológicos confirmaron que se trataba de un meningioma anaplásico de grado III, con criterio de tratamiento coadyuvante.The case report of a patient who began presenting headache, vertigos, visual disorders and loss of balance is presented. By means of the magnetic resonance a left tumoral parietal image of 3 cm diameter was visualized, of extra-axial localization and well defined lobulated contours, with great non-homogeneous zones of contrast, surrounded by extensive perilesional edema. An angiotomography was carried out, previous to the surgery, looking for irrigation and vascular compromise. The resection of 95% of the lesion was achieved (grade II of Simpson which included adjacent infiltrated dura madre and preserving the superior longitudinal sinus. Pathological results confirmed that it was an anaplastic meningioma grade III, with criterium for adyuvant treatment.

  11. MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kaji, Mitumasa

    1988-01-01

    MRI has gained a prominent position in the diagnosis of brain tumors. We examined 30 cases of meningiomas and distinguished their subtype according to the criteria of Rubinic histology. We discussed the MRI findings and compared then with X-CT findings so to their intensity, delination of tumors, whether accompanied by peripheral edema, and T 1 values. MRI delinated the tumors as well as CE-CT. No remarkable difference was found between the subtypes. (author)

  12. Primary extradural meningioma arising from the calvarium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ravi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumours. Meningiomas arising at other locations are termed primary extradural meningiomas (EDM and are rare. Here we report a case of EDM arising from the calvarium – a primary calvarial meningioma (PCM.

  13. Management of Benign Skull Base Meningiomas: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mendenhall, William M.; Friedman, William A.; Amdur, Robert J.; Foote, Kelly D.

    2004-01-01

    The optimal management of benign meningiomas of the skull base is reviewed. Elderly patients with small, asymptomatic tumors can be observed and treatment can be initiated if and when progression occurs. Patients with tumors that appear to be amenable to complete resection with an acceptable rate of morbidity are optimally treated with surgery. Decompression of more extensive tumors through conservative subtotal resection and preservation of the involved cranial nerves may result in improved ...

  14. Primary extradural meningioma arising from the calvarium | Ravi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumours. Meningiomas arising at other locations are termed primary extradural meningiomas (EDMs) and are rare. Here we report a case of EDM arising from the calvarium – a primary calvarial meningioma (PCM).

  15. Communication through plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korotkevich, A. O.; Newell, A. C.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2007-01-01

    We wish to transmit messages to and from a hypersonic vehicle around which a plasma sheath has formed. For long distance transmission, the signal carrying these messages must be necessarily low frequency, typically 2 GHz, to which the plasma sheath is opaque. The idea is to use the plasma properties to make the plasma sheath appear transparent

  16. Surgical outcomes after reoperation for recurrent skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Stephen T; Lee, David S; Yen, Adam J; Lucas, Calixto-Hope G; Raleigh, David R; Aghi, Manish K; Theodosopoulos, Philip V; McDermott, Michael W

    2018-05-04

    OBJECTIVE Skull base meningiomas are surgically challenging tumors due to the intricate skull base anatomy and the proximity of cranial nerves and critical cerebral vasculature. Many studies have reported outcomes after primary resection of skull base meningiomas; however, little is known about outcomes after reoperation for recurrent skull base meningiomas. Since reoperation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent meningioma, the authors sought to define the risk profile for reoperation of skull base meningiomas. METHODS A retrospective review of 2120 patients who underwent resection of meningiomas between 1985 and 2016 was conducted. Clinical information was extracted from the medical records, radiology data, and pathology data. All records of patients with recurrent skull base meningiomas were reviewed. Demographic data, presenting symptoms, surgical management, outcomes, and complications data were collected. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate survival after reoperation. Logistic regression was used to evaluate for risk factors associated with complications. RESULTS Seventy-eight patients underwent 100 reoperations for recurrent skull base meningiomas. Seventeen patients had 2 reoperations, 3 had 3 reoperations, and 2 had 4 or more reoperations. The median age at diagnosis was 52 years, and 64% of patients were female. The median follow-up was 8.5 years. Presenting symptoms included cranial neuropathy, headache, seizure, proptosis, and weakness. The median time from initial resection to first reoperation was 4.4 years and 4.1 years from first to second reoperation. Seventy-two percent of tumors were WHO grade I, 22% were WHO grade II, and 6% were WHO grade III. The sphenoid wing was the most common location (31%), followed by cerebellopontine angle (14%), cavernous sinus (13%), olfactory groove (12%), tuberculum sellae (12%), and middle fossa floor (5%). Forty-four (54%) tumors were ≥ 3 cm in maximum diameter at the time of the first

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1: tumour-to-liver ratio is superior to an SUV{sub max} cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Johannes [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Centre Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Apostolova, Ivayla [Otto-von-Guericke University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Bannas, Peter; Yamamura, Jin; Herrmann, Jochen; Adam, Gerhard; Derlin, Thorsten [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Friedrich, Reinhard E. [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Mautner, Victor F. [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of normalising intra-tumour tracer accumulation on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to reference tissue uptake for characterisation of peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) compared with the established maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) cut-off of >3.5. Forty-nine patients underwent FDG PET/CT. Intra-tumour tracer uptake (SUVmax) was normalised to three different reference tissues (tumour-to-liver, tumour-to-muscle and tumour-to-fat ratios). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used out to assess the diagnostic performance. Histopathology and follow-up served as the reference standard. Intra-tumour tracer uptake correlated significantly with liver uptake (r{sub s} = 0.58, P = 0.016). On ROC analysis, the optimum threshold for tumour-to-liver ratio was >2.6 (AUC = 0.9735). Both the SUVmax cut-off value of >3.5 and a tumour-to-liver ratio >2.6 provided a sensitivity of 100 %, but specificity was significantly higher for the latter (90.3 % vs 79.8 %; P = 0.013). In patients with NF1, quantitative {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging may identify malignant change in neurofibromas with high accuracy. Specificity could be significantly increased by using the tumour-to-liver ratio. The authors recommend further evaluation of a tumour-to-liver ratio cut-off value of >2.6 for diagnostic intervention planning. (orig.)

  18. Cathepsin L in human meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinkaus, M.; Lah, T.T.; Vranic, A.; Dolenc, V.V.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Although meningiomas are considered as benign tumours, about 10% comprise a subgroup of a typical meningiomas, classified as WHO grade II, with greater likelihood of recurrences and/or aggressive behaviour, including the possibility of brain tissue invasion. The lysosomal cysteine endopeptidase cathepsin L plays a role in tumour cell invasion and malignant progression of cancer, and has been suggested as a prognostic marker for certain types of tumours. Results. In our study, we compared the expression of cathepsin L in 30 meningiomas with their clinical invasiveness. Cathepsin L was determined by immunohistochemical analysis, quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Northern blot. We showed that expression of cathepsin L protein was significantly higher (p=0.019) in 9 atypical than in 21 benign meningiomas. Within the group of benign meningiomas, expression of cathepsin L was significantly lower in the transitional histological subtype. We measured the levels of cathepsin LA type of RNA splicing variants: LA, LAI and LAII, but not LAIII and not the LB variant, the latter being several times lower than the LA type. In contrast to protein levels, the levels of cathepsin LA, AI, AII RNA variants did not differ between histological subtypes or between benign and a typical meningiomas. The expression of total measured cathepsin LA, AI, AII RNA variants in the samples, taken from the centre and the periphery of the tumours, also showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusions. These results indicate that cathepsin L protein over-expression may contribute to the development of the aggressive and possibly invasive character of a typical meningiomas and that it may be up regulated at the translational level. (author)

  19. Preoperative cellulose porous beads for therapeutic embolization of meningioma: provocation test and technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Yutaka; Morioka, Motohiro; Yano, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Hideo; Makino, Keishi; Mizuno, Takamasa; Takeshima, Hideo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2007-01-01

    Cellulose porous beads (CPBs) are exceptionally uniform in size and nonabsorbable and they provide highly effective tumor devascularization. The risk of cranial nerve palsy must not be overlooked when embolization with CPBs is considered in meningioma patients. We attempted to identify patients at risk of cranial nerve palsy after meningioma embolization. Prior to preoperative superselective embolization with 200 μm diameter CPBs, 141 patients with meningioma underwent provocation test with lidocaine and amytal. They were divided into two groups on the basis of whether they were or were not considered eligible for embolization. We evaluated the differences between the two groups with respect to tumor anatomy, angiographic findings, and clinical presentation and recorded complications associated with the embolization of the meningioma. Of the 141 patients, 128 underwent CPB embolization (group 2); 13 were not embolized because their provocation test results were positive (group 1, n = 11) or because they showed vasospasm (n = 2). Group 1 patients had meningioma in the cavernous sinus or petroclival region. Characteristically, the feeders were of middle meningeal artery origin and exhibited a posteromedial course toward the petrous apex or cavernous sinus. In group 2 patients the middle meningeal artery was the feeder, but it lacked branches coursing posteromedially. Three of these patients experienced complications which included intratumoral hemorrhage (n 2) and post-embolization hearing disturbance (n = 1). Patients with meningioma whose tumor-feeding arteries run posteromedially toward the petrous apex or cavernous sinus are at increased risk of post-embolization cranial nerve palsy. Appropriate protocols, including lidocaine and amytal provocation tests, may reduce the risk of complications after CPB embolization of the external carotid territory in this group of patients. (orig.)

  20. Preoperative cellulose porous beads for therapeutic embolization of meningioma: provocation test and technical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Yutaka; Morioka, Motohiro; Yano, Shigetoshi; Nakamura, Hideo; Makino, Keishi; Mizuno, Takamasa; Takeshima, Hideo; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi [Kumamoto University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Hamada, Jun-ichiro [Kanazawa University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    Cellulose porous beads (CPBs) are exceptionally uniform in size and nonabsorbable and they provide highly effective tumor devascularization. The risk of cranial nerve palsy must not be overlooked when embolization with CPBs is considered in meningioma patients. We attempted to identify patients at risk of cranial nerve palsy after meningioma embolization. Prior to preoperative superselective embolization with 200 {mu}m diameter CPBs, 141 patients with meningioma underwent provocation test with lidocaine and amytal. They were divided into two groups on the basis of whether they were or were not considered eligible for embolization. We evaluated the differences between the two groups with respect to tumor anatomy, angiographic findings, and clinical presentation and recorded complications associated with the embolization of the meningioma. Of the 141 patients, 128 underwent CPB embolization (group 2); 13 were not embolized because their provocation test results were positive (group 1, n = 11) or because they showed vasospasm (n = 2). Group 1 patients had meningioma in the cavernous sinus or petroclival region. Characteristically, the feeders were of middle meningeal artery origin and exhibited a posteromedial course toward the petrous apex or cavernous sinus. In group 2 patients the middle meningeal artery was the feeder, but it lacked branches coursing posteromedially. Three of these patients experienced complications which included intratumoral hemorrhage (n = 2) and post-embolization hearing disturbance (n = 1). Patients with meningioma whose tumor-feeding arteries run posteromedially toward the petrous apex or cavernous sinus are at increased risk of post-embolization cranial nerve palsy. Appropriate protocols, including lidocaine and amytal provocation tests, may reduce the risk of complications after CPB embolization of the external carotid territory in this group of patients. (orig.)

  1. Barrier cell sheath formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  2. Cystic meningiomas in 2 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, R.S.; Kornegay, J.N.; Lane, S.B.; Thrall, D.L.; Page, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Two dogs with signs of forebrain disease had hypodense lesions on computed tomography evaluation. Magnetic resonance imaging of the first dog showed a hypointense lesion on the T1-weighted scan and a hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted scanning. At surgery, both dogs had a primary cystic intracranial lesion, and the abnormal tissue adjacent to the cyst had histological features of meningioma. Each dog underwent whole brain irradiation after surgery, and 1 dog lived for 3 years after treatment. While uncommon, meningioma should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs with cystic intracranial lesions

  3. Tuberculum sellae meningiomas: surgical considerations Meningiomas do tuberculo selar: aspectos cirúrgicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Landeiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We report our experience on the treatment of tuberculum sellae meningiomas (TSMs regarding the involvement of the optic canal and clinical outcomes. We reviewed 23 patients who were operated on between January 1997 and December 2008. The surgical approach was unilateral subfrontal supraorbital osteotomy in one piece. Attempts were made to improve visual function via extra/intradural unroofing of the optic canal, which released the optic nerve. Visual symptoms were present preoperatively in 21 patients, and two patients were asymptomatic. Visual acuity remained intact in 6 patients, improved in 10, was unchanged in 5 patients, and worsened in 2 patients. The postoperative visual field was normal or improved in 17 patients, unchanged in four patients, and worsened in two patients. The optic canal and clinoid were drilled extradurally in eight patients and intradurally in nine patients. Total resection of TSMs was achieved in 19 patients. Incomplete resection occurred in two patients. Decompression of the optic canal seemed to increase the visual outcome.Apresentamos nossa experiência em 23 pacientes operados com meningiomas do tubérculo da sela, com enfoque na descompressão do nervo óptico e nos sintomas visuais do pós-operatório. Vinte e três pacientes com meningiomas do tubérculo da sela foram operados entre janeiro de 1997 e dezembro de 2008, através do acesso subfrontal via ostetomia supraorbital. Remoção do teto do canal óptico por via extra ou intradural foi realizada em 17 pacientes. Sintomas visuais no pré-operatório ocorreram em 21 pacientes, 2 eram assintomáticos. Melhora visual ocorreu em 10, permaneceu inalterada em 5 e piorou em 2 pacientes. No pós-operatório o campo visual normalizou-se em 17 pacientes, permaneceu inalterado em 4 e diminuiu em 2. Descompressão dos nervos ópticos foi realizada em 17 pacientes. Ressecção total dos meningiomas do tubérculo da sela foi possível em 19 pacientes. Abertura do canal

  4. Surgical experience with skull base approaches for foramen magnum meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin Sanabria, Elio Arnaldo; Ehara, Kazumasa; Tamaki, Norihiko

    2002-11-01

    The surgical treatment of patients with foramen magnum meningioma remains challenging. This study evaluated the outcome of this tumor according to the evolution of surgical approaches during the last 29 years. A retrospective analysis of medical records, operative notes, and neuroimages of 492 meningioma cases from 1972 to 2001 identified seven cases of foramen magnum meningioma (1.4%). All patients showed various neurological symptoms corresponding with foramen magnum syndrome. The tumor locations were anterior in five cases and posterior in two. Surgical removal was performed through a transoral approach in one patient, the suboccipital approach in three, and the transcondylar approach in two. Total removal was achieved in all patients, except for one who refused any surgical treatment. The major complications were tetraparesis and lower cranial nerve paresis for tumors in anterior locations, and minor complications for posterior locations. One patient died of atelectasis and pneumonia after a long hospitalization. The transcondylar approach is recommended for anterior locations, and the standard suboccipital approach for posterior locations.

  5. Meningiomas anteriores e antero-laterais do forame magno Anterior and lateral foramen magnum meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Inácio de Tella Jr

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Relatamos nossa experiência com 11 pacientes portadores de meningiomas do forame magno, oito cranioespinhais e três espinocraniais. A média de idade foi 50,8 anos, o sintoma mais comum foi cefaléia occipital com duração média de 18,6 meses. Os principais achados neurológicos foram tetraparesia e comprometimento dos nervos cranianos baixos. O tratamento foi cirúrgico, sempre com exposição da artéria vertebral em sua entrada na dura-máter da fossa posterior e ressecção de parte do côndilo occipital apenas em três casos. Ressecção total foi possível em sete pacientes e parcial nos demais, devido às aderências a vasos e nervos. O prognóstico esteve relacionado com as condições neurológicas pré-operatórias.We report our experience with 11 cases of foramen magnum meningiomas, eight originating inside the posterior fossa and three in the caudal region. The mean age of the patients was 50.8 years and the main complaint was cervical headache for at least 18.6 months and at the neurological examination, tetraparesis and deficit of the lower cranial nerves were very often observed. All patients were submitted to surgical treatment, always with exposition of the vertebral artery at the entry zone in the duramater of the posterior fossa, with partial removal of the occipital condyle in only three cases. Total resection was obtained in seven patients and partial removal in the other four due to adherences to vessels and nerves. The prognostic was related to the neurological condition before surgery.

  6. Current treatment options for meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apra, Caroline; Peyre, Matthieu; Kalamarides, Michel

    2018-03-01

    With an annual incidence of 5/100,000, meningioma is the most frequent primary tumor of the central nervous system. Risk factors are radiotherapy and hormone intake. Most meningiomas are grade I benign tumors, but up to 15% are atypical and 2% anaplastic according to the WHO 2016 histological criteria. Areas covered: This review details the current standard therapy based on international guidelines and recent literature, and describes new approaches developed to treat refractory cases. First-line treatments are observation and surgery, but adjuvant radiotherapy/radiosurgery is discussed for atypical and indicated for anaplastic meningiomas. The most problematic cases include skull base meningiomas that enclose vasculo-nervous structures and surgery- and radiation-refractory tumors that present with significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment of recurrent tumors is based on radiotherapy and repeated surgery. Systematic therapies are not effective in general but several clinical trials are ongoing. Expert commentary: Molecular characterization of the tumors, based on genetic mutations such as NF2, SMO, TERT, TRAF7, and on the methylation profile are developing, completing the histological classification and giving new insights into prognosis and treatment options.

  7. Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gomes de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carvalho J.R.G., Vasconcellos C.H.C., Bastos I. P.B., Trajano F.L.C., Costa T.S. & Fernandes J.I [Canine Intracranial Meningioma: Case report.] Meningioma intracraniano canino: Relato de caso. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(supl. 3:1- 7, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465 Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23.897-000, Brasil, E-mail: vetjulio@yahoo.com.br Intracranial neoplasms usually show their signals in a moderate way, revealing a long background of nonspecific signs, making the diagnosis more difficult. The meningioma is the most common intracranial neoplasm in dogs and cats. Along the years, the Veterinary Medicine has experienced important technological improvements, making it possible the diagnosis of a lot of diseases. Therefore, diseases considered not common in the past, started being diagnosed more frequently, for instance, brain lesions. The objective of this research is to report a case of intracranial meningioma in a Boxer dog that arrived at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, highlighting its clinical improvement, diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Orbital meningioma, the Utrecht experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, Maarten Ph.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem

    2001-01-01

    AIMS. 1) To evaluate epidemiological data (age, gender, initial complaints, and ophthalmic findings) of a patient cohort with a primary or secondary orbital meningioma. 2) To evaluate the clinical course of these patients. 3) To evaluate the outcome of treatment. PATIENTS AND METHODS. All

  9. Preoperative embolization of gigantic meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongsheng; Chen Huaqun; Dong Congsong; Li Wenhui; Dai Zhenyu; Chen Guozhi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of preoperative embolization in treatment of patients with gigantic meningioma. Methods: Fourteen cases of gigantic meningioma diameter from 6 to 11 cm were measured by CT and MRI scan. DSA manifested that they are vascularizd meningioma and showed the mainly feeding arteries. We used getation sponge to superselectively embilized the feeding arteries. All tumors were performed surgical excision 3-7 days after the embolization. Results: DSA showed the blood supplies in the tumors in 9 cases were completely blocked, and that in 5 cases were dramatically eliminated. All patients were operated 3-7 days after the embolization. During the operations the bleeding were dramatically decreased and the operation time was shortened compared with those in unembolized cases. It helps us remove the tumors easy and quickly from the attachments. No complication occurred during and after the operations. Conclusion: Preoperative embolization of gigantic meningioma is a useful and relatively safe method in helping surgicaly and completely excised of tumor with significant reduction of blood loss and operation time. (authors)

  10. Canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor involving nerve roots of the third lumbar spinal cord segmentTumor maligno da bainha de nervo periférico envolvendo raízes nervosas do terceiro segmento medular lombar em um cão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Olegário da Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST involving spinal nerve roots are uncommon in dogs. A nine-year old, intact, mixed-breed dog, demonstrated clinical signs of incoordination in the pelvic limbs and micturition for approximately one week. Clinical examination revealed proprioceptive deficits and bilateral patellar hyperreflexia. During exploratory celiotomy a mass was observed adhered to the lumbar vertebral segments. Medical therapy was initiated, but neurological signs were progressive, and the owner opted for euthanasia. Gross examination showed that the mass in the abdominal cavity was attached to the lumbar segments L3 and L4, causing bone lysis in L3, but showed no tumor invasion into the spinal canal. Microscopic features were characterized by prominent proliferation of ovoid and fusiform cells with poorly defined cytoplasm arranged in interlacing bundles and concentric whorls. The cells were embedded in a delicate to moderate collagenous stroma and moderate anisokariose and high mitotic activity were noted. The immunohistochemical assay showed positive staining for GFAP, S-100 protein and vimentin, and negative staining for factor VIII, ?-actin and citokeratine. The definitive diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor was made on the basis of the histological and immunohistochemical findings. Tumores malignos da bainha de nervo periférico (TMBNP em raízes nervosas espinhais são incomuns em cães. Relata-se o caso de um cão, sem raça definida, nove anos de idade, não castrado, com histórico de incoordenação em membros pélvicos e retenção urinária há aproximadamente uma semana. Ao exame clínico constatou-se déficit proprioceptivo e hiperreflexia patelar bilaterais. Durante a celiotomia exploratória constatou-se uma massa intensamente vascularizada e aderida aos segmentos vertebrais lombares. Estabeleceu-se plano terapêutico e o animal foi tratado com fluidoterapia, anti-inflamatório e analg

  11. Congenital intracranial meningioma. A case report and literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed.......A case report of congenital intracranial meningioma is presented. We describe what appears to be the first fetal meningioma of the fibroblastic subtype. The literature is reviewed, and the subtype and sex distribution of fetal meningiomas is discussed....

  12. Radiation-induced meningiomas in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, S.D.; Rockswold, G.L.; Chou, S.N.; Yock, D.; Berger, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced meningiomas rarely have latency periods short enough from the time of irradiation to the clinical presentation of the tumor to present in the pediatric patient. Three cases of radiation-induced intracranial meningiomas in pediatric patients are presented. The first involved a meningioma of the right frontal region in a 10-year-old boy 6 years after the resection and irradiation of a 4th ventricular medulloblastoma. Review of our pediatric tumor cases produced a second case of a left temporal fossa meningioma presenting in a 15-year-old boy with a history of irradiation for retinoblastoma at age 3 years and a third case of a right frontoparietal meningioma in a 15-year-old girl after irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Only three cases of meningiomas presenting in the pediatric age group after radiation therapy to the head were detected in our review of the literature

  13. Application of CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system in resection of skull base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailiang; Zhang, Haishi; Xie, Qing; Gong, Ye; Zheng, Mingzhe; Wang, Daijun; Zhu, Hongda; Chen, Xiancheng; Zhou, Liangfu

    2014-12-01

    Here, we introduced our short experience on the application of a new CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system, which was provided by Integra Lifesciences corporation, in skull base meningiomas resection. Ten patients with anterior, middle skull base and sphenoid ridge meningioma were operated using the CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system at the Neurosurgery Department of Shanghai Huashan Hospital from August 2014 to October 2014. There were six male and four female patients, aged from 38 to 61 years old (the mean age was 48.5 years old). Five cases with tumor located at anterior skull base, three cases with tumor on middle skull base, and two cases with tumor on sphenoid ridge. All the patents received total resection of meningiomas with the help of this new tool, and the critical brain vessels and nerves were preserved during operations. All the patients recovered well after operation. This new CUSA Excel ultrasonic aspiration system has the advantage of preserving vital brain arteries and cranial nerves during skull base meningioma resection, which is very important for skull base tumor operations. This key step would ensure a well prognosis for patients. We hope the neurosurgeons would benefit from this kind of technique.

  14. Edema and malignancy in meningiomas

    OpenAIRE

    Mattei,Tobias Alécio; Mattei,Josias Alécio; Ramina,Ricardo; Aguiar,Paulo Henrique; Plese,José Pindaro; Marino Jr,Raul

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: In recent years there have been many attempts to define a subset of aggressive malignant meningiomas based on histopathology and imaging technologies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of peritumoral edema and its volume using the imaging technologies, computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and correlate these results with the histological WHO classification. Reported causes of tumoral edema and its relationships to the histological characteristics were...

  15. Postoperative radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ha Chung; Lee, Myung Za

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of postoperative external radiotherapy for patients with intracranial meningiomas. The records of thirty three patients with intracranial meningiomas who were treated with postoperative external irradiation at our institution between Feb, 1988 and Nov, 1999 were retrospectively analyzed. Median age of patients at diagnosis was 53 years with range of 17 to 68 years. Sites of involvement were parasagital, cerebral convexity, sphenoid ridge, parasellar and tentorium cerebella. Of 33 evaluated patients, 15 transitional, 10 meningotheliomatous, 4 hemangiopericytic, 3 atypical and 1 malignant meningioma were identified. Four patients underwent biopsy alone and remaining 29 patients underwent total tumor resection. A dose of 50 to 60 Gy was delivered in 28-35 daily fractions over a period of 5 to 7 weeks. Follow-up period ranged from 12 months to 8 years. The actuarial survival rates at 5 and 7 years for entire group of patients were 78% and 67%, respectively. The corresponding disease free survival rates were 73% and 61 %, respectively. The overall local control rate at 5 years was 83%. One out of 25 patients in benign group developed local failure, while 4 out of 8 patients in malignant group did local failure (p <0.05), Of 4 patients who underwent biopsy alone, 2 developed local failure. There was no significant difference in 5 year actuarial survival between patients who underwent total tumor resection and those who did biopsy alone. Patients whose age is under 60 showed slightly better survival than those whose age is 60 or older, although this was not statistically significant. There was no documented late complications in any patients. Based on our study, we might conclude that postoperative external beam radiotherapy tends to improve survival of patients with intracranial meningiomas comparing with surgery alone

  16. Nephrotic syndrome associated with meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Zachariah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old man presented with recurrent frontal meningioma and nephrotic syndrome. Renal biopsy could not be done in view of the rapid neurological deterioration. The patient underwent surgical resection of the tumor. Within 4 weeks, the edema decreased, serum albumin improved, and proteinuria decreased spontaneously. At three months of followup, the patient had attained complete remission of nephrotic state.

  17. CT and MRI of the skull base, including the cranial nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    Some considerations about nuclear magnetic resonance and computerized tomography, essential for examining skull base lesions are treated here, including the cranial nerves. Neoplasms such as meningiomas, adenomas, chordomas, chondrosarcomas and others tumors are also cited, mentioning some commentaries. (author)

  18. A case of hypervascular meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Makita, Yasumasa; Nabeshima, Sachio; Tei, Taikyoku; Keyaki, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    1988-01-01

    A 30-year-old, right handed male was admitted with headache and mild right-sided motor weakness of one year's duration. A CT scan revealed a mass over the left frontal convexity. A cerebral angiogram showed a huge, hypervascular tumor which was fed by bilateral external carotid and left internal carotid arteries. Because of its size and location, a surgical intervention was considered contraindicated at that time. Instead he was initially irradiated 52 Gy in total dose with 10 MV x-rays (Lineac). A CT scan 4 month thereafter revealed remarkable decrease in the size of tumor and reduction of its mass effect. A CT scan 12 months later, however, revealed increase in low density area around mass, although the size of the tumor was much smaller than before. He was readmitted for surgery 14 months after irradiation. An angiogram visualized more reduction of tumor stain and the caliber of feeding arteries. The tumor was totally removed without resultant neurological deficits. A histological diagnosis of the tumor was meningotheliomatous meningioma with well developed vascular networks. Meningioma is usually not a radiosensitive tumor, but there are some reports of cases with hypervascular meningiomas which have been effectively treated with irradiation preoperatively. In the present case, because of a huge vascular tumor in the dominant hemisphere, irradiation was given initial and 14 months thereafter the tumor was totally removed without neurological deficits. (author)

  19. Trigeminal complications arising after surgery of cranial base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Ulf; Linderoth, Bengt; Mathiesen, Tiit

    2012-04-01

    Chronic severe facial pain is a feared sequel of cranial base surgery. This study explores the symptomatology, incidence and impact on the individual of postoperative de novo trigeminal nerve affection as well as the recovery potential. Out of 231 patients operated for cranial base meningiomas at the Karolinska University Hospital during 7 years, 25 complained of de novo trigeminal symptoms at clinical follow-up 3 months after surgery. Six were later lost to follow-up leaving 19 participants in the study, which was conducted using a questionnaire and a structured telephone interview. All patients complained of facial numbness, affecting the V1 branch in 10/19 patients (53%), the V2 branch in 18/19 (95%) and the V3 branch in 9/19 (47%). Surprisingly, only three (16%) suffered from trigeminal pain, which could be adequately managed by pharmacotherapy. However, five patients (26%) demonstrated ocular dysaesthetic problems. Twelve (63%) described their handicap to be mild, while seven (37%) had daily or severe symptoms. Five patients (26%) reported no improvement over time, while nine (47%) showed improvement and four (21%) stated good recovery. Only one patient (5%) claimed complete symptom remission. In the present study, 11% of the patients presented with a de novo postoperative affection of the trigeminal nerve after removal of a cranial base meningioma; 37% of these reported daily/severe symptoms. Only 26% showed good recovery, observed in patients without tumour infiltration of the nerve or intraoperative nerve damage. In spite of frequent complaints of numbness, pain was uncommon (16%) and often manageable by pharmacotherapy, while ocular symptoms turned out to be more frequent and more disabling than expected.

  20. Pure intrasellar meningioma located under the pituitary gland: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Park, Dong Woo; Park, Choong Ki; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Lee, Young Jun; Lee, SAeung Ro

    2013-01-01

    Most intrasellar meningiomas are located in the subdiaphragmatic and supraglandular region because they originate from the diaphragma sellae. Subglandular meningiomas located under the pituitary gland are extremely rare. Intrasellar meningiomas in the subdiaphragmatic and subglandular region probably originate from the dura in the sellar floor. We report a case of a subglandular meningioma along with a review of the literature.

  1. Pure intrasellar meningioma located under the pituitary gland: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Park, Dong Woo; Park, Choong Ki; Pyo, Ju Yeon [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Jun; Lee, SAeung Ro [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Most intrasellar meningiomas are located in the subdiaphragmatic and supraglandular region because they originate from the diaphragma sellae. Subglandular meningiomas located under the pituitary gland are extremely rare. Intrasellar meningiomas in the subdiaphragmatic and subglandular region probably originate from the dura in the sellar floor. We report a case of a subglandular meningioma along with a review of the literature.

  2. Clinical results of BNCT for malignant meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Tamura, Yoji; Kawabata, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Malignant meningiomas is difficult pathology to be controlled as well as GBM. Since June of 2005, we applied BNCT for 7 cases of malignancy related meningiomas with 13 times neutron irradiation. Five were anaplastic, one was atypical meningiomas and one was sarcoma transformed from meningioma with cervical lymph node metastasis. All cases were introduced after repetitive surgeries and XRT or SRS. Follow-up images were available for 6 cases with observation duration between 2 to 9 months. We applied F-BPA-PET before BNCT in 6 out of 7 cases. One case was received methionine-PET. Five out of 6 cases who received BPA-PET study showed good BPA uptake more than 3 of T/N ratio. One atypical meningiomas cases showed 2.0 of T/N ratio. Original tumor sizes were between 9.2 to 92.7 ml. Two out of 5 anaplastic meningiomas showed CR and all six cases showed radiographic improvements. Clinical symptoms before BNCT such as hemiparesis and facial pain were improved after BNCT, except one case. An huge atypical meningiomas which arisen from tentorium and extended bilateral occipital lobes and brain stem, visual problems were worsened after repetitive BNCT with increase of peritumoral edema. Malignant meningiomas are seemed to be good candidate for BNCT. (author)

  3. Intracranial meningiomas after high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, D.; Gomori, J.M.; Siegal, T.; Shalit, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Three patients who presented with intracranial meningiomas 12, 15, and 20 years, respectively, after therapeutic high-dose irradiation of a primary brain tumor are described. Analysis of these cases and similar documented cases suggests that meningiomas after high-dose irradiation constitute a recognizable entity. Patients with such tumors received radiation therapy at a young age (mean age, 9.4 years). After a latent period of 2 to 47 years (mean, 19.8 years) they developed meningiomas at the site of irradiation, at a much younger age than patients with ''spontaneous'' meningiomas. Similar to the situation with meningiomas after low-dose irradiation, a relatively high proportion of meningiomas induced by high-dose irradiation tend to be malignant and biologically aggressive. A very young age at the time of irradiation seems to predispose to the induction of malignant meningiomas, rather than benign tumors. These unusual features provide indirect evidence that high-dose radiation may play a role in the pathogenesis of meningiomas.41 references

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of xanthomatous meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Y.; Tsubokawa, T.; Tanaka, A.; Koshinaga, M.; Nemoto, N.

    1993-01-01

    A case of meningioma with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia occurring in the left frontal convexity of a 37-year-old woman is reported. The tumour was demonstrated as a hypodense mass with minimal enhancement on CT. Our findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging may provide a clue to the diagnosis of meningiomas with extensive xanthomatous metaplasia when CT is less specific. (orig.)

  5. Peritumoral brain edema in angiomatous supratentorial meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Sørensen, Lars Peter; Dyrbye, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) pathway and peritumoral brain edema (PTBE) through comparison of non-angiomatous and angiomatous meningiomas. Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors, which often have PTBE. VEGF-A is an integral part of PTBE...

  6. Parapharyngeal meningioma extending from the intracranial space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchibori, M.; Odake, G.; Ueda, S.; Yasuda, N.; Hisa, I.

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year old woman with a giant parapharyngeal meningioma extending from the intracranial cavity was admitted to our hospital. The parapharyngeal tumor was biopsied using the transoral approach, and a histological section diagnosis suggested meningioma. Thereafter, further examination by magnetic resonance images (MRI) and contrast enhanced CT scans revealed a diffuse meningioma en plaque in the posterior fossa. Invasion extended from the clival dura to the right sigmoid sinus. The extracranial extension of a meningioma is very rare but a few cases have been reported. In almost all of the reported cases, a large intracranial meningioma was simultaneously or previously verified by CT scans. Our case was special in that the intracranial mass was not voluminous but showed en plaque extension, and also because the pathway of the extracranial extension through the jugular foramen was clearly visualized by CT and MRI. Obliteration and invasion of the right sigmoid sinus and the internal jugular vein by tumor were also demonstrated. (orig.)

  7. Skull base meningioma. Surgical and adjuvant treatment with clinical and PET evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudjonsson, O.

    2001-01-01

    The treatment strategy for skull base meningiomas remains a controversial issue. Because of the proximity of these tumours to critical neurovascular structures, the risk for vascular damage and new cranial neuropathies postoperatively is significant. To avoid unacceptable neurological deficits the surgical treatment strategy includes different surgical approaches and a subtotal removal of these tumours in some cases. However, because the rate of recurrence and progression is significant in these patients, a demand for adjuvant treatment and better prognostic methods is called for so that treatment and follow-up can be tailored to each patient. Accordingly, we have chosen to evaluate general outcome and facial nerve function after translabyrinthine and transcochlear approaches for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas. Furthermore, we have evaluated two adjuvant treatments, namely, irradiation by high-energy proton beams and medical treatment with interferon-alpha as well as evaluation of the treatment effect with 11 C-L-methionine PET. In addition, we have evaluated a new PET tracer ( 76 Br-BrdU) for 'in vivo' determination of the growth potential of intracranial tumours. Conclusion: The translabyrinthine and transcochlear approaches are apparently safe surgical procedures in the treatment of CPA meningiomas. Proton beam therapy is technically feasible as suggested by the fact that only minimal side effects were observed. Moreover, none of the meningiomas treated have shown progression during a 36-month follow-up. Our results indicate that IFN-alpha can be an effective oncostatic treatment for certain patients with meningiomas. The 11 C-L-methionine PET method might be used as a complement to CT or MRI in the evaluation of the effect of proton beam and IFN-alpha treatment in meningiomas. The present attempt failed to demonstrate that the PET tracer 76 Br-BrdU could be used for the non-invasive characterisation of growth potential in brain, tumours

  8. Skull base meningioma. Surgical and adjuvant treatment with clinical and PET evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudjonsson, O

    2001-05-01

    The treatment strategy for skull base meningiomas remains a controversial issue. Because of the proximity of these tumours to critical neurovascular structures, the risk for vascular damage and new cranial neuropathies postoperatively is significant. To avoid unacceptable neurological deficits the surgical treatment strategy includes different surgical approaches and a subtotal removal of these tumours in some cases. However, because the rate of recurrence and progression is significant in these patients, a demand for adjuvant treatment and better prognostic methods is called for so that treatment and follow-up can be tailored to each patient. Accordingly, we have chosen to evaluate general outcome and facial nerve function after translabyrinthine and transcochlear approaches for cerebellopontine angle (CPA) meningiomas. Furthermore, we have evaluated two adjuvant treatments, namely, irradiation by high-energy proton beams and medical treatment with interferon-alpha as well as evaluation of the treatment effect with {sup 11}C-L-methionine PET. In addition, we have evaluated a new PET tracer ({sup 76}Br-BrdU) for 'in vivo' determination of the growth potential of intracranial tumours. Conclusion: The translabyrinthine and transcochlear approaches are apparently safe surgical procedures in the treatment of CPA meningiomas. Proton beam therapy is technically feasible as suggested by the fact that only minimal side effects were observed. Moreover, none of the meningiomas treated have shown progression during a 36-month follow-up. Our results indicate that IFN-alpha can be an effective oncostatic treatment for certain patients with meningiomas. The {sup 11}C-L-methionine PET method might be used as a complement to CT or MRI in the evaluation of the effect of proton beam and IFN-alpha treatment in meningiomas. The present attempt failed to demonstrate that the PET tracer {sup 76}Br-BrdU could be used for the non-invasive characterisation of growth potential in

  9. Metastatic meningioma presenting as cancer of unknown primary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of anaplastic meningioma presenting in an extracranial osseous location, initially diagnosed as cancer of unknown primary. Although anaplastic meningioma comprise 3% of all meningiomas, this subtype is more likely to be associated with metastases. The increased degree of dedifferentiation in anaplastic meningioma makes diagnosis difficult, especially if characteristic imaging findings of meningioma are not identified. Adequate tissue for diagnostic purposes and appropriate imaging studies may help in establishing a definitive diagnosis.

  10. Foramen magnum meningiomas: surgical treatment in a single public institution in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto Oscar Colli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the clinical outcome of patients with foramen magnum (FM meningiomas. Method: Thirteen patients (11 Feminine / 2 Masculine with FM meningiomas operated on through lateral suboccipital approach were studied. Clinical outcome were analyzed using survival (SC and recurrence-free survival curves (RFSC. Results: All tumors were World Health Organization grade I. Total, subtotal and partial resections were acchieved in 69.2%, 23.1% and 7.7%, respectively, and SC was better for males and RFSC for females. Tumor location, extent of resection and involvement of vertebral artery/lower cranial nerves did not influence SC and RFSC. Recurrence rate was 7.7%. Operative mortality was 0. Main complications were transient (38.5% and permanent (7.7% lower cranial nerve deficits, cerebrospinal fluid fistula (30.8%, and transient and permanent respiratory difficulties in 7.7% each. Conclusions: FM meningiomas can be adequately treated in public hospitals in developing countries if a multidisciplinary team is available for managing postoperative lower cranial nerve deficits.

  11. Receptores de progesterona en meningioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminio Ojeda Di Ninno

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar la presencia de los receptores de progesterona en meningiomas y su frecuencia mediante la inmunohistoquímica. Material y Métodos: Se analizaron 24 muestras provenientes de pacientes intervenidos quirúrgicamente en el Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas entre los años 1990 y 1992 con diagnóstico anatomopatológico de meningioma. La determinación de los receptores se hizo mediante una técnica de inmunohistoquímica rápida que permite el estudio de tejidos fijados previamente en parafina. Resultados: De los 24 casos estudiados, nueve resultaron ser positivos en la determinación de receptores de progesterona (37%. Se pudo observar un marcado predominio dentro del grupo femenino quienes constituyeron 8/9 casos positivos. Conclusiones: El empleo de esta reciente técnica de inmunohistoquímica aplicada a tejido de fijado en parafina, nos ha permitido confirmar la presencia de receptores de progesterona en meningiomas con una frecuencia elevada que creemos amerita un estudio más amplio de manera sistemática que incluya la intervención terapéutica mediante el uso de antiprogestágenos, como el Mifepristone o RU 486. De este estudio podrían beneficiarse no sólo pacientes operados recientemente sino aquellos que, intervenidos en el pasado sean detectados como portadores de receptores de progesterona mediante la aplicación de esta novedosa técnica (Rev Med Hered 1995; 6: 121-130.

  12. MRI findings of intracranial cystic meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Hu, L.-B.; Zhen, J.W.; Zou, L.-G.; Feng, X.-Y.; Wang, W.-X.; Wen, L.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To report the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of intracranial cystic meningiomas and compare these features in intra- and peritumoural cyst groups. Materials and methods: Fourteen cases of peritumoural cystic meningiomas were compared with 18 cases of intratumoural cystic meningiomas. All patients were examined using non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI. Tumour location, tumour size, signal intensity, enhancement characteristics, and cystic changes were assessed. The MRI features were compared between the intra- and peritumoural cyst groups. Results: Most cystic meningiomas comprised two or more cysts. The solid parts of the tumours showed moderate or marked enhancement after the injection of contrast material. An enhanced cyst wall was found in six out of 14 cases in the peritumoural cyst group, but not in the intratumoural cyst group. Peritumoural cystic meningiomas were predominately located in the cerebral falx, whereas the intratumoural cystic meningiomas were predominantly found in frontal convexity (X 2 = 7.434, p = 0.024). The cysts were larger in the peritumoural cyst group than in the intratumoural cyst group (t = 5.274, p = 0.0258). Peritumoural oedema was more commonly found in the intratumoural cyst group (X 2 = 6.863, p = 0.008). Cystic meningiomas with solid parts located inside the cyst are reported for the first time. Conclusion: Cystic meningiomas, although uncommon, should be differentiated from other cystic intracranial lesions. Peri- and intratumoural cystic meningiomas have distinct MRI features. The present study provides the first report of two lesions with solid parts located inside the cyst, as well as one lesion with a calcified solid nodule and haemorrhage within the cyst.

  13. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  14. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of olfactory meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangdong; Wang Zhong; Zhang Shiming; Zhu Fengqing; Zhou Dai; Hui Guozhen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical diagnosis and treatment of olfactory meningioma. Methods: In this group 17 olfactory meningiomas were operated, and the clinical presentations and the surgery results were obtained. Results: The symptoms of psychiatrical disorder, visual disturbances and eclipse at presentation was higher. In 16 cases the grade of resection was Simpson II, 1 case Simpson III, most of the cases had a good recovery. Conclusion: Attention should be paid to the early symptom at presentation such as psychiatrical disorder to obtain an early diagnosis. Microsurgery is useful in the treatment of olfactory meningioma. (authors)

  15. MRI features and pathologic types of benign meningiomas and their correlation with tumor recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tieqiao; Zhu Mingwang; Zhao Dianjiang; Qi Xueling; Wang Lining; Zhang Xufei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine MR manifestations and pathologic types of benign meningiomas and their relationship with tumor recurrence. Methods: There were 218 patients (160 females,58 males; age range 4-79 years) with benign meningiomas in the study, including 31 recurrent meningiomas (recurrence group)and 187 primary meningiomas (primary group). All patients were proved by postoperative pathology. Differences of pathological types and MRI manifestations between the recurrence group and the primary group were evaluated by using χ 2 test and rank sum test. Logistic regression analysis was performed by taking tumor recurrence as the dependent variable, and age, gender, vital structures involvement and pathologic types as independent variables. The recurrent time intervals were compared by rank sum test. Results: There were 30 patients with intracranial vital structures involvement or extreintracranial communication tumors in the recurrent group, which was obviously higher than that of the primary group (61 patients). The difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =57.672, P=0.001). The tumors located in the skull-base and juxtasinus in the recurrent group were obviously more than those in the primary group, and difference was statistically significant (χ 2 =10.990, P=0.001). Multi-logistic regression analysis showed that the recurrent risk of benign meningiomas was elevated significantly only with vital structure involvement or extreintracranial communication tumors (wald χ 2 =31.863, OR=3.820, P=0.001). The recurrent risk of dural sinus involvement was 3.820 times of cerebral artery trunk and cranial nerves involvement, and the risk of the latter was 3.820 times of the non-involved. There was no statistical difference between the two groups in pathology type, location, peritumoral edema, tumor morphology and tumor size. The relapse time of dural sinus involvement and cerebral artery trunk involvement in the recurrent group was 24(13 to 180) and 126(12 to 187

  16. A rare case of multiple meningiomas with different histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma I. Papacocea

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are generally benign tumors but sometimes they manifest tendency to progress towards malignancy. It is not yet clear if anaplastic meningiomas have an innate malignancy characteristic, or an initially beginning histological appearance that degenerates malignantly in time. According to literature data, the risk of a benign meningioma to progress towards malignant phenotype is about 0.16-2%, such malignant transformation occurring after a variable period of time (2-16 years. A still unanswered question is how many of the malignant meningiomas present this appearance as an innate feature and how many of them originate from benign meningiomas. Multiple meningiomas are defined as the presence of two or more distinct meningiomas. They occur in 6-10% of all patients that present meningiomas. Multiple meningiomas with a distinct histological appearance are rarely discovered. They support the theory of meningiomas that develop independently in the same patient. Different histology of multiple meningiomas is found in less than a third of the patients who suffer from this pathology. We are presenting the case of a patient with multiple meningiomas with distinct histology, one being benign and the other malignant. In connection with this case we are raising a question of therapeutic management in patients diagnosed with malignant meningiomas, namely if other possible small/ benign meningiomas should be also entirely resected.

  17. Dumbbell meningioma of the cervico-clavicular region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, V; Miklić, P; Besenski, N; Miklić, D; Franz, G

    1991-01-01

    The authors are reporting on a case of a 55-year-old man with an epidural meningioma in the region from the C VII. to the Th I. segment. The tumor encircled this region, and to the front and right involved the channels through which pass the C VI, C VII. and C VIII. roots. Subdurally, no tumoral mass was found. Another part of this tumor, of the same histological architecture as the epidural cervicospinal part was found in the supraclavicular region to the right, closely connected to the arteries and nerves of this region. The authors discuss the possibility of the tumoral occurrence at this site, primarily taking into account the origin of this tumor from the cells of the outer surface of the arachnoidea, i.e. cap cells which can invade the dura, with later separation from the main arachnoidal layer. The other possibility of such dumbbell meningioma occurring at the outgoing openings of the neural paths from the spinal channel should be looked for in the remnants of the arachnoidal cells in the region of the outgoing openings. In the paper are also discussed and correlated clinico-pathological, CT and angiographic findings.

  18. Meningiomas in 2009: controversies and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Belinda A; Jhamb, Ashu; Maguire, John A; Toyota, Brian; Ma, Roy

    2009-02-01

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial primary neoplasm in adults. Over recent years, interest in this clinically diverse group of tumors has intensified, bringing new questions and challenges to the fore, particularly in the fields of epidemiology, radiology, pathology, genetics, and treatment. Interest in modern meningioma research has been stimulated by the high tumor prevalence and the advances in technology. The incidence of meningiomas is climbing, and may indicate increased exposure to environmental risk factors or more sensitive diagnostic modalities. Technological advances have dramatically improved radiologic imaging and radiotherapy treatments, and further refinements are under investigation. Furthermore, the current era of tumor genetics and molecular biology is challenging translational researchers to discover new, targeted, therapeutic agents. This review is an update on the recent advances in the understanding of meningiomas and their management, and highlights pertinent research questions to be addressed in the future.

  19. Prostate carcinoma mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas H. Bradley

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that dural-based metastatic lesions may mimic meningiomas, warranting thorough pre-operative work-up to exclude the possibility of metastasis. In certain cases, identification of widespread disease might preclude surgery and favor palliation, instead.

  20. Atypical imaging appearances of intracranial meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Leary, S. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Adams, W.M. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Parrish, R.W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Mukonoweshuro, W. [Radiology Department, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: William.mukonoweshuro@phnt.swest.nhs.uk

    2007-01-15

    Meningiomas are the commonest primary, non-glial intracranial tumours. The diagnosis is often correctly predicted from characteristic imaging appearances. This paper presents some examples of atypical imaging appearances that may cause diagnostic confusion.

  1. Mechanics of anesthetic needle penetration into human sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Maiti, Spandan; Gan, Maria G; Verdecchia, Nicole M; Orebaugh, Steven L; Vorp, David A

    2018-06-06

    Nerve blocks are frequently performed by anesthesiologists to control pain. For sciatic nerve blocks, the optimal placement of the needle tip between its paraneural sheath and epineurial covering is challenging, even under ultrasound guidance, and frequently results in nerve puncture. We performed needle penetration tests on cadaveric isolated paraneural sheath (IPS), isolated nerve (IN), and the nerve with overlying paraneural sheath (NPS), and quantified puncture force requirement and fracture toughness of these specimens to assess their role in determining the clinical risk of nerve puncture. We found that puncture force (123 ± 17 mN) and fracture toughness (45.48 ± 9.72 J m -2 ) of IPS was significantly lower than those for NPS (1440 ± 161 mN and 1317.46 ± 212.45 Jm -2 , respectively), suggesting that it is not possible to push the tip of the block needle through the paraneural sheath only, without pushing it into the nerve directly, when the sheath is lying directly over the nerve. Results of this study provide a physical basis for tangential placement of the needle as the ideal situation for local anesthetic deposition, as it allows for the penetration of the sheath along the edge of the nerve without entering the epineurium. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intraventricular trigonal meningioma: Neuronavigation? No, thanks!

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Danilo O. A.; Matis, Georgios K.; Costa, Leonardo F.; Kitamura, Matheus A. P.; Birbilis, Theodossios A.; Azevedo Filho, Hildo R. C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Most of the time meningiomas are benign brain tumors and surgical removal ensures cure in the vast majority of the cases. Thus, whenever possible, complete surgical resection should be the goal of the treatment. Methods: This is a report of our surgical technique for the operative resection of a trigonal meningioma in a resource-limited setting. The necessity of accurate and deep knowledge of the regional anatomy is outlined. Results: A 44-year-old male presented to our outpatient...

  3. Pathological Location of Cranial Nerves in Petroclival Lesions: How to Avoid Their Injury during Anterior Petrosal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Tomio, Ryosuke; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Shibao, Shunsuke; Schick, Uta; Toda, Masahiro; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kawase, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Objectives  Numerous surgical approaches have been developed to access the petroclival region. The Kawase approach, through the middle fossa, is a well-described option for addressing cranial base lesions of the petroclival region. Our aim was to gather data about the variation of cranial nerve locations in diverse petroclival pathologies and clarify the most common pathologic variations confirmed during the anterior petrosal approach. Method  A retrospective analysis was made of both videos and operative and histologic records of 40 petroclival tumors from January 2009 to September 2013 in which the Kawase approach was used. The anatomical variations of cranial nerves IV-VI related to the tumor were divided into several location categories: superior lateral (SL), inferior lateral (IL), superior medial (SM), inferior medial (IM), and encased (E). These data were then analyzed taking into consideration pathologic subgroups of meningioma, epidermoid, and schwannoma. Results  In 41% of meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is encased by the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trigeminal nerve is in the SL part of the tumor, and it is in 20% of the IL portion of the tumor. In 38% of the meningiomas, the trochlear nerve is encased by the tumor. The abducens nerve is not always visible (35%). The pathologic nerve pattern differs from that of meningiomas for epidermoid and trigeminal schwannomas. Conclusion  The pattern of cranial nerves IV-VI is linked to the type of petroclival tumor. In a meningioma, tumor origin (cavernous, upper clival, tentorial, and petrous apex) is the most important predictor of the location of cranial nerves IV-VI. Classification of four subtypes of petroclival meningiomas using magnetic resonance imaging is very useful to predict the location of deviated cranial nerves IV-VI intraoperatively.

  4. Surgical Management of Olfactory Groove Meningiomas | El-Naggar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the bifrontal approach to olfactory groove meningiomas ... in all patients was Grade I meningiomas (World Health Organization grading). ... Bifrontal approach offers excellent exposure, and when combined with modern ...

  5. Predictors of severe complications in intracranial meningioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartek, Jiri; Sjåvik, Kristin; Förander, Petter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate predictors of complications after intracranial meningioma resection using a standardized reporting system for adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted in a Scandinavian population-based cohort of 979 adult operations for intracranial meningioma perfo...

  6. Molecular signatures define two main classes of meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello Joseph F

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningiomas are common brain tumors that are classified into three World Health Organization grades (benign, atypical and malignant and are molecularly ill-defined tumors. The purpose of this study was identify molecular signatures unique to the different grades of meningiomas and to unravel underlying molecular mechanisms driving meningioma tumorigenesis. Results We have used a combination of gene expression microarrays and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to show that meningiomas of all three grades fall into two main molecular groups designated 'low-proliferative' and 'high-proliferative' meningiomas. While all benign meningiomas fall into the low-proliferative group and all malignant meningiomas fall into the high-proliferative group, atypical meningiomas distribute into either one of these groups. High-proliferative atypical meningiomas had an elevated median MIB-1 labeling index and a greater frequency of copy number aberrations (CNAs compared to low-proliferative atypical meningiomas. Additionally, losses on chromosome 6q, 9p, 13 and 14 were found exclusively in the high-proliferative meningiomas. We have identified genes that distinguish benign low-proliferative meningiomas from malignant high-proliferative meningiomas and have found that gain of cell-proliferation markers and loss of components of the transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathway were the major molecular mechanisms that distinguish these two groups. Conclusion Collectively, our data suggests that atypical meningiomas are not a molecularly distinct group but are similar to either benign or malignant meningiomas. It is anticipated that identified molecular and CNA markers will potentially be more accurate prognostic markers of meningiomas.

  7. Skull base chordoid meningioma: Imaging features and pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, Mark Y.S.; Gomes, Lavier; Ng, Thomas; Cruz, Malville Da; Dexter, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The clinical, imaging and pathological features of a skull base chordoid meningioma (CM) are described. The huge tumour resulted in obstructive hydrocephalus and partial erosion of the clivus such that a chordoma was suspected. The lesion's MRI findings were similar to those of a meningioma. Light microscopic, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural features were diagnostic of CM. Chordoid meningioma is a rare subtype of meningioma and has a great tendency to recur should surgical resection be incomplete Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  8. Stability of the plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.N.

    1979-12-01

    The stability of a collisionless sheath joined to a plasma in the presence of secondary emission of electrons from the sheath boundary is examined in the fluid approximation. Instability is unlikely to occur under floating conditions but if significant currents flow corresponding to increased wall-plasma potentials the system can go unstable. (author)

  9. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  10. Stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume in invasive meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1996-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume in bone and brain invasive meningiomas was made. For comparison the nuclear mean volume of benign meningiomas was estimated. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these groups. We found that the nuclear mean...... volume in the bone and brain invasive meningiomas was larger than in the benign tumors. The difference was significant and moreover it was seen that there was no overlap between the two groups. In the bone invasive meningiomas the nuclear mean volume appeared to be larger inside than outside the bone....... No significant difference in nuclear mean volume was found between brain and bone invasive meningiomas. The results demonstrate that invasive meningiomas differ from benign meningiomas by an objective stereological estimation of nuclear mean volume (p

  11. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  12. Lateral suboccipital retrosigmoid approach with tentorial incision for petroclival meningiomas: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahata, Hitoshi; Tokimura, Hiroshi; Hirahara, Kazuho; Ishii, Takeshi; Mori, Masanao; Hanaya, Ryosuke; Arita, Kazunori

    2014-08-01

    Introduction The resection of petroclival meningiomas presents great neurosurgical challenges. Although multiple surgical approaches have been developed, the retrosigmoid route tends to be used to address tumors that are predominantly located in the posterior fossa. Our modification of the lateral suboccipital retrosigmoid approach with the placement of a tentorial incision yields good visualization of the supratentorial part of the tumor around the midbrain. Methods We treated four patients, one with primary and three with recurrent petroclival meningioma, by our modified approach. After lateral suboccipital craniotomy, the infratentorial part of the tumor was removed after detaching it from the tentorial surface. The cerebellar tentorium was then carefully incised from the supracerebellar angle, taking care not to damage the superior cerebellar artery and trochlear nerve. Results The operative field surrounding the midbrain was widened by this procedure, and safe dissection of the tumor from the brainstem and other neurovascular structures was performed with direct observation of the interface. Conclusions Our approach is a useful modification of the retrosigmoid approach to petroclival meningiomas. It facilitates the safe resection of the supratentorial part of the tumor in the ambient cistern behind the tentorium.

  13. The electrostatic cylindrical sheath in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chunhua; Sun Xiaoxia; Bai Dongxue

    2004-01-01

    The electrostatic sheath with a cylindrical geometry in an ion-electron plasma is investigated. Assuming a Boltzmann response to electrons and cold ions with bulk flow, it is shown that the radius of the cylindrical geometry do not affect the sheath potential significantly. The authors also found that the sheath potential profile is steeper in the cylindrical sheath compared to the slab sheath. The distinct feature of the cylindrical sheath is that the ion density distribution is not monotonous. The sheath region can be divided into three regions, two ascendant regions and one descendant region. (author)

  14. Anode sheath in Hall thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorf, L.; Semenov, V.; Raitses, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamic equations is used to describe quasineutral plasma in ionization and acceleration regions of a Hall thruster. The electron distribution function and Poisson equation are invoked for description of a near-anode region. Numerical solutions suggest that steady-state operation of a Hall thruster can be achieved at different anode sheath regimes. It is shown that the anode sheath depends on the thruster operating conditions, namely the discharge voltage and the mass flow rate

  15. MRI of the optic nerve in benign intracranial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gass, A.; Barker, G.J.; Riordan-Eva, P.; MacManus, D.; Sanders, M.; Tofts, P.S.; McDonald, W.I.; Moseley, I.F.; Miller, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the MRI appearance of the optic nerve and its cerebrospinal-fluid-containing sheath in 17 patients with benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) and 15 normal controls. Using phased-array local coils, 3-mm coronal T2-weighted fat-suppressed fast spin-echo images were obtained with an in-plane resolution of < 0.39 mm. The optic nerve and its sheath were clearly differentiated. An enlarged, elongated subarachnoid space around the optic nerve was demonstrated in patients with BIH. High-resolution MRI of the optic nerve offers additional information which may be of value for diagnosis and in planning and monitoring treatment. (orig.). With 5 figs

  16. Meningioma of Foramen Magnum Causing Drop Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Mahore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old female presented with frequent episodes of falls without loss of consciousness. These episodes lasted for brief period followed by full neurological recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain showed foramen magnum meningioma encasing left vertebral artery. The patient had dramatic improvement after excision of the tumor.

  17. Analysis of peritumoral cerebral edema of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masaaki; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Abe, Juzo; Sekino, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Takei; Hayashi, Tatsuo.

    1992-01-01

    Peritumoral edema associated with 28 meningiomas was studied. The results of radiological investigation, using MRI, CT, and angiography, and histological studies were described and correlated with each other in order to clarify the mechanism of peritumoral cerebral edema production. Extensive peritumoral edema was recognized when the venous sinus or cortical veins, especially the superficial and deep Sylvian veins, were invaded and/or compressed markedly by the tumor. Therefore, large tumors (more than 5 cm in diameter) which were located in the parasagittal area and the middle cranial fossa had a tendency to be associated with extensive peritumoral edema. The posterior fossa meningiomas were associated with small edema because there were rich venous channels in the posterior fossa. Although there have been several reports that the peritumoral edema of meningioma would be produced by the vessels of the tumor itself and would migrate through the tumor capsule into the surrounding brain tissue, and although mechanical factors alone are not sufficient to explain peritumoral edema production, we would like to postulate that the longstanding mechanical compression of venous circulation by the meningioma might be an important factor in the production of the peritumoral cerebral edema. (author)

  18. Intraventricular trigonal meningioma: Neuronavigation? No, thanks!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danilo O A; Matis, Georgios K; Costa, Leonardo F; Kitamura, Matheus A P; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Azevedo Filho, Hildo R C

    2011-01-01

    Most of the time meningiomas are benign brain tumors and surgical removal ensures cure in the vast majority of the cases. Thus, whenever possible, complete surgical resection should be the goal of the treatment. This is a report of our surgical technique for the operative resection of a trigonal meningioma in a resource-limited setting. The necessity of accurate and deep knowledge of the regional anatomy is outlined. A 44-year-old male presented to our outpatient clinic complaining of cephalalgia increasing in frequency and intensity over the last month. His neurological exam was normal, yet a brain computed tomography scan revealed a lesion in the right trigone of the ventricular system. The diagnosis of possible meningioma was set. After thoroughly informing the patient, tumor resection was decided. An intraparietal sulcus approach was favored without the use of any modern technological aids such as intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging or neuronavigation. The postoperative course was uneventful and a postoperative computed tomography scan demonstrated the complete resection of the tumor. The patient was discharged two days later with no neurological deficits. In a two-year-follow-up he remains recurrence-free. In the current cost-effective era it is still possible to safely remove an intraventricular trigonal meningioma without the convenience of neuronavigation. Since the best neuronavigator is the profound neuroanatomical knowledge, no technological advancement could replace a well-educated and trained neurosurgeon.

  19. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  20. Natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio

    1999-01-01

    The author examined the natural history of intracranial meningioma after radiotherapy using CT or MR imaging. Twenty patients with intracranial meningioma received radiotherapy from a high-energy linear accelerator (4-10 MV X rays) from 1980 to 1996. The total doses were 50 Gy to the tumor bed in single doses of 2 Gy in 5 weekly fractions. Meningiomas in 10 of 20 patients were reduced within 1 to 38 months after radiotherapy, the average being 11 months. The tumors were controlled for a median of 60 months after radiotherapy (range 19-126 months). Four other patients have shown no change in tumor size after radiotherapy. The tumors were controlled for a median of 70 months after radiotherapy (range 37-127 months). The other six patients have shown tumor growth within 3 to 25 months after radiotherapy, after which the tumors stopped growing for a median of 71 months (range 2-181 months). Neither tumor size nor histological type was related to response. The growth of tumors was controlled by radiotherapy for a median duration of 43 months in the meningothelial type, 52 months in the fibroblastic type, and 61 months in the transitional type. The median duration for all benign tumors was 52 months. A moderate correlation was noted between tumor response and functional outcome after radiotherapy in 9 patients with neurological deficits. The natural histories of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy were grouped into three categories. Some tumors showed no change in size over a long period. This was a characteristic response after radiotherapy that differed from that of other brain tumors. The results of this study provide important information for the follow-up of intracranial meningiomas after radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Meningiomas, dicentric chromosomes, gliomas, and telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T; Maltby, E; Brock, I; Royds, J; Timperley, W; Jellinek, D

    1999-08-01

    Lack of telomere maintenance during cell replication leads to telomere erosion and loss of function. This can result in telomere associations which probably cause the dicentric chromosomes seen in some tumour cells. One mechanism of telomere maintenance in dividing cells is the action of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds TTAGGG repeats onto telomeres and compensates for their shortening during cell division. Over 90 per cent of extracranial malignant neoplasms have been found to have telomerase activity. This study sought to determine if there was a relationship between absence of telomerase activity and presence of dicentric chromosomes in meningiomas and to what extent the other main group of central nervous system tumours, the gliomas, expressed telomerase activity. Telomerase activity was measured on 25 meningiomas and 29 gliomas. Four of the meningiomas were atypical variants and 11 were positive for dicentric chromosomes. Twenty-five of 29 gliomas were glioblastoma multiforme tumours. Measures were taken to ensure absence of false positives due to primer-dimer interaction and false negatives due to protein degradation or the presence of Taq polymerase inhibitors. All 25 meningiomas and the four low-grade gliomas (WHO grade II) were telomerase activity-negative. Seven (28 per cent) of the 25 glioblastoma multiforme tumours showed telomerase activity. The absence of telomerase activity in meningiomas and the high frequency of telomere associations support the hypothesis that these tumours are benign, transformed but pre-crisis. The relatively low frequency of telomerase activity in the malignant glioblastoma multiforme suggests that most of these tumours may have other mechanisms of telomere maintenance and that the potentially therapeutic telomerase inhibitors will not be of great value in the future management of the majority of patients suffering from these tumours. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. ULTRASOUND AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSIS OF OPTIC NERVE TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Saakyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive examination was made in 93 patients, including 18 children, with tumors of the optic nerve (ON. Duplex ultrasound scanning was performed in 39 patients, of them there were 11 patients with ON gliomas and 28 with ON meningiomas. The specific computed tomographic and echographic signs of ON glioma and meningiomas were detected. The studies have shown that duplex ultrasound scanning and structural computed tomography of orbital sockets are highly informative complementary imaging procedures for ON tumors, which permits one to make their correct diagnosis, to specify surgical volume, and to plan adequate treatment.

  3. Atypical olfactory groove meningioma associated with uterine fibromatosis; case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma I. Papacocea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant presence of the olfactory groove meningioma with uterine fibrosis is very rare. Our report presents the case of a giant olfactory groove meningioma revealed after a uterine fibroma resection in a 44 years-old female, due to a generalized seizure 10 days after operation. Cranial CT-scan identified the tumor as an olfactory groove meningioma. The tumor was operated with a macroscopically complete resection; the endothermal coagulation of the dura attachment was performed (Simpson II with a good postoperative evolution. Laboratory results showed the presence of receptors for steroid hormones both in meningioma and uterine tumor, and the histopathological examination revealed an atypical meningioma with 17% proliferation markers. Our findings suggest that even though meningiomas are benign tumors and a complete resection usually indicates a good prognosis, the association with uterine fibromatosis and the presence of high percentage of steroid receptors creates a higher risk to relapse, imposing therefore a good monitoring.

  4. A Rare Case of Radiologically Not Distinguishable Coexistent Meningioma and Vestibular Schwannoma in the Cerebellopontine Angle – Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Grauvogel

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The simultaneous occurrence of cerebellopontine angle (CPA meningioma and vestibular schwannoma (VS in the absence of neurofibromatosis type 2 or history of irradiation is very rare. We report a case with coexistent CPA meningioma and VS, which were radiologically not distinguishable in preoperative imaging. Case Description: A 46-year-old female presented with acute hearing loss, tinnitus and gait ataxia. Otorhinolaryngological diagnostic workup and imaging studies showed an intra- and extrameatal homogenous contrast enhancing lesion. The neuroradiological diagnosis was VS. The patient was operated via the retrosigmoid approach. Intraoperatively two distinct tumors were found: a small, mainly intrameatally located VS and a larger meningioma originating from the dura of the petrous bone. Both tumors were completely microsurgically removed. The patient experienced no new neurological deficit after surgery; particularly facial nerve function was completely preserved. Histopathological examination revealed a fibromatous meningioma and a VS, respectively. Conclusions: The coincidental occurrence of CPA meningioma and VS is very rare. Careful interpretation of imaging studies before surgery is crucial. Even such rare cases should be kept in mind when discussing the therapeutic options with the patient. More studies are needed for a better understanding of mechanisms leading to multiple tumor growth.

  5. Stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas was made. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these two meningeal neoplasms. The difference was significant and it was moreover seen that there was no overlap between the two groups....... The results demonstrate that atypical meningiomas can be distinguished from benign meningiomas by an objective stereological estimation of nuclear volume....

  6. Epilepsy and adverse quality of life in surgically resected meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanti, M J; Marson, A G; Jenkinson, M D

    2017-09-01

    Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors, and despite surgery or therapy with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), many patients suffer from seizures. Epilepsy has a significant impact on quality of life (QoL) in non-tumor populations, but the impact of epilepsy on QoL in patients with meningioma is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of epilepsy on QoL in patients that have undergone resection of a benign meningioma. We recruited meningioma patients without epilepsy (n=109), meningioma patients with epilepsy (n=56), and epilepsy patients without meningioma (n=64). QoL was measured with the Short Form 36 version 2 (SF-36), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT-BR), and the Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (LAEP). Regression analyses identified significant determinants of QoL. Patients with meningioma and epilepsy had poorer QoL scores than meningioma patients without epilepsy in all measures. In FACT-BR, this difference was significant. Multiple regression analyses demonstrated that current AED use had a greater impact on QoL scores than recent seizures. Other variables associated with impaired QoL included depression, unemployment, and meningioma attributed symptoms. Epilepsy has a negative impact on quality of life in patients with benign meningioma. AED use is correlated with impaired QoL and raised LAEP scores, suggesting that AEDs and adverse effects may have led to impaired QoL in our meningioma patients with epilepsy. The severity of epilepsy in our meningioma population was comparatively mild; therefore, a more conservative approach to AED therapy may be indicated in an attempt to minimize adverse effects. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Sheath waves, non collisional dampings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marec, Jean Lucien Ernest

    1974-01-01

    When a metallic conductor is inserted into an ionised gas, an area of electron depletion is formed between the conductor and the plasma: the ionic sheath. Moreover, if the conductor is excited by an electric field, this ionic sheath plays an important role with respect to microwave properties. In this research thesis, the author addresses the range of frequencies smaller than the plasma frequency, and reports the study of resonance phenomena. After a presentation of the problem through a bibliographical study, the author recalls general characteristics of sheath wave propagation and of sheath resonances, and discusses the validity of different hypotheses (for example and among others, electrostatic approximations, cold plasma). Then, the author more particularly addresses theoretical problems related to non collisional dampings: brief bibliographical study, detailed presentation and description of the theoretical model, damping calculation methods. The author then justifies the design and performance of an experiment, indicates measurement methods used to determine plasma characteristics as well as other magnitudes which allow the description of mechanisms of propagation and damping of sheath waves. Experimental results are finally presented with respect to various parameters. The author discusses to which extent the chosen theoretical model is satisfying [fr

  8. Surgery for convexity/parasagittal/falx meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochi, Takashi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2013-01-01

    Incidence of the complication related with the surgical treatment of meningiomas in the title was reviewed together with consideration of data about progress observation and stereotactic radiosurgery. MEDLINE papers in English were on line searched with keywords contained in above using PubMed System. For the convexity meningioma, 50-141 cases (mean age, 48-58.9 y) with 1.9-3.6 cm or 146.3 mL of the tumor size or volume were reported in 6 literatures (2006-2011), presenting 0% of surgery related death, 1-5.9% of internal medical or 5.5-37.4% of surgical complication, 0-2% of postoperative hemorrhage, 0-15.4% of neurological and 0-15.4% of prolonged/permanent deficits. For the parasagittal/falx meningioma, 46-108 cases (age, 55-58 y) with 1.9-4 cm tumor were reported in 8 literatures (2004-2011), presenting 0-5.7% death, 2-7.4% medical or 5.4-31% surgical complication, 0-3% hemorrhage, 0-15.4 neurologic and 0-15.4% prolonged deficits. For complications after the radiosurgery of the all 3 meningiomas, 41-832 cases (50-60 y) with tumors of 24.7-28 mm or 4.7-7.4 mL were reported in 8 literatures (2003-2012), presenting the incidence of 6.8-26.8% of radiation-related complications like headache, seizures and paralysis necessary for steroid treatment, and 1.20 or 4.80% of permanent morbidity. For the natural history of incidental meningiomas involving tentorium one, 16-144 cases in 6 literatures (2000-2012) revealed the growth rate/y of 1.9-3.9 mm or 0.54-1.15 mL. The outcome of surgical treatment of the meningiomas, a representative benign tumor, was concluded to be rather good as surgery was generally needed only when the disease became symptomatic due to the tumor growth. (T.T.)

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas compressing optical pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, Klaus-Detlef; Henzel, Martin; Gross, Markus W.; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Microsurgical resection is usually the treatment of choice for meningiomas, especially for those that compress the optical pathways. However, in many cases of skull-base meningiomas a high risk of neurological deficits and recurrences exist in cases where the complete tumor removal was not possible. In such cases (fractionated) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) can offer an alternative treatment option. We evaluated the local control rate, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2003, 183 patients with skull-base meningiomas were treated with SRT, among them were 65 patients with meningiomas that compressed optical pathways (64 benign, 1 atypical). Of these 65 cases, 20 were treated with SRT only, 27 were subtotally resected before SRT, and 18 underwent multiple tumor resections before SRT. We investigated the results until 2005, with a median follow-up of 45 months (range, 22-83 months). The tumor volume (TV = gross tumor volume) ranged from 0.61 to 90.20 cc (mean, 18.9 cc). Because of the risk of new visual disturbances, the dose per fraction was either 2 or 1.8 Gy for all patients, to a total dose of 50 to 60 Gy. Results: The overall survival and the progression-free survival rates for 5 years were assessed to 100% in this patient group. To date, no progression for these meningiomas have been observed. Quantitatively, tumor shrinkage of more than 20%, or more than 2 mm in diameter, was proved in 35 of the 65 cases after SRT. In 29 of the 65 patients, at least 1 of the symptoms improved. On application of the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), acute toxicity (Grade 3) was seen in 1 case (worsening of conjunctivitis). Another 2 patients developed late toxicity by LENT-SOMA score, 1 x Grade 1 and 1 x Grade 3 (field of vision loss). Conclusion: As a low-risk and effective treatment option for tumor control, SRT with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy per fraction can also be recommended in case of meningiomas that compress optical pathways. An

  10. Preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by perfusion MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Shanghai Jiaotong University affiliated First People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiology, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Roediger, Lars A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Shen, Tianzhen [Fudan University Huashan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Miao, Jingtao [Shanghai Jiaotong University affiliated First People' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2008-10-15

    This paper aims to evaluate the value of perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the preoperative subtyping of meningiomas by analyzing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) of three benign subtypes and anaplastic meningiomas separately. Thirty-seven meningiomas with peritumoral edema (15 meningothelial, ten fibrous, four angiomatous, and eight anaplastic) underwent perfusion MR imaging by using a gradient echo echo-planar sequence. The maximal rCBV (compared with contralateral normal white matter) in both tumoral parenchyma and peritumoral edema of each tumor was measured. The mean rCBVs of each two histological subtypes were compared using one-way analysis of variance and least significant difference tests. A p value less than 0.05 indicated a statistically significant difference. The mean rCBV of meningothelial, fibrous, angiomatous, and anaplastic meningiomas in tumoral parenchyma were 6.93{+-}3.75, 5.61{+-}4.03, 11.86{+-}1.93, and 5.89{+-}3.85, respectively, and in the peritumoral edema 0.87{+-}0.62, 1.38{+-}1.44, 0.87{+-}0.30, and 3.28{+-}1.39, respectively. The mean rCBV in tumoral parenchyma of angiomatous meningiomas and in the peritumoral edema of anaplastic meningiomas were statistically different (p<0.05) from the other types of meningiomas. Perfusion MR imaging can provide useful functional information on meningiomas and help in the preoperative diagnosis of some subtypes of meningiomas. (orig.)

  11. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit

  12. Self-consistent radial sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazeltine, R.D.

    1988-12-01

    The boundary layer arising in the radial vicinity of a tokamak limiter is examined, with special reference to the TEXT tokamak. It is shown that sheath structure depends upon the self-consistent effects of ion guiding-center orbit modification, as well as the radial variation of E /times/ B-induced toroidal rotation. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained from an idealized model which, however simplified, preserves such self-consistent effects. It is argued that the radial sheath, which occurs whenever confining magnetic field-lines lie in the plasma boundary surface, is an object of some intrinsic interest. It differs from the more familiar axial sheath because magnetized charges respond very differently to parallel and perpendicular electric fields. 11 refs., 1 fig

  13. Schwannoma Originating From the Periphereral Intercostal Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Aksoy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are usually solitary, encapsulated, and asymptomatic, benign neurogenic tumors originating from the nerve sheath. Schwannomas rarely show malignant transformation, however, require close monitoring. They are primarily located in the thorax in the costovertebral sulcus, may rarely originate from peripheral intercostal nerves. Less than 10% of primary thoracic neurogenic tumors originate from the peripheral intercostal nerves. The main treatment and diagnosis of schwannomas are complete surgical resection. We report a rare case of a 40-year-old male with asymptomatic schwannoma originating from an intercostal nerve which was found incidentally on his chest X-ray and was treated with surgery.

  14. Nerve Regeneration in the Peripheral Nervous System versus the Central Nervous System and the Relevance to Speech and Hearing after Nerve Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Gordon, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Schwann cells normally form myelin sheaths around axons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and support nerve regeneration after nerve injury. In contrast, nerve regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) is not supported by the myelinating cells known as oligodendrocytes. We have found that: 1) low frequency electrical stimulation can be…

  15. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  16. Brain edema associated with intracranial meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Minoru; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Hirai, Osamu

    1992-01-01

    Brain edema associated with intracranial meningiomas was investigated on 80 patients, excluding recurrent cases. Statistically significant positive correlations with the degree of edema were found with large tumors, the convexity or parasagittal locations, the venous outflow disturbance, and the evidence of cortical disruption or peritumoral enhancement visualized on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imagings. Patients with a short clinical history and with angiographic evidence of hypervascularity tended to have edema, but there was no statistical significance. It is concluded that various factors are responsible for the edema associated with meningiomas and that it would be hard to determine the most important cause, since each factor plays a part edema production, spread, and resolution. (author)

  17. Olfactory groove meningiomas: approaches and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires de; Tahara, Adriana; Almeida, Antonio Nogueira; Simm, Renata; Silva, Arnaldo Neves da; Maldaun, Marcos Vinicius Calfatt; Panagopoulos, Alexandros Theodoros; Zicarelli, Carlos Alexandre; Silva, Pedro Gabriel

    2009-09-01

    Olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM) account for 4.5% of all intracranial meningiomas. We report 21 patients with OGMs. Tumors were operated on using three surgical approaches: bifrontal (7 patients), fronto-pterional (11 patients) and fronto-orbital (3 patients). Total tumor removal (Simpson Grade 1) was achieved in 13 patients and Simpson II in 8 patients. Perioperative mortality was 4.76%. The average size of the OGM was 4.3+/-1.1cm. The overall recurrence rate was 19%. We preferred to use the pterional approach, which provides quick access to the tumor with less brain exposure. It also allows complete drainage of cisternal cerebrospinal fluid, providing a good level of brain relaxation during surgery. However, for long, thin tumors, hemostasis can be difficult using this approach.

  18. Primary atypical sacral meningioma- not always benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhadra, A.K.; Casey, A.T.H.; Saifuddin, A.; Briggs, T.W. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    We present a case of an atypical recurrent meningioma of the sacrum with pulmonary metastasis in a 31-year-old man. He presented with deep-seated buttock pain and urinary hesitancy for 3 months. MRI revealed a lesion occupying the central and left side of the sacral canal at the S1-S2 level. Surgical excision of the lesion via a posterior approach was undertaken, and the patient became symptom-free post-operatively. Histology confirmed atypical meningioma. Eight months later he re-presented with similar symptoms, and MRI confirmed local recurrence. The patient underwent left hemisacrectomy. Six months later he again presented with low back pain and MRI confirmed a second local recurrence. A CT scan of the chest showed multiple lung metastases. The patient died of a severe chest infection 18 months later. (orig.)

  19. Obturator nerve schwannoma presenting as an adnexal mass: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, M.; Thurston, W.A.; Merchant, N. [The Toronto Hospital, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Murphy, K.J. [The Toronto Hospital, Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-02-01

    Schwannomas are relatively common, benign nerve-sheath tumours. They arise most commonly from either cranial nerves or the dorsal root of spinal nerves. Schwannomas have also been reported to occur in peripheral nerve-root trunks, although this location is much less common. We report a case of a 45-year-old woman with a large pelvic mass originally believed to be an ovarian tumour. Following surgical excision, the tumour was found to be a schwannoma of the obturator nerve. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of an obturator nerve schwannoma. The imaging features of schwannomas are reviewed. (author)

  20. Evaluation of preoperative embolization of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Tae; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Myung Jun; Ji, Eun Kyung; Shin, Byung Suck; Kim, Chang Jin; Kim, Jong Uk; Whang, C. Jin

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative embolization of intrancranial meningioma.Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed intrancranial meningioma patients (n=37) who underwent preoperative embolization. They were categorized into two groups, skull base lesions (n=22) and non-skull base lesions (n=15), according to tumor location. In addition, embolization results were classified by comparison between pre- and post-embolization angiography as complete (residual tumor staining 10 or 30%). In each group, estimated blood loss (EBL) was estimated by amount of intraoperative transfusion with pre- and post-operative hemoglobin level. Tumor resectability was evaluated by follow-up computed tomography. New symptoms occurring within 24 hours of embolization were considered to be those associated with embolization ; symptoms improved by conservative treatment were regarded as mild, while those resulting in new deficits were considered severe. Results : In the group with skull base lesions (n=22), complete embolization with the criteria of residual tumor staining of less than 30% was performed in 14 patients(EBL=1770ml;complete surgical removal in nine patients and incomplete removal four). Incomplete embolization was performed in eight patients (EBL=3210ml; complete and incomplete removal each in four patients). In the group with non-skull base lesions, complete embolization with the criteria of residual tumor staining of less than 10% was performed in five patients (EBL=970ml) and incomplete embolization in ten (EBL=2260ml). Complete tumor removal was possible in this group regardless of the completeness of preoperative tumor embolization. In a case of intraventricular meningioma (3%), intratumoral hemorrhage occurred on the day following embolization. Other mild post-embolization complications occurred in three cases (8%). Conclusion : Preoperative embolization can be an effective and safe procedure for meningioma and may reduce intraoperative blood

  1. Prostate carcinoma mimicking a sphenoid wing meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Lucas H; Burton, Matthew; Gokden, Murat; Serletis, Demitre

    2015-01-01

    We report here on a rare case of a large, lateral sphenoid wing tumor with radiographic and intraoperative findings highly suggestive of meningioma, yet pathology was in fact consistent with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. An 81 year-old male presented with expressive dysphasia, right-sided weakness and headaches. Imaging revealed a heterogeneously-enhancing lesion based on the left lateral sphenoid wing. The presumed diagnosis was strongly in favor of meningioma, and the patient underwent complete resection of the dural-based lesion. Final pathology confirmed the unexpected finding of a metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma. Although he tolerated surgery well, the patient was subsequently referred for palliative therapy given findings of widespread systemic disease. Intracranial metastases may involve the dura, at times presenting with rare radiographic features highly suggestive for meningioma, as in our case here. This makes differentiation, at least based on imaging, a challenge. Elderly patients presenting with neurological deficits secondary to a newly-diagnosed, dural-based lesion should thus be considered for metastasis, prompting additional imaging studies (including body CT, MRI or PET) to rule out a primary lesion elsewhere. In some cases, this may affect the overall decision to proceed with surgical resection, or alternatively, to proceed directly to palliative therapy (the latter decision made in the context of widespread metastatic disease). We conclude that dural-based metastatic lesions may mimic meningiomas, warranting thorough pre-operative work-up to exclude the possibility of metastasis. In certain cases, identification of widespread disease might preclude surgery and favor palliation, instead. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas. Symptomatology, acute and late toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzel, M.; Gross, M.W.; Failing, T.; Strassmann, G.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Gisssen (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Marburg Univ. (Germany); Hamm, K.; Surber, G.; Kleinert, G. [Dept. of Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, Helios Klinikum Erfurt (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Background and purpose: stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is well established in the treatment of skull base meningiomas, but this therapy approach is limited to small tumors only. The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offers an alternative treatment option. This study aims at local control, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and methods: between 1997-2003, 224 patients were treated with SRT (n= 183), hypofractionated SRT (n = 30), and SRS (n = 11). 95/224 were treated with SRT/SRS alone. 129/224 patients underwent previous operations. Freedom from progression and overall survival, toxicity, and symptomatology were evaluated systematically. Additionally, tumor volume (TV) shrinkage was analyzed three-dimensionally within the planning system. Results: the median follow-up was 36 months (range, 12-100 months). Overall survival and freedom from progression for 5 years were 92.9% and 96.9%. Quantitative TV reduction was 26.2% and 30.3% 12 and 18 months after SRT/SRS (p < 0.0001). 95.9% of the patients improved their symptoms or were stable. Clinically significant acute toxicity (CTC III ) was rarely seen (2.5%). Clinically significant late morbidity (III -IV ) or new cranial nerve palsies did not occur. Conclusion: SRT offers an additional treatment option of high efficacy with only few side effects. In the case of large tumor size (> 4 ml) and adjacent critical structures (< 2 mm), SRT is highly recommended. (orig.)

  3. Imaging diagnosis of meningiomas of ethmoid sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Bingfeng; Liang Shuming; Li Mao

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the imaging features of meningiomas of ethmoid sinuses. Methods: Six cases of meningiomas of ethmoid sinuses verified pathologically were analyzed retrospectively. Results: CT scans of 6 cases exhibited huge cystic masses (n = 3), huge cystic-solid masses (n = 2), huge solid mass (n = 1). The cystic walls were remarkable osteosclerosis. The density of solid masses were homogeneous, or heterogeneous with calcifications and cystic changes, and prominent contrast-enhancement. MR images of 1 case (1/6) showed a cystic-solid mass, the cystic portion was high signal intensity on T 2 WI and low signal intensity on T 1 WI, while the solid mass was iso-signal intensity on T 1 WI and T 2 WI. The solid portion was enhanced. X-ray plain films of 3 cases (3/6) displayed ethmoid sinuses enlargement and high density. Conclusion: For the meningiomas of ethmoid sinuses, CT finding was specific, MRI was helpful in differential diagnosis, and X-ray plain films was of no qualitative value

  4. Plasma sheath criterion in thermal electronegative plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghomi, Hamid; Khoramabadi, Mansour; Ghorannevis, Mahmod; Shukla, Padma Kant

    2010-01-01

    The sheath formation criterion in electronegative plasma is examined. By using a multifluid model, it is shown that in a collisional sheath there will be upper as well as lower limits for the sheath velocity criterion. However, the parameters of the negative ions only affect the lower limit.

  5. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  6. Hormone replacement therapy increases the risk of cranial meningioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting.......We investigated the influence of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) use on the risk of meningioma in a population-based setting....

  7. Suprasellar Anaplastic Meningioma Masquerading As Craniopharyngioma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Abdelzaher

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Anaplastic meningiomas are uncommon. We report the clinical, radiological and pathological features of an anaplastic meningioma in a young male Egyptian patient presenting as a suprasellar solid/cystic enhancing mass resembling a craniopharyngioma. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2014; 2(3.000: 154-157

  8. Lipomatous secretory meningioma: case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebig, T.; Hoffmann, T.; Hosten, N.; Sander, B.; Lanksch, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    Secretory meningioma is a rare entity which may be characterised by imaging features unusual for other subtypes of meningoma, such as low attenuation on CT, high (fat-tissue equivalent) signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI, marked surrounding oedema, and irregular contrast enhancement. We report a case of secretory meningioma and review the literature. (orig.) (orig.)

  9. Perfusion MR imaging for differentiation of benign and malignant meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Hao; Rodiger, Lars A.; Shen, Tianzhen; Miao, Jingtao; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    Introduction Our purpose was to determine whether perfusion MR imaging can be used to differentiate benign and malignant meningiomas on the basis of the differences in perfusion of tumor parenchyma and/or peritumoral edema. Methods A total of 33 patients with preoperative meningiomas (25 benign and

  10. Rare suprasellar chordoid meningioma with INI1 gene mutation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chordoid Meningioma is a rare brain tumour characterized genetically by loss of genetic material from chromosome 22q at cytogenetic level resulting in mutation of NF2 gene. Objectives and case report: In the present report, we described a rare case of suprasellar chordoid meningioma, which presented in a ...

  11. Steroid hormone and epidermal growth factor receptors in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsfall, D J; Goldsmith, K G; Ricciardelli, C; Skinner, J M; Tilley, W D; Marshall, V R

    1989-11-01

    A prospective study of steroid hormone and epidermal growth factor receptor expression in 57 meningiomas is presented. Scatchard analysis of radioligand binding identified 20% of meningiomas as expressing classical oestrogen receptors (ER) at levels below that normally accepted for positivity, the remainder being negative. ER could not be visualized in any meningioma using immunocytochemistry. Alternatively, 74% of meningiomas demonstrated the presence of progesterone receptors (PR) by Scatchard analysis, the specificity of which could not be attributed to glucocorticoid or androgen receptors. Confirmation of classical PR presence was determined by immunocytochemical staining. The presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was demonstrated in 100% of meningiomas using immunocytochemical staining. These data are reviewed in the context of previously reported results and are discussed in relation to the potential for medical therapy as an adjunct to surgery.

  12. Ion acceleration in the plasma source sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    This note is a calculation of the potential drop for a planar plasma source, across the source sheath, into a uniform plasma region defined by vector E = 0 and/or perhaps ∂ 2 PHI/∂ x 2 = 0. The calculation complements that of Bohm who obtained the potential drop at the other end of a plasma, at a planar collector sheath. The result is a relation between the source ion flux and the source sheath potential drop and the accompanying ion acceleration. This planar source sheath ion acceleration mechanism (or that from a distributed source) can provide the pre-collector-sheath ion acceleration as found necessary by Bohm. 3 refs

  13. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  14. A new entity in the differential diagnosis of geniculate ganglion tumours: fibrous connective tissue lesion of the facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arriba, Alvaro; Lassaletta, Luis; Pérez-Mora, Rosa María; Gavilán, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of geniculate ganglion tumours includes chiefly schwannomas, haemangiomas and meningiomas. We report the case of a patient whose clinical and imaging findings mimicked the presentation of a facial nerve schwannoma.Pathological studies revealed a lesion with nerve bundles unstructured by intense collagenisation. Consequently, it was called fibrous connective tissue lesion of the facial nerve. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. [Microsurgical removal of olfactory groove meningiomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ri-Sheng; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Mao, Ying; Zhang, Rong; Yang, Wei-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    To explore an effective method for further improving the surgical results of treatment of olfactory groove meningiomas. Sixty seven cases of olfactory groove meningiomas were treated by microneurosurgery, among which fifty seven were de novo cases, eight were recurrent tumors and the other two re-recurrent cases. Modified Derome approach was used in 12 cases, bilateral subfrontal approach in 28 cases, modified pterional approach in 21 cases and unilateral subfrontal approach in six cases. Tumors were resected microsurgically with radical removal of invaded dura, bone, and paranasal sinus mucosa. Reconstruction was performed in patients with skull base defect. Simpson grade I removal was accomplished in 59 cases, grade II in seven cases and grade IV in one case. Among 57 patients with de novo tumor, Simpson I resection was accomplished in 54 cases. Postoperative rhinorrhea and intracranial infection occurred in one case and was cured after temporal lumbar CSF drainage and antibiotic therapy. Two patients (2.9%) died within one month after operation, i.e.one aged patient of heart failure and the other of severe hypothalamus complication. Forty seven patients (72.3%) were followed up from one to ten years with an average of five years and four months. With the exception of two cases died, among the alive 45 patients, there were only three patients with tumor recurrence, which had undergone Simpson II or IV tumor resection. No recurrence was found in cases with Simpson I tumor removal. Previous blurred vision was not improved in three patients, hemiparalysis in two patients, and the other patients recovered well, resuming previous jobs or being able to take care themselves. Total tumor removal (Simpson I) should be the surgical goal for treatment of olfactory groove meningiomas, especially for de novo cases. An appropriate approach is fundamental in the effort to remove an OGM totally. Appropriate anterior skull base reconstruction with vascularized material is

  16. Synchronous meningioma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, Chaim B; Rayes, Mahmoud; Kupsky, William J; Guthikonda, Murali

    2010-06-01

    Synchronous primary brain tumors are exceedingly rare. When they occur, most cases are associated with metastatic disease. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first case of an atypical meningioma infiltrated by a T-cell-primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), specifically anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). We present a novel, unifying, plausible mechanism for its origin based on theories in the current literature. A 65-year-old man with a history of near-total resection of atypical meningioma presented with a complaint of progressive headaches. Imaging revealed recurrent tumor. Left frontal-temporal craniotomy with near-total tumor resection followed by radiation was performed. Recurrent symptomatic tumor led to repeat left frontotemporal craniotomy with tumor resection and partial anterior temporal lobectomy. Part of the specimen showed predominantly fibrotic neoplasm composed of nests and whorls of meningothelial cells, highlighted by epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) staining. The remainder of the specimen consisted of densely cellular neoplasm centered in connective tissue, including areas involved by meningioma. This tumor was composed of moderately large lymphoid cells with large nuclei, prominent nucleoli, and amphophilic cytoplasm. These cells were strongly immunoreactive for CD3 and CD30 but remained unstained with EMA, anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1 (ALK-1), CD15 or cytotoxic associated antigen TIA-1. Smaller mature lymphocytes, chiefly T-cells, were intermixed. The morphologic and immunohistochemical features were considered typical of anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. The pathogenesis of this association may have been due to radiation-mediated breakdown of the blood-brain barrier with subsequent T-cell infiltration and proliferation. We advocate aggressive resection and long-term surveillance for individuals with metastasis, especially higher-grade neoplasms that receive radiotherapy.

  17. Nerve sheath myxoma of the dorsal paravertebral space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melih Malkoc

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Although the most presented case of NMS are dermal tumors, it may also be found extremely rare locations. We conclude that, the definitive treatment of NSM is surgical excision with safe margins even when it is possible.

  18. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour Associated With Von ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination revealed a middle aged woman with generalized subcutaneous nodules of various sizes (3mm - 2.5cm), multiple café-au-lait spots (2cm-4.5cm), a plexiform neurofibroma on the left side of the forehead measuring 6cm x 5cm x 5cm. There was a firm, non-pulsatile and non-tender mass (11.5cm x 9cm x 5cm) on ...

  19. Non-Maxwellian plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1998-01-01

    There is much experimental evidence that heat flux to divertor plates or to limiters is very asymmetric. For example, Lowry made measurements on poloidal limiters in JET, Stangeby and McCracken reported asymmetries in several experiments. In 1991 Haines considered the effects on the Child-Langmuir sheaths of having a net current flow. It was found that a sheath that receives more ions than electrons receives more energy flux than a sheath that receives more electrons than ions. We now extend the model to include for the electrons departures from a Maxwellian distribution arising from a net current flow, heat flow and thermoelectric effects in the scrape-off layer (SOL). It is envisaged that a net current flows in the SOL due to applied or induced electric fields, and is of a magnitude similar to that in the adjacent bulk plasma, though reduced due to the lower temperature in the SOL. We employ conventional linear transport theory eg. Braginskii, Epperlein and Haines in which the ions are a stationary Maxwellian. (orig.)

  20. Embolisation of intracranial meningiomas without subsequent surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendszus, M.; Solymosi, L.; Martin-Schrader, I.; Schlake, H.P.

    2003-01-01

    In an open, prospective study, we embolised intracranial meningiomas in seven patients, without subsequent surgery. Follow-up over a mean of 20 months included serial neurological examination, MRI and MR spectroscopy. Clinically, embolisation had no adverse effects. Symptomatic patients showed clinical improvement. On MRI marked tumour shrinkage occurred after embolisation in six patients, and was most pronounced during the first 6 months. In a young boy the tumour was unchanged despite complete angiographic devascularisation. Embolisation without subsequent surgery may cause substantial tumour shrinkage and thus be used in selected in patients. However, thorough follow-up is mandatory to ascertain the effects of embolisation. (orig.)

  1. Olfactory groove meningioma: discussion of clinical presentation and surgical outcomes following excision via the subcranial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Jon-Paul; Hecht, Sarah L; Gebarski, Stephen S; Lin, Erin M; Sullivan, Stephen E; Marentette, Lawrence J

    2011-11-01

    To describe surgical outcomes and radiographic features of olfactory groove meningiomas treated by excision through the subcranial approach. Special emphasis is placed on paranasal sinus and orbit involvement. Retrospective review of a series of patients. Nineteen patients underwent excision of olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) via the transglabellar/subcranial approach between December 1995 and November 2009. Nine patients had previously undergone prior resection at outside institutions, and four had prior radiotherapy in addition to a prior excision. Transglabellar/subcranial surgical approach to the anterior skull base was performed. Tumor histology included three World Health Organization (WHO) grade III lesions, one WHO grade II lesion, and 15 WHO grade I lesions. Fourteen patients had evidence of extension into the paranasal sinuses, with the ethmoid sinus being most commonly involved. Kaplan-Meier estimates of mean overall and disease-free survival were 121.45 months and 93.03 months, respectively. The mean follow-up interval was 41.0 months, and at the time of data analysis three patients had recurrent tumors. Seven (36.8%) patients experienced a major complication in the perioperative period; there were no perioperative mortalities. Orbit invasion was observed in four patients, with optic nerve impingement in 11 patients. Of these, three patients had long-term diplopia. No patients experienced worsening of preoperative visual acuity. Olfactory groove meningiomas demonstrate a propensity to spread into the paranasal sinuses, particularly in recurrent cases. Given a tendency for infiltrative recurrence along the skull base, this disease represents an important area of collaboration between neurosurgery and otolaryngology. The subcranial approach offers excellent surgical access for excision, particularly for recurrences that involve the paranasal sinuses and optic apparatus. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society

  2. RF sheaths for arbitrary B field angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ippolito, Daniel; Myra, James

    2014-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries and accelerate electrons out of the plasma. Sheath effects reduce the efficiency of ICRF heating, cause RF-specific impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and increase the plasma-facing component damage. The rf sheath potential is sensitive to the angle between the B field and the wall, the ion mobility and the ion magnetization. Here, we obtain a numerical solution of the non-neutral rf sheath and magnetic pre-sheath equations (for arbitrary values of these parameters) and attempt to infer the parametric dependences of the Child-Langmuir law. This extends previous work on the magnetized, immobile ion regime. An important question is how the rf sheath voltage distributes itself between sheath and pre-sheath for various B field angles. This will show how generally previous estimates of the rf sheath voltage and capacitance were reasonable, and to improve the RF sheath BC. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  3. High incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Takahiro; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Hoshi, Masaharu

    1999-01-01

    Since the atomic bomb explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, high incidences of leukemia, thyroid cancer and other tumors have been reported as atomic bomb-induced tumors. We investigated the incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. Sixty-eight patients surgically treated for meningioma who had been within 2.0 km of the hypocenter of the explosion were identified. Six hundred and seven non-exposed patients with meningioma were also studied. Treatment dates were from 1975 to 1992. The incidences of meningioma among 68 subjects within 2.0 km and 607 non-exposed patients were 8.7 and 3.0 cases per 10 5 persons per year, respectively. The incidences of meningioma among the survivors of Hiroshima in 5-year intervals since 1975 were 5.3, 7.4, 10.1, and 14.9, respectively. The incidences of meningioma classified by distances from the hypocenter of 1.5-2.0 km, 1.0-1.5 km and less than 1.0 km were 6.3, 7.6 and 20.0, respectively. The incidences of meningioma classified by doses to the brain of 0-0.099 Sv, 0.1-0.99 Sv and more than 1.0 Sv were 7.7, 9.2 and 18.2, respectively. The incidence of meningioma among Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors has increased since 1975. There was a significant correlation between the incidence and the dose of radiation to the brain. The present findings strongly suggest that meningioma is one of the tumors induced by atomic bombing in Hiroshima. (author)

  4. Stereological analysis of nuclear volume in recurrent meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1994-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear volume in recurrent and non-recurrent meningiomas was made. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these two groups. We found that the mean nuclear volumes in recurrent meningiomas were all larger at debut than in any...... of the control tumors. The mean nuclear volume of the individual recurrent tumors appeared to change with time, showing a tendency to diminish. A relationship between large nuclear volume at presentation and number of or time interval between recurrences was not found. We conclude that measurement of mean...... nuclear volume in meningiomas might help identify a group at risk of recurrence....

  5. Cystic meningioma: unusual entity with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maheshwari Vikas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cystic meningioma is a relatively rare condition, radiological appearance of the cystic-solid components of the mass may create a diagnostic dilemma. The presence of a cyst is not a common imaging feature and this makes it difficult to differentiate it from hemangioblastoma, craniopharyngioma, metastasis and gliomas. Cystic meningiomas are present more commonly in children. We present a 60 year old male who presented with seizures and frontal lobe signs. The lesion was suspected as glioma however, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated as meningioma. Patient showed remarkable recovery after surgery. Complete cyst resection should be considered if it is technically feasible and safe.

  6. ['Histrionic personality disorder with regression and conversion': a meningioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Elberink, A M L; Oudijn, M S; Kwa, V I H; Van, H L

    2011-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman, who was believed to be suffering from histrionic personality disorder with regression and conversion, was finally diagnosed with a frontal meningioma. Patients with meningiomas can present with a variety of psychiatric symptoms, sometimes even before neurological symptoms occur. The diagnosis is often delayed because the symptoms are misleading and it is difficult to modify a psychiatric diagnosis once this has been made. Discussion focuses on the characteristic signs of a meningioma, the reasons for delays in diagnosis and the indications for brain-imaging on psychiatric patients.

  7. Foramen Magnum Meningioma: a Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurinovic, Pavao; Bulicic, Ana Repic; Marcic, Marino; Mise, Nikolina Ivica; Titlic, Marina; Suljic, Enra

    2016-02-01

    Meningiomas are slow-growing benign tumors that arise at any location where arachnoid cells reside. Although meningiomas account for a sizable proportion of all primary intracranial neoplasms (14.3-19%), only 1.8 to 3.2% arise at the foramen magnum. Their indolent development at the craniocervical junction makes clinical diagnosis complex and often leads to a long interval between onset of symptoms and diagnosis. We report a case of a 79-year-old male patient, presented with ataxia and sense of threatening fainting during verticalization. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the presence of meningioma in the right side of craniospinal junction.

  8. Rapid recurrence of a malignant meningioma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Oguz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This short report presents a case that developed rapid recurrence of a malignant meningioma. The meningioma was located on the right temporal lobe and total removal (Simpson grade-II was performed. Radiotherapy was not given and the lesion recurred within four months. The MIB-1 (Ki-67 index was 30 % and the tumor fulfilled all the criteria of anaplasia. After the second surgery, patient was transferred to the Radiation Oncology for radiotherapy. Should we questioned the extent of surgery? Neurosurgeons should be careful and close follow-up the patients with malignant meningioma.

  9. Metastatic meningioma: positron emission tomography CT imaging findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, C

    2010-12-01

    The imaging findings of a case of metastasing meningioma are described. The case illustrates a number of rare and interesting features. The patient presented with haemoptysis 22 years after the initial resection of an intracranial meningioma. CT demonstrated heterogeneous masses with avid peripheral enhancement without central enhancement. Blood supply to the larger lesion was partially from small feeding vessels from the inferior pulmonary vein. These findings correlate with a previously published case in which there was avid uptake of fluoro-18-deoxyglucose peripherally with lesser uptake centrally. The diagnosis of metastasing meningioma was confirmed on percutaneous lung tissue biopsy.

  10. Immunohistochemical profile of neurotrophins in human cranial dura mater and meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Marco; Bronzetti, Elena; Pompili, Elena; Ionta, Brunella; Alicino, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Anna; Santoro, Antonio; Pastore, Francesco S; Elenkov, Ilia; Fumagalli, Lorenzo

    2009-06-01

    The immunohistochemical profile of neurotrophins and their receptors in the human cranial dura mater was studied by examining certain dural zones in specimens harvested from different regions (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital). Dural specimens were obtained during neurosurgical operations performed in ten patients for surgical treatment of intracranial lesions (meningiomas, traumas, gliomas, vascular malformations). The dural fragments were taken from the area of the craniotomy at least 8 cm from the lesion as well as from the area in which the meningioma had its dural attachment. Immunohistochemical characterization and distribution of neurotrophins, with their receptors, were analyzed. The concrete role played by these neurotrophic factors in general regulation, vascular permeability, algic responsivity and release of locally active substances in the human dura mater is still controversial. Our study revealed a general structural alteration of dural tissue due to the invasivity of meningiomatous lesions, together with an improved expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in highly proliferating neoplastic cells and an evident production of nerve growth factor (NGF) in inflammatory cells, suggesting that BDNF has a role in supporting the proliferation rate of neoplastic cells, while NGF is involved in the activation of a chronic inflammatory response in neoplastic areas.

  11. Ultrasound diagnosis of rectus sheath hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M. S.; Chang, J. C.; Rhee, C. B.

    1984-01-01

    6 cases of rectus sheath hematoma were correctly diagnosed by ultrasound. 2 cases had bilateral rectus sheath hematoma and 4 cases were unilateral. On ultrasound finding, relatively well defined oval or spindle like cystic mass situated in the area of rectus muscle on all cases. Ultrasound examination may give more definite diagnosis and extension rectus sheath hematoma and also helpful to follow up study of hematoma

  12. Tendon sheath fibroma in the thigh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Vincent M; Ashana, Adedayo O; de la Cruz, Michael; Lackman, Richard D

    2012-04-01

    Tendon sheath fibromas are rare, benign soft tissue tumors that are predominantly found in the fingers, hands, and wrists of young adult men. This article describes a tendon sheath fibroma that developed in the thigh of a 70-year-old man, the only known tendon sheath fibroma to form in this location. Similar to tendon sheath fibromas that develop elsewhere, our patient's lesion presented as a painless, slow-growing soft tissue nodule. Physical examination revealed a firm, nontender mass with no other associated signs or symptoms. Although the imaging appearance of tendon sheath fibromas varies, our patient's lesion appeared dark on T1- and bright on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. It was well marginated and enhanced with contrast.Histologically, tendon sheath fibromas are composed of dense fibrocollagenous stromas with scattered spindle-shaped fibroblasts and narrow slit-like vascular spaces. Most tendon sheath fibromas can be successfully removed by marginal excision, although 24% of lesions recur. No lesions have metastasized. Our patient's tendon sheath fibroma was removed by marginal excision, and the patient remained disease free 35 months postoperatively. Despite its rarity, tendon sheath fibroma should be included in the differential diagnosis of a thigh mass on physical examination or imaging, especially if it is painless, nontender, benign appearing, and present in men. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Single-fraction Radiosurgery for Presumed Intracranial Meningiomas: Efficacy and Complications From a 22-Year Experience

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    Pollock, Bruce E., E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Stafford, Scott L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the rate of tumor control and factors associated with radiation-related complications after single-fraction radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with imaging defined intracranial meningiomas. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 251 patients (192 women, 59 men) having SRS for imaging-defined intracranial meningiomas between 1990 and 2008. Excluded were patients with radiation-induced tumors, meningiomatosis, or neurofibromatosis. The mean patient age was 58.6 {+-} 13.4 years. The majority of tumors involved the skull base/tentorium (n = 210, 83.7%). The mean treatment volume was 7.7 {+-} 6.2 cm{sup 3}; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.8 {+-} 2.0 Gy. Follow-up (mean, 62.9 {+-} 43.9 months) was censored at last evaluation (n = 224), death (n = 22), or tumor resection (n = 5). Results: No patient died from tumor progression or radiation-related complications. Tumor size decreased in 181 patients (72.1%) and was unchanged in 67 patients (26.7%). Three patients (1.2%) had in-field tumor progression noted at 28, 145, and 150 months, respectively. No patient had a marginal tumor progression. The 3- and 10-year local control rate was 99.4%. One patient had distant tumor progression at 105 months and underwent repeat SRS. Thirty-one patients (12.4%) had either temporary (n = 8, 3.2%) or permanent (n = 23, 9.2%) symptomatic radiation-related complications including cranial nerve deficits (n = 14), headaches (n = 5), hemiparesis (n = 5), new/worsened seizure (n = 4), cyst-formation (n = 1), hemifacial spasm (n = 1), and stroke (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year complication rates were 8.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Radiation-related complications were associated with convexity/falx tumors (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.3-6.1, p = 0.009) and increasing tumor volume (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.0-1.1, p = 0.04) on multivariate analysis. No patient developed a radiation-induced tumor. Conclusions: Single-fraction SRS at the used dose range provides a high rate of tumor control for

  14. Single-fraction Radiosurgery for Presumed Intracranial Meningiomas: Efficacy and Complications From a 22-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, Bruce E.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Foote, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To define the rate of tumor control and factors associated with radiation-related complications after single-fraction radiosurgery (SRS) for patients with imaging defined intracranial meningiomas. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of 251 patients (192 women, 59 men) having SRS for imaging-defined intracranial meningiomas between 1990 and 2008. Excluded were patients with radiation-induced tumors, meningiomatosis, or neurofibromatosis. The mean patient age was 58.6 ± 13.4 years. The majority of tumors involved the skull base/tentorium (n = 210, 83.7%). The mean treatment volume was 7.7 ± 6.2 cm 3 ; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.8 ± 2.0 Gy. Follow-up (mean, 62.9 ± 43.9 months) was censored at last evaluation (n = 224), death (n = 22), or tumor resection (n = 5). Results: No patient died from tumor progression or radiation-related complications. Tumor size decreased in 181 patients (72.1%) and was unchanged in 67 patients (26.7%). Three patients (1.2%) had in-field tumor progression noted at 28, 145, and 150 months, respectively. No patient had a marginal tumor progression. The 3- and 10-year local control rate was 99.4%. One patient had distant tumor progression at 105 months and underwent repeat SRS. Thirty-one patients (12.4%) had either temporary (n = 8, 3.2%) or permanent (n = 23, 9.2%) symptomatic radiation-related complications including cranial nerve deficits (n = 14), headaches (n = 5), hemiparesis (n = 5), new/worsened seizure (n = 4), cyst-formation (n = 1), hemifacial spasm (n = 1), and stroke (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year complication rates were 8.3% and 11.5%, respectively. Radiation-related complications were associated with convexity/falx tumors (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.3–6.1, p = 0.009) and increasing tumor volume (HR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.0–1.1, p = 0.04) on multivariate analysis. No patient developed a radiation-induced tumor. Conclusions: Single-fraction SRS at the used dose range provides a high rate of tumor control for patients

  15. Retroperitoneal and rectus sheath hematomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasotakis, George

    2014-02-01

    The retroperitoneum is rich in vascular structures and can harbor large hematomas, traumatic or spontaneous. The management of retroperitoneal hematomas depends on the mechanism of injury and whether they are pulsatile/expanding. Rectus sheath hematomas are uncommon abdominal wall hematomas secondary to trauma to the epigastric arteries of the rectus muscle. The common risk factors include anticoagulation, strenuous exercise, coughing, coagulation disorders, and invasive procedures on/through the abdominal wall. The management is largely supportive, with the reversal of anticoagulation and transfusions; angioembolization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rare case of multiple meningiomas in nonneurofibromatosis patient at unusual locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setia Vikrant

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple meningioma is a condition in which more than one intracranial lesion is seen in different location and these lesions may occur with or without signs of neurofibromatosis. Incidence of multiple meningioma range from 1 to 10% in different series. We report a case of multiple meningioma in a 33 years old female who had 14 intracranial lesions both supratentorially and infratentorially, and underwent surgery for large right lateral intraventricular meningioma. She had two meningiomas located in posterior fossa associated with supratentorial meningioma, which has been rarely reported.

  17. Malignant Subdural Hematoma Associated with High-Grade Meningioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Shinichiro; Tsunoda, Akira; Kawamura, Kaito; Sugiyama, Natsuki; Saito, Rikizo; Maruki, Chikashi

    2018-01-01

    A 70-year-old man, who had previously undergone surgical resection of left parasagittal meningioma involving the middle third of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) two times, presented with recurrence of the tumor. We performed removal of the tumor combined with SSS resection as Simpson grade II. After tumor removal, since a left dominant bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) appeared, it was treated by burr hole surgery. However, because the CSDH rapidly and repeatedly recurred and eventually changed to acute subdural hematoma, elimination of the hematoma with craniotomy was accomplished. The patient unfortunately died of worsening of general condition despite aggressive treatment. Histopathology of brain autopsy showed invasion of anaplastic meningioma cells spreading to the whole outer membrane of the subdural hematoma. Subdural hematoma is less commonly associated with meningioma. Our case indicates the possibility that subdural hematoma associated with meningioma is formed by a different mechanism from those reported previously. PMID:29896565

  18. Parasagittal meningiomas – literature review and a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Papacocea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are tumors that can develop anywhere along the neuraxis, but with increased concentration in some specific areas. Parasagittal meningiomas have the dural attachment on the external layer of the superior sagittal sinus (SSS and invade the parasagittal angle displacing brain away from its normal position. Among meningiomas, the parasagittal location is the most common (22%. Taking into account their anatomic insertion along SSS, parasagittal meningiomas can have their dural attachment in the anterior, the middle or the posterior third of the SSS. Most frequently parasagittal meningiomas are located in the middle third of the superior sagittal sinus (between coronal suture and lambdoid suture. The clinical picture of parasagittal meningiomas depends on the tumor location along the SSS and so is the attitude towards ligation and reconstruction of the sinus. Controversial issues regarding surgical management of parasagittal meningiomas concerning leaving a tumor remnant that invades the SSS instead attempting total resection, or the attitude in the case of totally occluded segment of a sinus are summarized in this paper. The special care for the venous system is emphasized. The recurrence matter is also approached underlining the importance of adjuvant radiosurgery for the management of residual tumors. Results described in the main papers of the literature are reviewed. Conclusions are referring to the historical evolution regarding the surgical management of parasagittal meningiomas: aggressiveness of resection, sinus reconstruction, importance of adjuvant techniques: radiosurgery, endovascular surgery and to the importance of microsurgery and careful and meticulous planning of the approach in order to avoid interference with venous collaterals. A suggestive clinical case from the authors experience is presented.

  19. Neuroradiological diagnosis and microsurgical treatment of suprasellar meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfisterer, W.

    1991-01-01

    Meningiomas are extracerebrale tumours of the central nervous system. The percental share of this brain neoplasms amounts to 10 - 15 %. Suprasellar meningiomas have a narrow relation to the nervus opticus, hypothalamus, A. carotis interna, A. cerebri anterior and A. carotis media. This explains the clinical-neurological-symptoms. With aid of angiography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and microneurosurgery the mortality can be decreased from 50 % to 5 %. (Botek)

  20. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  1. Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, G.; Renard, A.; Mazeron, J.J.; Valery, C.; Mokhtari, K.

    2001-01-01

    Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of meningiomas. Cerebral meningiomas account for 15-20% of all cerebral tumours. Although seldom malignant, they frequently recur in spite of complete surgery, which remains the cornerstone of the treatment. In order to decrease the probability of local recurrence, radiotherapy has often been recommended in atypical or malignant meningioma as well as in benign meningioma which was incompletely resected. However, this treatment never was the subject of prospective studies, randomized or not. The purpose of this review of the literature was to give a progress report on the results of different published series in the field of methodology as well as in the techniques of radiotherapy. Proposals for a therapeutic choice are made according to this analysis. For grade I or grade II-III meningiomas, limits of gross tumor volume (GTV) include the tumour in place or the residual tumour after surgery; clinical target volume (CTV) limits include gross tumour volume before surgery with a GTV-CTV distance of 1 and 2 cm respectively. Delivered doses are 55 Gy into CTV and 55-60 Gy and 70 Gy into GTV for grade I and grade II-III meningiomas respectively. (authors)

  2. Psychopathological manifestations of multiple meningiomas in the right hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lukshina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature on meningiomas and their psychopathological manifestations that occupy a central position in the clinical picture in almost every 5 patients with these tumors. The authors provide a clinical and psychopathological analysis of a female patient with multiple meningiomas in the right hemisphere: a giant meningioma in the posterior third of the falx, a large meningioma in the temporal region, and three small meningiomas in the frontal and parietal regions. The disease started as headache; however, psychopathological symptoms remained missed by physicians, such as emotional lability; personality changes leading to family dissension; lower criticism; spatial orientation problems; hypomnesia; left-sided visual inattention,occurred in parallel. Surgical treatment was performed by stages: the two largest meningiomas were removed at an 11-day interval, which presented a means of observing psychopathological changes after each operation. It is concluded that greater attention should be given to the psychopathological manifestations of the disease, which is important to make a primary diagnosis and to define further treatment policy.

  3. Parasellar meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alair Augusto S.M.D. dos; Fontes, Cristina Asvolinsque P.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed 22 cases of patients with parasellar meningiomas evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in private clinics of the cities of Niteroi and Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Our aim was to characterize the imaging findings in this type of tumor. MRI scanners with 0.5 and 1.0 Tesla magnets were used for the acquisition of multiplanar T1-weighted (pre-and post-gadolinium administration) and T2-weighted images. The main symptoms observed were headache and visual disturbances. Hyperprolactinaemia was observed in only one patient. The most frequent imaging finding was a parasellar mass which appeared hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and enhanced intensively after gadolinium administration. MRI is useful to demonstrate the lesion and to asses the damage to adjacent structures, particularly when the patient presents visual disturbances due to involvement of the cavernous sinuses. (author)

  4. Benign meningiomas: primary treatment selection affects survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condra, Kellie S.; Buatti, John M.; Mendenhall, William M.; Friedman, William A.; Marcus, Robert B.; Rhoton, Albert L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the effect of primary treatment selection on outcomes for benign intracranial meningiomas at the University of Florida. Methods and Materials: For 262 patients, the impact of age, Karnofsky performance status, pathologic features, tumor size, tumor location, and treatment modality on local control and cause-specific survival was analyzed (minimum potential follow-up, 2 years; median follow-up, 8.2 years). Extent of surgery was classified by Simpson grade. Treatment groups: surgery alone (n = 229), surgery and postoperative radiotherapy (RT) (n = 21), RT alone (n = 7), radiosurgery alone (n = 5). Survival analysis: Kaplan-Meier method with univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: At 15 years, local control was 76% after total excision (TE) and 87% after subtotal excision plus RT (SE+RT), both significantly better (p = 0.0001) than after SE alone (30%). Cause-specific survival at 15 years was reduced after treatment with SE alone (51%), compared with TE (88%) or SE+RT (86%) (p = 0.0003). Recurrence after primary treatment portended decreased survival, independent of initial treatment group or salvage treatment selection (p = 0.001). Atypical pathologic features predicted reduced 15-year local control (54 vs. 71%) and cause-specific survival rates (57 vs. 86%). Multivariate analysis for cause-specific survival revealed treatment group (SE vs. others; p = 0.0001), pathologic features (atypical vs. typical; p = 0.0056), and Karnofsky performance status (≥80 vs. <80; p = 0.0153) as significant variables. Conclusion: Benign meningiomas are well managed by TE or SE+RT. SE alone is inadequate therapy and adversely affects cause-specific survival. Atypical pathologic features predict a poorer outcome, suggesting possible benefit from more aggressive treatment. Because local recurrence portends lower survival rates, primary treatment choice is important

  5. Short-term observations of the regenerative potential of injured proximal sensory nerves crossed with distal motor nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-xiu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor nerves and sensory nerves conduct signals in different directions and function in different ways. In the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, the best prognosis is obtained by keeping the motor and sensory nerves separated and repairing the nerves using the suture method. However, the clinical consequences of connections between sensory and motor nerves currently remain unknown. In this study, we analyzed the anatomical structure of the rat femoral nerve, and observed the motor and sensory branches of the femoral nerve in the quadriceps femoris. After ligation of the nerves, the proximal end of the sensory nerve was connected with the distal end of the motor nerve, followed by observation of the changes in the newly-formed regenerated nerve fibers. Acetylcholinesterase staining was used to distinguish between the myelinated and unmyelinated motor and sensory nerves. Denervated muscle and newly formed nerves were compared in terms of morphology, electrophysiology and histochemistry. At 8 weeks after connection, no motor nerve fibers were observed on either side of the nerve conduit and the number of nerve fibers increased at the proximal end. The proportion of newly-formed motor and sensory fibers was different on both sides of the conduit. The area occupied by autonomic nerves in the proximal regenerative nerve was limited, but no distinct myelin sheath was visible in the distal nerve. These results confirm that sensory and motor nerves cannot be effectively connected. Moreover, the change of target organ at the distal end affects the type of nerves at the proximal end.

  6. Primary cutaneous meningioma on the scalp of an infant; a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Jeong; Lim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Sung Mee; Yoo, Eun Ae [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    During childhood, meningioma is an uncommon tumor, and in infants, extracranial meningioma is very rare. We report a case of primary cutaneous menigioma occurring on the scalp of a ten-month-old girl.

  7. [Dynamics of lagophthalmos depending on facial nerve repair and its intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnikova, T V; Serova, N K; Shimansky, V N

    2014-01-01

    Over 200 patients with acoustic neuromas and over 100 patients with posterior cranial fossa meningiomas are annually operated on at the N.N. Burdenko Neurosurgical Institute. Intraoperative monitoring of the facial nerve function is used in most patients with tumors of the posterior cranial fossa to identify the facial nerve in the surgical wound. If the anatomical integrity of the facial nerve in the cranial cavity cannot be retained, facial nerve repair is performed to restore the facial muscle function. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the facial nerve has a great prognostic significance to evaluate the dynamics of lagophthalmos in the late postoperative period and to select the proper method for lagophthalmos correction. When the facial nerve was reinnervated by the descending branch or trunk of the hypoglossal nerve, sufficient eyelid closure was observed only in 3 patients out of 17.

  8. Hormones, radiosurgery and virtual reality: new aspects of meningioma management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    The understanding and management of meningiomas is changing significantly today. One of the most striking features of their pathophysiology is their predominance in women. In a series of 517 patients with meningiomas seen by the Brain Tumor Group at Brigham and Women's Hospital, the female:male ratio was 2.4:1. The progesterone receptor appears to be the major candidate to explain this difference. Progesterone receptor can be shown to be expressed in 81% of women and 40% of men with meningiomas. Surgery remains the mainstay of meningioma management. At the Brigham and Women's Hospital three-dimensional reconstruction techniques have markedly improved the ability to visualize the tumor as well as its relation to vascular structures. With MRI reconstruction, it is possible to know the tumor's relation to the sagittal and other sinuses, to identify feeders and proximity to major arteries, and to establish its location and relation to cortex by frameless stereotaxis. These techniques can be used in a virtual reality format are some of the most powerful in neurosurgery both for teaching and for the surgical procedure itself. External beam radiation has been shown by others to be an effective adjunctive treatment to prevent meningioma recurrence. Recently, linear accelerator radiosurgery and stereotactic radiotherapy have changed the pattern radiation at our institution. In a series of 56 skull base meningiomas, for example, 95% were controlled (i.e., showed now growth) over a four year period. Fractionated focal radiation potentially offers the same control rate with fewer complications. With increasing understanding and treatment possibilities, meningiomas remain one of the most intriguing and challenging tumors in the nervous system. (author)

  9. Perfusion MR imaging for differentiation of benign and malignant meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hao; Roediger, Lars A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Shen, Tianzhen; Miao, Jingtao

    2008-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine whether perfusion MR imaging can be used to differentiate benign and malignant meningiomas on the basis of the differences in perfusion of tumor parenchyma and/or peritumoral edema. A total of 33 patients with preoperative meningiomas (25 benign and 8 malignant) underwent conventional and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging. Maximal relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and the corresponding relative mean time to enhance (rMTE) (relative to the contralateral normal white matter) in both tumor parenchyma and peritumoral edema were measured. The independent samples t-test was used to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in the mean rCBV and rMTE ratios between benign and malignant meningiomas. The mean maximal rCBV values of benign and malignant meningiomas were 7.16±4.08 (mean±SD) and 5.89±3.86, respectively, in the parenchyma, and 1.05±0.96 and 3.82±1.39, respectively, in the peritumoral edema. The mean rMTE values were 1.16±0.24 and 1.30±0.32, respectively, in the parenchyma, and 0.91±0.25 and 1.24±0.35, respectively, in the peritumoral edema. The differences in rCBV and rMTE values between benign and malignant meningiomas were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in the parenchyma, but both were statistically significant (P<0.05) in the peritumoral edema. Perfusion MR imaging can provide useful information on meningioma vascularity which is not available from conventional MRI. Measurement of maximal rCBV and corresponding rMTE values in the peritumoral edema is useful in the preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant meningiomas. (orig.)

  10. Perfusion MR imaging for differentiation of benign and malignant meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Shanghai Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, First People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Roediger, Lars A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Shen, Tianzhen [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Miao, Jingtao [Shanghai Jiaotong University, Department of Radiology, First People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2008-06-15

    Our purpose was to determine whether perfusion MR imaging can be used to differentiate benign and malignant meningiomas on the basis of the differences in perfusion of tumor parenchyma and/or peritumoral edema. A total of 33 patients with preoperative meningiomas (25 benign and 8 malignant) underwent conventional and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MR imaging. Maximal relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and the corresponding relative mean time to enhance (rMTE) (relative to the contralateral normal white matter) in both tumor parenchyma and peritumoral edema were measured. The independent samples t-test was used to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in the mean rCBV and rMTE ratios between benign and malignant meningiomas. The mean maximal rCBV values of benign and malignant meningiomas were 7.16{+-}4.08 (mean{+-}SD) and 5.89{+-}3.86, respectively, in the parenchyma, and 1.05{+-}0.96 and 3.82{+-}1.39, respectively, in the peritumoral edema. The mean rMTE values were 1.16{+-}0.24 and 1.30{+-}0.32, respectively, in the parenchyma, and 0.91{+-}0.25 and 1.24{+-}0.35, respectively, in the peritumoral edema. The differences in rCBV and rMTE values between benign and malignant meningiomas were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in the parenchyma, but both were statistically significant (P<0.05) in the peritumoral edema. Perfusion MR imaging can provide useful information on meningioma vascularity which is not available from conventional MRI. Measurement of maximal rCBV and corresponding rMTE values in the peritumoral edema is useful in the preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant meningiomas. (orig.)

  11. Proton Stereotactic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Benign Meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halasz, Lia M., E-mail: lhalasz@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bussiere, Marc R.; Dennis, Elizabeth R.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chapman, Paul H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Given the excellent prognosis for patients with benign meningiomas, treatment strategies to minimize late effects are important. One strategy is proton radiation therapy (RT), which allows less integral dose to normal tissue and greater homogeneity than photon RT. Here, we report the first series of proton stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) used for the treatment of meningiomas. Methods and Materials: We identified 50 patients with 51 histologically proven or image- defined, presumed-benign meningiomas treated at our institution between 1996 and 2007. Tumors of <4 cm in diameter and located {>=}2 mm from the optic apparatus were eligible for treatment. Indications included primary treatment (n = 32), residual tumor following surgery (n = 8), and recurrent tumor following surgery (n = 10). The median dose delivered was 13 Gray radiobiologic equivalent (Gy[RBE]) (range, 10.0-15.5 Gy[RBE]) prescribed to the 90% isodose line. Results: Median follow-up was 32 months (range, 6-133 months). Magnetic resonance imaging at the most recent follow-up or time of progression revealed 33 meningiomas with stable sizes, 13 meningiomas with decreased size, and 5 meningiomas with increased size. The 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 94% (95% confidence interval, 77%-98%). Symptoms were improved in 47% (16/ 34) of patients, unchanged in 44% (15/34) of patients, and worse in 9% (3/34) of patients. The rate of potential permanent adverse effects after SRS was 5.9% (3/51 patients). Conclusions: Proton SRS is an effective therapy for small benign meningiomas, with a potentially lower rate of long-term treatment-related morbidity. Longer follow-up is needed to assess durability of tumor control and late effects.

  12. Meningiomas after cranial radiotherapy for childhood cancer: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, Francesco; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Garbossa, Diego; Biasin, Eleonora; Rudà, Roberta; Daniele, Dino; Arvat, Emanuela; Corrias, Andrea; Fagioli, Franca; Brignardello, Enrico

    2015-07-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) treated with cranial radiation therapy (CRT) are at risk of developing meningiomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cumulative incidence of meningiomas in a cohort of CCS who previously underwent CRT. We considered all CCS who received CRT and were followed up at the "Transition Unit for Childhood Cancer Survivors" in Turin. Even though asymptomatic, they had at least one brain computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging performed at a minimum interval of 10 years after treatment for pediatric cancer. We identified 90 patients (median follow-up 24.6 years). Fifteen patients developed meningioma (median time from pediatric cancer, 22.5 years). In four patients, it was suspected on the basis of neurological symptoms (i.e., headache or seizures), whereas all other cases, including five giant meningiomas, were discovered in otherwise asymptomatic patients. Multiple meningiomas were discovered in four CCS. Ten patients underwent surgical resection. An atypical meningioma (grade II WHO) was reported in four patients. One patient with multiple meningiomas died for a rapid growth of the intracranial lesions. A second neoplasm (SN) other than meningioma was diagnosed in five out of the 15 patients with meningioma and in ten out of the 75 CCS without meningioma. Cox multivariate analysis showed that the occurrence of meningioma was associated with the development of other SNs, whereas age, sex, or CRT dose had no influence. CCS at risk of the development of meningioma deserve close clinical follow-up, especially those affected by other SNs.

  13. New observations concerning the interpretation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of meningioma

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    Yue, Qiang [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Huaxi MR Research Center, Department of Radiology, Chengdu (China); Isobe, Tomonori [Kitasato University, Department of Medical Technology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Minato (Japan); Shibata, Yasushi; Kawamura, Hiraku; Yamamoto, Youhei; Takano, Shingo; Matsumura, Akira [University of Tsukuba, Department of Neurosurgery, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba Science City, Ibaraki (Japan); Anno, Izumi [University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    This study was aimed to clarify some ambiguities in the interpretation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) of meningiomas. The cases of 31 meningioma patients (27 benign and 4 nonbenign meningiomas) that underwent single-voxel 1H-MRS (PRESS sequence, TR/TE = 2,000 ms/68, 136, 272 ms) were retrospectively analyzed. To verify the findings of in-vivo study, phantoms were measured, and pathological sections of 11 patients were reviewed. All meningiomas demonstrated increased choline and decreased creatine, except for a lipomatous meningioma that only displayed a prominent lipid (Lip) peak. Alanine (Ala) and lactate (Lac) coexisted in eight cases, indicating an alternative pathway of energy metabolism in meningiomas. They partially overlapped with each other and demonstrated a triplet-like spectral pattern, which was consistent with phantom study. Glutamine/glutamate (Glx) was helpful for the recognition of meningioma when Ala was absent. N-acetyl compounds(NACs) were observed in nine cases whose voxels were completely limited within the tumors, indicating that meningiomas might have endogenous NACs. Lac was indicative of an aggressive meningioma, although not always a nonbenign one. Lip not only represented micronecrosis in nonbenign meningiomas, but also reflected microcystic changes or fatty degeneration in benign meningiomas. 1H-MRS reflects some distinctive biochemical and pathological changes of meningiomas that might be misinterpreted. (orig.)

  14. [Positional damage of the sciatic nerve during neurosurgical intervention into the posterior cranial fossa in the sitting position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, A N; Lubnin, A Iu; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Kolycheva, M V; Ogurtsova, A A; Grigorian, A A

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a rare case of severe, but reversible bilateral damage to the sciatic nerve (compression neuropathy) in a patient with Blumenbach's clivus meningioma developing during 12-hour operation removing the tumor in the patient's sitting position on the operating table. The etiology and prevention of this complication are discussed.

  15. Radiotherapy for intracranial meningioma. Special reference to malignant and high risk benign meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Teppei; Iijima, Mitsuharu; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    1995-01-01

    Results of radiotherapy in 21 patients who had been treated for intracranial meningioma from April 1975 to March 1993 at Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital are presented. All patients were treated with 4 MV X-rays using conventional fractionation. The median tumor dose was 54.4 Gy (range 30 Gy to 70 Gy). Radiotherapy was delivered by conformation technique in 11, parallel opposed field in four and three ports technique in two. Of 21 meningiomas, 13 were histologically malignant and 8 were benign. The median follow-up period was 63 months. Overall survival rate at 5 years was 71% for benign and 63% for malignant meningiomas; the 5-year progression-free survival rates were 25% and 30%, respectively. Eight of 21 patients received 60 Gy or more, and the remaining 13 received less than 60 Gy. The 5-year overall survival rates for these two groups were 43% and 83% (p<0.05), respectively. Ten of 21 patients were treated with post-operative radiotherapy as initial treatment and eleven of 21 patients were treated with salvage therapy with or without surgical excision for recurrent lesions. The 5-year survival rates and progression-free survival rates of these two groups showed no significant differences. From analysis of the clinical course of the salvage therapy group, radiotherapy may prolong survival time and delay further tumor recurrence. According to the present study, radiotherapy (doses of 55 Gy to 60 Gy) after primary resection and at the time of recurrence are equally effective for prolongation of survival and delay of further tumor recurrence. (author)

  16. Three-dimensional analysis of antenna sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Ho, Y.L.

    1996-01-01

    The present work is motivated by the importance of r.f. sheaths in determining the antenna-plasma interaction and the sensitivity of the sheaths to the complicated three-dimensional structure of modern ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennas. To analyze r.f. sheaths on the plasma facing regions of the launcher, we first calculate the contact points of the tokamak magnetic field lines on the surface of the antenna Faraday screen and nearby limiters for realistic three-dimensional magnetic flux surface and antenna geometries. Next, the r.f. voltage that can drive sheaths at the contact points is determined and used to assess the resulting sheath power dissipation, r.f.-driven sputtering, and r.f.-induced convective cells (which produce edge profile modification). The calculations are embodied in a computer code, ANSAT (antenna sheath analysis tool), and sample ANSAT runs are shown to highlight the physics- and geometry-dependent characteristics of the r.f. sheaths and their relationship to the antenna design. One use of ANSAT is therefore as a design tool, to assess the strengths and weaknesses of a given design with respect to critical voltage handling and edge plasma interaction issues. Additionally, examples are presented where ANSAT has been useful in the analysis and interpretation of ICRF experiments (orig.)

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of meningiomas; Radiocirurgia estereotaxica no tratamento de meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penna, Antonio Belmiro Rodrigues Campbell [Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Vieira, Sergio Lannes [Hospital Sao Vicente de Paula, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia; Rossini Junior, Olamir [Clinica Radioterapia Botafogo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-04-01

    We report the results of the treatment of four patients with inoperable meningiomas who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery using a linear accelerator of 6 MeV. Radiological examinations carried out from 12 to 22 months later revealed tumor growth arrest in all patients, giving a response rate of 100%. No early or late neurological complications dur to the radiosurgical treatment was observed. During the follow-up period no death caused by radiation was reported. Although the number of cases and the follow-up period were insufficient to show statistical significance, the results were satisfactory and thus require further investigations. (author)

  18. Rectus sheath abscess after laparoscopic appendicectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golash Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Port site wound infection, abdominal wall hematoma and intraabdominal abscess formation has been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. We describe here a rectus sheath abscess which occurred three weeks after the laparoscopic appendicectomy. It was most likely the result of secondary infection of the rectus sheath hematoma due to bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the inferior epigastric arteries or a direct tear of the rectus muscle. As far as we are aware this complication has not been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy.

  19. Meningioma as second malignant neoplasm after oncological treatment during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.L.; Gebhardt, U. [Klinikum Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology; Warmuth-Metz, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Pietsch, T. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Soerensen, N. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kortmann, R.D. [University Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2012-05-15

    A total of 38 patients (18 female/20 male) with childhood meningioma were recruited from the German registry HIT-Endo (1989-2009). In 5 cases meningioma occurred as second malignant neoplasm (SMN). Histologies were confirmed by reference assessment in all cases (SMN: 2 WHO I, 1 WHO II, 2 WHO III). The SMNs were diagnosed at a median age of 12.4 years with a median latency of 10.2 years after primary malignancy (PMN; 4 brain tumors, 1 lymphoblastic leukemia; median age at diagnosis 2.7 years). Meningioma occurred as SMN in the irradiated field of PMN (range 12-54 Gy). The outcome after treatment of SMN meningioma (surgery/irradiation) was favorable in terms of psychosocial status and functional capacity in 4 of 5 patients (1 death). We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who were exposed to radiation therapy at young age harbor the risk of developing meningioma as a SMN at a particularly short latency period in case of high dose exposure. (orig.)

  20. Hemichorea and dystonia due to frontal lobe meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors originating from the meninges, also known as meningiomas, have rarely been known to cause parkinsonian symptoms and other movement disorders. Although some cases of AV malformations causing movement disorders have been described in the literature, not much has been reported about meningiomas in this regard. The aim of this case report is to further highlight the importance of brain imaging in patients with movement disorders for even a benign tumor; and also emphasize the need for a careful movement disorder examination because more than one phenomenology of movement disorders may result from the mechanical pressure caused by a tumor. We present a case report of a patient with a heavily calcified right frontal lobe meningioma. Our patient had irregular, involuntary, brief, fleeting and unpredictable movements of her left upper and lower extremities, consistent with chorea. The patient also had abnormal dystonic posturing of her left arm while walking. This case report highlights the importance of brain imaging as well as careful neurological examinations of patients with benign meningiomas. Moreover, it illustrates the remarkable specificity yet clinical diversity of meningiomas in presentation through movement disorders.

  1. The contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging to distinguishing typical from atypical meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakyemez, Bahattin [Uludag University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Bursa State Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey); Yildirim, Nalan; Gokalp, Gokhan; Erdogan, Cuneyt; Parlak, Mufit [Uludag University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2006-08-15

    Atypical/malignant meningiomas recur more frequently then typical meningiomas. In this study, the contribution of diffusion-weighted MR imaging to the differentiation of atypical/malignant and typical meningiomas and to the determination of histological subtypes of typical meningiomas was investigated. The study was performed prospectively on 39 patients. The signal intensity of the lesions was evaluated on trace and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) images. ADC values were measured in the lesions and peritumoral edema. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Mean ADC values in atypical/malignant and typical meningiomas were 0.75{+-}0.21 and 1.17{+-}0.21, respectively. Mean ADC values for subtypes of typical meningiomas were as follows: meningothelial, 1.09{+-}0.20; transitional, 1.19{+-}0.07; fibroblastic, 1.29{+-}0.28; and angiomatous, 1.48{+-}0.10. Normal white matter was 0.91{+-}0.10. ADC values of typical meningiomas and atypical/malignant meningiomas significantly differed (P<0.001). However, the difference between peritumoral edema ADC values was not significant (P>0.05). Furthermore, the difference between the subtypes of typical meningiomas and atypical/malignant meningiomas was significant (P<0.001). Diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings of atypical/malignant meningiomas and typical meningiomas differ. Atypical/malignant meningiomas have lower intratumoral ADC values than typical meningiomas. Mean ADC values for peritumoral edema do not differ between typical and atypical meningiomas. (orig.)

  2. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  3. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kyoung Doo; Eo, Hong; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, So-Young; Jeon, Tae Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  5. Can preoperative MR imaging predict optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kyoung Doo, E-mail: kdsong0308@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Hong, E-mail: rtombow@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye, E-mail: jhkate.kim@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, So-Young, E-mail: sy1131.yoo@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Tae Yeon, E-mail: hathor97.jeon@samsung.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of pre-operative MRI for the detection of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and informed consent were waived for this retrospective study. A total of 41 patients were included. Inclusion criteria were histologically proven retinoblastoma, availability of diagnostic-quality preoperative MR images acquired during the 4 weeks before surgery, unilateral retinoblastoma, and normal-sized optic nerve. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the MR images independently. Five imaging findings (diffuse mild optic nerve enhancement, focal strong optic nerve enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, tumor location, and tumor size) were evaluated against optic nerve invasion of retinoblastoma. The predictive performance of all MR imaging findings for optic nerve invasion was also evaluated by the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Optic nerve invasion was histopathologically confirmed in 24% of study population (10/41). The differences in diffuse mild enhancement, focal strong enhancement, optic sheath enhancement, and tumor location between patients with optic nerve invasion and patients without optic nerve invasion were not significant. Tumor sizes were 16.1 mm (SD: 2.2 mm) and 14.9 mm (SD: 3.6 mm) in patients with and without optic nerve involvement, respectively (P = 0.444). P-Values from binary logistic regression indicated that all five imaging findings were not significant predictors of tumor invasion of optic nerve. The AUC values of all MR imaging findings for the prediction of optic nerve invasion were 0.689 (95% confidence interval: 0.499–0.879) and 0.653 (95% confidence interval: 0.445–0.861) for observer 1 and observer 2, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of MRI in patients with normal-sized optic nerves have limited usefulness in preoperatively predicting the presence of optic nerve invasion in retinoblastoma.

  6. Primary mediastinal atypical meningioma: Report of a case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogi Akira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Meningiomas are common neoplasms arising from the central nervous system meninges. On the other hand, primary ectopic meningiomas are extremely rare and usually limited to the head and neck region or to the paravertebral soft tissues. Their occurrence in the mediastinum is even rarer. Until now, only 4 cases of primary mediastinal meningioma have been reported in the literature searched on Medline. Because of its rarity and intriguing pathogenesis, we report here a case of primary mediastinal meningioma that was treated by surgical resection. The clinical features, treatment, pathological findings, and prognosis are analyzed, and the literature on ectopic meningioma is reviewed.

  7. Human vagus nerve branching in the cervical region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Hammer

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation is increasingly applied to treat epilepsy, psychiatric conditions and potentially chronic heart failure. After implanting vagus nerve electrodes to the cervical vagus nerve, side effects such as voice alterations and dyspnea or missing therapeutic effects are observed at different frequencies. Cervical vagus nerve branching might partly be responsible for these effects. However, vagus nerve branching has not yet been described in the context of vagus nerve stimulation.Branching of the cervical vagus nerve was investigated macroscopically in 35 body donors (66 cervical sides in the carotid sheath. After X-ray imaging for determining the vertebral levels of cervical vagus nerve branching, samples were removed to confirm histologically the nerve and to calculate cervical vagus nerve diameters and cross-sections.Cervical vagus nerve branching was observed in 29% of all cases (26% unilaterally, 3% bilaterally and proven histologically in all cases. Right-sided branching (22% was more common than left-sided branching (12% and occurred on the level of the fourth and fifth vertebra on the left and on the level of the second to fifth vertebra on the right side. Vagus nerves without branching were significantly larger than vagus nerves with branches, concerning their diameters (4.79 mm vs. 3.78 mm and cross-sections (7.24 mm2 vs. 5.28 mm2.Cervical vagus nerve branching is considerably more frequent than described previously. The side-dependent differences of vagus nerve branching may be linked to the asymmetric effects of the vagus nerve. Cervical vagus nerve branching should be taken into account when identifying main trunk of the vagus nerve for implanting electrodes to minimize potential side effects or lacking therapeutic benefits of vagus nerve stimulation.

  8. CT morphology of benign median nerve tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyerabend, T.; Schmitt, R.; Lanz, U.; Warmuth-Metz, M.; Wuerzburg Univ.

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 3 patients with benign tumors of the median nerve, histologically confirmed as neurilemmoma, fibrolipoma and hemangioma. The neurilemmoma showed a ring-shaped contrast enhancement. The fibrolipoma presented with areas of solid soft tissue and areas of fat. The hemangioma was a solid tumor with a lacunar, vascular contrast enhancement. According to our experience and to the previous literature CT gives useful information regarding the anatomic location, size, and relationship of peripheral nerve sheath tumors to surrounding structures, and may help to differentiate between various tumor types. (orig.)

  9. Rectus sheath hematoma: three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapan Selin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Rectus sheath hematoma is an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is an accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear. It could occur spontaneously or after trauma. They are usually located infraumblically and often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen, inflammatory diseases or tumours of the abdomen. Case presentation We reported three cases of rectus sheath hematoma presenting with a mass in the abdomen and diagnosed by computerized tomography. The patients recovered uneventfully after bed rest, intravenous fluid replacement, blood transfusion and analgesic treatment. Conclusion Rectus sheath hematoma is a rarely seen pathology often misdiagnosed as acute abdomen that may lead to unnecessary laparotomies. Computerized tomography must be chosen for definitive diagnosis since ultrasonography is subject to error due to misinterpretation of the images. Main therapy is conservative management.

  10. Imaging characteristics of meningiomas in Yemen - impact of Khat abuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alansi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial meningiomas are the most common tumor derived from non-neural epithelial tissues, accounting for 13% to 26% of all intracranial tumors. In Yemen, several epidemiological studies have showed an increasing rate of meningiomas during the last 15-20 years. This can be explained by the influence of specific epidemiological factors (racial, genetic, toxic, etc) as well as, noticeably improved diagnostic imaging. A specific risk factor for Yemeni sub-population groups is chronic use of Khat (Catha Edulis Forskal, CE ) - an amphetamine-like product, associated with a variety of serious health, social and economic problems. The present study analyzed the imaging characteristics of meningiomas in Yemeni patients, who systematically use CE, compared to those who never consume it.

  11. MR imaging of cranial nerve schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, M.; Peyster, R.; Cross, R.R.; Charles, J.; Murtagh, R.; Shapiro, R.; Chyatte, D.

    1988-01-01

    One of the major advantages of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging over other imaging modalities is direct visualization of the cranial nerves. This is best accomplished with thin-section, contiguous T1-weighted images. They report a series of 75 cranial nerve neuromas, including 47 of the eighth nerve and a mixture of schwannomas involving all other cranial nerves (excluding the fourth). All tumors demonstrated at least some area of increased signal (equal to or greater than that of cerebrospinal fluid) on T2-weighted images. This fact enabled them to differentiate schwannomas from neoplasms (lymphoma, meningioma, sarcoma) that may be isointense on T2-weighted pulse sequences. Many of the lesions had areas of low signal intermixed with predominantly high signal (on T2-weighted images). The pathologic evaluation of these areas of decreased signal revealed predominant fibrosis. In addition, some of the neuromas had a cystic component. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging may permit detection when the nerve is still normal in size

  12. Primary intraosseous atypical inflammatory meningioma presenting as a lytic skull lesion: Case report with review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohara, Sangita; Agarwal, Swapnil; Khurana, Nita; Pandey, P N

    2016-01-01

    Primary extradural meningiomas of the skull comprise 1% of all meningiomas, and lytic skull meningiomas are still rarer and are said to be more aggressive. We present a case of 38-year-old male with an extradural tumor which on histopathological examination showed features of inflammatory atypical meningioma (WHO Grade II). The intense inflammatory nature of osteolytic primary intraosseous meningioma has not been reported before. This entity deserves special mention because of the need for adjuvant therapy and proper follow-up.

  13. Reexcision Perineural Invasion and Epithelial Sheath Neuroma Possibly on a Spectrum of Postinjury Reactive Hyperplasia Mediated by IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James Y; Nuovo, Gerard; Kline, Mitchell; Magro, Cynthia M

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial sheath neuroma is a rarely recognized but established entity in the medical literature. First described in 2000 by Requena et al, there have only been 7 published cases to date, mostly in female patients and presenting as symptomatic solitary lesions on the back without a known history of trauma. In 2006, Beer et al described and reviewed a dozen cases in which epithelial sheath neuroma-like features were seen in the advent of a surgical procedure, which was termed "re-excision perineural invasion" and attributed to possible eccrine duct implantation during surgery. Our case is a 66-year-old male patient who underwent an excision of a melanocytic neoplasm in which a reactive epithelial sheath neuroma was incidentally discovered in the excision specimen, adjacent to the biopsy site cicatrix. Histologically, there was benign cutaneous nerve hyperplasia with a proliferation of squamous epithelium in intimate apposition to the nerve bundles in the superficial dermis. We postulate that the process active in the formation of re-excision perineural invasion is the same as in epithelial sheath neuroma and that minor trauma not appreciable on histologic examination is responsible in the latter entity. We performed IL-6 staining and documented that IL-6 was upregulated at the interface of the nerve and reactive epithelium, but was absent in nerves distant from the site of surgery, suggesting that IL-6 may be essential to the lesion's development. The recognition of reactive epithelial sheath neuroma including the subcategory of re-excision perineural invasion is crucial for the dermatopathologist to prevent mislabeling this reactive entity as a perineural squamous cell carcinoma, which has clinical consequences for the patient such as wider re-excision and radiation treatment. Additionally, we have identified a potential pathophysiologic basis for this lesion.

  14. Influence of Electrical and Electromagnetic Stimulation on Nerve Regeneration in the Transected Mouse Sciatic Nerve : An Electron Microscopic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Akiko; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Matsubara, Takako; Miki, Akinori

    2001-01-01

    Influence of electrical and electromagnetic stimulation on nerve regeneration was electron microscopically examined in the transected mouse sciatic nerve. Two days after the transection, several thin regenerating axons (daughter axons) were observed between the myelin sheath and basal lamina of Schwann cells in the proximal stump. Growth cones of the daughter axons contained several small round vesicles and mitochondria, and the shaft of them, neurofilaments, neurotubules and profiles of smoo...

  15. Amide proton transfer imaging for differentiation of benign and atypical meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Bio [The Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyunghwa; Choi, Yoon Seong; Lee, Seung-Koo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung Soo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei University, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee; Kang, Seok-Gu [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhou, Jinyuan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the difference in amide proton transfer (APT)-weighted signals between benign and atypical meningiomas and determine the value of APT imaging for differentiating the two. Fifty-seven patients with pathologically diagnosed meningiomas (benign, 44; atypical, 13), who underwent preoperative MRI with APT imaging between December 2014 and August 2016 were included. We compared normalised magnetisation transfer ratio asymmetry (nMTR{sub asym}) values between benign and atypical meningiomas on APT-weighted images. Conventional MRI features were qualitatively assessed. Both imaging features were evaluated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The discriminative value of MRI with and without nMTR{sub asym} was evaluated. The nMTR{sub asym} of atypical meningiomas was significantly greater than that of benign meningiomas (2.46% vs. 1.67%; P < 0.001). In conventional MR images, benign and atypical meningiomas exhibited significant differences in maximum tumour diameter, non-skull base location, and heterogeneous enhancement. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, high nMTR{sub asym} was an independent predictor of atypical meningiomas (adjusted OR, 11.227; P = 0.014). The diagnostic performance of MRI improved with nMTR{sub asym} for predicting atypical meningiomas. Atypical meningiomas exhibited significantly higher APT-weighted signal intensities than benign meningiomas. The discriminative value of conventional MRI improved significantly when combined with APT imaging for diagnosis of atypical meningioma. (orig.)

  16. Studies on clinical significances of intracranial meningiomas in computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasamo, Shizuya

    1986-01-01

    Meningioma has been widely assumed to be a representative benign tumor among the primary intracranial tumors. However, many problems still remain in the clinical management of meningioma. The author had studied the clinical significance of meningiomas from the 104 cases he had experienced. CT was performed in 101 cases of them. In this paper, CT findings of meningioma were initially analyzed with reference to correlations of symptomatological and histopathological features. The mechanism of occurrence of the peritumoral low density (PTL) found on CT was discussed under an identification of cerebral edema. Secondly, the endocrinological environment was studied since certain hormonal changes might influence the growth and spread of the tumor. Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) in the tumor tissue were studied and discussed as to their clinical evaluation. Thirdly, fine structures in 12 cases of meningiomas were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). And the correlation between the TEM findings and clinical and endocrinological findings were discussed. From these results, the author drew the following conclusions; 1) There was no correlation between the tumor and the hormonal environment, but there is a suggestive evidence that meningioma might be hormone-dependent. 2) The factors of occurrence of PTL were tumor size, location of tumor and histological subtype. And from the findings of TEM, one of the mechanisms of occurrence of PTL might be due to secretion of an edema factor from tumor tissue. 3) Close correlation between tumor size and period from onset to admission was found, and when the tumor size (xmm) was measured on CT, the time of occurrence of tumor (y months ago) could be roughly calculated from the following equation; y = 1.9x - 13.3 (r = 0.683, p < 0.01). (J.P.N.)

  17. Demyelinating polyneuropathy with focally folded myelin sheaths in a family of Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhaesebrouck, An E; Couturier, Jérôme; Cauzinille, Laurent; Mizisin, Andrew P; Shelton, G Diane; Granger, Nicolas

    2008-12-15

    A spontaneous demyelinating polyneuropathy in two young Miniature Schnauzer dogs was characterized clinically, electrophysiologically and histopathologically. Both dogs were related and a third dog, belonging to the same family, had similar clinical signs. On presentation, clinical signs were restricted to respiratory dysfunction. Electrophysiological tests showed a dramatic decrease in both motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. Microscopic examination of peripheral nerve biopsies (light and electron microscopy, teased nerve fibers), showed that this neuropathy was characterized by segmental demyelination and focally folded myelin sheaths. Various clinical syndromes associated with tomacula or focal thickening of the myelin sheath of the peripheral nerves have been described in humans and shown to be caused by gene mutations affecting the myelin proteins, such as the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies or the demyelinating forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In animals, a tomaculous neuropathy has been reported in cattle and chickens but not in carnivores. Here we report a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy with tomacula in two Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

  18. Relationship between the Ulnar Nerve and the Branches of the Radial Nerve to the Medial Head of the Triceps Brachii Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sh, Cho; Ih, Chung; Uy, Lee

    2018-05-17

    One branch of the radial nerve to the medial head of the triceps brachii muscle (MHN) has been described as accompanying or joining the ulnar nerve. Mostly two MHN branches have been reported, with some reports of one; however, the topographical anatomy is not well documented. We dissected 52 upper limbs from adult cadavers and found one, two, and three MHN branches in 9.6%, 80.8%, and 9.6% of cases, respectively. The MHN accompanying the ulnar nerve was always the superior MHN. The relationship between the ulnar nerve and the MHN was classified into four types according to whether the MHN was enveloped along with the ulnar nerve in the connective tissue sheath and whether it was in contact with the ulnar nerve. It contacted the ulnar nerve in 75.0% of cases and accompanied it over a mean distance of 73.6 mm (range 36-116 mm). In all cases in which the connective tissue sheath enveloped the branch of the MHN and the ulnar nerve, removing the sheath confirmed that the MHN branch originated from the radial nerve. The detailed findings and anatomical measurements of the MHN in this study will help in identifying its branches during surgical procedures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Theory of the Electron Sheath and Presheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Brett; Baalrud, Scott; Yee, Benjamin; Hopkins, Matthew; Barnat, Edward

    2015-09-01

    Electron sheaths are commonly found near Langmuir probes collecting the electron saturation current. The common assumption is that the probe collects the random flux of electrons incident on the sheath, which tacitly implies that there is no electron presheath and that the flux collected is due to a velocity space truncation of the velocity distribution function (VDF). This work provides a dedicated theory of electron sheaths, which suggests that electron sheaths are not so simple. Motivated by VDFs observed in recent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations, we develop a 1D model for the electron sheath and presheath. In the model, under low temperature plasma conditions, an electron pressure gradient accelerates electrons in the presheath to a flow velocity that exceeds the electron thermal speed at the sheath edge. This pressure gradient allows the generation of large flows compared to those that would be generated by the electric field alone. It is due to this pressure gradient that the electron presheath extends much further into the plasma (nominally by a factor of √{mi /me }) than an analogous ion presheath. Results of the model are compared with PIC simulations. This work was supported by the Office of Fusion Energy Science at the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94SL85000 and by the Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program under Contract Number DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  20. A sheath model for arbitrary radiofrequency waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, M. M.; Chabert, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    The sheath is often the most important region of a rf plasma, because discharge impedance, power absorption and ion acceleration are critically affected by the behaviour of the sheath. Consequently, models of the sheath are central to any understanding of the physics of rf plasmas. Lieberman has supplied an analytical model for a radio-frequency sheath driven by a single frequency, but in recent years interest has been increasing in radio-frequency discharges excited by increasingly complex wave forms. There has been limited success in generalizing the Lieberman model in this direction, because of mathematical complexities. So there is essentially no sheath model available to describe many modern experiments. In this paper we present a new analytical sheath model, based on a simpler mathematical framework than that of Lieberman. For the single frequency case, this model yields scaling laws that are identical in form to those of Lieberman, differing only by numerical coefficients close to one. However, the new model may be straightforwardly solved for arbitrary current waveforms, and may be used to derive scaling laws for such complex waveforms. In this paper, we will describe the model and present some illustrative examples.

  1. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-01-01

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported

  2. [Constitutional syndrome as a presentation of a cerebellopontine meningioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Serrato, A; Mata-Palma, A; Olmedo-Llanes, J; García-Ordóñez, M A

    2014-03-01

    Meningiomas are basically benign tumours arising in the meninges and account for 15-25% of intracranial tumours in adults. It is clinically signs are due to compression of the neighbouring structures, with the main symptoms being migraine, behavioural changes, and neurological deficits. We present a case where constitutional syndrome was the first and principal manifestation of an intracranial cerebellopontine meningioma. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Primary extra-cranial meningioma following total hip replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, T.J.; Beggs, I. [Royal Infirmary, Department of Radiology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Patton, J.T.; Porter, D. [Royal Infirmary, Department of Orthopaedics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Salter, D.M.; Al-Nafussi, A. [Royal Infirmary, Department of Pathology, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    A 61-year-old man presented with pain at the left hip and decreased mobility 10 years after total hip replacement. Imaging demonstrated a large destructive expansile mass adjacent to the prosthesis. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of an extra-cranial meningioma. Primary tumours after total hip replacement are rare and include soft tissue sarcomas, bone sarcomas and lymphomas. To our knowledge, no previous cases of primary extracranial meningioma have been identified. The imaging features, histology, pathogenesis and differential diagnosis are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Malignant Transformation of Vagal Nerve Schwannoma in to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwannomas are benign, rare peripheral nerve sheath tumors that occur in the head and neck region. Some physicians opt to closely observe cases of schwannoma of the neck on an outpatient basis rather than to perform radical surgery. However, there is a possibility, albeit rare, of malignant transformation of a benign ...

  5. Malignant Transformation of Vagal Nerve Schwannoma in to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vagal schwannomas are benign, rare peripheral nerve sheath tumors in the head and neck region. Some physicians opt to closely observe cases of schwannoma of the neck on an outpatient basis rather than to perform radical surgery. However, there is a possibility, albeit rare, of malignant transformation of a.

  6. Gamma Knife radiosurgery of olfactory groove meningiomas provides a method to preserve subjective olfactory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gande, Abhiram; Kano, Hideyuki; Bowden, Gregory; Mousavi, Seyed H; Niranjan, Ajay; Flickinger, John C; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-02-01

    Anosmia is a common outcome after resection of olfactory groove meningioma(s) (OGM) and for some patients represents a significant disability. To evaluate long term tumor control rates and preservation of subjective olfaction after Gamma Knife (GK) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of OGM. We performed a retrospective chart review and telephone assessments of 41 patients who underwent GK SRS between 1987 and 2008. Clinical outcomes were stratified by full, partial or no subjective olfaction, whereas tumor control was assessed by changes in volume greater or lesser than 25%. The median clinical and imaging follow-up were 76 and 65 months, respectively. Prior to SRS, 19 (46%) patients had surgical resections and two (5%) had received fractionated radiation therapy. Twenty four patients (59%) reported a normal sense of smell, 12 (29%) reported a reduced sense of smell and five (12%) had complete anosmia. The median tumor volume was 8.5 cm(3) (range 0.6-56.1), the mean radiation dose at the tumor margin was 13 Gy (range 10-20) and the median estimated dose to the olfactory nerve was 5.1 Gy (range 1.1-18.1). At follow-up, 27 patients (66%) reported intact olfaction (three (7%) described return to a normal sense of smell), nine (22%) described partial anosmia, and five (12%) had complete anosmia. No patient reported deterioration in olfaction after SRS. Thirteen patients (32%) showed significant tumor regression, 26 (63%) had no further growth and two (5%) had progressed. The progression free tumor control rates were 97% at 1 year and 95% at 2, 10 and 20 years. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects occurred in three (7%) patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery provided both long term tumor control and preservation of olfaction.

  7. Fractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of intracranial meningiomas: local control, functional efficacy, and tolerance in 91 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, Jean-Philippe; Caudry, Michel; Guerin, Jean; Celerier, Denis; San Galli, Francois; Causse, Nicole; Trouette, Renaud; Dautheribes, Michel

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and tolerance of external fractionated radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of intracranial meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From January 1981 to September 1993, 91 patients with intracranial meningiomas were treated with fractionated RT. Indications were as follows: (a) incomplete surgical resection, 29 patients; (b) tumor recurrences without considering the amount of the second resection, if performed, 14 patients; (c) completely excised angioblastic, aggressive benign, and anaplastic tumors, 8 patients; (d) medically inoperable and basilar tumors where operation would involve considerable danger or permanent neurological damage, 44 patients. Most patients were irradiated with 6 to 9 MV photon beams. A three- to four-field technique with coned-down portals was used. Doses were calculated on the 95% isodose and were given 5 days a week for a median total dose of 52 Gy (1.80 Gy/fraction). Results: Median follow-up from radiation therapy was 40 months. Acute tolerance was excellent, but there were six late delayed injuries. Tumor recurrences occurred in six cases. Six patients died from their tumor or RT complications, 19 from nontumoral reasons. Three, 5- and 10-year survival rates were 82, 71, and 40%, respectively. The most significant prognostic factor was age: 5-year survival rate was 86% for patients less than 65 years and 37% for patients more than 65. However, there were no differences in recurrence-free survival rates between patients younger than 65 and the oldest ones. Of 60 symptomatic patients with neurological deficits, 43 had neurological improvement (72%), beginning in some cases within 15 to 20 days after starting RT. Conclusion: These results reassess the role of fractionated RT in the treatment of meningiomas, and stress on its efficacy, especially on cranial nerves palsies, without severe toxicity in most cases

  8. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Quantitative assessment of inter-observer variability in target volume delineation on stereotactic radiotherapy treatment for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Ogita, Mikio; Yamashita, Koichi; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Shiomi, Hiroya; Tsubokura, Takuji; Kodani, Naohiro; Nishimura, Takuya; Aibe, Norihiro; Udono, Hiroki; Nishikata, Manabu; Baba, Yoshimi

    2011-01-01

    To assess inter-observer variability in delineating target volume and organs at risk in benign tumor adjacent to optic tract as a quality assurance exercise. We quantitatively analyzed 21 plans made by 11 clinicians in seven CyberKnife centers. The clinicians were provided with a raw data set (pituitary adenoma and meningioma) including clinical information, and were asked to delineate the lesions and create a treatment plan. Their contouring and plans (10 adenoma and 11 meningioma plans), were then compared. In addition, we estimated the influence of differences in contouring by superimposing the respective contours onto a default plan. The median planning target volume (PTV) and the ratio of the largest to the smallest contoured volume were 9.22 cm 3 (range, 7.17 - 14.3 cm 3 ) and 1.99 for pituitary adenoma, and 6.86 cm 3 (range 6.05 - 14.6 cm 3 ) and 2.41 for meningioma. PTV volume was 10.1 ± 1.74 cm 3 for group 1 with a margin of 1 -2 mm around the CTV (n = 3) and 9.28 ± 1.8 cm 3 (p = 0.51) for group 2 with no margin (n = 7) in pituitary adenoma. In meningioma, group 1 showed larger PTV volume (10.1 ± 3.26 cm 3 ) than group 2 (6.91 ± 0.7 cm 3 , p = 0.03). All submitted plan keep the irradiated dose to optic tract within the range of 50 Gy (equivalent total doses in 2 Gy fractionation). However, contours superimposed onto the dose distribution of the default plan indicated that an excessive dose 23.64 Gy (up to 268% of the default plan) in pituitary adenoma and 24.84 Gy (131% of the default plan) in meningioma to the optic nerve in the contours from different contouring. Quality assurance revealed inter-observer variability in contour delineation and their influences on planning for pituitary adenoma and meningioma near optic tract

  10. Intracranial meningiomas in the present era of modern neuroimaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Intracranial meningioma is the most common primary, intracranial, extra-axial neoplasm. It is mesenchymal in origin and arises from meningothelial cells of arachnoid villi of meninges. Objectives: To re-emphasize the regional anatomic localisation and diagnostic radiological features of intracranial ...

  11. Spinal meningiomas in dogs: 13 cases (1972-1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingeroth, J.M.; Prata, R.G.; Patnaik, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    Medical records of 13 dogs with spinal meningiomas were reviewed. Breed predilections were not found. Males outnumbered females 9 to 4, and most of the dogs were middle-aged. All dogs had motor deficits of various degrees, and approximately half of the dogs had clinical signs of mild to moderate spinal pain. The remainder had histories of clinical signs suggestive of chronic discomfort. There was a prolonged (greater than 3 months) delay between the onset of signs and diagnosis, except in 3 dogs. The neurologic courses usually were progressive. Results of noncontrast spinal radiography were normal in 10 dogs; in 3 dogs, the lamina appeared scalloped. Results of myelography contributed to the correct diagnosis in 10 of 12 dogs; however, in 2 dogs, intradural/extramedullary tumors were thought to be intramedullary lesions. A preponderance of cervical meningiomas was found, accounting for 10 of 13 tumors. Lumbar meningiomas were found in the remaining 3 dogs. Surgery was performed in 9 of the dogs, six of which improved after surgery. Poor results were correlated with tumors that involved spinal cord segments of an intumescence, ventrally located tumors, iatrogenic trauma, and tumor invasion into adjacent neural parenchyma. Four of 13 spinal meningiomas were found to be invasive into the spinal cord itself

  12. Successful radiopeptide targeting of metastatic anaplastic meningioma: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabet, Amir; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Wilinek, Winfried; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Ezziddin, Samer

    2011-01-01

    A patient with anaplastic meningioma and lung metastases resistant to conventional treatment underwent radiopeptide therapy with 177Lu- DOTA-octreotate in our institute. The treatment resulted in significant improvement in patient's quality of life and inhibition of tumor progression. This case may eventually help to establish the value of radiopeptide therapy in patients with this rare condition

  13. Cytogenetic studies of 19 meningiomas and their clinical significance. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsgård, L; Rønne, M; Schrøder, H D

    1989-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis of 19 meningiomas from 10 female and 9 male patients are reported. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in all cases with a stemline karyotype 45, XY, -22 or 45, XX, -22. Three of these had additional sidelines: (a) 44, XX, -1, -4, -6, -8, -22, +19, +del(1) (:p33----q43), +dup...

  14. Cytogenetic studies of 11 meningiomas and their clinical significance. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsgård, L; Schrøder, H D; Rønne, M

    1990-01-01

    Cytogenetic analyses of 11 consecutive cases of meningiomas from 7 female and 4 male patients are reported. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in all cases. Only two of the cases showed cells with normal karyotype in addition to the abnormal stemline. Two of the cases displayed a more aggressive...

  15. Successful radiopeptide targeting of metastatic anaplastic meningioma: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biersack Hans-Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A patient with anaplastic meningioma and lung metastases resistant to conventional treatment underwent radiopeptide therapy with 177Lu- DOTA-octreotate in our institute. The treatment resulted in significant improvement in patient's quality of life and inhibition of tumor progression. This case may eventually help to establish the value of radiopeptide therapy in patients with this rare condition.

  16. Surgery of Craniocervical Meningiomas | El-Naggar | Alexandria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Twenty six patients with craniocervical meningiomas were operated upon during the period from 2000 to 2009 using the standard posterior approach for posterior lesions (14 cases), extreme lateral approach without drilling of the occipital condyle in the antrolateral and posterolateral lesions(6 cases) and ...

  17. Stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1993-01-01

    A stereological estimation of nuclear volume in benign and atypical meningiomas was made. The aim was to investigate whether this method could discriminate between these two meningeal neoplasms. The difference was significant and it was moreover seen that there was no overlap between the two groups...

  18. Spinal meningiomas in dogs: 13 cases (1972-1987)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fingeroth, J. M.; Prata, R. G.; Patnaik, A. K.

    1987-09-15

    Medical records of 13 dogs with spinal meningiomas were reviewed. Breed predilections were not found. Males outnumbered females 9 to 4, and most of the dogs were middle-aged. All dogs had motor deficits of various degrees, and approximately half of the dogs had clinical signs of mild to moderate spinal pain. The remainder had histories of clinical signs suggestive of chronic discomfort. There was a prolonged (greater than 3 months) delay between the onset of signs and diagnosis, except in 3 dogs. The neurologic courses usually were progressive. Results of noncontrast spinal radiography were normal in 10 dogs; in 3 dogs, the lamina appeared scalloped. Results of myelography contributed to the correct diagnosis in 10 of 12 dogs; however, in 2 dogs, intradural/extramedullary tumors were thought to be intramedullary lesions. A preponderance of cervical meningiomas was found, accounting for 10 of 13 tumors. Lumbar meningiomas were found in the remaining 3 dogs. Surgery was performed in 9 of the dogs, six of which improved after surgery. Poor results were correlated with tumors that involved spinal cord segments of an intumescence, ventrally located tumors, iatrogenic trauma, and tumor invasion into adjacent neural parenchyma. Four of 13 spinal meningiomas were found to be invasive into the spinal cord itself.

  19. Chemoattractive capacity of different lengths of nerve fragments bridging regeneration chambers for the repair of sciatic nerve defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiren Zhang; Yubo Wang; Jincheng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study by our research group showed that 6-mm-long regeneration chamber bridging is equivalent to autologous nerve transplantation for the repair of 12-mm nerve defects.In this study,we compared the efficacy of different lengths (6,8,10 mm) of nerve fragments bridging 6-mm regeneration chambers for the repair of 12-mm-long nerve defects.At 16 weeks after the regeneration chamber was implanted,the number,diameter and myelin sheath thickness of the regenerated nerve fibers,as well as the conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve and gastrocnemius muscle wet weight ratio,were similar to that observed with autologous nerve transplantation.Our results demonstrate that 6-,8-and 10-mm-long nerve fragments bridging 6-mm regeneration chambers effectively repair 12-mm-long nerve defects.Because the chemoattractive capacity is not affected by the length of the nerve fragment,we suggest adopting 6-mm-long nerve fragments for the repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  20. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  1. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  2. The Top-100 Most-Cited Articles on Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Othman; Albakr, Abdulrahman; Al-Habib, Amro; Ajlan, Abdulrazag

    2017-11-01

    There is an abundance of articles published on meningioma. To identify the 100 most-cited articles on meningioma and to perform a bibliometric analysis. In November 2016, we performed a title-specific search of the Scopus database using "meningioma" as our search query term without publication date restrictions. The top 100 most cited articles were obtained and reviewed. The top 100 most cited articles received a mean 198 citations per paper. Publication dates ranged from 1953 to 2013; most articles were published between 1994 and 2003, with 50 articles published during that period. NEUROSURGERY published the greatest number of top cited articles (22 of 100). The most frequent study categories were laboratorial studies (31 of 100) and natural history studies (28 of 100). Nonoperative management studies were twice as common as operative management studies in the top-cited articles. Neurosurgery as a specialty contributed to 50% of the top 100 list. The most contributing institute was the Mayo Clinic (11%); the majority of the top cited articles originated in the United States (53%). We identified the top 100 most-cited articles on meningioma that may be considered significant and impactful works, as well as the most noteworthy. In addition, we recognized the historical development and advances in meningioma research and the important contributions of various authors, specialty fields, and countries. A large proportion of the most cited articles were written by authors other than neurosurgeons, and many of these articles were published in non-neurosurgery journals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The treatment for asymptomatic meningiomas in the era of radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Yoshiyasu; Yamanaka, Kazuhiro; Morikawa, Toshie; Ishiguro, Tomoya; Honda, Yuji; Matsusaka, Yasuhiro; Komiyama, Masaki; Yasui, Toshihiro

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the treatment results in asymptomatic meningiomas in the era of radiosurgery. We encountered 56 patients with asymptomatic meningiomas from January, 1994 to December, 2001. There were 16 male patients and 40 female patients. The most common location was the cerebral convexity. We performed gamma knife radiosurgery for three patients after diagnosis of cavernous sinus meningiomas. The other patients were followed-up after diagnosis for a mean follow-up period of 30.8 months (5 months to 8 years). Tumor growth was verified in 25 patients (43%) and two patients (3.7%) suffered neurological deficits. Among the tumor growth patients, operative resection was performed in six patients (11%) and gamma knife radiosurgery was performed in four patients (7.5%). The other patients were placed under observation. We decided the treatment strategy paying attention to the tumor location, tumor growth speed, tumor size and operative difficulty. The tumor growth rate was 0.1 cm/year among the patients with tumor growth. It was 0.72 cm/year (0.02 to 1.54 cm/year) in the operative group, 0.3 cm/year (0.04 to 0.76 cm/year) in the gamma knife radiosurgery group and 0.08 cm/year (0.01 to 0.76 cm/year) in the observed group. One patient suffered procedure-related deterioration of paresis after operation. The treatment of asymptomatic meningiomas must be decided depending on their natural history and locations. We recommend early radiosurgery for cavernous sinus meningiomas. (author)

  4. Expression and clinical value of EGFR in human meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus B. Arnli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Meningiomas are common intracranial tumors in humans that frequently recur despite having a predominantly benign nature. Even though these tumors have been shown to commonly express EGFR/c-erbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor, results from previous studies are uncertain regarding the expression of either intracellular or extracellular domains, cellular localization, activation state, relations to malignancy grade, and prognosis. Aims This study was designed to investigate the expression of the intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR and of the activated receptor as well as its ligands EGF and TGFα in a large series of meningiomas with long follow-up data, and investigate if there exists an association between antibody expression and clinical and histological data. Methods A series of 186 meningiomas consecutively operated within a 10-year period was included. Tissue microarrays were constructed and immunohistochemically analyzed with antibodies targeting intracellular and extracellular domains of EGFR, phosphorylated receptor, and EGF and TGFα. Expression levels were recorded as a staining index (SI. Results Positive immunoreactivity was observed for all antibodies in most cases. There was in general high SIs for the intracellular domain of EGFR, phosphorylated EGFR, EGF, and TGFα but lower for the extracellular domain. Normal meninges were negative for all antibodies. Higher SIs for the phosphorylated EGFR were observed in grade II tumors compared with grade I (p = 0.018. Survival or recurrence was significantly decreased in the time to recurrence analysis (TTR with high SI-scores of the extracellular domain in a univariable survival analysis (HR 1.152, CI (1.036–1.280, p = 0.009. This was not significant in a multivariable analysis. Expression of the other antigens did not affect survival. Conclusion EGFR is overexpressed and in an activated state in human meningiomas. High levels of ligands also support this

  5. Sciatic nerve tumor and tumor-like lesions - uncommon pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Thakkar, Rashmi S.; Carrino, John A.; Chhabra, Avneesh [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Maragakis, Nicholas; Hoeke, Ahmet; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Sciatic nerve mass-like enlargement caused by peripheral nerve sheath tumors or neurocutaneous syndromes such as neurofibromatosis or schwannomatosis has been widely reported. Other causes of enlargement, such as from perineuroma, fibromatosis, neurolymphoma, amyloidosis, endometriosis, intraneural ganglion cyst, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy are relatively rare. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of such lesions. In this article, the authors discuss normal anatomy of the sciatic nerve and MRI findings of the above-mentioned lesions. (orig.)

  6. Meningioma of the internal auditory vanal: case report Meningioma do meato acústico interno: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Campos Moraes Amato

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas limited to the internal auditory canal (IAC are rare. Acoustic neuroma is usually the diagnosis made when a tumor is found in this location because of its higher frequency. We report on a 58 year-old woman with a meningioma arising from the IAC and the difficulty to establish the pre-surgical diagnosis, based on clinical and radiological features. The perioperative suspicion and confirmation are very important to deal with the dura and bone infiltration in order to reduce tumor recurrence.Meningiomas restritos ao meato acústico interno são raros. O neurinoma do acústico é o principal diagnóstico diferencial feito quando um tumor é encontrado nesta região devido a sua maior freqüência. Apresentamos o caso de uma mulher de 58 anos de idade com meningioma localizado no meato acústico interno e as dificuldades na realização do diagnóstico pré-operatório considerando-se as apresentações clínica e radiológica. A suspeita e a confirmação do diagnóstico intraoperatório são importantes porque a dura subjacente e eventual osso comprometido devem ser ressecados para reduzir a possibilidade de recidiva.

  7. Ki-67 immunoreactivity in meningiomas--determination of the proliferative potential of meningiomas using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, C; Schrøder, H D

    1997-01-01

    The proliferative potential of 66 human intracranial meningiomas (15 benign, 15 atypical, 15 recurrent, 13 bone-invasive, and 8 brain-invasive) was investigated by means of immunohisto-chemistry using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67. This antibody recognizes a nuclear antigen present in human cells...

  8. Plasma sheath in non-Maxwellian plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Takuo; Horigome, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    Reviewing many theoretical and experimental works on the electron-energy distributions (EEDF) of various plasmas, we point out that many plasmas have EEDF of non-Maxwellian in shape. Therefore, the recent treatment of plasma sheath using the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution approximation should be improved. To do this, we have adopted Rutcher's standard distribution as a generalized form in place of the traditional Maxwellian, and found that the minimum energy of ions entering the sheath edge (Bohm's criterion) varies largely, and have also shown the variation of Debye length with the shape of EEDF. The length is the most important parameter to proceed with more detailed analysis on plasma-sheaths, and also to control them in the future. (author)

  9. Meningiomas of pineal region in children Meningiomas da região da pineal em crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Matushita

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Meningiomas are uncommon tumors in children and either more rarely encountered in the pineal region. We report two cases of meningioma of the pineal region in children. One of these cases was a five years-old girl and the other a one year-old boy. No specific clinical presentation or tomographic examinations findings was identified before treatment, suggestive of a diagnosis of menigioma. The clinical and laboratory features were very similar to the most common tumors of the pineal region. Prior to the surgery, the histology of these tumors was not suspected. Both patients underwent direct surgery and complete removal was achieved by a suboccipital transtentorial approach. The tumors originated from velum interpositum in both cases. At the follow up, one case presented with recurrence six years later, and she underwent a reoperation with total resection without morbidity. Long-term follow up presented no other recurrences.Meningiomas são tumores poucos frequentes em crianças, e mais raramente encontrados na região da pineal. Relatamos dois casos de meningioma da região da pineal em crianças, uma menina de cinco anos e um menino de um ano de idade. Não foi identificada nenhuma forma de apresentação clinica ou caracteristica tomográfica, antes do tratamento, que sugerisse o diagnóstico de meningioma. As características clinicas e laboratoriais encontradas foram similares às de tumores mais frequentes da região da pineal. Ambos os pacientes foram submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico e a remoção completa foi obtida por abordagem suboccipital transtentorial. Durante o seguimento, um dos pacientes foi reoperado por recorrencia do tumor seis anos após o tratamento inicial. Atualmente, os pacientes encontram-se livres de recorrência tumoral.

  10. A juvenile case of radiation-induced meningioma two years after radiation for craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Tomoaki; Zama, Akira; Ono, Nobuo; Nakamura, Tadashi; Tamura, Masaru; Ohe, Tihiro; Nakazato, Yoichi

    1994-01-01

    The patient was a 7-years-old boy who received radiation therapy of 50 Gy after total gross removal of a craniopharyngioma. After two years a follow up CT scan showed a new enhanced lesion in the right temporal tip within the previous irradiation field. Total removal of the tumor was performed and its histological examination showed it to be an atypical meningioma. This atypical meningioma satisfied Cahan's criteria. So we diagnosed this atypical meningioma as radiation-induced meningioma. Immunohistochemically this meningioma stained for Vimentin. An electron microscopical examination showed neither desmosome nor interdigitation. The score of Ki-67 and BrdU-L. I was very small. Compared with previously reported juvenile radiation-induced meningioma, the latency was very short. The patient received growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy. We suspected relation between GH replacement therapy and short latency. He was discharged without any new neurological deficits and we haven't detected tumor recurrence for two years. (author)

  11. Effect of Surface Pore Structure of Nerve Guide Conduit on Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Jin Rae; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with different surface pore structures (nano-porous inner surface vs. micro-porous inner surface) but similar physical and chemical properties were fabricated by rolling the opposite side of asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membranes. The effect of the pore structure on peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGCs was investigated using a sciatic nerve defect model of rats. The nerve fibers and tissues were shown to have regenerated along the longitudinal direction through the NGC with a nano-porous inner surface (Nanopore NGC), while they grew toward the porous wall of the NGC with a micro-porous inner surface (Micropore NGC) and, thus, their growth was restricted when compared with the Nanopore NGC, as investigated by immunohistochemical evaluations (by fluorescence microscopy with anti-neurofilament staining and Hoechst staining for growth pattern of nerve fibers), histological evaluations (by light microscopy with Meyer's modified trichrome staining and Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscopy for the regeneration of axon and myelin sheath), and FluoroGold retrograde tracing (for reconnection between proximal and distal stumps). The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) immobilized on the pore surfaces of the NGCs on nerve regeneration was not so significant when compared with NGCs not containing immobilized NGF. The NGC system with different surface pore structures but the same chemical/physical properties seems to be a good tool that is used for elucidating the surface pore effect of NGCs on nerve regeneration. PMID:22871377

  12. A Review of Stereotactic Radiosurgery Practice in the Management of Skull Base Meningiomas

    OpenAIRE

    Vera, Elena; Iorgulescu, J. Bryan; Raper, Daniel M.S.; Madhavan, Karthik; Lally, Brian E.; Morcos, Jacques; Elhammady, Samy; Sherman, Jonathan; Komotar, Ricardo J.

    2014-01-01

    Gross total resection of skull base meningiomas poses a surgical challenge due to their proximity to neurovascular structures. Once the gold standard therapy for skull base meningiomas, microsurgery has been gradually replaced by or used in combination with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This review surveys the safety and efficacy of SRS in the treatment of cranial base meningiomas including 36 articles from 1991 to 2010. SRS produces excellent tumor control with low morbidity rates compare...

  13. Extraskeletal Ewing’s Sarcoma Arising from the Sciatic Nerve: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadhar Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing’s sarcoma is a common bone tumour of childhood but is a rare occurrence in individuals over 20 years of age. Few cases are reported as originating from peripheral nerves. We present an unusual case of extraosseous Ewing’s sarcoma originating from the sciatic nerve in a 66-year-old patient which had the clinical hallmarks of a benign nerve sheath tumour. Following discussion at a multidisciplinary meeting, excision biopsy of the suspected benign nerve sheath tumour was planned. At operation, the mass had malignant features. Histology confirmed the presence of Ewing’s sarcoma. Due to the morbidity of nerve resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were commenced. Ewing’s sarcoma is known to mimic benign pathologies. In this case there were subtle signs of a malignant process in the form of unremitting pain. It is vital to keep in mind the less common tumours that can affect the peripheral nervous system in such cases.

  14. Long-Term Results of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Intracranial Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chang Ki; Jung, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jong Hee; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Chang, Won Seok

    2015-10-01

    The predominant treatment modality for meningioma is surgical resection. However, gamma knife radiosurgery is also an important treatment modality for meningioma that is small or cannot be completely removed because of its location. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and long-term results of radiosurgical treatment for meningioma in our institution. We studied 628 patients (130 men and 498 women) who underwent gamma knife radiosurgery for intracranial meningioma, which is radiologically diagnosed, from Jan 2008 to Nov 2012. We included patients with single lesion meningioma, and followed up after 6 months with imaging, and then at 24 months with a clinical examination. Patients with high-grade meningioma or multiple meningiomas were excluded. We analyzed each of the factors associated with progression free survival. The median patient's age was 56.8 years. Maximal dosage was 27.8 Gy and marginal dosage was 13.9 Gy. The overall tumor control rate was 95%. Twenty-eight patients (4.4%) showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Ninety-eight patients (15%) developed peritumoral edema (PTE) after gamma-knife surgery; two of them (2%) underwent surgical resections due to PTE. Nine patients had craniotomy and tumor removal after gamma knife surgery. Gamma knife surgery for intracranial meningioma has proven to be a safe and effective treatment tool with successful long-term outcomes. Gamma knife radiosurgery can be especially effective in cases of remnant meningioma after surgical resection or where PTE is not present.

  15. Primary Atypical Meningioma of the Nasal Cavity: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Yogesh; Pradhan, Bibhu

    2018-01-01

    Background Meningioma is a central nervous system tumor that typically arises in proximity to meninges. Extracranial primary atypical meningioma of sinonasal tract is a rare one. Methods We discuss the clinical, radiological, and histological presentation of an elderly female with primary atypical meningioma of the nasal cavity, which was excised via endoscopic endonasal approach. Results There was no recurrence even up to 20 months of follow-up after endoscopic excision. Conclusion Extracranial primary atypical meningioma should be kept in mind as one of the differential diagnoses of nasal mass. Histopathological diagnosis along with immunohistochemistry should be used for definitive diagnosis. PMID:29682381

  16. Edema cerebral em meningiomas: aspectos radiológicos e histopatológicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souto Antonio Aversa do

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversos fatores têm sido associados ao desenvolvimento de edema peritumoral nos meningiomas. Foram estudados os aspectos radiológicos e anátomo-patológicos de 51 meningiomas intracranianos operados no Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF. Dois terços dos meningiomas apresentavam edema perilesional. O tamanho dos meningiomas correlacionou-se com a presença de edema, sendo mais frequente nos meningiomas grandes (>4cm. A localização parece, também, influenciar no desenvolvimento do edema peritumoral, sendo mais acentuado nos meningiomas da asa do esfenóide e incomum nos meningiomas do tubérculo selar. Os subtipos histológicos de meningioma não se correlacionaram com a intensidade do edema peritumoral. Dos diversos mediadores químicos descritos na literatura recente relacionados ao desenvolvimento de edema peritumoral em tumores intracranianos, destaca-se o fator de crescimento do endotélio vascular (VEGF. A expressão nos meningiomas do VEGF e de seu receptor flk-1 foi estudada com técnica imuno-histoquímica, demonstrando a sua expressão nas células tumorais.

  17. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases fromMeningioma: Report of Two Cases andTreatment Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Daneshbod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningioma is usually a benign central nervous system (CNS tumor. Metastasisis rare; however if it does occur the most metastatic sites are the liver and lungs. Here,two cases of CNS meningioma with metastasis to cervical lymph nodes are reported.The first case, a 48 year-old man developed cervical lymph node metastasis nine yearsafter primary tumor diagnosis. The second case, a 23 year-old woman with parietallobe meningioma, developed lymph node metastasis in the neck nine months afterthe diagnosis of meningioma

  18. Differentiation of meningiomas from histologic mimics via the use of claudin-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, A.M.R.; Naquib, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Meningiomas may be occasionally difficult to distinguish pathologically from other tumors of the central nervous system. Claudin-1 is a tight junction-associated protein recently shown to be expressed in anaplastic meningiomas. This study aimed at assessment whether immunohistochemical staining for claudin-1 could help distinguish meningiomas from histologic mimics, compared with commonly used markers. Tissue sections from 20 meningothelial meningiomas, 40 fibrous meningiomas, 20 atypical meningiomas, 14 solitary fibrous tumors of the meninges, 10 meningeal hemangiopericytomas, and 14 vestibular schwannomas were stained immunohistochemically for claudin-1, epithelial membrane antigen, S-100 protein, CD34, and glial fibrillary acidic protein. In total, 42(53%) of 80 meningiomas were immunoreactive for claudin-1, whereas none of the other tumors were positive. In contrast, there was considerable overlap in the distribution of the other antibodies evaluated. Claudin-1 seems to be a specific marker for meningiomas in this context. Although its sensitivity is relatively low, claudin-1 may be helpful in a panel of immunostains to distinguish meningiomas from histologic mimics. (author)

  19. Primary Atypical Meningioma of the Nasal Cavity: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leison Maharjan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Meningioma is a central nervous system tumor that typically arises in proximity to meninges. Extracranial primary atypical meningioma of sinonasal tract is a rare one. Methods. We discuss the clinical, radiological, and histological presentation of an elderly female with primary atypical meningioma of the nasal cavity, which was excised via endoscopic endonasal approach. Results. There was no recurrence even up to 20 months of follow-up after endoscopic excision. Conclusion. Extracranial primary atypical meningioma should be kept in mind as one of the differential diagnoses of nasal mass. Histopathological diagnosis along with immunohistochemistry should be used for definitive diagnosis.

  20. Aggressive surgery and focal radiation in the management of meningiomas of the skull base: preservation of function with maintenance of local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, P.McL.; Loeffler, J.S.; Villavicencio, A.T.; Rhouddou, C.

    2001-01-01

    Background: recent study series have reported that post-operative external beam radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery with the linear accelerator or gamma knife improves long-term local control of sub-totally resected or recurrent meningiomas. Methods: analysis of treatment results in 100 consecutive patients with skull base meningiomas managed by one surgeon with a median follow-up of five years. Treatment principles included observation for asymptomatic tumors; surgery for progressive or symptomatic tumors unless surgery was medically contraindicated or refused by the patient; to make surgery as aggressive as possible but with the goal of presenting full function of the patient; and to use radiosurgery or conformal fractionated radiation therapy if residual tumor was demonstrated. Preoperative, postoperative, and observational data were prospectively accumulated and stored in a large database system. Median follow up was 5 years with a range from 2 to 10 years. Findings: the most frequent presenting symptoms were headache (45 %) and changes in vision (29 %). Cranial nerve deficits (49 %) and cerebellar signs (24 %) were the most common physical findings. Seventy-two patients had surgical resection. Of these, 93 % had greater than 50 % resection and 47 % had radiographically complete resection. There were no perioperative deaths and there were five surgical complications for a rate of 7 %. Complications included nemiparesis (2.8 %) new cranial nerve palsy (2.8%), and indolent osteomyelitis (1.4 %). Fifteen patients had observation only; none of who progressed. Thirteen patients had radiation only, primarily because of patient preference or medical contraindications to surgery in the setting of substantial symptoms. There were no complications of this therapy. With a median five-year follow-up, only one patient (1 %) demonstrated tumor progression using the treatment paradigm outlined here. Interpretation. These results demonstrate that skull base

  1. Arthroscopic sheath design and technical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijthof, Gabriëlle J. M.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Herder, Just L.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2009-01-01

    The maintenance of a clear view on the operation area is essential to perform a minimally invasive procedure In arthroscopy, this is achieved by irrigating the Joint with a saline fluid that is pumped through the joint At present the arthroscopic sheaths are not designed for optimal irrigation,

  2. Genipin-Cross-Linked Chitosan Nerve Conduits Containing TNF-α Inhibitors for Peripheral Nerve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Zhao, Weijia; Niu, Changmei; Zhou, Yujie; Shi, Haiyan; Wang, Yalin; Yang, Yumin; Tang, Xin

    2018-07-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs) are considered a promising alternative to autologous nerve grafting, which is considered the "gold standard" clinical strategy for peripheral nerve repair. Here, we immobilized tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors onto a nerve conduit, which was introduced into a chitosan (CS) matrix scaffold utilizing genipin (GP) as the crosslinking agent, to fabricate CS-GP-TNF-α inhibitor nerve conduits. The in vitro release kinetics of TNF-α inhibitors from the CS-GP-TNF-α inhibitor nerve conduits were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vivo continuous release profile of the TNF-α inhibitors released from the CS-GP-TNF-α inhibitor nerve conduits was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay over 14 days. We found that the amount of TNF-α inhibitors released decreased with time after the bridging of the sciatic nerve defects in rats. Moreover, 4 and 12 weeks after surgery, histological analyses and functional evaluations were carried out to assess the influence of the TENG on regeneration. Immunochemistry performed 4 weeks after grafting to assess early regeneration outcomes revealed that the TENG strikingly promoted axonal outgrowth. Twelve weeks after grafting, the TENG accelerated myelin sheath formation, as well as functional restoration. In general, the regenerative outcomes following TENG more closely paralleled findings observed with autologous grafting than the use of the CS matrix scaffold. Collectively, our data indicate that the CS-GP-TNF-α inhibitor nerve conduits comprised an elaborate system for sustained release of TNF-α inhibitors in vitro, while studies in vivo demonstrated that the TENG could accelerate regenerating axonal outgrowth and functional restoration. The introduction of CS-GP-TNF-α-inhibitor nerve conduits into a scaffold may contribute to an efficient and adaptive immune microenvironment that can be used to facilitate peripheral nerve repair.

  3. Primary intra-fourth ventricular meningioma: Report two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishanth Sadashiva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningioma's occurring intraventricular region are rare and these occurring in the fourth ventricle is even rare. Because of the rarity, it is not usually considered as a differential diagnosis in any age group. Clinical features and Imaging is not characteristic, and most of them are thought to be some different tumor. Here, we discuss two cases harboring a primary fourth ventricular meningioma Grade II, which was surgically excised successfully. Total excision was achieved in both cases and as the tumor was firm to soft and vermian splitting was not required. Understanding the clinical features and a careful preoperative radiological examination is required to differentiate this tumor from more commonly occurring lesions at this location.

  4. Scoring radiologic characteristics to predict proliferative potential in meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiba, Tetsuo; Hashimoto, Naoya; Maruno, Motohiko; Izumoto, Shuichi; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Kagawa, Naoki; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using radiologic characteristics to predict the proliferative potential in meningiomas. Our statistical analysis revealed that the presence of peritumoral edema, an ambiguous brain-tumor border, and irregular tumor shape were significantly correlated with a higher MIB-1 staining index (SI) value. We developed the following scoring system for specific features in each tumor: peritumoral edema (tumor with edema=1, tumor without edema=0); brain-tumor border (tumor with any ambiguous border=1, tumor circumscribed by a distinct rim=0); and tumor shape (tumor with irregular shape=1, tumor with smooth shape=0). Using Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis, we found a significant correlation (P<0.005) between total score calculated for each patient and SI value. Our findings suggest that the proliferative potential of meningiomas can be predicted using a less invasive preoperative examination focusing on the presence of peritumoral edema, ambiguous brain-tumor border, and irregular tumor shape. (author)

  5. CT findings in three cases of cystic meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumoto, Kazuhiro; Nishizawa, Teruhiko; Kasamo, Shizuya; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Mihara, Tadahiro

    1983-01-01

    The authors have encountered three cases of cystic meningioma among a total of 46 cases. Case 1. This 16-year-old boy complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting for about 5 months. He also felt double vision. On admission, the subjective complaints were headache, nausea, and vomiting, but there was no objective symptom. In CT scans a well-circumscribed low-density area with a nodule-like iso-density mass at the anterolaterally portion was shown in the left temporal rogion. This iso-density mass was homogenously enhanced in the contrast study. In an operation, approximately 60 ml of xanthochromic fluid was aspirated, and the nodule-like mass was totally removed. The histological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma with a large cyst. Case 2. This 49-year-old woman had complained of blurred vision for 4 months before her admission. An ophthalmologist discovered a choked disc and referred her to our department. On admission a neurological examination disclosed a bilateral choked disc and disturbed visual acuity in her left eye. In CT scans, the mass, which was located in the right frontotemporal region, was markedly enhanced, and a small low-density lesion was recognized in it. Angiographically, a tumor stain fed by the middle meningeal artery was shown. The pathologic al diagnosis was angioblastic meningioma. Case 3. This 68-year-old woman, who had had several attacks of loss of consciousness within the 3 years before admission, had now complained of nausea and vomiting for one month. On admission, neurological examination disclosed paraparesis and paresthesia of the lt. lower limb. In CT scans an irregular mass contiguous to the falx was enhanced; it was surrounded by a low-density lesion which was considered to continue to the ependymal layer of the lateral ventricle. Multilobular cysts were found, and about 10 ml of xanthochromic fluid was aspirated . The histological diagnosis was angioblastic meningioma. (J.P.N.)

  6. CT findings in three cases of cystic meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusumoto, Kazuhiro; Nishizawa, Teruhiko; Kasamo, Shizuya; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Mihara, Tadahiro (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-02-01

    The authors have encountered three cases of cystic meningioma among a total of 46 cases. Case 1. This 16-year-old boy complained of headache, nausea, and vomiting for about 5 months. He also felt double vision. On admission, the subjective complaints were headache, nausea, and vomiting, but there was no objective symptom. In CT scans a well-circumscribed low-density area with a nodule-like iso-density mass at the anterolaterally portion was shown in the left temporal rogion. This iso-density mass was homogenously enhanced in the contrast study. In an operation, approximately 60 ml of xanthochromic fluid was aspirated, and the nodule-like mass was totally removed. The histological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma with a large cyst. Case 2. This 49-year-old woman had complained of blurred vision for 4 months before her admission. An ophthalmologist discovered a choked disc and referred her to our department. On admission a neurological examination disclosed a bilateral choked disc and disturbed visual acuity in her left eye. In CT scans, the mass, which was located in the right frontotemporal region, was markedly enhanced, and a small low-density lesion was recognized in it. Angiographically, a tumor stain fed by the middle meningeal artery was shown. The pathologic al diagnosis was angioblastic meningioma. Case 3. This 68-year-old woman, who had had several attacks of loss of consciousness within the 3 years before admission, had now complained of nausea and vomiting for one month. On admission, neurological examination disclosed paraparesis and paresthesia of the lt. lower limb. In CT scans an irregular mass contiguous to the falx was enhanced; it was surrounded by a low-density lesion which was considered to continue to the ependymal layer of the lateral ventricle. Multilobular cysts were found, and about 10 ml of xanthochromic fluid was aspirated . The histological diagnosis was angioblastic meningioma.

  7. Spinal meningioma: relationship between degree of cord compression and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Simon; Gregson, Barbara; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find the relationships between the degree of cord compression as seen on MRIs with persisting cord atrophy after decompression and patient outcomes in spinal meningiomas. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 31 patients' pre- and postoperative MRIs, preoperative functional status and their outcomes at follow-up. The following metrics were analysed; percentage cord area at maximum compression, percentage tumour occupancy and percentage cord occupancy. These were then compared with outcome as measured by the Nurick scale. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87%) had thoracic meningiomas, 3 (10%) cervical and 1 (3%) cervicothoracic. The meningiomas were pathologically classified as grade 1 (29) or grade 2 (2) according to the WHO classification. The average remaining cord cross-sectional area was 61% of the estimated original value. The average tumour occupancy of the canal was 72%. The average cord occupancy of the spinal canal at maximum compression was 20%. No correlation between cord cross-section area and Nurick Scale was seen. On the postoperative scan, the average cord area had increased to 84%. No correlation was seen between this value and outcome. We found that cross-section area measurements on MRI scans have no obvious relationship with function before or after surgery. This is a base for future research into the mechanism of cord recovery and other compressive cord conditions.

  8. Analysis of peritumoral edema in MRI of meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seung Jae; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Ko, Young Tae; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Yoon Wha

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence and the degree of peritumoral edema on MRI in meningioma and to correlate other MR findings with the edema. MR images of 35 patients with histologically confirmed meningioma were retrospectively reviewed. We analyzed the MR findings with special attention to the presence or absence and degree of edema. The edema was grade as absent, mild (extending less than 1 cm from outer margin of mass), moderate (1 to 3 cm with mild mass effect), and severe (more than 3 cm with marked mass effect). We also evaluated size and margin of the tumor, heterogeneity of mass signal, enhancement pattern and dural enhancement of the masses. In 24 patients with cerebral angiography, cerebral vascularity on angiogram was correlated with MR findings. Statistic correlation analysis was done using SAS ver 6.04. Twenty five of 35 cases (72%) had edema; mild in 11 case, moderate in 10 cases, and severe in 4 cases. Heterogeneous signal intensity of mass ( 0.05), dural enhancement (>0.05), and histologic type (>0.05) were not correlated with edema. In meningioma, moderate to severe peritumoral edema occurred in 41% (14/35). The edema was correlated with heterogenous enhancement, size, location, heterogeneous signal intensity and vascularity of the mass on angiography

  9. Intracranial meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in 78 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Lucato, Leandro T.; Barros, Cristiano Ventorin de; Marie, Sueli K.N.; Santana, Pedro; Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires de; Rosemberg, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of 78 patients with meningiomas diagnosed in a single institution. Method: 78 patients with histological proven intracranial meningioma were studied. There were 52 female and 26 male patients (median=56 years). All MR imaging examinations were performed with 1.5-T MR imaging unit with standard protocol. The images were studied by two neuroradiologists, who reached the decisions regarding the findings by consensus. Results: Most of the tumors showed low signal on T1- (60%) and high signal on T2- (68%) and FLAIR (69%) weighted images. Also, the lesions showed heterogeneous signal on T1 (60%), T2 (68%) and FLAIR (64%) sequences. After contrast administration, 83% (n=65) of the tumors presented accentuated and 17% (n=13) showed moderate enhancement. The tumors were located in the frontal lobe in 44% of the cases, in the parietal lobe in 35%, the occipital lobe in 19% and the temporal lobe in 12% of the patients. Areas of vasogenic edema around the tumors were seen in 90% of the cases. Twenty six per cent of the cases showed bone infiltration, and the dural tail sign was seen in 59% of the tumors. Conclusion: Intracranial meningiomas usually show heterogeneous low signal on T1- and high signal on T2-weighted and FLAIR images, with intense enhancement after contrast administration. The frontal and parietal lobes are commonly affected. In addition, brain edema, dural tail sign and bone infiltration are the most frequent associated findings. (author)

  10. Clinicopathologic features of aggressive meningioma emphasizing the role of radiotherapy in treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Henzel, M. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology; Farhoud, A.; Sure, U.; Heinze, S.; Bertalanffy, H. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Mennel, H.D. [Philipps Univ., Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology

    2006-11-15

    Background and Purpose: Although meningiomas are typically benign, they occasionally behave in an aggressive fashion and carry a less favorable prognosis. The aim of this study was to review the clinical, radiologic and histopathologic features of these aggressive variants as well as the outcome after multimodality therapy. Patients and Methods: 16 patients with atypical meningiomas (n=11) and anaplastic meningiomas (n=5) were treated in the Departments of Neurosurgery and Radiation Oncology at the University Hospital of Philipps University Marburg, Germany, between 1997 and 2003. Tumor grading was based on new WHO criteria. There were eleven men and five women with a mean age of 54 years. The median follow-up period was 34 months. Results: A total of 24 surgical procedures were performed for these 16 patients. Only seven patients underwent postoperative fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Patients with atypical meningioma received radiotherapy only for the recurrent disease. Six patients (37.5%) experienced tumor recurrence after a mean period of 27.2 months in spite of gross total resection. Radiographic findings suggestive of aggressiveness were observed mostly with WHO grade III meningiomas. By comparing the proliferation rate in four cases with atypical meningioma operated twice, the recurrent tumor had a higher proliferation rate than the first tumor in three cases. A special proliferation pattern was noticed in MIB-1 with anaplastic meningiomas. The mean overall survival period was 66.5 months. There was no mortality among patients with atypical meningioma, while four out of five patients with anaplastic meningioma died during follow-up. Conclusion: Considering the higher rate of recurrence in aggressive meningiomas even after radical surgical excision and the possibility that the recurrent tumor is more aggressive than the original one, surgery should be combined with postoperative fractionated radiotherapy to improve local tumor control. The peculiar

  11. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group.

  12. Role of Demyelination Efficiency within Acellular Nerve Scaffolds during Nerve Regeneration across Peripheral Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiqin Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hudson’s optimized chemical processing method is the most commonly used chemical method to prepare acellular nerve scaffolds for the reconstruction of large peripheral nerve defects. However, residual myelin attached to the basal laminar tube has been observed in acellular nerve scaffolds prepared using Hudson’s method. Here, we describe a novel method of producing acellular nerve scaffolds that eliminates residual myelin more effectively than Hudson’s method through the use of various detergent combinations of sulfobetaine-10, sulfobetaine-16, Triton X-200, sodium deoxycholate, and peracetic acid. In addition, the efficacy of this new scaffold in repairing a 1.5 cm defect in the sciatic nerve of rats was examined. The modified method produced a higher degree of demyelination than Hudson’s method, resulting in a minor host immune response in vivo and providing an improved environment for nerve regeneration and, consequently, better functional recovery. A morphological study showed that the number of regenerated axons in the modified group and Hudson group did not differ. However, the autograft and modified groups were more similar in myelin sheath regeneration than the autograft and Hudson groups. These results suggest that the modified method for producing a demyelinated acellular scaffold may aid functional recovery in general after nerve defects.

  13. Five Fraction Image-Guided Radiosurgery for Primary and Recurrent Meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Karl Oermann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Benign tumors that arise from the meninges can be difficult to treat due to their potentially large size and proximity to critical structures such as cranial nerves and sinuses. Single fraction radiosurgery may increase the risk of symptomatic peritumoral edema. In this study, we report our results on the efficacy and safety of five fraction image-guided radiosurgery for benign meningiomas. Materials/Methods: Clinical and radiographic data from 38 patients treated with five fraction radiosurgery were reviewed retrospectively. Mean tumor volume was 3.83mm3 (range, 1.08-20.79 mm3. Radiation was delivered using the CyberKnife, a frameless robotic image-guided radiosurgery system with a median total dose of 25 Gy (range, 25 Gy-35 Gy. Results: The median follow-up was 20 months. Acute toxicity was minimal with eight patients (21% requiring a short course of steroids for headache at the end of treatment. Pre-treatment neurological symptoms were present in 24 patients (63.2%. Post treatment, neurological symptoms resolved completely in 14 patients (58.3%, and were persistent in eight patients (33.3%. There were no local failures, 24 tumors remained stable (64% and 14 regressed (36%. Pre-treatment peritumoral edema was observed in five patients (13.2%. Post-treatment asymptomatic peritumoral edema developed in five additional patients (13.2%. On multivariate analysis, pre-treatment peritumoral edema and location adjacent to a large vein were significant risk factors for radiographic post-treatment edema (p = 0.001 and p = 0.026 respectively. Conclusions: These results suggest that five fraction image-guided radiosurgery is well tolerated with a response rate for neurologic symptoms that is similar to other standard treatment options. Rates of peritumoral edema and new cranial nerve deficits following five fraction radiosurgery were low. Longer follow-up is required to validate the safety and long-term effectiveness of this treatment approach.

  14. Outer Electrospun Polycaprolactone Shell Induces Massive Foreign Body Reaction and Impairs Axonal Regeneration through 3D Multichannel Chitosan Nerve Guides

    OpenAIRE

    Duda, Sven; Dreyer, Lutz; Behrens, Peter; Wienecke, Soenke; Chakradeo, Tanmay; Glasmacher, Birgit; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    We report on the performance of composite nerve grafts with an inner 3D multichannel porous chitosan core and an outer electrospun polycaprolactone shell. The inner chitosan core provided multiple guidance channels for regrowing axons. To analyze the in vivo properties of the bare chitosan cores, we separately implanted them into an epineural sheath. The effects of both graft types on structural and functional regeneration across a 10 mm rat sciatic nerve gap were compared to autologous nerv...

  15. [Gradient-index (GRIN) endoscopic examinations from the inner structures of the optic nerve meninges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Frank Michael; Killer, Hanspeter Esriel; Meyer, Peter

    2003-03-01

    Due to the excellent image quality and the small outer diameter of the GRIN-(gradient index) endoscope tips we were able to examine the subdural and the subarachnoidal space of the optic nerve meninges by endoscopy. This examination was performed to obtain more information about the inner structure of the optic nerve meninges. In this post-mortem study 7 optic nerves were examined from the chiasm to the globe by GRIN endoscopy (Volpi, Schlieren, Switzerland), with an outer diameter of 0.89 mm, integrated optic of 0.5 mm diameter and an integrated fluid channel of 0.2 mm diameter. In all cases the endoscopic examination of the optic nerve meninges was technically easy to perform. It was possible to study the inner surface of the nerve sheaths and the nerve sheath spaces in close-up. We found horizontal and vertical cords on the inner surface of the dura mater, which could tighten by movements of the optic nerve. With a gradient-index (GRIN) endoscope we obtained new information about the inner structure of the optic nerve meninges. New theories about the changes of the optic nerve meninges during movements of the optic nerve may evolve from this study. Further studies with this new method should be encouraged.

  16. Intracranial meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings in 78 cases; Meningiomas intracranianos: achados de ressonancia magnetica em 78 casos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasparetto, Emerson L.; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Lucato, Leandro T.; Barros, Cristiano Ventorin de [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Radiology]. E-mail: egasparetto@gmail.com; Marie, Sueli K.N.; Santana, Pedro; Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires de [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Neurology; Rosemberg, Sergio [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine. Dept. of Pathology

    2007-09-15

    Objective: To present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of 78 patients with meningiomas diagnosed in a single institution. Method: 78 patients with histological proven intracranial meningioma were studied. There were 52 female and 26 male patients (median=56 years). All MR imaging examinations were performed with 1.5-T MR imaging unit with standard protocol. The images were studied by two neuroradiologists, who reached the decisions regarding the findings by consensus. Results: Most of the tumors showed low signal on T1- (60%) and high signal on T2- (68%) and FLAIR (69%) weighted images. Also, the lesions showed heterogeneous signal on T1 (60%), T2 (68%) and FLAIR (64%) sequences. After contrast administration, 83% (n=65) of the tumors presented accentuated and 17% (n=13) showed moderate enhancement. The tumors were located in the frontal lobe in 44% of the cases, in the parietal lobe in 35%, the occipital lobe in 19% and the temporal lobe in 12% of the patients. Areas of vasogenic edema around the tumors were seen in 90% of the cases. Twenty six per cent of the cases showed bone infiltration, and the dural tail sign was seen in 59% of the tumors. Conclusion: Intracranial meningiomas usually show heterogeneous low signal on T1- and high signal on T2-weighted and FLAIR images, with intense enhancement after contrast administration. The frontal and parietal lobes are commonly affected. In addition, brain edema, dural tail sign and bone infiltration are the most frequent associated findings. (author)

  17. Castleman's disease associated with a cerebellar chordoid meningioma and intestinal lymphangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Chul Jin; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Jong Seung; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Kong, Doo-Sik; Shin, Hyung Jin; Suh, Yeon Lim; Kim, Kyoung Mee; Choe, Yon Ho

    2010-11-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a rare nonneoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown etiology. It is characterized by enlarged hyperplastic lymph nodes, usually presenting as a localized mass. Although an intracranial location is very uncommon, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a chordoid meningioma. We describe a pediatric case of CD with a cerebellar chordoid meningioma and intestinal lymphangiectasia.

  18. Computed tomography and angiography do not reliably discriminate malignant meningiomas from benign ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servo, A.; Porras, M.; Jaeaeskelaeinen, J.; Paetau, A.; Haltia, M.

    1990-01-01

    Histological anaplasia, found in up to 10% of meningiomas, is an important prognostic sign as it is associated with increased recurrence rate and volume growth rate. We studied in retrospect a series of 230 primary intracranial meningiomas to discover whether histological anaplasia can be reliably foreseen in CT scans and angiograms. 205 meningiomas were histologically benign, and 25 meningiomas were classified as malignant (atypical or anaplastic), with either incipient (20) or overt (5) signs of anaplasia. Of ten CT parameters tested, three were associated significantly more often with malignant meningiomas: Nodular contour (58.3% vs 26.7%); cysts (20.0% vs 4.4%) and absence of calcifications (92% vs 65.3%); none of these parameters was an absolute sign of anaplasia. 'Mushrooming', previously regarded as a definite sign of malignancy, was seen in 9% of benign meningiomas and in 21% of malignant ones. In angiography, no apparent differences between benign and malignant meningiomas were seen. The conclusion is that it is not possible to distinguish malignant meningiomas from benign ones with CT or angiography. (orig.)

  19. Common variation at 10p12.31 near MLLT10 influences meningioma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbins, Sara E; Broderick, Peter; Melin, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for meningioma, we conducted a genome-wide association study of 859 affected individuals (cases) and 704 controls with validation in two independent sample sets totaling 774 cases and 1,764 controls. We identified a new susceptibility locus for meningioma at 10p12....

  20. Craniocervical Junction Meningiomas without Hydrocephalus Presenting Solely with Syncope: Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pierre-Olivier; Bojanowski, Michel W

    2018-06-01

    To our knowledge, there have not been any reported cases of a meningioma of the craniocervical region presenting solely with syncope as its initial symptom. Only 1 case of meningioma presenting with syncope has been published, but it was associated with hydrocephalus. We report 2 cases of syncope caused by a craniocervical junction meningioma, with syncope being the sole presenting symptom and without hydrocephalus. We discuss the possible pathophysiology, as well as the clinical relevance of this type of presentation. We reviewed the charts, operative details, and imagery of 2 cases of meningioma in the region of the craniocervical junction, with syncope as their sole presenting feature. We also reviewed the literature. In 1 case the syncope occurred spontaneously. In the other, it occurred during a Valsalva maneuver. Both meningiomas were surgically removed via a retromastoid approach. There was no recurrence of syncope following surgery. Following a literature review, we found 1 case of posterior fossa meningioma presenting with syncope, but hydrocephalus was also present. Syncope can be the sole manifestation of a meningioma of the craniocervical junction. Such syncopes are a consequence of transient dysfunction of the autonomous pathways in the medulla and/or of the medulla's output. In the absence of other causes of syncope, a meningioma in this region, even in the absence of hydrocephalus, should not be considered as fortuitous, but rather as the actual cause of syncope. Recognizing this possibility offers the potential for proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the syncope. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Histological examination of the gadolinium-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Keiichi; Tada, Tsuyoshi; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Kyoshima, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeaki

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging often demonstrates gadolinium (Gd) enhancement of the dura mater around meningiomas. The Gd-enhanced dura mater was histologically investigated to detect meningioma cells. Gd enhancement of the dura mater occurred in 11 (79%) of the 14 meningiomas studied, and extended as far as 35 mm from the tumor. Histological examination revealed generation of vascular-rich loose connective tissue at the surface of the dura in all five tumors examined. Some clusters of meningothelial cells were distributed in the loose connective tissue in three of the five specimens, and one cluster was obviously neoplastic. These observations suggest that clusters of meningioma cells occur in the Gd-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas. (author)

  2. Histological examination of the gadolinium-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Keiichi; Tada, Tsuyoshi; Fukasaku, Kazuaki; Kyoshima, Kazuhiko; Kobayashi, Shigeaki [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1993-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging often demonstrates gadolinium (Gd) enhancement of the dura mater around meningiomas. The Gd-enhanced dura mater was histologically investigated to detect meningioma cells. Gd enhancement of the dura mater occurred in 11 (79%) of the 14 meningiomas studied, and extended as far as 35 mm from the tumor. Histological examination revealed generation of vascular-rich loose connective tissue at the surface of the dura in all five tumors examined. Some clusters of meningothelial cells were distributed in the loose connective tissue in three of the five specimens, and one cluster was obviously neoplastic. These observations suggest that clusters of meningioma cells occur in the Gd-enhanced dura mater around meningiomas. (author).

  3. Histological-subtypes and anatomical location correlated in meningeal brain tumors (meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Not enough literature is available to suggest a link between the histological subtypes of intracranial meningeal brain tumors, called ′meningiomas′ and their location of origin. Aim: The evidence of correlation between the anatomical location of the intracranial meningiomas and the histopathological grades will facilitate specific diagnosis and accurate treatment. Materials and Methods: The retrospective study was conducted in a single high-patient-inflow Neurosurgical Center, under a standard and uniform medical protocol, over a period of 30 years from December 1982 to December 2012. The records of all the operated 729 meningiomas were analyzed from the patient files in the Medical Records Department. The biodata, x-rays, angiography, computed tomography (CT scans, imaging, histopathological reports, and mortality were evaluated and results drawn. Results: The uncommon histopathological types of meningiomas (16.88% had common locations of origin in the sphenoid ridge, posterior parafalcine, jugular foramen, peritorcular and intraventricular regions, cerebellopontine angle, and tentorial and petroclival areas. The histopathological World Health Organization (WHO Grade I (Benign Type meningiomas were noted in 89.30%, WHO Grade II (Atypical Type in 5.90%, and WHO Grade III (Malignant Type in 4.80% of all meningiomas. Meningiomas of 64.60% were found in females, 47.32% were in the age group of 41-50 years, and 3.43% meningiomas were found in children. An overall mortality of 6.04% was noted. WHO Grade III (malignant meningiomas carried a high mortality (25.71% and the most common sites of meningiomas with high mortality were: The cerebellopontine angles, intraventricular region, sphenoid ridge, tuberculum sellae, and the posterior parafalcine areas. Conclusion: The correlation between the histological subtypes and the anatomical location of intracranial meningeal brain tumors, called meningiomas, is evident, but further research is

  4. Radio frequency sheaths in an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    The physics of radio-frequency (rf) sheaths near a conducting surface is studied for plasmas immersed in a magnetic field that makes an oblique angle θ with the surface. A set of one-dimensional equations is developed that describes the dynamics of the time-dependent magnetic presheath and non-neutral Debye sheath. The model employs Maxwell-Boltzmann electrons, and the magnetization and mobility of the ions is determined by the magnetic field strength, and wave frequency, respectively. The angle θ, assumed to be large enough to insure an electron-poor sheath, is otherwise arbitrary. Concentrating on the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies, the equations are solved numerically to obtain the rectified (dc) voltage, the rf voltage across the sheath, and the rf current flowing through the sheath. As an application of this model, the sheath voltage-current relation is used to obtain the rf sheath impedance, which in turn gives an rf sheath boundary condition for the electric field at the sheath-plasma interface that can be used in rf wave codes. In general, the impedance has both resistive and capacitive contributions, and generalizes previous sheath boundary condition models. The resistive part contributes to parasitic power dissipation at the wall

  5. Transglutaminase 2 expression is increased as a function of malignancy grade and negatively regulates cell growth in meningioma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Cheng Huang

    Full Text Available Most meningiomas are benign, but some clinical-aggressive tumors exhibit brain invasion and cannot be resected without significant complications. To identify molecular markers for these clinically-aggressive meningiomas, we performed microarray analyses on 24 primary cultures from 21 meningiomas and 3 arachnoid membranes. Using this approach, increased transglutaminase 2 (TGM2 expression was observed, which was subsequently validated in an independent set of 82 meningiomas by immunohistochemistry. Importantly, the TGM2 expression level was associated with increasing WHO malignancy grade as well as meningioma recurrence. Inhibition of TGM2 function by siRNA or cystamine induced meningioma cell death, which was associated with reduced AKT phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Collectively, these findings suggest that TGM2 expression increases as a function of malignancy grade and tumor recurrence and that inhibition of TGM2 reduces meningioma cell growth.

  6. Collision tumor of the facial nerve: a synchronous seventh nerve schwannoma and neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Brian C; Carlson, Matthew L; Driscoll, Colin L; Moore, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    To report a novel case of a collision tumor involving an intraparotid neurofibroma and a mastoid segment facial nerve schwannoma. Clinical capsule report. Tertiary academic referral center. A 29-year-old woman with a 2-year history of an asymptomatic enlarging left infraauricular mass and normal FN function presented to a tertiary care referral center. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion in the deep portion of the parotid gland extending into the stylomastoid foramen. The patient underwent superficial parotidectomy, and a cystic parotid mass was found to be intrinsic to the intraparotid facial nerve. A portion of the mass was biopsied, and intraoperative frozen section pathology was consistent with a neurofibroma. A mastoidectomy with FN decompression was then performed until a normal-appearing segment was identified just proximal to the second genu. After biopsy, proximal facial nerve stimulation failed to elicit evoked motor potentials, and en bloc resection was performed. Final pathology demonstrated a schwannoma involving the mastoid segment and a neurofibroma involving the proximal intraparotid facial nerve. We report the first case of a facial nerve collision tumor involving an intraparotid neurofibroma and a mastoid segment facial nerve schwannoma. Benign FN sheath tumors of the parotid gland are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a parotid mass.

  7. Association of Genetic Predisposition With Solitary Schwannoma or Meningioma in Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmanaban, Omar N; Sadler, Katherine V; Kamaly-Asl, Ian D; King, Andrew T; Rutherford, Scott A; Hammerbeck-Ward, Charlotte; McCabe, Martin G; Kilday, John-Paul; Beetz, Christian; Poplawski, Nicola K; Evans, D Gareth; Smith, Miriam J

    2017-09-01

    Meningiomas and schwannomas are usually sporadic, isolated tumors occurring in adults older than 60 years and are rare in children and young adults. Multiple schwannomas and/or meningiomas are more frequently associated with a tumor suppressor syndrome and, accordingly, trigger genetic testing, whereas solitary tumors do not. Nevertheless, apparently sporadic tumors in young patients may herald a genetic syndrome. To determine the frequency of the known heritable meningioma- or schwannoma-predisposing mutations in children and young adults presenting with a solitary meningioma or schwannoma. Using the database of the Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine, this cohort study analyzed lymphocyte DNA from young individuals prospectively referred to the clinic for genetic testing between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2016, on presentation with a single meningioma (n = 42) or schwannoma (n = 135) before age 25 years. Sequencing data were also examined from an additional 39 patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 who were retrospectively identified as having a solitary tumor before age 25 years. Patients with schwannoma were screened for NF2, SMARCB1, and LZTR1 gene mutations, while patients with meningioma were screened for NF2, SMARCB1, SMARCE1, and SUFU. The type of underlying genetic mutation, or lack of a predisposing mutation, was associated with the presenting tumor type and subsequent development of additional tumors or other features of known schwannoma- and meningioma-predisposing syndromes. In 2 cohorts of patients who presented with an isolated meningioma (n = 42; median [range] age, 11 [1-24] years; 22 female) or schwannoma (n = 135; median [range] age, 18 [0.2-24] years; 60 female) before age 25 years, 16 of 42 patients (38%) had a predisposing mutation to meningioma and 27 of 135 patients (20%) to schwannoma, respectively. In the solitary meningioma cohort, 34 of 63 patients (54%) had a constitutional mutation in a known meningioma

  8. Intracranial schwannomas arising from cranial nerves: Case series and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmeet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumors arising from the cranial nerve sheath are common intracranial neoplasms, with only few articles describing their imaging characteristics. In this present study of four cases of schwannomas originating from the cranial nerves in the head region, we are discussing the radiological features on imaging with the clinical presentation and contrasting them with other differentials in their respective locations. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were done in these cases and correlated with clinical and biopsy findings.

  9. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications

  10. Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

  11. Unusually large quiescent ancient schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta P Wanjari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ancient schwannoma is considered as a variant of schwannoma, comprising about 10% of all schwanommas. Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm derived from the nerve sheath of peripheral motor, sensory and sympathetic nerves and from the cranial nerve pairs. It usually presents as a solitary soft-tissue lesion which is slow growing, encapsulated and is often associated with nerve attached peripherally. Diagnosis is often confirmed with the microscopic examination. The long standing schwannoma attributes to degenerative changes and is termed "ancient" schwannoma. Present case is of a 68-year-old female patient who reported with an asymptomatic large swelling below mandible on the left side since last 23 years. The lesion was surgically excised under general anesthesia.

  12. Assessment of nerve ultrastructure by fibre-optic confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushway, T R; Lanzetta, M; Cox, G; Trickett, R; Owen, E R

    1996-01-01

    Fibre-optic technology combined with confocality produces a microscope capable of optical thin sectioning. In this original study, tibial nerves have been stained in a rat model with a vital dye, 4-(4-diethylaminostyryl)-N-methylpyridinium iodide, and analysed by fibre-optic confocal microscopy to produce detailed images of nerve ultrastructure. Schwann cells, nodes of Ranvier and longitudinal myelinated sheaths enclosing axons were clearly visible. Single axons appeared as brightly staining longitudinal structures. This allowed easy tracing of multiple signal axons within the nerve tissue. An accurate measurement of internodal lengths was easily accomplished. This technique is comparable to current histological techniques, but does not require biopsy, thin sectioning or tissue fixing. This study offers a standard for further in vivo microscopy, including the possibility of monitoring the progression of nerve regeneration following microsurgical neurorraphy.

  13. Sheath heating in low-pressure capacitive radio frequency discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, B.P.

    1991-01-01

    Capacitively coupled, parallel plate, r.f. discharges are commonly used for materials processing. The electrons in such a discharge gain and lose energy by reflection from the oscillating sheaths which form at the electrodes. Previous models of the electron heating by this mechanism have assumed that the sheath motion is slow compared to the electron thermal velocity, so that the electron energy change from each reflection is small. Here, the heating rate, density, and sheath width relations are derived analytically in the limit of very fast sheath motion. Numerical results are presented spanning the slow and fast limits. Results from particle-in-cell simulations show that in the large-energy-change regime, an electron beam is produced on each sheath expansion. At low pressure, this beam can traverse the plasma and interact with the sheath at the opposite electrode, producing a beam energy and density dependence on the length of the discharge. The beam produces a time and space varying warm tail on the electron energy distribution. Two revised heating models are derived, assuming power-law and two-temperature electron energy distributions, with temporal variation in electron temperature. These revised models yield new predictions for the variation of the power, density, and sheath thickness with applied r.f. voltage. These predictions are compared with simulation results and laboratory experiment. The electron sheath motion is investigated experimentally by observing the signal on a floating probe in the sheath region. This is compared to the signal product by a non-linear circuit model which accounts for the perturbation of the sheath potential by the probe and includes various forms of sheath motion. The experimental observations are consistent with the analytical predictions. Experimental observations of plasma-sheath resonance oscillations are presented which agree with analytical predictions

  14. Nondestructive testing of metallic sheath for internally cooled superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClung, R.W.; Cook, K.V.; Dodd, C.V.; Smith, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    For quality assurance in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Large Coil Program, we developed ultrasonic and eddy-current techniques to examine the JBK-75 alloy sheath for superconducting cable for a large magnet. Ultrasound was used to examine the strip before forming into the sheath, and eddy currents were used to examine the seam weld after the sheath had been formed around the cable

  15. Primary brain tumours, meningiomas and brain metastases in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verheecke, Magali; Halaska, Michael J; Lok, Christianne A

    2014-01-01

    to obtain better insight into outcome and possibilities of treatment in pregnancy. METHODS: We collected all intracranial tumours (primary brain tumour, cerebral metastasis, or meningioma) diagnosed during pregnancy, registered prospectively and retrospectively by international collaboration since 1973......, respectively. Eight patients (30%) underwent brain surgery, seven patients (26%) had radiotherapy and in three patients (11%) chemotherapy was administered during gestation. Two patients died during pregnancy and four pregnancies were terminated. In 16 (59%) patients elective caesarean section was performed...... were reassuring. CONCLUSION: Adherence to standard protocol for the treatment of brain tumours during pregnancy appears to allow a term delivery and a higher probability of a vaginal delivery....

  16. Optic Nerve Hemangioblastoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Zywicke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemangioblastomas are World Health Organization (WHO grade I tumors of uncertain histologic origin. These central nervous system tumors are most often found in the posterior fossa, brainstem, and spinal cord. There are fewer than 20 reported cases of optic nerve hemangioblastomas in the literature. We present a patient with visual decline found to have a mass arising from within the posterior orbital canal that grossly involved the optic nerve sheath. Neuropathologic evaluation showed hemangioblastoma. Although not a common tumor in this location, consideration of hemangioblastoma in the differential diagnosis is important as they can have a more aggressive course than other tumors of this region and have a detrimental effect on visual prognosis.

  17. Clinical potential of meningioma genomic insights: a practical review for neurosurgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsy, Michael; Azab, Mohammed A; Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Guan, Jian; Eli, Ilyas; Jensen, Randy L; Ormond, D Ryan

    2018-06-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common intracranial pathological conditions, accounting for 36% of intracranial lesions treated by neurosurgeons. Although the majority of these lesions are benign, the classical categorization of tumors by histological type or World Health Organization (WHO) grade has not fully captured the potential for meningioma progression and recurrence. Many targeted treatments have failed to generate a long-lasting effect on these tumors. Recently, several seminal studies evaluating the genomics of intracranial meningiomas have rapidly changed the understanding of the disease. The importance of NF2 (neurofibromin 2), TRAF7 (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] receptor-associated factor 7), KLF4 (Kruppel-like factor 4), AKT1, SMO (smoothened), PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha), and POLR2 (RNA polymerase II subunit A) demonstrates that there are at least 6 distinct mutational classes of meningiomas. In addition, 6 methylation classes of meningioma have been appreciated, enabling improved prediction of prognosis compared with traditional WHO grades. Genomic studies have shed light on the nature of recurrent meningioma, distinct intracranial locations and mutational patterns, and a potential embryonic cancer stem cell-like origin. However, despite these exciting findings, the clinical relevance of these findings remains elusive. The authors review the key findings from recent genomic studies in meningiomas, specifically focusing on how these findings relate to clinical insights for the practicing neurosurgeon.

  18. Alternative Splicing of CHEK2 and Codeletion with NF2 Promote Chromosomal Instability in Meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q are thought to initiate tumorigenesis in nearly 50% of meningiomas, and 22q deletion is the earliest and most frequent large-scale chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. In aggressive meningiomas, 22q deletions are generally accompanied by the presence of large-scale segmental abnormalities involving other chromosomes, but the reasons for this association are unknown. We find that large-scale chromosomal alterations accumulate during meningioma progression primarily in tumors harboring 22q deletions, suggesting 22q-associated chromosomal instability. Here we show frequent codeletion of the DNA repair and tumor suppressor gene, CHEK2, in combination with NF2 on chromosome 22q in a majority of aggressive meningiomas. In addition, tumor-specific splicing of CHEK2 in meningioma leads to decreased functional Chk2 protein expression. We show that enforced Chk2 knockdown in meningioma cells decreases DNA repair. Furthermore, Chk2 depletion increases centrosome amplification, thereby promoting chromosomal instability. Taken together, these data indicate that alternative splicing and frequent codeletion of CHEK2 and NF2 contribute to the genomic instability and associated development of aggressive biologic behavior in meningiomas.

  19. Gain of chromosome arm 1q in atypical meningioma correlates with shorter progression-free survival.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    Aims: Atypical (WHO grade II) meningiomas have moderately high recurrence rates; even for completely resected tumours, approximately one-third will recur. Post-operative radiotherapy (RT) may aid local control and improve survival, but carries the risk of side effects. More accurate prediction of recurrence risk is therefore needed for patients with atypical meningioma. Previously, we used high-resolution array CGH to identify genetic variations in 47 primary atypical meningiomas and found that approximately 60% of tumors show gain of 1q at 1q25.1 and 1q25.3 to 1q32.1 and that 1q gain appeared to correlate with shorter progression-free survival. This study aimed to validate and extend these findings in an independent sample. Methods: 86 completely resected atypical meningiomas (with 25 recurrences) from two neurosurgical centres in Ireland were identified and clinical follow up was obtained. Utilizing a dual-colour interphase FISH assay, 1q gain was assessed using BAC probes directed against 1q25.1 and 1q32.1. Results: The results confirm the high prevalence of 1q gain at these loci in atypical meningiomas. We further show that gain at 1q32.1 and age each correlate with progression-free survival in patients who have undergone complete surgical resection of atypical meningiomas. Conclusions: These independent findings suggest that assessment of 1q copy number status can add clinically useful information for the management of patients with atypical meningiomas.

  20. Annihilation model of the Tormac sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, J.H.

    1979-02-01

    A one-dimensional, steady state fluid model is developed to describe the boundary layer between plasma and magnetic field that occurs in the Tormac sheath. Similar systems which may be treatable by the same model are tokamaks with divertors and reversed field mirrors. The model includes transport across the magnetic field as well as mirror losses along the field, the latter being represented as annihilation terms in the one-dimensional equations. The model equations are derived from the two-dimensional, time dependent hierarchy of equations generated by taking velocity moments of the kinetic equation including collisions

  1. ICRF antenna Faraday shield plasma sheath model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whealton, J.H.; Ryan, P.M.; Raridon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    A two-dimensional nonlinear formulation that explicitly considers the plasma edge near a Faraday shield in a self-consistent manner is used in the modeling of the ion motion for a Faraday shield concept and model suggested by Perkins. Two models are considered that may provide significant insight into the generation of impurities for ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas. In one of these models a significant sheath periodically forms next to the Faraday screen, with ion acoustic waves heating the ions in the plasma. (orig.)

  2. The characteristics of RF modulated plasma boundary sheaths: An analysis of the standard sheath model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2015-09-01

    The characteristics of radio frequency (RF) modulated plasma boundary sheaths are studied on the basis of the so-called ``standard sheath model.'' This model assumes that the applied radio frequency ωRF is larger than the plasma frequency of the ions but smaller than that of the electrons. It comprises a phase-averaged ion model - consisting of an equation of continuity (with ionization neglected) and an equation of motion (with collisional ion-neutral interaction taken into account) - a phase-resolved electron model - consisting of an equation of continuity and the assumption of Boltzmann equilibrium -, and Poisson's equation for the electrical field. Previous investigations have studied the standard sheath model under additional approximations, most notably the assumption of a step-like electron front. This contribution presents an investigation and parameter study of the standard sheath model which avoids any further assumptions. The resulting density profiles and overall charge-voltage characteristics are compared with those of the step-model based theories. The authors gratefully acknowledge Efe Kemaneci for helpful comments and fruitful discussions.

  3. Computer-based radiological longitudinal evaluation of meningiomas following stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimol, Eli Ben; Joskowicz, Leo; Eliahou, Ruth; Shoshan, Yigal

    2018-02-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a common treatment for intracranial meningiomas. SRS is planned on a pre-therapy gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI scan (Gd-T1w MRI) in which the meningioma contours have been delineated. Post-SRS therapy serial Gd-T1w MRI scans are then acquired for longitudinal treatment evaluation. Accurate tumor volume change quantification is required for treatment efficacy evaluation and for treatment continuation. We present a new algorithm for the automatic segmentation and volumetric assessment of meningioma in post-therapy Gd-T1w MRI scans. The inputs are the pre- and post-therapy Gd-T1w MRI scans and the meningioma delineation in the pre-therapy scan. The output is the meningioma delineations and volumes in the post-therapy scan. The algorithm uses the pre-therapy scan and its meningioma delineation to initialize an extended Chan-Vese active contour method and as a strong patient-specific intensity and shape prior for the post-therapy scan meningioma segmentation. The algorithm is automatic, obviates the need for independent tumor localization and segmentation initialization, and incorporates the same tumor delineation criteria in both the pre- and post-therapy scans. Our experimental results on retrospective pre- and post-therapy scans with a total of 32 meningiomas with volume ranges 0.4-26.5 cm[Formula: see text] yield a Dice coefficient of [Formula: see text]% with respect to ground-truth delineations in post-therapy scans created by two clinicians. These results indicate a high correspondence to the ground-truth delineations. Our algorithm yields more reliable and accurate tumor volume change measurements than other stand-alone segmentation methods. It may be a useful tool for quantitative meningioma prognosis evaluation after SRS.

  4. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezue, Wilfred C; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C; Ndubuisi, Chika C; Chikani, Mark C; Achebe, David S

    2012-09-01

    The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM) mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare.

  5. Intracranial meningiomas managed at Memfys hospital for neurosurgery in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred C Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The epidemiology and pathology of meningioma in Nigeria are still evolving and little has been published about this tumor in Nigeria, especially in the southeast region. The aim of this paper is to compare the characteristics of intracranial meningioma managed in our center with the pattern reported in the literature worldwide. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial meningioma between January 2002 and December 2010 at a Private neurosurgery Hospital in Enugu, Nigeria. We excluded patients whose histology results were inconclusive. Results: Meningiomas constituted 23.8% of all intracranial tumors seen in the period. The male to female ratio was 1:1.1. The peak age range for males and females were in the fifth and sixth decades, respectively. The most common location is the Olfactory groove in 26.5% of patients followed by convexity in 23.5%. Presentation varied with anatomical location of tumor. Patients with olfactory groove meningioma (OGM mostly presented late with personality changes and evidence of raised ICP. Tuberculum sellar and sphenoid region tumors presented earlier with visual impairment with or without hormonal abnormalities. Seizures occurred in 30.9% of all patients and in 45% of those with convexity meningiomas. Only 57.4% of the patients were managed surgically and there was no gender difference in this group. WHO grade1 tumors were the most common histological types occurring in 84.6%. One patient had atypical meningioma and two had anaplastic tumors. Conclusion: The pattern of meningioma in our area may have geographical differences in location and histology. Childhood meningioma was rare.

  6. Long-term chemotherapy with lomustine of intracranial meningioma occurring in a miniature schnauzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dong-In; Kim, Ha-Jung; Park, Chul; Kim, Ju-Won; Kang, Byeong-Teck; Lim, Chae-Young; Park, Eun-Hee; Sur, Jung-Hyang; Seo, Min-Ho; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Park, Hee-Myung

    2006-04-01

    A 14-year-old male miniature schnauzer was referred to us because it was circling to the right. A mass in the diencephalon was noted on brain magnetic resonance images. The dura was thickened with marked linear enhancement after contrast administration. Based on diagnostic image analysis, this lesion strongly suggested meningioma. The patient's symptoms were well controlled by a combination therapy of prednisolone and lomustine (CCNU), and survived for thirteen months after diagnosis. This case was diagnosed as a meningioma based on histopathological findings. This report describes the clinical findings, imaging characteristics, and pathologic features of a diencephalic and mesencephalic meningioma and long-term survival after lomustine and prednisolone therapy.

  7. A case of a temporal bone meningioma presenting as a serous otitis media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolay, Simon; De Foer, Bert; Bernaerts, Anja; Van Dinther, Joost; Parizel, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    We report the imaging features of a case of a temporal bone meningioma extending into the middle ear cavity and clinically presenting as a serous otitis media. Temporal bone meningioma extending in the mastoid or the middle ear cavity, however, is very rare. In case of unexplained or therapy-resistant serous otitis media and a nasopharyngeal tumor being ruled out, a temporal bone computed tomography (CT) should be performed. If CT findings are suggestive of a temporal bone meningioma, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination with gadolinium will confirm diagnosis and show the exact extension of the lesion

  8. Unsuspected meningioma in a patient with pituitary gigantism. Case report with autopsy findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, J.M.; Ghatak, N.R.; Oppenheimer, J.H.

    1975-06-01

    A unique example of a clinically unsuspected large parasellar meningioma is described in a 36-yr-old pituitary giant who had been treated initially with conventional irradiation, subsequently by surgical excision of an acidophil adenoma, and ultimately with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) prior to his demise. The patient died of increased intracranial pressure resulting from a combined mass effect of the meningioma and recurrent tumor. The relationship between radiation and the development of the meningioma is discussed, as well as the fine ultrastructure of a highly functioning acidophil adenoma.

  9. Unsuspected meningioma in a patient with pituitary gigantism. Case report with autopsy findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, J.M.; Ghatak, N.R.; Oppenheimer, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    A unique example of a clinically unsuspected large parasellar meningioma is described in a 36-yr-old pituitary giant who had been treated initially with conventional irradiation, subsequently by surgical excision of an acidophil adenoma, and ultimately with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) prior to his demise. The patient died of increased intracranial pressure resulting from a combined mass effect of the meningioma and recurrent tumor. The relationship between radiation and the development of the meningioma is discussed, as well as the fine ultrastructure of a highly functioning acidophil adenoma

  10. [A case of petrous ridge meningioma manifested as pneumocephalus followed by Eustachian tube insufflation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinya; Gi, Hidefuku; Uno, Jyunji; Ikai, Yoshiaki; Inoha, Satoshi; Nagaoka, Shintarou; Nishio, Shunji

    2009-05-01

    A 50-year-old female, who had a headache after Eustachian tube insufflation for her ear congestion, came to our hospital. CT and MRI revealed pneumocephalus and petrous ridge meningioma which destroyed petrous bone and air cells. Eustachian tube insufflation was considered to make the air coming into the middle ear, mastoid air cell and then into the intracranial space destroying the tumor. At surgery, there was subdural hematoma around the tumor. Total removal of the tumor and the hematoma membrane was performed. Histologically, the tumor was transitional meningioma and the cluster of meningioma cells were noted in the subdural hematoma membrane.

  11. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  12. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  13. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  14. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  15. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  16. Abnormal contrast enhancement after the removal of meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soutsu, M; Hashimoto, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Sekino, H; Nakamura, N [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-12-01

    Since the introduction of Computerized Tomography (CT) in August, 1976, we have had experience with 20 patients with meningioma. In 10 patients out of the 20, the tumors were removed totally and examined by contrast-enhanced CT pre- and postoperatively. In spite of the total removal of the tumor, however, 5 patients showed an unexpected abnormal enhancement at the operated site after the infusion of a contrast material. These changes were relatively intense, so it was suspected that there were residual tumors. Comparing these 5 cases with the remaining 5 that had no postoperative enhancement, the former cases were shown by operative and angiographical findings to have more adhesion and connecting vessels between tumor and cortex. Since such a postoperative abnormal enhancement is seen along the corticotomy or retracted area after operations for and aneurysm or another lesion, damaged brain tissue was though to be the probable reason for this enhancement. Moreover, the circulatory change caused by cutting the connecting vessels between tumor and cortex was considered to be another reason for the enhancement. This mechanism was also considered to be one reason for the post-meningioma syndrome by El-Banhawy. These postoperative enhancements decreased in density and became obscure within 4 or 8 weeks. Any reappearance of such changes after that period should be examined, carefully to determine whether or not it marks a recurrent tumor.

  17. Follicular thyroid carcinoma mimicking meningioma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnalatha Buandasan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC is a well-differentiated tumor which resembles the normal microscopic pattern of the thyroid. Although intracranial metastasis to the brain is frequent in adults, metastasis from FTC is very rare. Dural metastases mimicking meningioma have been documented in the literature now and then. However, cases arising from a FTC are again very rare. We report the case of a middle-aged lady who presented with progressive, painless left eye proptosis. She was noted to have a non-axial proptosis with dystopia, compressive optic neuropathy and exposure keratitis. She also had a painless swelling over the occipital region. She was initially misdiagnosed to have multiple foci of meningioma based on magnetic resonance imaging findings. Subsequent histopathological examination revealed presence of FTC. She was euthyroid but was found to have multiple small thyroid nodules by ultrasonography. Hence, the definite diagnosis of all dural masses must be histological wherever possible and thyroid carcinoma should be considered as a potential primary tumour in such presentations.

  18. Following the canyon to reach and remove olfactory groove meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefini, Roberto; Zenga, Francesco; Giacomo, Esposito; Bolzoni, Andrea; Tartara, Fulvio; Spena, Giannantonio; Ambrosi, Claudia; Fontanella, Marco M

    2017-04-01

    Olfactory groove meningiomas (OGMs) represent approximately 10% of all intracranial meningiomas. They arise in the olfactory fossa, a variable depression delimited by the lateral lamella and perpendicular plate. The cribriform plate with the lateral lamella and ethmoidal and orbital roof could be viewed as a 'canyon' with the frontal sinus as the main entrance. Between January 2000 and December 2013, 32 consecutive patients underwent removal of OGMs through this 'canyon' at the Department of Neurosurgery of Brescia and Turin. Complete removal was achieved in all patients with this trans-frontal sinus subcranial approach (Simpson grade I; mean lesion volume, 46.6 cm3). Five patients (15.6%) experienced nasal CSF leakage, treated with external lumbar drain positioning for 4 days and resolved in all cases but one, which was re-operated. Two patients (6.2%) during the CSF leakage experienced meningitis at day 7 after surgery, both successfully treated by intravenous antibiotic therapy. After one month, one patient developed hydrocephalus, treated with a ventricular peritoneal shunt. In one patient, traction on the OGM caused bleeding of the callosomarginal artery, which was coagulated with superior frontal gyrus ischemia without neurological consequences. Glasgow Outcome Scale Score at 6 months was V in 29 patients, IV in one patient, and I in two patients. Advantages with this approach may include easy and early control of blood supply from its insertion in the skull base, minimal frontal lobe retraction, preservation of the frontal veins draining to the sagittal sinus, and a satisfactory aesthetic outcome.

  19. The plasma-sheath boundary region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R N

    2003-01-01

    In this review an attempt is made to give a broad coverage of the problem of joining plasma and sheath over a wide range of physical conditions. We go back to the earliest works quoting them, where appropriate, to understand what those who introduced the various terms associated with the structure of the plasma-sheath had in mind. We try to bring out the essence of the insights that have been gained subsequently, by quoting from the literature selectively, indicating how misunderstandings have arisen. In order to make it accessible to the generality of those currently working in low temperature plasmas we have sought to avoid mathematical complexity but retain physical insight, quoting from published work where appropriate. Nevertheless, in clarifying my own ideas I have found it necessary to do additional original work in order to give a consistent picture. In this way I have sought to bring together work in the late 1920s, the 1960s, and now mindful of the commercial importance of plasma processing, work over the past 15 years that adds to the general understanding. (topical review)

  20. Volumetric changes and clinical outcome for petroclival meningiomas after primary treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Zjiwar H A; Lie, Suan Te; Leenstra, Sieger; Hanssens, Patrick E J

    2018-01-26

    OBJECTIVE Petroclival meningiomas (PCMs) can cause devastating clinical symptoms due to mass effect on cranial nerves (CNs); thus, patients harboring these tumors need treatment. Many neurosurgeons advocate for microsurgery because removal of the tumor can provide relief or result in symptom disappearance. Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is often an alternative for surgery because it can cause tumor shrinkage with improvement of symptoms. This study evaluates qualitative volumetric changes of PCM after primary GKRS and its impact on clinical symptoms. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective study of patients with PCM who underwent primary GKRS between 2003 and 2015 at the Gamma Knife Center of the Elisabeth-Tweesteden Hospital in Tilburg, the Netherlands. This study yields 53 patients. In this study the authors concentrate on qualitative volumetric tumor changes, local tumor control rate, and the effect of the treatment on trigeminal neuralgia (TN). RESULTS Local tumor control was 98% at 5 years and 93% at 7 years (Kaplan-Meier estimates). More than 90% of the tumors showed regression in volume during the first 5 years. The mean volumetric tumor decrease was 21.2%, 27.1%, and 31% at 1, 3, and 6 years of follow-up, respectively. Improvement in TN was achieved in 61%, 67%, and 70% of the cases at 1, 2, and 3 years of follow-up, respectively. This was associated with a mean volumetric tumor decrease of 25% at the 1-year follow-up to 32% at the 3-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS GKRS for PCMs yields a high tumor control rate with a low incidence of neurological deficits. Many patients with TN due to PCM experienced improvement in TN after radiosurgery. GKRS achieves significant volumetric tumor decrease in the first years of follow-up and thereafter.

  1. Embedded cladding surface thermocouples on Zircaloy-sheathed heater rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.

    1977-06-01

    Titanium-sheathed Type K thermocouples embedded in the cladding wall of zircaloy-sheathed heater rods are described. These thermocouples constitute part of a program intended to characterize the uncertainty of measurements made by surface-mounted cladding thermocouples on nuclear fuel rods. Fabrication and installation detail, and laboratory testing of sample thermocouple installations are included

  2. Sheath structure transition controlled by secondary electron emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Langendorf, S. J.; Walker, M. L. R.; Keidar, M.

    2015-04-01

    In particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC MCC) simulations and in an experiment we study sheath formation over an emissive floating Al2O3 plate in a direct current discharge plasma at argon gas pressure 10-4 Torr. The discharge glow is maintained by the beam electrons emitted from a negatively biased hot cathode. We observe three types of sheaths near the floating emissive plate and the transition between them is driven by changing the negative bias. The Debye sheath appears at lower voltages, when secondary electron emission is negligible. With increasing applied voltage, secondary electron emission switches on and a first transition to a new sheath type, beam electron emission (BEE), takes place. For the first time we find this specific regime of sheath operation near the floating emissive surface. In this regime, the potential drop over the plate sheath is about four times larger than the temperature of plasma electrons. The virtual cathode appears near the emissive plate and its modification helps to maintain the BEE regime within some voltage range. Further increase of the applied voltage U initiates the second smooth transition to the plasma electron emission sheath regime and the ratio Δφs/Te tends to unity with increasing U. The oscillatory behavior of the emissive sheath is analyzed in PIC MCC simulations. A plasmoid of slow electrons is formed near the plate and transported to the bulk plasma periodically with a frequency of about 25 kHz.

  3. Electrospinning jet behaviors under the constraints of a sheath gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the ejection efficiency and uniformity of nanofibers is the key to applications of electrospinning technology. In this work, a novel electrospinning spinneret with a sheath gas passageway is designed. The frictional resistance that stems from the sheath gas provides additional stretching and restriction forces on the jet. The sheath gas also reduces interference and enhances the stability of the charged jet. A bead-on-strain simulation model is built up to determine the constraint effects of the sheath gas. Simulation results show that the sheath gas decreases the motion area and increases the stretching ratio of the liquid jet. The stretching force from the sheath gas decreases the diameter and increases the uniformity of the nanofiber. As the gas pressure increases from 0 kPa to 50 kPa, the critical voltage of the jet ejection decreases from 8.4 kV to 2.5 kV, the diameter of the nanofiber deposition zone decreases from 40 cm to 10 cm, and the diameter of the nanofibers decreases from 557.97 nm to 277.73 nm. The uniformity of nanofibers can be improved significantly using a sheath gas. The sheath gas contributes to the rapid deposition of a uniform nanofibrous membrane and the industrial applications of electrospinning.

  4. Significance of rice sheath photosynthesis: Yield determination by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using high-yielding hybrid rice Liangyopeijiu (LYP9), its male parent 9311 and hybrid rice Shanyou 63 (SY63) as the experimental materials, the photosynthesis of rice sheath was studied by 14C radio-autography. The results showed that rice sheath could trap sunlight and produce photosynthates, and these ...

  5. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abe; Raitses, Yevgeny; Keidar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  6. What is the size of a floating sheath? An answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Farina; Naggary, Schabnam; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter

    2016-09-01

    The formation of a non-neutral boundary sheath in front of material surfaces is universal plasma phenomenon. Despite several decades of research, however, not all related issues are fully clarified. In a recent paper, Chabert pointed out that this lack of clarity applies even to the seemingly innocuous question ``What the size of a floating sheath?'' This contribution attempts to provide an answer that is not arbitrary: The size of a floating sheath is defined as the plate separation of an equivalent parallel plate capacitor. The consequences of the definition are explored with the help of a self-consistent sheath model, and a comparison is made with other sheath size definitions. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft within SFB TR 87.

  7. Effect of collisions on photoelectron sheath in a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh; Mishra, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a study of the effect of the collision of electrons with atoms/molecules on the structure of a photoelectron sheath. Considering the half Fermi-Dirac distribution of photo-emitted electrons, an expression for the electron density in the sheath has been derived in terms of the electric potential and the structure of the sheath has been investigated by incorporating Poisson's equation in the analysis. The method of successive approximations has been used to solve Poisson's equation with the solution for the electric potential in the case of vacuum, obtained earlier [Sodha and Mishra, Phys. Plasmas 21, 093704 (2014)], being used as the zeroth order solution for the present analysis. The inclusion of collisions influences the photoelectron sheath structure significantly; a reduction in the sheath width with increasing collisions is obtained.

  8. Sheath impedance effects in very high frequency plasma experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Hollenstein, C.

    1995-05-01

    The frequency dependence (13.56 MHz to 70 MHz) of the ion energy distribution at the ground electrode was measured by mass spectrometry in a symmetrical capacitive argon discharge. Reduced sheath impedance at Very High Frequency allows high levels of plasma power and substrate ion flux whilst maintaining low levels of ion energy and electrode voltage. The lower limit of ion bombardment energy is fixed by the sheath floating potential at high frequency, in contrast to low frequencies where only the rf voltage amplitude is determinant. The capacitive sheaths are thinner at high frequencies which accentuates the high frequency reduction in sheath impedance. It is argued that the frequency dependence of sheath impedance is responsible for the principal characteristics of Very High Frequency plasmas. The measurements are summarised by simple physical descriptions and compared with a Particle-In-Cell simulation. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  9. Benign Sphenoid Wing Meningioma Presenting with an Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Frič

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Study Object We report an unusual case of a benign lateral sphenoid wing meningioma that presented with, and was masked by, an acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Case Report A 68-year-old woman was admitted after sudden onset of coma. Computed tomography (CT revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage, without any underlying vascular pathology on CT angiography. During the surgery, we found a lateral sphenoid wing meningioma with intratumoral bleeding that extended into the surrounding brain parenchyma. Results We removed the hematoma and resected the tumor completely in the same session. The histopathological classification of the tumor was a WHO grade I meningothelial meningioma. The patient recovered very well after surgery, without significant neurological sequelae. Conclusions Having reviewed the relevant references from the medical literature, we consider this event as an extremely rare presentation of a benign sphenoid wing meningioma in a patient without any predisposing medical factors. The possible mechanisms of bleeding from this tumor type are discussed.

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor A protein level and gene expression in intracranial meningiomas with brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nassehi, Damoun; Dyrbye, Henrik; Andresen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Meningiomas are the second most common primary intracranial tumors in adults. Although meningiomas are mostly benign, more than 50% of patients with meningioma develop peritumoral brain edema (PTBE), which may be fatal because of increased intracranial pressure. Vascular endothelial growth factor....... Forty-three patients had primary, solitary, supratentorial meningiomas with PTBE. In these, correlations in PTBE, edema index, VEGF-A protein, VEGF gene expression, capillary length, and tumor water content were investigated. DNA-branched hybridization was used for measuring VEGF gene expression...... in tissue homogenates prepared from frozen tissue samples. The method for VEGF-A analysis resembled an ELISA assay, but was based on chemiluminescence. The edema index was positively correlated to VEGF-A protein (p = 0.014) and VEGF gene expression (p

  11. Similarities and distinctions of CIR and Sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaev, Yuri; Lodkina, Irina; Nikolaeva, Nadezhda; Yermolaev, Michael

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of OMNI data and our catalog of large scale solar wind (SW) streams during 1976-2000 [Yermolaev et al., 2009] we study the average temporal profiles for two types of compressed regions: CIR (corotating interaction region - compressed region before High Speed Stream (HSS)) and Sheath (compressed region before fast Interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs), including Magnetic Cloud (MC) and Ejecta). As have been shown by Nikolaeva et al, [2015], the efficiency of magnetic storm generation is ~50% higher for Sheath and CIR than for ICME (MC and Ejecta), i.e. reaction magnetosphere depends on type of driver. To take into account the different durations of SW types, we use the double superposed epoch analysis (DSEA) method: rescaling the duration of the interval for all types in such a manner that, respectively, beginning and end for all intervals of selected type coincide [Yermolaev et al., 2010; 2015]. Obtained data allows us to suggest that the formation of all types of compression regions has the same physical mechanism irrespective of piston (HSS or ICME) type and differences are connected with geometry and full jumps of speed in edges of compression regions. If making the natural assumption that the gradient of speed is directed approximately on normal to the piston, CIR has the largest angle between the gradient of speed and the direction of average SW speed, and ICME - the smallest angle. The work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects 13-02-00158, 16-02-00125 and by Program of Presidium of the Russian Academy of Sciences. References: Nikolaeva, N. S. , Yu. I. Yermolaev, and I. G. Lodkina (2015), Modeling of the Corrected Dst* Index Temporal Profile on the Main Phase of the Magnetic Storms Generated by Different Types of Solar Wind, Cosmic Research, Vol. 53, No. 2, pp. 119-127. Yermolaev, Yu. I., N. S. Nikolaeva, I. G. Lodkina, and M. Yu. Yermolaev (2009), Catalog of Large-Scale Solar Wind Phenomena during 1976-2000, Cosmic Research

  12. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M.; Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs

  13. Sheath rendezvous method: a novel distal protection technique during endovascular treatment of subclavian artery occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Takuya; Urasawa, Kazushi; Nakama, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Yuya; Tan, Michinao; Koshida, Ryoji; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-01

    To describe an innovative distal protection technique, "sheath rendezvous method", during endovascular treatment for subclavian arterial occlusions. 4.5F and 6F guiding sheath were inserted from left brachial and common femoral artery, respectively. 0.014″ guidewire retrogradely passed through occlusion and into antegrade sheath to establish a pull-through system. 3.0 mm balloon was used to expand occlusion and anchor to deliver retrograde sheath into antegrade one. Both sheaths locked by balloon dilatation crossed occlusion until antegrade sheath passed over lesion. Balloon expandable stent was delivered within antegrade sheath. Sheath was removed, and stent was implanted. We obtained an excellent outcome without complications.

  14. Intracranial meningioma as primary presentation for an undiagnosed collision metastatic breast cancer: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrag, Ashraf; Ansari, Jawaher; Ali, Muhammad; Sunbuli, Ghanem; Kassem, Hassan; Al Hamad, Abdul-Aziz

    2018-05-01

    Intracranial metastasis from breast cancer is a relatively common finding, however, the appearance of breast cancer metastasis in a meningioma is very rare. Several cases of tumor-to-tumor metastasis and collision tumors have been reported previously, with meningioma being implicated as the most common benign intracranial neoplasm to harbour the metastasis. Occasionally, the discovery of a tumor-to-meningioma metastasis may herald the diagnosis of an occult primary malignancy. Careful histopathological assessment of the resected meningioma specimen is pivotal to the management of these patients, as this will alter the treatment plan and prognosis considerably. Intracranial meningioma with collision breast cancer as primary presentation of an undiagnosed metastatic breast cancer is extremely rare. The current study presents a case of intracranial meningioma with collision breast cancer as a primary presentation, and reviews the available evidence for this unusual disease entity.

  15. Expression of proto-oncogene KIT is up-regulated in subset of human meningiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini Masum

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background KIT is a proto-oncogene involved in diverse neoplastic processes. Aberrant kinase activity of the KIT receptor has been targeted by tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI therapy in different neoplasias. In all the earlier studies, KIT expression was reported to be absent in meningiomas. However, we observed KIT mRNA expression in some meningioma cases. This prompted us to undertake its detailed analyses in meningioma tissues resected during 2008–2009. Methods Tumor tissues and matched peripheral blood samples collected from meningioma patients were used for detailed molecular analyses. KIT expression was ascertained immunohistochemically and validated by immunoblotting. KIT and KITLG transcript levels were discerned by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR. Similarly, KIT amplification and allele loss were assessed by quantitative real-time (qPCR and validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH on the neoplastic tissues. Possible alterations of the gene at the nucleotide level were analyzed by sequencing. Results Contrary to earlier reports, KIT expression, was detected immunohistochemically in 20.6% meningioma cases (n = 34. Receptor (KIT and ligand (KITLG transcripts monitored by RT-qPCR were found to co-express (p = 0.048 in most of the KIT immunopositive tumors. 1/7 KIT positive meningiomas showed allele loss corroborated by reduced FISH signal in the corresponding neoplastic tissue. Sequence analysis of KIT showed M541L substitution in exon 10, in one of the immunopositive cases. However, its biological consequence remains to be uncovered. Conclusions This study clearly demonstrates KIT over-expression in the human meningiomas. The data suggest that up-regulated KIT transcription (p  0.05, is a likely mechanism responsible for altered KIT expression. Thus, KIT is a potential candidate for detailed investigation in the context of meningioma pathogenesis.

  16. Expression of proto-oncogene KIT is up-regulated in subset of human meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, Masum; Jha, Ajaya Nand; Abrari, Andleeb; Ali, Sher

    2012-01-01

    KIT is a proto-oncogene involved in diverse neoplastic processes. Aberrant kinase activity of the KIT receptor has been targeted by tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in different neoplasias. In all the earlier studies, KIT expression was reported to be absent in meningiomas. However, we observed KIT mRNA expression in some meningioma cases. This prompted us to undertake its detailed analyses in meningioma tissues resected during 2008–2009. Tumor tissues and matched peripheral blood samples collected from meningioma patients were used for detailed molecular analyses. KIT expression was ascertained immunohistochemically and validated by immunoblotting. KIT and KITLG transcript levels were discerned by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR). Similarly, KIT amplification and allele loss were assessed by quantitative real-time (qPCR) and validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the neoplastic tissues. Possible alterations of the gene at the nucleotide level were analyzed by sequencing. Contrary to earlier reports, KIT expression, was detected immunohistochemically in 20.6% meningioma cases (n = 34). Receptor (KIT) and ligand (KITLG) transcripts monitored by RT-qPCR were found to co-express (p = 0.048) in most of the KIT immunopositive tumors. 1/7 KIT positive meningiomas showed allele loss corroborated by reduced FISH signal in the corresponding neoplastic tissue. Sequence analysis of KIT showed M541L substitution in exon 10, in one of the immunopositive cases. However, its biological consequence remains to be uncovered. This study clearly demonstrates KIT over-expression in the human meningiomas. The data suggest that up-regulated KIT transcription (p < 0.001), instead of gene amplification (p > 0.05), is a likely mechanism responsible for altered KIT expression. Thus, KIT is a potential candidate for detailed investigation in the context of meningioma pathogenesis

  17. Body mass index, physical activity, and risk of adult meningioma and glioma: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, Tobias; Behrens, Gundula; Schmid, Daniela; Schlecht, Inga; Fischer, Beate; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2015-10-13

    Whether adiposity and lack of physical activity affect the risk for developing meningioma and glioma is poorly understood. Our objective was to characterize these associations in detail. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of adiposity and physical activity in relation to meningioma and glioma using cohort and case-control studies published through February 2015. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We identified 12 eligible studies of body mass index (BMI) and 6 studies of physical activity, comprising up to 2,982 meningioma cases and 3,057 glioma cases. Using normal weight as the reference group, overweight (summary relative risk [RR] = 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.01-1.43) and obesity (RR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.32-1.79) were associated with increased risk of meningioma. In contrast, overweight (RR = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.94-1.20) and obesity (RR = 1.11, 95% CI = 0.98-1.27) were unrelated to glioma. Similarly, dose-response meta-analyses revealed a statistically significant positive association of BMI with meningioma, but not glioma. High vs low physical activity levels showed a modest inverse relation to meningioma (RR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.61-0.88) and a weak inverse association with glioma (RR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.76-0.97). Relations persisted when the data were restricted to prospective studies, except for the association between physical activity and glioma, which was rendered statistically nonsignificant (RR = 0.91, 95% CI = 0.77-1.07). Adiposity is related to enhanced risk for meningioma but is unassociated with risk for glioma. Based on a limited body of evidence, physical activity is related to decreased risk of meningioma but shows little association with risk of glioma. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Foramen of Monro meningioma with atypical appearance: CT and conventional MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakyemez, B.; Erdogan, C.; Oruc, E.; Parlak, M.; Aker, S.; Aksoy, K.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Intraventricular meningiomas have often been reported; however, literature reveals very few cases localized within foramen of Monro. Herein we report a 57-year-old woman admitted with obstructive hydrocephalus-related symptoms. Strikingly, the lesion was completely calcified in (T and had no marked solid component on MRI. The lesion was completely removed by surgical resection with a transfrontal intraventricular approach. The resected mass was histopathologically diagnosed as meningioma. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after the operation

  19. Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging of meningioma and other intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Derek R; Hunt, Christopher H; Nathan, Mark A; Parisi, Joseph E; Boeve, Bradley F; Murray, Melissa E; Knopman, David S; Jack, Clifford R; Petersen, Ronald C; Lowe, Val J; Johnson, Geoffrey B

    2018-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common intracranial tumors. Diagnosis by MRI is generally straightforward, but lack of imaging specificity can present a diagnostic dilemma, particularly in patients with cancer. We report our experience with meningioma identification on Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET/CT. Patients who underwent PiB PET/CT from 2006 to 2015 were reviewed to identify those with intracranial tumors. Tumor types were classified by MR appearance, or by pathology when available. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) measurements of tumor PiB activity were compared across tumor types. 2472 patients underwent PiB PET/CT in the period of interest; 45 patients (1.8%) had probable or definite intracranial tumor. Tumor types were meningioma (29/45, 64%), vestibular schwannoma (7/45, 16%), pituitary macroadenoma (4/45, 9%), metastatic disease (2/45, 4%), and others (3/45, 7%). In patients with meningioma, the mean lesion SUVmax was 2.05 (SD 1.37), versus 1.00 (SD 0.42) in patients with non-meningioma tumors (p < 0.01). A receiver operating curve was created for lesion:cerebellum SUVmax ratio, with an area under the curve of 0.91 for a value of 1.68. At or above this ratio, specificity for meningioma was 100% (95% CI 79-100%) and sensitivity was 76% (95% CI 57-90%). PiB PET activity within an intracranial tumor is a highly specific and reasonably sensitive marker of meningioma. Further prospective evaluation is warranted to validate this result as well as to assess the performance of commercially available beta-amyloid radiotracers in meningioma identification.

  20. A solution to meningiomas at the trigone of the lateral ventricle using a contralateral transfalcine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Xie, Tao; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Ma, Bingbing; Wang, Xuejian; Gu, Ye; Ge, Junqi; Xu, Wenlong; Hu, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Li, Qiuping; Yu, Yong; Zhou, Hao; Jiang, Yinchuan; Li, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    Access to the trigone of the lateral ventricle is challenging because of the deep location and the intimate relationships to eloquent areas. A novel posterior interhemispheric transfalx transprecuneus approach for two meningiomas at the trigone of the lateral ventricle is described. The meningiomas were resected completely with good neurologic outcomes and no operative mortality. The feasibilities and advantages of this novel approach are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Utilization of glutamate/creatine ratios for proton spectroscopic diagnosis of meningiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazany, Saman; Hesselink, John R.; Healy, John F.; Imbesi, Steven G.

    2007-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine the potential of metabolites other than alanine to diagnose intracranial meningiomas on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Using a 1.5-T MR system the lesions were initially identified on FLAIR, and T1- and T2-weighted images. Employing standard point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) for single voxel proton MRS (TR 1500 ms, TE 30 ms, 128 acquisitions, voxel size 2 x 2 x 2 cm, acquisition time 3.12 min), MR spectra were obtained from 5 patients with meningiomas, from 20 with other intracranial lesions, and from 4 normal controls. Peak heights of nine resonances, including lipid, lactate, alanine, NAA (N-acetylaspartate), β/γ-Glx (glutamate + glutamine), creatine, choline, myo-inositol, and α-Glx/glutathione, were measured in all spectra. The relative quantity of each metabolite was measured as the ratio of its peak height to the peak height of creatine. Relative quantities of α-Glx/glutathione, β/γ-Glx, and total Glx/glutathione were significantly elevated in meningiomas compared to the 20 other intracranial lesions and the normal control brains. Alanine was found in four of five meningiomas, but lactate partially masked the alanine in three meningiomas. None of the other lesions or control brains showed an alanine peak. The one meningioma with no alanine and the three others with lactate had elevated Glx. While alanine is a relatively unique marker for meningioma, our results support the hypothesis that the combination of glutamate/creatine ratios and alanine on proton MRS is more specific and reliable for the diagnosis of meningiomas than alanine alone. (orig.)

  2. Unilateral hypertrophic skin lesions, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma: The many faces of Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika R Lal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a rare condition with a wide spectrum of abnormalities. It is characterized by hamartomatous malformations involving multiple organs. Serious complications may ensue, such as pulmonary embolism, cystic lung disease, and various neoplasms such as parotid adenomas, ovarian cystadenomas, and meningiomas. We report here a case of Proteus syndrome in a 21-year-old woman who had facial hemihypertrophy, cerebriform plantar hyperplasia, hemimegalencephaly, and meningioma for the rarity of the entity.

  3. Utilization of glutamate/creatine ratios for proton spectroscopic diagnosis of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazany, Saman [University of California, School of Medicine, San Diego, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R.; Healy, John F.; Imbesi, Steven G. [UCSD Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2007-02-15

    Our purpose was to determine the potential of metabolites other than alanine to diagnose intracranial meningiomas on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Using a 1.5-T MR system the lesions were initially identified on FLAIR, and T1- and T2-weighted images. Employing standard point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) for single voxel proton MRS (TR 1500 ms, TE 30 ms, 128 acquisitions, voxel size 2 x 2 x 2 cm, acquisition time 3.12 min), MR spectra were obtained from 5 patients with meningiomas, from 20 with other intracranial lesions, and from 4 normal controls. Peak heights of nine resonances, including lipid, lactate, alanine, NAA (N-acetylaspartate), {beta}/{gamma}-Glx (glutamate + glutamine), creatine, choline, myo-inositol, and {alpha}-Glx/glutathione, were measured in all spectra. The relative quantity of each metabolite was measured as the ratio of its peak height to the peak height of creatine. Relative quantities of {alpha}-Glx/glutathione, {beta}/{gamma}-Glx, and total Glx/glutathione were significantly elevated in meningiomas compared to the 20 other intracranial lesions and the normal control brains. Alanine was found in four of five meningiomas, but lactate partially masked the alanine in three meningiomas. None of the other lesions or control brains showed an alanine peak. The one meningioma with no alanine and the three others with lactate had elevated Glx. While alanine is a relatively unique marker for meningioma, our results support the hypothesis that the combination of glutamate/creatine ratios and alanine on proton MRS is more specific and reliable for the diagnosis of meningiomas than alanine alone. (orig.)

  4. The trans-frontal-sinus subcranial approach for removal of large olfactory groove meningiomas: surgical technique and comparison to other approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boari, Nicola; Gagliardi, Filippo; Roberti, Fabio; Barzaghi, Lina Raffaella; Caputy, Anthony J; Mortini, Pietro

    2013-05-01

    Several surgical approaches have been previously reported for the treatment of olfactory groove meningiomas (OGM).The trans-frontal-sinus subcranial approach (TFSSA) for the removal of large OGMs is described, comparing it with other reported approaches in terms of advantages and drawbacks. The TFSSA was performed on cadaveric specimens to illustrate the surgical technique. The surgical steps of the TFSSA and the related anatomical pictures are reported. The approach was adopted in a clinical setting; a case illustration is reported to demonstrate the feasibility of the described approach and to provide intraoperative pictures. The TFSSA represents a possible route to treat large OGMs. The subcranial approach provides early devascularization of the tumor, direct tumor access from the base without traction on the frontal lobes, good overview of dissection of the optic nerves and anterior cerebral arteries, and dural reconstruction with pedicled pericranial flap. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. THREE YEARS STUDY OF SCHWANNOMAS OF PERIPHERAL NERVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Dhua

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In this paper authors present three cases of schwannomas including a case of multiple schwannomas without the features of neurofibromatosis (NF. There was no family history of neurofibromatosis. All the patients underwent surgical excision and improved from the symptomatic lesions. Histopathology confirmed these lesions as schwannomas. The authors recommend surgery for symptomatic lesions. Asymptomatic tumours can be monitored. Regular follow up is essential as they may develop fresh lesions at any time. The relevant literature is discussed. • Malignant transformation of the schwannomas is rare and has poor prognosis. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of schwannomas. • We should distinguish between “ancient schwannoma” and malignant transformation of schwannoma since treatment and prognosis vary. • Imaging is not entirely reliable in differentiating benign from malignant peripheral nerve tumours. MATERIALS AND METHODS All the patients underwent surgical excision and improved from the symptomatic lesions. Histopathology confirmed these lesions as schwannomas. The authors recommend surgery for symptomatic lesions. RESULTS The histopathological studies confirmed the lesion as Flexi Schwannoma and surgery was considered to be the best option. CONCLUSION Schwannomas and meningiomas are usually benign tumours curable by complete removal. They occur either as single sporadic tumors in otherwise healthy individuals in the fourth to sixth decades of life or as multiple tumours at an early age as part of the autosomal dominant genetic disorder neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2. The hallmark feature of NF2 is bilateral vestibular schwannomas. Multiplicity, a lobular growth pattern, and invasiveness are typical features of NF2 schwannomas. The diagnosis of NF2 is difficult in a group of heterogeneous and poorly defined patients who do not have BVSs but present with other features suggestive of NF2, namely (1 multiple

  6. Characteristics of metal sheathed thermocouples in thermowell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takehiro; Nakase, Tsuyoshi; Tanabe, Yutaka; Yamada, Kunitaka; Yoshizaki, Akio; Roko, Kiyokazu

    1987-01-01

    Static and dynamic characteristics of thermowell type thermocouples which are planned to be used for the High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) have been investigated. A mock-up test section was installed in Kawasaki's Helium Test Loop (KH-200). Thermal characteristics tests were carried out under the 600 ∼ 1000 deg C temperature conditions. The test section was equipped with four types sheathed thermocouples; the well type, the non well type, and ones with and without the thermal radiation shielding plate. The measured temperature by the well type thermocouples with the shielding plate was only about 1.3 deg C higher than the one without the shielding plate at gas temperature 990 deg C. The measured time constant of the well type thermocouples was about 7 seconds in the condition of the heat transfer coefficient 1600 Kcal/m 2 h deg C on the well surface, and coincided with the calculated one by ''TRUMP'' code. (author)

  7. Estimation of radiation losses from sheathed thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, I.L.; Coney, J.E.R.; Gibbs, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermocouples are often used for temperature measurements in heat exchangers. However if the radiation losses from a thermocouple in a high temperature gas flow to colder surroundings are ignored significant errors can occur. Even at moderate temperature differences, these can be significant. Prediction of radiation losses from theory can be problematic, especially in situations where there are large variations in the measured temperatures as the emissivity and radiative heat transfer coefficient of the thermocouple are not constant. The following approach combines experimental results with established empirical relationships to estimate losses due to radiation in an annular heat exchanger at temperatures up to 950 o C. - Highlights: → Sheathed thermocouples are often used to measure temperatures in heat exchangers. → Errors are introduced if radiation losses are ignored. → Radiation losses are environment specific and may be significant. → Experimental and theoretical methods are used to estimate losses. → Hot side maximum temperature 950 o C.

  8. Phrenic nerves and diaphragms in sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, J; Weber, U; Schröder, J M; Lemke, R; Althoff, H

    1998-01-30

    Disturbances of the respiratory system may be an important factor in the cascade of events leading to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Even though the diaphragm is the major respiratory muscle in infants, little is known about alterations of this muscle and of the phrenic nerve in SIDS. In the present study, diaphragms and phrenic nerves of 24 SIDS infants and seven controls were analyzed. Morphometric analysis revealed only slightly larger cross sectional areas of phrenic nerve axons but no increase in myelin sheath thickness in SIDS cases. However, in one SIDS case, myelinated nerve fibre density was severely reduced. Using electron microscopy, several nerve fibres of SIDS infants showed focal accumulations of neurofilaments. Muscle fibre diameters in SIDS diaphragms were significantly larger compared to controls (P fibre ruptures and contracture bands were found. These prominent nonspecific ultrastructural alterations should advise caution in the interpretation of morphometric data. Thus, in some cases exemplified by one case of the present series, decreased density of phrenic nerve myelinated axons might contribute to SIDS. Still, the present results indicate that development of phrenic nerves and diaphragms is not delayed in most SIDS infants.

  9. The Sheath-less Planar Langmuir Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The Langmuir probe is one of the oldest plasma diagnostics, provided the plasma density and species temperature from analysis of a current-voltage curve as the voltage is swept over a practically chosen range. The analysis depends on a knowledge or theory of the many factors that influence the current-voltage curve including, probe shape, size, nearby perturbations, and the voltage reference. For applications in Low Earth Orbit, the Planar Langmuir Probe, PLP, is an attractive geometry because the ram ion current is very constant over many Volts of a sweep, allowing the ion density and electron temperature to be determined independently with the same instrument, at different points on the sweep. However, when the physical voltage reference is itself small and electrically floating as with a small spacecraft, the spacecraft and probe system become a double probe where the current collection theory depends on the interaction of the spacecraft with the plasma which is generally not as simple as the probe itself. The Sheath-less PLP, SPLP, interlaces on a single ram facing surface, two variably biased probe elements, broken into many small and intertwined segments on a scale smaller than the plasma Debye length. The SPLP is electrically isolated from the rest of the spacecraft. For relative bias potentials of a few volts, the ion current to all segments of each element will be constant, while the electron currents will vary as a function of the element potential and the electron temperature. Because the segments are small, intertwined, and floating, the assembly will always present the same floating potential to the plasma, with minimal growth as a function of voltage, thus sheath-less and still planar. This concept has been modelled with Nascap, and tested with a physical model inserted into a Low Earth Orbit-like chamber plasma. Results will be presented.

  10. An analysis of the magnetic resonance imaging and pathology of intracal lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianli; Zhou Junlin; Ma Yongheng; Dong Chi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the MRI features of the intracranial lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma and the correlation between the MRI features and pathology. Methods: Review retrospectively the MRI and pathologic data of seven patients with lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma which were confirmed by surgery and pathology. Results: The seven cases of lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma were solitary, six cases demonstrated flat growth along the meninges, five cases had not yet formed specific nodules, and two cases exhibited irregular lobulation. Seven cases had no clear boundary, peritumoral brain edema was obvious and adjacent brain tissues were invaded to varying degrees. After plain MRI scans, the focuses of seven cases exhibited lower-isointense signal in T1WI, five cases revealed higher-isointense signal and two cases showed lower-isointense signal in T2WI. Enhancement scans demonstrated marked enhancement in seven cases, and the meninges in six cases thicken irregularly and extensively. Pathology showed the richness and diversity of cells, an infiltration containing plasma cells and lymphocytes, as well as the unequal areas of neoplastic spindle cells and meninge epithelial cells. Conclusion: Lymphoplasmacyte-rich meningioma is a subtype meningioma of WHO I-grade, which is seldom seen and whose imaging appearances are varied from ordinary meningioma. Its features include growing flat along the meninges, irregular forms, unclear boundary, obvious edema, notable strengthening effect, usual invasion of adjacent brain tissues, and similar inflammation.

  11. A juvenile case of radiation-induced meningioma two years after radiation for craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, Tomoaki; Zama, Akira; Ono, Nobuo; Nakamura, Tadashi; Tamura, Masaru; Ohe, Tihiro; Nakazato, Yoichi (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-04-01

    The patient was a 7-years-old boy who received radiation therapy of 50 Gy after total gross removal of a craniopharyngioma. After two years a follow up CT scan showed a new enhanced lesion in the right temporal tip within the previous irradiation field. Total removal of the tumor was performed and its histological examination showed it to be an atypical meningioma. This atypical meningioma satisfied Cahan's criteria. So we diagnosed this atypical meningioma as radiation-induced meningioma. Immunohistochemically this meningioma stained for Vimentin. An electron microscopical examination showed neither desmosome nor interdigitation. The score of Ki-67 and BrdU-L. I was very small. Compared with previously reported juvenile radiation-induced meningioma, the latency was very short. The patient received growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy. We suspected relation between GH replacement therapy and short latency. He was discharged without any new neurological deficits and we haven't detected tumor recurrence for two years. (author).

  12. Study of immediate technetium 99m uptake by intracranial meningiomas and meningoblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcin, Gerard.

    1976-01-01

    The immediate uptake of technetium 99m in 43 meningiomas and meningoblastomas, observed with a scintillation camera, was analysed. The study concerns the first 30 seconds of the scintigraphic examination, a period corresponding to the arrival of the tracer in the carotids and its progress in the brain circulation (arterial time, capillary time and venous time). The principle of the examination and the facilities of use of the tracer employed are described, after which the examination procedure and the normal images obtained are reported. The technique applied to these 43 patients revealed an instant uptake site in 37 cases, i.e. about 65%. Of the 6 remaining cases 2 were meningiomas of the posterior cranial fossa, 1 was due to technical mistakes, another corresponded to a cystic meningioma of the convexity and the last two to meningiomas of the small splenoid wing. These results confirm those of other authors. Other immediate uptake centres are provided by angiomas, arteriovenous anevrisms and certain glioblastomas. This sign although very important for the meningioma diagnosis, must be corroborated by results of other examinations. It would be useful to make a kinematic study of instant uptake in order to establish, if possible, the exact time of appearance (arterial, capillary or veinous) of this site in meningiomas and in other tumours where the some clinical sign is observed [fr

  13. Contribution of dynamic contrast MR imaging to the differentiation between dural metastasis and meningioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kremer, S.; Grand, S.; Le Bas, J.F.; Remy, C.; Pasquier, B.; Benabid, A.L.; Bracard, S.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the perfusion-sensitive characteristics of cerebral dural metastases and compare them with the data on meningiomas. Twenty-two patients presenting with dural tumor underwent conventional and dynamic susceptibility-contrast MR imaging: breast carcinoma metastases, two patients; colorectal carcinoma metastasis, one patient; lung carcinoma metastasis, one patient; Merkel carcinoma metastasis, one patient; lymphoma, one patient; meningiomas, 16 patients. The imaging characteristics were analyzed using conventional MR imaging. The cerebral blood volume (CBV) maps were obtained for each patient and the relative CBV (rCBV) in different areas was calculated using the ratio between the CBV in the pathological area (CBVp) and in the contralateral white matter (CBVn). The differentiation between a meningioma and a dural metastasis can be difficult using conventional MR imaging. The rCBVs of lung carcinoma metastasis (1 case: 1.26), lymphoma (1 case: 1.29), breast carcinoma metastasis (2 cases: 1.50,1.56) and rectal carcinoma metastasis (1 case: 3.34) were significantly lower than that of meningiomas (16 cases: mean rCBV = 8.97±4.34, range 4-18). Merkel carcinoma metastasis (1 case: 7.56) showed an elevated rCBV, not different from that of meningiomas. Dural metastases are sometimes indistinguishable from meningiomas using conventional MR imaging. rCBV mapping can provide additional information by demonstrating a low rCBV which may suggest the diagnosis of metastasis. (orig.)

  14. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in recurrent meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolomei, Mirco; Bodei, Lisa; De Cicco, Concetta; Grana, Chiara Maria; Baio, Silvia Melania; Arico, Demetrio; Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Cremonesi, Marta [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Botteri, Edoardo [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Milan (Italy); Sansovini, Maddalena [Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (I.R.S.T.), Radiometabolic Medicine Division, Meldola (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    Meningiomas are generally benign and in most cases surgery is curative. However, for high-grade histotypes or partially resected tumours, recurrence is fairly common. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is usually given in such cases but is not always effective. We assessed peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) using {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC in a group of patients with meningioma recurring after standard treatments in all of whom somatostatin receptors were strongly expressed on meningioma cell surfaces. Twenty-nine patients with scintigraphically proven somatostatin subtype 2 receptor-positive meningiomas were enrolled: 14 had benign (grade I), 9 had atypical (grade II) and 6 had malignant (grade III) disease. Patients received intravenous {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC for 2-6 cycles for a cumulative dose in the range of 5-15 GBq. Clinical and neuroradiological evaluations were performed at baseline, during and after PRRT. The treatment was well tolerated in all patients. MRI 3 months after treatment completion showed disease stabilization in 19 of 29 patients (66%) and progressive disease in the remaining 10 (34%). Better results were obtained in patients with grade I meningioma than in those with grade II-III, with median time to progression (from beginning PRRT) of 61 months in the low-grade group and 13 months in the high-grade group. PRRT with {sup 90}Y-DOTATOC can interfere with the growth of meningiomas. The adjuvant role of this treatment, soon after surgery, especially in atypical and malignant histotypes, deserves further investigation. (orig.)

  15. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  16. Management of pregnant female with meningioma for craniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sahu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial meningioma during pregnancy challenges the skill of obstetricians, neurosurgeons and neuroanesthesiologists in resection of the tumor and to secure delivery of the baby. Advances in fetal and maternal monitoring, neuroanesthesia, and microsurgical techniques allow safe neurosurgical management of these patients. Urgent neurosurgical intervention is reserved for the management of malignancies, active hydrocephalus, and benign brain tumors associated with signs of impending herniation or progressive neurological deficit. Particular attention is given to maintain stable maternal hemodynamics to avoid uterine hypo perfusion and fetal hypoxia intraoperatively. Therefore, the major challenge of neuroanesthesia during pregnancy is to provide an appropriate balance between competing, and even contradictory, clinical goals of neuroanesthesiology and obstetric practice.

  17. Use of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jae-Ik; Shin, Ji Hoon; Song, Ho-Young; Yoon, Chang Jin; Nam, Deok Ho; Choi, Won-Chan; Lim, Jin-Oh

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose was to assess the safety and usefulness of guiding sheaths in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. Two types of guiding sheath were made from straight polytetrafluoroethylene tubes. Type A was 80 cm in length, 4 mm in outer diameter and 3 mm in inner diameter. Type B was 70 cm in length, 6 mm in outer diameter and 5 mm in inner diameter. The type A sheath was used in 18 patients in whom a catheter-guide wire combination failed to pass through a stricture. The type B sheath was used in 22 patients in whom a stent delivery system failed to pass through the stricture due to loop formation within the gastric lumen. The overall success rate for guiding a catheter-guide wire through a stricture after using the type A sheath was 89%. The overall success rate for passing a stent delivery system through a stricture after using the type B sheath was 100%. All procedures were tolerated by the patients without any significant complications. The guiding sheaths were safe and useful in peroral fluoroscopic gastroduodenal stent placement. (orig.)

  18. ALINE: A device dedicated to understanding radio-frequency sheaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Devaux

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In fusion devices, radiofrequency (RF antennas are used for heating the plasma. Those antennas and the plasma interact with each other through the so-called RF sheaths, layers of plasma where the quasi-neutrality breaks down and large electric fields arise. Among the effects of RF sheaths, there is the enhancement of the particles and energy fluxes toward the surface of the antenna, which in turn generate hot spots and release impurities, which are both deleterious for plasma operations. RF sheaths comprehension stumbles on the difficulty to achieve in situ measurements of the sheath properties, as scrape-off layer plasmas are a harsh environment. The very goal of the ALINE device is to tackle this issue and to fulfil the blank between numerical simulations and full-scale experiment by providing measurements within the RF sheaths in a controlled environment. In this paper we report on the latest experimental results from ALINE, in which a cylindrical Langmuir probe mounted on a remotely controlled and programmable arm allows for plasma characterizations in the three dimensions of space around the stainless steel antenna, including the sheath. We present a series of density and potential profiles and three dimension (3D maps in the plasma surrounding a stainless-steel RF antenna as well as in the sheath itself, for unmagnetized and magnetized plasmas.

  19. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Hashimoto, Hideki; McFarlane, Ian R.; Hayashi, Naoaki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Taketa, Eisuke; Tamura, Katsunori; Takano, Mikio; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.; Kunoh, Hitoshi; Takada, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III) and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II) concentrations, Fe(III) precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II) to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III) was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II) medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter), while those in the Fe(III) medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter) with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved) of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths. PMID:27271677

  20. Abiotic Deposition of Fe Complexes onto Leptothrix Sheaths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Kunoh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria classified in species of the genus Leptothrix produce extracellular, microtubular, Fe-encrusted sheaths. The encrustation has been previously linked to bacterial Fe oxidases, which oxidize Fe(II to Fe(III and/or active groups of bacterial exopolymers within sheaths to attract and bind aqueous-phase inorganics. When L. cholodnii SP-6 cells were cultured in media amended with high Fe(II concentrations, Fe(III precipitates visibly formed immediately after addition of Fe(II to the medium, suggesting prompt abiotic oxidation of Fe(II to Fe(III. Intriguingly, these precipitates were deposited onto the sheath surface of bacterial cells as the population was actively growing. When Fe(III was added to the medium, similar precipitates formed in the medium first and were abiotically deposited onto the sheath surfaces. The precipitates in the Fe(II medium were composed of assemblies of globular, amorphous particles (ca. 50 nm diameter, while those in the Fe(III medium were composed of large, aggregated particles (≥3 µm diameter with a similar amorphous structure. These precipitates also adhered to cell-free sheaths. We thus concluded that direct abiotic deposition of Fe complexes onto the sheath surface occurs independently of cellular activity in liquid media containing Fe salts, although it remains unclear how this deposition is associated with the previously proposed mechanisms (oxidation enzyme- and/or active group of organic components-involved of Fe encrustation of the Leptothrix sheaths.

  1. The Tubular Sheaths Encasing Methanosaeta thermophila Filaments Are Functional Amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Larsen, Poul; Finster, Kai; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Vad, Brian S; Bøggild, Andreas; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-08-14

    Archaea are renowned for their ability to thrive in extreme environments, although they can be found in virtually all habitats. Their adaptive success is linked to their unique cell envelopes that are extremely resistant to chemical and thermal denaturation and that resist proteolysis by common proteases. Here we employ amyloid-specific conformation antibodies and biophysical techniques to show that the extracellular cell wall sheaths encasing the methanogenic archaea Methanosaeta thermophila PT are functional amyloids. Depolymerization of sheaths and subsequent MS/MS analyses revealed that the sheaths are composed of a single major sheath protein (MspA). The amyloidogenic nature of MspA was confirmed by in vitro amyloid formation of recombinant MspA under a wide range of environmental conditions. This is the first report of a functional amyloid from the archaeal domain of life. The amyloid nature explains the extreme resistance of the sheath, the elastic properties that allow diffusible substrates to penetrate through expandable hoop boundaries, and how the sheaths are able to split and elongate outside the cell. The archaeal sheath amyloids do not share homology with any of the currently known functional amyloids and clearly represent a new function of the amyloid protein fold. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Deoxycholic Acid and the Marginal Mandibular Nerve: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Alexander D; Ansari, Waseem; Young, Jason M; Maley, Bruce; Plesec, Thomas P; Hwang, Catherine J; Perry, Julian D

    2018-06-04

    One of the rare but serious complications observed with deoxycholic acid administration is damage to the marginal mandibular nerve. In this study, we evaluated if deoxycholic acid directly induces histologic damage to fresh cadaveric marginal mandibular nerve. A segment of marginal mandibular nerve was harvested from 12 hemifaces of 6 fresh cadavers. The nerve specimen was exposed to either 0.9% sterile saline for 24 h, deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 20 min, or deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 24 h. The nerve specimens were then fixed in glutaraldehyde for a minimum of 24 h. Toluidine blue stained sections were evaluated for stain intensity using light microscopy and color deconvolution image analysis. Supraplatysmal fat was harvested as a positive control and exposed to the same treatments as the marginal mandibular nerve specimens, then evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Toluidine blue staining was less in the marginal mandibular nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid when compared to saline. The specimen exposed to deoxycholic acid for 24 h showed less toluidine blue staining than that of the nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid for 20 min. Transmission electron microscopy of submental fat exposed to deoxycholic acid revealed disruption of adipocyte cell membrane integrity and loss of cellular organelles when compared to specimens only exposed to saline. Deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) damages the marginal mandibular nerve myelin sheath in fresh human cadaver specimens. Direct deoxycholic acid neurotoxicity may cause marginal mandibular nerve injury clinically. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  3. Computed tomography of cystic nerve root sleeve dilatation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neave, V C; Wycoff, R R

    1983-10-01

    A case of cystic nerve root sleeve dilatation in the lumbar area associated with a chronic back pain syndrome is presented. Prominent computed tomography (CT) findings include: (a) rounded masses in the region of the foramina isodense with cerebrospinal fluid in the subarachnoid space; (b) associated asymmetry of epidural fat distribution; (c) enlargement of the neural foramina in axial sections with scalloped erosion of the adjacent posteriolateral vertebral body, pedicle, and pedicular-laminar junction with preservation of cortex and without bony sclerosis or infiltrative appearance; (d) prominent or ectatic dural sac with lack of usual epidural landmarks between the sac and vertebral body; and (e) multilevel abnormalities throughout the entire lumbar region. Myelographic and CT correlations are demonstrated with a review of the literature. A discussion of the various cystic abnormalities involving nerve root sheaths is undertaken in an attempt to clarify the confusing nomenclature applied to nerve root sleeve pathology.

  4. Ultrasonographic findings of pilar sheath acanthoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Joo; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Seong Jin [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Pilar sheath acanthoma is a rare benign follicular hamartoma that presents with a central sinus containing keratinous material and is lined by epithelium. It typically occurs on the face, especially on the upper lip and forehead. In our case, the ultrasound (US) feature of pilar sheath acanthoma revealed a well-defined, oval hypoechoic nodule with hypoechoic capping within the dermis over the medial aspect of the calf. To the best of our knowledge, despite many reports on the clinicopathological aspects of pilar sheath acanthoma, this entity has not been well described in the radiologic literature, and US findings have not been documented.

  5. Experimental test of models of radio-frequency plasma sheaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolewski, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The ion current and sheath impedance were measured at the radio-frequency-powered electrode of an asymmetric, capacitively coupled plasma reactor, for discharges in argon at 1.33 endash 133 Pa. The measurements were used to test the models of the radio frequency sheath derived by Lieberman [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 17, 338 (1989)] and Godyak and Sternberg [Phys. Rev. A 42, 2299 (1990)], and establish the range of pressure and sheath voltage in which they are valid. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. Dynamics of Dust in a Plasma Sheath with Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Ping; Liu Jinyuan; Gon Ye; Liu Yue; Wang Xiaogang

    2007-01-01

    Dynamics of dust in a plasma sheath with a magnetic field was investigated using a single particle model. The result shows that the radius, initial position, initial velocity of the dust particles and the magnetic field do effect their movement and equilibrium position in the plasma sheath. Generally, the dust particles with the same size, whatever original velocity and position they have, will locate at the same position in the end under the net actions of electrostatic, gravitational, neutral collisional, and Lorentz forces. But the dust particles will not locate in the plasma sheath if their radius is beyond a certain value

  7. Clinical and Treatment Features of Orbital Neurogenic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Bingöl Kızıltunç

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and treatment features of orbital neurogenic tumors. Material and Method: The records of 35 patients with orbital neurogenic tumors who were diagnosed and treated at Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, between 1998 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Orbitotomy via a cutaneous approach was performed in 21 (60% cases and orbitotomy via a transconjunctival approach was performed in 7 (20% cases. Three (8% cases had been operated at different centers. Four (12% cases were diagnosed clinically. Total excisional biopsy was performed in 11 (31.4% cases, subtotal excisional biopsy was performed in 7 (20%, and incisional biopsy was performed in 10 (28.6% cases. 14 (40% 35 cases were diagnosed as meningioma, 12 (34% as peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and 9 (26% cases were diagnosed as optic nerve glioma. Six (43% meningioma cases were optic nerve sheath meningioma, 5 (36% were sphenoid wing meningioma, 2 (14% were ectopic meningioma, and 1 (7% was perisellar meningioma. Six (50% of peripheral nerve sheath tumors were schwannoma, 2 (16% were solitary neurofibroma, 4 (34% were plexiform neurofibroma. External beam radiotherapy was performed in 15 (42.8% cases, cyberknife radiosurgery in 1 (2.8% , chemotherapy in 1 (2.8%, and enucleation ( because of neovascular glaucoma and vitreous hemorrhage was performed in 1 (2.8% case. Discussion: The most common orbital neurogenic tumors are meningioma, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and optic nerve glioma. For meningioma and glioma, external beam radiotherapy is required; for schwannoma and solitary neurofibroma, total excisional biopsy is the preferred treatment. The success of visual and anatomic results are high after treatment. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 335-9

  8. Identification of a third protein 4.1 tumor suppressor, protein 4.1R, in meningioma pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Victoria A.; Li, Wen; Gascard, Philippe; Perry, Arie; Mohandas, Narla; Gutmann, David H.

    2003-06-11

    Meningiomas are common tumors of the central nervous system, however, the mechanisms under lying their pathogenesis are largely undefined. Two members of the Protein 4.1 super family, the neuro fibromatosis 2 (NF2) gene product (merlin/schwannomin) and Protein 4.1B have been implicated as meningioma tumor suppressors. In this report, we demonstrate that another Protein 4.1 family member, Protein 4.1R, also functions as a meningioma tumor suppressor. Based on the assignment of the Protein 4.1R gene to chromosome 1p32-36, a common region of deletion observed in meningiomas, we analyzed Protein 4.1R expression in meningioma cell lines and surgical tumor specimens. We observed loss of Protein 4.1R protein expression in two meningioma cell lines (IOMM-Lee, CH157-MN) by Western blotting as well as in 6 of 15 sporadic meningioma as by immuno histo chemistry (IHC). Analysis of a subset of these sporadic meningiomas by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Protein 4.1R specific probe demonstrated 100 percent concordance with the IHC results. In support of a meningioma tumor suppressor function, over expression of Protein 4.1R resulted in suppression of IOMM-Lee and CH157MN cell proliferation. Similar to the Protein 4.1B and merlin meningioma tumor suppressors, Protein 4.1R localization in the membrane fraction increased significantly under conditions of growth arrest in vitro. Lastly, Protein 4.1R interacted with some known merlin/Protein 4.1B interactors such as CD44 and bII-spectrin, but did not associate with the Protein 4.1B interactors 14-3-3 and PRMT3 or the merlin binding proteins SCHIP-1 and HRS. Collectively, these results suggest that Protein 4.1R functions as an important tumor suppressor important in the molecular pathogenesis of meningioma.

  9. Visual Outcome in Meningiomas Around Anterior Visual Pathways Treated With Linear Accelerator Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiebel-Kalish, Hadas; Reich, Ehud; Gal, Lior; Rappaport, Zvi Harry; Nissim, Ouzi; Pfeffer, Raphael; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Meningiomas threatening the anterior visual pathways (AVPs) and not amenable for surgery are currently treated with multisession stereotactic radiotherapy. Stereotactic radiotherapy is available with a number of devices. The most ubiquitous include the gamma knife, CyberKnife, tomotherapy, and isocentric linear accelerator systems. The purpose of our study was to describe a case series of AVP meningiomas treated with linear accelerator fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) using the multiple, noncoplanar, dynamic conformal rotation paradigm and to compare the success and complication rates with those reported for other techniques. Patients and Methods: We included all patients with AVP meningiomas followed up at our neuro-ophthalmology unit for a minimum of 12 months after FSRT. We compared the details of the neuro-ophthalmologic examinations and tumor size before and after FSRT and at the end of follow-up. Results: Of 87 patients with AVP meningiomas, 17 had been referred for FSRT. Of the 17 patients, 16 completed >12 months of follow-up (mean 39). Of the 16 patients, 11 had undergone surgery before FSRT and 5 had undergone FSRT as first-line management. Tumor control was achieved in 14 of the 16 patients, with three meningiomas shrinking in size after RT. Two meningiomas progressed, one in an area that was outside the radiation field. The visual function had improved in 6 or stabilized in 8 of the 16 patients (88%) and worsened in 2 (12%). Conclusions: Linear accelerator fractionated RT using the multiple noncoplanar dynamic rotation conformal paradigm can be offered to patients with meningiomas that threaten the anterior visual pathways as an adjunct to surgery or as first-line treatment, with results comparable to those reported for other stereotactic RT techniques.

  10. [Hydrocephalus Associated with Small Clinoidal Meningioma that Resolved after Tumor Removal:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hidemoto; Aiba, Toyotaka; Watanabe, Toru; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-12-01

    Small meningiomas causing hydrocephalus without obstruction of the ventricular system are rare. Herein, we report a case of small clinoidal meningioma with communicating hydrocephalus, which resolved after tumor removal. A 70-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of memory disturbance followed by gait disturbance. MR images revealed a right clinoidal meningioma, 2 cm in diameter, and dilatation of the ventricles suggesting communicating hydrocephalus. The cerebrospinal fluid(CSF)pressure was 130 mmH2O, as determined via a lumbar puncture. High concentrations of protein(65mg/dL)were detected in the lumbar CSF. The tumor was completely removed via a frontotemporal craniotomy. Higher protein concentrations(94mg/dL)were detected in the CSF obtained intraoperatively from the sylvian cistern. The histopathological diagnosis was meningothelial meningioma. The patient's symptoms improved markedly after surgery. Postoperative MR images revealed resolution of the hydrocephalus. The lumbar CSF protein concentration returned to normal(43mg/dL). Neither tumor recurrence nor progression of hydrocephalus has been observed for 4 years. Communicating hydrocephalus, associated with a small meningioma at the supratentorial region, has not been described. Previous studies have shown that patients with meningioma may develop communicating hydrocephalus after tumor removal or stereotactic radiosurgery. Thus, it is interesting that the small supratentorial meningioma in our case developed communicating hydrocephalus without any therapeutic intervention. Considering the CSF protein concentration, we speculate that the hydrocephalus was the result of CSF malabsorption associated with high CSF protein concentration and CSF pathway obstruction at the suprasellar cistern caused by the tumor.

  11. Maternally expressed gene 3, an imprinted noncoding RNA gene, is associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Gejman, Roger; Mahta, Ali; Zhong, Ying; Rice, Kimberley A; Zhou, Yunli; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Louis, David N; Klibanski, Anne

    2010-03-15

    Meningiomas are common tumors, representing 15% to 25% of all central nervous system tumors. NF2 gene inactivation on chromosome 22 has been shown as an early event in tumorigenesis; however, few factors underlying tumor growth and progression have been identified. The chromosomal abnormalities of 14q32 are often associated with meningioma pathogenesis and progression; therefore, it has been proposed that an as yet unidentified tumor suppressor is present at this locus. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 which encodes a noncoding RNA with an antiproliferative function. We found that MEG3 mRNA is highly expressed in normal arachnoidal cells. However, MEG3 is not expressed in the majority of human meningiomas or the human meningioma cell lines IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN. There is a strong association between loss of MEG3 expression and tumor grade. Allelic loss at the MEG3 locus is also observed in meningiomas, with increasing prevalence in higher grade tumors. In addition, there is an increase in CpG methylation within the promoter and the imprinting control region of MEG3 gene in meningiomas. Functionally, MEG3 suppresses DNA synthesis in both IOMM-Lee and CH157-MN cells by approximately 60% in bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. Colony-forming efficiency assays show that MEG3 inhibits colony formation in CH157-MN cells by approximately 80%. Furthermore, MEG3 stimulates p53-mediated transactivation in these cell lines. Therefore, these data are consistent with the hypothesis that MEG3, which encodes a noncoding RNA, may be a tumor suppressor gene at chromosome 14q32 involved in meningioma progression via a novel mechanism.

  12. A case of falx meningiomas showing an unusual extension on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuha, Mitsuru; Fudaba, Hiroyoshi; Orita, Tetsuji; Wakuta, Yukio; Aoki, Hideo

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that homogeneous high-density areas with well-defined borders and marked contrast enhancements on CT scans are characteristic features of meningiomas. However, there are a few cases of meningiomas which are more difficult to diagnose because of their unusual CT findings. We have, for example, recently experienced a case of falx meningioma with a small attachment to the flax and a large exophytic component in the brain parenchyma. This 53-year-old female had complained of dull headaches for several years. She had then suffered speech disturbance in June, 1983, followed by a weakness of her right arm. She was referred to our clinic on Oct. 31, 1983. The neurological findings on admission were dyscalculia, mild motor dysphasia, and right hemiparesis to a minor degree. CT revealed a left frontal iso- and high-density mass lesion and also central, partly visible, low-density areas. A postinfusion study showed a moderate contrast enhancement. Also noted were a partial attachment of these tumors to the falx and a more prominent contrast enhancement of these areas than those of other tumor sites. A left internal carotid angiogram revealed a frontal tumor stain, fed by the left ACA and MCAs; early venous drainage was also seen. Moreover, left external carotid angiography showed a small tumor stain adjacent to the falx. Left frontoparietal craniotomy, on Nov. 14, 1983, revealed a soft, well-defined tumor, partly attached to the tumor. Histology indicated a meningioma with partial anisocytosis and mitoses of tumor cells; this was consequently diagnosed as a malignant meningioma. Intracranial meningiomas with a small attachment to the falx and large areas of exophytic components are rare CT findings. In addition to the CT findings mentioned above, the heterogeneity of the absorption coefficients of meningiomas on CT and differential diagnosis were discussed. (author)

  13. Zircaloy sheathed thermocouples for PWR fuel rod temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.V.; Wesley, R.D.; Wilkins, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Small diameter zircaloy sheathed thermocouples have been developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Surface mounted thermocouples were developed to measure the temperature of zircaloy clad fuel rods used in the Thermal Fuels Behavior Program (TFBP), and embedded thermocouples were developed for use by the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program for support tests using zircaloy clad electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulators. The first objective of this developmental effort was to produce zircaloy sheathed thermocouples to replace titanium sheathed thermocouples and thereby eliminate the long-term corrosion of the titanium-to-zircaloy attachment weld. The second objective was to reduce the sheath diameter to obtain faster thermal response and minimize cladding temperature disturbance due to thermocouple attachment

  14. significance of rice sheath photosynthesis: yield determination by c ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    1State Key Laboratory of Hybrid Rice, Hunan Hybrid Rice Research Center, Changsha 410125, P.R. China. 2School of ... for contribution rates of sheath photosynthesis to economical yield. ..... related processes during ripening in rice plants.

  15. Bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Datta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath arises from the synovium of tendon sheaths, joints, or bursae, mostly affects adults between 30 and 50 years of age, and is slightly more common in females. We report the case of a 32-years-old male presenting with pain in both ankles without any history of trauma. On clinical examination, tenderness on both tendoachilles and local thickening were observed. Ultrasonography showed thickening of local tendinous area with increase in anteroposterior diameter, and Doppler demonstrated increased flow in peritendinous area. MRI findings showed that most of the tumor had intermediate signal intensity and portions of the tumor had low signal intensity. Fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision biopsy was done with no recurrence on five month follow-up. Review of literature did not reveal any similar result; so, bilateral giant cell tumor of tendon sheath of tendoachilles is a rare presentation.

  16. Measure Guideline: Guidance on Taped Insulating Sheathing Drainage Planes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grin, A. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Lstiburek, J. [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this research is to provide durable and long-term water management solutions using exterior insulating sheathing as part of the water management system. It is possible to tape or seal the joints in insulating sheathing to create a drainage plane and even an air control layer. There exists the material durability component of the tape as well as the system durability component being the taped insulating sheathing as the drainage plane. This measure guideline provides best practice and product recommendations from the interviewed contractors and homebuilders who collectively have a vast amount of experience. Three significant issues were discussed with the group, which are required to make taped insulating sheathing a simple, long-term, and durable drainage plane: horizontal joints should be limited or eliminated wherever possible; where a horizontal joint exists use superior materials; and frequent installation inspection and regular trade training are required to maintain proper installation.

  17. Stability of the Tonks–Langmuir discharge pre-sheath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tskhakaya, D. D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Kos, L. [LECAD Laboratory, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tskhakaya, D. [Fusion@ÖAW, Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien, Wiedner Hauptstraße 8-10, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    The article formulates the stability problem of the plasma sheath in the Tonks–Langmuir discharge. Using the kinetic description of the ion gas, i.e., the stability of the potential shape in the quasi-neutral pre-sheath regarding the high and low frequency, the perturbations are investigated. The electrons are assumed to be Maxwell–Boltzmann distributed. Regarding high-frequency perturbations, the pre-sheath is shown to be stable. The stability problem regarding low-frequency perturbations can be reduced to an analysis of the “diffusion like” equation, which results in the instability of the potential distribution in the pre-sheath. By means of the Particle in Cell simulations, also the nonlinear stage of low frequency oscillations is investigated. Comparing the figure obtained with the figure for linear stage, one can find obvious similarity in the spatial-temporal behavior of the potential.

  18. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. MUST ONCOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES BE IN THE SURGERY OF MENINGIOMAS? EN BLOC REMOVAL OF GIANT RIGHT FRONTAL MENINGIOMA WITH EXTRACRANIAL SPREAD. DESCRIPTION OF A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Karakhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of the oncological principle – en bloc ablastic tumor resection – can expect a breakthrough in the treatment of baseline unfavorable patient groups. In the described case of atypical meningioma, its en bloc resection presents significant technical difficulties when accomplishing the task associated with the giant sizes of a tumor as an iceberg growing outside and into the cranial cavity, its rich vascularization from both the internal and external carotid artery system, with the involvement of the superior sagittal sinus, the presence of a dense bone crown that combines the three-component construction of a neoplasm, which made difficult safe mobilization and scanning in the cranial cavity.In such topographic variants, the criteria for the Simpson radical meningioma resection are inapplicable and only en bloc tumor resection may reflect the oncological principles of surgery. The technologies of en bloc resection of intracranial meningiomas should be more frequently used because preoperative neurovisualization and even histological diagnosis does not always allow the grade of meningiomas to be specified.

  20. Properties of leaves particleboard for sheathing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuryawan, Arif; Rahmawaty

    2018-03-01

    Manufacturing particleboard (PB) made of leaves was carried out to make non-structural building components, such as insulation, partition, wall, and sheathing. Raw materials used dry leaves originated from plantation (palm oil leaves) and forest plantation (magahony leaves). The adhesive used was interior type thermosetting commercial resins, namely 10% urea-formaldehyde (UF) based on oven dry leaves. Hardener used for UF resin was 1% and 3% ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) 20% (w/w), respectively. Technically, the target density of PB was 0.8 g/cm3 with the dimension’s size of (250 x 250 x 10) mm3. The pressure, temperature, and time of pressing of the hot press were 25 kgf/cm2, 120C, and 10 minutes, respectively. After conditioning for one week, the PB then was evaluated their physical and mechanical properties according to Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) A 5908 (2003). Results of this work showed: 1) Both types of PB (palm oil and mahagony leaves) were feasible to be produced for non-structural applications; 2) Addition of hardener enhanced the physical and mechanical properties of PB; 3) It was recommended to enhance the performance of the PB by manipulation of the raw materials and the design.