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Sample records for nerve segment distal

  1. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later on. Inflammation of the tendons ( tendonitis ) or joints ( arthritis ) can also put pressure on the nerve. ... how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Neuromuscular ultrasound to view problems with the muscles and ...

  2. Segmental reversal of distal small intestine in short bowel syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grave, Pernille Kock; Thomsen, Sabrina Valentin; Clark, Pia Susanne

    2018-01-01

    were the influence on cell proliferation and mucosal architecture shown by histological analysis. Methods: Sixteen piglets underwent a 60% resection of the distal small intestine and were randomized into two groups. Group 1 short bowel syndrome alone (SBS) (n = 8) and group 2 with reversal of a distal...... small intestinal segment (SBS-RS) (n = 8). Body weight was measured daily and the pigs were euthanized after 1 month. Crypt depths, villus heights and muscle layers thicknesses were measured. For the evaluation of microvilli of the brush border of the epithelium and cell proliferation...... was found in the SBS group and increase in the thickness of the circular and longitudinal muscle layers in the SBS-RS group. In the distal ileal segment the longitudinal muscle layer thicknesses were increased in the SBS group. Otherwise, no significant changes were found. Conclusion: Reversal of a 20-cm...

  3. Short-term observations of the regenerative potential of injured proximal sensory nerves crossed with distal motor nerves

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    Xiu-xiu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor nerves and sensory nerves conduct signals in different directions and function in different ways. In the surgical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, the best prognosis is obtained by keeping the motor and sensory nerves separated and repairing the nerves using the suture method. However, the clinical consequences of connections between sensory and motor nerves currently remain unknown. In this study, we analyzed the anatomical structure of the rat femoral nerve, and observed the motor and sensory branches of the femoral nerve in the quadriceps femoris. After ligation of the nerves, the proximal end of the sensory nerve was connected with the distal end of the motor nerve, followed by observation of the changes in the newly-formed regenerated nerve fibers. Acetylcholinesterase staining was used to distinguish between the myelinated and unmyelinated motor and sensory nerves. Denervated muscle and newly formed nerves were compared in terms of morphology, electrophysiology and histochemistry. At 8 weeks after connection, no motor nerve fibers were observed on either side of the nerve conduit and the number of nerve fibers increased at the proximal end. The proportion of newly-formed motor and sensory fibers was different on both sides of the conduit. The area occupied by autonomic nerves in the proximal regenerative nerve was limited, but no distinct myelin sheath was visible in the distal nerve. These results confirm that sensory and motor nerves cannot be effectively connected. Moreover, the change of target organ at the distal end affects the type of nerves at the proximal end.

  4. Partial lesions of the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve: graft versus partial reconstruction.

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    Bento, Ricardo F; Salomone, Raquel; Brito, Rubens; Tsuji, Robinson K; Hausen, Mariana

    2008-09-01

    In cases of partial lesions of the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve, should the surgeon perform an intraoperative partial reconstruction, or partially remove the injured segment and place a graft? We present results from partial lesion reconstruction on the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve. A retrospective study on 42 patients who presented partial lesions on the intratemporal segment of the facial nerve was performed between 1988 and 2005. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the procedure used: interposition of the partial graft on the injured area of the nerve (group 1; 12 patients); keeping the preserved part and performing tubulization (group 2; 8 patients); and dividing the parts of the injured nerve (proximal and distal) and placing a total graft of the sural nerve (group 3; 22 patients). Fracture of the temporal bone was the most frequent cause of the lesion in all groups, followed by iatrogenic causes (p lesion of the facial nerve is still questionable. Among these 42 patients, the best results were those from the total graft of the facial nerve.

  5. Median nerve fascicular anatomy as a basis for distal neural prostheses.

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    Planitzer, Uwe; Steinke, Hanno; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Bechmann, Ingo; Hammer, Niels; Winkler, Dirk

    2014-05-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) serves as a possible therapy to restore missing motor functions of peripheral nerves by means of cuff electrodes. FES is established for improving lower limb function. Transferring this method to the upper extremity is complex, due to a lack of anatomical data on the physiological configuration of nerve fascicles. Our study's aim was to provide an anatomical basis for FES of the median nerve in the distal forearm and hand. We investigated 21 distal median nerves from 12 body donors. The peripheral fascicles were traced back by removing the external and interfascicular epineurium and then assigned to 4 quadrants. A distinct motor and sensory distribution was observed. The fascicles innervating the thenar eminence and the first lumbrical muscle originated from the nerves' radial parts in 82%. The fascicle supplying the second lumbrical muscle originated from the ulnar side in 78%. No macroscopically visible plexus formation was observed for the distal median nerve in the forearm. The findings on the distribution of the motor branches of the median nerve and the missing plexus formation may likely serve as an anatomical basis for FES of the distal forearm. However, due to the considerable variability of the motor branches, cuff electrodes will need to be adapted individually in FES. Taking into account the sensory distribution of the median nerve, FES may also possibly be applied in the treatment of regional pain syndromes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Radial nerve palsy in mid/distal humeral fractures: is early exploration effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keighley, Geffrey; Hermans, Deborah; Lawton, Vidya; Duckworth, David

    2018-03-01

    Radial nerve palsies are a common complication with displaced distal humeral fractures. This case series examines the outcomes of early operative exploration and decompression of the nerve with fracture fixation with the view that this provides a solid construct for optimisation of nerve recovery. A total of 10 consecutive patients with a displaced distal humeral fracture and an acute radial nerve palsy were treated by the senior author by open reduction and internal fixation of the distal humerus and exploration and decompression of the radial nerve. Motor function and sensation of the radial nerve was assessed in the post-operative period every 2 months or until full recovery of the radial nerve function had occurred. All patients (100%) had recovery of motor and sensation function of their upper limb in the radial nerve distribution over a 12-month period. Recovery times ranged between 4 and 32 weeks, with the median time to recovery occurring at 26 weeks and the average time to full recovery being 22.9 weeks. Wrist extension recovered by an average of 3 months (range 2-26 weeks) and then finger extension started to recover 2-6 weeks after this. Disability of the arm, shoulder and hand scores ranged from 0 to 11.8 at greater than 1 year post-operatively. Our study demonstrated that early operative exploration of the radial nerve when performing an open stabilization of displaced distal humeral fractures resulted in a 100% recovery of the radial nerve. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Distal nerve transfer versus supraclavicular nerve grafting: comparison of elbow flexion outcome in neonatal brachial plexus palsy with C5-C7 involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Carlos O; Siqueira, Mario G; Martins, Roberto S; Foroni, Luciano H; Sterman-Neto, Hugo

    2017-09-01

    Ulnar and median nerve transfers to arm muscles have been used to recover elbow flexion in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, but there is no direct outcome comparison with the classical supraclavicular nerve grafting approach. We retrospectively analyzed patients with C5-C7 neonatal brachial plexus palsy submitted to nerve surgery and recorded elbow flexion recovery using the active movement scale (0-7) at 12 and 24 months after surgery. We compared 13 patients submitted to supraclavicular nerve grafting with 21 patients submitted to distal ulnar or median nerve transfer to biceps motor branch. We considered elbow flexion scores of 6 or 7 as good results. The mean elbow flexion score and the proportion of good results were better using distal nerve transfers than supraclavicular grafting at 12 months (p nerve grafting at 12 months showed good elbow flexion recovery after ulnar nerve transfers. Distal nerve transfers provided faster elbow flexion recovery than supraclavicular nerve grafting, but there was no significant difference in the outcome after 24 months of surgery. Patients with failed supraclavicular grafting operated early can still benefit from late distal nerve transfers. Supraclavicular nerve grafting should remain as the first line surgical treatment for children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  8. Facial nerve hemangioma: a rare case involving the vertical segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Neda; Newkirk, Kenneth; Kim, H Jeffrey

    2013-02-01

    This case report and literature review reports on a rare case of facial nerve hemangioma (FNH) involving the vertical facial nerve (FN) segment, and discusses the clinical presentation, imaging, pathogenesis, and management of these rare lesions. A 53-year-old male presented with a 10-year history of right hemifacial twitching and progressive facial paresis (House-Brackmann grading score V/VI). The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies confirmed an expansile lesion along the vertical FN segment. Excision and histopathologic examination demonstrated FNH. FNHs involving the vertical FN segment are extremely rare. Despite being rare lesions, we believe that familiarity with the presentation and management of FNHs are imperative. Laryngoscope, 2012. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Differential roles of stretch-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents innervating mouse distal colon and rectum

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bin; Brumovsky, Pablo R.; Gebhart, Gerald F.

    2010-01-01

    Information about colorectal distension (i.e., colorectal dilation by increased intraluminal pressure) is primarily encoded by stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents in the pelvic nerve (PN). Despite anatomic differences between rectum and distal colon, little is known about the functional roles of colonic vs. rectal afferents in the PN pathway or the quantitative nature of mechanosensory encoding. We utilized an in vitro mouse colorectum-PN preparation to investigate pressure-encoding charac...

  10. Nerve Stimulator Guided Axillary Block in Painless Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures; a Randomized Clinical Trial

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    Hossein Alimohammadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the high prevalence of upper extremity fractures and increasing need to perform painless reduction in the emergency departments, the use of analgesic methods with fewer complications and more satisfaction appears to be essential. The aim of this study is comparison the nerve stimulator guided axillary block (NSAB with intravenous sedation in induction of analgesia for painless reduction of distal radius fractures. Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial, 60 patients (18-70 years of age suffered from distal radius fractures, were divided into two equal groups. One group received axillary nerve block by nerve stimulator guidance and the other procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA using midazolam/fentanyl. Onset of analgesia, duration of analgesic effect, total procedure time and pain scores were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS and the outcomes were compared. Chi-squared and student t test were performed to evaluate differences between two groups. Results: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups (83.3% male. The mean age of patients was 31 ±0.7 years. While the onset of analgesia was significantly longer in the NSAB group, the mean total time of procedure was shorter than PSA (p<0.001. The NSAB group needed a shorter post-operative observation time (P<0.001. Both groups experienced equal pain relief before, during and after procedure (p>0.05. Conclusion: It seems that shorter post-operative monitoring time and consequently lesser total time of procedure, make nerve stimulator guided axillary block as an appropriate alternative for procedural sedation and analgesia in painless reduction of distal radius fractures in emergency department. 

  11. [Sciatic nerve block "out-of-plane" distal to the bifurcation: effective and safe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, T; Apel, J; Vicent, O; Büttner, J

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound guided distal sciatic nerve block (DSB) at bifurcation level shows fast onset and provides excellent success rates. However, its safe performance might be difficult for the unexperienced physician. Just slightly distal to the bifurcation, the tibial nerve (TN) and common fibular nerve (CFN) can be shown clearly separated from each other. Therefore, we investigated if a block done here would provide similar quality results compared to the DSB proximally to the division, with a potentially lower risk of nerve damage. In this randomized, prospective trial, 56 patients per group received either a DSB distal to the bifurcation "out-of-plane" (dist.) or proximally "in-plane" (prox.) with 30 ml of Mepivacaine 1% each. Success was tested by a blinded examiner after 15 and 30 min respectively (sensory and motor block of TN and CFN: 0 = none, 2 = complete, change of skin temperature). Videos of the blocks were inspected by an independent expert retrospectively with regard to the spread of the local anesthetic (LA) and accidental intraneural injection. Cumulative single nerve measurements and temperature changes revealed significant shorter onset and better efficacy (dist/prox: 15 min: 3.13 ± 1.86/1.82 ± 1.62; 30 min: 5.73 ± 1.92/3.21 ± 1.88; T 15 min : 30.3 ± 3.48/28.0 ± 3.67, T 30 min . 33.0 ± 2.46/30.6 ± 3.86; MV/SD; ANOVA; p safe application of the LA, so an effective block can be done with just one injection. DSB slightly distal to the bifurcation, in an out-of-plane technique between the TN and CFN, can be done fast, effectively and safe.

  12. Nerve supply to the internal anal sphincter differs from that to the distal rectum: an immunohistochemical study of cadavers.

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    Kinugasa, Yusuke; Arakawa, Takashi; Murakami, Gen; Fujimiya, Mineko; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2014-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is a common problem after anal sphincter-preserving operations. The intersphincteric autonomic nerves supplying the internal anal sphincter (IAS) are formed by the union of: (1) nerve fibers from Auerbach's nerve plexus of the most distal part of the rectum and (2) the inferior rectal branches of the pelvic plexus (IRB-PX) running along the conjoint longitudinal muscle coat. The aim of the present study is to identify the detailed morphology of nerves to the IAS. The study comprised histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of paraffin-embedded sections from a large block of anal canal from the preserved 10 cadavers. The IRB-PX came from the superior aspect of the levator ani and ran into the anal canal on the anterolateral side. These nerves contained both sympathetic and parasympathetic fibers, but the sympathetic content was much higher than in nerves from the distal rectum. All intramural ganglion cells in the distal rectum were neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive and tyrosine hydroxylase-negative and were restricted to above the squamous-columnar epithelial junction. Parasympathetic nerves formed a lattice-like plexus in the circular smooth muscles of the distal rectum, whereas the IAS contained short, longitudinally running sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, although sympathetic nerves were dominant. The major autonomic nerve input to the IAS seemed not to originate from the distal rectum but from the IRB-PX. Injury to the IRB-PX during surgery seemed to result in loss of innervation to the major part of the IAS.

  13. Intra-temporal facial nerve centerline segmentation for navigated temporal bone surgery

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    Voormolen, Eduard H. J.; van Stralen, Marijn; Woerdeman, Peter A.; Pluim, Josien P. W.; Noordmans, Herke J.; Regli, Luca; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan W.; Viergever, Max A.

    2011-03-01

    Approaches through the temporal bone require surgeons to drill away bone to expose a target skull base lesion while evading vital structures contained within it, such as the sigmoid sinus, jugular bulb, and facial nerve. We hypothesize that an augmented neuronavigation system that continuously calculates the distance to these structures and warns if the surgeon drills too close, will aid in making safe surgical approaches. Contemporary image guidance systems are lacking an automated method to segment the inhomogeneous and complexly curved facial nerve. Therefore, we developed a segmentation method to delineate the intra-temporal facial nerve centerline from clinically available temporal bone CT images semi-automatically. Our method requires the user to provide the start- and end-point of the facial nerve in a patient's CT scan, after which it iteratively matches an active appearance model based on the shape and texture of forty facial nerves. Its performance was evaluated on 20 patients by comparison to our gold standard: manually segmented facial nerve centerlines. Our segmentation method delineates facial nerve centerlines with a maximum error along its whole trajectory of 0.40+/-0.20 mm (mean+/-standard deviation). These results demonstrate that our model-based segmentation method can robustly segment facial nerve centerlines. Next, we can investigate whether integration of this automated facial nerve delineation with a distance calculating neuronavigation interface results in a system that can adequately warn surgeons during temporal bone drilling, and effectively diminishes risks of iatrogenic facial nerve palsy.

  14. [Electromyographic differential diagnosis in cases of abducens nerve paresis with nuclear or distal neurogenic sive myogenic origine (author's transl)].

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    Heuser, M

    1979-09-01

    Abducens nerve paresis may be of nuclear, of peripheral distal neurogenic origine, or is simulated by a myogenic weakness of abduction. Polygraphic emg analysis of the oculoauricularphenomenon (oap) permits a differentiation. In the emg, the oap proved to be a physiologic and constant automatic and always bilateral interaction between the hemolateral abducens nerve and both Nn. faciales with corresponding and obligatory coinnervation of the Mm. retroauricularis of the external ear. In case of medullary, nuclear or internuclear lesions, the oap is disturbed, instable, diminished or abolished, whereas in distal neurogenic or myogenic paresis, even in complete paralysis the oap is bilaterally well preserved.

  15. Forces necessary for the disruption of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII.

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    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Manipulation of the cisternal segment of cranial nerves is often performed by the neurosurgeon. To date, attempts at quantifying the forces necessary to disrupt these nerves in situ, to our knowledge, has not been performed. The present study seeks to further elucidate the forces necessary to disrupt the cranial nerves while within the subarachnoid space. The cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII were exposed in six unfixed cadavers, all less than 6 hr postmortem. Forces to failure were then measured. Mean forces necessary to disrupt nerves for left sides in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, III, VIII, XI, VI, V, and II, respectively. Mean forces for right-sided cranial nerves in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, VIII, V, VI, XI, III, and II, respectively. Overall, cranial nerves requiring the least amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV, VII, and IX. Those requiring the highest amount of force included cranial nerves II, V, VI, and XI. There was an approximately ten-fold difference between the least and greatest forces required to failure. Cranial nerve III was found to require significantly (P cranial nerves II through XII. We found that cranial nerve IX consistently took the least amount of force until its failure and cranial nerve II took the greatest. Other cranial nerves that took relatively small amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV and VII. Although in vivo damage can occur prior to failure of a cranial nerve, our data may serve to provide a rough estimation for the maximal amount of tension that can be applied to a cranial nerve that is manipulated while within its cistern.

  16. Enhancement of nerve structure segmentation by a correntropy-based pre-image approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gil-González

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral Nerve Blocking (PNB is a commonly used technique for performing regional anesthesia and managing pain. PNB comprises the administration of anesthetics in the proximity of a nerve. In this sense, the success of PNB procedures depends on an accurate location of the target nerve. Recently, ultrasound images (UI have been widely used to locate nerve structures for PNB, since they enable a noninvasive visualization of the target nerve and the anatomical structures around it. However, UI are affected by speckle noise, which makes it difficult to accurately locate a given nerve. Thus, it is necessary to perform a filtering step to attenuate the speckle noise without eliminating relevant anatomical details that are required for high-level tasks, such as segmentation of nerve structures. In this paper, we propose an UI improvement strategy with the use of a pre-image-based filter. In particular, we map the input images by a nonlinear function (kernel. Specifically, we employ a correntropybased mapping as kernel functional to code higher-order statistics of the input data under both nonlinear and non-Gaussian conditions. We validate our approach against an UI dataset focused on nerve segmentation for PNB. Likewise, our Correntropy-based Pre-Image Filtering (CPIF is applied as a pre-processing stage to segment nerve structures in a UI. The segmentation performance is measured in terms of the Dice coefficient. According to the results, we observe that CPIF finds a suitable approximation for UI by highlighting discriminative nerve patterns.

  17. Sodium Channel Nav1.8 Underlies TTX-Resistant Axonal Action Potential Conduction in Somatosensory C-Fibers of Distal Cutaneous Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amanda H; Vyshnevska, Alina; Hartke, Timothy V; De Col, Roberto; Mankowski, Joseph L; Turnquist, Brian; Bosmans, Frank; Reeh, Peter W; Schmelz, Martin; Carr, Richard W; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2017-05-17

    Voltage-gated sodium (Na V ) channels are responsible for the initiation and conduction of action potentials within primary afferents. The nine Na V channel isoforms recognized in mammals are often functionally divided into tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive (TTX-s) channels (Na V 1.1-Na V 1.4, Na V 1.6-Na V 1.7) that are blocked by nanomolar concentrations and TTX-resistant (TTX-r) channels (Na V 1.8 and Na V 1.9) inhibited by millimolar concentrations, with Na V 1.5 having an intermediate toxin sensitivity. For small-diameter primary afferent neurons, it is unclear to what extent different Na V channel isoforms are distributed along the peripheral and central branches of their bifurcated axons. To determine the relative contribution of TTX-s and TTX-r channels to action potential conduction in different axonal compartments, we investigated the effects of TTX on C-fiber-mediated compound action potentials (C-CAPs) of proximal and distal peripheral nerve segments and dorsal roots from mice and pigtail monkeys ( Macaca nemestrina ). In the dorsal roots and proximal peripheral nerves of mice and nonhuman primates, TTX reduced the C-CAP amplitude to 16% of the baseline. In contrast, >30% of the C-CAP was resistant to TTX in distal peripheral branches of monkeys and WT and Na V 1.9 -/- mice. In nerves from Na V 1.8 -/- mice, TTX-r C-CAPs could not be detected. These data indicate that Na V 1.8 is the primary isoform underlying TTX-r conduction in distal axons of somatosensory C-fibers. Furthermore, there is a differential spatial distribution of Na V 1.8 within C-fiber axons, being functionally more prominent in the most distal axons and terminal regions. The enrichment of Na V 1.8 in distal axons may provide a useful target in the treatment of pain of peripheral origin. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT It is unclear whether individual sodium channel isoforms exert differential roles in action potential conduction along the axonal membrane of nociceptive, unmyelinated peripheral nerve

  18. Comparison of Lower Limb Segments Kinematics in a Taekwondo Kick. An Approach to the Proximal to Distal Motion

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    Estevan Isaac

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In taekwondo, there is a lack of consensus about how the kick sequence occurs. The aim of this study was to analyse the peak velocity (resultant and value in each plane of lower limb segments (thigh, shank and foot, and the time to reach this peak velocity in the kicking lower limb during the execution of the roundhouse kick technique. Ten experienced taekwondo athletes (five males and five females; mean age of 25.3 ±5.1 years; mean experience of 12.9 ±5.3 years participated voluntarily in this study performing consecutive kicking trials to a target located at their sternum height. Measurements for the kinematic analysis were performed using two 3D force plates and an eight camera motion capture system. The results showed that the proximal segment reached a lower peak velocity (resultant and in each plane than distal segments (except the peak velocity in the frontal plane where the thigh and shank presented similar values, with the distal segment taking the longest to reach this peak velocity (p < 0.01. Also, at the instant every segment reached the peak velocity, the velocity of the distal segment was higher than the proximal one (p < 0.01. It provides evidence about the sequential movement of the kicking lower limb segments. In conclusion, during the roundhouse kick in taekwondo inter-segment motion seems to be based on a proximo-distal pattern.

  19. Treatment of tailgut cysts by extended distal rectal segmental resection with rectoanal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Andreas; Plodeck, Verena; Toma, Marieta; Saeger, Hans-Detlev; Pistorius, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for tailgut cysts, because of their malignant potential and tendency to regrow if incompletely resected. We report our experience of treating patients with tailgut cysts, and discuss diagnostics, surgical approaches, and follow-up. We performed extended distal rectal segmental resection of the tailgut cyst, with rectoanal anastomosis. We report the clinical, radiological, pathological, and surgical findings, describe the procedures performed, and summarize follow-up data. Two patients underwent en-bloc resection of a tailgut cyst, the adjacent part of the levator muscle, and the distal rectal segment, followed by an end-to-end rectoanal anastomosis. There was no evidence of anastomotic leakage postoperatively. At the time of writing, our patients were relapse-free with no, or non-limiting, symptoms of anal incontinence, respectively. This surgical approach appears to have a low complication rate and good recovery outcomes. Moreover, as the sphincter is preserved, so is the postoperative anorectal function. This approach could result in a low recurrence rate.

  20. Diagnostic lumbosacral segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics: a prospective double-blind study on the variability and interpretation of segmental effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Groen, G.J.; Crul, B.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Selective spinal nerve infiltration blocks are used diagnostically in patients with chronic low back pain radiating into the leg. Generally, a segmental nerve block is considered successful if the pain is reduced substantially. Hypesthesia and elicited paresthesias

  1. Musculocutaneous nerve substituting for the distal part of radial nerve: A case report and its embryological basis

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    A S Yogesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present case, we have reported a unilateral variation of the radial and musculocutaneous nerves on the left side in a 64-year-old male cadaver. The radial nerve supplied all the heads of the triceps brachii muscle and gave cutaneous branches such as lower lateral cutaneous nerve of the arm and posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm. The radial nerve ended without continuing further. The musculocutaneous nerve supplied the brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscles. The musculocutaneous nerve divided terminally into two branches, superficial and deep. The deep branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual deep branch of the radial nerve while the superficial branch of musculocutaneous nerve corresponded to usual superficial branch of the radial nerve. The dissection was continued to expose the entire brachial plexus from its origin and it was found to be normal. The structures on the right upper limb were found to be normal. Surgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of the upper limb.

  2. Genetic modification of human sural nerve segments by a lentiviral vector encoding nerve growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous nerve grafts are used to treat severe peripheral nerve injury, but recovery of nerve function after grafting is rarely complete. Exogenous application of neurotrophic factors may enhance regeneration, but thus far the application of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by

  3. Closed retrograde retrieval of the distal broken segment of femoral cannulated intramedullary nail using a ball-tipped guide wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metikala, Sreenivasulu; Mohammed, Riazuddin

    2011-07-01

    Extracting broken segments of intramedullay nails from long bones can be an operative challenge, particularly from the distal end. We report a case series where a simple and reproducible technique of extracting broken femoral cannulated nails using a ball-tipped guide wire is described. This closed technique involves no additional equipment or instruments. Eight patients who underwent the described method were included in the study. The technique involves using a standard plain guide wire passed through the cannulated distal broken nail segment after extraction of the proximal nail fragment. The plain guide wire is then advanced distally into the knee joint carefully under fluoroscopy imaging. Over this wire, a 5-millimeter (mm) cannulated large drill bit is used to create a track up to the distal broken nail segment. Through the small knee wound, a ball-tipped guide wire is passed, smooth end first, till the ball engages the end of the nail. The guide wire is then extracted along with the broken nail through the proximal wound. The method was successfully used in all eight patients for removal of broken cannulated intramedullary nail from the femoral canal without any complications. All patients underwent exchange nailing with successful bone union in six months. None of the patients had any problems at the knee joint at the final follow-up. We report a technique for successful extraction of the distal fragment of broken femoral intramedullary nails without additional surgical approaches.

  4. Risk of injury to the sural nerve during posterolateral approach to the distal tibia: An ultrasound simulation study.

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    Mizia, Ewa; Pękala, Przemysław A; Chomicki-Bindas, Piotr; Marchewka, Wojciech; Loukas, Marios; Zayachkowski, Alexander G; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2018-05-08

    Introduction When surgeons operate on the foot and ankle, the most common complication that may arise is injury of the cutaneous nerves. The sural nerve (SN) is potentially at risk of being injured when treating fractures involving the distal tibia using the posterolateral approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate how differences in length and position of the surgical treatment of fractures involving the distal tibia can affect the risk of SN injury. Materials and Methods The study involved 40 healthy volunteers (n=80 lower limbs). Ultrasound simulation of each potential surgical incision site was used to locate the SN and to assess the risk of injury. Results The study showed that the SN predominantly travels more posteriorly at levels more proximal from the tip of the lateral malleolus. At these more proximal points of the SN's course, it was proven that there was an overall increased incidence of iatrogenic injury to the SN in incisions made closer to the Achilles tendon. Based on these results, a quasi 3 dimensional figure was created showing the anatomical structures of this region to identify areas at high risk for SN injury. Conclusions By revealing how length and position of the surgical incision can influence the risk of SN injury, we hope to provide information to surgeons on the optimal technique to avoid iatrogenic SN injury while operating on the distal tibia via a posterolateral approach. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Study of the anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches in the distal medial leg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, André Leal Gonçalves; Ferreira, Marcus Castro

    2012-01-01

    Objective Determine, through dissection in fresh cadavers, the topographic anatomy of the tibial nerve and its branches at the ankle, in relation to the tarsal tunnel. Methods Bilateral dissections were performed on 26 fresh cadavers and the locations of the tibial nerve bifurcation and its branches were measured in millimeters. For the calcaneal branches, the amount and their respective nerves of origin were also analyzed. Results The tibial nerve bifurcation occurred under the tunnel in 88% of the cases and proximally in 12%. As for the calcaneal branches, the medial presented with one (58%), two (34%) and three (8%) branches, with the most common source occurring in the tibial nerve (90%) and the lower with a single branch per leg and lateral plantar nerve as the most common origin (70%). Level of Evidence, V Expert opinion. PMID:24453596

  6. Evaluation of intravenous regional anaesthesia and four-point nerve block efficacy in the distal hind limb of dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, S; Khraim, N; Szura, G; Starke, A; Engelke, E; Pfarrer, C; Hopster, K; Schmicke, M; Kehler, W; Heppelmann, M; Kästner, S B R; Rehage, J

    2017-11-07

    Intravenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA) and hindfoot four-point nerve block anaesthesia (NBA) are recommended for local anaesthesia (LA) in the distal limb of dairy cows. Two studies were conducted to compare the efficacy, time until onset and stress responses to IVRA and NBA in dairy cows. In the first cross-over designed study, eight healthy unsedated German Holstein cows, restrained in lateral recumbency (LR) on a surgical tipping table, were treated with IVRA and NBA using procaine 2% as a local anaesthetic. Distal limb desensitization was tested by electrical (e-), mechanical (m-) and thermal (t-) nociceptive stimulation 10 min before and 15 and 30 min after LA. Hormonal-metabolic (blood concentrations of cortisol, lactate, non-esterified fatty acids, and glucose) and cardio-respiratory (heart and respiratory rate, mean arterial blood pressure) stress responses to treatment were assessed at predetermined intervals. In the second study, six healthy, unsedated German Holstein cows in LR were treated (crossover design) with IVRA and NBA. Short-interval e-stimulation was measured by the time until complete distal limb desensitization. In the first study, four of eight cows responded to e-stimulation 15 min after IVRA, while none of the cows treated with NBA responded until the safety cut-off level was reached. E-stimulation revealed complete desensitization of the distal limb 30 min after LA in all cows. Half of the cows did not respond to m- and t-stimulation before LA, so no further evaluation was performed. Stress reactions to IVRA and NBA treatment were similar, but differences may have been masked by stress response to LR restraint. In the second study, complete desensitization was achieved 12.5 min after NBA, while one of the six cows still responded to e-stimulation 20 min after IVRA. Hindfoot nerve block anaesthesia and intravenous regional anaesthesia induced complete desensitization of the distal hind limb in dairy cows. However, the anaesthesia

  7. The cisternal segment of the abducens nerve in man: three-dimensional MR imaging

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    Alkan, Alpay E-mail: aalkan@inonu.edu.tr; Sigirci, Ahmet; Ozveren, M. Faik; Kutlu, Ramazan; Altinok, Tayfun; Onal, Cagatay; Sarac, Kaya

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to identify the abducens nerve in its cisternal segment by using three-dimensional turbo spin echo T2-weighted image (3DT2-TSE). The abducens nerve may arise from the medullopontine sulcus by one singular or two separated rootlets. Material and methods: We studied 285 patients (150 males, 135 females, age range: 9-72 years, mean age: 33.3{+-}14.4) referred to MR imaging of the inner ear, internal auditory canal and brainstem. All 3D T2-TSE studies were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. Imaging parameters used for 3DT2-TSE sequence were TR:4000, TE:150, and 0.70 mm slice thickness. A field of view of 160 mm and 256x256 matrix were used. The double rootlets of the abducens nerve and contralateral abducens nerves and their relationships with anatomical structures were searched in the subarachnoid space. Results: We identified 540 of 570 abducens nerves (94.7%) in its complete cisternal course with certainty. Seventy-two cases (25.2%) in the present study had double rootlets of the abducens nerve. In 59 of these cases (34 on the right side and 25 on the left) presented with unilateral double rootlets of the abducens. Thirteen cases presented with bilateral double rootlets of the abducens (4.5%). Conclusion: An abducens nerve arising by two separate rootlets is not a rare variation. The detection of this anatomical variation by preoperative MR imaging is important to avoid partial damage of the nerve during surgical procedures. The 3DT2-TSE as a noninvasive technique makes it possible to obtain extremely high-quality images of microstructures as cranial nerves and surrounding vessels in the cerebellopontine cistern. Therefore, preoperative MR imaging should be performed to detect anatomical variations of abducens nerve and to reduce the chance of operative injuries.

  8. The cisternal segment of the abducens nerve in man: three-dimensional MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkan, Alpay; Sigirci, Ahmet; Ozveren, M. Faik; Kutlu, Ramazan; Altinok, Tayfun; Onal, Cagatay; Sarac, Kaya

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to identify the abducens nerve in its cisternal segment by using three-dimensional turbo spin echo T2-weighted image (3DT2-TSE). The abducens nerve may arise from the medullopontine sulcus by one singular or two separated rootlets. Material and methods: We studied 285 patients (150 males, 135 females, age range: 9-72 years, mean age: 33.3±14.4) referred to MR imaging of the inner ear, internal auditory canal and brainstem. All 3D T2-TSE studies were performed with a 1.5 T MR system. Imaging parameters used for 3DT2-TSE sequence were TR:4000, TE:150, and 0.70 mm slice thickness. A field of view of 160 mm and 256x256 matrix were used. The double rootlets of the abducens nerve and contralateral abducens nerves and their relationships with anatomical structures were searched in the subarachnoid space. Results: We identified 540 of 570 abducens nerves (94.7%) in its complete cisternal course with certainty. Seventy-two cases (25.2%) in the present study had double rootlets of the abducens nerve. In 59 of these cases (34 on the right side and 25 on the left) presented with unilateral double rootlets of the abducens. Thirteen cases presented with bilateral double rootlets of the abducens (4.5%). Conclusion: An abducens nerve arising by two separate rootlets is not a rare variation. The detection of this anatomical variation by preoperative MR imaging is important to avoid partial damage of the nerve during surgical procedures. The 3DT2-TSE as a noninvasive technique makes it possible to obtain extremely high-quality images of microstructures as cranial nerves and surrounding vessels in the cerebellopontine cistern. Therefore, preoperative MR imaging should be performed to detect anatomical variations of abducens nerve and to reduce the chance of operative injuries

  9. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Segmentation on FD-OCT Scans of Normal Subjects and Glaucoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Markus A; Hornegger, Joachim; Mardin, Christian Y; Tornow, Ralf P

    2010-11-08

    Automated measurements of the retinal nerve fiber layer thickness on circular OCT B-Scans provide physicians additional parameters for glaucoma diagnosis. We propose a novel retinal nerve fiber layer segmentation algorithm for frequency domain data that can be applied on scans from both normal healthy subjects, as well as glaucoma patients, using the same set of parameters. In addition, the algorithm remains almost unaffected by image quality. The main part of the segmentation process is based on the minimization of an energy function consisting of gradient and local smoothing terms. A quantitative evaluation comparing the automated segmentation results to manually corrected segmentations from three reviewers is performed. A total of 72 scans from glaucoma patients and 132 scans from normal subjects, all from different persons, composed the database for the evaluation of the segmentation algorithm. A mean absolute error per A-Scan of 2.9 µm was achieved on glaucomatous eyes, and 3.6 µm on healthy eyes. The mean absolute segmentation error over all A-Scans lies below 10 µm on 95.1% of the images. Thus our approach provides a reliable tool for extracting diagnostic relevant parameters from OCT B-Scans for glaucoma diagnosis.

  10. A Triple-Masked, Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus and Distal Peripheral Nerve Block Anesthesia for Outpatient Hand Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas C. K. Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. For hand surgery, brachial plexus blocks provide effective anesthesia but produce undesirable numbness. We hypothesized that distal peripheral nerve blocks will better preserve motor function while providing effective anesthesia. Methods. Adult subjects who were scheduled for elective ambulatory hand surgery under regional anesthesia and sedation were recruited and randomly assigned to receive ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block or distal block of the ulnar and median nerves. Each subject received 15 mL of 1.5% mepivacaine at the assigned location with 15 mL of normal saline injected in the alternate block location. The primary outcome (change in baseline grip strength measured by a hydraulic dynamometer was tested before the block and prior to discharge. Subject satisfaction data were collected the day after surgery. Results. Fourteen subjects were enrolled. Median (interquartile range [IQR] strength loss in the distal group was 21.4% (14.3, 47.8%, while all subjects in the supraclavicular group lost 100% of their preoperative strength, P = 0.001. Subjects in the distal group reported greater satisfaction with their block procedures on the day after surgery, P = 0.012. Conclusion. Distal nerve blocks better preserve motor function without negatively affecting quality of anesthesia, leading to increased patient satisfaction, when compared to brachial plexus block.

  11. High-Resolution Isotropic Three-Dimensional MR Imaging of the Extraforaminal Segments of the Cranial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jessica; Desai, Naman S; Jeffery, Dean; Aygun, Nafi; Blitz, Ari

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution isotropic 3-dimensional (D) MR imaging with and without contrast is now routinely used for imaging evaluation of cranial nerve anatomy and pathologic conditions. The anatomic details of the extraforaminal segments are well-visualized on these techniques. A wide range of pathologic entities may cause enhancement or displacement of the nerve, which is now visible to an extent not available on standard 2D imaging. This article highlights the anatomy of extraforaminal segments of the cranial nerves and uses select cases to illustrate the utility and power of these sequences, with a focus on constructive interference in steady-state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DISTAL MYOPATHIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimachkie, Mazen M.; Barohn, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Over a century ago, Gowers described two young patients in whom distal muscles weakness involved the hand, foot, sternocleidomastoid, and facial muscles in the other case the shoulder and distal leg musculature. Soon after, , similar distal myopathy cases were reported whereby the absence of sensory symptoms and of pathologic changes in the peripheral nerves and spinal cord at postmortem examination allowed differentiation from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. In 1951, Welander described autosomal dominant (AD) distal arm myopathy in a large Scandanavian cohort. Since then the number of well-characterized distal myopathies has continued to grow such that the distal myopathies have formed a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. Affected kindred commonly manifest weakness that is limited to foot and toe muscles even in advanced stages of the disease, with variable mild proximal leg, distal arm, neck and laryngeal muscle involvement in selected individuals. An interesting consequence of the molecular characterization of the distal myopathies has been the recognition that mutation in a single gene can lead to more than one clinical disorder. For example, Myoshi myopathy (MM) and limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2B are allelic disorders due to defects in the gene that encodes dysferlin. The six well described distal myopathy syndromes are shown in Table 1. Table 2 lists advances in our understanding of the myofibrillar myopathy group and Table 3 includes more recently delineated and less common distal myopathies. In the same manner, the first section of this review pertains to the more traditional six distal myopathies followed by discussion of the myofibrillar myopathies. In the third section, we review other clinically and genetically distinctive distal myopathy syndromes usually based upon single or smaller family cohorts. The fourth section considers other neuromuscular disorders that are important to recognize as they display prominent

  13. The anatomical relationship of the superficial radial nerve and the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve: A possible factor in persistent neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poublon, A.R.; Walbeehm, E.T.; Duraku, L.S.; Eilers, P.H.; Kerver, A.L.; Kleinrensink, G.J.; Coert, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN) is known for developing neuropathic pain syndromes after trauma. These pain syndromes can be hard to treat due to the involvement of other nerves in the forearm. When a nerve is cut, the Schwann cells, and also other cells in the distal segment of

  14. The anatomical relationship of the superficial radial nerve and the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve : A possible factor in persistent neuropathic pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poublon, A. R.; Walbeehm, E. T.; Duraku, L. S.; Eilers, P. H C; Kerver, A. L A; Kleinrensink, G. J.; Coert, J. H.

    The superficial branch of the radial nerve (SBRN) is known for developing neuropathic pain syndromes after trauma. These pain syndromes can be hard to treat due to the involvement of other nerves in the forearm. When a nerve is cut, the Schwann cells, and also other cells in the distal segment of

  15. [The technique of hearing reconstruction in the cases of conductive hearing loss with malformed tympanic segment of facial nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng; Song, Rendong; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-02

    To explore the technique of hearing reconstruction in the cases of conductive hearing loss with malformed tympanic segment of facial nerve. Data of 10 cases from July 2010 to March 2015 were collected.The status of tympanic segment of facial nerve, malformed ossicles and the reconstructed methods of ossicular chain were analyzed and discussed based on the embryo anatomy and surgical technique. All facial nerves in 10 cases were exposed and drooping to stapes or cover the oval window.Three patients who had normal stapes, pushed by the exposed facial nerve, were reconstructed with partial ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP). Two patients who had footplate, with partial fixation, were reconstructed with total ossicular replacement prostheses (TORP). Three patients who had atresia of the oval window were implanted with Piston after being made hole in the atresia plate.Another two cases who had atresia of the oval window were implanted with TORP after promontory being drilled out.All cases had no injury of facial nerve and nervous hearing, and no tinnitus.Nine cases had conductive hearing improvement, except one with promontory drilled out. Patients who had conductive hearing loss with malformed tympanic segment of facial nerve can be treated by the technique of hearing reconstruction.The fenestration technique in the bottom of the scala tympani of the basal turn provides us a new method for treating patients whose oval window was fully covered by malformed facial nerve.

  16. End-to-side neurorrhaphy repairs peripheral nerve injury: sensory nerve induces motor nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Zhang, She-Hong; Wang, Tao; Peng, Feng; Han, Dong; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is an option in the treatment of the long segment defects of a nerve. It involves suturing the distal stump of the disconnected nerve (recipient nerve) to the side of the intimate adjacent nerve (donor nerve). However, the motor-sensory specificity after end-to-side neurorrhaphy remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate whether cutaneous sensory nerve regeneration induces motor nerves after end-to-side neurorrhaphy. Thirty rats were randomized into three groups: (1) end-to-side neurorrhaphy using the ulnar nerve (mixed sensory and motor) as the donor nerve and the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve as the recipient nerve; (2) the sham group: ulnar nerve and cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve were just exposed; and (3) the transected nerve group: cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve was transected and the stumps were turned over and tied. At 5 months, acetylcholinesterase staining results showed that 34% ± 16% of the myelinated axons were stained in the end-to-side group, and none of the myelinated axons were stained in either the sham or transected nerve groups. Retrograde fluorescent tracing of spinal motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion showed the proportion of motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the end-to-side group was 21% ± 5%. In contrast, no motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the sham group and transected nerve group were found in the spinal cord segment. These results confirmed that motor neuron regeneration occurred after cutaneous nerve end-to-side neurorrhaphy.

  17. Microneurosurgical management of aneurysms at A4 and A5 segments and distal cortical branches of anterior cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehecka, Martin; Dashti, Reza; Hernesniemi, Juha; Niemelä, Mika; Koivisto, Timo; Ronkainen, Antti; Rinne, Jaakko; Jääskeläinen, Juha

    2008-10-01

    Aneurysms originating distal to the A3 segment of the ACA, located on the A4 and the A5 segments or the distal cortical branches of the ACA (AdistAs) are rare, forming about 0.5% of all IAs. There are only few reports on management of AdistAs. In this article, we review the practical anatomy, preoperative planning, and avoidance of complications in the microsurgical dissection and clipping of AdistAs. This review, and the whole series on IAs, is mainly based on the personal microneurosurgical experience of the senior author (J. H.) in 2 Finnish centers (Helsinki and Kuopio), which serve without patient selection the catchment area in Southern and Eastern Finland. These 2 centers have treated more than 10000 patients with IAs since 1951. In the Kuopio Cerebral Aneurysm Database of 3005 patients and 4253 IAs, there were 26 patients carrying 26 AdistAs, forming 0.9% of all patients with IAs, 0.6% of all IAs, and 2% of all ACA aneurysms. A total of 10 (38%) patients presented with ruptured AdistAs, with ICH in 4 (40%) and IVH in 2 (20%); 16 patients (62%) had multiple aneurysms. AdistAs are small, even when ruptured, with relatively wide base, and they are frequently associated with ICHs. Our data suggest that AdistAs rupture at smaller size than IAs in general. The challenge is to locate the aneurysm inside the interhemispheric fissure and to clip the neck adequately without obstructing branching arteries at the base. Unruptured AdistAs also need microneurosurgical clipping even when they are small.

  18. The Effects of Smoking on Anterior Segment Parameters, Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer, and Pupillary Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü Ekinci Köktekir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the alterations in the anterior segment parameters, retinal nerve fiber layer, and pupillary functions in smokers. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 45 eyes of 45 smokers and 45 eyes of 45 non-smoker control subjects were evaluated. All patients underwent measurement of anterior segment parameters with optical low coherence reflectometry (OLCR, mesopic and photopic pupillary diameter with an aberrometer device, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness with optical coherence tomography, and dry-eye assessment with Schirmer’s test. The results were compared with independent t-test by SPSS 16.0 Inc., and a p-value lower than 0.05 was determined as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between both groups in terms of mesopic pupil diameters that were measured with both OLCR and aberrometer device (p=0.03 and 0.02, respectively. Schirmer scores were also significantly decreased in smokers (p=0.001. The other measured parameters demonstrated no difference between smokers and non-smokers (p>0.05 for all. Conclusion: Smoking may affect pupillary functions, especially the mesopic pupillary diameter, and may cause a deficiency in pupil response under dark circumstances. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 11-4

  19. Influence of needle position on lumbar segmental nerve root block selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, André P; Groen, Gerbrand J; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H

    2006-01-01

    In patients with chronic low back pain radiating to the leg, segmental nerve root blocks (SNRBs) are performed to predict surgical outcome and identify the putative symptomatic spinal nerve. Epidural spread may lead to false interpretation, affecting clinical decision making. Systematic fluoroscopic analysis of epidural local anesthetic spread and its relationship to needle tip location has not been published to date. Study aims include assessment of epidural local anesthetic spread and its relationship to needle position during fluoroscopy-assisted blocks. Patients scheduled for L4, L5, and S1 blocks were included in this prospective observational study. Under fluoroscopy and electrostimulation, they received 0.5 mL of a mixture containing lidocaine 5 mg and iohexol 75 mg. X-rays with needle tip and contrast were scored for no epidural spread (grade 0), local spread epidurally (grade 1), or to adjacent nerve roots (grade 2). Sixty-five patients were analyzed for epidural spread, 62 for needle position. Grade 1 epidural spread occurred in 47% of L4 and 28% of L5 blocks and grade 2 spread in 3 blocks (5%; L5 n = 1, S1 n = 2). For lumbar blocks, the needle was most frequently found in the lateral upper half of the intervertebral foramen. Epidural spread occurred more frequently with medial needle positions (P = .06). The findings suggest (P = .06) that the risk of grade 1 and 2 lumbar epidural spread, which results in decreased SNRB selectivity, is greater with medial needle positions in the intervertebral foramen. The variability in anatomic position of the dorsal root ganglion necessitates electrostimulation to guide SNRB in addition to fluoroscopy.

  20. Diagnostic lumbosacral segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics: a prospective double-blind study on the variability and interpretation of segmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, A P; Groen, G J; Crul, B J

    2001-01-01

    Selective spinal nerve infiltration blocks are used diagnostically in patients with chronic low back pain radiating into the leg. Generally, a segmental nerve block is considered successful if the pain is reduced substantially. Hypesthesia and elicited paresthesias coinciding with the presumed segmental level are used as controls. The interpretation depends on a standard dermatomal map. However, it is not clear if this interpretation is reliable enough, because standard dermatomal maps do not show the overlap of neighboring dermatomes. The goal of the present study is to establish if dissimilarities exist between areas of hypesthesia, spontaneous pain reported by the patient, pain reduction by local anesthetics, and paresthesias elicited by sensory electrostimulation. A secondary goal is to determine to what extent the interpretation is improved when the overlaps of neighboring dermatomes are taken into account. Patients suffering from chronic low back pain with pain radiating into the leg underwent lumbosacral segmental nerve root blocks at subsequent levels on separate days. Lidocaine (2%, 0.5 mL) mixed with radiopaque fluid (0.25 mL) was injected after verifying the target location using sensory and motor electrostimulation. Sensory changes (pinprick method), paresthesias (reported by the patient), and pain reduction (Numeric Rating Scale) were reported. Hypesthesia and paresthesias were registered in a standard dermatomal map and in an adapted map which included overlap of neighboring dermatomes. The relationships between spinal level of injection, extent of hypesthesia, location of paresthesias, and corresponding dermatome were assessed quantitatively. Comparison of the results between both dermatomal maps was done by paired t-tests. After inclusion, data were processed for 40 segmental nerve blocks (L2-S1) performed in 29 patients. Pain reduction was achieved in 43%. Hypesthetic areas showed a large variability in size and location, and also in comparison to

  1. Sectional anatomy aid for improvement of decompression surgery approach to vertical segment of facial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Zhang, Yi Qun; Liu, Min; Jin, Limin; Huangfu, Mingmei; Liu, Zhenyu; Hua, Peiyan; Liu, Yulong; Hou, Ruida; Sun, Yu; Li, You Qiong; Wang, Yu Fa; Feng, Jia Chun

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to find a surgical approach to a vertical segment of the facial nerve (VFN) with a relatively wide visual field and small lesion by studying the location and structure of VFN with cross-sectional anatomy. High-resolution spiral computed tomographic multiplane reformation was used to reform images that were parallel to the Frankfort horizontal plane. To locate the VFN, we measured the distances as follows: from the VFN to the paries posterior bony external acoustic meatus on 5 typical multiplane reformation images, to the promontorium tympani and the root of the tympanic ring on 2 typical images. The mean distances from the VFN to the paries posterior bony external acoustic meatus are as follows: 4.47 mm on images showing the top of the external acoustic meatus, 4.20 mm on images with the best view of the window niche, 3.35 mm on images that show the widest external acoustic meatus, 4.22 mm on images with the inferior margin of the sulcus tympanicus, and 5.49 mm on images that show the bottom of the external acoustic meatus. The VFN is approximately 4.20 mm lateral to the promontorium tympani on images with the best view of the window niche and 4.12 mm lateral to the root of the tympanic ring on images with the inferior margin of the sulcus tympanicus. The other results indicate that the area and depth of the surgical wound from the improved approach would be much smaller than that from the typical approach. The surgical approach to the horizontal segment of the facial nerve through the external acoustic meatus and the tympanic cavity could be improved by grinding off the external acoustic meatus to show the VFN. The VFN can be found by taking the promontorium tympani and tympanic ring as references. This improvement is of high potential to expand the visual field to the facial nerve, remarkably without significant injury to the patients compared with the typical approach through the mastoid process.

  2. Androgen-dependent and independent process of bone formation in the distal segment of Os penis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, R; Izumi, K; Yamaoka, I

    1995-11-01

    The distal segment of the os penis of the rat develops as a fibrocartilage which is replaced with non-lamellar bone by endochondral ossification after puberty. Development of the fibrocartilage and its calcification have been shown to be induced by androgens, but androgen-dependency of the endochondral ossification has not been studied in detail. In the present study, immature male rats of various ages were castrated and the ossification of the fibrocartilage of os penis was examined. In rats castrated at 6 weeks, when the fibrocartilage was scarcely calcified, ossification did not occur even at 24 weeks. When the castrated rats were treated with testosterone, ossification started before 12 weeks of age. In rats castrated at 8 weeks, when the fibrocartilage was heavily calcified, endochondral ossification was observed in some of the animals (5/7) at 24 weeks of age. The results of this study indicate that once the fibrocartilage is calcified, the endochondral ossification can take place without androgen, although the androgen can promote the process of ossification.

  3. The morphological substrate for Renal Denervation: Nerve distribution patterns and parasympathetic nerves. A post-mortem histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amsterdam, Wouter A C; Blankestijn, Peter J; Goldschmeding, Roel; Bleys, Ronald L A W

    2016-03-01

    Renal Denervation as a possible treatment for hypertension has been studied extensively, but knowledge on the distribution of nerves surrounding the renal artery is still incomplete. While sympathetic and sensory nerves have been demonstrated, there is no mention of the presence of parasympathetic nerve fibers. To provide a description of the distribution patterns of the renal nerves in man, and, in addition, provide a detailed representation of the relative contribution of the sympathetic, parasympathetic and afferent divisions of the autonomic nervous system. Renal arteries of human cadavers were each divided into four longitudinal segments and immunohistochemically stained with specific markers for afferent, parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves. Nerve fibers were semi-automatically quantified by computerized image analysis, and expressed as cross-sectional area relative to the distance to the lumen. A total of 3372 nerve segments were identified in 8 arteries of 7 cadavers. Sympathetic, parasympathetic and afferent nerves contributed for 73.5% (95% CI: 65.4-81.5%), 17.9% (10.7-25.1%) and 8.7% (5.0-12.3%) of the total cross-sectional nerve area, respectively. Nerves are closer to the lumen in more distal segments and larger bundles that presumably innervate the kidney lie at 1-3.5mm distance from the lumen. The tissue-penetration depth of the ablation required to destroy 50% of the nerve fibers is 2.37 mm in the proximal segment and 1.78 mm in the most distal segments. Sympathetic, parasympathetic and afferent nerves exist in the vicinity of the renal artery. The results warrant further investigation of the role of the parasympathetic nervous system on renal physiology, and may contribute to refinement of the procedure by focusing the ablation on the most distal segment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Extensive molecular differences between anterior- and posterior-half-sclerotomes underlie somite polarity and spinal nerve segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keynes Roger J

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polarization of somite-derived sclerotomes into anterior and posterior halves underlies vertebral morphogenesis and spinal nerve segmentation. To characterize the full extent of molecular differences that underlie this polarity, we have undertaken a systematic comparison of gene expression between the two sclerotome halves in the mouse embryo. Results Several hundred genes are differentially-expressed between the two sclerotome halves, showing that a marked degree of molecular heterogeneity underpins the development of somite polarity. Conclusion We have identified a set of genes that warrant further investigation as regulators of somite polarity and vertebral morphogenesis, as well as repellents of spinal axon growth. Moreover the results indicate that, unlike the posterior half-sclerotome, the central region of the anterior-half-sclerotome does not contribute bone and cartilage to the vertebral column, being associated instead with the development of the segmented spinal nerves.

  5. TOPOGRAFÍA INTRANEURAL DE LA RAMA PROFUNDA DEL NERVIO ULNAR EN EL ANTEBRAZO DISTAL: ESTUDIO CADAVÉRICO. Intraneural topography of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve in the distal forearm: cadaveric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín García Pisón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: estudiar la topografía intraneural de la rama profunda del nervio ulnar (RPNU en el antebrazo distal en vistas a su identificación mediante disección intraneural mínima durante la transferencia del nervio del pronador cuadrado (NPC a la RPNU. Materiales y métodos: En 15 antebrazos cadavéricos se fijó el paquete vasculonervioso ulnar a los planos musculares profundos cada un centímetro tomando como referencia el hueso pisiforme. Se disecó en sentido proximal la RPNU bajo microscopio quirúrgico (Olympus OME, 4-20x y se registró su posición intraneural en base a una división en cuadrantes. Se midió la distancia desde el origen de la rama cutánea dorsal (RCD del nervio ulnar al pisiforme y se registró su relación intraneural con la RPNU. Resultados: La RPNU se individualizó hasta 69mm (41-94 proximal al hueso pisiforme, ubicándose en el cuadrante posteromedial del nervio ulnar en el 78% (67-87, el 93% (92-93 y el 100% de los casos entre los 0-2, 3-6 y 7-9 centímetros, respectivamente. La distancia pisiforme-RCD fue de 63mm (52-83. En 11 miembros la disección de la RPNU se extendió proximalmente al origen de la RCD, ubicándose siempre entre esta última y la rama superficial del nervio ulnar. Conclusiones: La topografía intraneural de la RPNU en el sitio óptimo para su sección en vistas a su anastomosis con el NPC es predecible en la mayoría de los casos, lo que confirma la viabilidad de su identificación precisa mediante disección intraneural mínima.  Objective: to assess the intraneural anatomy of the deep branch of the ulnar nerve (DBUN in the distal forearm in reference to its identification by means of minimal intraneural dissection during pronator quadratus nerve to DBUN transfers. Materials and methods: In 15 cadaveric forearms the ulnar neurovascular bundle was identified and attached to the subjacent muscles every one centimeter. Pisiform bone was used as reference. Intraneural proximal dissection of

  6. Lumbar segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics, pain relief, and motor function: a prospective double-blind study between lidocaine and ropivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, André P; Wilder Smith, Oliver H G; Crul, Ben J P; van de Heijden, Marc P; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2004-08-01

    Selective segmental nerve blocks with local anesthetics are applied for diagnostic purposes in patients with chronic back pain to determine the segmental level of the pain. We performed this study to establish myotomal motor effects after L4 spinal nerve blocks by lidocaine and ropivacaine and to evaluate the relationship with pain. Therefore, 20 patients, of which 19 finished the complete protocol, with chronic lumbosacral radicular pain without neurological deficits underwent segmental nerve blocks at L4 with both lidocaine and ropivacaine. Pain intensity scores (verbal numeric rating scale; VNRS) and the maximum voluntary muscle force (MVMF; using a dynamometer expressed in newtons) of the tibialis anterior and quadriceps femoris muscles were measured on the painful side and on the control side. The median VNRS decrease was 4.0 (P segmental nerve (L4) block is associated with increased quadriceps femoris and tibialis anterior MVMF, without differences for lidocaine and ropivacaine.

  7. High-resolution CISS MR imaging with and without contrast for evaluation of the upper cranial nerves: segmental anatomy and selected pathologic conditions of the cisternal through extraforaminal segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Ari M; Macedo, Leonardo L; Chonka, Zachary D; Ilica, Ahmet T; Choudhri, Asim F; Gallia, Gary L; Aygun, Nafi

    2014-02-01

    The authors review the course and appearance of the major segments of the upper cranial nerves from their apparent origin at the brainstem through the proximal extraforaminal region, focusing on the imaging and anatomic features of particular relevance to high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging evaluation. Selected pathologic entities are included in the discussion of the corresponding cranial nerve segments for illustrative purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary nerve grafting: A study of revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, Charbel; Scholz, Thomas; Cole, Matthew D; Steward, Earl; Vanderkam, Victoria; Evans, Gregory R D

    2003-01-01

    It was the purpose of this study to evaluate the revascularization of primary nerve repair and grafts using orthogonal polarization spectral (OPS) (Cytometrix, Inc.) imaging, a novel method for real-time evaluation of microcirculatory blood flow. Twenty male Sprague Dawley rats (250 g) were anesthetized with vaporized halothane and surgically prepared for common peroneal nerve resection. Group I animals (n = 10) underwent primary neurorraphy following transection, utilizing a microsurgical technique with 10-0 nylon suture. Group II (n = 10) animals had a 7-mm segment of nerve excised, reversed, and subsequently replaced as a nerve graft under similar techniques. All animals were evaluated using the OPS imaging system on three portions (proximal, transection site/graft, and distal) of the nerve following repair or grafting. Reevaluation of 5 animals randomly selected from each group using the OPS imaging system was again performed on days 14 and 28 following microsurgical repair/grafting. Values were determined by percent change in vascularity of the common peroneal nerve at 0 hr following surgery. Real-time evaluation of blood flow was utilized as an additional objective criterion. Percent vascularity in group I and II animals increased from baseline in all segments at day 14. By day 28, vascularity in nerves of group I rats decreased in all segments to values below baseline, with the exception of the transection site, which remained at a higher value than obtained directly after surgical repair. In group II animals, vascularity remained above baseline in all segments except the distal segment, which returned to vascularity levels similar to those at 0 hr. Further, occlusion of the vessels demonstrated in the graft and distal segments following initial transection appeared to be corrected. This study suggests that revascularization may occur via bidirectional inosculation with favored proximal vascular growth advancement. The use of real-time imaging offers a

  9. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients.

  10. Anatomic assessment of sympathetic peri-arterial renal nerves in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Cheng, Qi; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Fowler, David R; Kolodgie, Frank D; Virmani, Renu; Joner, Michael

    2014-08-19

    Although renal sympathetic denervation therapy has shown promising results in patients with resistant hypertension, the human anatomy of peri-arterial renal nerves is poorly understood. The aim of our study was to investigate the anatomic distribution of peri-arterial sympathetic nerves around human renal arteries. Bilateral renal arteries were collected from human autopsy subjects, and peri-arterial renal nerve anatomy was examined by using morphometric software. The ratio of afferent to efferent nerve fibers was investigated by dual immunofluorescence staining using antibodies targeted for anti-tyrosine hydroxylase and anti-calcitonin gene-related peptide. A total of 10,329 nerves were identified from 20 (12 hypertensive and 8 nonhypertensive) patients. The mean individual number of nerves in the proximal and middle segments was similar (39.6 ± 16.7 per section and 39.9 ± 1 3.9 per section), whereas the distal segment showed fewer nerves (33.6 ± 13.1 per section) (p = 0.01). Mean subject-specific nerve distance to arterial lumen was greatest in proximal segments (3.40 ± 0.78 mm), followed by middle segments (3.10 ± 0.69 mm), and least in distal segments (2.60 ± 0.77 mm) (p renal sympathetic nerve fibers is lower in distal segments and dorsal locations. There is a clear predominance of efferent nerve fibers, with decreasing prevalence of afferent nerves from proximal to distal peri-arterial and renal parenchyma. Understanding these anatomic patterns is important for refinement of renal denervation procedures. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Longitudinal changes of nerve conduction velocity, distal motor latency, compound motor action potential duration, and skin temperature during prolonged exposure to cold in a climate chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, Walter; Klenk, Jochen; Becker, Clemens; Zscheile, Julia; Gabor, Kai-Steffen; Lindemann, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Changes of nerve conduction velocity (NCV), distal motor latency (DML), compound motor action potential (CMAP) duration, and skin temperature with regard to cold have been investigated by use of ice packs or cold water baths, but not after cooling of environmental temperature which has higher ecological validity. The aim of this study was to investigate these parameters during cooled room temperature. NCV, DML, and CMAP duration of the common fibular nerve, and skin temperature were measured in 20 healthy young females during exposure to 15°C room temperature, coming from 25°C room. We found that NCV decreased and DML increased linearly during 45 min observation time, in contrast to CMAP duration and skin temperature which changes followed an exponential curve. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating changes of these parameters during exposure to environmental cold. The results may pilot some new hypotheses and studies on physiological and pathological changes of the peripheral nervous system and skin to environmental cold, e.g., in elderly with peripheral neuropathies.

  12. Altered protein phosphorylation in sciatic nerve from rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrama, L.H.; Berti-Mattera, L.N.; Eichberg, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of experimental diabetes on the phosphorylation of proteins in the rat sciatic nerve was studied. Nerves from animals made diabetic with streptozocin were incubated in vitro with [ 32 P]orthophosphate and divided into segments from the proximal to the distal end, and proteins from each segment were then separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The principal labeled species were the major myelin proteins, P0, and the basic proteins. After 6 wk of diabetes, the incorporation of isotope into these proteins rose as a function of distance along the nerve in a proximal to distal direction and was significantly higher at the distal end compared with incorporation into nerves from age-matched controls. The overall level of isotope uptake was similar in nerves from diabetic animals and weight-matched controls. The distribution of 32 P among proteins also differed in diabetic nerve compared with both control groups in that P0 and the small basic protein accounted for a greater proportion of total label incorporated along the entire length of nerve. In contrast to intact nerve, there was no significant difference in protein phosphorylation when homogenates from normal and diabetic nerve were incubated with [ 32 P]-gamma-ATP. The results suggest that abnormal protein phosphorylation, particularly of myelin proteins, is a feature of experimental diabetic neuropathy and that the changes are most pronounced in the distal portion of the nerve

  13. 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels in spectral-domain OCT volumes of the optic nerve head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Niemeijer, Meindert; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-03-01

    Segmentation of retinal blood vessels can provide important information for detecting and tracking retinal vascular diseases including diabetic retinopathy, arterial hypertension, arteriosclerosis and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Many studies on 2-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from a variety of medical images have been performed. However, 3-D segmentation of retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) volumes, which is capable of providing geometrically accurate vessel models, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously studied. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a method that can automatically detect 3-D retinal blood vessels from spectral-domain OCT scans centered on the optic nerve head (ONH). The proposed method utilized a fast multiscale 3-D graph search to segment retinal surfaces as well as a triangular mesh-based 3-D graph search to detect retinal blood vessels. An experiment on 30 ONH-centered OCT scans (15 right eye scans and 15 left eye scans) from 15 subjects was performed, and the mean unsigned error in 3-D of the computer segmentations compared with the independent standard obtained from a retinal specialist was 3.4 +/- 2.5 voxels (0.10 +/- 0.07 mm).

  14. The percentage of macrophage numbers in rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satrio Wicaksono

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Excessive accumulation of macrophages in sciatic nerve fascicles inhibits regeneration of peripheral nerves. The aim of this study is to determine the percentage of the macrophages inside and outside of the fascicles at the proximal, at the site of injury and at the distal segment of rat model of sciatic nerve crush injury. Thirty male 3 months age Wistar rats of 200-230 g were divided into sham-operation group and crush injury group. Termination was performed on day 3, 7, and 14 after crush injury. Immunohistochemical examination was done using anti CD68 antibody. Counting of immunopositive and immunonegative cells was done on three representative fields for extrafascicular and intrafascicular area of proximal, injury and distal segments. The data was presented as percentage of immunopositive cells. The percentage of the macrophages was significantly increased in crush injury group compared to the sham-operated group in all segments of the peripheral nerves. While the percentage of macrophages outside fascicle in all segments of sciatic nerve and within the fascicle in the proximal segment reached its peak on day 3, the percentage of macrophages within the fascicles at the site of injury and distal segments reached the peak later at day 7. In conclusions, accumulation of macrophages outside the nerve fascicles occurs at the beginning of the injury, and then followed later by the accumulation of macrophages within nerve fascicles

  15. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  16. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T

    2001-11-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  17. Epicardial distribution of ST segment and T wave changes produced by stimulation of intrathoracic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, P; Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R A; Armour, J A

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three ventricular epicardial electrograms were recorded simultaneously in 8 atropinized dogs during stimulation of acutely decentralized intrathoracic autonomic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves. Three variables were measured: (1) isochronal maps representing the epicardial activation sequence, (2) maps depicting changes in areas under the QRS complex and T wave (regional inhomogeneity of repolarization), and (3) local and total QT intervals. Neural stimulations did not alter the activation sequence but induced changes in the magnitude and polarity of the ST segments and T waves as well as in QRST areas. Stimulation of the same neural structure in different dogs induced electrical changes with different amplitudes and in different regions of the ventricles, except for the ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerve which usually affected the dorsal wall of the left ventricle. Greatest changes occurred when the right recurrent, left intermediate medial, left caudal pole, left ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerves and stellate ganglia were stimulated. Local QT durations either decreased or did not change, whereas total QT duration as measured using a root-mean-square signal did not change, indicating the regional nature of repolarization changes. Taken together, these data indicate that intrathoracic efferent sympathetic neurons can induce regional inhomogeneity of repolarization without prolonging the total QT interval.

  18. MR imaging of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves: Neurovascular relationships and abnormal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Changhu, E-mail: tigerlch@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Du Yinglin, E-mail: duyinglinzhuo@sohu.co [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, 72, Jingshi Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Xu Jinfa, E-mail: xuke5598@icom.c [Liao Cheng City People' s Hospital, Dongchang Road, Liaocheng, Shandong (China); Wu Lebin, E-mail: Lebinwu518@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Cheng, E-mail: cacab2a@126.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Ximing, E-mail: wxming369@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Haiyan, E-mail: whyott@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yu Fuhua, E-mail: changhu1970@163.co [Weifang Medical College, 7166, West Road Baotong Weifang, Shandong (China)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: To evaluate the detailed anatomic features, neurovascular relationships of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves (PGCN: IX, X, XI, XII); to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in demonstrating the PGCN with disorders caused by abnormal compression related to artery or tumor. Methods: A total of 59 volunteers, 12 patients with abnormal symptom in the PGCN underwent three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging, and 22 of these volunteers and 12 patients also underwent MR angiography in which a time-of-flight (TOF) sequence was used to further distinguish the PGCN from the adjacent blood vessels. Anatomical features, neurovascular relationships of the PGCN in 59 volunteers and abnormal changes in 12 patients caused by neurovascular compression or tumor were observed from multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images, cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver were used to testify the PGCN displayed in 59 volunteers. Results: 3D-CISS MR imaging depicted the proximal cisternal segment of the cranial nerves complex (CN IX, X, XI) at the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 100% (118/118), 99% (117/118) of 118 sides; CNXII in the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 90% (106/118), 91% (107/118) of 118 sides. At the sagittal planes, the CN IX, X, XI were found parallel to each other in the cisternal segment in 45.2% (53/117) of 117 sides, gathering into a bundle of nerves complex before entering the jugular foramen (JF) in 54.7% (64/117) of 117sides. VAs were blood vessels more often identified, they were found to be in contact with the PGCN in 28.0% (33/118) of 118 sides, and not in contact in 72.0% (85/118) of 118 sides. 3D-CISS MR imaging of volunteers revealed the similar result corresponding to cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver. Twelve patients with abnormal changes in the PGCN were all displayed well, among them 8 were

  19. MR imaging of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves: Neurovascular relationships and abnormal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Changhu; Du Yinglin; Xu Jinfa; Wu Lebin; Liu Cheng; Wang Ximing; Wang Haiyan; Yu Fuhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the detailed anatomic features, neurovascular relationships of the cisternal segment of the posterior group of cranial nerves (PGCN: IX, X, XI, XII); to evaluate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in demonstrating the PGCN with disorders caused by abnormal compression related to artery or tumor. Methods: A total of 59 volunteers, 12 patients with abnormal symptom in the PGCN underwent three-dimensional (3D) Fourier transformation constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging, and 22 of these volunteers and 12 patients also underwent MR angiography in which a time-of-flight (TOF) sequence was used to further distinguish the PGCN from the adjacent blood vessels. Anatomical features, neurovascular relationships of the PGCN in 59 volunteers and abnormal changes in 12 patients caused by neurovascular compression or tumor were observed from multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images, cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver were used to testify the PGCN displayed in 59 volunteers. Results: 3D-CISS MR imaging depicted the proximal cisternal segment of the cranial nerves complex (CN IX, X, XI) at the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 100% (118/118), 99% (117/118) of 118 sides; CNXII in the oblique axial, sagittal planes in 90% (106/118), 91% (107/118) of 118 sides. At the sagittal planes, the CN IX, X, XI were found parallel to each other in the cisternal segment in 45.2% (53/117) of 117 sides, gathering into a bundle of nerves complex before entering the jugular foramen (JF) in 54.7% (64/117) of 117sides. VAs were blood vessels more often identified, they were found to be in contact with the PGCN in 28.0% (33/118) of 118 sides, and not in contact in 72.0% (85/118) of 118 sides. 3D-CISS MR imaging of volunteers revealed the similar result corresponding to cryomicrotome section and 3D-CISS MR imaging of cranial cadaver. Twelve patients with abnormal changes in the PGCN were all displayed well, among them 8 were

  20. Intra-temporal facial nerve centerline segmentation for navigated temporal bone surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormolen, E.H.J.; Stralen, van M.; Woerdeman, P.A.; Pluim, J.P.W.; Noordmans, H.J.; Regli, L.; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, J.W.; Viergever, M.A.; Wong, K.H.; Holmes III, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Approaches through the temporal bone require surgeons to drill away bone to expose a target skull base lesion while evading vital structures contained within it, such as the sigmoid sinus, jugular bulb, and facial nerve. We hypothesize that an augmented neuronavigation system that continuously

  1. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Oshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN, which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury.

  2. Renal artery nerve distribution and density in the porcine model: biologic implications for the development of radiofrequency ablation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Armando; Rousselle, Serge; Palmieri, Taylor; Rate, William R; Wicks, Joan; Degrange, Ashley; Hyon, Chelsea M; Gongora, Carlos A; Hart, Randy; Grundy, Will; Kaluza, Greg L; Granada, Juan F

    2013-12-01

    Catheter-based renal artery denervation has demonstrated to be effective in decreasing blood pressure among patients with refractory hypertension. The anatomic distribution of renal artery nerves may influence the safety and efficacy profile of this procedure. We aimed to describe the anatomic distribution and density of periarterial renal nerves in the porcine model. Thirty arterial renal sections were included in the analysis by harvesting a tissue block containing the renal arteries and perirenal tissue from each animal. Each artery was divided into 3 segments (proximal, mid, and distal) and assessed for total number, size, and depth of the nerves according to the location. Nerve counts were greatest proximally (45.62% of the total nerves) and decreased gradually distally (mid, 24.58%; distal, 29.79%). The distribution in nerve size was similar across all 3 sections (∼40% of the nerves, 50-100 μm; ∼30%, 0-50 μm; ∼20%, 100-200 μm; and ∼10%, 200-500 μm). In the arterial segments ∼45% of the nerves were located within 2 mm from the arterial wall whereas ∼52% of all nerves were located within 2.5 mm from the arterial wall. Sympathetic efferent fibers outnumbered sensory afferent fibers overwhelmingly, intermixed within the nerve bundle. In the porcine model, renal artery nerves are seen more frequently in the proximal segment of the artery. Nerve size distribution appears to be homogeneous throughout the artery length. Nerve bundles progress closer to the arterial wall in the distal segments of the artery. This anatomic distribution may have implications for the future development of renal denervation therapies. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neural stem cells enhance nerve regeneration after sciatic nerve injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin; Zhou, Shuai; Feng, Guo-Ying; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Sun, Yi; Liu, Qian; Huang, Fei

    2012-10-01

    With the development of tissue engineering and the shortage of autologous nerve grafts in nerve reconstruction, cell transplantation in a conduit is an alternative strategy to improve nerve regeneration. The present study evaluated the effects and mechanism of brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) on sciatic nerve injury in rats. At the transection of the sciatic nerve, a 10-mm gap between the nerve stumps was bridged with a silicon conduit filled with 5 × 10(5) NSCs. In control experiments, the conduit was filled with nerve growth factor (NGF) or normal saline (NS). The functional and morphological properties of regenerated nerves were investigated, and expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and NGF was measured. One week later, there was no connection through the conduit. Four or eight weeks later, fibrous connections were evident between the proximal and distal segments. Motor function was revealed by measurement of the sciatic functional index (SFI) and sciatic nerve conduction velocity (NCV). Functional recovery in the NSC and NGF groups was significantly more advanced than that in the NS group. NSCs showed significant improvement in axon myelination of the regenerated nerves. Expression of NGF and HGF in the injured sciatic nerve was significantly lower in the NS group than in the NSCs and NGF groups. These results and other advantages of NSCs, such as ease of harvest and relative abundance, suggest that NSCs could be used clinically to enhance peripheral nerve repair.

  4. Changes in the structural properties of peripheral nerves after transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby, E B; Meyer, B M; Schwappach, J; Alvine, G

    1996-11-01

    Changes in peripheral nerve structural properties after transection were measured weekly for 5 weeks in the distal stump of the sciatic nerve in 50 Sprague-Dawley rats. Each week after transection, the distal stump of the transected nerve showed increased stiffness when compared to intact nerves. Linear elastic stiffness reached a maximum at weeks 1 and 2 after transection, when the transected nerves were 15% stiffer than the contralateral control sides. Toughness was also increased and reached a maximum at week 4 with a 50% difference between values for experimental and control sides. Overall failure load was between 21% and 27% greater, peaking at week 3. An increase in stiffness of the distal stump would result in increased tension at the suture line, as the nerve gap is overcome when performing a delayed neurorraphy. These data suggest, with respect to structural properties, that an end-to-end repair should be carried out at the time of injury; after only 1 week, significant stiffness in the distal segment of the nerve developed, which should result in an increase in tension at the repair site.

  5. Recurrent neuroma formation after lateral arm free flap coverage with neurorraphy to the posteroantebrachial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Steven L; Gordon, Michael J

    2004-09-01

    We report a patient with previous wrist trauma and development of a symptomatic neuroma of the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The patient had previously been successfully treated with lateral arm free flap coverage with neurorrhaphy to a segment of the posteroantebrachial cutaneous nerve carried with the flap. Two years following this procedure the patient experienced re-onset of symptoms prompting surgical exploration of the area. At the time of operation a recurrent neuroma was found at the free distal terminus of the transferred posteroantebrachial cutaneous nerve. The neuroma was repositioned into the distal radius via a burr hole with relief of symptoms.

  6. Using Eggshell Membrane as Nerve Guide Channels in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Farjah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:  The aim of this study was to evaluate the final outcome of nerve regeneration across the eggsell membrane (ESM tube conduit in comparison with autograft. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male rats (250-300 g were randomized into (1 ESM conduit, (2 autograft, and (3 sham surgery groups. The eggs submerged in 5% acetic acid. The decalcifying membranes were cut into four pieces, rotated over the teflon mandrel and dried at   37°C. The left sciatic nerve was surgically cut. A 10-mm nerve segment was cut and removed. In the ESM group, the proximal and distal cut ends of the sciatic nerve were telescoped into the nerve guides. In the autograft group, the 10 mm nerve segment was reversed and used as an autologous nerve graft. All animals were evaluated by sciatic functional index (SFI and electrophysiology testing.  Results:The improvement in SFI from the first to the last evalution in ESM and autograft groups were evaluated. On days 49 and 60 post-operation, the mean SFI of ESM group was significantly greater than the autograft group (P 0.05. Conclusion:These findings demonstrate that ESM effectively enhances nerve regeneration and promotes functional recovery in injured sciatic nerve of rat.

  7. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability with preterminal nerve and neuromuscular junction remodeling is a hallmark of Schwartz-Jampel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauché, Stéphanie; Boerio, Delphine; Davoine, Claire-Sophie; Bernard, Véronique; Stum, Morgane; Bureau, Cécile; Fardeau, Michel; Romero, Norma Beatriz; Fontaine, Bertrand; Koenig, Jeanine; Hantaï, Daniel; Gueguen, Antoine; Fournier, Emmanuel; Eymard, Bruno; Nicole, Sophie

    2013-12-01

    Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS) is a recessive disorder with muscle hyperactivity that results from hypomorphic mutations in the perlecan gene, a basement membrane proteoglycan. Analyses done on a mouse model have suggested that SJS is a congenital form of distal peripheral nerve hyperexcitability resulting from synaptic acetylcholinesterase deficiency, nerve terminal instability with preterminal amyelination, and subtle peripheral nerve changes. We investigated one adult patient with SJS to study this statement in humans. Perlecan deficiency due to hypomorphic mutations was observed in the patient biological samples. Electroneuromyography showed normal nerve conduction, neuromuscular transmission, and compound nerve action potentials while multiple measures of peripheral nerve excitability along the nerve trunk did not detect changes. Needle electromyography detected complex repetitive discharges without any evidence for neuromuscular transmission failure. The study of muscle biopsies containing neuromuscular junctions showed well-formed post-synaptic element, synaptic acetylcholinesterase deficiency, denervation of synaptic gutters with reinnervation by terminal sprouting, and long nonmyelinated preterminal nerve segments. These data support the notion of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in SJS, which would originate distally from synergistic actions of peripheral nerve and neuromuscular junction changes as a result of perlecan deficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased rate of stent thrombosis and target lesion revascularization after filter protection in primary percutaneous coronary intervention for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 15-month follow-up of the DEDICATION (Drug Elution and Distal Protection in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Anne; Kelbaek, Henning; Kløvgaard, Lene

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of distal protection during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).......The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of distal protection during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)....

  9. Quantitative evaluation of normal lumbosacral plexus nerve by using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yin; Wang Chuanbing; Liu Wei; Zong Min; Sa Rina; Shi Haibin; Wang Dehang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the lumbosacral plexus nerves by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and quantitatively evaluate them by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in healthy volunteers. Methods: A total of 60 healthy volunteers (30 males and 30 females) underwent DTI scanning. Mean FA values of the lumbosacral plexus nerves (both sides of lumbar roots L3 to S1, proximal and distal to the lumbar foraminal zone) were quantified. Differences among various segments of lumbar nerve roots were compared with ANOVA test and SNK test. Differences between two sides of the lumbar nerve roots at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. Differences between the proximal and the distal nerve to the the lumbar foraminal zone at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. The lumbosacral plexus nerve was visualized with tractography. Results: (1) The lumbosacral plexus nerve was clearly visualized with tractography. (2) Mean FA values of the lumbar nerve roots L3 to S1 were as followings: proximal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.202 ± 0.021, 0.201 ± 0.026, 0.201 ± 0.027, 0.191 ±0.016, distal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.222 ± 0.034, 0.250 ± 0.028, 0.203 ± 0.026, 0.183 ± 0.020, proximal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.200 ± 0.023, 0.202 ± 0.023, 0.205 ± 0.027, 0.191 ± 0.017, distal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.225 ± 0.032, 0.247 ± 0.027, 0.205 ± 0.033, 0.183 ± 0.021. Mean FA values were significantly different between the proximal nerve to the distal nerve in lumbar nerve roots L3, L4, S1 (t=-9.114-2.366, P<0.05), but not significantly different in L5 (P>0.05). Differences were not found between the right and left side nerves at the same lumbar segment (P>0.05). (3) The whole length of the lumbar roots nerve L3 to S1 can be visualized clearly by using DTT. Conclusions: Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography can show and provide quantitative information of human lumbosacral plexus nerves. DTI

  10. Distal digital replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Leila; Klausner, Jill Q; Chang, James

    2013-11-01

    Hand surgeons have been hesitant to perform distal digital replantation because of the technical challenges and the perception of a high cost-to-benefit ratio. Recent studies, however, have shown high survival rates and excellent functional and aesthetic results, providing renewed enthusiasm for distal replantation. The authors reviewed the literature and summarize key points regarding the surgical treatment, perioperative care, and outcomes of distal digital replantation. They describe specific techniques and considerations for surgical repair in each of four distal zones as described by Sebastin and Chung. Zone 1A replantation involves an artery-only anastomosis of a longitudinal pulp artery. Venous anastomosis first becomes possible in zone 1B. Zone 1C involves periarticular amputations where arthrodesis of the distal interphalangeal joint is usually indicated. Repair of the artery, vein, and nerve is technically optimal in zone 1D, where venous anastomosis should be performed. Overall, survival rates for distal digital replantation are similar to those reported for more proximal replantation. The literature reports good outcomes regarding nail salvage, fingertip sensibility, and range of motion, with restoration of length and aesthetic appearance. Distal replantation performed at institutions that specialize in microsurgery and specifically tailored to the level of injury is associated with good survival, function, and patient satisfaction and superior aesthetic outcome. More prospective data are needed to evaluate the cost of treatment, psychological outcomes, and functional outcomes of distal replantation compared with revision amputation.

  11. Transplantation of bone-marrow-derived cells into a nerve guide resulted in transdifferentiation into Schwann cells and effective regeneration of transected mouse sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Lopes, Fátima Rosalina; Frattini, Flávia; Marques, Suelen Adriani; Almeida, Fernanda Martins de; de Moura Campos, Lenira Camargo; Langone, Francesco; Lora, Silvano; Borojevic, Radovan; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco

    2010-10-01

    Peripheral nerves possess the capacity of self-regeneration after traumatic injury. Nevertheless, the functional outcome after peripheral-nerve regeneration is often poor, especially if the nerve injuries occur far from their targets. Aiming to optimize axon regeneration, we grafted bone-marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) into a collagen-tube nerve guide after transection of the mouse sciatic nerve. The control group received only the culture medium. Motor function was tested at 2, 4, and 6 weeks after surgery, using the sciatic functional index (SFI), and showed that functional recovery was significantly improved in animals that received the cell grafts. After 6 weeks, the mice were anesthetized, perfused transcardially, and the sciatic nerves were dissected and processed for transmission electron microscopy and light microscopy. The proximal and distal segments of the nerves were compared, to address the question of improvement in growth rate; the results revealed a maintenance and increase of nerve regeneration for both myelinated and non-myelinated fibers in distal segments of the experimental group. Also, quantitative analysis of the distal region of the regenerating nerves showed that the numbers of myelinated fibers, Schwann cells (SCs) and g-ratio were significantly increased in the experimental group compared to the control group. The transdifferentiation of BMDCs into Schwann cells was confirmed by double labeling with S100/and Hoechst staining. Our data suggest that BMDCs transplanted into a nerve guide can differentiate into SCs, and improve the growth rate of nerve fibers and motor function in a transected sciatic-nerve model.

  12. Public control of environmental health hazards (clinical and experimental studies of distal axonopathy--a frequent form of brain and nerve damage produced by environmental chemical hazards)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumburg, H.H.; Spencer, P.S.

    1979-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies of the peripheral and central nervous system degeneration (distal dying-back axonopathy) in humans and experimental animals produced by acrylamide monomer and certain hydrocarbon compounds are summarized. The human distal axonopathies include: many of the naturally occurring, genetically determined system disorders/ certain nutritional disorders/ uremic neuropathy/ the neuropathies associated with some malignancies/ and the toxic neuropathies induced by industrial chemicals. The irreversible, subclinical, and clinical effects of distal axonopathies on the human central nervous system are examined. A morphological rationale for previously enigmatic clinical phenomena in the human toxic neuropathies is presented. Neuropathology is potentially useful in the screening of chemicals for neurotoxicity. (7 photos, 24 references)

  13. Experimental study of vascularized nerve graft: evaluation of nerve regeneration using choline acetyltransferase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, M; Tamai, S; Yajima, H; Kawanishi, K

    2001-01-01

    A comparative study of nerve regeneration was performed on vascularized nerve graft (VNG) and free nerve graft (FNG) in Fischer strain rats. A segment of the sciatic nerve with vascular pedicle of the femoral artery and vein was harvested from syngeneic donor rat for the VNG group and the sciatic nerve in the same length without vascular pedicle was harvested for the FNG group. They were transplanted to a nerve defect in the sciatic nerve of syngeneic recipient rats. At 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks after operation, the sciatic nerves were biopsied and processed for evaluation of choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity, histological studies, and measurement of wet weight of the muscle innervated by the sciatic nerve. Electrophysiological evaluation of the grafted nerve was also performed before sacrifice. The average CAT activity in the distal to the distal suture site was 383 cpm in VNG and 361 cpm in FNG at 2 weeks; 6,189 cpm in VNG and 2,264 cpm in FNG at 4 weeks; and 11,299 cpm in VNG and 9,424 cpm in FNG at 6 weeks postoperatively. The value of the VNG group was statistically higher than that of the FNG group at 4 weeks postoperatively. Electrophysiological and histological findings also suggested that nerve regeneration in the VNG group was superior to that in the FNG group during the same period. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups after 6 weeks postoperatively in any of the evaluations. The CAT measurement was useful in the experiments, because it was highly sensitive and reproducible. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The superiority of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of facial, vestibulocochlear nerves and their abnormal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Changhu, E-mail: tigerlch@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang Bin, E-mail: liangchangbo.student@sina.co [Liao Cheng City People' s Hospital, Dongchang Road, Liaocheng, Shandong (China); Wu Lebin, E-mail: Lebinwu518@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Du Yinglin, E-mail: duyinglinzhuo@sohu.co [Shandong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Public Health Institute, 72, Jingshi Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang Ximing, E-mail: wxminmg369@163.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Liu Cheng, E-mail: cacab2a@126.co [Shandong University, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, CT Room, 324, Jingwu Road, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yu Fuhua, E-mail: changhu1970@163.co [Weifang Medical College, 7166, West Road Baotong Weifang, Shandong (China)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: To select the best imaging method for clinical otologic patients through evaluating 3D constructive interference of steady state (CISS) image quality in visualizing the facial, vestibulocochlear nerves (CN:VII-VIII) and their abnormal changes. Methods: The CN:VII-VIII as well as inner ear structures in 48 volunteers were examined using 3D-CISS and 3D turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences respectively, and displayed to the full at the reformatted and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the CN:VII-VIII as well as inner ear structures. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxin test, p < 0.05 was considered significant. In addition, 8 patients with abnormality in facial or vestibulocochlear nerves were also examined using 3D-CISS sequence. Results: The identification rates for the cisternal segment of facial, vestibulocochlear nerves and corresponding membranous labyrinth were 100%. Abnormal changes of the facial or vestibulocochlear nerves were clearly shown in 8 patients, among them 1 was caused by bilateral acoustic neurinoma, 1 by cholesteatoma at cerebellopontine angle, 1 by arachnoid cyst, 1 by neurovascular adhesion, 4 by neurovascular compression. Conclusion: With 3D-CISS sequence the fine structure of the CN:VII-VIII and corresponding membranous labyrinth can be clearly demonstrated; lesions at the site of cerebellopontine angle can also be found easily.

  15. Nerve regeneration using tubular scaffolds from biodegradable polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausner, T; Schmidhammer, R; Zandieh, S; Hopf, R; Schultz, A; Gogolewski, S; Hertz, H; Redl, H

    2007-01-01

    In severe nerve lesion, nerve defects and in brachial plexus reconstruction, autologous nerve grafting is the golden standard. Although, nerve grafting technique is the best available approach a major disadvantages exists: there is a limited source of autologous nerve grafts. This study presents data on the use of tubular scaffolds with uniaxial pore orientation from experimental biodegradable polyurethanes coated with fibrin sealant to regenerate a 8 mm resected segment of rat sciatic nerve. Tubular scaffolds: prepared by extrusion of the polymer solution in DMF into water coagulation bath. The polymer used for the preparation of tubular scaffolds was a biodegradable polyurethane based on hexamethylene diisocyanate, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and dianhydro-D-sorbitol. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL: Eighteen Sprague Dawley rats underwent mid-thigh sciatic nerve transection and were randomly assigned to two experimental groups with immediate repair: (1) tubular scaffold, (2) 180 degrees rotated sciatic nerve segment (control). Serial functional measurements (toe spread test, placing tests) were performed weekly from 3rd to 12th week after nerve repair. On week 12, electrophysiological assessment was performed. Sciatic nerve and scaffold/nerve grafts were harvested for histomorphometric analysis. Collagenic connective tissue, Schwann cells and axons were evaluated in the proximal nerve stump, the scaffold/nerve graft and the distal nerve stump. The implants have uniaxially-oriented pore structure with a pore size in the range of 2 micorm (the pore wall) and 75 x 700 microm (elongated pores in the implant lumen). The skin of the tubular implants was nonporous. Animals which underwent repair with tubular scaffolds of biodegradable polyurethanes coated with diluted fibrin sealant had no significant functional differences compared with the nerve graft group. Control group resulted in a trend-wise better electrophysiological recovery but did not show statistically significant

  16. Vascular Response of the Segments Adjacent to the Proximal and Distal Edges of the ABSORB Everolimus-Eluting Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gogas, Bill D; Serruys, Patrick W; Diletti, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to investigate in vivo the vascular response at the proximal and distal edges of the second-generation ABSORB everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS).......This study sought to investigate in vivo the vascular response at the proximal and distal edges of the second-generation ABSORB everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS)....

  17. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  18. Evidence for a systemic regulation of neurotrophin synthesis in response to peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhbazau, Antos; Martinez, Jose A; Xu, Qing-Gui; Kawasoe, Jean; van Minnen, Jan; Midha, Rajiv

    2012-08-01

    Up-regulation of neurotrophin synthesis is an important mechanism of peripheral nerve regeneration after injury. Neurotrophin expression is regulated by a complex series of events including cell interactions and multiple molecular stimuli. We have studied neurotrophin synthesis at 2 weeks time-point in a transvertebral model of unilateral or bilateral transection of sciatic nerve in rats. We have found that unilateral sciatic nerve transection results in the elevation of nerve growth factor (NGF) and NT-3, but not glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor or brain-derived neural factor, in the uninjured nerve on the contralateral side, commonly considered as a control. Bilateral transection further increased NGF but not other neurotrophins in the nerve segment distal to the transection site, as compared to the unilateral injury. To further investigate the distinct role of NGF in regeneration and its potential for peripheral nerve repair, we transduced isogeneic Schwann cells with NGF-encoding lentivirus and transplanted the over-expressing cells into the distal segment of a transected nerve. Axonal regeneration was studied at 2 weeks time-point using pan-neuronal marker NF-200 and found to directly correlate with NGF levels in the regenerating nerve. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  19. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors Using Image-Based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-11-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the most common approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, misdirection, vascular damage, intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and optic nerve injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less-experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation coupled with neuronavigation in localizing neurovascular structures during TSS. Twenty-five patients with a pituitary tumor underwent preoperative 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and MRI images loaded into the navigation platform were used for segmentation and preoperative planning. After patient registration and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe or Doppler probe on or as close as possible to the target. Preoperative segmentation of the internal carotid artery and cavernous sinus matched with the intraoperative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. Image guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of cases. The mean accuracy of the measurements was 1.20 ± 0.21 mm. Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation, especially with 3-dimensional reconstruction, is highly informative preoperatively and potentially could assist less-experienced neurosurgeons in preventing vascular and neural injury during TSS. In addition, the accuracy found in this study is comparable to previously reported neuronavigation measurements. This preliminary study is encouraging for future prospective intraoperative validation with larger numbers of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The visceromotor and somatic afferent nerves of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Djibril; Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Quillard, Jeanine; Ba, Nathalie; Allodji, Rodrigue Sètchéou; Benoit, Gérard; Bedretdinova, Dina; Bessede, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Innervation of the penis supports erectile and sensory functions. This article aims to study the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and afferent somatic (sensory) nervous systems of the penis and to investigate how these systems relate to vascular pathways. Penises obtained from five adult cadavers were studied via computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). The number of autonomic and somatic nerve fibers was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Proximally, penile innervation was mainly somatic in the extra-albugineal sector and mainly autonomic in the intracavernosal sector. Distally, both sectors were almost exclusively supplied by somatic nerve fibers, except the intrapenile vascular anastomoses that accompanied both somatic and autonomic (nitrergic) fibers. From this point, the neural immunolabeling within perivascular nerve fibers was mixed (somatic labeling and autonomic labeling). Accessory afferent, extra-albugineal pathways supplied the outer layers of the penis. There is a major change in the functional type of innervation between the proximal and distal parts of the intracavernosal sector of the penis. In addition to the pelvis and the hilum of the penis, the intrapenile neurovascular routes are the third level where the efferent autonomic (visceromotor) and the afferent somatic (sensory) penile nerve fibers are close. Intrapenile neurovascular pathways define a proximal penile segment, which guarantees erectile rigidity, and a sensory distal segment. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  1. Study of tibial nerve regeneration in Wistar rats in primary neurorrhaphy with and without gap, wrapped in vein segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos Dos Santos, Ewerton; Fernandes, Marcela; Gomes Dos Santos, João Baptista; Mattioli Leite, Vilnei; Valente, Sandra Gomes; Faloppa, Flávio

    2012-01-01

    This study compared nerve regeneration in Wistar rats, using epineural neurorrhaphy with a gap of 1.0 mm and without a gap, both wrapped with jugular vein tubes. Motor neurons in the spinal cord between L3 and S1 were used for the count, marked by exposure of the tibial nerve to Fluoro-Gold (FG). The tibial nerves on both sides were cut and sutured, with a gap on one side and no gap in the other. The sutures were wrapped with a jugular vein. Four months after surgery the tibial nerves were exposed to Fluoro-Gold and the motor neuron count performed in the spinal cord. The results were statistically analyzed by the paired Wilcoxon test. There was a statistical difference between the groups with and without gap in relation to the motor neuron count (p=0.013). The epineural neurorraphy without gap wrapped with jugular vein showed better results for nerve regeneration than the same procedure with gap. Experimental Study .

  2. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saatci, I.; Sahintuerk, F.; Sennaroglu, L.; Boyvat, F.; Guersel, B.; Besim, A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  3. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  4. Experimental chronic entrapment of the sciatic nerve in adult hamsters: an ultrastructural and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz R.A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrapment neuropathy is a group of clinical disorders involving compression of a peripheral nerve and interference with nerve function mostly through traction injury. We have investigated the chronic compression of peripheral nerves as an experimental procedure for detecting changes in ultrastructural nerve morphology. Adult hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, N = 30 were anesthetized with a 25% pentobarbital solution and received a cuff around the right sciatic nerve. Left sciatic nerves were not operated (control group. Animals survived for varying times (up to 15 weeks, after which they were sacrificed and both sciatic nerves were immediately fixed with a paraformaldehyde solution. Experimental nerves were divided into segments based upon their distance from the site of compression (proximal, entrapment and distal. Semithin and ultrathin sections were obtained and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were qualitatively described and data from semithin sections were morphometrically analyzed both in control and in compressed nerves. We observed endoneurial edema along with both perineurial and endoneurial thickening and also the existence of whorled cell-sparse structures (Renaut bodies in the subperineurial space of compressed sciatic nerves. Morphometric analyses of myelinated axons at the compression sites displayed a remarkable increase in the number of small axons (up to 60% in comparison with the control axonal number. The distal segment of compressed nerves presented a distinct decrease in axon number (up to 40% comparatively to the control group. The present experimental model of nerve entrapment in adult hamsters was shown to promote consistent histopathologic alterations analogous to those found in chronic compressive neuropathies.

  5. Multimodal Navigation in Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Resection of Pituitary Tumors using Image-based Vascular and Cranial Nerve Segmentation: A Prospective Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Parviz; Eichberg, Daniel; Golby, Alexandra; Zamani, Amir; Laws, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is a well-known approach for the treatment of pituitary tumors. However, lateral misdirection and vascular damage, intraoperative CSF leakage, and optic nerve and vascular injuries are all well-known complications, and the risk of adverse events is more likely in less experienced hands. This prospective study was conducted to validate the accuracy of image-based segmentation in localization of neurovascular structures during TSS. Methods Twenty-five patients with pituitary tumors underwent preoperative 3TMRI, which included thin-sectioned 3D space T2, 3D Time of Flight and MPRAGE sequences. Images were reviewed by an expert independent neuroradiologist. Imaging sequences were loaded in BrainLab iPlanNet (16/25 cases) or Stryker (9/25 cases) image guidance platforms for segmentation and pre-operative planning. After patient registration into the neuronavigation system and subsequent surgical exposure, each segmented neural or vascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe on or as close as possible to the target. The audible pulsations of the bilateral ICA were confirmed using a micro-Doppler probe. Results Pre-operative segmentation of the ICA and cavernous sinus matched with the intra-operative endoscopic and micro-Doppler findings in all cases (Dice Similarity Coefficient =1). This information reassured the surgeons with regard to the lateral extent of bone removal at the sellar floor and the limits of lateral exploration. Excellent correspondence between image-based segmentation and the endoscopic view was also evident at the surface of the tumor and at the tumor-normal gland interfaces. This assisted in preventing unnecessary removal of the normal pituitary gland. Image-guidance assisted the surgeons in localizing the optic nerve and chiasm in 64% of the cases and the diaphragma sella in 52% of cases, which helped to determine the limits of upward exploration and to decrease the risk of CSF

  6. [Distal clavicle fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppel, G; Lenich, A; Imhoff, A B

    2014-06-01

    Reposition and fixation of unstable distal clavicle fractures with a low profile locking plate (Acumed, Hempshire, UK) in conjunction with a button/suture augmentation cerclage (DogBone/FibreTape, Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA). Unstable fractures of the distal clavicle (Jäger and Breitner IIA) in adults. Unstable fractures of the distal clavicle (Jäger and Breitner IV) in children. Distal clavicle fractures (Jäger and Breitner I, IIB or III) with marked dislocation, injury of nerves and vessels, or high functional demand. Patients in poor general condition. Fractures of the distal clavicle (Jäger and Breitner I, IIB or III) without marked dislocation or vertical instability. Local soft-tissue infection. Combination procedure: Initially the lateral part of the clavicle is exposed by a 4 cm skin incision. After reduction of the fracture, stabilization is performed with a low profile locking distal clavicle plate. Using a special guiding device, a transclavicular-transcoracoidal hole is drilled under arthroscopic view. Additional vertical stabilization is arthroscopically achieved by shuttling the DogBone/FibreTape cerclage from the lateral portal cranially through the clavicular plate. The two ends of the FibreTape cerclage are brought cranially via adjacent holes of the locking plate while the DogBone button is placed under the coracoid process. Thus, plate bridging is achieved. Finally reduction is performed and the cerclage is secured by surgical knotting. Use of an arm sling for 6 weeks. Due to the fact that the described technique is a relatively new procedure, long-term results are lacking. In the short term, patients postoperatively report high subjective satisfaction without persistent pain.

  7. Combined use of high-definition and volumetric optical coherence tomography for the segmentation of neural canal opening in cases of optic nerve edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jui-Kai; Kardon, Randy H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2015-03-01

    In cases of optic-nerve-head edema, the presence of the swelling reduces the visibility of the underlying neural canal opening (NCO) within spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) volumes. Consequently, traditional SD-OCT-based NCO segmentation methods often overestimate the size of the NCO. The visibility of the NCO can be improved using high-definition 2D raster scans, but such scans do not provide 3D contextual image information. In this work, we present a semi-automated approach for the segmentation of the NCO in cases of optic disc edema by combining image information from volumetric and high-definition raster SD-OCT image sequences. In particular, for each subject, five high-definition OCT B-scans and the OCT volume are first separately segmented, and then the five high-definition B-scans are automatically registered to the OCT volume. Next, six NCO points are placed (manually, in this work) in the central three high-definition OCT B-scans (two points for each central B-scans) and are automatically transferred into the OCT volume. Utilizing a combination of these mapped points and the 3D image information from the volumetric scans, a graph-based approach is used to identify the complete NCO on the OCT en-face image. The segmented NCO points using the new approach were significantly closer to expert-marked points than the segmented NCO points using a traditional approach (root mean square differences in pixels: 5.34 vs. 21.71, p < 0.001).

  8. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  9. Traumatic Distal Ulnar Artery Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet A. Karaarslan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a posttraumatic distal ulnar artery thrombosis case that has occurred after a single blunt trauma. The ulnar artery thrombosis because of chronic trauma is a frequent condition (hypothenar hammer syndrome but an ulnar artery thrombosis because of a single direct blunt trauma is rare. Our patient who has been affected by a single blunt trauma to his hand and developed ulnar artery thrombosis has been treated by resection of the thrombosed ulnar artery segment. This report shows that a single blunt trauma can cause distal ulnar artery thrombosis in the hand and it can be treated merely by thrombosed segment resection in suitable cases.

  10. Nerve conduction in relation to vibration exposure - a non-positive cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Tohr

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral neuropathy is one of the principal clinical disorders in workers with hand-arm vibration syndrome. Electrophysiological studies aimed at defining the nature of the injury have provided conflicting results. One reason for this lack of consistency might be the sparsity of published longitudinal etiological studies with both good assessment of exposure and a well-defined measure of disease. Against this background we measured conduction velocities in the hand after having assessed vibration exposure over 21 years in a cohort of manual workers. Methods The study group consisted of 155 male office and manual workers at an engineering plant that manufactured pulp and paper machinery. The study has a longitudinal design regarding exposure assessment and a cross-sectional design regarding the outcome of nerve conduction. Hand-arm vibration dose was calculated as the product of self-reported occupational exposure, collected by questionnaire and interviews, and the measured or estimated hand-arm vibration exposure in 1987, 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2008. Distal motor latencies in median and ulnar nerves and sensory nerve conduction over the carpal tunnel and the finger-palm segments in the median nerve were measured in 2008. Before the nerve conduction measurement, the subjects were systemically warmed by a bicycle ergometer test. Results There were no differences in distal latencies between subjects exposed to hand-arm vibration and unexposed subjects, neither in the sensory conduction latencies of the median nerve, nor in the motor conduction latencies of the median and ulnar nerves. Seven subjects (9% in the exposed group and three subjects (12% in the unexposed group had both pathological sensory nerve conduction at the wrist and symptoms suggestive of carpal tunnel syndrome. Conclusion Nerve conduction measurements of peripheral hand nerves revealed no exposure-response association between hand-arm vibration exposure and

  11. Evaluation of reach and grasp robot-assisted therapy suggests similar functional recovery patterns on proximal and distal arm segments in sub-acute hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Rui C V; Harwin, William S; Lamperd, Robert; Collin, Christine

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides some additional evidence in support of the hypothesis that robot therapies are clinically beneficial in neurorehabilitation. Although only four subjects were included in the study, the design of the intervention and the measures were done so as to minimize bias. The results are presented as single case studies, and can only be interpreted as such due to the study size. The intensity of intervention was 16 h and the therapy philosophy (based on Carr and Shepherd) was that coordinated movements are preferable to joint based therapies, and that coordinating distal movements (in this case grasps) helps not only to recover function in these areas, but has greater value since the results are immediately transferable to daily skills such as reach and grasp movements.

  12. BDNF gene delivery within and beyond templated agarose multi-channel guidance scaffolds enhances peripheral nerve regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingyong; Lu, Paul; Lynam, Dan; Bednark, Bridget; Campana, W. Marie; Sakamoto, Jeff; Tuszynski, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Objective. We combined implantation of multi-channel templated agarose scaffolds with growth factor gene delivery to examine whether this combinatorial treatment can enhance peripheral axonal regeneration through long sciatic nerve gaps. Approach. 15 mm long scaffolds were templated into highly organized, strictly linear channels, mimicking the linear organization of natural nerves into fascicles of related function. Scaffolds were filled with syngeneic bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) secreting the growth factor brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and lentiviral vectors expressing BDNF were injected into the sciatic nerve segment distal to the scaffold implantation site. Main results. Twelve weeks after injury, scaffolds supported highly linear regeneration of host axons across the 15 mm lesion gap. The incorporation of BDNF-secreting cells into scaffolds significantly increased axonal regeneration, and additional injection of viral vectors expressing BDNF into the distal segment of the transected nerve significantly enhanced axonal regeneration beyond the lesion. Significance. Combinatorial treatment with multichannel bioengineered scaffolds and distal growth factor delivery significantly improves peripheral nerve repair, rivaling the gold standard of autografts.

  13. Peripheral nervous system maturation in preterm infants: longitudinal motor and sensory nerve conduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, S; Bertini, Giovanna; Bastianelli, M; Gabbanini, S; Gualandi, D; Molesti, E; Dani, C

    2018-04-10

    To study the evolution of sensory-motor nerves in the upper and lower limbs in neurologically healthy preterm infants and to use sensory-motor studies to compare the rate of maturation in preterm infants at term age and full-term healthy neonates. The study comprised 26 neurologically normal preterm infants born at 23-33 weeks of gestational age, who underwent sensory nerve conduction and motor nerve conduction studies from plantar medial and median nerves and from tibial and ulnar nerves, respectively. We repeated the same neurophysiological studies in 19 of the preterm infants every 2 weeks until postnatal term age. The data from the preterm infants at term was matched with a group of ten full-term babies a few days after birth. The motor nerve conduction velocity of the tibial and ulnar nerves showed progressive increases in values in relation to gestational age, but there was a decrease of values in distal latencies and F wave latencies. Similarly, there was a gradual increase of sensory nerve conduction velocity values of the medial plantar and median nerves and decreases in latencies in relation to gestational age. At term age, the preterm infants showed significantly lower values of conduction velocities and distal latencies than the full-term neonates. These results were probably because the preterm infants had significantly lower weights, total length and, in particular, distal segments of the limbs at term age. The sensory-motor conduction parameters were clearly related to gestational age, but extrauterine life did not affect the maturation of the peripheral nervous system in the very preterm babies who were neurologically healthy.

  14. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ?cross-bridging? to promote nerve regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour per...

  15. Overexpression of GDNF in the uninjured DRG exerts analgesic effects on neuropathic pain following segmental spinal nerve ligation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasu, Kumiko; Sakai, Atsushi; Hanawa, Hideki; Shimada, Takashi; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2011-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a survival-promoting factor for a subset of nociceptive small-diameter neurons, has been shown to exert analgesic effects on neuropathic pain. However, its detailed mechanisms of action are still unknown. In the present study, we investigated the site-specific analgesic effects of GDNF in the neuropathic pain state using lentiviral vector-mediated GDNF overexpression in mice with left fifth lumbar (L5) spinal nerve ligation (SNL) as a neuropathic pain model. A lentiviral vector expressing both GDNF and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was constructed and injected into the left dorsal spinal cord, uninjured fourth lumbar (L4) dorsal root ganglion (DRG), injured L5 DRG, or plantar skin of mice. In SNL mice, injection of the GDNF-EGFP-expressing lentivirus into the dorsal spinal cord or uninjured L4 DRG partially but significantly reduced the mechanical allodynia in association with an increase in GDNF protein expression in each virus injection site, whereas injection into the injured L5 DRG or plantar skin had no effects. These results suggest that GDNF exerts its analgesic effects in the neuropathic pain state by acting on the central terminals of uninjured DRG neurons and/or on the spinal cells targeted by the uninjured DRG neurons. This article shows that GDNF exerts its analgesic effects on neuropathic pain by acting on the central terminals of uninjured DRG neurons and/or on the spinal cells targeted by these neurons. Therefore, research focusing on these GDNF-dependent neurons in the uninjured DRG would provide a new strategy for treating neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. ATF3 upregulation in glia during Wallerian degeneration: differential expression in peripheral nerves and CNS white matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffin Robert S

    2004-03-01

    regulating changes in gene expression necessary for preparing the distal segments of injured peripheral nerves for axonal regeneration. The absence of the ATF3 and c-Jun from CNS glia during Wallerian degeneration may limit their ability to support regeneration.

  17. Nerve ultrasound shows subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in neurofibromatosis type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telleman, Johan A; Stellingwerff, Menno D; Brekelmans, Geert J; Visser, Leo H

    2018-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is mainly associated with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Peripheral nerve involvement is described in symptomatic patients, but evidence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement is scarce. We conducted a cross-sectional pilot study in 2 asymptomatic and 3 minimally symptomatic patients with NF2 to detect subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. Patients underwent clinical examination, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS). A total of 30 schwannomas were found, divided over 20 nerve segments (33.9% of all investigated nerve segments). All patients had at least 1 schwannoma. Schwannomas were identified with HRUS in 37% of clinically unaffected nerve segments and 50% of nerve segments with normal NCS findings. HRUS shows frequent subclinical peripheral nerve involvement in NF2. Clinicians should consider peripheral nerve involvement as a cause of weakness and sensory loss in the extremities in patients with this disease. Muscle Nerve 57: 312-316, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Nonunions of the distal tibia treated by reamed intramedullary nailing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richmond, Jeffrey; Colleran, Kevin; Borens, Olivier; Kloen, Peter; Helfet, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of reamed intramedullary nailing in the treatment of nonunions of the distal one-fourth of the tibia. Nonunions of the distal tibia are particularly difficult to treat given the short distal segment, the proximity to the ankle joint, and the

  19. Selective visualization of pelvic splanchnic nerve and pelvic plexus using readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography: A preliminary study in healthy male volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Rikiya, E-mail: rickdom@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Isoda, Hiroyoshi, E-mail: sayuki@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Arizono, Shigeki, E-mail: arizono@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Furuta, Akihiro, E-mail: akihirof@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ohno, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: goohno@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Osaka Red Cross Hospital, 5-30 Fudegasaki-cho, Tennoji-ku, Osaka, 543-8555 (Japan); Ono, Ayako, E-mail: onoayako@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Murata, Katsutoshi, E-mail: katsutoshi.murata@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare Japan KK, Gate City Osaki West Tower, 11-1 Osaki 1-Chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8644 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • RS-EPI DW-MRN has a potential to selectively depict the pelvic parasympathetic nerve. • The nervous visibility showed a moderate correlation with the image artifact level. • Our method could help preserving function after pelvic nerve-preserving surgery. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the potential of readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (RS-EPI DW-MRN) for the selective visualization of pelvic splanchnic nerve and pelvic plexus in healthy male volunteers. Materials and methods: Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained. RS-EPI DW-MRN images were acquired from thirteen healthy male volunteers aged 25–48 years between September 2013 and December 2013. For RS-EPI DW-MRN, the following parameters were used: spatial resolution, 1.1 × 1.1 × 2.5 mm; b-value, 250 s/mm{sup 2}; number of readout-segments, seven; and acquisition time, 7 min 45 s. For qualitative assessment, two abdominal radiologists independently evaluated the visibility of the pelvic splanchnic nerves and pelvic plexuses bilaterally in each subject on oblique coronal thin-slab 10-mm-thick maximum intensity projection images and scored it with a 4-point grading scale (excellent, good, fair, poor). Both readers scored twice at 6-month intervals. Inter-observer and intra-observer variability were evaluated using Cohen’s quadratically weighted κ statistics. Image artifact level was scored on a 4-point grading scale by other two abdominal radiologists in order to evaluate the correlation between the nerve visibility and the severity of imaging artifacts using the Spearman’s correlation coefficient. Results: Qualitative grading showed the following success rate (number of nerves qualitatively scored as excellent or good divided by total number of nerves): reader 1 (first set), 73% (19/26); reader 2 (first set), 77% (20/26); reader 1 (second set), 81% (21/26); and reader 2 (second set), 77% (20

  20. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  1. Remodeling of motor units after nerve regeneration studied by quantitative electromyography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Boeckstyns, Michel; Ibsen, Allan

    2016-01-01

    different types of nerve repair. Methods: Reinnervation of muscle was compared clinically and electrophysiologically in complete median or ulnar nerve lesions with short gap lengths in the distal forearm repaired with a collagen nerve conduit (11 nerves) or nerve suture (10 nerves). Reestablishment of motor...

  2. Endovascular treatment of ruptured distal posterior inferior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... there are lots of reports regarding the interventional therapy of the artery aneurysms (including proximal and distal), all of which are considered to be safe and effective. All the incidences of interventional-related complications are below 10% and there is no report of injury of lower cranial nerves [11, 12].

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of acute crush injury of rabbit sciatic nerve: correlation with histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Shen, J.; Chen, J.; Wang, X.; Liu, Q.; Liang, B.

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relation between the quantitative assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the correlation with histology and functional recovery by using the rabbit sciatic nerve crush model. In New Zealand, 32 rabbits were randomly divided into 2 groups (group A and B); all rabbits underwent crushing injury of their left sciatic nerve. In group A (n = 16), the sciatic nerves were crushed by using microvessel clamps with a strength of 3.61 kg. In group B (n = 16), the sciatic nerves were crushed with a strength of 10.50 kg. Right sciatic nerves were served as controls. Serial MRI of both hind limbs in each rabbit was performed before and at the time point of 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after crushed injury. The MRI protocol included T1-weighted spin-echo (T1WI), 3 dimension turbo spin-echo T2-weighted (3DT2WI), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo images with spectral presaturation with inversion recovery (T2WI/SPIR), balanced fast-field echo (B-FFE) and short-time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. The coronal image of the sciatic nerve was obtained. The nerve and muscle signal ratio (SIR) on each sequence was measured. The function recovery was observed and pathological examination was performed at each time point. A signal intensity increase of the distal segment of crushed sciatic nerves was found on 3DT2WI, T2WI/SP1R, B-FFE, and STIR, but not on T,WI images. Of 32 crushed nerves, 30 nerves showed high signal intensity. The correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% with false negative-positive of 6.25%. The SIR of the crushed sciatic nerve at distal portion was higher than those of the control nerves; there was a statistically significant difference (P 0.05). The SIR between group A and group B was not found statistically significantly different (P > 0.05). The SIR of crushed nerves at distal portion increased at one week after the crush injury, subsequently further increased, and reached a maximum at 2 weeks. The pathological examination revealed myelin

  4. Scaffoldless tissue-engineered nerve conduit promotes peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after tibial nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M. Adams; Keith W. VanDusen; Tatiana Y. Kostrominova; Jacob P. Mertens; Lisa M. Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerve tissue may cause loss of function in both the nerve and the targeted muscles it innervates. This study compared the repair capability of engineered nerve conduit (ENC), engineered fibroblast conduit (EFC), and autograft in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap. ENCs were fabricated utilizing primary fibroblasts and the nerve cells of rats on embryonic day 15 (E15). EFCs were fabricated utilizing primary fi-broblasts only. Following a 12-week recovery, nerve repair was assessed by measuring contractile properties in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, and histology of muscle and nerve. The autografts, ENCs and EFCs reestablished 96%, 87% and 84% of native distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, 100%, 44% and 44% of native specific force of medical gastrocnemius, and 63%, 61% and 67% of native medial gastrocnemius mass, re-spectively. Histology of the repaired nerve revealed large axons in the autograft, larger but fewer axons in the ENC repair, and many smaller axons in the EFC repair. Muscle histology revealed similar muscle fiber cross-sectional areas among autograft, ENC and EFC repairs. In conclusion, both ENCs and EFCs promot-ed nerve regeneration in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap repair, suggesting that the E15 rat nerve cells may not be necessary for nerve regeneration, and EFC alone can suffice for peripheral nerve injury repair.

  5. Microsurgical replantation of a small segment of thumb volar skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyürek, Mustafa; Safak, Tunç

    2004-06-01

    This report presents a case of microsurgical replantation of a volar skin segment of the thumb. In a 24-year-old patient, a heavy object falling over the dominant thumb resulted in a crush-avulsion injury of a pure skin segment measuring 4 x 2 cm. Examination revealed that the distal fingertip as well as the bone-tendon structures remained intact. Exploration demonstrated that both neurovascular bundles were included in the avulsed skin segment. Microsurgical replantation was achieved successfully, repairing the radial digital artery at both ends with vein grafts as well as anastomosing a palmar vein. Both digital nerves were coapted proximally and distally. An excellent functional and cosmetic result was accomplished with a good sensory recovery. The authors conclude that microsurgical replantation should be attempted in cases of more proximal pure skin avulsions, even if the injury spares distal fingertip tissue or bone-tendon units. In such cases, replantation is superior to any other method of reconstruction. Liberal use of vein grafts is crucial to achieve success.

  6. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  8. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  9. G-CSF prevents caspase 3 activation in Schwann cells after sciatic nerve transection, but does not improve nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Hanna K; Kodama, Akira; Ekström, Per; Dahlin, Lars B

    2016-10-15

    Exogenous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has emerged as a drug candidate for improving the outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. We raised the question if exogenous G-CSF can improve nerve regeneration following a clinically relevant model - nerve transection and repair - in healthy and diabetic rats. In short-term experiments, distance of axonal regeneration and extent of injury-induced Schwann cell death was quantified by staining for neurofilaments and cleaved caspase 3, respectively, seven days after repair. There was no difference in axonal outgrowth between G-CSF-treated and non-treated rats, regardless if healthy Wistar or diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats were examined. However, G-CSF treatment caused a significant 13% decrease of cleaved caspase 3-positive Schwann cells at the lesion site in healthy rats, but only a trend in diabetic rats. In the distal nerve segments of healthy rats a similar trend was observed. In long-term experiments of healthy rats, regeneration outcome was evaluated at 90days after repair by presence of neurofilaments, wet weight of gastrocnemius muscle, and perception of touch (von Frey monofilament testing weekly). The presence of neurofilaments distal to the suture line was similar in G-CSF-treated and non-treated rats. The weight ratio of ipsi-over contralateral gastrocnemius muscles, and perception of touch at any time point, were likewise not affected by G-CSF treatment. In addition, the inflammatory response in short- and long-term experiments was studied by analyzing ED1 stainable macrophages in healthy rats, but in neither case was any attenuation seen at the injury site or distal to it. G-CSF can prevent caspase 3 activation in Schwann cells in the short-term, but does not detectably affect the inflammatory response, nor improve early or late axonal outgrowth or functional recovery. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anatomical details of the brainstem and cranial nerves visualized by high resolution readout-segmented multi-shot echo-planar diffusion-weighted images using unidirectional MPG at 3T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Yamazaki, Masahiro; Kawai, Hisashi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu; Isoda, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    We compared diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with readout-segmented multi-shot echo-planar imaging (rs-EPI) and single-shot EPI, both using unidirectional motion-probing gradient, in 10 patients for visualization of the anatomical structures in the brainstem. DWI by rs-EPI was significantly better than DWI by single-shot EPI for visualizing the medial longitudinal fasciculus, lateral lemniscus, corticospinal tract, and seventh/eighth cranial nerves and offered significantly less distortion of the brainstem. (author)

  11. Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers., a medicinal mushroom, activates peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kah-Hui; Kanagasabapathy, Gowri; Naidu, Murali; David, Pamela; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2016-10-01

    To study the ability of aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus mushroom in the treatment of nerve injury following peroneal nerve crush in Sprague-Dawley rats. Aqueous extract of Hericium erinaceus was given by daily oral administration following peroneal nerve crush injury in Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of protein kinase B (Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways; and c-Jun and c-Fos genes were studied in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) whereas the activity of protein synthesis was assessed in peroneal nerves by immunohistochemical method. Peripheral nerve injury leads to changes at the axonal site of injury and remotely located DRG containing cell bodies of sensory afferent neurons. Immunofluorescence studies showed that DRG neurons ipsilateral to the crush injury in rats of treated groups expressed higher immunoreactivities for Akt, MAPK, c-Jun and c-Fos as compared with negative control group (P <0.05). The intensity of nuclear ribonucleoprotein in the distal segments of crushed nerves of treated groups was significantly higher than in the negative control group (P <0.05). H. erinaceus is capable of promoting peripheral nerve regeneration after injury. Potential signaling pathways include Akt, MAPK, c-Jun, and c-Fos, and protein synthesis have been shown to be involved in its action.

  12. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this disorder. Alternative Names Renal tubular acidosis - distal; Renal tubular acidosis type I; Type I RTA; RTA - distal; Classical RTA Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney ...

  13. Testing the effectiveness and the contribution of experimental supercharge (reversed) end-to-side nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadi, Mustafa; Ramachandran, Sudheesh; Islam, Abir; Forden, Joanne; Guo, Gui Fang; Midha, Rajiv

    2018-05-18

    OBJECTIVE Supercharge end-to-side (SETS) transfer, also referred to as reverse end-to-side transfer, distal to severe nerve compression neuropathy or in-continuity nerve injury is gaining clinical popularity despite questions about its effectiveness. Here, the authors examined SETS distal to experimental neuroma in-continuity (NIC) injuries for efficacy in enhancing neuronal regeneration and functional outcome, and, for the first time, they definitively evaluated the degree of contribution of the native and donor motor neuron pools. METHODS This study was conducted in 2 phases. In phase I, rats (n = 35) were assigned to one of 5 groups for unilateral sciatic nerve surgeries: group 1, tibial NIC with distal peroneal-tibial SETS; group 2, tibial NIC without SETS; group 3, intact tibial and severed peroneal nerves; group 4, tibial transection with SETS; and group 5, severed tibial and peroneal nerves. Recovery was evaluated biweekly using electrophysiology and locomotion tasks. At the phase I end point, after retrograde labeling, the spinal cords were analyzed to assess the degree of neuronal regeneration. In phase II, 20 new animals underwent primary retrograde labeling of the tibial nerve, following which they were assigned to one of the following 3 groups: group 1, group 2, and group 4. Then, secondary retrograde labeling from the tibial nerve was performed at the study end point to quantify the native versus donor regenerated neuronal pool. RESULTS In phase I studies, a significantly increased neuronal regeneration in group 1 (SETS) compared with all other groups was observed, but with modest (nonsignificant) improvement in electrophysiological and behavioral outcomes. In phase II experiments, the authors discovered that secondary labeling in group 1 was predominantly contributed from the donor (peroneal) pool. Double-labeling counts were dramatically higher in group 2 than in group 1, suggestive of hampered regeneration from the native tibial motor neuron pool

  14. Acute sciatic nerve crush injuries in rabbits: MRI and pathological comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xinchun; Chen Jianyu; Wang Xinlu; Shen Jun; Liu Qingyu; Liang Biling

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Simulating injury mechanism in human peripheral nerve, acute sciatic nerve crush injuries model was produced in rabbits to investigate the relationship between the manifestations of MRI and pathology in order to provide the information for clinical therapy and operative plan. Methods: Thirty-two adult rabbits were randomly divided into two groups: group A (n=16) and B (n=16). In group A, the left sciatic nerves were crushed with a stress of 3.61 kg; In group B, with a stress of 10.50 kg. 4 time intervals in each group were observed in 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks, respectively, and each time interval contained 4 rabbits. Left sciatic nerves were served as injured sides, right sciatic nerves were regarded as control sides. MRI was performed at different time interval after crush injury. Then the nerves were examined pathologically. Results: There were no obvious changes on T 1 WI in injured sides, but the injured distal segment of sciatic nerve thickened and twisted, showing high signal intensity on 3D T 2 WI, T 2 WI/SPIR, B-FFE, and T 2 WI/STIR. MRI could show abnormality of 30 sciatic nerves, the correct diagnostic rate was 93.75% and false negative rate was 6.25%. The distal sciatic nerve/muscle signal intensity ratio (SIR) of the injured sides was significantly higher than that of the control sides (P 0.05). SIR in injured side increased at 1 week, reached the peak at 2 weeks, at this time, nerve axons disappeared and lots of myelin degenerated, abduction function disappeared. SIR decreased during 4-8 weeks, the myelin sheath breakdown and Schwann cell proliferated obviously, and abduction functions were observed. The control sciatic nerves showed no abnormality in MRI and pathology. Conclusion: MRI can make the diagnosis of crush injury of sciatic nerve, and dynamic SIR measurement of nerve injury correlates well with the pathological and functional recovery process. MRI is an effective method to monitor degeneration, regeneration, and prognosis after

  15. The First Experience of Triple Nerve Transfer in Proximal Radial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Andalib, Sasan

    2018-01-01

    Injury to distal portion of posterior cord of brachial plexus leads to palsy of radial and axillary nerves. Symptoms are usually motor deficits of the deltoid muscle; triceps brachii muscle; and extensor muscles of the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Tendon transfers, nerve grafts, and nerve transfers are options for surgical treatment of proximal radial nerve palsy to restore some motor functions. Tendon transfer is painful, requires a long immobilization, and decreases donor muscle strength; nevertheless, nerve transfer produces promising outcomes. We present a patient with proximal radial nerve palsy following a blunt injury undergoing triple nerve transfer. The patient was involved in a motorcycle accident with complete palsy of the radial and axillary nerves. After 6 months, on admission, he showed spontaneous recovery of axillary nerve palsy, but radial nerve palsy remained. We performed triple nerve transfer, fascicle of ulnar nerve to long head of the triceps branch of radial nerve, flexor digitorum superficialis branch of median nerve to extensor carpi radialis brevis branch of radial nerve, and flexor carpi radialis branch of median nerve to posterior interosseous nerve, for restoration of elbow, wrist, and finger extensions, respectively. Our experience confirmed functional elbow, wrist, and finger extensions in the patient. Triple nerve transfer restores functions of the upper limb in patients with debilitating radial nerve palsy after blunt injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. High-frequency electrical stimulation can be a complementary therapy to promote nerve regeneration in diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hong Kao

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether 1 mA of percutaneous electrical stimulation (ES at 0, 2, 20, or 200 Hz augments regeneration between the proximal and distal nerve stumps in streptozotocin diabetic rats. A10-mm gap was made in the diabetic rat sciatic nerve by suturing the stumps into silicone rubber tubes. Normal animals were used as the controls. Starting 1 week after transection, ES was applied between the cathode placed at the distal stump and the anode at the proximal stump every other day for 3 weeks. At 4 weeks after surgery, the normal controls and the groups receiving ES at 20, and 200 Hz had a higher success percentage of regeneration compared to the ES groups at 0 and 2 Hz. In addition, quantitative histology of the successfully regenerated nerves revealed that the groups receiving ES at a higher frequency, especially at 200 Hz, had a more mature structure with more myelinated fibers compared to those in the lower-frequency ES groups. Similarly, electrophysiology in the ES group at 200 Hz showed significantly shorter latency, larger amplitude, larger area of evoked muscle action potentials and faster conduction velocity compared to other groups. Immunohistochemical staining showed that ES at a higher frequency could significantly promote calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in lamina I-II regions in the dorsal horn and recruit a higher number of macrophages in the diabetic distal sciatic nerve. The macrophages were found that they could stimulate the secretion of nerve growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and transforming growth factor-β in dissected sciatic nerve segments. The ES at a higher frequency could also increase cutaneous blood flow in the ipsilateral hindpaw to the injury. These results indicated that a high-frequency ES could be necessary to heal severed diabetic peripheral nerve with a long gap to be repaired.

  17. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  18. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  19. Restoration of sensory dysfunction following peripheral nerve injury by the polysaccharide from culinary and medicinal mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr. Pers. through its neuroregenerative action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kah-Hui WONG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peripheral nerves have the unique capability to regenerate after injury. Insights into regeneration of peripheral nerves after injury may have implications for neurodegenerative diseases of the nervous system. We investigated the ability of polysaccharide from Hericium erinaceus mushroom in the treatment of nerve injury following peroneal nerve crush in Sprague-Dawley rats by daily oral administration. In sensory functional recovery test, the time taken for the rats to withdraw its hind limb from contact with the hot plate was measured. The test revealed acceleration of sensory recovery in the polysaccharide group compared to negative controls. Further, peripheral nerve injury leads to changes at the remotely located DRG containing cell bodies of sensory neurons. Immunofluorescence studies showed that Akt and p38 MAPK were expressed in DRG and strongly upregulated in polysaccharide group after peripheral nerve injury. The intensity of endothelial cells antigen-1 that recognized endothelial cells in the blood vessels of distal segments in crushed nerves was significantly higher in the treated groups than in the negative control group. Our findings suggest that H. erinaceus is capable of accelerating sensory functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury and the effect involves the activation of protein kinase signaling pathways and restoration of blood-nerve barrier.

  20. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  1. Ultrasonographic demonstration of intraneural neovascularization after penetrating nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Csillik, Anita; Dévay, Katalin; Rosero, Maja

    2018-06-01

    Hypervascularization of nerves has been shown to be a pathological sign in some peripheral nerve disorders, but has not been investigated in nerve trauma. An observational cohort study was performed of the intraneural blood flow of 30 patients (34 nerves) with penetrating nerve injuries, before or after nerve reconstruction. All patients underwent electrophysiological assessment, and B-mode and color Doppler ultrasonography. Intraneural hypervascularization proximal to the site of injury was found in all nerves, which was typically marked and had a longitudinal extension of several centimeters. In 6 nerves, some blood flow was also present within the injury site or immediately distal to the injury. No correlation was found between the degree of vascularization and age, size of the scar / neuroma, or degree of reinnervation. Neovascularization of nerves proximal to injury sites appears to be an essential element of nerve regeneration after penetrating nerve injuries. Muscle Nerve 57: 994-999, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Left ventricular contractile function after distal protection in primary percutaneous coronary intervention Results from the Drug Elution and Distal Protection in ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, K F; Kelbæk, H; Thuesen, L

    2011-01-01

    Coronary intervention (PCI) may result in an increased infarct size. We evaluated the effect of distal protection during PCI for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) on myocardial function.......Coronary intervention (PCI) may result in an increased infarct size. We evaluated the effect of distal protection during PCI for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) on myocardial function....

  3. Magnetic Resonance Neurography Visualizes Abnormalities in Sciatic and Tibial Nerves in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeggemose, Michael; Pham, Mirko; Ringgaard, Steffen; Tankisi, Hatice; Ejskjaer, Niels; Heiland, Sabine; Poulsen, Per L; Andersen, Henning

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluates whether diffusion tensor imaging magnetic resonance neurography (DTI-MRN), T2 relaxation time, and proton spin density can detect and grade neuropathic abnormalities in patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients with type 1 diabetes ( n = 49) were included-11 with severe polyneuropathy (sDPN), 13 with mild polyneuropathy (mDPN), and 25 without polyneuropathy (nDPN)-along with 30 healthy control subjects (HCs). Clinical examinations, nerve conduction studies, and vibratory perception thresholds determined the presence and severity of DPN. DTI-MRN covered proximal (sciatic nerve) and distal (tibial nerve) nerve segments of the lower extremity. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were calculated, as were T2 relaxation time and proton spin density obtained from DTI-MRN. All magnetic resonance findings were related to the presence and severity of neuropathy. FA of the sciatic and tibial nerves was lowest in the sDPN group. Corresponding with this, proximal and distal ADCs were highest in patients with sDPN compared with patients with mDPN and nDPN, as well as the HCs. DTI-MRN correlated closely with the severity of neuropathy, demonstrating strong associations with sciatic and tibial nerve findings. Quantitative group differences in proton spin density were also significant, but less pronounced than those for DTI-MRN. In conclusion, DTI-MRN enables detection in peripheral nerves of abnormalities related to DPN, more so than proton spin density or T2 relaxation time. These abnormalities are likely to reflect pathology in sciatic and tibial nerve fibers. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  5. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  6. Facial reanimation by muscle-nerve neurotization after facial nerve sacrifice. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, A; Labbé, D; Babin, E; Fromager, G

    2016-12-01

    Recovering a certain degree of mimicry after sacrifice of the facial nerve is a clinically recognized finding. The authors report a case of hemifacial reanimation suggesting a phenomenon of neurotization from muscle-to-nerve. A woman benefited from a parotidectomy with sacrifice of the left facial nerve indicated for recurrent tumor in the gland. The distal branches of the facial nerve, isolated at the time of resection, were buried in the masseter muscle underneath. The patient recovered a voluntary hémifacial motricity. The electromyographic analysis of the motor activity of the zygomaticus major before and after block of the masseter nerve showed a dependence between mimic muscles and the masseter muscle. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the spontaneous reanimation of facial paralysis. The clinical case makes it possible to argue in favor of muscle-to-nerve neurotization from masseter muscle to distal branches of the facial nerve. It illustrates the quality of motricity that can be obtained thanks to this procedure. The authors describe a simple implantation technique of distal branches of the facial nerve in the masseter muscle during a radical parotidectomy with facial nerve sacrifice and recovery of resting tone but also a quality voluntary mimicry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Natsis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An unusual combination of median nerve’s variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve’s medial root. The latter (fourth root was united with the lateral (fifth root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications.

  8. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical 'cross-bridging' to promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa; Eva, Placheta; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-10-01

    Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges) into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to 'protect' chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  9. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  10. Sensory nerve conduction in the caudal nerves of rats with diabetes Condução nervosa sensorial no nervo caudal de ratos com diabetes experimental

    OpenAIRE

    Celina Cordeiro de Carvalho; Juliana Netto Maia; Otávio Gomes Lins; Sílvia Regina Arruda de Moraes

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate sensory nerve conduction of the caudal nerve in normal and diabetic rats. METHODS: Diabetes was induced in twenty 8-weeks old Wistar male rats. Twenty normal rats served as controls. Caudal nerve conduction studies were made before diabetes induction and the end of each week for six consecutive weeks. The caudal nerve was stimulated distally and nerve potentials were recorded proximally on the animal's tail using common "alligator" clips as surface electrodes. RESULTS:...

  11. Peripheral nerve regeneration with conduits: use of vein tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sabongi, Rodrigo Guerra; Fernandes, Marcela; dos Santos, Jo?o Baptista Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a challenge to modern medicine due to the complexity of the neurobiological nerve regenerating process. There is a greater challenge when the transected nerve ends are not amenable to primary end-to-end tensionless neurorraphy. When facing a segmental nerve defect, great effort has been made to develop an alternative to the autologous nerve graft in order to circumvent morbidity at donor site, such as neuroma formation, scarring and permanent los...

  12. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  13. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  14. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang, E-mail: njmu_wangdehang@126.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica.

  17. Surgical treatment of distal biceps tendon rupture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina N. Cozma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Distal biceps tendon rupture affects the functional upperextremity movement, impairing supination and flexion strength. According to age, profession and additional risks treatment might be nonoperative or surgical. Methods. We describe the case of a 43 years old male patient who sustained an injury to his right distal biceps and was diagnosed with acute right distal biceps rupture. Surgical treatment was decided and biceps tendon was reinserted to the radius tuberosity using a combination of a cortical button fixation associated with an interference screw. Results. Postoperative functional result was favorable with no complications and with no movement limitation after one month. Conclusions. When possible, distal biceps tendon repair should be realized surgically because this permits restoring of the muscle strength to near normal levels with no loss of motion. Nerve complications are common; therefore the surgery should be realized by experienced upper extremity surgeons.

  18. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-hui Kou; Pei-xun Zhang; Yan-hua Wang; Bo Chen; Na Han; Feng Xue; Hong-bo Zhang; Xiao-feng Yin; Bao-guo Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated ne...

  19. Effect of neurotrophic factor, MDP, on rats’ nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fornazari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine the immune-modulating effects of the neurotrophic factor N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP on median nerve regeneration in rats. We used male Wistar rats (120-140 days of age, weighing 250-332 g and compared the results of three different techniques of nerve repair: 1 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures alone (group S - 10 rats, 2 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures plus fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA; group SF - 20 rats, and 3 sutures plus FTA, with MDP added to the FTA (group SFM - 20 rats. Functional assessments using the grasp test were performed weekly for 12 weeks to identify recovery of flexor muscle function in the fingers secondary to median nerve regeneration. Histological analysis was also utilized. The total number and diameter of myelinated fibers were determined in each proximal and distal nerve segment. Two indices, reported as percentage, were calculated from these parameters, namely, the regeneration index and the diameter change index. By the 8th week, superiority of group SFM over group S became apparent in the grasping test (P = 0.005. By the 12th week, rats that had received MDP were superior in the grasping test compared to both group S (P < 0.001 and group SF (P = 0.001. Moreover, group SF was better in the grasping test than group S (P = 0.014. However, no significant differences between groups were identified by histological analysis. In the present study, rats that had received MDP obtained better function, in the absence of any significant histological differences.

  20. Is distal motor and/or sensory demyelination a distinctive feature of anti-MAG neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Ribrag, Vincent; Adams, David; Brisset, Marion; Vignon, Marguerite; Baron, Marine; Malphettes, Marion; Theaudin, Marie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    To report the frequency of the different patterns of sensory and motor electrophysiological demyelination distribution in patients with anti-MAG neuropathy in comparison with patients with IgM neuropathy without MAG reactivity (IgM-NP). Thirty-five anti-MAG patients at early disease stage (20.1 months) were compared to 23 patients with IgM-NP; 21 CIDP patients and 13 patients with CMT1a neuropathy were used as gold standard neuropathies with multifocal and homogeneous demyelination, respectively. In all groups, standard motor and sensory electrophysiological parameters, terminal latency index and modified F ratio were investigated. Motor electrophysiological demyelination was divided in four profiles: distal, homogeneous, proximal, and proximo-distal. Distal sensory and sensorimotor demyelination were evaluated. Anti-MAG neuropathy is a demyelinating neuropathy in 91 % of cases. In the upper limbs, reduced TLI is more frequent in anti-MAG neuropathy, compared to IgM-NP. But, predominant distal demyelination of the median nerve is encountered in only 43 % of anti-MAG neuropathy and is also common in IgM-NP (35 %). Homogeneous demyelination was the second most frequent pattern (31 %). Concordance of electrophysiological profiles across motor nerves trunks is low and median nerve is the main site of distal motor conduction slowing. Reduced sensory conduction velocities occurs in 14 % of patients without evidence of predominant distal slowing. Simultaneous sensory and motor distal slowing was more common in the median nerve of anti-MAG neuropathy than IgM-NP. Electrophysiological distal motor demyelination and sensory demyelination are not a distinctive feature of anti-MAG reactivity. In anti-MAG neuropathy it is mainly found in the median nerve suggesting a frequent nerve compression at wrist.

  1. [New anterolateral approach of distal femur for treatment of distal femoral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Dai, Min; Zou, Fan; Luo, Song; Li, Binhua; Qiu, Ping; Nie, Tao

    2013-11-01

    To assess the effectiveness of the new anterolateral approach of the distal femur for the treatment of distal femoral fractures. Between July 2007 and December 2009, 58 patients with distal femoral fractures were treated by new anterolateral approach of the distal femur in 28 patients (new approach group) and by conventional approach in 30 patients (conventional approach group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, cause of injury, affected side, type of fracture, disease duration, complication, or preoperative intervention (P > 0.05). The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative fluoroscopy frequency, hospitalization days, and Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) score of knee were recorded. Operation was successfully completed in all patients of 2 groups, and healing of incision by first intention was obtained; no vascular and nerves injuries occurred. The operation time and intraoperative fluoroscopy frequency of new approach group were significantly less than those of conventional approach group (P 0.05). All patients were followed up 12-36 months (mean, 19.8 months). Bone union was shown on X-ray films; the fracture healing time was (12.62 +/- 2.34) weeks in the new approach group and was (13.78 +/- 1.94) weeks in the conventional approach group, showing no significant difference (t=2.78, P=0.10). The knee HSS score at last follow-up was 94.4 +/- 4.2 in the new approach group, and was 89.2 +/- 6.0 in the conventional approach group, showing significant difference between 2 groups (t=3.85, P=0.00). New anterolateral approach of the distal femur for distal femoral fractures has the advantages of exposure plenitude, minimal tissue trauma, and early function rehabilitation training so as to enhance the function recovery of knee joint.

  2. Comparing the Efficacy of Triple Nerve Transfers with Nerve Graft Reconstruction in Upper Trunk Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kathleen M; Power, Hollie A; Olson, Jaret L; Morhart, Michael J; Harrop, A Robertson; Watt, M Joe; Chan, K Ming

    2017-10-01

    Upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus injury can cause profound shoulder and elbow dysfunction. Although neuroma excision with interpositional sural nerve grafting is the current gold standard, distal nerve transfers have a number of potential advantages. The goal of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes and health care costs between nerve grafting and distal nerve transfers in children with upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus injury. In this prospective cohort study, children who underwent triple nerve transfers were followed with the Active Movement Scale for 2 years. Their outcomes were compared to those of children who underwent nerve graft reconstruction. To assess health care use, a cost analysis was also performed. Twelve patients who underwent nerve grafting were compared to 14 patients who underwent triple nerve transfers. Both groups had similar baseline characteristics and showed improved shoulder and elbow function following surgery. However, the nerve transfer group displayed significantly greater improvement in shoulder external rotation and forearm supination 2 years after surgery (p The operative time and length of hospital stay were significantly lower (p the overall cost was approximately 50 percent less in the nerve transfer group. Triple nerve transfer for upper trunk obstetric brachial plexus injury is a feasible option, with better functional shoulder external rotation and forearm supination, faster recovery, and lower cost compared with traditional nerve graft reconstruction. Therapeutic, II.

  3. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  4. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  5. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  6. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  8. Distal finger replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheker, Luis R; Becker, Giles W

    2011-03-01

    Reconstruction of the fingertip distal to the flexor tendon insertion by replantation remains controversial and technically challenging, but the anatomy of the fingertip has been well described and provides help in surgical planning. The open-book surgical technique is described with potential complications and is illustrated with clinical cases. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Canine malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor involving nerve roots of the third lumbar spinal cord segmentTumor maligno da bainha de nervo periférico envolvendo raízes nervosas do terceiro segmento medular lombar em um cão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisângela Olegário da Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST involving spinal nerve roots are uncommon in dogs. A nine-year old, intact, mixed-breed dog, demonstrated clinical signs of incoordination in the pelvic limbs and micturition for approximately one week. Clinical examination revealed proprioceptive deficits and bilateral patellar hyperreflexia. During exploratory celiotomy a mass was observed adhered to the lumbar vertebral segments. Medical therapy was initiated, but neurological signs were progressive, and the owner opted for euthanasia. Gross examination showed that the mass in the abdominal cavity was attached to the lumbar segments L3 and L4, causing bone lysis in L3, but showed no tumor invasion into the spinal canal. Microscopic features were characterized by prominent proliferation of ovoid and fusiform cells with poorly defined cytoplasm arranged in interlacing bundles and concentric whorls. The cells were embedded in a delicate to moderate collagenous stroma and moderate anisokariose and high mitotic activity were noted. The immunohistochemical assay showed positive staining for GFAP, S-100 protein and vimentin, and negative staining for factor VIII, ?-actin and citokeratine. The definitive diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor was made on the basis of the histological and immunohistochemical findings. Tumores malignos da bainha de nervo periférico (TMBNP em raízes nervosas espinhais são incomuns em cães. Relata-se o caso de um cão, sem raça definida, nove anos de idade, não castrado, com histórico de incoordenação em membros pélvicos e retenção urinária há aproximadamente uma semana. Ao exame clínico constatou-se déficit proprioceptivo e hiperreflexia patelar bilaterais. Durante a celiotomia exploratória constatou-se uma massa intensamente vascularizada e aderida aos segmentos vertebrais lombares. Estabeleceu-se plano terapêutico e o animal foi tratado com fluidoterapia, anti-inflamatório e analg

  10. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu P Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint , forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments.The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis.

  11. Effects of autonomic nerve stimulation on colorectal motility in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei Dong; Ridolfi, Timothy J.; Kosinski, Lauren; Ludwig, Kirk; Takahashi, Toku

    2010-01-01

    Background Several disease processes of the colon and rectum, including constipation and incontinence, have been associated with abnormalities of the autonomic nervous system. However, the autonomic innervation to the colon and rectum are not fully understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the effect of stimulation of vagus nerves, pelvic nerves (PN) and hypogastric nerves (HGN) on colorectal motility in rats. Methods Four strain gauge transducers were implanted on the proximal colon, mid colon, distal colon and rectum to record circular muscle contractions in rats. Electrical stimulation was administered to the efferent distal ends of the cervical vagus nerve, PN and HGN. Motility index (MI) was evaluated before and during stimulation. Key Results Electrical stimulation (5–20 Hz) of the cervical vagus elicited significant contractions in the mid colon and distal colon, whereas less pronounced contractions were observed in the proximal colon. PN stimulation elicited significant contractions in the rectum as well as the mid colon and distal colon. Atropine treatment almost completely abolished the contractions induced by vagus nerve and PN stimulation. HGN stimulation caused relaxations in the rectum, mid colon and distal colon. The relaxations in response to HGN stimulation were abolished by propranolol. Conclusions & Inferences Vagal innervation extends to the distal colon, while the PN has projections in the distribution of the rectum through the mid colon. This suggests a pattern of dual parasympathetic innervation in the left colon. Parasympathetic fibers regulate colorectal contractions via muscarinic receptors. The HGN mainly regulates colorectal relaxations via beta-adrenoceptors. PMID:20067587

  12. Side-To-Side Nerve Bridges Support Donor Axon Regeneration Into Chronically Denervated Nerves and Are Associated With Characteristic Changes in Schwann Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, J Michael; Alvarez-Veronesi, M Cecilia; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Gordon, Tessa; Borschel, Gregory H

    2015-11-01

    Chronic denervation resulting from long nerve regeneration times and distances contributes greatly to suboptimal outcomes following nerve injuries. Recent studies showed that multiple nerve grafts inserted between an intact donor nerve and a denervated distal recipient nerve stump (termed "side-to-side nerve bridges") enhanced regeneration after delayed nerve repair. To examine the cellular aspects of axon growth across these bridges to explore the "protective" mechanism of donor axons on chronically denervated Schwann cells. In Sprague Dawley rats, 3 side-to-side nerve bridges were placed over a 10-mm distance between an intact donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) distal nerve stump. Green fluorescent protein-expressing TIB axons grew across the bridges and were counted in cross section after 4 weeks. Immunofluorescent axons and Schwann cells were imaged over a 4-month period. Denervated Schwann cells dedifferentiated to a proliferative, nonmyelinating phenotype within the bridges and the recipient denervated CP nerve stump. As donor TIB axons grew across the 3 side-to-side nerve bridges and into the denervated CP nerve, the Schwann cells redifferentiated to the myelinating phenotype. Bridge placement led to an increased mass of hind limb anterior compartment muscles after 4 months of denervation compared with muscles whose CP nerve was not "protected" by bridges. This study describes patterns of donor axon regeneration and myelination in the denervated recipient nerve stump and supports a mechanism where these donor axons sustain a proregenerative state to prevent deterioration in the face of chronic denervation.

  13. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of the Cerebellopontine Angle: A Diagnostic Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Lassaletta, Luis; Roda, José María; Frutos, Remedios; Patrón, Mercedes; Gavilán, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Facial nerve schwannomas are rare lesions that may involve any segment of the facial nerve. Because of their rarity and the lack of a consistent clinical and radiological pattern, facial nerve schwannomas located at the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. In this report, a case of a CPA/IAC facial nerve schwannoma is presented. Contemporary diagnosis and management of this rare lesion are analyzed.

  14. Renal denervation beyond the bifurcation: The effect of distal ablation placement on safety and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeftink, Martine M A; Spiering, Wilko; De Jong, Mark R; Doevendans, Pieter A; Blankestijn, Peter J; Elvan, Arif; Heeg, Jan-Evert; Bots, Michiel L; Voskuil, Michiel

    2017-04-01

    Renal denervation may be more effective if performed distal in the renal artery because of smaller distances between the lumen and perivascular nerves. The authors reviewed the angiographic results of 97 patients and compared blood pressure reduction in relation to the location of the denervation. No significant differences in blood pressure reduction or complications were found between patient groups divided according to their spatial distribution of the ablations (proximal to the bifurcation in both arteries, distal to the bifurcation in one artery and distal in the other artery, or distal to the bifurcation in both arteries), but systolic ambulatory blood pressure reduction was significantly related to the number of distal ablations. No differences in adverse events were observed. In conclusion, we found no reason to believe that renal denervation distal to the bifurcation poses additional risks over the currently advised approach of proximal denervation, but improved efficacy remains to be conclusively established. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration through asymmetrically porous nerve guide conduit with nerve growth factor gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kang, Jun Goo; Kim, Tae Ho; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with nerve growth factor (NGF) gradient along the longitudinal direction by rolling a porous polycaprolactone membrane with NGF concentration gradient. The NGF immobilized on the membrane was continuously released for up to 35 days, and the released amount of the NGF from the membrane gradually increased from the proximal to distal NGF ends, which may allow a neurotrophic factor gradient in the tubular NGC for a sufficient period. From the in vitro cell culture experiment, it was observed that the PC12 cells sense the NGF concentration gradient on the membrane for the cell proliferation and differentiation. From the in vivo animal experiment using a long gap (20 mm) sciatic nerve defect model of rats, the NGC with NGF concentration gradient allowed more rapid nerve regeneration through the NGC than the NGC itself and NGC immobilized with uniformly distributed NGF. The NGC with NGF concentration gradient seems to be a promising strategy for the peripheral nerve regeneration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 52-64, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Radiographic anatomy of the distal dural SAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, J.L.; Olsen, K.O.

    1991-01-01

    A radio-anatomical study was performed of the distal dural sac (DS) in 121 patients subjected to myelography. In 83.4% the termination of the DS was located from the upper half of the S1-segment to the lower half of the S2-segment. In the remaining patients the dural terminations were more distally located. The average location of the DS-termination was higher than that found in a previous anatomic study. The inference is that in patients with low-back pain and sciatica, the DS tends to terminate at a higher spinal level than in a non-selected anatomic material. The caudal reduction in sagittal diameter of the DS was less than that of the frontal diameter of the sac. The linear diminution in cross-sectional area of the DS from the level of L3 towards the lumbosacral junction was not correlated with the degree of caudal extension of the DS into the sacrum. Thus the length of the DS and its transverse diameters are independent of each other. These results supported the view that the location of the termination of the DS (and hence that of the spinal cord) is not related to stenosis of the central spinal canal. (orig.)

  17. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  18. Imaging of the optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Masterson, Karen; Delavelle, Jacqueline; Viallon, Magalie; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Becker, Christoph D.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  19. Unilateral duplicated abducens nerve coursing through both the sphenopetroclival venous gulf and cavernous sinus: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquet, Thomas; Lefranc, Michel; Chenin, Louis; Foulon, Pascal; Havet, Éric; Peltier, Johann

    2018-03-15

    In this anatomy report, we describe the first case of abducens nerve duplication limited to the sphenopetroclival venous gulf and the cavernous sinus. The objective point of division of the two duplicated roots was localized at the gulfar face of the dural porus, just distal to the unique cisternal trunk of the abducens nerve, as it pierced the petroclival dural mater. In the gulfar segment, both roots traveled through a variant of Dorello's canal called the "petrosphenoidal canal" and remained separated through the posterior half of the cavernous sinus. Both roots finally fused in the anterior half of the cavernous sinus to innervate the lateral rectus muscle as a single trunk. Although many variants of the abducens nerve have been reported over the recent decades, this anatomic variation has never been previously described and enriches the continuum of abducens nerve variations reported in the literature data. Awareness of this variation is crucial for neurosurgeons, especially during clival or petrosal surgical approaches used for resection of skull base chordomas.

  20. Anterior transposition of the radial nerve--a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakkanti, Madhusudhan R; Roberts, Craig S; Murphy, Joshua; Acland, Robert D

    2008-01-01

    The radial nerve is at risk during the posterior plating of the humerus. The purpose of this anatomic study was to assess the extent of radial nerve dissection required for anterior transposition through the fracture site (transfracture anterior transposition). A cadaver study was conducted approaching the humerus by a posterior midline incision. The extent of dissection of the nerve necessary for plate fixation of the humerus fracture was measured. An osteotomy was created to model a humeral shaft fracture at the spiral groove (OTA classification 12-A2, 12-A3). The radial nerve was then transposed anterior to the humeral shaft through the fracture site. The additional dissection of the radial nerve and the extent of release of soft tissue from the humerus shaft to achieve the transposition were measured. Plating required a dissection of the radial nerve 1.78 cm proximal and 2.13 cm distal to the spiral groove. Transfracture anterior transposition of the radial nerve required an average dissection of 2.24 cm proximal and 2.68 cm distal to the spiral groove. The lateral intermuscular septum had to be released for 2.21 cm on the distal fragment to maintain laxity of the transposed nerve. Transfracture anterior transposition of the radial nerve before plating is feasible with dissection proximal and distal to the spiral groove and elevation of the lateral intermuscular septum. Potential clinical advantages of this technique include enhanced fracture site visualization, application of broader plates, and protection of the radial nerve during the internal fixation.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of facial nerve schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew L; Aviv, Richard I; Chen, Joseph M; Nedzelski, Julian M; Yuen, Heng-Wai; Fox, Allan J; Bharatha, Aditya; Bartlett, Eric S; Symons, Sean P

    2009-12-01

    This study characterizes the magnetic resonance (MR) appearances of facial nerve schwannoma (FNS). We hypothesize that the extent of FNS demonstrated on MR will be greater compared to prior computed tomography studies, that geniculate involvement will be most common, and that cerebellar pontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC) involvement will more frequently result in sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Retrospective study. Clinical, pathologic, and enhanced MR imaging records of 30 patients with FNS were analyzed. Morphologic characteristics and extent of segmental facial nerve involvement were documented. Median age at initial imaging was 51 years (range, 28-76 years). Pathologic confirmation was obtained in 14 patients (47%), and the diagnosis reached in the remainder by identification of a mass, thickening, and enhancement along the course of the facial nerve. All 30 lesions involved two or more contiguous segments of the facial nerve, with 28 (93%) involving three or more segments. The median segments involved per lesion was 4, mean of 3.83. Geniculate involvement was most common, in 29 patients (97%). CPA (P = .001) and IAC (P = .02) involvement was significantly related to SNHL. Seventeen patients (57%) presented with facial nerve dysfunction, manifesting in 12 patients as facial nerve weakness or paralysis, and/or in eight with involuntary movements of the facial musculature. This study highlights the morphologic heterogeneity and typical multisegment involvement of FNS. Enhanced MR is the imaging modality of choice for FNS. The neuroradiologist must accurately diagnose and characterize this lesion, and thus facilitate optimal preoperative planning and counseling.

  2. Electrical stimulation promotes regeneration of injured oculomotor nerves in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Du

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional recovery after oculomotor nerve injury is very poor. Electrical stimulation has been shown to promote regeneration of injured nerves. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation would improve the functional recovery of injured oculomotor nerves. Oculomotor nerve injury models were created by crushing the right oculomotor nerves of adult dogs. Stimulating electrodes were positioned in both proximal and distal locations of the lesion, and non-continuous rectangular, biphasic current pulses (0.7 V, 5 Hz were administered 1 hour daily for 2 consecutive weeks. Analysis of the results showed that electrophysiological and morphological recovery of the injured oculomotor nerve was enhanced, indicating that electrical stimulation improved neural regeneration. Thus, this therapy has the potential to promote the recovery of oculomotor nerve dysfunction.

  3. After facial nerve damage, regenerating axons become aberrant throughout the length of the nerve and not only at the site of the lesion: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D; Raisman, G

    2004-02-01

    After facial nerve trauma, aberrant regeneration is associated with synkinesis. Animal models of mechanical nerve guides or reparative cell transplants at the site of a lesion have not been shown to improve disorganized regeneration. We examined whether this is because regenerating axons become disorganized throughout the length of the nerve and not only at the site of the lesion. In rats (n = 12), retrograde fluorescent tracer techniques were used to establish that most of the temporal branch fibres were carried in the superior half of the facial nerve trunk. In two further groups of rats (n = 24) a complete proximal facial nerve lesion was made, and the nerve immediately repaired by suture. After 4 weeks, at a second operation, the superior half of the facial nerve trunk was cut, either proximal or distal to the original lesion, and retrograde tracers were applied to distal branches of the nerve. It was possible to localize the points at which regenerating fibres became aberrant in their course by studying the number of labelled motoneurons in the facial nucleus after application of the tracer to the temporal branch of the nerve: this was similar in the distal and proximal hemisection groups, suggesting that aberrant axonal development occurred throughout the length of the nerve. Future strategies aimed at improving the organization of regeneration need to provide guidance cues not only at the site of the lesion as previously thought, but also throughout the length of the nerve.

  4. Combined KHFAC + DC nerve block without onset or reduced nerve conductivity after block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manfred; Vrabec, Tina; Wainright, Jesse; Bhadra, Niloy; Bhadra, Narendra; Kilgore, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) waveforms have been shown to provide peripheral nerve conductivity block in many acute and chronic animal models. KHFAC nerve block could be used to address multiple disorders caused by neural over-activity, including blocking pain and spasticity. However, one drawback of KHFAC block is a transient activation of nerve fibers during the initiation of the nerve block, called the onset response. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using charge balanced direct current (CBDC) waveforms to temporarily block motor nerve conductivity distally to the KHFAC electrodes to mitigate the block onset-response. Approach. A total of eight animals were used in this study. A set of four animals were used to assess feasibility and reproducibility of a combined KHFAC + CBDC block. A following randomized study, conducted on a second set of four animals, compared the onset response resulting from KHFAC alone and combined KHFAC + CBDC waveforms. To quantify the onset, peak forces and the force-time integral were measured during KHFAC block initiation. Nerve conductivity was monitored throughout the study by comparing muscle twitch forces evoked by supra-maximal stimulation proximal and distal to the block electrodes. Each animal of the randomized study received at least 300 s (range: 318-1563 s) of cumulative dc to investigate the impact of combined KHFAC + CBDC on nerve viability. Main results. The peak onset force was reduced significantly from 20.73 N (range: 18.6-26.5 N) with KHFAC alone to 0.45 N (range: 0.2-0.7 N) with the combined CBDC and KHFAC block waveform (p conductivity was observed after application of the combined KHFAC + CBDC block relative to KHFAC waveforms. Significance. The distal application of CBDC can significantly reduce or even completely prevent the KHFAC onset response without a change in nerve conductivity.

  5. Distal vertebral artery reconstruction when managing vertebrobasilar insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Galaktionov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review devoted to the reconstruction of the distal vertebral artery and a clinical case of successful surgical treatment of a patient suffering from vertebrobasilar insufficiency caused by occlusion of the vertebral artery in a proximal segment. The external carotid artery-distal vertebral artery bypass was performed by using the radial artery.Received 27 February 2017. Revised 25 July 2017. Accepted 3 August 2017.Funding: The study did not have sponsorship.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest. 

  6. Intraoperative nerve monitoring in laryngotracheal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolufer, Sergio; Coves, María Dolores; Gálvez, Carlos; Villalona, Gustavo Adolfo

    Laryngotracheal surgery has an inherent risk of injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN). These complications go from minor dysphonia to even bilateral vocal cord paralysis. The intraoperative neuromonitoring of the RLN was developed in the field of thyroid surgery, in order to preserve nerve and vocal cord function. However, tracheal surgery requires in-field intubation of the distal trachea, which limits the use of nerve monitoring using conventional endotracheal tube with surface electrodes. Given these challenges, we present an alternative method for nerve monitoring during laryngotracheal surgery through the insertion of electrodes within the endolaryngeal musculature by bilateral puncture. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical Anatomy of the Lingual Nerve: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittitavornwong, Somsak; Babston, Michael; Denson, Douglas; Zehren, Steven; Friend, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Knowledge of lingual nerve anatomy is of paramount importance to dental practitioners and maxillofacial surgeons. The purpose of this article is to review lingual nerve anatomy from the cranial base to its insertion in the tongue and provide a more detailed explanation of its course to prevent procedural nerve injuries. Fifteen human cadavers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine's Anatomical Donor Program were reviewed. The anatomic structures and landmarks were identified and confirmed by anatomists. Lingual nerve dissection was carried out and reviewed on 15 halved human cadaver skulls (total specimens, 28). Cadaveric dissection provides a detailed examination of the lingual nerve from the cranial base to tongue insertion. The lingual nerve receives the chorda tympani nerve approximately 1 cm below the bifurcation of the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves. The pathway of the lingual nerve is in contact with the periosteum of the mandible just behind the internal oblique ridge. The lingual nerve crosses the submandibular duct at the interproximal space between the mandibular first and second molars. The submandibular ganglion is suspended from the lingual nerve at the distal area of the second mandibular molar. A zoning classification is another way to more accurately describe the lingual nerve based on close anatomic landmarks as seen in human cadaveric specimens. This system could identify particular areas of interest that might be at greater procedural risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Dual pathology proximal median nerve compression of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Siun M

    2013-12-01

    We report an unusual case of synchronous pathology in the forearm- the coexistence of a large lipoma of the median nerve together with an osteochondroma of the proximal ulna, giving rise to a dual proximal median nerve compression. Proximal median nerve compression neuropathies in the forearm are uncommon compared to the prevalence of distal compression neuropathies (eg Carpal Tunnel Syndrome). Both neural fibrolipomas (Refs. 1,2) and osteochondromas of the proximal ulna (Ref. 3) in isolation are rare but well documented. Unlike that of a distal compression, a proximal compression of the median nerve will often have a definite cause. Neural fibrolipoma, also called fibrolipomatous hamartoma are rare, slow-growing, benign tumours of peripheral nerves, most often occurring in the median nerve of younger patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such dual pathology in the same forearm, giving rise to a severe proximal compression of the median nerve. In this case, the nerve was being pushed anteriorly by the osteochondroma, and was being compressed from within by the intraneural lipoma. This unusual case highlights the advantage of preoperative imaging as part of the workup of proximal median nerve compression.

  9. Dual pathology proximal median nerve compression of the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Siun M; Browne, Katherine; Tuite, David J; O'Shaughnessy, Michael

    2013-12-01

    We report an unusual case of synchronous pathology in the forearm- the coexistence of a large lipoma of the median nerve together with an osteochondroma of the proximal ulna, giving rise to a dual proximal median nerve compression. Proximal median nerve compression neuropathies in the forearm are uncommon compared to the prevalence of distal compression neuropathies (eg Carpal Tunnel Syndrome). Both neural fibrolipomas (Refs. 1,2) and osteochondromas of the proximal ulna (Ref. 3) in isolation are rare but well documented. Unlike that of a distal compression, a proximal compression of the median nerve will often have a definite cause. Neural fibrolipoma, also called fibrolipomatous hamartoma are rare, slow-growing, benign tumours of peripheral nerves, most often occurring in the median nerve of younger patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such dual pathology in the same forearm, giving rise to a severe proximal compression of the median nerve. In this case, the nerve was being pushed anteriorly by the osteochondroma, and was being compressed from within by the intraneural lipoma. This unusual case highlights the advantage of preoperative imaging as part of the workup of proximal median nerve compression. Copyright © 2013 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distal corporoplasty for distal cylinders extrusion after penile prosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrino, Maurizio; Chiancone, Francesco; Battaglia, Gaetano; Pucci, Luigi; Fedelini, Paolo

    2017-02-03

    Distal extrusion of cylinders is a potential complication of the penile prosthesis implantation. Several methods have been proposed for repairing a distal penile erosion. We present our preliminary experience in "Distal corporoplasty" technique. We enrolled 18 consecutive patients whose underwent a distal corporoplasty with simultaneous reimplantation of an "AMS 700 inflatable penile prosthesis (LGX)" from January 2013 to November 2015 at our hospital. All procedures were performed by a single surgical team. Intraoperative and postoperative complications have been classified and reported according to Satava6 and Clavien-Dindo (CD) system.7 Mean values with standard deviations (±SD) were computed and reported for all items. Mean age of the patients was 53.61 (±11.90) years. Mean body max index (BMI) was 24.22 (±2.51). Mean operative time was 85.2 (±13.1) minutes. Blood losses were minimal. No intraoperative complications are reported according to Satava classification. Four out of 18 patients (22.22%) experienced postoperative complications according to CD system. All patients had sexual intercourse for the first time postsurgery after a mean of 59.11 ± 2.08 days. Mean follow-up was 22.11 (±9.95). Distal extrusion of cylinders is a potential complication of the penile prosthesis implantation. Distal corporoplasty was first described by Mulcahy. He reported a series of 14 patients with a follow-up of about 2 years with optimal functional outcomes. Moreover, distal corporoplasty resulted in shorter operative time, better function, less pain, and fewer recurrences than Gortex windsock repair.10 In our experience, distal corporoplasty is a simple and safe procedure in the treatment of distal cylinders extrusion when the prosthetic material is not exposed to the exterior.

  11. Protective Effect of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Rat Sciatic Nerve Ischemia Reperfusion Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan Turamanlar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha lipoic acid is a potent antioxidant that plays numerous roles in human health. This study examined the effect of ALA on rat sciatic nerve ischemia reperfusion damage. Aims: Protective effect of alpha lipoic acid (ALA on sciatic nerve following ischemia-reperfusion in rats was investigated by using light microscopy and biochemical methods. Provided that the protective effect of ALA on sciatic nerve is proven, we think the damage to the sciatic nerve that has already occurred or might occur in patients for various reasons maybe prevented or stopped by giving ALA in convenient doses. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Forty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 grams were used in this study. Rats were randomly divided into six groups including one control (Group 1, one sham (Group 2, two ischemia-reperfusion (Groups 3 and 4 and two treatment groups (Groups5 and 6. Doses of 60 and 100 mg/kg ALA were given (Group 5 and 6 intra peritoneally twice, 1 and 24 hours before the ischemia to each treatment group. Ischemia was carried out the abdominal aorta starting from the distal part of the renal vein for two hours followed by reperfusion for three hours. In immunohistochemical methods, fibronectin immunoreactivity was analyzed. For biochemical analyses, the tissues were taken in eppendorf microtubes and superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx enzyme activities as well as malondialdehyde (MDA and nitricoxide (NO levels were measured. Results: Fibronectin was observed to have increased significantly in the ischemia group; on the other hand, it was observed to have decreased in parallel to the doses in the ALA groups. Biochemical studies showed that SOD and GSHPx declined with ischemia-reperfusion, but the activities of these enzymes were increased in the treatment groups in parallel with the dose. It was found that increased MDA levels with ischemia-reperfusion were decreased in parallel with ALA dose

  12. Recurrent unilateral facial nerve palsy in a child with dehiscent facial nerve canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The dehiscent facial nerve canal has been well documented in histopathological studies of temporal bones as well as in clinical setting. We describe clinical and radiologic features of a child with recurrent facial nerve palsy and dehiscent facial nerve canal. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: A 5-year-old male was referred to the otolaryngology clinic for evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media and hearing loss. He also developed recurrent left peripheral FN palsy associated with episodes of bilateral acute otitis media. High resolution computed tomography of the temporal bones revealed incomplete bony coverage of the tympanic segment of the left facial nerve. Conclusions: Recurrent peripheral FN palsy may occur in children with recurrent acute otitis media in the presence of a dehiscent facial nerve canal. Facial nerve canal dehiscence should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with recurrent peripheral FN palsy.

  13. Fractures of the distal tibia treated with polyaxial locking plating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Luo, Cong-Feng; Zhou, Zu-Bin; Zeng, Bing-Fang

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the healing rate, complications, and functional outcomes in 32 adult patients with very short metaphyseal fragments in fractures of the distal tibia treated with a polyaxial locking system. The average distance from the distal extent of the fracture to the tibial plafond was 11 mm. All fractures healed and the average time to union was 14 weeks. Six patients (19%) reported occasional local disturbance over the medial malleolus. There were two cases of postoperative superficial infections and evidence of delayed wound healing. Using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle score, the average functional score was 87.3 points (of 100 total possible points). Our results show the polyaxial locking plates, which offer more fixation versatility, may be a reasonable treatment option for distal tibia fractures with very short metaphyseal segments.

  14. Sciatic Nerve Conductivity is Impaired by Hamstring Strain Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzaki, Karina; Nakazato, Koichi; Mizuno, Masuhiko; Yonechi, Tooru; Higo, Yusuke; Kubo, Yoshiaki; Kono, Tokuyoshi; Hiranuma, Kenji

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess sciatic nerve conductivity in athletes with a history of hamstring strain injuries. Twenty-seven athletes with a history of hamstring strain injuries were included in the injured group. The control group consisted of 16 uninjured participants. We measured the proximal and distal latencies and calculated the sciatic nerve conduction velocity to evaluate neuronal conductivity. The results were expressed as median values and interquartile ranges. Both proximal latency and distal latency of the injured limb in the injured group were significantly longer than those of the uninjured limb (phamstring strain injuries. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The superiority of 3D-CISS sequence in displaying the cisternal segment of posterior nerves and their pathological changes%3D-CISS MRI序列对脑池段后组脑神经及其病变显示的优势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁长虎; 柳澄; 李坤成; 武乐斌; 庞琦; 乌大尉; 王海燕; 于富华

    2009-01-01

    目的 通过脑池段后组脑神经3D-CISS序列与3D-TSE序列成像质量的比较,评估3D-CISS序列对脑池段后组脑神经及其病变显示的作用.方法 对45例正常体检者和12例患有各种后组脑神经异常症状的病人进行3D-CISS序列、3D-TSE序列扫描,对后组腑神经成像进行评分.结果 舌咽、迷走、副神经及舌下神经在3D-CISS、3D-TSE序列的显示率依次为:100%、57.1%;100%、52.3%;100%、41.1%;91.0%、59.3%.应用3D-CISS序列:对8例血管性神经痛病人显示了责任血管压迫点,对3例后组脑神经微小肿瘤进行了显示,对1例蛛网膜囊肿病人显示了压迫点.结论 对于被脑脊液围绕的后组脑神经显示成像,3D-CISS序列是较好的选择.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy of 3D-CISS on image quality of posterior nerves surrounded by CSF when compared with that of 3D-TSE. Method A total of 45 volunteers and 12 patients with abnormality of posterior cranial nerves were examined using 3D-CISS and 3D-TSE sequences respectively. The image quality were graded for glossopharyngeal nerve、vagus nerve、accessory nerve、 hypoglossal nerves (CN Ⅸ、Ⅹ、Ⅺ、Ⅻ) and their related arteries. Results The identification rates for cisternal segment of posterior nerves were as follows: glossopharyngeal nerve (100% in 3D-CISS and 57.1% in 31)-TSE)、vagus nerve(100% in 3D-CISS and 52.3% in 3I)-TSE)、accessory nerve(100% in 3D-CISS and 41.1% in 3D-TSE)、hypoglossal nerves(91.0% in 3D-CISS and 59.3% in 3D-TSE);12 patients with pathological changes in posterior nerves were all displayed well, among them 8 were pressed by artery, 1 by arachnoid cyst,3 caused by tumors. Conclusions 3D-CISS sequence is preferable when imaging posterior cranial nerves surrounded by CSF.

  16. Collision tumor of the facial nerve: a synchronous seventh nerve schwannoma and neurofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Brian C; Carlson, Matthew L; Driscoll, Colin L; Moore, Eric J

    2012-10-01

    To report a novel case of a collision tumor involving an intraparotid neurofibroma and a mastoid segment facial nerve schwannoma. Clinical capsule report. Tertiary academic referral center. A 29-year-old woman with a 2-year history of an asymptomatic enlarging left infraauricular mass and normal FN function presented to a tertiary care referral center. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion in the deep portion of the parotid gland extending into the stylomastoid foramen. The patient underwent superficial parotidectomy, and a cystic parotid mass was found to be intrinsic to the intraparotid facial nerve. A portion of the mass was biopsied, and intraoperative frozen section pathology was consistent with a neurofibroma. A mastoidectomy with FN decompression was then performed until a normal-appearing segment was identified just proximal to the second genu. After biopsy, proximal facial nerve stimulation failed to elicit evoked motor potentials, and en bloc resection was performed. Final pathology demonstrated a schwannoma involving the mastoid segment and a neurofibroma involving the proximal intraparotid facial nerve. We report the first case of a facial nerve collision tumor involving an intraparotid neurofibroma and a mastoid segment facial nerve schwannoma. Benign FN sheath tumors of the parotid gland are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a parotid mass.

  17. Role of metallothioneins in peripheral nerve function and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceballos, D; Lago, N; Verdú, E

    2003-01-01

    The physiological role of the metallothionein (MT) family of proteins during peripheral nerve injury and regeneration was examined in Mt1+ 2 and Mt3 knockout (KO) mice. To this end, the right sciatic nerve was crushed, and the regeneration distance was evaluated by the pinch test 2-7 days....... The improved regeneration observed with the Mt3 KO mice was confirmed by compound nerve action potentials that were recorded from digital nerves at 14 dpl only in this group. We conclude that Mt3 normally inhibits peripheral nerve regeneration........ Moreover, the number of regenerating axons in the distal tibial nerve was significantly higher in Mt3KO mice than in the other two strains at 14 dpl. Immunoreactive profiles to protein gene product 9.5 were present in the epidermis and the sweat glands of the plantar skin of the hindpaw of the Mt3 KO group...

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5-S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3-S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  20. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa [Chiba University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba (Japan); Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi [Chiba University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Chiba (Japan); Toyone, Tomoaki [Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Chiba (Japan); Takaso, Masashi [Kitasato University, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Sagamihara City, Kanagawa (Japan); Aoki, Yasuchika [Chiba Rosai Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ichihara, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  1. Effect of Surface Pore Structure of Nerve Guide Conduit on Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Jin Rae; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL)/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with different surface pore structures (nano-porous inner surface vs. micro-porous inner surface) but similar physical and chemical properties were fabricated by rolling the opposite side of asymmetrically porous PCL/F127 membranes. The effect of the pore structure on peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGCs was investigated using a sciatic nerve defect model of rats. The nerve fibers and tissues were shown to have regenerated along the longitudinal direction through the NGC with a nano-porous inner surface (Nanopore NGC), while they grew toward the porous wall of the NGC with a micro-porous inner surface (Micropore NGC) and, thus, their growth was restricted when compared with the Nanopore NGC, as investigated by immunohistochemical evaluations (by fluorescence microscopy with anti-neurofilament staining and Hoechst staining for growth pattern of nerve fibers), histological evaluations (by light microscopy with Meyer's modified trichrome staining and Toluidine blue staining and transmission electron microscopy for the regeneration of axon and myelin sheath), and FluoroGold retrograde tracing (for reconnection between proximal and distal stumps). The effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) immobilized on the pore surfaces of the NGCs on nerve regeneration was not so significant when compared with NGCs not containing immobilized NGF. The NGC system with different surface pore structures but the same chemical/physical properties seems to be a good tool that is used for elucidating the surface pore effect of NGCs on nerve regeneration. PMID:22871377

  2. Optogenetic probing of nerve and muscle function after facial nerve lesion in the mouse whisker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Akhil; Vajtay, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Aman; Yiantsos, S. Olga; Lee, Christian R.; Margolis, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Optogenetic modulation of neural circuits has opened new avenues into neuroscience research, allowing the control of cellular activity of genetically specified cell types. Optogenetics is still underdeveloped in the peripheral nervous system, yet there are many applications related to sensorimotor function, pain and nerve injury that would be of great benefit. We recently established a method for non-invasive, transdermal optogenetic stimulation of the facial muscles that control whisker movements in mice (Park et al., 2016, eLife, e14140)1. Here we present results comparing the effects of optogenetic stimulation of whisker movements in mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) selectively in either the facial motor nerve (ChAT-ChR2 mice) or muscle (Emx1-ChR2 or ACTA1-ChR2 mice). We tracked changes in nerve and muscle function before and up to 14 days after nerve transection. Optogenetic 460 nm transdermal stimulation of the distal cut nerve showed that nerve degeneration progresses rapidly over 24 hours. In contrast, the whisker movements evoked by optogenetic muscle stimulation were up-regulated after denervation, including increased maximum protraction amplitude, increased sensitivity to low-intensity stimuli, and more sustained muscle contractions (reduced adaptation). Our results indicate that peripheral optogenetic stimulation is a promising technique for probing the timecourse of functional changes of both nerve and muscle, and holds potential for restoring movement after paralysis induced by nerve damage or motoneuron degeneration.

  3. Anatomy of pudendal nerve at urogenital diaphragm--new critical site for nerve entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Stephan; Ebmer, Johannes; Dellon, A Lee; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2005-11-01

    To investigate the relations of the pudendal nerve in this complex anatomic region and determine possible entrapment sites that are accessible for surgical decompression. Entrapment neuropathies of the pudendal nerve are an uncommon and, therefore, often overlooked or misdiagnosed clinical entity. The detailed relations of this nerve as it exits the pelvis through the urogenital diaphragm and enters the mobile part of the penis have not yet been studied. Detailed anatomic dissections were performed in 10 formalin preserved hemipelves under 3.5x loupe magnification. The pudendal nerve was dissected from the entrance into the Alcock canal to the dorsum of the penis. The branching pattern of the nerve and its topographic relationship were recorded and photographs taken. The anatomic dissections revealed that the pudendal nerve passes through a tight osteofibrotic canal just distal to the urogenital diaphragm at the entrance to the base of the penis. This canal is, in part, formed by the inferior ramus of the pubic bone, the suspensory ligament of the penis, and the ischiocavernous body. In two specimens, a fusiform pseudoneuromatous thickening was found. The pudendal nerve is susceptible to compression at the passage from the Alcock canal to the dorsum of the penis. Individuals exposed to repetitive mechanical irritation in this region are especially endangered. Diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy can have additional compression neuropathy with decreased penile sensibility and will benefit from decompression of the pudendal nerve.

  4. Renal denervation beyond the bifurcation : The effect of distal ablation placement on safety and blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeftink, Martine M A; Spiering, Wilko; De Jong, Mark R.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Elvan, Arif; Heeg, Jan Evert; Bots, Michiel L.; Voskuil, Michiel

    2017-01-01

    Renal denervation may be more effective if performed distal in the renal artery because of smaller distances between the lumen and perivascular nerves. The authors reviewed the angiographic results of 97 patients and compared blood pressure reduction in relation to the location of the denervation.

  5. Hypoglossal-facial-jump-anastomosis without an interposition nerve graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutner, Dirk; Luers, Jan C; Grosheva, Maria

    2013-10-01

    The hypoglossal-facial-anastomosis is the most often applied procedure for the reanimation of a long lasting peripheral facial nerve paralysis. The use of an interposition graft and its end-to-side anastomosis to the hypoglossal nerve allows the preservation of the tongue function and also requires two anastomosis sites and a free second donor nerve. We describe the modified technique of the hypoglossal-facial-jump-anastomosis without an interposition and present the first results. Retrospective case study. We performed the facial nerve reconstruction in five patients. The indication for the surgery was a long-standing facial paralysis with preserved portion distal to geniculate ganglion, absent voluntary activity in the needle facial electromyography, and an intact bilateral hypoglossal nerve. Following mastoidectomy, the facial nerve was mobilized in the fallopian canal down to its bifurcation in the parotid gland and cut in its tympanic portion distal to the lesion. Then, a tensionless end-to-side suture to the hypoglossal nerve was performed. The facial function was monitored up to 16 months postoperatively. The reconstruction technique succeeded in all patients: The facial function improved within the average time period of 10 months to the House-Brackmann score 3. This modified technique of the hypoglossal-facial reanimation is a valid method with good clinical results, especially in cases of a preserved intramastoidal facial nerve. Level 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Neurotization of the phrenic nerve with accessory nerve for high cervical spinal cord injury with respiratory distress: an anatomic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ce; Zhang, Ying; Nicholas, Tsai; Wu, Guoxin; Shi, Sheng; Bo, Yin; Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Xuhui; Yuan, Wen

    2014-01-01

    High cervical spinal cord injury is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Traditional treatments carry various complications such as infection, pacemaker failure and undesirable movement. Thus, a secure surgical strategy with fewer complications analogous to physiological ventilation is still required. We hope to offer one potential method to decrease the complications and improve survival qualities of patients from the aspect of anatomy. The purpose of the study is to provide anatomic details on the accessory nerve and phrenic nerve for neurotization in patients with high spinal cord injuries. 38 cadavers (76 accessory and 76 phrenic nerves) were dissected in the study. The width, length and thickness of each accessory nerve and phrenic nerve above clavicle were measured. The distances from several landmarks on accessory nerve to the origin and the end of the phrenic nerve above clavicle were measured too. Then, the number of motor nerve fibers on different sections of the nerves was calculated using the technique of immunohistochemistry. The accessory nerves distal to its sternocleidomastoid muscular branches were 1.52 ± 0.32 mm ~1.54 ± 0.29 mm in width, 0.52 ± 0.18 mm ~ 0.56 ± 0.20mm in thickness and 9.52 ± 0.98 cm in length. And the phrenic nerves above clavicle were 1.44 ± 0.23 mm ~ 1.45 ± 0.24 mm in width, 0.47 ± 0.15 mm ~ 0.56 ± 0.25 mm in thickness and 6.48 ± 0.78 cm in length. The distance between the starting point of accessory nerve and phrenic nerve were 3.24 ± 1.17 cm, and the distance between the starting point of accessory nerve and the end of the phrenic nerve above clavicle were 8.72 ± 0.84 cm. The numbers of motor nerve fibers in accessory nerve were 1,038 ± 320~1,102 ± 216, before giving out the sternocleidomastoid muscular branches. The number of motor nerve fibers in the phrenic nerve was 911 ± 321~1,338 ± 467. The accessory nerve and the phrenic were similar in width, thickness and the number of motor nerve fibers. And

  7. Electrophysiologic analysis of injury to cranial nerve XI during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanisnik, Bostjan; Zargi, Miha; Rodi, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    Despite preservation of the accessory nerve, a considerable number of patients report partial nerve damage after modified radical neck dissection (MRND) and selective neck dissection. Accessory nerve branches for the trapezius muscle were stimulated during neck dissection, and the M wave amplitude was measured during distinct surgical phases. The accessory nerve was mapped in 20 patients. The M wave recordings indicated that major nerve damage occurred during dissection at levels IIa and IIb in the most proximal segment of the nerve. The M waves evoked from this nerve segment decreased significantly during surgery (analysis of variance; p = .001). The most significant intraoperative injury to the accessory nerve during neck dissection occurs at anatomic nerve levels IIa and IIb. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E372-E376, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  9. Lentiviral-mediated transfer of CDNF promotes nerve regeneration and functional recovery after sciatic nerve injury in adult rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Ying-Jun; Nie, Lin, E-mail: chengleiyx@126.com

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •CDNF was successfully transfected by a lentiviral vector into the distal sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved S-100, NF200 expression and nerve regeneration after sciatic injury. •CDNF improved the remyelination and thickness of the regenerated sciatic nerve. •CDNF improved gastrocnemius muscle weight and sciatic functional recovery. -- Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is often followed by incomplete and unsatisfactory functional recovery and may be associated with sensory and motor impairment of the affected limb. Therefore, a novel method is needed to improve the speed of recovery and the final functional outcome after peripheral nerve injuries. This report investigates the effect of lentiviral-mediated transfer of conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) on regeneration of the rat peripheral nerve in a transection model in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after recombinant CDNF lentiviral vector application. We evaluated sciatic nerve regeneration after surgery using light and electron microscopy and the functional recovery using the sciatic functional index and target muscle weight. HE staining revealed better ordered structured in the CDNF-treated group at 8 weeks post-surgery. Quantitative analysis of immunohistochemistry of NF200 and S-100 in the CDNF group revealed significant improvement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration compared with the control groups at 4 weeks and 8 weeks after injury. The thickness of the myelination around the axons in the CDNF group was significantly higher than in the control groups at 8 weeks post-surgery. The CDNF group displayed higher muscle weights and significantly increased sciatic nerve index values. Our findings suggest that CDNF gene therapy could provide durable and stable CDNF protein concentration and has the potential to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration, morphological and functional recovery following nerve injury, which suggests a

  10. Morphometric analysis of the fascicular organisation of the optic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radunović Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The optic nerve is anatomically observed in four segments: intrabulbar, orbital, canalicular, and cranial. According to the literature, the surface of the transversal cut of the nerve is different through it. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fascicular organisation of the optic nerve, throughout its three segments from the eye. Methods. Five pairs of optic nerves, obtained from the autopsies were examined. Using Heidenhain's (azan staining, the cuts were prepared for microscopy. Morphometric analysis was performed using the stereological methods for morphometric cytology - the Weible’s testing system M42. The following measures were established: the surface of the transverse cut of the nerve, the entire surface of fasciculi, the entire surface of connective tissue and blood vessels, the number of fasciculi, the surface of a single fasciculus. Results. The surface of the transverse cut of the nerve was found to grow from the orbital to the cranial segment, as well as the entire surface of fasciculi. While their number is significantly lower in the cranial segment, the number of fasciculi varied slightly between the orbital and the canalicular segment. The surface of a single fasciculus grows from the bulb to the chiasma. There is probable a cause to believe that this may be due to fusion of the “small” fasciculi in the orbitocranial direction. Conclusion. There are significant differences among the examined parameters of the different parts of the optic nerve.

  11. Reverse Distal Transverse Palmar Arch in Distal Digital Replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ching-Yueh; Orozco, Oscar; Vinagre, Gustavo; Shafarenko, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Refinements in microsurgery have made distal finger replantation an established technique with high success rates and good functional and aesthetic outcomes. However, it still represents a technically demanding procedure due to the small vessel caliber and frequent lack of vessel length, requiring the use of interpositional venous grafts in some instances. We describe a new technique for anastomosis in fingertip replantation, whereby the need for venous grafts is eliminated. Applying the reverse distal transverse palmar arch technique, 11 cases of distal digital replantation were performed between January 2011 and July 2016. The described procedure was used for arterial anastomosis in 10 cases and arteriovenous shunting for venous drainage in 1 case. A retrospective case review was conducted. The technical description and clinical outcome evaluations are presented. Ten of the 11 replanted digits survived, corresponding to an overall success rate of 91%. One replant failed due to venous insufficiency. Blood transfusions were not required for any of the patients. Follow-up (range, 1.5-5 months) revealed near-normal range of motion and good aesthetic results. All of the replanted digits developed protective sensation. The average length of hospital admission was 5 days. All patients were satisfied with the results and were able to return to their previous work. The use of the reverse distal transverse palmar arch is a novel and reliable technique in distal digital replantation when an increase in vessel length is required, allowing for a tension-free arterial repair without the need for vein grafts.

  12. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  13. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  14. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  15. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  16. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    Although there have recently been numerous reports of enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy, the mechanism of enhancement remains largely unknown. In the present study, animal models with experimentally induced facial paralysis were prepared, and the vascular permeabilities of normal and damaged facial nerves were assessed using Evans blue albumin (EBA) as a tracer. The Gd-DTPA contents in normal and compressively damaged facial nerves were also investigated. In the normal intratemporal facial nerve, EBA remained in the vessels, and did not leak into the endoneurium. In contrast, vascular permeability was very high in the epineurium and the geniculate ganglion which showed leakage of large amounts of EBA from vessels. At the site of compression in the damaged nerve, EBA leakage was also seen in the endoneurism, indicating accentuated vascular permeability. This accentuation of vascular permeability shifted toward the distal side. However, no EBA leakage was seen on the side proximal to the site of compression. Significantly higher Gd-DTPA contents were obtained in the facial nerve on the paralytic side than in that on the normal side (p<0.001). As for differences between the distal and proximal sides, the distal side had a significantly higher Gd-DTPA content (p<0.01). Assessment of vascular permeability with EBA revealed accentuated vascular permeability on the side distal to the site of compression. These results showed the presence of a blood nerve barrier (BNB) in the facial nerve. Furthermore, the present findings suggest that the enhancement of the facial nerve on the affected side is caused by BNB destruction due to nerve damage and subsequent Gd-DTPA leakage from the vessels. Furthermore, it is suggested that the facial nerve enhancement appears to occur mainly on the distal side of the damaged portion of the nerve. (author)

  17. 3T MR 3D-FIESTA demonstrating cranial nerves in cisternal segment and their relationship with adjacent lesions%3T MR三维稳态进动快速成像序列显示脑池段颅神经及其与周围病变的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠毅毅; 王庆征; 李传亭; 刘传梅; 张红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the usefulness of 3T MR 3D-FIESTA in displaying the relationship between the nerves in posterior and middle fossa and rheir adjacent lesions. Methods 34 cases of intracranial lesions in posterior and middle fossa were study with FSE T1W1,FSE T2WI and 3D-FIESTA sequences in 3T MR. The relationship bctween the lesions and the cranial nerves in cisternal segment were confirmed with surgery. Results 34 patients mainly showed 48 lesions on MR imaging. 9 cranial nerves were embedded by its adjacent lesions. 51 were pushed. 25 nerves were involved, and lesions were adjacent to 10 nerves. 23 patients underwent surgery in all 34 cases. The accuracy of 3D-FIESTA imag-ings in demonstrating relationship between cranial nerves with adjacent lesions were 5/6. 26/28. 3/3. 12/13. Conclusion 3T MR 3D-FIESTA imaging could depict the relationship between the nerves in cisternal segment and its adjacent lesions correctly, and it is useful in preoperative evaluation and treatment of intracranial lesions.%目的 探讨3T MR三维稳态进动快速成像(3D-FIESTA)序列显示中、后颅窝颅神经及其与周围病变关系的价值.方法 对34例颅内脑外病变的患者行反转恢复SE T1WI、FSE T2 WI及3D-FIESTA序列扫描.脑池段颅神经与周围病变的关系情况与手术结果相对照.结果 34例患者中共48处病变,3D-FIESTA序列显示9条神经被周围病变包绕.51条颅神经被压迫.与病变相邻的颅神经有10条,病变累及其邻近25条神经;其中23例患者行手术治疗,手术与MR图像对照.3D-FIESTA显示颅神经与周围病变关系的准确性分别为5/6、26/28、3/3、12/13.结论 3T MR 3D-FI-ESTA序列可以正确显示脑池段颅神经及其与周围病变的关系.对治疗前评估及病变的治疗有重要的应用价值.

  18. A novel suture method to place and adjust peripheral nerve catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C.; Steen-Hansen, C.; Madsen, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a peripheral nerve catheter, attached to a needle, which works like an adjustable suture. We used in-plane ultrasound guidance to place 45 catheters close to the femoral, saphenous, sciatic and distal tibial nerves in cadaver legs. We displaced catheters after their initial...

  19. Regulation of semaphorin III/collapsin-1 gene expression during peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Giger, Roman J; Verhaagen, J

    1998-01-01

    The competence of neurons to regenerate depends on their ability to initiate a program of gene expression supporting growth and on the growth-permissive properties of glial cells in the distal stump of the injured nerve. Most studies on intrinsic molecular mechanisms governing peripheral nerve

  20. The Relationship between Peripheral Nerve Conduction Velocity and Ophthalmological Findings in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Early Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Ito

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV is an indicator of neuronal damage in the distal segment of the peripheral nerves. Here, we determined the association between NCV and other systemic and ocular clinical findings, in type 2 diabetes patients with early diabetic retinopathy (DR. Methods. This study included 42 eyes of 42 type 2 diabetes patients (median age: 54 years with no DR or with mild nonproliferative DR. Standard statistical techniques were used to determine associations between clinical findings. Results. Sural sensory conduction velocity (SCV and tibial motor conduction velocity (MCV were significantly lower in mild nonproliferative DR patients than patients with no DR (P=0.008 and P=0.01, resp.. Furthermore, logistic regression analyses revealed that sural SCV and tibial MCV were independent factors contributing to the presence of mild nonproliferative DR (OR 0.83, P=0.012 and OR 0.69 P=0.02, resp.. Tibial MCV was correlated with choroidal thickness (CT (P=0.01, and a multiple regression analysis revealed that age, tibial MCV, and carotid intima-media thickness were independent associating factors with CT (P=0.035, P=0.015, and P=0.008, resp.. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that reduced NCV may be closely associated with early DR in type 2 diabetes patients. Thus, reduced nerve conduction is a potential early biomarker of DR.

  1. Use of superficial peroneal nerve graft for treating peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Ribak

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical results from treating chronic peripheral nerve injuries using the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft donor source. METHODS: This was a study on eleven patients with peripheral nerve injuries in the upper limbs that were treated with grafts from the sensitive branch of the superficial peroneal nerve. The mean time interval between the dates of the injury and surgery was 93 days. The ulnar nerve was injured in eight cases and the median nerve in six. There were three cases of injury to both nerves. In the surgery, a longitudinal incision was made on the anterolateral face of the ankle, thus viewing the superficial peroneal nerve, which was located anteriorly to the extensor digitorum longus muscle. Proximally, the deep fascia between the extensor digitorum longus and the peroneal longus muscles was dissected. Next, the motor branch of the short peroneal muscle (one of the branches of the superficial peroneal nerve was identified. The proximal limit of the sensitive branch was found at this point. RESULTS: The average space between the nerve stumps was 3.8 cm. The average length of the grafts was 16.44 cm. The number of segments used was two to four cables. In evaluating the recovery of sensitivity, 27.2% evolved to S2+, 54.5% to S3 and 18.1% to S3+. Regarding motor recovery, 72.7% presented grade 4 and 27.2% grade 3. There was no motor deficit in the donor area. A sensitive deficit in the lateral dorsal region of the ankle and the dorsal region of the foot was observed. None of the patients presented complaints in relation to walking. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the superficial peroneal nerve as a graft source for treating peripheral nerve injuries is safe and provides good clinical results similar to those from other nerve graft sources.

  2. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hui Kou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated nerve fiber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were sutured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-finger flexion and mild wrist flexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction velocity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple amplification of regenerating myelinated nerve fibers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve fibers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple amplification was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  3. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres: multiple amplification of axonal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Wang, Yan-Hua; Chen, Bo; Han, Na; Xue, Feng; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-bud regeneration, i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve fiber regeneration. Our previous studies have verified the limit and validity of multiple amplification of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple amplification of myelinated nerve fiber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were sutured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-finger flexion and mild wrist flexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction velocity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple amplification of regenerating myelinated nerve fibers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve fibers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple amplification was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  4. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  5. MRI of peripheral nerve lesions of the lower limbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacour-Petit, M.C.; Ducreux, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Bicetre, Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Lozeron, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Bicetre, Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2003-03-01

    Our aim is to illustrate the contribution of MRI to diagnosis of lesions of the lower-limb nerve trunks. We report six patients who had clinical and electrophysiological examination for a peroneal or tibial nerve palsy. MRI of the knee showed in three cases a nonenhancing cystic lesion of the peroneal nerve suggesting an intraneural ganglion cyst, confirmed by histological study in one case. One patient with known neurofibromatosis had an enhancing nodular lesion of the peroneal nerve compatible with a neurofibroma. Two patients had diffuse hypertrophy with high signal on T2-weighted images, without contrast enhancement of the sciatic nerve or its branches. These lesions were compatible with localised hypertrophic neuropathy. In one case, biopsy of the superficial branch of the peroneal nerve showed insignificant axonal degeneration. MRI can provide information about the size and site of the abnormal segment of a nerve before treatment and can be used to distinguish different patterns of focal lesion. (orig.)

  6. Active Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ajay; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system observes and understands a scene/image by making a series of fixations. Every fixation point lies inside a particular region of arbitrary shape and size in the scene which can either be an object or just a part of it. We define as a basic segmentation problem the task of segmenting that region containing the fixation point. Segmenting the region containing the fixation is equivalent to finding the enclosing contour- a connected set of boundary edge fragments in the edge map of the scene - around the fixation. This enclosing contour should be a depth boundary.We present here a novel algorithm that finds this bounding contour and achieves the segmentation of one object, given the fixation. The proposed segmentation framework combines monocular cues (color/intensity/texture) with stereo and/or motion, in a cue independent manner. The semantic robots of the immediate future will be able to use this algorithm to automatically find objects in any environment. The capability of automatically segmenting objects in their visual field can bring the visual processing to the next level. Our approach is different from current approaches. While existing work attempts to segment the whole scene at once into many areas, we segment only one image region, specifically the one containing the fixation point. Experiments with real imagery collected by our active robot and from the known databases 1 demonstrate the promise of the approach.

  7. Effect of cochlear nerve electrocautery on the adult cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, Claire E; Merwin, William H; Klatt-Cromwell, Cristine; Hutson, Kendall A; Ewend, Matthew G; Adunka, Oliver F; Fitzpatrick, Douglas C; Buchman, Craig A

    2015-04-01

    Electrocauterization and subsequent transection of the cochlear nerve induce greater injury to the cochlear nucleus than sharp transection alone. Some studies show that neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients fit with auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) fail to achieve speech perception abilities similar to ABI recipients without NF2. Reasons for these differences remain speculative. One hypothesis posits poorer performance to surgically induced trauma to the cochlear nucleus from electrocautery. Sustained electrosurgical depolarization of the cochlear nerve may cause excitotoxic-induced postsynaptic nuclear injury. Equally plausible is that cautery in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus induces necrosis. The cochlear nerve was transected in anesthetized adult gerbils sharply with or without bipolar electrocautery at varying intensities. Gerbils were perfused at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days postoperatively; their brainstem and cochleas were embedded in paraffin and sectioned at 10 μm. Alternate sections were stained with flourescent markers for neuronal injury or Nissl substance. In additional experiments, anterograde tracers were applied directly to a sectioned eighth nerve to verify that fluorescent-labeled profiles seen were terminating auditory nerve fibers. Cochlear nerve injury was observed from 72 hours postoperatively and was identical across cases regardless of surgical technique. Postsynaptic cochlear nucleus injury was not seen after distal transection of the nerve. By contrast, proximal transection was associated with trauma to the cochlear nucleus. Distal application of bipolar electrocautery seems safe for the cochlear nucleus. Application near the root entry zone must be used cautiously because this may compromise nuclear viability needed to support ABI stimulation.

  8. Spontaneous temporal changes and variability of peripheral nerve conduction analyzed using a random effects model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Thomas; Gaist, David; Otto, Marit

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: The reproducibility of variables commonly included in studies of peripheral nerve conduction in healthy individuals has not previously been analyzed using a random effects regression model. We examined the temporal changes and variability of standard nerve conduction measures in the leg...... reexamined after 2 and 26 weeks. There was no change in the variables except for a minor decrease in sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and a minor increase in tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Reproducibility was best for peroneal nerve distal motor latency and motor conduction velocity......, sural nerve sensory conduction velocity, and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Between-subject variability was greater than within-subject variability. Sample sizes ranging from 21 to 128 would be required to show changes twice the magnitude of the spontaneous changes observed in this study. Nerve...

  9. Translocations used to generate chromosome segment duplications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a duplication (Dp) of the translocated segment and four inviable (white, W) ascospores with .... of this work, namely, the definition of breakpoint junction sequences of 12 ..... then our results would place supercontig 10.9 in distal. LG VIR. A third ...

  10. Electrophysiological Assessment of a Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber Nerve Graft for Facial Nerve Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacqueline J; McClendon, Mark T; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; Álvarez, Zaida; Stupp, Samuel I; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2018-04-27

    Facial nerve injury can cause severe long-term physical and psychological morbidity. There are limited repair options for an acutely transected facial nerve not amenable to primary neurorrhaphy. We hypothesize that a peptide amphiphile nanofiber neurograft may provide the nanostructure necessary to guide organized neural regeneration. Five experimental groups were compared, animals with 1) an intact nerve, 2) following resection of a nerve segment, and following resection and immediate repair with either a 3) autograft (using the resected nerve segment), 4) neurograft, or 5) empty conduit. The buccal branch of the rat facial nerve was directly stimulated with charge balanced biphasic electrical current pulses at different current amplitudes while nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) and electromygraphic (EMG) responses were recorded. After 8 weeks, the proximal buccal branch was surgically re-exposed and electrically evoked nCAPs were recorded for groups 1-5. As expected, the intact nerves required significantly lower current amplitudes to evoke an nCAP than those repaired with the neurograft and autograft nerves. For other electrophysiologic parameters such as latency and maximum nCAP, there was no significant difference between the intact, autograft and neurograft groups. The resected group had variable responses to electrical stimulation, and the empty tube group was electrically silent. Immunohistochemical analysis and TEM confirmed myelinated neural regeneration. This study demonstrates that the neuroregenerative capability of peptide amphiphile nanofiber neurografts is similar to the current clinical gold standard method of repair and holds potential as an off-the-shelf solution for facial reanimation and potentially peripheral nerve repair. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Reconstruction of the abdominal vagus nerve using sural nerve grafts in canine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbo; Wang, Jun; Luo, Fen; Wang, Zhiming; Wang, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG) and the vagal resection group (VG). The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8-0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis). Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible.

  12. Reconstruction of the abdominal vagus nerve using sural nerve grafts in canine models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently, vagus nerve preservation or reconstruction of vagus has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing the severed vagal trunk using an autologous sural nerve graft. METHODS: Ten adult Beagle dogs were randomly assigned to two groups of five, the nerve grafting group (TG and the vagal resection group (VG. The gastric secretion and emptying functions in both groups were assessed using Hollander insulin and acetaminophen tests before surgery and three months after surgery. All dogs underwent laparotomy under general anesthesia. In TG group, latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in a vagal trunk were measured, and then nerves of 4 cm long were cut from the abdominal anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Two segments of autologous sural nerve were collected for performing end-to-end anastomoses with the cut ends of vagal trunk (8-0 nylon suture, 3 sutures for each anastomosis. Dogs in VG group only underwent partial resections of the anterior and posterior vagal trunks. Laparotomy was performed in dogs of TG group, and latency and conduction velocity of the action potential in their vagal trunks were measured. The grafted nerve segment was removed, and stained with anti-neurofilament protein and toluidine blue. RESULTS: Latency of the action potential in the vagal trunk was longer after surgery than before surgery in TG group, while the conduction velocity was lower after surgery. The gastric secretion and emptying functions were weaker after surgery in dogs of both groups, but in TG group they were significantly better than in VG group. Anti-neurofilament protein staining and toluidine blue staining showed there were nerve fibers crossing the anastomosis of the vagus and sural nerves in dogs of TG group. CONCLUSION: Reconstruction of the vagus nerve using the sural nerve is technically feasible.

  13. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  14. Segmentation: Identification of consumer segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg, Esben

    2005-01-01

    It is very common to categorise people, especially in the advertising business. Also traditional marketing theory has taken in consumer segments as a favorite topic. Segmentation is closely related to the broader concept of classification. From a historical point of view, classification has its...... origin in other sciences as for example biology, anthropology etc. From an economic point of view, it is called segmentation when specific scientific techniques are used to classify consumers to different characteristic groupings. What is the purpose of segmentation? For example, to be able to obtain...... a basic understanding of grouping people. Advertising agencies may use segmentation totarget advertisements, while food companies may usesegmentation to develop products to various groups of consumers. MAPP has for example investigated the positioning of fish in relation to other food products...

  15. Segmental Vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geel, Nanja; Speeckaert, Reinhart

    2017-04-01

    Segmental vitiligo is characterized by its early onset, rapid stabilization, and unilateral distribution. Recent evidence suggests that segmental and nonsegmental vitiligo could represent variants of the same disease spectrum. Observational studies with respect to its distribution pattern point to a possible role of cutaneous mosaicism, whereas the original stated dermatomal distribution seems to be a misnomer. Although the exact pathogenic mechanism behind the melanocyte destruction is still unknown, increasing evidence has been published on the autoimmune/inflammatory theory of segmental vitiligo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Peripheral nerve function during hyperglycemic clamping in insulin-dependent diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, S H; Ejlertsen, B; Gjessing, H

    1989-01-01

    The influence of hyperglycemia on peripheral nerve function was studied in 9 patients with long-term insulin-dependent diabetes. Blood glucose concentration was raised 13.5 +/- 0.5 mmol/l (mean +/- SEM) within 15 min and kept approximately 15 mmol/l over basal level for 120 min by intravenous...... glucose infusion. Hyperglycemia was accompanied by increased plasma osmolality. Sensory and motor nerve conduction and distal motor latency in the ulnar nerve were determined before, immediately after induction of hyperglycemia, and again after 120 min hyperglycemia. Distal (5th finger - wrist......) and proximal (wrist - elbow) sensory nerve conduction showed an insignificant increase as hyperglycemia was induced. During hyperglycemia mean distal sensory conduction decreased from 53.1 m/s to 50.4 m/s (P less than 0.05) and mean proximal sensory conduction decreased from 56.0 m/s to 54.2 m/s (P less than 0...

  17. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  18. Functional recovery of denervated skeletal muscle with sensory or mixed nerve protection: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Tian Li

    Full Text Available Functional recovery is usually poor following peripheral nerve injury when reinnervation is delayed. Early innervation by sensory nerve has been indicated to prevent atrophy of the denervated muscle. It is hypothesized that early protection with sensory axons is adequate to improve functional recovery of skeletal muscle following prolonged denervation of mixed nerve injury. In this study, four groups of rats received surgical denervation of the tibial nerve. The proximal and distal stumps of the tibial nerve were ligated in all animals except for those in the immediate repair group. The experimental groups underwent denervation with nerve protection of peroneal nerve (mixed protection or sural nerve (sensory protection. The experimental and unprotected groups had a stage II surgery in which the trimmed proximal and distal tibial nerve stumps were sutured together. After 3 months of recovery, electrophysiological, histological and morphometric parameters were assessed. It was detected that the significant muscle atrophy and a good preserved structure of the muscle were observed in the unprotected and protective experimental groups, respectively. Significantly fewer numbers of regenerated myelinated axons were observed in the sensory-protected group. Enhanced recovery in the mixed protection group was indicated by the results of the muscle contraction force tests, regenerated myelinated fiber, and the results of the histological analysis. Our results suggest that early axons protection by mixed nerve may complement sensory axons which are required for promoting functional recovery of the denervated muscle natively innervated by mixed nerve.

  19. Randomized comparison of distal protection versus conventional treatment in primary percutaneous coronary intervention: the drug elution and distal protection in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (DEDICATION) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelbaek, Henning; Terkelsen, Christian J; Helqvist, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of distal protection during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in native coronary vessels. BACKGROUND: Embolization of material from the infarct-related lesion during PCI may...

  20. Distal protection in cardiovascular medicine: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Onn Akbar; Bhindi, Ravinay; McMahon, Aisling C; Brieger, David; Kritharides, Leonard; Lowe, Harry C

    2006-08-01

    Iatrogenic and spontaneous downstream microembolization of atheromatous material is increasingly recognized as a source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Devising ways of reducing this distal embolization using a variety of mechanical means--distal protection--is currently under intense and diverse investigation. This review therefore summarizes the present status of distal protection. It examines the problem of distal embolization, describes the available distal protection devices, reviews those areas of cardiovascular medicine where distal protection devices are being investigated, and discusses potential future developments.

  1. Anatomical Basis and Clinical Application of Synovial Flaps in the Wrist and Distal Forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colen, David L; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Colen, Lawrence B

    2017-05-01

    Neuropathic symptoms after median nerve repair at the wrist or secondary to refractory carpal tunnel syndrome may become debilitating. These symptoms develop because of perineural adhesions, intraneural fibrosis, and fixation of the nerve to the transverse carpal ligament after surgery, and often require neurolysis. Interposition of vascularized soft tissue over the median nerve at the time of neurolysis prevents recurrence of such adhesions. The synovial flap, fashioned from the synovial lining of the flexor tendon sheath, is an ideal tissue for this purpose. Previous authors have described the surgical technique of the synovial flap, but the anatomical basis and design of the flap have not been previously discussed. Twenty fresh cadaver upper extremities were injected with Microfil to analyze the arterial anatomy, flap dimensions, and arc of rotation of the flexor tendon synovium mobilized as a flap suitable for coverage of the median nerve at the wrist. The authors determined that both radial and ulnar-based flaps are clinically useful for providing coverage in the wrist and distal forearm. This flap was used in 18 patients with complicated median nerve lesions in this region. All patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Of 13 patients treated for posttraumatic median nerve neuromas, all but two had significant resolution of symptoms. When used as a vascularized flap, the flexor tendon synovium provides adequate protection of the median nerve. Flap dimensions and vascularity of this tissue make it an ideal local flap option when performing reoperative surgery on the median nerve.

  2. Salvage of cervical motor radiculopathy using peripheral nerve transfer reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Fardad T; Hossain, Taushaba; Miller, Caroline; Power, Dominic M

    2018-05-10

    Motor nerve transfer surgery involves re-innervation of important distal muscles using either an expendable motor branch or a fascicle from an adjacent functioning nerve. This technique is established as part of the reconstructive algorithm for traumatic brachial plexus injuries. The reproducible outcomes of motor nerve transfer surgery have resulted in exploration of the application of this technique to other paralysing conditions. The objective of this study is to report feasibility and increase awareness about nerve transfer as a method of improving upper limb function in patients with cervical motor radiculopathy of different aetiology. In this case series we report 3 cases with different modes of injury to the spinal nerve roots with significant and residual motor radiculopathy that have been successfully treated with nerve transfer surgery with good functional outcomes. The cases involved iatrogenic nerve root injury, tumour related root compression and degenerative root compression. Nerve transfer surgery may offer reliable reconstruction for paralysis when there has been no recovery following a period of conservative management. However the optimum timing of nerve transfer intervention is not yet identified for patients with motor radiculopathy.

  3. Changes in contralateral protein metabolism following unilateral sciatic nerve section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menendez, J.A.; Cubas, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in nerve biochemistry, anatomy, and function following injuries to the contralateral nerve have been repeatedly reported, though their significance is unknown. The most likely mechanisms for their development are either substances carried by axoplasmic flow or electrically transmitted signals. This study analyzes which mechanism underlies the development of a contralateral change in protein metabolism. The incorporation of labelled amino acids (AA) into proteins of both sciatic nerves was assessed by liquid scintillation after an unilateral section. AA were offered locally for 30 min to the distal stump of the sectioned nerves and at homologous levels of the intact contralateral nerves. At various times, from 1 to 24 h, both sciatic nerves were removed and the proteins extracted with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). An increase in incorporation was found in both nerves 14-24 h after section. No difference existed between sectioned and intact nerves, which is consistent with the contralateral effect. Lidocaine, but not colchicine, when applied previously to the nerves midway between the sectioning site and the spinal cord, inhibited the contralateral increase in AA incorporation. It is concluded that electrical signals, crossing through the spinal cord, are responsible for the development of the contralateral effect. Both the nature of the proteins and the significance of the contralateral effect are matters for speculation

  4. The role of neurotrophic factors in nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Tessa

    2009-02-01

    This review considers the 2 sources of neurotrophic factors in the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the neurons and the nonneuronal cells in the denervated distal nerve stumps, and their role in axon regeneration. Morphological assessment of regenerative success in response to administration of exogenous growth factors after nerve injury and repair has indicated a role of the endogenous neurotrophic factors from Schwann cells in the distal nerve stump. However, the increased number of axons may reflect more neurons regenerating their axons and/or increased numbers of axon sprouts from the same number of neurons. Using fluorescent dyes to count neurons that regenerated their axons across a suture site and into distal nerve stumps, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) were found not to increase the number of neurons that regenerated their axons after immediate nerve repair. Nevertheless, the factors did reverse the deleterious effect of delayed nerve repair, indicating that the axons that regenerate into the distal nerve stump normally have access to sufficient levels of endogenous neurotrophic factors to sustain their regeneration, while neurons that do not have access to these factors require exogenous factors to sustain axon regeneration. Neurons upregulate neurotrophic factors after axotomy. The upregulation is normally slow, beginning after 7 days and occurring in association with a protracted period of axonal regeneration in which axons grow out from the proximal nerve stump across a suture site over a period of 1 month in rodents. This staggered axon regeneration across the suture site is accelerated by a 1-hour period of low-frequency electrical stimulation that simultaneously accelerates the expression of BDNF and its trkB receptor in the neurons. Elevation of the level of BDNF after 2 days to > 3 times that found in unstimulated neurons was accompanied by elevation of the level of cAMP and followed by

  5. Anatomical aspects of the nerves of the leg and foot of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla, Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Although distal stifle joint nerve distribution has been well established in domestic animals, this approach is scarcely reported in wild animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe the nerves of the leg and foot of Myrmecophaga tridactyla with emphasis on their ramification, distribution, topography and territory of innervation. For this purpose, six adult cadavers fixed and preserved in 10% formalin solution were used. The nerves of the leg and foot of the M. tridactyla were the saphenous nerve (femoral nerve branch, fibular and tibial nerves and lateral sural cutaneous nerve (branches of the sciatic nerve and caudal sural cutaneous nerve (tibial nerve branch. The saphenous nerve branches to the skin, the craniomedial surface of the leg, the medial surface of the tarsal and metatarsal regions and the dorsomedial surface of the digits I and II (100% of cases, III (50% of cases and IV (25% of cases. The lateral sural cutaneous nerve innervates the skin of the craniolateral region of the knee and leg. The fibular nerve innervates the flexor and extensor muscles of the tarsal region of the digits and skin of the craniolateral surface of the leg and dorsolateral surface of the foot. The tibial nerve innervates the extensor muscles of the tarsal joint and flexor, adductor and abductor muscles of the digits and the skin of the plantar surface. The caudal sural cutaneous nerve innervates the skin of the caudal surface of the leg. The nerves responsible for the leg and foot innervation were the same as reported in domestic and wild animals, but with some differences, such as the more distal division of the common fibular nerve, the absence of dorsal metatarsal branches of the deep fibular nerve and a greater involvement of the saphenous nerve in the digital innervation with branches to the digits III and IV, in addition to digits I and II.

  6. Facial nerve palsy associated with a cystic lesion of the temporal bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Na Hyun; Shin, Seung-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Facial nerve palsy results in the loss of facial expression and is most commonly caused by a benign, self-limiting inflammatory condition known as Bell palsy. However, there are other conditions that may cause facial paralysis, such as neoplastic conditions of the facial nerve, traumatic nerve injury, and temporal bone lesions. We present a case of facial nerve palsy concurrent with a benign cystic lesion of the temporal bone, adjacent to the tympanic segment of the facial nerve. The patient's symptoms subsided after facial nerve decompression via a transmastoid approach.

  7. Peripheral nerve regeneration with conduits: use of vein tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabongi, Rodrigo Guerra; Fernandes, Marcela; Dos Santos, João Baptista Gomes

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a challenge to modern medicine due to the complexity of the neurobiological nerve regenerating process. There is a greater challenge when the transected nerve ends are not amenable to primary end-to-end tensionless neurorraphy. When facing a segmental nerve defect, great effort has been made to develop an alternative to the autologous nerve graft in order to circumvent morbidity at donor site, such as neuroma formation, scarring and permanent loss of function. Tubolization techniques have been developed to bridge nerve gaps and have been extensively studied in numerous experimental and clinical trials. The use of a conduit intends to act as a vehicle for moderation and modulation of the cellular and molecular ambience for nerve regeneration. Among several conduits, vein tubes were validated for clinical application with improving outcomes over the years. This article aims to address the investigation and treatment of segmental nerve injury and draw the current panorama on the use of vein tubes as an autogenous nerve conduit.

  8. Peripheral nerve regeneration with conduits: use of vein tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Guerra Sabongi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of peripheral nerve injuries remains a challenge to modern medicine due to the complexity of the neurobiological nerve regenerating process. There is a greater challenge when the transected nerve ends are not amenable to primary end-to-end tensionless neurorraphy. When facing a segmental nerve defect, great effort has been made to develop an alternative to the autologous nerve graft in order to circumvent morbidity at donor site, such as neuroma formation, scarring and permanent loss of function. Tubolization techniques have been developed to bridge nerve gaps and have been extensively studied in numerous experimental and clinical trials. The use of a conduit intends to act as a vehicle for moderation and modulation of the cellular and molecular ambience for nerve regeneration. Among several conduits, vein tubes were validated for clinical application with improving outcomes over the years. This article aims to address the investigation and treatment of segmental nerve injury and draw the current panorama on the use of vein tubes as an autogenous nerve conduit.

  9. Small vestibular schwannomas presenting with facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espahbodi, Mana; Carlson, Matthew L; Fang, Te-Yung; Thompson, Reid C; Haynes, David S

    2014-06-01

    To describe the surgical management and convalescence of two patients presenting with severe facial nerve weakness associated with small intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (VS). Retrospective review. Two adult female patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms and subacute facial nerve paralysis (House-Brackmann Grade IV and V). In both cases, post-contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing lesion within the internal auditory canal without lateral extension beyond the fundus. Translabyrinthine exploration demonstrated vestibular nerve origin of tumor, extrinsic to the facial nerve, and frozen section pathology confirmed schwannoma. Gross total tumor resection with VIIth cranial nerve preservation and decompression of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was performed. Both patients recovered full motor function between 6 and 8 months after surgery. Although rare, small VS may cause severe facial neuropathy, mimicking the presentation of facial nerve schwannomas and other less common pathologies. In the absence of labyrinthine extension on MRI, surgical exploration is the only reliable means of establishing a diagnosis. In the case of confirmed VS, early gross total resection with facial nerve preservation and labyrinthine segment decompression may afford full motor recovery-an outcome that cannot be achieved with facial nerve grafting.

  10. Biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging method for peripheral nerve injury: regeneration law of nerve fibers in the conduit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-xun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical effects of 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of the biological conduit to repair peripheral nerve injury are better than in the traditional epineurium suture, so it is possible to replace the epineurium suture in the treatment of peripheral nerve injury. This study sought to identify the regeneration law of nerve fibers in the biological conduit. A nerve regeneration chamber was constructed in models of sciatic nerve injury using 2-mm small gap sleeve bridging of a biodegradable biological conduit. The results showed that the biological conduit had good histocompatibility. Tissue and cell apoptosis in the conduit apparently lessened, and regenerating nerve fibers were common. The degeneration regeneration law of Schwann cells and axons in the conduit was quite different from that in traditional epineurium suture. During the prime period for nerve fiber regeneration (2-8 weeks, the number of Schwann cells and nerve fibers was higher in both proximal and distal ends, and the effects of the small gap sleeve bridging method were better than those of the traditional epineurium suture. The above results provide an objective and reliable theoretical basis for the clinical application of the biological conduit small gap sleeve bridging method to repair peripheral nerve injury.

  11. Tissue-engineered rhesus monkey nerve grafts for the repair of long ulnar nerve defects: similar outcomes to autologous nerve grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-qing Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acellular nerve allografts can help preserve normal nerve structure and extracellular matrix composition. These allografts have low immunogenicity and are more readily available than autologous nerves for the repair of long-segment peripheral nerve defects. In this study, we repaired a 40-mm ulnar nerve defect in rhesus monkeys with tissue-engineered peripheral nerve, and compared the outcome with that of autograft. The graft was prepared using a chemical extract from adult rhesus monkeys and seeded with allogeneic Schwann cells. Pathomorphology, electromyogram and immunohistochemistry findings revealed the absence of palmar erosion or ulcers, and that the morphology and elasticity of the hypothenar eminence were normal 5 months postoperatively. There were no significant differences in the mean peak compound muscle action potential, the mean nerve conduction velocity, or the number of neurofilaments between the experimental and control groups. However, outcome was significantly better in the experimental group than in the blank group. These findings suggest that chemically extracted allogeneic nerve seeded with autologous Schwann cells can repair 40-mm ulnar nerve defects in the rhesus monkey. The outcomes are similar to those obtained with autologous nerve graft.

  12. Tissue-engineered rhesus monkey nerve gratfs for the repair of long ulnar nerve defects:similar outcomes to autologous nerve gratfs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-qing Jiang; Jun Hu; Jian-ping Xiang; Jia-kai Zhu; Xiao-lin Liu; Peng Luo

    2016-01-01

    Acellular nerve allogratfs can help preserve normal nerve structure and extracellular matrix composition. These allogratfs have low immu-nogenicity and are more readily available than autologous nerves for the repair of long-segment peripheral nerve defects. In this study, we repaired a 40-mm ulnar nerve defect in rhesus monkeys with tissue-engineered peripheral nerve, and compared the outcome with that of autogratf. The gratf was prepared using a chemical extract from adult rhesus monkeys and seeded with allogeneic Schwann cells. Pathomo-rphology, electromyogram and immunohistochemistry ifndings revealed the absence of palmar erosion or ulcers, and that the morphology and elasticity of the hypothenar eminence were normal 5 months postoperatively. There were no signiifcant differences in the mean peak compound muscle action potential, the mean nerve conduction velocity, or the number of neuroiflaments between the experimental and control groups. However, outcome was signiifcantly better in the experimental group than in the blank group. These ifndings suggest that chemically extracted allogeneic nerve seeded with autologous Schwann cells can repair 40-mm ulnar nerve defects in the rhesus monkey. The outcomes are similar to those obtained with autologous nerve gratf.

  13. Nerve regeneration with aid of nanotechnology and cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghati, Tina; Yang, Shi Yu; Mosahebi, Afshin; Alavijeh, Mohammad S; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing nerve defects with large gaps remains one of the most operative challenges for surgeons. Incomplete recovery from peripheral nerve injuries can produce a diversity of negative outcomes, including numbness, impairment of sensory or motor function, possibility of developing chronic pain, and devastating permanent disability. In the last few years, numerous microsurgical techniques, such as coaptation, nerve autograft, and different biological or polymeric nerve conduits, have been developed to reconstruct a long segment of damaged peripheral nerve. A few of these techniques are promising and have become popular among surgeons. Advancements in the field of tissue engineering have led to development of synthetic nerve conduits as an alternative for the nerve autograft technique, which is the current practice to bridge nerve defects with gaps larger than 30 mm. However, to date, despite significant progress in this field, no material has been found to be an ideal alternative to the nerve autograft. This article briefly reviews major up-to-date published studies using different materials as an alternative to the nerve autograft to bridge peripheral nerve gaps in an attempt to assess their ability to support and enhance nerve regeneration and their prospective drawbacks, and also highlights the promising hope for nerve regeneration with the next generation of nerve conduits, which has been significantly enhanced with the tissue engineering approach, especially with the aid of nanotechnology in development of the three-dimensional scaffold. The goal is to determine potential alternatives for nerve regeneration and repair that are simply and directly applicable in clinical conditions. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. [Results After Distal Digital Replantation - Is It Worth The Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braig, David; Thiele, Jan R; Penna, Vincenzo; Stark, G Björn; Eisenhardt, Steffen U

    2017-02-01

    There are only relative indications for distal digital replantation in zones 1 and 2 according to Tamai. In contrast to primary closure for fingertip amputations, replantation is a complex procedure that requires skills in supermicrosurgical techniques, as vessels with diameters between 0.3-0.8 mm are connected. In addition the time spent in hospital and the time off from work are longer. Distal digital replantation is thus only indicated, if the expected functional and aesthetic benefits surmount those of primary closure. We retrospectively analysed all fingertip amputations in zone 1 and 2 according to Tamai between 9/2009 and 7/2014 where we attempted distal digital replantation. The success of replantation, wound healing and functional results were evaluated according to Yamano. We performed 11 distal digital replantations in the study period. There were 6 total amputations, 4 subtotal amputations and 1 avulsion of the digital pulp. Revascularisation with long-term reattachment of the amputated tissues was possible in 8 cases (73%). In 3 cases (27%) secondary amputation closure was necessary. The mean operating time was 3 h 56 min. 6 patients, which had a successful replantation, were available for follow-up examinations after a mean period of 19 months. 5 patients were satisfied with the result and would again prefer replantation over primary amputation closure. 4 patients reported a good function of the replanted digits and did not complain about any limitations in their use. 2 patients complained about restricted function. All patients could return to their previous places of employment and were free of pain. Of the 12 affected digital nerves 11 nerves had a 2-point discrimination (2-PD) of ≤15 mm, 3 of them had a 2-PD between 7 and 10 mm and 4 of them of replanted digits and nail deformities in 2 patients. Distal digital replantation is complex and technically challenging. It leads to high patient satisfaction with only minimal functional

  15. Distal triceps injuries (including snapping triceps): A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttlewood, Kimberley; Beazley, James; Smith, Christopher D

    2017-06-18

    To review current literature on types of distal triceps injury and determine diagnosis and appropriate management. We performed a systematic review in PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE using the terms distal triceps tears and snapping triceps on the 10 th January 2017. We excluded all animal, review, foreign language and repeat papers. We reviewed all papers for relevance and of the papers left we were able to establish the types of distal triceps injury, how these injuries are diagnosed and investigated and the types of management of these injuries including surgical. The results are then presented in a review paper format. Three hundred and seventy-nine papers were identified of which 65 were relevant to distal triceps injuries. After exclusion we had 47 appropriate papers. The papers highlighted 2 main distal triceps injuries: Distal triceps tears and snapping triceps. Triceps tear are more common in males than females occurring in the 4 th -5 th decade of life and often due to a direct trauma but are also strongly associated with weightlifting and American football. The tears are diagnosed by history and clinically with a palpable gap. Diagnosis can be confirmed with the use of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment depends on type of tear. Partial tears can be treated conservatively with bracing and physio whereas acute tears need repair either open or arthroscopic using suture anchor or bone tunnel techniques with similar success. Chronic tears often need augmenting with tendon allograft or autograft. Snapping triceps are also seen more in men than women but at a mean age of 32 years. They are characterized by a snapping sensation mostly medially and can be associated with ulna nerve subluxation and ulna nerve symptoms. US is the diagnostic modality of choice due to its dynamic nature and to differentiate between snapping triceps tendon or ulna nerve. Treatment is conservative initially with activity avoidance and if that fails surgical

  16. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Etiology and mechanisms of ulnar and median forearm nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puzović Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacgraund/Aim. Most often injuries of brachial plexus and its branches disable the injured from using their arms and/or hands. The aim of this study was to investigate the etiology and mechanisms of median and ulnar forearm nerves injuries. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included 99 patients surgically treated in the Clinic of Neurosurgery, Clinical Center of Serbia, from January 1st, 2000 to December 31st, 2010. All data are obtained from the patients' histories. Results. The majority of the injured patients were male, 81 (81.8%, while only 18 (18.2% were females, both mainly with nerve injuries of the distal forearm - 75 (75.6%. Two injury mechanisms were present, transection in 85 patients and traction and contusion in 14 of the patients. The most frequent etiological factor of nerve injuries was cutting, in 61 of the patients. Nerve injuries are often associated with other injuries. In the studied patients there were 22 vascular injuries, 33 muscle and tendon injuries and 20 bone fractures. Conclusion. The majority of those patients with peripheral nerve injuries are represented in the working age population, which is a major socioeconomic problem. In our study 66 out of 99 patients were between 17 and 40 years old, in the most productive age. The fact that the majority of patients had nerve injuries of the distal forearm and that they are operated within the first 6 months after injury, promises them good functional prognosis.

  18. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    hydrogel. This indicates return of some feeling to the limb via the fully-configured conduit. Immunohistochemical analysis of the implanted conduits removed from the rats after the four-week implantation period confirmed the presence of myelinated axons within the conduit and distal to the site of implantation, further supporting that the conduit promoted nerve repair over this period of time. This study describes the design considerations and fabrication of a novel multicomponent, multimodal bio-engineered synthetic conduit for peripheral nerve repair.

  19. A novel conduit-based coaptation device for primary nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Riley, D Colton; Kelm, Nathaniel D; Cardwell, Nancy; Pollins, Alonda C; Afshari, Ashkan; Nguyen, Lyly; Dortch, Richard D; Thayer, Wesley P

    2018-06-01

    Conduit-based nerve repairs are commonly used for small nerve gaps, whereas primary repair may be performed if there is no tension on nerve endings. We hypothesize that a conduit-based nerve coaptation device will improve nerve repair outcomes by avoiding sutures at the nerve repair site and utilizing the advantages of a conduit-based repair. The left sciatic nerves of female Sprague-Dawley rats were transected and repaired using a novel conduit-based device. The conduit-based device group was compared to a control group of rats that underwent a standard end-to-end microsurgical repair of the sciatic nerve. Animals underwent behavioral assessments at weekly intervals post-operatively using the sciatic functional index (SFI) test. Animals were sacrificed at four weeks to obtain motor axon counts from immunohistochemistry. A sub-group of animals were sacrificed immediately post repair to obtain MRI images. SFI scores were superior in rats which received conduit-based repairs compared to the control group. Motor axon counts distal to the injury in the device group at four weeks were statistically superior to the control group. MRI tractography was used to demonstrate repair of two nerves using the novel conduit device. A conduit-based nerve coaptation device avoids sutures at the nerve repair site and leads to improved outcomes in a rat model. Conduit-based nerve repair devices have the potential to standardize nerve repairs while improving outcomes.

  20. Anatomic and pathologic features of third cranial nerve disorders according to magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, Y.; Torres, J.; Ramos, M.; Caniego, J.L.; Manzanares, R.; Fresno, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this report is to demonstrate the utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in the diagnosis of disorders involving the third cranial nerves. We have selected MR studies corresponding to patients with an anomaly affecting the third cranial nerves, whether alone or in combination with other cranial nerves. In order to better study the pathology of these cranial nerves, we considered four different segments of the nerves: mesencephalic, cisternal, cavernous and orbital. We present the MR features of the anatomy of the third cranial nerves and the most representative lesions affecting the different intracranial segments: infraction, multiple sclerosis, glioma and cavernoma in the mesencephalon; posterior communicating artery aneurysm, neuritis, neurinomas and meningioma in the cisternal segment; aneurysm of the internal carotid artery, cavernous carotid fistula, metastasis and meningioma in the cavernous sinus and Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in the orbital apex. (Author) 11 refs

  1. Bilateral en-masse distalization of maxillary posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Noorollahian

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce a new method for bilateral distal movement of the entire maxillary posterior segment. Case report: A 17-year-old girl with Class I skeletal malocclusion (end-to-end molar relationships, deviated midline and space deficiency for left maxillary canine was referred for orthodontic treatment. She did not accept maxillary first premolars extraction. A modified Hyrax appliance (Dentaurum Ispringen, Germany was used for bilateral distalization of maxillary posterior teeth simultaneously. Expansion vector was set anteroposteriorly. Posterior legs of Hyrax were welded to first maxillary molar bands. All posterior teeth on each side consolidated with a segment of 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire from the buccal side. Anterior legs of Hyrax were bent into eyelet form and attached to the anterior palate with two mini-screws (2 × 10 mm (Jeil Medical Corporation Seoul, South Korea. Hyrax opening rate was 0.8 mm per month. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to evaluate the extent of distal movement. 3.5-mm distalization of posterior maxillary teeth was achieved in five months. Results: A nearly bodily distal movement without anchorage loss was obtained. Conclusion: The mini-screw-supported modified Hyrax appliance was found to be helpful for achieving en-masse distal movement of maxillary posterior teeth.

  2. Cutaneous somatic and autonomic nerve TDP-43 deposition in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yuting; Liu, Wenxiu; Li, Yifan; Sun, Bo; Li, Yanran; Yang, Fei; Wang, Hongfen; Li, Mao; Cui, Fang; Huang, Xusheng

    2018-05-26

    To evaluate the involvement of the sensory and autonomic nervous system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to determine whether TDP-43/pTDP-43 deposits in skin nerve fibers signify a valuable biomarker for ALS. Eighteen patients with ALS and 18 age- and sex-matched control subjects underwent physical examinations, in addition to donating skin biopsies from the distal leg. The density of epidermal, Meissner's corpuscle (MC), sudomotor, and pilomotor nerve fibers were measured. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the cutaneous somatic and autonomic nerve fiber density and TDP-43/pTDP-43 deposition. Intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD) was reduced in individuals with ALS (P nerve fiber density (SGNFD) (P nerve fiber density (PNFD) (P nerve fibers may indicate an important role in the underlying pathogenesis of ALS. This observation might be used as a potential biomarker for diagnosing ALS.

  3. Laparoscopic radical nephroureterectomy: dilemma of the distal ureter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Jordan R; Matin, Surena F

    2004-03-01

    Laparoscopic nephroureterectomy has recently emerged as a safe, minimally invasive approach to upper tract urothelial cancers. The most controversial and challenging feature of laparoscopic nephroureterectomy is the management of the distal ureter. We review the most common methods of managing the distal ureter, with emphasis on contemporary oncologic outcomes, indications, advantages, and disadvantages. There are currently in excess of five different approaches to the lower ureter. These techniques often combine features of endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open management. They include open excision, a transvesical laparoscopic detachment and ligation technique, laparoscopic stapling of the distal ureter and bladder cuff, the "pluck" technique, and ureteral intussusception. Each technique has distinct advantages and disadvantages, differing not only in technical approach, but oncological principles as well. While the existing published data do not overwhelmingly support one approach over the others, the open approach remains one of the most reliable and oncologically sound procedures. The principles of surgical oncology dictate that a complete, en-bloc resection, with avoidance of tumor seeding, remains the preferred treatment of all urothelial cancers. The classical open technique of securing the distal ureter and bladder cuff achieves this principle and has withstood the test of time. Transvesical laparoscopic detachment and ligation is an oncologically valid approach in patients without bladder tumors, but is limited by technical considerations. The laparoscopic stapling technique maintains a closed system but risks leaving behind ureteral and bladder cuff segments. Both transurethral resection of the ureteral orifice (pluck) and intussusception techniques should be approached with caution, as the potential for tumor seeding exists. Additional long-term comparative outcomes are needed to solve the dilemma of the distal ureter.

  4. MR findings of facial nerve on oblique sagittal MRI using TMJ surface coil: normal vs peripheral facial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Ok; Lee, Myeong Jun; Lee, Chang Joon; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the findings of normal facial nerve, as seen on oblique sagittal MRI using a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) surface coil, and then to evaluate abnormal findings of peripheral facial nerve palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy and 50 normal facial nerves of 36 patients without facial palsy. All underwent oblique sagittal MRI using a T MJ surface coil. We analyzed the course, signal intensity, thickness, location, and degree of enhancement of the facial nerve. According to the angle made by the proximal parotid segment on the axis of the mastoid segment, course was classified as anterior angulation (obtuse and acute, or buckling), straight and posterior angulation. Among 50 normal facial nerves, 24 (48%) were straight, and 23 (46%) demonstrated anterior angulation; 34 (68%) showed iso signal intensity on T1W1. In the group of patients, course on the affected side was either straight (40%) or showed anterior angulation (55%), and signal intensity in 80% of cases was isointense. These findings were similar to those in the normal group, but in patients with post-traumatic or post-operative facial palsy, buckling, of course, appeared. In 12 of 18 facial palsy cases (66.6%) in which contrast materials were administered, a normal facial nerve of the opposite facial canal showed mild enhancement on more than one segment, but on the affected side the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement in all 14 patients with acute facial palsy. Eleven of these (79%) showed fair or marked enhancement on more than one segment, and in 12 (86%), mild enhancement of the proximal parotid segment was noted. Four of six chronic facial palsy cases (66.6%) showed atrophy of the facial nerve. When oblique sagittal MR images are obtained using a TMJ surface coil, enhancement of the proximal parotid segment of the facial nerve and fair or marked enhancement of at least one segment within the facial canal always suggests pathology of

  5. The effect of bioresorbable vascular scaffold implantation on distal coronary endothelial function in dyslipidemic swine with and without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Mieke; Sorop, Oana; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; de Vries, René; van Duin, Richard W B; Peters, Ilona; van Loon, Janine E; de Maat, Moniek P; van Beusekom, Heleen M; van der Giessen, Wim J; Jan Danser, A H; Duncker, Dirk J

    2018-02-01

    We studied the effect of bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) implantation on distal coronary endothelial function, in swine on a high fat diet without (HFD) or with diabetes (DM+HFD). Five DM+HFD and five HFD swine underwent BVS implantation on top of coronary plaques, and were studied six months later. Conduit artery segments >5mm proximal and distal to the scaffold and corresponding segments of non-scaffolded coronary arteries, and segments of small arteries within the flow-territory of scaffolded and non-scaffolded arteries were harvested for in vitro vasoreactivity studies. Conduit segments proximal and distal of the BVS edges showed reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation as compared to control vessels (p≤0.01), with distal segments being most prominently affected(p≤0.01). Endothelial dysfunction was only observed in DM±HFD swine and was principally due to a loss of NO. Endothelium-independent vasodilation and vasoconstriction were unaffected. Surprisingly, segments from the microcirculation distal to the BVS showed enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation (pswine, and did not appear to be either NO- or EDHF-mediated. Six months of BVS implantation in DM+HFD swine causes NO-mediated endothelial dysfunction in nearby coronary segments, which is accompanied by a, possibly compensatory, increase in endothelial function of the distal microcirculation. Endothelial dysfunction extending into coronary conduit segments beyond the implantation-site, is in agreement with recent reports expressing concern for late scaffold thrombosis and of early BVS failure in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  7. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  8. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  9. Mixed segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Grutt; Bonde, Anders; Aagaard, Morten

    content analysis and audience segmentation in a single-source perspective. The aim is to explain and understand target groups in relation to, on the one hand, emotional response to commercials or other forms of audio-visual communication and, on the other hand, living preferences and personality traits...

  10. Sequential imaging of intraneural sciatic nerve endometriosis provides insight into symptoms of cyclical sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Collins, Mark S; Sandroni, Paola; Cheville, John C; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis of the nerve often remains an elusive diagnosis. We report the first case of intraneural lumbosacral plexus endometriosis with sequential imaging at different phases of the menstrual cycle: during the luteal phase and menstruation. Compared to the first examination, the examination performed during the patient's period revealed the lumbosacral plexus larger and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. The intraneural endometriosis cyst was also larger and showed recent hemorrhage. Additionally, this case represents another example of perineural spread of endometriosis from the uterus to the lumbosacral plexus along the autonomic nerves and then distally to the sciatic nerve and proximally to the spinal nerves.

  11. Spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Morgan; Inaba, Kenji; Cheng, Vincent; Bardes, James M; Lam, Lydia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Matsushima, Kazuhide; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the distal pancreas are infrequent. Universally accepted recommendations about the need for routine splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy do not exist. The aims of this study were to compare outcomes after distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy versus spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, and to define the appropriate patient population for splenic preservation. All patients who underwent distal pancreatectomy (January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2014) were identified from the National Trauma Data Bank. Patients with concomitant splenic injury and those who underwent partial splenectomy were excluded. Demographics, clinical data, procedures, and outcomes were collected. Study groups were defined by surgical procedure: distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy versus spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. Baseline characteristics between groups were compared with univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis was performed with logistic and linear regression to examine differences in outcomes. Over the 8-year study period, 2,223 patients underwent distal pancreatectomy. After excluding 1,381 patients with concomitant splenic injury (62%) and 8 (pancreatectomy and splenectomy, those who underwent spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy were younger (p pancreatectomy (p = 0.017). Complications, mortality, and intensive care unit LOS were not significantly different. In young patients after blunt trauma who are not severely injured, a spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy should be considered to allow for conservation of splenic function and a shorter hospital LOS. In all other patients, the surgeon should not hesitate to remove the spleen with the distal pancreas. Therapy, level IV.

  12. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  13. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  14. Ultrasonographic median nerve cross-section areas measured by 8-point 'inching test' for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome: a correlation of nerve conduction study severity and duration of clinical symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shu-Fang; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chang, Wen-Neng

    2011-01-01

    Incremental palmar stimulation of the median nerve sensory conduction at the wrist, the 'inching test', provides an assessment with reference to segments proximal and distal to the entrapment. This study used high-resolution ultrasonography (US) to measure the median nerve's cross-section areas (CSAs) like the 'inching test' and to correlate with the nerve conduction study (NCS) severity and duration of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Two hundred and twelve (212) 'CTS-hands' from 135 CTS patients and 50 asymptomatic hands ('A-hands') from 25 control individuals were enrolled. The median nerve CSAs were measured at the 8-point marked as i4, i3, i2, i1, w, o1, o2, and 03 in inching test. The NCS severities were classified into six groups based on motor and sensory responses (i.e., negative, minimal, mild, moderate, severe, and extreme). Results of US studies were compared in terms of NCS severity and duration of clinical CTS symptoms. There was significantly larger CSA of the NCS negative group of 'CTS-hands' than of 'A-hands'. The cut-off values of the CSAs of the NCS negative CTS group were 12.5 mm 2 , 11.5 mm 2 and 10.1 mm 2 at the inlet, wrist crease, and outlet, respectively. Of the 212 'CTS-hands', 32 were NCS negative while 40 had minimal, 43 mild, 85 moderate, 10 severe, and two extreme NCS severities. The CSAs of 'CTS-hands' positively correlated with different NCS severities and with the duration of CTS symptoms. By duration of clinical symptoms, 12 of the 212 'CTS-hands' were in the 1 month group; 82 in >1 month and ≤12 months group, and 118 in >12 months group. In 'inching test', segments i4-i3 and i3-i2 were the most common 'positive-site'. The corresponding CSAs measured at i4 and i3, but not at i2, were significantly larger than those measured at points that were not 'positive-site'. Using the 8-point measurement of the median

  15. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keum Won [Pohang Medical Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hae Kwan [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis.

  16. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keum Won; Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul; Cheong, Hae Kwan

    2001-01-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis

  17. Fractures of the distal limb occuring under effective diagnostic anaethesia during equine lameness examination

    OpenAIRE

    Plückhahn, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Fractures of the distal limb occuring during present effect of diagnostic nerve blocks respective intraarticular anesthesia represent rare but severe complications in equine lameness examinations. Due to very poor prognosis most cases in this study resulted in euthanisation of the horse. Several reasons can be claimed to cause fractures. As for the above mentioned fact that total loss of the animal is common due to severity of the fracture, the most important reason is represented by undet...

  18. Acceleration of Regeneration of Large-Gap Peripheral Nerve Injuries Using Acellular Nerve Allografts plus amniotic Fluid Derived Stem Cells (AFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    cells (AFS) to promote and accelerate nerve regeneration . The presence of the AFS will provide support for the regenerating axons without the...plus AFS cells . Cross sections of the distal part of the regenerated nerves were evaluated by light and electronic microscopy. ANA plus AFS group...and myelin thickness in ANA plus AFS cells treated group (Figure 2.1.1), indicating enhanced regenerating ability of the axons. Neuromuscular

  19. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  20. Mapping of the left-sided phrenic nerve course in patients undergoing left atrial catheter ablations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Martin; Wutzler, Alexander; Parwani, Abdul S; Attanasio, Philipp; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation has been associated with left-sided phrenic nerve palsy. Knowledge of the individual left phrenic nerve course therefore is essential to prevent nerve injury. The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of an intraprocedural pace mapping and reconstruction of the left phrenic nerve course and to characterize which anatomical areas are affected. In patients undergoing left atrial catheter ablation, a three-dimensional map of the left atrial anatomical structures was created. The left-sided phrenic nerve course was determined by high-output pace mapping and reconstructed in the map. In this study, 40 patients with atrial fibrillation or atrial tachycardias were included. Left phrenic nerve capture was observed in 23 (57.5%) patients. Phrenic nerve was captured in 22 (55%) patients inside the left atrial appendage, in 22 (55%) in distal parts, in 21 (53%) in medial parts, and in two (5%) in ostial parts of the appendage. In three (7.5%) patients, capture was found in the distal coronary sinus and in one (2.5%) patient in the left atrium near the left atrial appendage ostium. Ablation target was changed due to direct spatial relationship to the phrenic nerve in three (7.5%) patients. No phrenic nerve palsy was observed. Left-sided phrenic nerve capture was found inside and around the left atrial appendage in the majority of patients and additionally in the distal coronary sinus. Phrenic nerve mapping and reconstruction can easily be performed and should be considered prior catheter ablations in potential affected areas. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Long-term outcome after drug-eluting versus bare-metal stent implantation in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction: 3-year follow-up of the randomized DEDICATION (Drug Elution and Distal Protection in Acute Myocardial Infarction) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Anne; Kelbaek, Henning; Thuesen, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare long-term clinical outcomes after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI).......The purpose of this study was to compare long-term clinical outcomes after implantation of drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)....

  2. End-to-side nerve neurorrhaphy: critical appraisal of experimental and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, E; Lauretti, L; Tufo, T; D'Ercole, M; Ciampini, A; Doglietto, F

    2007-01-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy (ESN) or terminolateral neurorraphy consists of connecting the distal stump of a transected nerve, named the recipient nerve, to the side of an intact adjacent nerve, named the donor nerve, "in which only an epineurial window is performed". This procedure was reintroduced in 1994 by Viterbo, who presented a report on an experimental study in rats. Several experimental and clinical studies followed this report with various and sometimes conflicting results. In this paper we present a review of the pertinent literature. Our personal experience using a sort of end-to-side nerve anastomosis, in which the donor nerve is partially transected, is also presented and compared with ESN as defined above. When the proximal nerve stump of a transected nerve is not available, ESN, which is claimed to permit anatomic and functional preservation of the donor nerve, seems an attractive technique, though yet not proven to be effective. Deliberate axotomy of the donor nerve yields results that are proportional to the entity of axotomy, but such technique, though resembling ESN, is an end-to-end neurorrhaphy. Neither experimental or clinical evidence support liberalizing the clinical use of ESN, a procedure with only an epineurial window in the donor nerve and without deliberate axotomy. Much more experimental investigation needs to be done to explain the ability of normal, intact nerves to sprout laterally. Such procedure appears justified only in an investigational setting.

  3. Treatment of soft-tissue loss with nerve defect in the finger using the boomerang nerve flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    This study reports simultaneous repair of soft-tissue loss and proper digital nerve defect in the finger using a boomerang nerve flap including nerve graft from the dorsal branch of the proper digital nerve. From July of 2007 to May of 2010, the flap was used in 17 fingers in 17 patients. The injured fingers included five index, seven long, and five ring fingers. The mean soft-tissue loss was 2.5 × 1.9 cm. The mean flap size was 2.8 × 2.1 cm. Proper digital nerve defects were reconstructed using nerve graft harvested from the dorsal branch of the adjacent finger's proper digital nerve. The average nerve graft length was 2.5 cm. The comparison group included 32 patients treated using a cross-finger flap and a secondary free nerve graft. In the study group, 15 flaps survived completely. Partial necrosis at the distal edge of the flap occurred in two cases. At a mean follow-up of 22 months, the average static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test results on the pulp of the reconstructed finger were 7.5 mm and 3.86, respectively. In the comparison group, the results were 9.3 mm and 3.91, respectively. The study group presented better discriminatory sensation on the pulp and milder pain and cold intolerance in the reconstructed finger. The boomerang nerve flap is useful and reliable for reconstructing complicated finger damage involving soft-tissue loss and nerve defect, especially in difficult anatomical regions. Therapeutic, II.

  4. Phrenic nerve neurotization utilizing the spinal accessory nerve: technical note with potential application in patients with high cervical quadriplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Pearson, Blake; Loukas, Marios; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oakes, W Jerry

    2008-11-01

    High cervical quadriplegia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Artificial respiration in these patients carries significant long-term risks such as infection, atelectasis, and respiratory failure. As phrenic nerve pacing has been proven to free many of these patients from ventilatory dependency, we hypothesized that neurotization of the phrenic nerve with the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) may offer one potential alternative to phrenic nerve stimulation via pacing and may be more efficacious and longer lasting without the complications of an implantable device. Ten cadavers (20 sides) underwent exposure of the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle. The SAN was split into anterior and posterior halves and the anterior half transposed to the ipsilateral phrenic nerve as it crossed the anterior scalene muscle. The mean distance between the cervical phrenic nerve and the SAN in the posterior cervical triangle was 2.5 cm proximally, 4 cm at a midpoint, and 6 cm distally. The range for these measurements was 2 to 4 cm, 3.5 to 5 cm, and 4 to 8.5 cm, respectively. The mean excess length of SAN available after transposition to the more anteromedially placed phrenic nerve was 5 cm (range 4 to 6.5 cm). The mean diameter of these regional parts of the spinal accessory and phrenic nerves was 2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found for measurements between sides. To our knowledge, using the SAN for neurotization to the phrenic nerve for potential use in patients with spinal cord injury has not been previously explored. Following clinical trials, these data may provide a mechanism for self stimulation of the diaphragm and obviate phrenic nerve pacing in patients with high cervical quadriplegia. Our study found that such a maneuver is technically feasible in the cadaver.

  5. Selective reinnervation: a comparison of recovery following microsuture and conduit nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, P J; Bain, J R; Mackinnon, S E; Makino, A P; Hunter, D A

    1991-09-20

    Selective reinnervation was studied by comparing the regeneration across a conventional neurorraphy versus a conduit nerve repair. Lewis rats underwent right sciatic nerve transection followed by one of four different nerve repairs (n = 8/group). In groups I and II a conventional neurorraphy was performed and in groups III and IV the proximal and distal stumps were coapted by use of a silicone conduit with an interstump gap of 5 mm. The proximal and distal stumps in groups I and III were aligned anatomically correct and the proximal stump was rotated 180 degrees in groups II and IV (i.e. proximal peroneal nerve opposite the distal tibial nerve and the proximal tibial nerve opposite the distal peroneal nerve). By 14 weeks, there was an equivalent, but incomplete return in sciatic function index (SFI) in groups I, III, and IV as measured by walking track analysis. However, the SFI became unmeasurable by 6 weeks in all group II animals. At 14 weeks, the percent innervation of the tibialis anterior and medial gastronemius muscles by the peroneal and tibial nerves respectively was estimated by selective compound muscle action potential amplitude recordings. When fascicular alignment was reversed, there was greater tibial (P = 0.02) and lesser peroneal (P = 0.005) innervation of the gastrocnemius muscle in the conduit (group IV) versus the neurorraphy (group II) group. This suggests that the gastrocnemius muscle may be selectively reinnervated by the tibial nerve. However, there was no evidence of selective reinnervation of the tibialis anterior muscle. Despite these differences, the functional recovery in both conduit repair groups (III and IV) was equivalent to a correctly aligned microsuture repair (group I) and superior to that in the incorrectly aligned microsuture repair (group II).

  6. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  7. Augmenting nerve regeneration with electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, T; Brushart, T M; Chan, K M

    2008-12-01

    Poor functional recovery after peripheral nerve injury is generally attributed to irreversible target atrophy. In rats, we addressed the functional outcomes of prolonged neuronal separation from targets (chronic axotomy for up to 1 year) and atrophy of Schwann cells (SCs) in distal nerve stumps, and whether electrical stimulation (ES) accelerates axon regeneration. In carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients with severe axon degeneration and release surgery, we asked whether ES accelerates muscle reinnervation. Reinnervated motor unit (MUs) and regenerating neuron numbers were counted electrophysiologically and with dye-labeling after chronic axotomy, chronic SC denervation and after immediate nerve repair with and without trains of 20 Hz ES for 1 hour to 2 weeks in rats and in CTS patients. Chronic axotomy reduced regenerative capacity to 67% and was alleviated by exogenous growth factors. Reduced regeneration to approximately 10% by SC denervation atrophy was ameliorated by forskolin and transforming growth factor-beta SC reactivation. ES (1 h) accelerated axon outgrowth across the suture site in association with elevated neuronal neurotrophic factor and receptors and in patients, promoted the full reinnervation of thenar muscles in contrast to a non-significant increase in MU numbers in the control group. The rate limiting process of axon outgrowth, progressive deterioration of both neuronal growth capacity and SC support, but not irreversible target atrophy, account for observed poor functional recovery after nerve injury. Brief ES accelerates axon outgrowth and target muscle reinnervation in animals and humans, opening the way to future clinical application to promote functional recovery.

  8. Ultrasound imaging accurately identifies the intercostobrachial nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed K. Thallaj

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To test the hypothesis that identification and blockade of the intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN can be achieved under ultrasound (US guidance using a small volume of local anesthetic. Methods: Twenty-eight adult male volunteers were examined at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from November 2012 to September 2013. Intercostobrachial nerve blockade was performed using one ml of 2% lidocaine under US guidance. A sensory map of the blocked area was developed relative to the medial aspect of the humeral head. Results: The ICBN appears as a hyper-echoic structure. The nerve diameter was 2.3±0.28 mm, and the depth was 9±0.28 mm. The measurements of the sensory-blocked area relative to the medial aspect of the humeral head were as follows: 6.3±1.6 cm anteriorly; 6.2±2.9 cm posteriorly; 9.4±2.9 cm proximally; and 9.2±4.4 cm distally. Intercostobrachial nerve blockade using one ml of local anesthetic was successful in all cases. Conclusion: The present study described the sonographic anatomical details of the ICBN and its sensory distribution to successfully perform selective US-guided ICBN blockade.

  9. Comparison of four different nerve conduction techniques of the superficial fibular sensory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarian, Mathew R; Condie, Nathan C; Austin, Erica A; Mccausland, Katie E; Andary, Michael T; Sylvain, James R; Mull, Iian R; Zemper, Eric D; Jannausch, Mary L

    2017-09-01

    There are many different nerve conduction study (NCS) techniques to study the superficial fibular sensory nerve (SFSN). We present reference distal latency values and comparative data regarding 4 different NCS for the SFSN. Four different NCS techniques, Spartan technique, Izzo techniques (medial and intermediate dorsal cutaneous branches), and Daube technique, were performed on (114) healthy volunteers. A total of 108 subjects with 164 legs were included. The mean latency of the Spartan technique was longest (3.9 ± 0.3 ms) while the Daube technique was the shortest (3.6 ± 0.7 ms). The mean amplitude of the Daube technique displayed the highest (15.2 ± 8.2 μV) with the Spartan technique having the lowest (8.7 ± 4.2 μV). Among the absent sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs), the Spartan technique was absent only twice (1.2%) and the Izzo Medial technique was absent more than the other techniques (2.9%). All 4 techniques were reliable methods for obtaining the superficial fibular nerve SNAP, present in 95% of individuals. Muscle Nerve 56: 458-462, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging in facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tien, R.D.; Dillon, W.P.

    1989-01-01

    GD-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging was used to evaluate 11 patients with facial nerve paralysis (five acute idiopathic facial palsy (Bell palsy), three chronic recurrent facial palsy, one acute facial palsy after local radiation therapy, one chronic facial dyskinesia, and one facial neuroma). In eight of 11 patients, there was marked enhancement of the infratemporal facial nerve from the labyrinthine segment to the stylomastoid foramen. Two patients had additional contrast enhancement in the internal auditory canal segment. In one patient, enhancement persisted (but to a lesser degree) 8 weeks after symptoms had resolved. In one patient, no enhancement was seen 15 months after resolution of Bell palsy. The facial neuroma was seen as a focal nodular enhancement in the mastoid segment of the facial nerve

  11. Anomalous facial nerve canal with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, L V; Curtin, H D

    2001-05-01

    Anteromedial "migration" of the first segment of the facial nerve canal has been previously identified in a patient with a non-Mondini-type cochlear malformation. In this study, several patients with the same facial nerve canal anomaly were reviewed to assess for the association and type of cochlear malformation. CT scans of the temporal bone of 15 patients with anteromedial migration of the first segment of the facial nerve canal were collected from routine departmental examinations. In seven patients, the anomalous course was bilateral, for a total of 22 cases. The migration was graded relative to normal as either mild/moderate or pronounced. The cochlea in each of these cases was examined for the presence and size of the basilar, second, and apical turns. The turns were either absent, small, normal, or enlarged. The CT scans of five patients with eight Mondini malformations were examined for comparison. The degree of the facial nerve migration was pronounced in nine cases and mild/moderate in 13. All 22 of these cases had associated cochlear abnormalities of the non-Mondini variety. These included common cavity anomalies with lack of definition between the cochlea and vestibule (five cases), cochleae with enlarged basilar turns and absent second or third turns (five cases), and cochleae with small or normal basilar turns with small or absent second or third turns (12 cases). None of the patients with Mondini-type cochlear malformations had anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal. Anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal occurs in association with some cochlear malformations. It did not occur in association with the Mondini malformations. A cochlea with a Mondini malformation, being similar in size to a normal cochlea, may physically prohibit such a deviation in course.

  12. Variations in the nerves of the thumb and index finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, W A; Coupland, R E

    1975-11-01

    The digital nerves to the thumb and index finger have been studied by dissecting twenty-five embalmed upper limbs. The palmar digital nerves to the thumb were constant in position and course, with a short lateral cutaneous branch from the radial palmar digital nerve in 30 per cent of cases. The palmar digital nerves to the index finger had a variable pattern, the commonest arrangement, well described in Gray's Anatomy, occurring in 74 per cent of cases. The variations and their frequency are described. By examining histological cross-sections of the index finger it was found that of about 5,000 endoneurial tubes entering the finger, 60 per cent passed beyond the distal digital crease to supply the pulp and nail bed. The depth of the palmar digital nerves was about 3 millimetres, but less at the digital creases, and their diameter lay between 1 and 1.5 millimetres as far as the distal digital crease. Clinical applications of the findings are discussed.

  13. Biomedical engineering strategies for peripheral nerve repair: surgical applications, state of the art, and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Bryan J; Gordon, Tessa; Loverde, Joseph R; Kochar, Arshneel S; Mackinnon, Susan E; Cullen, D Kacy

    2011-01-01

    Damage to the peripheral nervous system is surprisingly common and occurs primarily from trauma or a complication of surgery. Although recovery of nerve function occurs in many mild injuries, outcomes are often unsatisfactory following severe trauma. Nerve repair and regeneration presents unique clinical challenges and opportunities, and substantial contributions can be made through the informed application of biomedical engineering strategies. This article reviews the clinical presentations and classification of nerve injuries, in addition to the state of the art for surgical decision-making and repair strategies. This discussion presents specific challenges that must be addressed to realistically improve the treatment of nerve injuries and promote widespread recovery. In particular, nerve defects a few centimeters in length use a sensory nerve autograft as the standard technique; however, this approach is limited by the availability of donor nerve and comorbidity associated with additional surgery. Moreover, we currently have an inadequate ability to noninvasively assess the degree of nerve injury and to track axonal regeneration. As a result, wait-and-see surgical decisions can lead to undesirable and less successful "delayed" repair procedures. In this fight for time, degeneration of the distal nerve support structure and target progresses, ultimately blunting complete functional recovery. Thus, the most pressing challenges in peripheral nerve repair include the development of tissue-engineered nerve grafts that match or exceed the performance of autografts, the ability to noninvasively assess nerve damage and track axonal regeneration, and approaches to maintain the efficacy of the distal pathway and targets during the regenerative process. Biomedical engineering strategies can address these issues to substantially contribute at both the basic and applied levels, improving surgical management and functional recovery following severe peripheral nerve injury.

  14. Correlation of ultrasound appearance, gross anatomy, and histology of the femoral nerve at the femoral triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonchena, Tiffany K; McFadden, Kathryn; Orebaugh, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Correlation between ultrasound appearance, gross anatomic characteristics, and histologic structure of the femoral nerve (FN) is lacking. Utilizing cadavers, we sought to characterize the anatomy of the FN, and provide a quantitative measure of its branching. We hypothesize that at the femoral crease, the FN exists as a group of nerve branches, rather than a single nerve structure, and secondarily, that this transition into many branches is apparent on ultrasonography. Nineteen preserved cadavers were investigated. Ultrasonography was sufficient to evaluate the femoral nerve in nine specimens; gross dissection was utilized in all 19. Anatomic characteristics were recorded, including distances from the inguinal ligament to femoral crease, first nerve branch, and complete arborization of the nerve. The nerves from nine specimens were excised for histologic analysis. On ultrasound, the nerve became more flattened, widened, and less discrete as it coursed distally. Branching of the nerve was apparent in 12 of 18 images, with mean distance from inguinal ligament of 3.9 (1.0) cm. However, upon dissection, major branching of the femoral nerve occurred at 3.1 (1.0) cm distal to the inguinal ligament, well proximal to the femoral crease. Histologic analysis was consistent with findings at dissection. The femoral nerve arborizes into multiple branches between the inguinal ligament and the femoral crease. Initial branching is often high in the femoral triangle. As hypothesized, the FN exists as a closely associated group of nerve branches at the level of the femoral crease; however, the termination of the nerve into multiple branches is not consistently apparent on ultrasonography.

  15. Prognostic validation of a 17-segment score derived from a 20-segment score for myocardial perfusion SPECT interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Daniel S; Abidov, Aiden; Kang, Xingping; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Sciammarella, Maria G; Cohen, Ishac; Gerlach, James; Waechter, Parker B; Germano, Guido; Hachamovitch, Rory

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a 17-segment model of the left ventricle has been recommended as an optimally weighted approach for interpreting myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods to convert databases from previous 20- to new 17-segment data and criteria for abnormality for the 17-segment scores are needed. Initially, for derivation of the conversion algorithm, 65 patients were studied (algorithm population) (pilot group, n = 28; validation group, n = 37). Three conversion algorithms were derived: algorithm 1, which used mid, distal, and apical scores; algorithm 2, which used distal and apical scores alone; and algorithm 3, which used maximal scores of the distal septal, lateral, and apical segments in the 20-segment model for 3 corresponding segments of the 17-segment model. The prognosis population comprised 16,020 consecutive patients (mean age, 65 +/- 12 years; 41% women) who had exercise or vasodilator stress technetium 99m sestamibi myocardial perfusion SPECT and were followed up for 2.1 +/- 0.8 years. In this population, 17-segment scores were derived from 20-segment scores by use of algorithm 2, which demonstrated the best agreement with expert 17-segment reading in the algorithm population. The prognostic value of the 20- and 17-segment scores was compared by converting the respective summed scores into percent myocardium abnormal. Conversion algorithm 2 was found to be highly concordant with expert visual analysis by the 17-segment model (r = 0.982; kappa = 0.866) in the algorithm population. In the prognosis population, 456 cardiac deaths occurred during follow-up. When the conversion algorithm was applied, extent and severity of perfusion defects were nearly identical by 20- and derived 17-segment scores. The receiver operating characteristic curve areas by 20- and 17-segment perfusion scores were identical for predicting cardiac death (both 0.77 +/- 0.02, P = not significant). The optimal prognostic cutoff value for either 20

  16. Use of bone transport to treat tibial large segmental defects. Experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, S.C.; Volpi, R.S.; Vulcano, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone transport technique using the Ilizarov external fixator for the treatment of the extensive segmental bone defect induced in the tibia of 7 dogs. An Ilizarov frame assembled with one proximal half-ring, one middle ring and one distal ring, all connected to each other, was used. 30% of the tibia and fibula were removed in the medium and distal parts of the diaphyses, between the medium and distal rings

  17. Normal and pathological findings for the facial nerve on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Noury, K., E-mail: Kalnoury@kau.edu.sa [Department of Otolaryngology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Lotfy, A. [Radiology Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital and International Medical Centre, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the enhanced radiological anatomy and common pathological conditions of the facial nerve by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the MRI findings of the facial nerve of 146 patients who visited a tertiary academic referral center was conducted. Results: The radiological anatomy of the facial nerve was well illustrated using MRI, as were most of the common pathological conditions of the facial nerve. Conclusions: Enhancement of the facial nerve in MRI should be correlated with the clinical data. Normal individuals can show enhancement of the tympanic or vertical segments of the facial nerve. Enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the nerve is almost diagnostic of Bell's palsy. No specific enhancement patterns were observed for tumours or for infections of the middle or external ear. A larger population study is required for the accurate assessment of facial nerve enhancement in multiple sclerosis patients.

  18. Normal and pathological findings for the facial nerve on magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Noury, K.; Lotfy, A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the enhanced radiological anatomy and common pathological conditions of the facial nerve by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the MRI findings of the facial nerve of 146 patients who visited a tertiary academic referral center was conducted. Results: The radiological anatomy of the facial nerve was well illustrated using MRI, as were most of the common pathological conditions of the facial nerve. Conclusions: Enhancement of the facial nerve in MRI should be correlated with the clinical data. Normal individuals can show enhancement of the tympanic or vertical segments of the facial nerve. Enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the nerve is almost diagnostic of Bell's palsy. No specific enhancement patterns were observed for tumours or for infections of the middle or external ear. A larger population study is required for the accurate assessment of facial nerve enhancement in multiple sclerosis patients.

  19. "In Situ Vascular Nerve Graft" for Restoration of Intrinsic Hand Function: An Anatomical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Kamran; Zemoodeh, Hamid Reza; Zarenezhad, Mohammad; Owji, Mohammad

    2018-06-01

    In combined high median and ulnar nerve injury, transfer of the posterior interosseous nerve branches to the motor branch of the ulnar nerve (MUN) is previously described in order to restore intrinsic hand function. In this operation a segment of sural nerve graft is required to close the gap between the donor and recipient nerves. However the thenar muscles are not innervated by this nerve transfer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the superficial radial nerve (SRN) can be used as an "in situ vascular nerve graft" to connect the donor nerves to the MUN and the motor branch of median nerve (MMN) at the same time in order to address all denervated intrinsic and thenar muscles. Twenty fresh male cadavers were dissected in order to evaluate the feasibility of this modification of technique. The size of nerve branches, the number of axons and the tension at repair site were evaluated. This nerve transfer was technically feasible in all specimens. There was no significant size mismatch between the donor and recipient nerves Conclusions: The possible advantages of this modification include innervation of both median and ulnar nerve innervated intrinsic muscles, preservation of vascularity of the nerve graft which might accelerate the nerve regeneration, avoidance of leg incision and therefore the possibility of performing surgery under regional instead of general anesthesia. Briefly, this novel technique is a viable option which can be used instead of conventional nerve graft in some brachial plexus or combined high median and ulnar nerve injuries when restoration of intrinsic hand function by transfer of posterior interosseous nerve branches is attempted.

  20. Repair of the torn distal biceps tendon by endobutton fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A number of techniques have been described to reattach the torn distal biceps tendon to the bicipital tuberosity. We report a retrospective analysis of single incision technique using an endobutton fixation in sports persons. Materials and Methods: The present series include nine torn distal biceps tendons in eight patients, fixed anatomically to the radial tuberosity with an endobutton by using a single incision surgical technique; seven patients had suffered the injuries during contact sports. The passage of the endobutton was facilitated by using a blunt tipped pin in order to avoid injury to the posterior interosseous nerve. The patients were evaluated by Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score and Mayo elbow score. Results: The average age of the patients was 27.35 years (range 21-42 years. Average follow-up was 41.5 months (range 24-102 months. The final average flexion extension arc was 0°-143°, while the average pronation and supination angles were 77° (range 70°-82° and 81° (range 78°-85°, respectively at the last followup. All the patients had a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH score of 0 and a Mayo elbow score of 100 each. All the seven active sports persons were able to get back to their respective game. There was no nerve injury or any other complication. Conclusions: The surgical procedure used by us is a simple, safe and reproducible technique giving minimal morbidity and better cosmetic results.

  1. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  2. Brookhaven segment interconnect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morse, W.M.; Benenson, G.; Leipuner, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    We have performed a high energy physics experiment using a multisegment Brookhaven FASTBUS system. The system was composed of three crate segments and two cable segments. We discuss the segment interconnect module which permits communication between the various segments

  3. Resveratrol Promotes Nerve Regeneration via Activation of p300 Acetyltransferase-Mediated VEGF Signaling in a Rat Model of Sciatic Nerve Crush Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhuofeng; Cao, Jiawei; Shen, Yu; Zou, Yu; Yang, Xin; Zhou, Wen; Guo, Qulian; Huang, Changsheng

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are generally associated with incomplete restoration of motor function. The slow rate of nerve regeneration after injury may account for this. Although many benefits of resveratrol have been shown in the nervous system, it is not clear whether resveratrol could promote fast nerve regeneration and motor repair after peripheral nerve injury. This study showed that the motor deficits caused by sciatic nerve crush injury were alleviated by daily systematic resveratrol treatment within 10 days. Resveratrol increased the number of axons in the distal part of the injured nerve, indicating enhanced nerve regeneration. In the affected ventral spinal cord, resveratrol enhanced the expression of several vascular endothelial growth factor family proteins (VEGFs) and increased the phosphorylation of p300 through Akt signaling, indicating activation of p300 acetyltransferase. Inactivation of p300 acetyltransferase reversed the resveratrol-induced expression of VEGFs and motor repair in rats that had undergone sciatic nerve crush injury. The above results indicated that daily systematic resveratrol treatment promoted nerve regeneration and led to rapid motor repair. Resveratrol activated p300 acetyltransferase-mediated VEGF signaling in the affected ventral spinal cord, which may have thus contributed to the acceleration of nerve regeneration and motor repair.

  4. Partial recovery of respiratory function and diaphragm reinnervation following unilateral vagus nerve to phrenic nerve anastomosis in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiang Wen

    Full Text Available Respiratory dysfunction is the leading cause of mortality following upper cervical spinal cord injury (SCI. Reinnervation of the paralyzed diaphragm via an anastomosis between phrenic nerve and a donor nerve is a potential strategy to mitigate ventilatory deficits. In this study, anastomosis of vagus nerve (VN to phrenic nerve (PN in rabbits was performed to assess the potential capacity of the VN to compensate for lost PN inputs. At first, we compared spontaneous discharge pattern, nerve thickness and number of motor fibers between these nerves. The PN exhibited a highly rhythmic discharge while the VN exhibited a variable frequency discharge pattern. The rabbit VN had fewer motor axons (105.3±12.1 vs. 268.1±15.4. Nerve conduction and respiratory function were measured 20 weeks after left PN transection with or without left VN-PN anastomosis. Compared to rabbits subjected to unilateral phrenicotomy without VN-PN anastomosis, diaphragm muscle action potential (AP amplitude was improved by 292%, distal latency by 695%, peak inspiratory flow (PIF by 22.6%, peak expiratory flow (PRF by 36.4%, and tidal volume by 21.8% in the anastomosis group. However, PIF recovery was only 28.0%, PEF 28.2%, and tidal volume 31.2% of Control. Our results suggested that VN-PN anastomosis is a promising therapeutic strategy for partial restoration of diaphragm reinnervation, but further modification and improvements are necessary to realize the full potential of this technique.

  5. High-intensity facial nerve lesions on T2-weighted images in chronic persistent facial nerve palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Sendai City Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Univ. (Japan); Ishii, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Sendai City Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Okitsu, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Sendai City Hospital (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Univ. (Japan); Okudera, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels-Akita, Akita (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Our aim was to estimate the value of MRI in detecting irreversibly paralysed facial nerves. We examined 95 consecutive patients with a facial nerve palsy (14 with a persistent palsy, and 81 with good recovery), using a 1.0 T unit, with T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. The geniculate ganglion and tympanic segment had gave high signal on T2-weighted images in the chronic stage of persistent palsy, but not in acute palsy. The enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in the chronic persistent facial nerve palsy is similar to that in the acute palsy with good recovery. These findings suggest that T2-weighted MRI can be used to show severely damaged facial nerves. (orig.)

  6. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  7. Effect of hip and knee position on nerve conduction in the common fibular nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Peter Kaas; Robinson, Lawrence R

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the influence that hip and knee position have on routine fibular motor nerve conduction studies. Healthy subjects under age 40 were recruited (n = 24) to have fibular nerve conduction studies completed in various positions, using hip extension-knee extension as a control. A mean increase in conduction velocity of 2.5 m/s across the knee (P = 0.020) was seen during hip flexion compared with hip extension. A mean decrease in velocity of 1.6 m/s through the leg segment (P = 0.016) was seen during knee flexion compared with knee extension. This study shows that the optimal position of the leg during fibular nerve studies is with the hip in flexion and knee in extension, to more accurately reflect nerve length for velocity calculations. This may have implications for other peripheral nerves with respect to proximal joint position affecting calculated velocity. Muscle Nerve 56: 519-521, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The recurrent branch of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    OpenAIRE

    Horiguchi, M

    1981-01-01

    Cutaneous nerves of the upper arm were observed in 31 Japanese cadavers dissected in a student course of gross anatomy dissection and in cadaver selected randomly for intensive dissection. Contrary to the descriptions in current textbooks of human anatomy, the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm supplies also the skin over the distal region of the anterolateral surface of the upper arm. A branch to the upper arm (the recurrent branch) arises from the proper trunk of the lateral cutaneous n...

  9. Inhibition of Parkinsonian tremor with cutaneous afferent evoked by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Man-Zhao; Xu, Shao-Qin; Hu, Zi-Xiang; Xu, Fu-Liang; Niu, Chuan-Xin M; Xiao, Qin; Lan, Ning

    2017-07-14

    Recent study suggests that tremor signals are transmitted by way of multi-synaptic corticospinal pathway. Neurophysiological studies have also demonstrated that cutaneous afferents exert potent inhibition to descending motor commands by way of spinal interneurons. We hypothesize in this study that cutaneous afferents could also affect the transmission of tremor signals, thus, inhibit tremor in patients with PD. We tested this hypothesis by activating cutaneous afferents in the dorsal hand skin innervated by superficial radial nerve using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Eight patients with PD having tremor dominant symptom were recruited to participate in this study using a consistent experimental protocol for tremor inhibition. Resting tremor and electromyogram (EMG) of muscles in the upper extremity of these subjects with PD were recorded, while surface stimulation was applied to the dorsal skin of the hand. Fifteen seconds of data were recorded for 5 s prior to, during and post stimulation. Power spectrum densities (PSDs) of tremor and EMG signals were computed for each data segment. The peak values of PSDs in three data segments were compared to detect evidence of tremor inhibition. At stimulation intensity from 1.5 to 1.75 times of radiating sensation threshold, apparent suppressions of tremor at wrist, forearm and upper arm and in the EMGs were observed immediately at the onset of stimulation. After termination of stimulation, tremor and rhythmic EMG bursts reemerged gradually. Statistical analysis of peak spectral amplitudes showed a significant difference in joint tremors and EMGs during and prior to stimulation in all 8 subjects with PD. The average percentage of suppression was 61.56% in tremor across all joints of all subjects, and 47.97% in EMG of all muscles. The suppression appeared to occur mainly in distal joints and muscles. There was a slight, but inconsistent effect on tremor frequency in the 8 patients with PD tested. Our

  10. A novel rat model of brachial plexus injury with nerve root stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jintao; Yang, Jiantao; Yang, Yi; Li, Liang; Qin, Bengang; He, Wenting; Yan, Liwei; Chen, Gang; Tu, Zhehui; Liu, Xiaolin; Gu, Liqiang

    2018-02-01

    The C5-C6 nerve roots are usually spared from avulsion after brachial plexus injury (BPI) and thus can be used as donors for nerve grafting. To date, there are no appropriate animal models to evaluate spared nerve root stumps. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a rat model with spared nerve root stumps in BPI. In rupture group, the proximal parts of C5-T1 nerve roots were held with the surrounding muscles and the distal parts were pulled by a sudden force after the brachial plexus was fully exposed, and the results were compared with those of sham group. To validate the model, the lengths of C5-T1 spared nerve root stumps were measured and the histologies of the shortest one and the corresponding spinal cord were evaluated. C5 nerve root stump was found to be the shortest. Histology findings demonstrated that the nerve fibers became more irregular and the continuity decreased; numbers and diameters of myelinated axons and thickness of myelin sheaths significantly decreased over time. The survival of motoneurons was reduced, and the death of motoneurons may be related to the apoptotic process. Our model could successfully create BPI model with nerve root stumps by traction, which could simulate injury mechanisms. While other models involve root avulsion or rupturing by distal nerve transection. This model would be suitable for evaluating nerve root stumps and testing new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection through nerve root stumps in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Anomalous pancreatic ductal system allowing distal bowel gas with duodenal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Sevak

    2017-11-01

    Bypass of the atretic duodenal segment through an anomalous pancreatic ductal system is a rare anomaly described in the literature in only a handful of cases. This case report highlights the importance of considering duodenal atresia and pancreaticobiliary enteric bypass in the differential diagnosis of neonates presenting with partial duodenal obstruction. On ultrasound, the presence of gas in the biliary tree or pancreatic duct should alert the physician to the possibility of duodenal atresia with congenital pancreaticobiliary duct anomalies that allow for bypass of enteric contents, including air, into more distal bowel, thereby creating a gas pattern aptly described as double bubble with distal gas.

  12. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 2; Investigation of enhanced nerve portions in patients with facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    We performed enhanced MRI using Gd-DTPA in 84 patients with facial palsy. After assessing enhancement of the normal facial nerve, we examined enhancement in patients with Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. In 95% of patients with Bell's palsy, enhancement was obtained in the distal IAC and labyrinthine portions. In 72%, enhancement was significant from the distal IAC portion through the vertical portion. In some of the patients who underwent enhanced MRI twice, increased signal intensity was observed in distal portions such as the vertical portion. In many cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, enhancement was seen extensively in the IAC portion through the vertical portion. In the subjects with internal auditory symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, enhancement of the IAC portion was seen not only in the facial nerve but also in the vestibular and the cochlear nerves. These results suggest that the vascular permeability of lesions in Bell's palsy may be increased from the distal IAC portion to the vertical portion. Judging from the present findings with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, symptoms related to the enhanced portions suggest that accompanying internal auditory symptoms occur due to inflammation of the IAC portions of cochlear and vestibular nerves. (author).

  13. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 2; Investigation of enhanced nerve portions in patients with facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro [Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan)

    1993-08-01

    We performed enhanced MRI using Gd-DTPA in 84 patients with facial palsy. After assessing enhancement of the normal facial nerve, we examined enhancement in patients with Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. In 95% of patients with Bell's palsy, enhancement was obtained in the distal IAC and labyrinthine portions. In 72%, enhancement was significant from the distal IAC portion through the vertical portion. In some of the patients who underwent enhanced MRI twice, increased signal intensity was observed in distal portions such as the vertical portion. In many cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, enhancement was seen extensively in the IAC portion through the vertical portion. In the subjects with internal auditory symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, enhancement of the IAC portion was seen not only in the facial nerve but also in the vestibular and the cochlear nerves. These results suggest that the vascular permeability of lesions in Bell's palsy may be increased from the distal IAC portion to the vertical portion. Judging from the present findings with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, symptoms related to the enhanced portions suggest that accompanying internal auditory symptoms occur due to inflammation of the IAC portions of cochlear and vestibular nerves. (author).

  14. Posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicula end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermanns, P.H.; Beeger, R.; Koetter, D.; Hamburg Univ.

    1981-01-01

    Posttraumatic osteolysis of bone is rare. Its etiology is unknown. A case of posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle end is reported. Differentialdiagnostical and ethiological relations are discussed. The literature of posttraumatic osteolysis especially of distal clavicle osteolysis is reported. (orig.) [de

  15. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Traboulsi, S.L.; Witjes, J.A.; Kassouf, W.

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation

  16. Ultrasonographic findings of posterior interosseous nerve syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Dong; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings associated with posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) syndrome. Approval from the Institutional Review Board was obtained. A retrospective review of 908 patients' sonographic images of the upper extremity from January 2001 to October 2010 revealed 10 patients suspicious for a PIN abnormality (7 male and 3 female patients; mean age of 51.8±13.1 years; age range, 32 to 79 years). The ultrasonographic findings of PIN syndrome, including changes in the PIN and adjacent secondary changes, were evaluated. The anteroposterior diameter of the pathologic PIN was measured in eight patients and the anteroposterior diameter of the contralateral asymptomatic PIN was measured in six patients, all at the level immediately proximal to the proximal supinator border. The size of the pathologic nerves and contralateral asymptomatic nerves was compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Swelling of the PIN proximal to the supinator canal by compression at the arcade of Fröhse was observed in four cases. Swelling of the PIN distal to the supinator canal was observed in one case. Loss of the perineural fat plane in the supinator canal was observed in one case. Four soft tissue masses were noted. Secondary denervation atrophy of the supinator and extensor muscles was observed in two cases. The mean anteroposterior diameter of the pathologic nerves (n=8, 1.79±0.43 mm) was significantly larger than that of the contralateral asymptomatic nerves (n=6, 1.02±0.22 mm) (P=0.003). Ultrasonography provides high-resolution images of the PIN and helps to diagnose PIN syndrome through visualization of its various causes and adjacent secondary changes.

  17. Regenerative Capacity and Histomorphometric Changes in Rat Sciatic Nerve Following Experimental Neurotmesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lós, Deniele Bezerra; Novaes, Karyne Albino; de Miranda, Filipe Barbosa Cunha; Lira, Kamilla Dinah Santos de; Andrade, Rodrigo Fragoso de; Moraes, Sílvia Regina Arruda de

    2015-01-01

    Through a wide range of cellular and molecular events, the peripheral nervous system is endowed with great regenerative capacity, responding immediately to injuries that occur along the length of the nerve. The aim of this study was to histomorphometrically assess the degree of maturity of the nervous tissue and possible microscopic changes in newly formed nerve segments 60 days after experimental neurotmesis of the sciatic nerve in rats. Control Group (CG) and an Injury Group (IG) were used....

  18. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  19. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  20. Distal polyneuropathy in an adult Birman cat with toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 6-year-old female spayed Birman cat presented with a history of weight loss, stiff and short-strided gait in the pelvic limbs and reluctance to jump, progressing to non-ambulatory tetraparesis over 6 weeks. Poor body condition, dehydration and generalised muscle wastage were evident on general examination. Neurological examination revealed mildly depressed mental status, non-ambulatory flaccid tetraparesis and severely decreased proprioception and spinal reflexes in all four limbs. The neuroanatomical localisation was to the peripheral nervous system. Haematology, feline immunodeficiency virus/feline leukaemia virus serology, serum biochemistry, including creatine kinase and thyroxine, thoracic radiographs and abdominal ultrasound did not reveal significant abnormalities. Electromyography revealed fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in axial and appendicular muscles. Decreased motor conduction velocities and compound muscle action potential amplitudes were detected in ulnar and sciatic–tibial nerves. Residual latency was increased in the sciatic–tibial nerve. Histologically, several intramuscular nerve branches were depleted of myelinated fibres and a few showed mononuclear infiltrations. Toxoplasma gondii serology titres were compatible with active toxoplasmosis. Four days after treatment initiation with oral clindamycin the cat recovered the ability to walk. T gondii serology titres and neurological examination were normal after 11 and 16 weeks, respectively. Clindamycin was discontinued after 16 weeks. One year after presentation the cat showed mild relapse of clinical signs and seroconversion, which again resolved following treatment with clindamycin. Relevance and novel information To our knowledge, this is the first report of distal polyneuropathy associated with toxoplasmosis in a cat. This case suggests the inclusion of toxoplasmosis as a possible differential diagnosis for acquired polyneuropathies in

  1. HIV Distal Neuropathic Pain Is Associated with Smaller Ventral Posterior Cingulate Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltner, John R; Connolly, Colm G; Vaida, Florin; Jenkinson, Mark; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Archibald, Sarah; Akkari, Cherine; Schlein, Alexandra; Lee, Jisu; Wang, Dongzhe; Kim, Sung; Li, Han; Rennels, Austin; Miller, David J; Kesidis, George; Franklin, Donald R; Sanders, Chelsea; Corkran, Stephanie; Grant, Igor; Brown, Gregory G; Atkinson, J Hampton; Ellis, Ronald J

    2017-03-01

    . Despite modern antiretroviral therapy, HIV-associated neuropathy is one of the most prevalent, disabling and treatment-resistant complications of HIV disease. The presence and intensity of distal neuropathic pain is not fully explained by the degree of peripheral nerve damage. A better understanding of brain structure in HIV distal neuropathic pain may help explain why some patients with HIV neuropathy report pain while the majority does not. Previously, we reported that more intense distal neuropathic pain was associated with smaller total cerebral cortical gray matter volumes. The objective of this study was to determine which parts of the cortex are smaller. . HIV positive individuals with and without distal neuropathic pain enrolled in the multisite (N = 233) CNS HIV Antiretroviral Treatment Effects (CHARTER) study underwent structural brain magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate regional brain volumes in these structural brain images. . Left ventral posterior cingulate cortex was smaller for HIV positive individuals with versus without distal neuropathic pain (peak P  = 0.017; peak t = 5.15; MNI coordinates x = -6, y = -54, z = 20). Regional brain volumes within cortical gray matter structures typically associated with pain processing were also smaller for HIV positive individuals having higher intensity ratings of distal neuropathic pain. . The posterior cingulate is thought to be involved in inhibiting the perception of painful stimuli. Mechanistically a smaller posterior cingulate cortex structure may be related to reduced anti-nociception contributing to increased distal neuropathic pain. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Retina image–based optic disc segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Lin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The change of optic disc can be used to diagnose many eye diseases, such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration. Moreover, retinal blood vessel pattern is unique for human beings even for identical twins. It is a highly stable pattern in biometric identification. Since optic disc is the beginning of the optic nerve and main blood vessels in retina, it can be used as a reference point of identification. Therefore, optic disc segmentation is an important technique for developing a human identity recognition system and eye disease diagnostic system. This article hence presents an optic disc segmentation method to extract the optic disc from a retina image. The experimental results show that the optic disc segmentation method can give impressive results in segmenting the optic disc from a retina image.

  3. The WISTAH hand study: A prospective cohort study of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg Arun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. Methods/design A multi-center prospective cohort study was incepted to quantify risk factors for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and potentially develop improved methods for analyzing jobs. Disorders to analyze included carpal tunnel syndrome, lateral epicondylalgia, medial epicondylalgia, trigger digit, deQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis and other tendinoses. Workers have thus far been enrolled from 17 different employment settings in 3 diverse US states and performed widely varying work. At baseline, workers undergo laptop administered questionnaires, structured interviews, two standardized physical examinations and nerve conduction studies to ascertain demographic, medical history, psychosocial factors and current musculoskeletal disorders. All workers’ jobs are individually measured for physical factors and are videotaped. Workers are followed monthly for the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Repeat nerve conduction studies are performed for those with symptoms of tingling and numbness in the prior six months. Changes in jobs necessitate re-measure and re-videotaping of job physical factors. Case definitions have been established. Point prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome is a combination of paraesthesias in at least two median nerve-served digits plus an abnormal nerve conduction study at baseline. The lifetime cumulative incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome will also include those with a past history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Incident cases will exclude those with either a past history or prevalent cases at baseline. Statistical methods planned include survival analyses and logistic regression. Discussion A

  4. Diagnostic value of MRI for nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. Clinical and anatomic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Kageyama, Kazuhiro; Katakura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken in 26 patients with surgically proven nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. The findings on coronary images were compared with those of selective radiculography to assess the diagnostic ability of MRI to determine the site of nerve root compression. Intermission and partial defect, which reflect nerve root compression, were seen in only 5 (19.2%) of 26 nerve roots on MRI, as compared with 20 (76.9%) on radiculography. Thus MRI alone was difficult to diagnose nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. Furthermore, the optimum angle of coronary views was determined in 13 cadavers. Para-sagittal views were found to be optimal for the observation of the whole running of the nerve root. Three-dimensional MRI was found to have a potential to diagnose nerve root compression in the intervertebral foramen and the distal part of the intervertebral foramen. (N.K.)

  5. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes in sensation or movement No history of injury to the area No signs of nerve damage These medicines reduce swelling and pressure on the nerve. They may be injected directly into the area or taken by mouth. Other medicines include: Over-the-counter pain ...

  7. Tibial nerve (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve is commonly injured by fractures or other injury to the back of the knee or the lower leg. It may be affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The nerve can also be damaged by pressure from a tumor, abscess, or bleeding into the ...

  8. Detection of the symptomatic nerve root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masayasu

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with lumbar disc herniation with a chief complaint of unilateral leg pain underwent gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI, particularly to examine the nerve root in the distal area of hernia. MRI appearance fell into three grades: 0 - no visualization (n=7), 1 - heterogeneous visualization (n=7), and 2 - homogeneous visualization (n=10). In the quantitative evaluation of the severity of sciatica using SLR and JOA scores, it was found to be associated with the degree of visualization. All patients of grade 2 were required to receive surgery because pain relief was not attained in spite of 3 months or more conservative treatment. These findings indicatd the usefulness of MRI in predicting prognosis, as well as in diagnosing the responsible level. Since blood-nerve barrier damage and intraneural edema are considered to be involved in the visualization of the nerve root on MRI, MRI will help in diagnosing radicular sciatica and elucidating the pathophysiology of the disease. (N.K.)

  9. A multiparametric assay for quantitative nerve regeneration evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyn, B; van Remoortere, M; Nuydens, R; Meert, T; van de Wouwer, G

    2005-08-01

    We introduce an assay for the semi-automated quantification of nerve regeneration by image analysis. Digital images of histological sections of regenerated nerves are recorded using an automated inverted microscope and merged into high-resolution mosaic images representing the entire nerve. These are analysed by a dedicated image-processing package that computes nerve-specific features (e.g. nerve area, fibre count, myelinated area) and fibre-specific features (area, perimeter, myelin sheet thickness). The assay's performance and correlation of the automatically computed data with visually obtained data are determined on a set of 140 semithin sections from the distal part of a rat tibial nerve from four different experimental treatment groups (control, sham, sutured, cut) taken at seven different time points after surgery. Results show a high correlation between the manually and automatically derived data, and a high discriminative power towards treatment. Extra value is added by the large feature set. In conclusion, the assay is fast and offers data that currently can be obtained only by a combination of laborious and time-consuming tests.

  10. Storage and allogeneic transplantation of peripheral nerve using a green tea polyphenol solution in a canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Takashi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study, allogeneic-transplanted peripheral nerve segments preserved for one month in a polyphenol solution at 4°C could regenerate nerves in rodents demonstrated the same extent of nerve regeneration as isogeneic fresh nerve grafts. The present study investigated whether the same results could be obtained in a canine model. Methods A sciatic nerve was harvested from a male beagle dog, divided into fascicules of Sry and β-actin to investigate whether cells of donor origin remained in the allogeneic nerve segments. FK506 concentration was measured in blood samples taken before the animals were killed. Results The total myelinated axon numbers and amplitudes of the muscle action potentials correlated significantly with the blood FK506 concentration. Few axons were observed in the allogeneic-transplanted nerve segments in the PA0.025 group. PCR showed clear Sry-specific bands in specimens from the PA0.1 and PA0.05 groups but not from the PA0.025 group. Conclusions Successful nerve regeneration was observed in the polyphenol-treated nerve allografts when transplanted in association with a therapeutic dose of FK506. The data indicate that polyphenols can protect nerve tissue from ischemic damage for one month; however, the effects of immune suppression seem insufficient to permit allogeneic transplantation of peripheral nerves in a canine model.

  11. Usefulness of ultrasound assessment of median nerve mobility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Seok, Jung Im; Park, Dong-Soon; Cho, Hee Kyung

    2018-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Recently, dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging has shown differences in median nerve mobility between the affected and unaffected sides in CTS. Purpose The present study was performed to compare the median nerve mobility between patients with CTS and healthy individuals, and to correlate median nerve mobility with the severity of CTS. Material and Methods A total of 101 patients (128 wrists) with CTS and 43 healthy individuals (70 wrists) were evaluated. Electrodiagnostic studies were initially conducted to determine the neurophysiological grading scale (NGS). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve and the grade of median nerve mobility were measured using US. Results The mean grade of median nerve mobility in the CTS group (1.9) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.6; P mobility and distal motor latency of the median nerve (r = -0.218, P = 0.015), NGS (r = -0.207, P = 0.020) and CSA of the median nerve (r = -0.196, P = 0.028). Conclusion The grade of median nerve mobility was negatively correlated with the severity of CTS. US assessment of median nerve mobility may be useful in diagnosing and determining the severity of CTS.

  12. Degradation properties of the electrostatic assembly PDLLA/CS/CHS nerve conduit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Haixing [School of Chemical Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yan Yuhua; Wan Tao; Li Shipu, E-mail: yanyuhua8@126.co [Biomedical Materials and Engineering Research Center, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2009-08-15

    A poly(d,l-lactic acid)/chondroitin sulfate/chitosan (PDLLA/CS/CHS) nerve conduit for repairing nerve defects was prepared by electrostatic assembly and the thermally induced phase separation technique. The hydrophilic characteristics of the PDLLA/CS/CHS assembly nerve conduits were improved markedly. The degradation behavior of the nerve conduit with various assembly layers was evaluated by a pH change, weight loss rate and molecular weight change. The pH of the solution of the nerve conduit could be effectively adjusted by varying the layer numbers and overcoming the acidity-caused auto-acceleration of PDLLA; the nerve conduit can retain its integrity in a phosphate buffer solution after being degraded for 3 months. After such a conduit was implanted in the rat for 3 months, obvious degradation occurred, but the regenerated nerve was integrated and it grew successfully from the proximal to distal nerve stump. All these results implied that the degradation rate of the prepared conduit can adapt to the regeneration of the peripheral nerve, which might be a new derivative of PDLLA-based biodegradable materials for repairing nerve injuries without acidity-caused irritations and acidity-induced auto-accelerating degradation behavior as shown by PDLLA.

  13. NON-INVASIVE EVALUATION OF NERVE CONDUCTION IN SMALL DIAMETER FIBERS IN THE RAT

    OpenAIRE

    Zotova, Elena G.; Arezzo, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    A novel non-invasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9-18 m/s (Aδ axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmylinated C fibers conducting at ...

  14. Noninvasive Evaluation of Nerve Conduction in Small Diameter Fibers in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Elena G. Zotova; Joseph C. Arezzo

    2013-01-01

    A novel noninvasive technique was applied to measure velocity within slow conducting axons in the distal extreme of the sciatic nerve (i.e., digital nerve) in a rat model. The technique is based on the extraction of rectified multiple unit activity (MUA) from in vivo whole nerve compound responses. This method reliably identifies compound action potentials in thinly myelinated fibers conducting at a range of 9–18 m/s ( axons), as well as in a subgroup of unmyelinated C fibers conducting at ap...

  15. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of friction massage in tennis elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Wang, Han-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Friction massage is a commonly used physical therapy that is usually safe and without complication. We report an unusual case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy that arose after friction massage. Electrophysiologic findings confirmed a focal neuropathy 4-6 cm distal to the lateral epicondyle. The neurologic symptoms resolved completely 2 mos after discontinuation of friction massage. This case experience broadens the spectrum of etiologies of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies may be a useful adjunct to a thorough physical examination to confirm the diagnosis and is important to prognostic evaluation, if unexplained neurologic symptoms develop after certain physical therapy procedures. Further treatment includes avoiding compression and observation.

  16. Fixation of supraglenoid tubercle fractures using distal femoral locking plates in three Warmblood horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Sina; Fürst, Anton E; Sacks, Murielle; Bischofberger, Andrea S

    2016-05-18

    Three horses that were presented with supraglenoid tubercle fractures were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using distal femoral locking plates (DFLP). Placing the DFLP caudal to the scapular spine in order to preserve the suprascapular nerve led to a stable fixation, however, it resulted in infraspinatus muscle atrophy and mild scapulohumeral joint instability (case 1). Placing the DFLP cranial to the scapular spine and under the suprascapular nerve resulted in a stable fixation, however, it resulted in severe atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and scapulohumeral joint instability (case 2). Placing the DFLP cranial to the scapular spine and slightly overbending it at the suprascapular nerve passage site resulted in the best outcome (case 3). Only a mild degree of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle atrophy was apparent, which resolved quickly and with no effect on scapulohumeral joint stability. In all cases, fixation of supraglenoid tubercle fractures using DFLP in slightly different techniques led to stable fixations with good long-term outcome. One case suffered from a mild incisional infection and plates were removed in two horses. Placement of the DFLP cranial to the scapular spine and slightly overbending it at the suprascapular nerve passage prevented major nerve damage. Further cases investigating the degree of muscle atrophy following the use of the DFLP placed in the above-described technique are justified to improve patient outcome.

  17. α-Synuclein pathology in the cranial and spinal nerves in Lewy body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Keiko; Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Miki, Yasuo; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of phosphorylated α-synuclein in neurons and glial cells is a histological hallmark of Lewy body disease (LBD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Recently, filamentous aggregations of phosphorylated α-synuclein have been reported in the cytoplasm of Schwann cells, but not in axons, in the peripheral nervous system in MSA, mainly in the cranial and spinal nerve roots. Here we conducted an immunohistochemical investigation of the cranial and spinal nerves and dorsal root ganglia of patients with LBD. Lewy axons were found in the oculomotor, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves, but not in the hypoglossal nerve. The glossopharyngeal-vagus nerves were most frequently affected, with involvement in all of 20 subjects. In the spinal nerve roots, Lewy axons were found in all of the cases examined. Lewy axons in the anterior nerves were more frequent and numerous in the thoracic and sacral segments than in the cervical and lumbar segments. On the other hand, axonal lesions in the posterior spinal nerve roots appeared to increase along a cervical-to-sacral gradient. Although Schwann cell cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the spinal nerves, they were only minimal. In the dorsal root ganglia, axonal lesions were seldom evident. These findings indicate that α-synuclein pathology in the peripheral nerves is axonal-predominant in LBD, whereas it is restricted to glial cells in MSA. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Chitosan Nerve Guides with Regular or Increased Bendability for Acute and Delayed Peripheral Nerve Repair: A Comprehensive Comparison with Autologous Nerve Grafts and Muscle-in-Vein Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stößel, Maria; Wildhagen, Vivien M; Helmecke, Olaf; Metzen, Jennifer; Pfund, Charlotte B; Freier, Thomas; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2018-05-08

    Reconstruction of joint-crossing digital nerves requires the application of nerve guides with a much higher flexibility than used for peripheral nerve repair along larger bones. Nevertheless, collapse-resistance should be preserved to avoid secondary damage to the regrowing nerve tissue. In recent years, we presented chitosan nerve guides (CNGs) to be highly supportive for the regeneration of critical gap length peripheral nerve defects in the rat. Now, we evidently increased the bendability of regular CNGs (regCNGs) by developing a wavy wall structure, that is, corrugated CNGs (corrCNGs). In a comprehensive in vivo study, we compared both types of CNGs with clinical gold standard autologous nerve grafts (ANGs) and muscle-in-vein grafts (MVGs) that have recently been highlighted in the literature as a suitable alternative to ANGs. We reconstructed rat sciatic nerves over a critical gap length of 15 mm either immediately upon transection or after a delay period of 45 days. Electrodiagnostic measurements were applied to monitor functional motor recovery at 60, 90, 120, and 150 (only delayed repair) days postreconstruction. Upon explanation, tube properties were analyzed. Furthermore, distal nerve ends were evaluated using histomorphometry, while connective tissue specimens were subjected to immunohistological stainings. After 120 days (acute repair) or 150 days (delayed repair), respectively, compression-stability of regCNGs was slightly increased while it remained stable in corrCNGs. In both substudies, regCNGs and corrCNGs supported functional recovery of distal plantar muscles in a similar way and to a greater extent when compared with MVGs, while ANGs demonstrated the best support of regeneration. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  20. Superficial or deep implantation of motor nerve after denervation: an experimental study--superficial or deep implantation of motor nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askar, Ibrahím; Sabuncuoglu, Bízden Tavíl

    2002-01-01

    Neurorraphy, conventional nerve grafting technique, and artificial nerve conduits are not enough for repair in severe injuries of peripheral nerves, especially when there is separation of motor nerve from muscle tissue. In these nerve injuries, reinnervation is indicated for neurotization. The distal end of a peripheral nerve is divided into fascicles and implanted into the aneural zone of target muscle tissue. It is not known how deeply fascicles should be implanted into muscle tissue. A comparative study of superficial and deep implantation of separated motor nerve into muscle tissue is presented in the gastrocnemius muscle of rabbits. In this experimental study, 30 white New Zealand rabbits were used and divided into 3 groups of 10 rabbits each. In the first group (controls, group I), only surgical exposure of the gastrocnemius muscle and motor nerve (tibial nerve) was done without any injury to nerves. In the superficial implantation group (group II), tibial nerves were separated and divided into their own fascicles. These fascicles were implanted superficially into the lateral head of gastrocnemius muscle-aneural zone. In the deep implantation group (group III), the tibial nerves were separated and divided into their own fascicles. These fascicles were implanted around the center of the muscle mass, into the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle-aneural zone. Six months later, histopathological changes and functional recovery of the gastrocnemius muscle were investigated. Both experimental groups had less muscular weight than in the control group. It was found that functional recovery was achieved in both experimental groups, and was better in the superficial implantation group than the deep implantation group. EMG recordings revealed that polyphasic and late potentials were frequently seen in both experimental groups. Degeneration and regeneration of myofibrils were observed in both experimental groups. New motor end-plates were formed in a scattered

  1. Distal radius fractures result in alterations in scapular kinematics: a three-dimensional motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayhan, Cigdem; Turgut, Elif; Baltaci, Gul

    2015-03-01

    Scapular motion is closely integrated with arm motion. Injury to a distal segment requires compensatory changes in the proximal segments leading to alterations in scapular motion. Since the effects of distal injuries on scapular kinematics remain unknown, in the present study we investigated the influences on scapular motion in patients with distal injuries. Sixteen subjects with a history of distal radius fracture and 20 asymptomatic healthy subjects (controls) participated in the study. Three-dimensional scapular and humeral kinematic data were collected on all 3 planes of shoulder elevation: frontal, sagittal, and scapular. All testing was performed in a single session; therefore, the sensors remained attached to the participants for all testing. The position and orientation data of the scapula at 30°, 60°, 90°, and 120° humerothoracic elevation and 120°, 90°, 60°, and 30° lowering were used for statistical comparisons. Independent samples t-test was used to compare the scapular internal/external rotation, upward/downward rotation, and anterior/posterior tilt between the affected side of subjects with a distal radius fracture and the dominant side of asymptomatic subjects at the same stage of humerothoracic elevation. Scapular internal rotation was significantly increased at 30° elevation (P=0.01), 90° elevation (P=0.03), and 30° lowering (P=0.03), and upward rotation was increased at 30° and 60° elevation (Pplane elevation. Scapular upward rotation and anterior tilt were significantly increased during 30° lowering on both the scapular (P=0.002 and 0.02, respectively) and sagittal planes (P=0.01 and 0.02. respectively). Patients with distal radius fractures exhibit altered scapular kinematics, which may further contribute to the development of secondary musculoskeletal pathologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Regeneration of unmyelinated and myelinated sensory nerve fibres studied by a retrograde tracer method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Krarup, Christian; Schmalbruch, Henning

    2004-01-01

    of axons. Axonal counts do not reflect the number of regenerated neurons because of axonal branching and because myelinated axons form unmyelinated sprouts. Two days to 10 weeks after crushing, the distal sural or peroneal nerves were cut and exposed to fluoro-dextran. Large and small dorsal root ganglion...

  3. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    We performed enhanced MRI using Gd-DTPA in 84 patients with facial palsy. After assessing enhancement of the normal facial nerve, we examined enhancement in patients with Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. In 95% of patients with Bell's palsy, enhancement was obtained in the distal IAC and labyrinthine portions. In 72%, enhancement was significant from the distal IAC portion through the vertical portion. In some of the patients who underwent enhanced MRI twice, increased signal intensity was observed in distal portions such as the vertical portion. In many cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, enhancement was seen extensively in the IAC portion through the vertical portion. In the subjects with internal auditory symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, enhancement of the IAC portion was seen not only in the facial nerve but also in the vestibular and the cochlear nerves. These results suggest that the vascular permeability of lesions in Bell's palsy may be increased from the distal IAC portion to the vertical portion. Judging from the present findings with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, symptoms related to the enhanced portions suggest that accompanying internal auditory symptoms occur due to inflammation of the IAC portions of cochlear and vestibular nerves. (author)

  4. Conceptualizing distal drivers in land use competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niewhöner, Jörg; Nielsen, Jonas Ø; Gasparri, Gasparri

    2016-01-01

    This introductory chapter explores the notion of ‘distal drivers’ in land use competition. Research has moved beyond proximate causes of land cover and land use change to focus on the underlying drivers of these dynamics. We discuss the framework of telecoupling within human–environment systems...... as a first step to come to terms with the increasingly distal nature of driving forces behind land use practices. We then expand the notion of distal as mainly a measure of Euclidian space to include temporal, social, and institutional dimensions. This understanding of distal widens our analytical scope...... for the analysis of land use competition as a distributed process to consider the role of knowledge and power, technology, and different temporalities within a relational or systemic analysis of practices of land use competition. We conclude by pointing toward the historical and social contingency of land use...

  5. Distal technologies and type 1 diabetes management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Danny C; Barry, Samantha; Wagner, David V; Speight, Jane; Choudhary, Pratik; Harris, Michael A

    2018-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes requires intensive self-management to avoid acute and long-term health complications. In the past two decades, substantial advances in technology have enabled more effective and convenient self-management of type 1 diabetes. Although proximal technologies (eg, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, closed-loop and artificial pancreas systems) have been the subject of frequent systematic and narrative reviews, distal technologies have received scant attention. Distal technologies refer to electronic systems designed to provide a service remotely and include heterogeneous systems such as telehealth, mobile health applications, game-based support, social platforms, and patient portals. In this Review, we summarise the empirical literature to provide current information about the effectiveness of available distal technologies to improve type 1 diabetes management. We also discuss privacy, ethics, and regulatory considerations, issues of global adoption, knowledge gaps in distal technology, and recommendations for future directions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: distal arthrogryposis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 is a disorder characterized by joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement in the hands and feet. ... distal arthrogryposis type 1 . However, researchers speculate that contractures may be related to problems with muscle contraction ...

  7. Potassium secretion in mammalian distal colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Vaarby

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial organs adjust the „inner milieu“ of the body and are crucial for all homeostatic processes. Epithelial transport of different solutes and water is regulated phenomena. The regulation processes include both long term hormonal regulation and short term local agonist mediated regulation....... This research project is the summary of 3 original papers addressing the functional role of different regulating factors on ion transport in mouse distal colon. The first paper addresses the effect of luminal nucleotides on electrogenic Na+ absorption. The distal colon, like the distal nephron is an aldosterone......-sensitive tissue and participates in the regulation of Na+ excretion. In the distal nephron it was found that luminal nucleotides inhibit ENaC-mediated Na+ absorption. Here it was addressed whether luminal nucleotides regulate Na+ absorption and if so, which of the known luminal P2 receptors are involved. Using...

  8. MR imaging and T2 measurements in peripheral nerve repair with activation of Toll-like receptor 4 of neurotmesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Liejing; Li, Haojiang; Wen, Xuehua; Shen, Jun [Sun Yat-Sen University, Department of Radiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging in neurotmesis combined with surgical repair and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Forty-eight rats received subepineurial microinjection of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 24) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS, n = 24) immediately after surgical repair of the transected sciatic nerve. Sequential fat-suppressed T2-weighted imaging and quantitative T2 measurements were obtained at 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery, with histologic assessments performed at regular intervals. T2 relaxation times and histological quantification of the distal stumps were measured and compared. The distal stumps of transected nerves treated with LPS or PBS both showed persistent enlargement and hyperintense signal. T2 values of the distal stumps showed a rapid rise to peak level followed by a rapid decline pattern in nerves treated with LPS, while exhibiting a slow rise to peak value followed by a slow decline in nerves treated with PBS. Nerves treated with LPS exhibited more prominent macrophage recruitment, faster myelin debris clearance and more pronounced nerve regeneration. Nerves treated with TLR4 activation had a characteristic pattern of T2 value change over time. Longitudinal T2 measurements can be used to detect the enhanced repair effect associated with TLR4 activation in the surgical repair of neurotmesis. (orig.)

  9. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0047 TITLE: Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ahmet Höke...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0047 Nanofiber nerve guide for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration 5b. GRANT NUMBER...goal of this collaborative research project was to develop next generation engineered nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with aligned nanofibers and

  10. Complicated distal femoral epiphyseolysis treated by Ilizarov method: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vesna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Injuries of the distal femur are rare in children; however, they are frequently associated with complications. They are almost always physeal, most frequently Salter-Harris type II epiphyseolysis. The treatment of such injuries is similar in all physeal injuries. It is intended to provide growth plate recovery by gentle reduction and stable fixation thus preventing secondary complications, and also to provide decompression of the segment to solve the compartment syndrome and recover the neurovascular structures. Case Outline A seven-year old boy presented with a right knee injury while sleigh riding. He was admitted three weeks following the injury with distal femoral epiphysiolysis associated with peroneal palsy. A day after admission to our Institute the reduction was performed using the Ilizarov device. Physical therapy was started immediately after surgery, as well as walking with weight bearing on the operated leg. Five months after surgery the patient was anatomically and functionally recovered. Conclusion The presented method is recommended in the treatment of such injuries because of several reasons; reposition is simple and complete, there is no need to open the fracture site, fixation is stable, the growth plate is preserved, there is no need for additional external immobilisation, and physical therapy involving walking with weight bearing on the operated leg may be started immediately after surgery. .

  11. Palm to Finger Ulnar Sensory Nerve Conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowich, Eduardo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Orsini, Marco; Pupe, Camila; Pessoa, Bruno; Bittar, Caroline; Pires, Karina Lebeis; Bruno, Carlos; Coutinho, Bruno Mattos; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Ribeiro, Pedro; Velasques, Bruna; Bittencourt, Juliana; Teixeira, Silmar; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2015-12-29

    Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW) is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN) in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC) of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way) and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV) ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  12. Palm to finger ulnar sensory nerve conduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Davidowich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulnar neuropathy at the wrist (UNW is rare, and always challenging to localize. To increase the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnosis of UNW many authors advocate the stimulation of the ulnar nerve (UN in the segment of the wrist and palm. The focus of this paper is to present a modified and simplified technique of sensory nerve conduction (SNC of the UN in the wrist and palm segments and demonstrate the validity of this technique in the study of five cases of type III UNW. The SNC of UN was performed antidromically with fifth finger ring recording electrodes. The UN was stimulated 14 cm proximal to the active electrode (the standard way and 7 cm proximal to the active electrode. The normal data from amplitude and conduction velocity (CV ratios between the palm to finger and wrist to finger segments were obtained. Normal amplitude ratio was 1.4 to 0.76. Normal CV ratio was 0.8 to 1.23.We found evidences of abnormal SNAP amplitude ratio or substantial slowing of UN sensory fibers across the wrist in 5 of the 5 patients with electrophysiological-definite type III UNW.

  13. Normal distal pulmonary vein anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesława Klimek-Piotrowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is well known that the pulmonary veins (PVs, especially their myocardial sleeves play a critical role in the initiation and maintenance of atrial fibrillation. Understanding the PV anatomy is crucial for the safety and efficacy of all procedures performed on PVs. The aim of this study was to present normal distal PV anatomy and to create a juxtaposition of all PV ostium variants.Methods. A total of 130 randomly selected autopsied adult human hearts (Caucasian were examined. The number of PVs ostia was evaluated and their diameter was measured. The ostium-to-last-tributary distance and macroscopic presence of myocardial sleeves were also evaluated.Results. Five hundred forty-one PV ostia were identified. Four classical PV ostia patterns (two left and two right PVs were observed in 70.8% of all cases. The most common variant was the classical pattern with additional middle right PV (19.2%, followed by the common ostium for the left superior and the inferior PVs (4.44%. Mean diameters of PV ostia (for the classical pattern were: left superior = 13.8 ± 2.9 mm; left inferior = 13.3 ± 3.4 mm; right superior = 14.3 ± 2.9 mm; right inferior = 13.7 ± 3.3 mm. When present, the additional middle right PV ostium had the smallest PV ostium diameter in the heart (8.2 ± 4.1 mm. The mean ostium-to-last-tributary (closest to the atrium distances were: left superior = 15.1 ± 4.6 mm; left inferior = 13.5 ± 4.0 mm; right superior = 11.8 ± 4.0 mm; right inferior = 11.0 ± 3.7 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between sexes in ostia diameters and ostium-to-last-tributary distances.Conclusion. Only 71% of the cases have four standard pulmonary veins. The middle right pulmonary vein is present in almost 20% of patients. Presented data can provide useful information for the clinicians during interventional procedures or radiologic examinations of PVs.

  14. Robotic phrenic nerve harvest: a feasibility study in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto de Melo, P; Miyamoto, H; Serradori, T; Ruggiero Mantovani, G; Selber, J; Facca, S; Xu, W-D; Santelmo, N; Liverneaux, P

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to report on the feasibility of robotic phrenic nerve harvest in a pig model. A surgical robot (Da Vinci S™ system, Intuitive Surgical(®), Sunnyvale, CA) was installed with three ports on the pig's left chest. The phrenic nerve was transected distally where it enters the diaphragm. The phrenic nerve harvest was successfully performed in 45 minutes without major complications. The advantages of robotic microsurgery for phrenic nerve harvest are the motion scaling up to 5 times, elimination of physiological tremor, and free movement of joint-equipped robotic arms. Robot-assisted neurolysis may be clinically useful for harvesting the phrenic nerve for brachial plexus reconstruction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Intercalary bone segment transport in treatment of segmental tibial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, A.; Amin, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results and complications of intercalary bone segment transport in the treatment of segmental tibial defects. Design: This is a retrospective analysis of patients with segmental tibial defects who were treated with intercalary bone segment transport method. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from September 1997 to April 2001. Subjects and methods: Thirteen patients were included in the study who had developed tibial defects either due to open fractures with bone loss or subsequent to bone debridement of infected non unions. The mean bone defect was 6.4 cms and there were eight associated soft tissue defects. Locally made unilateral 'Naseer-Awais' (NA) fixator was used for bone segment transport. The distraction was done at the rate of 1mm/day after 7-10 days of osteotomy. The patients were followed-up fortnightly during distraction and monthly thereafter. The mean follow-up duration was 18 months. Results: The mean time in external fixation was 9.4 months. The m ean healing index' was 1.47 months/cm. Satisfactory union was achieved in all cases. Six cases (46.2%) required bone grafting at target site and in one of them grafting was required at the level of regeneration as well. All the wounds healed well with no residual infection. There was no residual leg length discrepancy of more than 20 mm nd one angular deformity of more than 5 degrees. The commonest complication encountered was pin track infection seen in 38% of Shanz Screws applied. Loosening occurred in 6.8% of Shanz screws, requiring re-adjustment. Ankle joint contracture with equinus deformity and peroneal nerve paresis occurred in one case each. The functional results were graded as 'good' in seven, 'fair' in four, and 'poor' in two patients. Overall, thirteen patients had 31 (minor/major) complications with a ratio of 2.38 complications per patient. To treat the bone defects and associated complications, a mean of

  16. Imaging symptomatics in recurrent facial nerve neuritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavchev, D.

    2001-01-01

    Gaining better insight into the etiology and pathogenesis of recurrent facial nerve neuritis requires the use of an appropriate imaging modality of examination. This is retrospective analysis of 106 patients with recurrent n. facialis neuritis, studied by conventional x-ray methods, including: segment roentgenography according to Schuller, Stenverse, Biezalski (in children), and hypocyloidal directly enlarged polytomography, with emphasis laid on their role in the diagnostic algorithm of study. Assessment is done of the Fallopian canal width and course, with a special reference to adjacent bony structures, having essential practical bearing on planning interventions for decompression of the nerve and chronic otomastoiditis treatment. In 30 % of the patients are observed inflammatory changes in the parafacial bony structures as an expression of inflammatory otogenic etiology of recurrent n. facialis neuritis, and in 7 % - eburneization of bony structures. The symptom of improved Fallopian canal visibility is documented in cases presenting chronic inflammatory processes involving parafacial cellular structures. (author)

  17. Impaired peripheral nerve regeneration in type-2 diabetic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vuong M; Tu, Nguyen Huu; Katano, Tayo; Matsumura, Shinji; Saito, Akira; Yamada, Akihiro; Furue, Hidemasa; Ito, Seiji

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common and serious complications of type-2 diabetes. Diabetic neuropathy is characterized by a distal symmetrical sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and its incidence increases in patients 40 years of age or older. In spite of extensive research over decades, there are few effective treatments for diabetic neuropathy besides glucose control and improved lifestyle. The earliest changes in diabetic neuropathy occur in sensory nerve fibers, with initial degeneration and regeneration resulting in pain. To seek its effective treatment, here we prepared a type-2 diabetic mouse model by giving mice 2 injections of streptozotocin and nicotinamide and examining the ability for nerve regeneration by using a sciatic nerve transection-regeneration model previously established by us. Seventeen weeks after the last injection, the mice exhibited symptoms of type-2 diabetes, that is, impaired glucose tolerance, decreased insulin level, mechanical hyperalgesia, and impaired sensory nerve fibers in the plantar skin. These mice showed delayed functional recovery and nerve regeneration by 2 weeks compared with young healthy mice and by 1 week compared with age-matched non-diabetic mice after axotomy. Furthermore, type-2 diabetic mice displayed increased expression of PTEN in their DRG neurons. Administration of a PTEN inhibitor at the cutting site of the nerve for 4 weeks promoted the axonal transport and functional recovery remarkably. This study demonstrates that peripheral nerve regeneration was impaired in type-2 diabetic model and that its combination with sciatic nerve transection is suitable for the study of the pathogenesis and treatment of early diabetic neuropathy. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. In vitro assessment of induced phrenic nerve cryothermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ryan P; Bersie, Stephanie M; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Phrenic nerve injury, both left and right, is considered a significant complication of cryoballoon ablation for treatment of drug-refractory atrial fibrillation, and functional recovery of the phrenic nerve can take anywhere from hours to months. The purpose of this study was to focus on short periods of cooling to determine the minimal amount of cooling that may terminate nerve function related to cryo ablation. Left and/or right phrenic nerves were dissected from the pericardium and connective tissue of swine (n = 35 preparations). Nerves were placed in a recording chamber modified with a thermocouple array. This apparatus was placed in a digital water bath to maintain an internal chamber temperature of 37°C. Nerves were stimulated proximally with a 1-V, 0.1-ms square wave. Bipolar compound action potentials were recorded proximal and distal to the site of ablation both before and after ablation, then analyzed to determine changes in latency, amplitude, and duration. Temperatures were recorded at a rate of 5 Hz, and maximum cooling rates were calculated. Phrenic nerves were found to elicit compound action potentials upon stimulation for periods up to 4 hours minimum. Average conduction velocity was 56.7 ± 14.7 m/s preablation and 49.8 ± 16.6 m/s postablation (P = .17). Cooling to mild subzero temperatures ceased production of action potentials for >1 hour. Taking into account the data presented here, previous publications, and a conservative stance, during cryotherapy applications, cooling of the nerve to below 4°C should be avoided whenever possible. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Deoxycholic Acid and the Marginal Mandibular Nerve: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Alexander D; Ansari, Waseem; Young, Jason M; Maley, Bruce; Plesec, Thomas P; Hwang, Catherine J; Perry, Julian D

    2018-06-04

    One of the rare but serious complications observed with deoxycholic acid administration is damage to the marginal mandibular nerve. In this study, we evaluated if deoxycholic acid directly induces histologic damage to fresh cadaveric marginal mandibular nerve. A segment of marginal mandibular nerve was harvested from 12 hemifaces of 6 fresh cadavers. The nerve specimen was exposed to either 0.9% sterile saline for 24 h, deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 20 min, or deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 24 h. The nerve specimens were then fixed in glutaraldehyde for a minimum of 24 h. Toluidine blue stained sections were evaluated for stain intensity using light microscopy and color deconvolution image analysis. Supraplatysmal fat was harvested as a positive control and exposed to the same treatments as the marginal mandibular nerve specimens, then evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Toluidine blue staining was less in the marginal mandibular nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid when compared to saline. The specimen exposed to deoxycholic acid for 24 h showed less toluidine blue staining than that of the nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid for 20 min. Transmission electron microscopy of submental fat exposed to deoxycholic acid revealed disruption of adipocyte cell membrane integrity and loss of cellular organelles when compared to specimens only exposed to saline. Deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) damages the marginal mandibular nerve myelin sheath in fresh human cadaver specimens. Direct deoxycholic acid neurotoxicity may cause marginal mandibular nerve injury clinically. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  20. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  1. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  2. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  3. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  4. The influence of distal-end heat treatment on deflection of nickel-titanium archwire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marcelo Faria da; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maia; Gurgel, Júlio de Araújo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the deflection-force behavior of nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires adjacent to the portion submitted to heat treatment. A total of 106 segments of NiTi wires (0.019 x 0.025-in) and heat-activated NiTi wires (0.016 x 0.022-in) from four commercial brands were tested. The segments were obtained from 80 archwires. For the experimental group, the distal portion of each segmented archwire was subjected to heat treatment (n = 40), while the other distal portion of the same archwire was used as a heating-free control group (n = 40). Deflection tests were performed in a temperature-controlled universal testing machine. Unpaired Student's t-tests were applied to determine if there were differences between the experimental and control groups for each commercial brand and size of wire. Statistical significance was set at p wire. Heat treatment applied to the distal ends of rectangular NiTi archwires does not permanently change the elastic properties of the adjacent portions.

  5. The influence of distal-end heat treatment on deflection of nickel-titanium archwire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Faria da Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the deflection-force behavior of nickel-titanium (NiTi orthodontic wires adjacent to the portion submitted to heat treatment. Material and Methods: A total of 106 segments of NiTi wires (0.019 x 0.025-in and heat-activated NiTi wires (0.016 x 0.022-in from four commercial brands were tested. The segments were obtained from 80 archwires. For the experimental group, the distal portion of each segmented archwire was subjected to heat treatment (n = 40, while the other distal portion of the same archwire was used as a heating-free control group (n = 40. Deflection tests were performed in a temperature-controlled universal testing machine. Unpaired Student's t-tests were applied to determine if there were differences between the experimental and control groups for each commercial brand and size of wire. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the tested groups with the same size and brand of wire. Conclusions: Heat treatment applied to the distal ends of rectangular NiTi archwires does not permanently change the elastic properties of the adjacent portions.

  6. Median nerve cross-sectional area and MRI diffusion characteristics: normative values at the carpal tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lawrence; Gai, Neville

    2009-01-01

    Enlargement of the median nerve is an objective potential imaging sign of carpal tunnel syndrome. Diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) may provide additional structural information that may prove useful in characterizing median neuropathy. This study further examines normal values for median nerve cross-sectional area (CSA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA). Twenty-three wrists in 17 healthy volunteers underwent MRI of the wrist at 3 T. In 13 subjects, DTI was performed at a B value of 600 mm 2 /s. Median nerve CSA, ADC, and FA were analyzed at standardized anatomic levels. Mean (SD) median nerve CSA within the proximal carpal tunnel was 10.0 (3.4) mm 2 . The mean (SD) FA of the median nerve was 0.71 (0.06) and 0.70 (0.13) proximal to and within the carpal tunnel, respectively. There was a significant difference between nerve CSA and ADC, but not FA, at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel. Nerve CSA, ADC, and FA did not differ between men and women or between dominant and non-dominant wrists. Nerve CSA at the proximal carpal tunnel was positively correlated with subject age and body mass index. Our results suggest a 90% upper confidence limit for normal median nerve CSA of 14.4 mm 2 at the proximal carpal tunnel, higher than normal limits reported by many ultrasound studies. We observed a difference between the CSA and ADC, but not the FA, of the median nerve at the distal forearm and proximal carpal tunnel levels. (orig.)

  7. Imaging the Cisternal Segment of Cranial Nerves with 3.0TMR 3D-COSMIC and Multiplanar Reconstruction%3.0TMR3D-COSMIC成像序列结合MRP对Ⅰ-Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段的成像研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家才; 郑红伟; 漆剑频; 夏黎明; 胡道予

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of To compare 3D-COSMIC MRI sequences for cranial nerves I ~XII. Methods 3D-C0SMIC were used in 20 volunteers and 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves. 480 nerves were evaluated. Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings into 3 grades: 1 (completely visualized), 2 (partially visualized), and 3 (not visualized). The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization, the relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades: 1 (notcontact),2(contact),3(compression). Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-COSMIC sequenceswere as follows respectively: nerve I (86%); nerve 11(100%); nerve 111(97%); nerve IV(23%); nerve V (100%); nerve VT(90%); nerve W( 100%); nerve Wl( 100%); nerve K-XI complex (63%, 100% and53%); nerve XE(40%). 3 of 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact. Conclusion 3D-COSM1C sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels, especially II -> UL V-, VI-. VII-. V1IK X cranial nerves, to help clinical treatment.%目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC 成像序列对Ⅰ-Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 采用3.0TMR扫描仪对20例健康志愿者和10例疑因血管等原因压迫相应颅脑神经产生临床症状的患者进行MR检查.并由两名神经放射学医师根据20例志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为以下3个等级:清晰、较清晰、不清晰,前两者定义为显示,后者定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 脑神经在3D-COSMIC序列的显示率分别为:嗅神经(86%),视神经(100%),动眼神经(97%),滑车神经(23%),三叉神经(100%),外展神经(90%),面神经(100%),前庭蜗神经 (100%),后组颅神经复合体(舌咽神经、迷走神经、副神经)(63%、100%、53%),

  8. 3.0T MR3D-COSMIC序列结合多平面重建对12对脑神经脑池段的成像价值%Imaging the cisternal segment of cranial nerves with 3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC and multiplanar reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红伟; 马秀华; 薛鹏; 漆剑频; 胡道予; 吕富荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of 3D-COSMIC MRI sequences for cranial nerves I-M.Methods 3D-COSMIC were used in 20 volunteers and 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves.480 nerves were evaluated.Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings into 3 grades: 1 (completely visualized) ,2 (partially visualized) ,and 3 (not visualized).The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization,the relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades;1 (notcontact) ,2(contact) ,3 (compression).Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-COSMIC sequences were as follows respectively: nerve I (86%);nerve Ⅱ (100%);nerve Ⅲ (97% );nerve Ⅳ(23%);nerve Ⅴ(100%) ;nerve Ⅵ (90%) ;nerve Ⅶ(100%);nerve 1(100%);nerve IX-XI complex(63% ,100% and 53%);nerve Ⅻ(40%)3 of 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact.Conclusion 3D-COSMIC sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels ,especially Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ,Ⅴ,Ⅵ,Ⅶ,Ⅷ,Ⅹ cranial nerves?to help clinical treatment.%目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC成像序列对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 采用3.0T MR扫描仪对20例健康志愿者和10例疑因血管等原因压迫相应颅脑神经产生临床症状的患者进行MR检查,扫描序列包括3D-COSMIC及3D-TOF-SPGR.并由2名神经放射学医师根据20例健康志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为清晰、较清晰、不清晰3个等级,清晰和较清晰定义为显示,不清晰定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 脑神经在3D-COSMIC序列的显示率分别为:嗅神经(86%),视神经(100%),动眼神经(97%),滑车神经(23%),三叉神经(100%),外展神经(90%),面神经(100%),前庭蜗神经(100%),后组颅神经复合体[舌咽神经(63%)

  9. Treatment of unstable distal radius fractures with Ilizarov circular, nonbridging external fixator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyllianakis, Minos; Mylonas, Spyros; Saridis, Alkis; Kallivokas, Alkiviadis; Kouzelis, Antonis; Megas, Panagiotis

    2010-03-01

    Unstable distal radius fractures remain a challenge for the treating orthopaedic surgeon. We present a retrospective follow-up study (mean follow-up 12.5 months) of 20 patients with 21 unstable distal radius fractures that were reduced in a closed manner and stabilized with a nonbridging Ilizarov external fixator. Subsequent insertion of olive wires for interfragmentary compression was performed in cases with intra-articular fractures. According to the overall evaluation proposed by Gartland and Werley scoring system 12 wrists were classified as excellent, 6 as good, 2 as fair and 1 as poor. Grade II pin-tract infection in distal fracture fragment was detected in 3 wires from a total of 78 (3.8%) and in 4 half pins out of a total of 9 (44.4%). Pronation was the most frequently impaired movement. This was restricted in 4 patients (19%) in whom a radioulnar transfixing wire was applied. Symptoms of irritation of superficial sensory branch of the radial nerve occurred in 3 patients with an olive wire applied in a closed manner in the distal fragment. Ilizarov method yields functional results comparable to that of other methods whilst it avoids wrist immobilization, open reduction and reoperation for implant removal. The method is associated with a low rate of major complication and satisfactory functional outcome. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Retrospective case series of the imaging findings of facial nerve hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yunlong; Jin, Yanfang; Yang, Bentao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Jiandong; Wang, Zhenchang

    2015-09-01

    The aim was to compare high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and thin-section magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of facial nerve hemangioma. The HRCT and MRI characteristics of 17 facial nerve hemangiomas diagnosed between 2006 and 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients included in the study suffered from a space-occupying lesion of soft tissues at the geniculate ganglion fossa. Affected nerve was compared for size and shape with the contralateral unaffected nerve. HRCT showed irregular expansion and broadening of the facial nerve canal, damage of the bone wall and destruction of adjacent bone, with "point"-like or "needle"-like calcifications in 14 cases. The average CT value was 320.9 ± 141.8 Hu. Fourteen patients had a widened labyrinthine segment; 6/17 had a tympanic segment widening; 2/17 had a greater superficial petrosal nerve canal involvement, and 2/17 had an affected internal auditory canal (IAC) segment. On MRI, all lesions were significantly enhanced due to high blood supply. Using 2D FSE T2WI, the lesion detection rate was 82.4 % (14/17). 3D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) revealed the lesions in all patients. HRCT showed that the average number of involved segments in the facial nerve canal was 2.41, while MRI revealed an average of 2.70 segments (P facial nerve hemangioma were typical, revealing irregular masses growing along the facial nerve canal, with calcifications and rich blood supply. Thin-section enhanced MRI was more accurate in lesion detection and assessment compared with HRCT.

  11. Intrathecal Spread of Injectate Following an Ultrasound-Guided Selective C5 Nerve Root Injection in a Human Cadaver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falyar, Christian R; Abercrombie, Caroline; Becker, Robert; Biddle, Chuck

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root blocks have been described in several case reports as a safe and effective means to anesthetize the distal clavicle while maintaining innervation of the upper extremity and preserving diaphragmatic function. In this study, cadavers were injected with 5 mL of 0.5% methylene blue dye under ultrasound guidance to investigate possible proximal and distal spread of injectate along the brachial plexus, if any. Following the injections, the specimens were dissected and examined to determine the distribution of dye and the structures affected. One injection revealed dye extended proximally into the epidural space, which penetrated the dura mater and was present on the spinal cord and brainstem. Dye was noted distally to the divisions in 3 injections. The anterior scalene muscle and phrenic nerve were stained in all 4 injections. It appears unlikely that local anesthetic spread is limited to the nerve root following an ultrasound-guided selective C5 nerve root injection. Under certain conditions, intrathecal spread also appears possible, which has major patient safety implications. Additional safety measures, such as injection pressure monitoring, should be incorporated into this block, or approaches that are more distal should be considered for the acute pain management of distal clavicle fractures.

  12. Intraneural Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for the Treatment of Radial Nerve Section: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unai García de Cortázar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The radial nerve is the most frequently injured nerve in the upper extremity. Numerous options in treatment have been described for radial nerve injury, such as neurolysis, nerve grafts, or tendon transfers. Currently, new treatment options are arising, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP, an autologous product with proved therapeutic effect for various musculoskeletal disorders. We hypothesized that this treatment is a promising alternative for this type of nerve pathology. The patient was a healthy 27-year-old man who suffered a deep and long cut in the distal anterolateral region of the right arm. Forty-eight hours after injury, an end-to-end suture was performed without a microscope. Three months after the surgery, an electromyogram (EMG showed right radial nerve neurotmesis with no tendency to reinnervation. Four months after the trauma, serial intraneural infiltrations of PRP were conducted using ultrasound guidance. The therapeutic effect was assessed by manual muscle testing and by EMG. Fourteen months after the injury and 11 months after the first PRP injection, functional recovery was achieved. The EMG showed a complete reinnervation of the musculature of the radial nerve dependent. The patient remains satisfied with the result and he is able to practice his profession. Conclusions: PRP infiltrations have the potential to enhance the healing process of radial nerve palsy. This case report demonstrates the therapeutic potential of this technology for traumatic peripheral nerve palsy, as well as the apt utility of US-guided PRP injections.

  13. [Preliminary investigation of treatment of ulnar nerve defect by end-to-side neurorrhaphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y; Wang, T; Fang, H

    1997-11-01

    In the repair of the defect of peripheral nerve, it was necessary to find an operative method with excellent therapeutic effect but simple technique. Based on the experimental study, one case of old injury of the ulnar nerve was treated by end-to-side neurorraphy with the intact median nerve. In this case the nerve defect was over 3 cm and unable to be sutured directly. The patient was followed up for fourteen months after the operation. The recovery of the sensation and the myodynamia was evaluated. The results showed that: the sensation and the motor function innervated by ulnar nerve were recovered. The function of the hand was almost recovered to be normal. It was proved that the end-to-side neurorraphy between the distal stump with the intact median nerve to repair the defect of the ulnar nerve was a new operative procedure for nerve repair. Clinically it had good effect with little operative difficulty. This would give a bright prospect to repair of peripheral nerve defect in the future.

  14. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  15. Transfer of extensor digiti minimi and extensor carpi ulnaris nerve branches to the intrinsic motor nerve branches: A histological study on cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, H; Haji Vandi, S

    2017-06-01

    In cases of high ulnar and median nerve palsy, result of nerve repair in term of intrinsic muscle recovery is unsatisfactory. Distal nerve transfer can alleviate the regeneration time and improve the results. Transfer of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) and extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) nerve branches to the deep branch of ulnar nerve (DBUN)/recurrent branch of median nerve (RMN) at wrist had been used to restore intrinsic hand function but, incomplete recovery occurred. The axon count at the donor nerve has a strong influence on the final results. This cadaveric study aims to analyses the histology of this nerve transfer to evaluate whether these donor nerves are suitable for this transfer or another donor nerve may be considered. Ten cadaveric upper limbs dissected to identify the location of the EDM, ECU, RMN and DBUN. Surface area, fascicle count, and axon number was determined by histological methods. The mean of axon number in the EDM, ECU, RMN and DBUN branches was 5931, 7355, 30960 and 35426, respectively. In this study, the number of axons in the EDM and ECU branches was 37% (13281/35426) of that in the DBUN. Also, the number of axons in the EDM and ECU branches was 42% (13281/30960) of that in the RMN. The axon count data showed an unfavorable match between the EDM, ECU and DBUN/RMN. Therefore, it is suggested that another donor nerve with higher axon number to be considered. Cadaver study (histological study). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells versus adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Fernandes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have confirmed that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be used for treatment of several nervous system diseases. However, isolation of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMSCs is an invasive and painful process and the yield is very low. Therefore, there is a need to search for other alterative stem cell sources. Adipose-derived MSCs (ADSCs have phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to those of BMSCs. The production of ADSCs is greater than that of BMSCs, and ADSCs proliferate faster than BMSCs. To compare the effects of venous grafts containing BMSCs or ADSCs on sciatic nerve injury, in this study, rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham (only sciatic nerve exposed, Matrigel (MG; sciatic nerve injury + intravenous transplantation of MG vehicle, ADSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing ADSCs, and BMSCs (sciatic nerve injury + intravenous MG containing BMSCs groups. Sciatic functional index was calculated to evaluate the function of injured sciatic nerve. Morphologic characteristics of nerves distal to the lesion were observed by toluidine blue staining. Spinal motor neurons labeled with Fluoro-Gold were quantitatively assessed. Compared with sham-operated rats, sciatic functional index was lower, the density of small-diameter fibers was significantly increased, and the number of motor neurons significantly decreased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. Neither ADSCs nor BMSCs significantly improved the sciatic nerve function of rats with sciatic nerve injury, increased fiber density, fiber diameters, axonal diameters, myelin sheath thickness, and G ratios (axonal diameter/fiber diameter ratios in the sciatic nerve distal to the lesion site. There was no significant difference in the number of spinal motor neurons among ADSCs, BMSCs and MG groups. These results suggest that neither BMSCs nor ADSCs provide satisfactory results for peripheral nerve repair when using MG as the conductor for

  17. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  18. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  19. Cranial nerve monitoring during subpial dissection in temporomesial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortler, Martin; Fiegele, Thomas; Walser, Gerald; Trinka, Eugen; Eisner, Wilhelm

    2011-06-01

    Cranial nerves (CNs) crossing between the brainstem and skull base at the level of the tentorial hiatus may be at risk in temporomesial surgery involving subpial dissection and/or tumorous growth leading to distorted anatomy. We aimed to identify the surgical steps most likely to result in CN damage in this type of surgery. Electromyographic responses obtained with standard neuromonitoring techniques and a continuous free-running EMG were graded as either contact activity or pathological spontaneous activity (PSA) during subpial resection of temporomesial structures in 16 selective amygdalohippocampectomy cases. Integrity of peripheral motor axons was tested by transpial/transarachnoidal electrical stimulation while recording compound muscle action potentials from distal muscle(s). Continuous EMG showed pathological activity in five (31.2%) patients. Nine events with PSA (slight activity, n = 8; strong temporary activity, n = 1) were recorded. The oculomotor nerve was involved three times, the trochlear nerve twice, the facial nerve once, and all monitored nerves on three occasions. Surgical maneuvers associated with PSA were the resection of deep parts of the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus (CN IV, twice; CN III, once), lining with or removing cotton patties from the resection cavity (III, twice; all channels, once) and indirect exertion of tension on the intact pia/arachnoid of the uncal region while mobilizing the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus en bloc (all channels, once; III, once). CMAPs were observed at 0.3 mA in two patients and at 0.6 mA in one patient, and without registering the exact amount of intensity in three patients. The most dangerous steps leading to cranial nerve damage during mesial temporal lobe surgery are the final stages of the intervention while the resection is being completed in the deep posterior part and the resection cavity is being lined with patties. Distant traction may act on nerves crossing the tentorial

  20. 142 Key words: Brachialis, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AWORI KIRSTEEN

    The innervation of brachialis muscle by the musculocutaneous nerve has been described as either type I or type II and the main trunk to this muscle is rarely absent. The contribution .... brachialis muscle by fiber analysis of supply nerves].

  1. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...... excitability studies are relatively novel but are acquiring an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral nerves. RECENT FINDINGS: By measuring responses in nerve that are related to nodal function (strength-duration time constant, rheobase and recovery cycle) and internodal function (threshold...

  2. Complications after pinning of supracondylar distal humerus fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyal, Ravi K; Chu, Jennifer Y; Schoenecker, Perry L; Dobbs, Matthew B; Luhmann, Scott J; Gordon, J Eric

    2009-01-01

    Supracondylar distal humerus fractures are one of the most common skeletal injuries in children. The current treatment of choice in North America is closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation. Often surgeons leave the pins exposed beneath a cast but outside the skin. Great variation exists with respect to preoperative skin preparation, and perioperative antibiotic administration. Few data exist regarding the rate of infection and other complications. The purpose of this study is to review a large series of children to evaluate the rate of infection and other complications. A retrospective review was carried out of all patients treated at our institution over an 11-year period. A total of 622 patients were identified that were followed for a minimum of 2 weeks after pin removal. Seventeen patients had flexion-type fractures, 294 had type II fractures, and 311 had type III fractures. Seventy-four fractures (11.9%) had preoperative nerve deficits with anterior interosseous palsies being the most common (33 fractures, 5.3%). Preoperative antibiotics were given to 163 patients (26.2%). Spray and towel draping were used in 362 patients, paint and towel draping were used in 65 patients, alcohol paint and towel draping were used in 146 patients, and a full preparation and draping were used in 13 patients. The pins were left exposed under the cast in 591 fractures (95%), and buried beneath the skin in 31 fractures (5.0%). A medial pin was placed in 311 fractures with a small incision made to aid placement in 18 of these cases. The most common complication was pin migration necessitating unexpected return to the operating room for pin removal in 11 patients (1.8%). One patient developed a deep infection with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis (0.2%). Five additional patients had superficial skin infections and were treated with oral antibiotics for a total infection rate of 6 of 622 patients (1.0%). One patient ultimately had a malunion and 4 others returned to the

  3. Spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkol Gokhan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal myoclonus is a rare disorder characterized by myoclonic movements in muscles that originate from several segments of the spinal cord and usually associated with laminectomy, spinal cord injury, post-operative, lumbosacral radiculopathy, spinal extradural block, myelopathy due to demyelination, cervical spondylosis and many other diseases. On rare occasions, it can originate from the peripheral nerve lesions and be mistaken for peripheral myoclonus. Careful history taking and electrophysiological evaluation is important in differential diagnosis. The aim of this report is to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics and treatment results of a case with spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury without any structural lesion.

  4. Localization of lead in rat peripheral nerve by electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windebank, A.J.; Dyck, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Lead intoxication in rats reliably produces segmental demyelination. Following a single intravenous injection of radioactive lead, localization of tracer was observed sequentially by quantitative electron microscopical autoradiography. The animals injected had been on a lead-containing diet for 70 days; as a result, the blood-nerve barrier was broken down and demyelination was proceeding. Six hours after a single dose, the lead was localized to the endoneurial space of the peroneal nerve, and 72 hours later, to the myelin membrane. Lead may exert a direct effect on the membrane and alter its stability both by altering the lipid content of the membrane and by directly interfering with the lamellar structure

  5. Latent X-ray damage in the rat sciatic nerve results in delay in functional recovery after a heat treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrind, H. H.; van Dam, W. M.; Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of X-irradiation on the sensitivity of the rat sciatic nerve to local hyperthermia was investigated. A 10 or 20 mm long segment of the nerve was irradiated intraoperatively using 50 kV X-rays. Hyperthermia (30 min at 45 degrees C), was applied to the irradiated part (over a length of 5

  6. Distal splenorenal shunt with partial spleen resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajin Predrag

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypersplenism is a common complication of portal hypertension. Cytopenia in hypersplenism is predominantly caused by splenomegaly. Distal splenorenal shunt (Warren with partial spleen resection is an original surgical technique that regulates cytopenia by reduction of the enlarged spleen. Objective. The aim of our study was to present the advantages of distal splenorenal shunt (Warren with partial spleen resection comparing morbidity and mortality in a group of patients treated by distal splenorenal shunt with partial spleen resection with a group of patients treated only by a distal splenorenal shunt. Method. From 1995 to 2003, 41 patients with portal hypertension were surgically treated due to hypersplenism and oesophageal varices. The first group consisted of 20 patients (11 male, mean age 42.3 years who were treated by distal splenorenal shunt with partial spleen resection. The second group consisted of 21 patients (13 male, mean age 49.4 years that were treated by distal splenorenal shunt only. All patients underwent endoscopy and assessment of oesophageal varices. The size of the spleen was evaluated by ultrasound, CT or by scintigraphy. Angiography was performed in all patients. The platelet and white blood cell count and haemoglobin level were registered. Postoperatively, we noted blood transfusion, complications and total hospital stay. Follow-up period was 12 months, with first checkup after one month. Results In the first group, only one patient had splenomegaly postoperatively (5%, while in the second group there were 13 patients with splenomegaly (68%. Before surgery, the mean platelet count in the first group was 51.6±18.3x109/l, to 118.6±25.4x109/l postoperatively. The mean platelet count in the second group was 67.6±22.8x109/l, to 87.8±32.1x109/l postoperatively. Concerning postoperative splenomegaly, statistically significant difference was noted between the first and the second group (p<0.05. Comparing the

  7. Contemporary Management of Primary Distal Urethral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Samer L; Witjes, Johannes Alfred; Kassouf, Wassim

    2016-11-01

    Primary urethral cancer is one of the rare urologic tumors. Distal urethral tumors are usually less advanced at diagnosis compared with proximal tumors and have a good prognosis if treated appropriately. Low-stage distal tumors can be managed successfully with a surgical approach in men or radiation therapy in women. There are no clear-cut indications for the choice of the most appropriate treatment modality. Organ-preserving modalities have shown effective and should be used whenever they do not compromise the oncological safety to decrease the physical and psychological trauma of dismemberment or loss of sexual/urinary function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spontaneous distal rupture of the plantar fascia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Draghi, Ferdinando

    2018-07-01

    Spontaneous ruptures of the plantar fascia are uncommon injuries. They typically occur at its calcaneal insertion and usually represent a complication of plantar fasciitis and local treatment with steroid injections. In contrast, distal ruptures commonly result from traumatic injuries. We describe the case of a spontaneous distal rupture of the plantar fascia in a 48-year-old woman with a low level of physical activity and no history of direct injury to the foot, plantar fasciitis, or steroid injections. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Torsion of wandering spleen and distal pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheflin, J.R.; Lee, C.M.; Kretchmar, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    Wandering spleen is the term applied to the condition in which a long pedicle allows the spleen to lie in an abnormal location. Torsion of a wandering spleen is an unusual cause of an acute abdomen and is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. Associated torsion of the distal pancreas is even more uncommon. The authors describe a patient with torsion of a wandering spleen and distal pancreas, who was correctly diagnosed, and define the merits of the imaging methods used. The initial examination should be 99 /sup m/Tc-sulfur colloid liner-spleen scanning

  10. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  11. Retrograde axonal transport of 125I-nerve growth factor in rat ileal mesenteric nerves. Effect of streptozocin diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.E.; Plurad, S.B.; Saffitz, J.E.; Grabau, G.G.; Yip, H.K.

    1985-01-01

    The retrograde axonal transport of intravenously (i.v.) administered 125 I-nerve growth factor ( 125 I-NGF) was examined in mesenteric nerves innervating the small bowel of rats with streptozocin (STZ) diabetes using methods described in detail in the companion article. The accumulation of 125 I-NGF distal to a ligature on the ileal mesenteric nerves of diabetic animals was 30-40% less than in control animals. The inhibition of accumulation of 125 I-NGF in diabetic animals was greater at a ligature tied 2 h after i.v. administration than at a ligature tied after 14 h, which suggests that the diabetic animals may have a lag in initiation of NGF transport in the terminal axon or retardation of transport at some site along the axon. The 125 I-NGF transport defect was observed as early as 3 days after the induction of diabetes, a time before the development of structural axonal lesions, and did not worsen at later times when dystrophic axonopathy is present. Both the ileal mesenteric nerves, which eventually develop dystrophic axonopathy in experimental diabetes, and the jejunal mesenteric nerves, which never develop comparable structural alterations, showed similar 125 I-NGF transport deficits, suggesting that the existence of the transport abnormality does not predict the eventual development of dystrophic axonal lesions. Autoradiographic localization of 125 I-NGF in the ileal mesenteric nerves of animals that had been diabetic for 11-13 mo demonstrated decreased amounts of 125 I-NGF in transit in unligated paravascular nerve fascicles. There was, however, no evidence for focal retardation of transported 125 I-NGF at the sites of dystrophic axonal lesions

  12. Mechanisms and Management of Diabetic Painful Distal Symmetrical Polyneuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Solomon; Boulton, Andrew J.M.; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2013-01-01

    Although a number of the diabetic neuropathies may result in painful symptomatology, this review focuses on the most common: chronic sensorimotor distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSPN). It is estimated that 15–20% of diabetic patients may have painful DSPN, but not all of these will require therapy. In practice, the diagnosis of DSPN is a clinical one, whereas for longitudinal studies and clinical trials, quantitative sensory testing and electrophysiological assessment are usually necessary. A number of simple numeric rating scales are available to assess the frequency and severity of neuropathic pain. Although the exact pathophysiological processes that result in diabetic neuropathic pain remain enigmatic, both peripheral and central mechanisms have been implicated, and extend from altered channel function in peripheral nerve through enhanced spinal processing and changes in many higher centers. A number of pharmacological agents have proven efficacy in painful DSPN, but all are prone to side effects, and none impact the underlying pathophysiological abnormalities because they are only symptomatic therapy. The two first-line therapies approved by regulatory authorities for painful neuropathy are duloxetine and pregabalin. α-Lipoic acid, an antioxidant and pathogenic therapy, has evidence of efficacy but is not licensed in the U.S. and several European countries. All patients with DSPN are at increased risk of foot ulceration and require foot care, education, and if possible, regular podiatry assessment. PMID:23970715

  13. Retrospective analysis of extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures treated with the use of pre-contoured lateral column metaphyseal LCP by triceps-sparing posterolateral approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatinder Kharbanda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Management of extra-articular distal humerus fractures presents a challenge to the treating surgeon due to the complex anatomy of the distal part of the humerus and complicated fracture morphology. Although surgical treatment has shown to provide a more stable reduction and alignment and predictable return to function, it has been associated with complications like iatrogenic radial nerve palsy, infection, non-union and Implant failure. We in the present series retrospectively analysed 20 patients with extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures surgically treated using the extra-articular distal humeral locking plate approached by the triceps-sparing posterolateral approach. The outcome was assessed using the DASH score, range of motion at the elbow and the time to union. The mean time to radiographic fracture union was 12 weeks.

  14. Retrospective analysis of extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures treated with the use of pre-contoured lateral column metaphyseal LCP by triceps-sparing posterolateral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Yatinder; Tanwar, Yashwant Singh; Srivastava, Vishal; Birla, Vikas; Rajput, Ashok; Pandit, Ramsagar

    2017-04-01

    Management of extra-articular distal humerus fractures presents a challenge to the treating surgeon due to the complex anatomy of the distal part of the humerus and complicated fracture morphology. Although surgical treatment has shown to provide a more stable reduction and alignment and predictable return to function, it has been associated with complications like iatrogenic radial nerve palsy, infection, non-union and Implant failure. We in the present series retrospectively analysed 20 patients with extra-articular distal humerus shaft fractures surgically treated using the extra-articular distal humeral locking plate approached by the triceps-sparing posterolateral approach. The outcome was assessed using the DASH score, range of motion at the elbow and the time to union. The mean time to radiographic fracture union was 12 weeks.

  15. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul

    2001-01-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  17. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul [Sungkyunkwan Univ., School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  18. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  19. Proximally evoked soleus H-reflex to S1 nerve root stimulation in sensory neuronopathies (ganglionopathies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Qing; Zhu, Yu; Qiao, Kai; Zheng, Chao-Jun; Bradley, Scott; Weber, Robert; Chen, Xiang-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Sensory neuronopathy (SNN) mimics distal sensory axonopathy. The conventional H-reflex elicited by tibial nerve stimulation (tibial H-reflex) is usually abnormal in both conditions. We evaluated the proximally evoked soleus H-reflex in response to S1 nerve root stimulation (S1 foramen H-reflex) in SNN. Eleven patients with SNN and 6 with distal sensory axonopathy were studied. Tibial and S1 foramen H-reflexes were performed bilaterally in each patient. Tibial and S1 foramen H-reflexes were absent bilaterally in all patients with SNN. In the patients with distal sensory axonopathy, tibial H-reflexes were absent in 4 and demonstrated prolonged latencies in 2, but S1 foramen H-reflexes were normal. Characteristic absence of the H-reflex after both proximal and distal stimulation reflects primary loss of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and the distinct non-length-dependent impairment of sensory nerve fibers in SNN. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Tenascin-C in peripheral nerve morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiquet, M; Wehrle-Haller, B

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) molecule tenascin/cytotactin (TN-C) is expressed at a high level by satellite (glial precursor) cells in developing peripheral nerves of the chick embryo; synthesis of its mRNA peaks at the time period when axonal growth is maximal. When offered as a substrate in vitro, TN-C mediates neurite outgrowth by both motor and sensory neurons. The ability to grow neurites on TN-C is developmentally regulated: sensory neurons from 4-day chick embryos (the stage at which peripheral nerves start to develop) grow immediately and rapidly, whereas neurons from older embryos respond with a long delay. A TN-C domain responsible for this activity is located within the C-terminal (distal) portion of TN-C subunits. Integrin receptors seem to be involved on peripheral neurites because their growth on TN-C is completely blocked by antibodies to beta 1 integrins. In striking contrast to neuronal processes, nerve satellite cells can attach to a TN-C substrate but are completely inhibited in their migratory activity. Artificial substrate borders between tenascin and fibronectin or laminin act as selective barriers that allow neurites to pass while holding up satellite cells. The repulsive action of TN-C on satellite cells is similar to that observed for other cell types and is likely to be mediated by additional TN-C domains. In view of these data, it is surprising that mice seem to develop normally without a functional TN-C gene. TN-C is likely to be redundant, that is, its dual action on cell adhesion is shared by other molecules.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Variant palmaris profundus enclosed by an unusual loop of the median nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOU, HSIU-CHU; JENG, HELLEN; KO, TSUI-LING; PAI, MAN-HUI; CHANG, CHIU-YUN; WU, CHING-HSIANG

    2001-01-01

    According to the usual description in most anatomy texts, the median nerve in the forearm passes between the 2 heads of pronator teres. It continues distally between flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus almost to the retinaculum. Muscular branches leave the nerve near the elbow and supply all superficial muscles of the anterior part of the forearm except flexor carpi ulnaris. Many variations of the median nerve in the forearm have been reported (Urban & Krosman, 1992). The palmaris profundus is also a rare anomaly of the forearm (Dyreby & Engber, 1982). It originates from the radial side of the common flexor tendon in the proximal forearm and inserts into the undersurface of the palmar aponeurosis. The origin of palmaris profundus may be close to the median nerve and its branches, and may be involved in compressive neuropathy of the anterior interosseous nerve. Its tendon crossing through the carpal canal has been implicated in the carpal tunnel syndrome (reviewed by Lahey & Aulicino, 1986). In some cases, palmaris profundus was found enclosed in a common fascial sheath with the median nerve (Stark, 1992; Sahinoglu et al. 1994). To indicate its close association with the median nerve, the palmaris profundus was also named ‘musculus comitans nervi mediani’ (Sahinoglu et al. 1994). This article reports an unusual loop of the median nerve encircling an anomalous palmaris profundus in the forearm, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously described. PMID:11693311

  2. Review: peripheral nerve regeneration using non-tubular alginate gel crosslinked with covalent bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Tadashi; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Kyoko; Nakashima, Toshihide; Tanihara, Masao; Ide, Chizuka

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a nerve regeneration material consisting of alginate gel crosslinked with covalent bonds. in the first part of this study, we attempted to analyze nerve regeneration through alginate gel in the early stages within 2 weeks. in the second part, we tried to regenerate cat peripheral nerve by using alginate tubular or non-tubular nerve regeneration devices, and compared their efficacies. Four days after surgery, regenerating axons grew without Schwann cell investment through the partially degraded alginate gel, being in direct contact with the alginate without a basal lamina covering. One to 2 weeks after surgery, regenerating axons were surrounded by common Schwann cells, forming small bundles, with some axons at the periphery being partly in direct contact with alginate. At the distal stump, numerous Schwann cells had migrated into the alginate 8-14 days after surgery. Remarkable restorations of the 50-mm gap in cat sciatic nerve were obtained after a long term by using tubular or non-tubular nerve regeneration material consisting mainly of alginate gel. However, there was no significant difference between both groups at electrophysiological and morphological evaluation. Although, nowadays, nerve regeneration materials being marketed mostly have a tubular structure, our results suggest that the tubular structure is not indispensable for peripheral nerve regeneration.

  3. Identification of adequate vehicles to carry nerve regeneration inducers using tubulisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento-Elias, Adriana Helena; Fresnesdas, Bruno César; Schiavoni, Maria Cristina Lopes; de Almeida, Natália Fernanda Gaspar; Santos, Ana Paula; de Oliveira Ramos, Jean; Junior, Wilson Marques; Barreira, Amilton Antunes

    2012-08-14

    Axonal regeneration depends on many factors, such as the type of injury and repair, age, distance from the cell body and distance of the denervated muscle, loss of surrounding tissue and the type of injured nerve. Experimental models use tubulisation with a silicone tube to research regenerative factors and substances to induce regeneration. Agarose, collagen and DMEM (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium) can be used as vehicles. In this study, we compared the ability of these vehicles to induce rat sciatic nerve regeneration with the intent of finding the least active or inert substance. The experiment used 47 female Wistar rats, which were divided into four experimental groups (agarose 4%, agarose 0.4%, collagen, DMEM) and one normal control group. The right sciatic nerve was exposed, and an incision was made that created a 10 mm gap between the distal and proximal stumps. A silicone tube was grafted onto each stump, and the tubes were filled with the respective media. After 70 days, the sciatic nerve was removed. We evaluated the formation of a regeneration cable, nerve fibre growth, and the functional viability of the regenerated fibres. Comparison among the three vehicles showed that 0.4% agarose gels had almost no effect on provoking the regeneration of peripheral nerves and that 4% agarose gels completely prevented fibre growth. The others substances were associated with profuse nerve fibre growth. In the appropriate concentration, agarose gel may be an important vehicle for testing factors that induce regeneration without interfering with nerve growth.

  4. Cranial nerve vascular compression syndromes of the trigeminal, facial and vago-glossopharyngeal nerves: comparative anatomical study of the central myelin portion and transitional zone; correlations with incidences of corresponding hyperactive dysfunctional syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guclu, Bulent; Sindou, Marc; Meyronet, David; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Simon, Emile; Mertens, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomy of the central myelin portion and the central myelin-peripheral myelin transitional zone of the trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves from fresh cadavers. The aim was also to investigate the relationship between the length and volume of the central myelin portion of these nerves with the incidences of the corresponding cranial dysfunctional syndromes caused by their compression to provide some more insights for a better understanding of mechanisms. The trigeminal, facial, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves from six fresh cadavers were examined. The length of these nerves from the brainstem to the foramen that they exit were measured. Longitudinal sections were stained and photographed to make measurements. The diameters of the nerves where they exit/enter from/to brainstem, the diameters where the transitional zone begins, the distances to the most distal part of transitional zone from brainstem and depths of the transitional zones were measured. Most importantly, the volume of the central myelin portion of the nerves was calculated. Correlation between length and volume of the central myelin portion of these nerves and the incidences of the corresponding hyperactive dysfunctional syndromes as reported in the literature were studied. The distance of the most distal part of the transitional zone from the brainstem was 4.19  ±  0.81 mm for the trigeminal nerve, 2.86  ±  1.19 mm for the facial nerve, 1.51  ±  0.39 mm for the glossopharyngeal nerve, and 1.63  ±  1.15 mm for the vagus nerve. The volume of central myelin portion was 24.54  ±  9.82 mm(3) in trigeminal nerve; 4.43  ±  2.55 mm(3) in facial nerve; 1.55  ±  1.08 mm(3) in glossopharyngeal nerve; 2.56  ±  1.32 mm(3) in vagus nerve. Correlations (p  nerves and incidences of the corresponding diseases. At present it is rather well-established that primary trigeminal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm and vago

  5. Age-related ultrastructural and monoamine oxidase changes in the rat optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurone, S; Ripandelli, G; Minni, A; Lattanzi, R; Miglietta, S; Pepe, N; Fumagalli, L; Micera, A; Pastore, F S; Artico, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the morphology and the distribution of the monoamine oxidase enzymatic system in the optic nerve of 4 month-old Wistar (young) and 28 month-old Wistar (old) rats. The optic nerve was harvested from 20 young and old rats. The segment of optic nerve was divided longitudinally into two pieces, each 0.1 mm in length. The first piece was used for transmission electron microscopy. The second piece was stained with histochemical reaction for monoamine oxidase. The agerelated changes in the optic nerve of rats include micro-anatomical details, ultrastructure and monoamine oxidase histochemical staining. A strong decrease of the thin nerve fibers and a swelling of the thick ones can be observed in optic nerve fibers of old rats. Increased monoamine oxidase histochemical staining of the optic nerve of aged rats is well demonstrated. The increase of meningeal shealth and the decrease of thin nerve fibers of the optic nerve in old rats are well documented. Morphological, ultrastructural and histochemical changes observed in optic nerve fibers of the old rats show a close relation with aging.

  6. A clear map of the lower cranial nerves at the superior carotid triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Garcia-Gonzalez, Ulises; Agrawal, Abhishek; Tavares, Paulo L M S; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2010-07-01

    The lower cranial nerves must be identified to avoid iatrogenic injury during skull base and high cervical approaches. Prompt recognition of these structures using basic landmarks could reduce surgical time and morbidity. The anterior triangle of the neck was dissected in 30 cadaveric head sides. The most superficial segments of the glossopharyngeal, vagus and its superior laryngeal nerves, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves were exposed and designated into smaller anatomic triangles. The midpoint of each nerve segment inside the triangles was correlated to the angle of the mandible (AM), mastoid tip (MT), and bifurcation of the common carotid artery. A triangle bounded by the styloglossus muscle, external carotid artery, and facial artery housed the glossopharyngeal nerve. This nerve segment was 0.06 ± 0.71 cm posterior to the AM and 2.50 ± 0.59 cm inferior to the MT. The vagus nerve ran inside the carotid sheath posterior to internal carotid artery and common carotid artery bifurcation in 48.3% of specimens. A triangle formed by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, sternocleidomastoid muscle, and internal jugular vein housed the accessory nerve, 1.90 ± 0.60 cm posterior to the AM and 2.30 ± 0.57 cm inferior to the MT. A triangle outlined by the posterior belly of digastric muscle, internal jugular vein, and common facial vein housed the hypoglossal nerve, which was 0.82 ± 0.84 cm posterior to the AM and 3.64 ± 0.70 cm inferior to the MT. Comprehensible landmarks can be defined to help expose the lower cranial nerves to avoid injury to this complex region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical anatomy of the styloid muscles and the extracranial glossopharyngeal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prades, J M; Gavid, M; Asanau, A; Timoshenko, A P; Richard, C; Martin, C H

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationships between the extracranial glossopharyngeal (IX) nerve and the muscles of the styloid diaphragm. In humans, the IX nerve is a hidden retrostyloid nerve which plays a critical role notably in swallowing and has to be preserved during infratemporal fossa and parapharyngeal spaces surgical procedures. In ten adult heads from cadavers (20 sides) fixed in formalin, dissection of the extracranial IX nerve was performed under operating microscope with special attention given to the relationships between this nerve and the styloid muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The three styloid muscles delimit three triangular intermuscular intervals which were each thoroughly explored. Different osseous landmarks were investigated for easy nerve location. The styloid process (SP) is the main superior osseous landmark for the three muscles of the styloid diaphragm. The stylohyoid muscle (SHM) is anteromedially located to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle. The styloglossus muscle (SGM) is medial and anterior to the SHM. The stylopharyngeal muscle (SPM) is the most vertical and medial of the three styloid muscles. It courses from the medial surface of the SP in a deep plane hidden between the SHM and the SGM. The extracranial IX nerve turns around the SPM superiorly with a vertical segment posterior to the SPM and inferiorly with a horizontal segment lateral to the SPM. The meeting point of the two segments of the IX nerve is about 10 mm anteriorly located from the transverse process of the atlas. The external carotid artery and some of its branches lie in contact with the lateral side of the IX nerve. Such relationships between the extracranial IX nerve, the styloid muscles and the transverse process of the atlas should be appreciated by clinician who treats patients with stylohyoid complex syndromes and by the surgeon for the parapharyngeal spaces approach.

  8. Urethral mobilization and advancement for distal hypospadias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/purpose Despite the existence of numerous techniques for the repair of distal penile hypospadias, none of them is completely satisfactory. Advancing the urethra without mobilization for repair of glanular hypospadias has the advantage of avoiding a common problem occurring with other techniques: ...

  9. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  10. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  11. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: Michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Brigido, Monica Kalume, E-mail: Mbrigido@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Antic, Marijana, E-mail: Misscroa@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon, E-mail: Llenchik@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Milants, Annemieke, E-mail: Annemieke.Milants@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vereecke, Evie, E-mail: Evie.Vereecke@kuleuven-kulak.be [Department of Anatomy, KULAK, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Kortrijk (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd [Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  12. The intracranial facial nerve as seen through different surgical windows: an extensive anatomosurgical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Antonio; Evins, Alexander I; Visca, Anna; Stieg, Phillip E

    2013-06-01

    The facial nerve has a short intracranial course but crosses critical and frequently accessed surgical structures during cranial base surgery. When performing approaches to complex intracranial regions, it is essential to understand the nerve's conventional and topographic anatomy from different surgical perspectives as well as its relationship with surrounding structures. To describe the entire intracranial course of the facial nerve as observed via different neurosurgical approaches and to provide an analytical evaluation of the degree of nerve exposure achieved with each approach. Anterior petrosectomies (middle fossa, extended middle fossa), posterior petrosectomies (translabyrinthine, retrolabyrinthine, transcochlear), a retrosigmoid, a far lateral, and anterior transfacial (extended maxillectomy, mandibular swing) approaches were performed on 10 adult cadaveric heads (20 sides). The degree of facial nerve exposure achieved per segment for each approach was assessed and graded independently by 3 surgeons. The anterior petrosal approaches offered good visualization of the nerve in the cerebellopontine angle and intracanalicular portion superiorly, whereas the posterior petrosectomies provided more direct visualization without the need for cerebellar retraction. The far lateral approach exposed part of the posterior and the entire inferior quadrants, whereas the retrosigmoid approach exposed parts of the superior and inferior quadrants and the entire posterior quadrant. Anterior and anteroinferior exposure of the facial nerve was achieved via the transfacial approaches. The surgical route used must rely on the size, nature, and general location of the lesion, as well as on the capability of the particular approach to better expose the appropriate segment of the facial nerve.

  13. Determining the proportion of coronary segments assessable on 16-slice CT coronary angiography: a brief report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soon, K. H.; Cox, N.; Eccleston, D.; Lim, Y.; Chaitowitz, I.; Bell, K. W.; Kelly, A-M.

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography (CT-CA) is becoming a popular non-invasive coronary imaging method. We aimed to determine the proportion of coronary segments assessable on a 16-slice CT in comparison with conventional selective coronary angiography (SCA). We identified all patients who had both 16-slice CT-CA and recent SCA (less than 12 months) from March 2004 to July 2005. Two CT reporters blinded to SCA independently classified coronary segment assessability on CT-CA. A cardiologist blinded to CT findings classified assess-ability of coronary segments on SCA. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and proportion of agreement. Ninety-five study pairs were included in the analysis. Of those, 1161 coronary segments were deemed assessable on SCA and 1103 segments (95%) were also assessable on CT-CA. Nonassessable segments on CT-CA were predominantly in the distal segments and branches of coronary arteries. Reasons for nonassessability were small calibre (48.3%), motion artefacts (20.7%) and poorly reconstructed segments (22.4%). The 16-slice CT was able to assess a high proportion of but not all coronary segments. Nonassessable segments were predominantly distal segments or branches of coronary arteries. Motion artefacts due to heart-rate changes, small calibre and poorly reconstructed images were main causes of nonassessability on 16-slice CT-CA

  14. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  15. Distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: Retrospective review of characteristics and endovascular treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Jin Wook; Jeong, Bae Woong; Seung, Won Bae

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the clinical outcome after treatment of distal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms via endovascular approach. Eleven patients with 11 distal PCA aneurysms who were treated via endovascular approach in Inje University Busan Paik Hospital and Kosin University Gospel Hospital from December 2002 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 11 patients, there were 3 males (27.3%) and 8 females (72.7%). The mean age was 56.6 years (range 44 -72 years) and the mean aneurysm size was 8.45 mm (3 - 30 mm). Four (36.4%) aneurysms were located in the P2 segment, 6 (54.5%) in the P3 segment and 1 (9.1%) in the P1/2 junction. Seven (63.6%) aneurysms were treated with preservation of the parent artery; and the remaining 4 (36.4%) aneurysms were treated with parent artery occlusion. After treatment, the overall complication rate was 27% with the morbidity rate of 9.1% and the mortality rate of 18%. Endovascular treatment of distal PCA aneurysm might be used to minimize neurologic deficit, considering the diverse and rich collaterals of posterior cerebral artery

  16. Distal posterior cerebral artery aneurysms: Retrospective review of characteristics and endovascular treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jin Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Bae Woong [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Seung, Won Bae [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Kosin University College of Medicine, Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The objective of this study was to review the clinical outcome after treatment of distal posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysms via endovascular approach. Eleven patients with 11 distal PCA aneurysms who were treated via endovascular approach in Inje University Busan Paik Hospital and Kosin University Gospel Hospital from December 2002 to December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Among the 11 patients, there were 3 males (27.3%) and 8 females (72.7%). The mean age was 56.6 years (range 44 -72 years) and the mean aneurysm size was 8.45 mm (3 - 30 mm). Four (36.4%) aneurysms were located in the P2 segment, 6 (54.5%) in the P3 segment and 1 (9.1%) in the P1/2 junction. Seven (63.6%) aneurysms were treated with preservation of the parent artery; and the remaining 4 (36.4%) aneurysms were treated with parent artery occlusion. After treatment, the overall complication rate was 27% with the morbidity rate of 9.1% and the mortality rate of 18%. Endovascular treatment of distal PCA aneurysm might be used to minimize neurologic deficit, considering the diverse and rich collaterals of posterior cerebral artery.

  17. Treatment of distal bronchial stenosis after bilateral lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Golovinskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effi ciency of lung transplantation is considerably limited by the complications associated with the bronchial pathologies. Despite the progress of the treatment methods, bronchial complications are still remaining as an actual problem in the postoperative period with frequency of occurrence from 7 to 29%. However, the bronchial stenosis are the most common bronchial complications after lung transplantation with mortality from 2 to 4%.Aim. To study an experience of our center of bronchial stenosis treatment in lung recipients. Materials and methods. 34 patients underwent lung transplantation from September 2014 to January 2017. 6 (16% of them had a stenosis of lobar or segmental bronchi from 84 to 494 postoperative day. 5 (83% of them have demonstrated multifocal lesions. In all of the cases there was performed an endoscopic bougienage, which involved a balloon dilatation and electrocoagulated incision of granular tissue under X-ray control. After that the patients were administrated by everolimus.Results. Restenosis was formed in 132,0 ± 94,2 postoperative day after primary treatment in all patients. In four cases (67% we used nitinol stent placement under X-ray control. There were no complications. In 3 cases stents were dislocated distally, so we needed to use repeated endoscopic bougienage to replace the stent. Using of everolimus has allowed to decrease the rate of restenosis, but it need future research.Conclusion. Distal bronchial stenosis after lung transplantation can be managed with endoscopic bougienage and stent placement. Adding everolimus has not signifi cantly affected the risk of frequency of restenosis.

  18. Distal anterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome after acoustic neuroma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Joseph L; Jackler, Robert K; Rigby, Peter L; Pitts, Lawrence H; Cheung, Steven W

    2002-07-01

    To define a clinicopathologic syndrome associated with persistent cerebellar dysfunction after acoustic neuroma (AN) excision. Case series derived from radiographic and clinical chart review. Tertiary referral center. In 12 patients with AN, persistent cerebellar dysfunction developed after AN removal. Each case demonstrated abnormality in the ipsilateral cerebellar peduncle on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cerebellar function and ambulatory status over the first postoperative year. On magnetic resonance imaging scans, the extent of cerebellar peduncle infarcts was variable. It ranged from focal brain injury (2 cm) spanning the full thickness of the peduncle. Peduncular infarcts were associated with large tumor size (average 3.8 cm, range 2.0-5.5 cm diameter). The long-term functional outcomes (>1 yr) varied. Dysmetria was unchanged or improved in over half of the patients (6 of 11 patients). Gait recovered to normal or to preoperative levels in 5 patients. In the 6 patients with persistent impaired mobility, 2 had mild gait disturbance, 3 required regular use of a cane, and 1 has been dependent on a walker. One patient had sustained mild motor weakness. Three of 11 patients remained dependent on others for activities of daily living. Peduncle injury most likely stems from interruption of distal branches of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA). These small vessels are intimately related to the capsule of the tumor and may supply both the neoplasm and the brain parenchyma. It has long been recognized that interruption of the proximal segment of the AICA results in severe injury to the pons, with devastating neurologic sequelae. A limited AICA syndrome caused by loss of its distal ramifications seems a more plausible explanation for peduncular infarction than either venous insufficiency or direct surgical trauma.

  19. Pavement management segment consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Dividing roads into "homogeneous" segments has been a major problem for all areas of highway engineering. SDDOT uses Deighton Associates Limited software, dTIMS, to analyze life-cycle costs for various rehabilitation strategies on each segment of roa...

  20. Assessment of nerve regeneration across nerve allografts treated with tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisheng, Han; Songjie, Zuo; Xin, Li

    2008-01-01

    Although regeneration of nerve allotransplant is a major concern in the clinic, there have been few papers quantitatively assessing functional recovery of animals' nerve allografts in the long term. In this study, functional recovery, histopathological study, and immunohistochemistry changes of rat nerve allograft with FK506 were investigated up to 12 weeks without slaughtering. C57 and SD rats were used for transplantation. The donor's nerve was sliced and transplanted into the recipient. The sciatic nerve was epineurally sutured with 10-0 nylon. In total, 30 models of transplantation were performed and divided into 3 groups that were either treated with FK506 or not. Functional recovery of the grafted nerve was serially assessed by the pin click test, walking track analysis and electrophysiological evaluations. A histopathological study and immunohistochemistry study were done in the all of the models. Nerve allografts treated with FK506 have no immune rejection through 12 weeks. Sensibility had similarly improved in both isografts and allografts. There has been no difference in each graft. Walk track analysis demonstrates significant recovery of motor function of the nerve graft. No histological results of difference were found up to 12 weeks in each graft. In the rodent nerve graft model, FK506 prevented nerve allograft rejection across a major histocompatibility barrier. Sensory recovery seems to be superior to motor function. Nerve isograft and allograft treated with FK506 have no significant difference in function recovery, histopathological result, and immunohistochemistry changes.

  1. Vasopressin-induced constriction of the isolated rat occipital artery is segment dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelko, Stephen P; Schmiedt, Chad W; Lewis, Tristan H; Lewis, Stephen J; Robertson, Tom P

    2013-01-01

    Circulating factors delivered to the nodose ganglion (NG) by the occipital artery (OA) have been shown to affect vagal afferent activity, and thus the contractile state of the OA may influence blood flow to the NG. OA were isolated and bisected into proximal and distal segments relative to the external carotid artery. Bisection highlighted stark differences between maximal contractile responses and OA sensitivity. Specifically, maximum responses to vasopressin and the V1 receptor agonist were significantly higher in distal than proximal segments. Distal segments were significantly more sensitive to 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the 5-HT2 receptor agonist than proximal segments. Angiotensin II (AT)2, V2 and 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonists did not elicit vascular responses. Additionally, AT1 receptor agonists elicited mild, yet not significantly different maximal responses between segments. The results of this study are consistent with contractile properties of rat OA being mediated via AT1, V1 and 5-HT2 receptors and dependent upon the OA segment. Furthermore, vasopressin-induced constriction of the OA, regardless of a bolus dose or a first and second concentration-response curve, retained this unique segmental difference. We hypothesize that these segmental differences may be important in the regulation of blood flow through the OA in health and disease. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Speaker segmentation and clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Kotti, M; Moschou, V; Kotropoulos, C

    2008-01-01

    07.08.13 KB. Ok to add the accepted version to Spiral, Elsevier says ok whlile mandate not enforced. This survey focuses on two challenging speech processing topics, namely: speaker segmentation and speaker clustering. Speaker segmentation aims at finding speaker change points in an audio stream, whereas speaker clustering aims at grouping speech segments based on speaker characteristics. Model-based, metric-based, and hybrid speaker segmentation algorithms are reviewed. Concerning speaker...

  3. Spinal segmental dysgenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Mahomed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality , seen in neonates and infants in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally . The condition is segmental with normal vertebrae above and below the malformation. This condition is commonly associated with various abnormalities that affect the heart, genitourinary, gastrointestinal tract and skeletal system. We report two cases of spinal segmental dysgenesis and the associated abnormalities.

  4. Automatic Melody Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation investigates music segmentation. In the field of Musicology, segmentation refers to a score analysis technique, whereby notated pieces or passages of these pieces are divided into “units” referred to as sections, periods, phrases, and so on. Segmentation

  5. Biocompatibility of Different Nerve Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Felix; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Fansa, Hisham

    2009-01-01

    Bridging nerve gaps with suitable grafts is a major clinical problem. The autologous nerve graft is considered to be the gold standard, providing the best functional results; however, donor site morbidity is still a major disadvantage. Various attempts have been made to overcome the problems of autologous nerve grafts with artificial nerve tubes, which are “ready-to-use” in almost every situation. A wide range of materials have been used in animal models but only few have been applied to date clinically, where biocompatibility is an inevitable prerequisite. This review gives an idea about artificial nerve tubes with special focus on their biocompatibility in animals and humans.

  6. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  7. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  8. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D₃ improves myelination and recovery after nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Francois Chabas

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated i that ergocalciferol (vitamin D2 increases axon diameter and potentiates nerve regeneration in a rat model of transected peripheral nerve and ii that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 improves breathing and hyper-reflexia in a rat model of paraplegia. However, before bringing this molecule to the clinic, it was of prime importance i to assess which form - ergocalciferol versus cholecalciferol - and which dose were the most efficient and ii to identify the molecular pathways activated by this pleiotropic molecule. The rat left peroneal nerve was cut out on a length of 10 mm and autografted in an inverted position. Animals were treated with either cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol, at the dose of 100 or 500 IU/kg/day, or excipient (Vehicle, and compared to unlesioned rats (Control. Functional recovery of hindlimb was measured weekly, during 12 weeks, using the peroneal functional index. Ventilatory, motor and sensitive responses of the regenerated axons were recorded and histological analysis was performed. In parallel, to identify the genes regulated by vitamin D in dorsal root ganglia and/or Schwann cells, we performed an in vitro transcriptome study. We observed that cholecalciferol is more efficient than ergocalciferol and, when delivered at a high dose (500 IU/kg/day, cholecalciferol induces a significant locomotor and electrophysiological recovery. We also demonstrated that cholecalciferol increases i the number of preserved or newly formed axons in the proximal end, ii the mean axon diameter in the distal end, and iii neurite myelination in both distal and proximal ends. Finally, we found a modified expression of several genes involved in axogenesis and myelination, after 24 hours of vitamin supplementation. Our study is the first to demonstrate that vitamin D acts on myelination via the activation of several myelin-associated genes. It paves the way for future randomised controlled clinical trials for peripheral

  9. Deficiency in monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in mice delays regeneration of peripheral nerves following sciatic nerve crush

    KAUST Repository

    Morrison, Brett M.; Tsingalia, Akivaga; Vidensky, Svetlana; Lee, Youngjin; Jin, Lin; Farah, Mohamed H.; Lengacher, Sylvain; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Pellerin, Luc; Rothsteinb, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration following injury occurs spontaneously, but many of the processes require metabolic energy. The mechanism of energy supply to axons has not previously been determined. In the central nervous system, monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1), expressed in oligodendroglia, is critical for supplying lactate or other energy metabolites to axons. In the current study, MCT1 is shown to localize within the peripheral nervous system to perineurial cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and Schwann cells by MCT1 immunofluorescence in wild-type mice and tdTomato fluorescence in MCT1 BAC reporter mice. To investigate whether MCT1 is necessary for peripheral nerve regeneration, sciatic nerves of MCT1 heterozygous mice are crushed and peripheral nerve regeneration was quantified electrophysiologically and anatomically. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) recovery is delayed from a median of 21. days in wild-type mice to greater than 38. days in MCT1 heterozygote mice. In fact, half of the MCT1 heterozygote mice have no recovery of CMAP at 42. days, while all of the wild-type mice recovered. In addition, muscle fibers remain 40% more atrophic and neuromuscular junctions 40% more denervated at 42. days post-crush in the MCT1 heterozygote mice than wild-type mice. The delay in nerve regeneration is not only in motor axons, as the number of regenerated axons in the sural sensory nerve of MCT1 heterozygote mice at 4. weeks and tibial mixed sensory and motor nerve at 3. weeks is also significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. This delay in regeneration may be partly due to failed Schwann cell function, as there is reduced early phagocytosis of myelin debris and remyelination of axon segments. These data for the first time demonstrate that MCT1 is critical for regeneration of both sensory and motor axons in mice following sciatic nerve crush.

  10. [Morphology research of the rat sciatic nerve bridged by collage-heparin sulfate scaffold].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-sen; Hu, Yun-yu; Luo, Zhuo-jing; Chen, Liang-wei; Liu, Hui-ling; Meng, Guo-lin; Lü, Rong; Xu, Xin-zhi

    2005-04-15

    To observe the treating effect of collage-heparin sulfate after the 10 mm rat sciatic nerve defect was bridged by it. A new kind of nervous tissue engineering scaffold was produced by freeze-drying technique from collagen-heparin sulfate. Thirty-two SD rats were randomly divided into A, B, C and D groups. Sciatic nerve defect in group A was bridged by collagen-heparin sulfate. In group B, sciatic nerve was bridged by auto-nerve transplantation. Group C was the blank control group. Animals in group D were normal. And 10 mm sciatic nerve defect was bridged in the experiment. Thirty-six weeks after the operation, the experimental animals were detected by HRP labeled retrograde trace, HE staining, toluidine staining, silvering staining, S100, GAP-43 and NF immunohistological staining, MBP immunofluorescence staining and transmission electron microscope to observe the nerve regeneration inducing effect of this new scaffold. Nine months after operation, the collage-heparin sulfate scaffold was replaced by newly regenerated nerve. The number of HRP labeled spinal cord anterior horn cells and the area of sensation nerve fiber at the posterior horn were similar with that was repaired by auto-nerve. GAP-43, NF and S100 labeled regenerated nerve fiber had passed the total scaffold and entered the distal terminal. The regenerated nerve fibers were paralleled, lineage arranged, coincide with the prearranged regenerating "channel" in the collagen-heparin sulfate scaffold. MBP immunofluorescence staining also proved that the newly regenerated nerve fiber could be ensheathed. In the experimental group, the area of myelinated nerve fiber and the thickness of the myelin sheath had no obvious difference with that of the group repaired by auto-nerve, except that the density of the regenerated myelinated sheath fiber was lower than that of the control group. Nervous tissue engineering scaffold produced by collagen-heparin sulfate can guide the regeneration of nerve fibers. The nerve

  11. The distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap for wrist defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Durga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the wrist with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represents a challenge to plastic surgeons, and such defects necessitate flap coverage to preserve hand functions and to protect its vital structures. We evaluated the use of a distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap in patients with volar soft tissue defects around the wrist. Materials and Methods: Between June 2004 and June 2006, seven patients of soft tissue defects on the volar aspect of the wrist underwent distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap. Out of seven patients, five were male and two patients were female. This flap was used in the reconstruction of the post road traffic accident defects in four patients and post electric burn defects in three patients. Flap was raised on one or two perforators and was rotated to 180°. Results: All flaps survived completely. Donor sites were closed primarily without donor site morbidity. Conclusion: The distally-based island Ulnar artery perforator flap is convenient, reliable, easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the volar aspect of the wrist. Early use of this flap allows preservation of vital structures, decreases morbidity and allows for early rehabilitation.

  12. 3.0T MR3D FIESTA+C成像序列结合多平面重建对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段的成像研究%Study on the cisternal segment of cranial nerves with 3.0T MR 3D- FIESTA+C and multiplanar reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红伟; 祁佩红; 薛鹏; 陈勇; 张道培; 漆剑频; 夏黎明; 胡道予

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D FIESTA+C成像序列对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 对20例健康志愿者和20例相应颅脑神经症状患者进行3.0T MR检查,扫描序列为3D FIESTA+C及3D FIESTA.根据20例志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为3个等级:清晰、较清晰、不清晰,前两者定义为显示,后者定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 3D FIESTA+C及3D FIESTA 2种序列脑神经的显示率分别为:嗅神经(36/40、29/40 ),视神经(40/40、40/40),动眼神经(39/40、37/40),滑车神经(7/40、7/40),三叉神经(40/40、40/40),外展神经(38/40、37/40 ),面神经(40/40、40/40),前庭蜗神经(40/40、40/40),后组脑神经复合体(舌咽神经、迷走神经、副神经) (36/40、30/40;40/40、40/40;32/40、25/40),舌下神经(23/40、21/40).20例神经症状患者中4例显示血管与神经接触或压迫,3例显示神经本身肿瘤或肿瘤压迫神经,其中5例为手术或病理证实.结论 3D-FIESTA+C成像序列较为清晰显示除滑车神经之外其余11对脑神经脑池段形态及其与血管的关系,尤其对I、Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ、Ⅵ、Ⅶ、Ⅷ、Ⅹ8对脑神经脑池段的显示效果较好.%Objective To investigate the applied value of MR 3D-FIESTA + C sequences for showing cranial nerves Ⅰ -Ⅶ. Methods 20 volunteers and 20 patients with complaint of cranial nerves underwent MR imaging at 3. 0T MR scanner using 3D-FIESTA + C and 3D)-FIESTA sequences. According to showing condition of the cranial nerves by MR imaging in 20 volunteers, which were divided into three grades: 1 ( completely visualized) , 2 (partially visualized) , and 3 ( not visualized). The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization. The relationships between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into three grades: 1 (not contact) ,2(contact) and 3( compression). Results The rates of visualization of these cranial

  13. Clinical diagnosis of distal diabetic polyneuropathy using neurological examination scores: correlation with nerve conduction studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen R Kamel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion Neurological examination scores can detect and grade neuropathy in the majority of cases. However, NCS was accurate for detection of diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy, especially for the subclinical neuropathies.

  14. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  15. Determining degree of optic nerve edema from color fundus photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agne, Jason; Wang, Jui-Kai; Kardon, Randy H.; Garvin, Mona K.

    2015-03-01

    Swelling of the optic nerve head (ONH) is subjectively assessed by clinicians using the Frisén scale. It is believed that a direct measurement of the ONH volume would serve as a better representation of the swelling. However, a direct measurement requires optic nerve imaging with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and 3D segmentation of the resulting images, which is not always available during clinical evaluation. Furthermore, telemedical imaging of the eye at remote locations is more feasible with non-mydriatic fundus cameras which are less costly than OCT imagers. Therefore, there is a critical need to develop a more quantitative analysis of optic nerve swelling on a continuous scale, similar to SD-OCT. Here, we select features from more commonly available 2D fundus images and use them to predict ONH volume. Twenty-six features were extracted from each of 48 color fundus images. The features include attributes of the blood vessels, optic nerve head, and peripapillary retina areas. These features were used in a regression analysis to predict ONH volume, as computed by a segmentation of the SD-OCT image. The results of the regression analysis yielded a mean square error of 2.43 mm3 and a correlation coefficient between computed and predicted volumes of R = 0:771, which suggests that ONH volume may be predicted from fundus features alone.

  16. Distal displacement of the maxilla and the upper first molar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, S; Molthen, R; West, E E; Miller, D M

    1979-06-01

    Data from a sample of 198 Class II cases treated with various appliances which deliver distally directed forces to the maxilla were examined to determine the frequency of absolute distal displacement of the upper first molar and of the maxilla. Analysis revealed that such distal displacement is possible and that it is, in fact, a frequent finding following treatment. Long-range stability of distal displacement was not assessed.

  17. Distal radioulnar joint: functional anatomy, including pathomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugstvedt, J R; Langer, M F; Berger, R A

    2017-05-01

    The distal radioulnar joint allows the human to rotate the forearm to place the hand in a desired position to perform different tasks, without interfering with the grasping function of the hand. The ulna is the stable part of the forearm around which the radius rotates; the stability of the distal radioulnar joint is provided by the interaction between ligaments, muscles and bones. The stabilizing structures are the triangular fibrocartilage complex, the ulnocarpal ligament complex, the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and tendon sheath, the pronator quadratus, the interosseous membrane and ligament, the bone itself and the joint capsule. The purpose of this review article is to present and illustrate the current understanding of the functional anatomy and pathomechanics of this joint.

  18. Distal Stressors and Depression among Homeless Men

    OpenAIRE

    Coohey, Carol; Easton, Scott D.

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common problem among homeless men that may interfere with functional tasks, such as securing stable housing, obtaining employment, and accessing health services. Previous research on depression among homeless men has largely focused on current psychosocial resources, substance abuse, and past victimization. Guided by Ensel and Lin’s life course stress process model, the authors examined whether distal stressors, including victimization and exposure to parent problems in childh...

  19. Reversed Palmaris Longus Muscle Causing Volar Forearm Pain and Ulnar Nerve Paresthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhashyam, Abhiram R; Harper, Carl M; Iorio, Matthew L

    2017-04-01

    A case of volar forearm pain associated with ulnar nerve paresthesia caused by a reversed palmaris longus muscle is described. The patient, an otherwise healthy 46-year-old male laborer, presented after a previous unsuccessful forearm fasciotomy for complaints of exercise exacerbated pain affecting the volar forearm associated with paresthesia in the ulnar nerve distribution. A second decompressive fasciotomy was performed revealing an anomalous "reversed" palmaris longus, with the muscle belly located distally. Resection of the anomalous muscle was performed with full relief of pain and sensory symptoms. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Fractures of the distal phalanx in the horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yovich, J.V.

    1989-01-01

    Fractures of the distal phalanx are an important cause of lameness referable to the foot. Depending on the fracture configuration and articular involvement, conservative or surgical treatment may be required. Fractures of the distal phalanx have been divided into six categories based on fracture configuration. Discussion of clinical features, management, and prognosis for horses with distal phalangeal fractures is presented for each fracture type

  1. Management and treatment of distal ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Calafiore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulcerative colitis (UC is a chronic inflammatory condition that is confined to the colonic mucosa. Its main symptoms include diarrhea, rectal bleeding and abdominal pain. Approximately two-thirds of UC patients have disease confined distal to the splenic flexure, which can be treated effectively with topical therapy. This means the active drug can be delivered directly to the site of inflammation, limiting the systemic absorption and potential side effects. Topical treatment with aminosalicylates is the most effective approach in the treatment of these forms, provided that the formulation reaches the upper margin of the disease. Given this, the suppository formulation is the treatment of choice for proctitis and distal sigmoiditis. Thanks to their proximal spread, enemas, foams and gels represent the treatment of choice for proctosigmoiditis and for distal ulcerative colitis. Oral aminosalicylates are less effective than topical therapies in patients with active disease, while the combination of topical and oral treatment is more effective in patients refractory to topical or oral mono-therapy. Topically administered aminosalicylates play an important role in the maintenance of remission, but the long-term adhesion to therapy is poor. For this reason, the oral formulation is the first-line therapy in the maintenance of remission. Refractory patients can be treated with topical steroids or systemic steroids and TNF-alpha inhibitors in severe forms.

  2. Distal Embolic Protection for Renal Arterial Interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubel, Gregory J.; Murphy, Timothy P.

    2008-01-01

    Distal or embolic protection has intuitive appeal for its potential to prevent embolization of materials generated during interventional procedures. Distal protection devices (DPDs) have been most widely used in the coronary and carotid vascular beds, where they have demonstrated the ability to trap embolic materials and, in some cases, to reduce complications. Given the frequency of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal artery stenosis undergoing stent placement, it is reasonable to propose that these devices may play an important role in limiting distal embolization in the renal vasculature. Careful review of the literature reveals that atheroembolization does occur during renal arterial interventions, although it often goes undetected. Early experience with DPDs in the renal arteries in patients with suitable anatomy suggests retrieval of embolic materials in approximately 71% of cases and renal functional improvement/stabilization in 98% of cases. The combination of platelet inhibition and a DPD may provide even greater benefit. Given the critical importance of renal functional preservation, it follows that everything that can be done to prevent atheroembolism should be undertaken including the use of DPDs when anatomically feasible. The data available at this time support a beneficial role for these devices

  3. Gamma knife irradiation of injured sciatic nerve induces histological and behavioral improvement in the rat neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yagasaki

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of gamma knife (GK irradiation on injured nerves using a rat partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL model. GK irradiation was performed at one week after ligation and nerve preparations were made three weeks after ligation. GK irradiation is known to induce immune responses such as glial cell activation in the central nervous system. Thus, we determined the effects of GK irradiation on macrophages using immunoblot and histochemical analyses. Expression of Iba-1 protein, a macrophage marker, was further increased in GK-treated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. Immunohistochemical study of Iba-1 in GK-irradiated injured sciatic nerves demonstrated Iba-1 positive macrophage accumulation to be enhanced in areas distal to the ligation point. In the same area, myelin debris was also more efficiently removed by GK-irradiation. Myelin debris clearance by macrophages is thought to contribute to a permissive environment for axon growth. In the immunoblot study, GK irradiation significantly increased expressions of βIII-tubulin protein and myelin protein zero, which are markers of axon regeneration and re-myelination, respectively. Toluidine blue staining revealed the re-myelinated fiber diameter to be larger at proximal sites and that the re-myelinated fiber number was increased at distal sites in GK-irradiated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. These results suggest that GK irradiation of injured nerves facilitates regeneration and re-myelination. In a behavior study, early alleviation of allodynia was observed with GK irradiation in PSL rats. When GK-induced alleviation of allodynia was initially detected, the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a potent analgesic factor, was significantly increased by GK irradiation. These results suggested that GK irradiation alleviates allodynia via increased GDNF. This study provides novel evidence that GK

  4. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  5. M5 segment aneurysm presenting as "pure acute SDH"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Singla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous "pure acute subdural hematoma (SDH" is arguably a rare condition. We report on a pregnant female patient presenting as spontaneous acute SDH without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH due to rupture of distal (M5 segment middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We hereby discuss the diagnostic dilemma of this rare condition, along with the need for watchful evaluation of acute SDH without preceding head injury presenting in emergency outpatient departments, especially when it is first encountered by a trainee resident.

  6. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  7. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  8. Fingertip replantation at or distal to the nail base: use of the technique of artery-only anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyürek, M; Safak, T; Keçik, A

    2001-06-01

    The authors describe the functional and aesthetic results of microsurgical replantation of 21 fingertip amputations at or distal to the nail base-namely, zone I amputations. There were 15 male and 6 female patients, with an average age of 26 years (age range, 1-41 years). Replantations were performed using the anastomosis of the artery-only technique, with neither vein nor nerve repair. Venous drainage was provided by an external bleeding method with a fish-mouth incision in "distal" zone I amputations for approximately 7 days, and by the use of leeches in more "proximal" zone I amputations for 10 to 12 days. Results indicated that the overall survival rate was 76%, with 16 of 21 digits surviving. Sensory evaluation at an average follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-18 months) revealed an average static two-point discrimination of 6.1 mm (range, 2.0-8.0 mm). Considering the unfavorable results and the donor site morbidity of various fingertip reconstructions, a microsurgical fingertip replantation should always be considered except in extremely distal, clean-cut, pediatric cases, in which case a composite graft is a possibility. The results of this series indicate that an amputated fingertip in zone I can be salvaged successfully by microvascular anastomosis of the artery only, with a nonmicrosurgical method of venous drainage. Furthermore, acceptable sensory recovery can be expected without any nerve coaptation.

  9. Skip segment Hirschsprung's disease: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: Hirschsprung\\'s disease is characterised by the congenital absence of ganglion cells beginning in the distal rectum and extending proximally for varying distances. \\'Zonal aganglionosis\\' is a phenomenon involving a zone of aganglionosis occurring within normally innervated intestine. \\'Skip segment\\' Hirschsprung\\'s disease (SSHD) involves a \\'skip area\\' of normally ganglionated intestine, surrounded proximally and distally by aganglionosis. While Hirschsprung\\'s disease is believed to be the result of incomplete craniocaudal migration of neural crest-derived cells, the occurrence of SSHD has no clear embryological explanation. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of SSHD, reported in the literature between 1954 and 2009, in order to determine the clinical characteristics of this rare entity and its significance. METHODS: The first reported case of SSHD was published in 1954. A systematic review of SSHD cases in the literature, from 1954 to 2009, was carried out using the electronic database \\'Pubmed\\'. Detailed information was recorded regarding the age, gender, presenting symptoms and location of the skip segment in each patient. RESULTS: 24 cases of SSHD have been reported in the literature to date. 18\\/24 (75%) of these cases were males and 6\\/24 (25%) were females. Of these, 22\\/24 (92%) were cases of total colonic aganglionosis (TCA), and 2\\/24 (8%) were rectosigmoid Hirschsprung\\'s disease. Of the 22 TCA cases, 9 (41%) had a skip segment in the transverse colon, 6 (27%) in the ascending colon, 2 (9%) in the caecum and 5 (23%) had multiple skip segments. In both rectosigmoid Hirschsprung\\'s disease cases, the skip segment was in the sigmoid colon. Overall, the length of the skip segment was variable, with the entire transverse colon ganglionated in some cases. CONCLUSION: SSHD occurs predominantly in patients with TCA. The existence of a skip area of normally innervated colon in TCA may influence surgical

  10. Vasopressin-induced constriction of the isolated rat occipital artery is segment-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelko, Stephen P.; Schmiedt, Chad W.; Lewis, Tristan H.; Lewis, Stephen J.; Robertson, Tom P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Circulating factors delivered to the nodose ganglion (NG) by the occipital artery (OA) have shown to affect vagal afferent activity, and thus the contractile state of the OA may influence blood flow to the NG. Methods OA were isolated and bisected into proximal and distal segments, relative to the external carotid artery. Results Bisection, highlighted stark differences between maximal contractile responses and OA sensitivity. Specifically, maximum responses to vasopressin and the V1 receptor agonist, were significantly higher in distal than proximal segments. Distal segments were significantly more sensitive to 5-HT and the 5-HT2 receptor agonist than proximal segments. AT2, V2 and 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists did not elicit vascular responses. Additionally, AT1 receptor agonists elicited mild, yet not significantly different maximal responses between segments. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with contractile properties of rat OA being mediated via AT1, V1 and 5-HT2 receptors, and are dependent upon the OA segment. Furthermore, vasopressin-induced constriction of the OA, regardless of a bolus dose or a first and second concentration response curve retained this unique segmental difference and therefore we hypothesize this may be a pathophysiological response in the regulation of blood flow through the OA. PMID:24192548

  11. Sciatic Nerve Injury After Proximal Hamstring Avulsion and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas J; Spinner, Robert J; Mohan, Rohith; Gibbs, Christopher M; Krych, Aaron J

    2017-07-01

    Muscle bellies of the hamstring muscles are intimately associated with the sciatic nerve, putting the sciatic nerve at risk of injury associated with proximal hamstring avulsion. There are few data informing the magnitude of this risk, identifying risk factors for neurologic injury, or determining neurologic outcomes in patients with distal sciatic symptoms after surgery. To characterize the frequency and nature of sciatic nerve injury and distal sciatic nerve-related symptoms after proximal hamstring avulsion and to characterize the influence of surgery on these symptoms. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. This was a retrospective review of patients with proximal partial or complete hamstring avulsion. The outcome of interest was neurologic symptoms referable to the sciatic nerve distribution below the knee. Neurologic symptoms in operative patients were compared pre- and postoperatively. The cohort consisted of 162 patients: 67 (41.4%) operative and 95 (58.6%) nonoperative. Sciatic nerve-related symptoms were present in 22 operative and 23 nonoperative patients, for a total of 45 (27.8%) patients (8 [4.9%] motor deficits, 11 [6.8%] sensory deficits, and 36 [22.2%] with neuropathic pain). Among the operative cohort, 3 of 3 (100.0%) patients showed improvement in their motor deficit postoperatively, 3 of 4 (75.0%) patients' sensory symptoms improved, and 17 of 19 (89.5%) patients had improvement in pain. A new or worsening deficit occurred in 5 (7.5%) patients postoperatively (2 [3.1%] motor deficits, 1 [1.5%] sensory deficit, and 3 [4.5%] with new pain). Predictors of operative intervention included lower age (odds ratio [OR], 0.952; 95% CI, 0.921-0.982; P = .001) and complete avulsion (OR, 10.292; 95% CI, 2.526-72.232; P hamstring avulsion are underrecognized. Currently, neurologic symptoms are not considered when determining whether to pursue operative intervention. Given the high likelihood of improvement with surgical treatment, neurologic symptoms should be

  12. Adrenaline with lidocaine for digital nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Rath, Santosh; Kalaivani, Mani; Bhanderi, Neel

    2015-03-19

    Surgery on fingers is a common procedure in emergency and day care surgery. Adrenaline combined with lidocaine can prolong digital nerve block and provide a bloodless operating field. Extended postoperative pain relief can reduce the need for analgesics and can facilitate hand rehabilitation. Conventionally, adrenaline is avoided at anatomical sites with end arteries such as digits, penis and pinna because of concerns about arterial spasm, ischaemia and gangrene distal to the site of drug infiltration. To assess the safety and efficacy of use of adrenaline (any dilution) combined with lidocaine (any dilution) for digital nerve blocks (fingers and toes). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2014), MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1966 to 18 November 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid SP (1980 to 18 November 2014). We also searched specific websites, such as www.indmed.nic.in; www.cochrane-sadcct.org; and www.Clinicaltrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the use of adrenaline with lidocaine and plain lidocaine in patients undergoing surgery on digits (fingers and toes). Our primary outcomes were duration of anaesthesia, adverse outcomes such as ischaemia distal to the injection site and cost analysis. Our secondary outcomes were duration of postoperative pain relief and reduced bleeding during surgery. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors independently extracted details of trial methodology and outcome data from reports of all trials considered eligible for inclusion. We performed all analyses on an intention-to-treat basis. We used a fixed-effect model when no evidence of significant heterogeneity between studies was found and a random-effects model when heterogeneity was likely. We included four RCTs with 167 participants. Risk of bias of the included studies was high, as none of them reported method of randomization, allocation concealment

  13. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  14. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  15. Myocardial Perfusion: Characteristics of Distal Intramyocardial Arteriolar Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, Mair; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Edwards, Phillip K; Anderson, Jill L; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2015-11-01

    A combination of experimental, theoretical, and imaging methodologies is used to examine the hierarchical structure and function of intramyocardial arteriolar trees in porcine hearts to provide a window onto a region of myocardial microvasculature which has been difficult to fully explore so far. A total of 66 microvascular trees from 6 isolated myocardial specimens were analyzed, with a cumulative number of 2438 arteriolar branches greater than or equal to 40 μm lumen diameter. The distribution of flow rates within each tree was derived from an assumed power law relationship for that tree between the diameter of vessel segments and flow rates that are consistent with that power law and subject to conservation of mass along hierarchical structure of the tree. The results indicate that the power law index increases at levels of arteriolar vasculature closer to the capillary level, consistent with a concomitant decrease in shear stress acting on endothelial tissue. These results resolve a long standing predicament which could not be resolved previously because of lack of data about the 3D, interconnected, arterioles. In the context of myocardial perfusion, the results indicate that the coefficient of variation of flow rate in pre-capillary distal arterioles is high, suggesting that heterogeneity of flow rate in these arterioles is not entirely random but may be due at least in part to active control.

  16. Maxillary molar distalization with the dual-force distalizer supported by mini-implants: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberti, Giovanni; Villegas, Carlos; Ealo, Martha; Palacio, John Camilo; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to describe the clinical effects of a bone-supported molar distalizing appliance, the dual-force distalizer. The study group included 16 patients (mean age, 14.3 years) with Class II molar relationships. Study models and lateral cephalograms were taken before and after the distalizing movement to record significant dental and skeletal changes (Wilcoxon test). The average distalization time was 5 months, with a movement rate of 1.2 mm per month; the distalization amounts were 5.9 +/- 1.72 mm at the crown level and 4.4 +/- 1.41 mm at the furcation level. The average molar inclination was 5.6 degrees +/- 3.7 degrees ; this was less than the amount of inclination generated by bone-supported appliances that use single distalizing forces. The correlation between inclination and distalization was not significant, indicating predominantly bodily movement. The teeth anterior to the first molar moved distally also; the second premolars distalized an average of 4.26 mm, and the incisors retruded by 0.53 mm. The dual-force distalizer is a valid alternative distalizing appliance that generates controlled molar distalization with a good rate of movement and no loss of anchorage.

  17. Robotic distal pancreatectomy versus conventional laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: a comparative study for short-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Eric C H; Tang, Chung Ngai

    2015-09-01

    Robotic system has been increasingly used in pancreatectomy. However, the effectiveness of this method remains uncertain. This study compared the surgical outcomes between robot-assisted laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy and conventional laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. During a 15-year period, 35 patients underwent minimally invasive approach of distal pancreatectomy in our center. Seventeen of these patients had robot-assisted laparoscopic approach, and the remaining 18 had conventional laparoscopic approach. Their operative parameters and perioperative outcomes were analyzed retrospectively in a prospective database. The mean operating time in the robotic group (221.4 min) was significantly longer than that in the laparoscopic group (173.6 min) (P = 0.026). Both robotic and conventional laparoscopic groups presented no significant difference in spleen-preservation rate (52.9% vs. 38.9%) (P = 0.505), operative blood loss (100.3 ml vs. 268.3 ml) (P = 0.29), overall morbidity rate (47.1% vs. 38.9%) (P = 0.73), and post-operative hospital stay (11.4 days vs. 14.2 days) (P = 0.46). Both groups also showed no perioperative mortality. Similar outcomes were observed in robotic distal pancreatectomy and conventional laparoscopic approach. However, robotic approach tended to have the advantages of less blood loss and shorter hospital stay. Further studies are necessary to determine the clinical position of robotic distal pancreatectomy.

  18. An innovative technique to distalize maxillary molar using microimplant supported rapid molar distalizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Goel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years, enhancements in implants have made their use possible as a mode of absolute anchorage in orthodontic patients. In this paper, the authors have introduced an innovative technique to unilaterally distalize the upper left 1 st molar to obtain an ideal Class I molar relationship from a Class II existing molar relationship with an indigenous designed distalizer. Clinical Innovation: For effective unilateral diatalization of molar, a novel cantilever sliding jig assembly was utilized with coil spring supported by a buccally placed single micro implant. The results showed 3 mm of bodily distalization with 1 mm of intrusion and 2° of distal tipping of upper left 1 st molar in 1.5 months. Discussion: This appliance is relatively easy to insert, well-tolerated, and requires minimal patient cooperation compared to other present techniques of molar distalization. Moreover, it is particularly useful in cases that are Class II on one side and Class I on the other, with a minor midline discrepancy and nominal overjet. Patient acceptance level was reported to be within patients physiological and comfort limits.

  19. Annotation of nerve cord transcriptome in earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasanthakumar Ponesakki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In annelid worms, the nerve cord serves as a crucial organ to control the sensory and behavioral physiology. The inadequate genome resource of earthworms has prioritized the comprehensive analysis of their transcriptome dataset to monitor the genes express in the nerve cord and predict their role in the neurotransmission and sensory perception of the species. The present study focuses on identifying the potential transcripts and predicting their functional features by annotating the transcriptome dataset of nerve cord tissues prepared by Gong et al., 2010 from the earthworm Eisenia fetida. Totally 9762 transcripts were successfully annotated against the NCBI nr database using the BLASTX algorithm and among them 7680 transcripts were assigned to a total of 44,354 GO terms. The conserve domain analysis indicated the over representation of P-loop NTPase domain and calcium binding EF-hand domain. The COG functional annotation classified 5860 transcript sequences into 25 functional categories. Further, 4502 contig sequences were found to map with 124 KEGG pathways. The annotated contig dataset exhibited 22 crucial neuropeptides having considerable matches to the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii, suggesting their possible role in neurotransmission and neuromodulation. In addition, 108 human stem cell marker homologs were identified including the crucial epigenetic regulators, transcriptional repressors and cell cycle regulators, which may contribute to the neuronal and segmental regeneration. The complete functional annotation of this nerve cord transcriptome can be further utilized to interpret genetic and molecular mechanisms associated with neuronal development, nervous system regeneration and nerve cord function.

  20. Iatrogenic facial nerve injuries during chronic otitis media surgery: a multicentre retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, T; Mulazimoglu, S; El Hadi, T; Darrouzet, V; Ayache, D; Somers, T; Schmerber, S; Vincent, C; Mondain, M; Lescanne, E; Bonnard, D

    2017-06-01

    To give an insight into why, when and where iatrogenic facial nerve (FN) injuries may occur and to explain how to deal with them in an emergency setting. Multicentre retrospective study in eight tertiary referral hospitals over 17 years. Twenty patients with partial or total FN injury during surgery for chronic otitis media (COM) were revised. Indication and type of surgery, experience of the surgeon, intra- and postoperative findings, value of CT scanning, patient management and final FN outcome were recorded. In 12 cases, the nerve was completely transected, but the surgeon was unaware in 11 cases. A minority of cases occurred in academic teaching hospitals. Tympanic segment, second genu and proximal mastoid segments were the sites involved during injury. The FN was not deliberately identified in 18 patients at the time of injury, and nerve monitoring was only applied in one patient. Before revision surgery, CT scanning correctly identified the lesion site in 11 of 12 cases and depicted additional lesions such as damage to the lateral semicircular canal. A greater auricular nerve graft was interposed in 10 cases of total transection and in one partially lesioned nerve: seven of them resulted in an HB III functional outcome. In two of the transected nerves, rerouting and direct end-to-end anastomosis was applied. A simple FN decompression was used in four cases of superficially traumatised nerves. We suggest checklists for preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative management to prevent and treat iatrogenic FN injury during COM surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Distal anastomotic vein adjunct usage in infrainguinal prosthetic bypasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhee, James T; Goodney, Philip P; Schanzer, Andres; Shaykevich, Shimon; Belkin, Michael; Menard, Matthew T

    2013-04-01

    Single-segment saphenous vein remains the optimal conduit for infrainguinal revascularization. In its absence, prosthetic conduit may be used. Existing data regarding the significance of anastomotic distal vein adjunct (DVA) usage with prosthetic grafts are based on small series. This is a retrospective cohort analysis derived from the regional Vascular Study Group of New England as well as the Brigham and Women's hospital database. A total of 1018 infrainguinal prosthetic bypass grafts were captured in the dataset from 73 surgeons at 15 participating institutions. Propensity scoring and 3:1 matching was performed to create similar exposure groups for analysis. Outcome measures of interest included: primary patency, freedom from major adverse limb events (MALEs), and amputation free survival at 1 year as a function of vein patch utilization. Time to event data were compared with the log-rank test; multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the adjusted association between vein cuff usage and the primary end points. DVA was defined as a vein patch, cuff, or boot in any configuration. Of the 1018 bypass operations, 94 (9.2%) had a DVA whereas 924 (90.8%) did not (no DVA). After propensity score matching, 88 DVAs (25%) and 264 no DVAs (75%) were analyzed. On univariate analysis of the matched cohort, the DVA and no DVA groups were similar in terms of mean age (70.0 vs 69.0; P = .55), male sex (58.0% vs 58.3%; P > .99), and preoperative characteristics such as living at home (93.2% vs 94.3%; P = .79) and independent ambulatory status (72.7% vs 75.7%; P = .64). The DVA and no DVA groups had similar rates of major comorbidities such as hypertension chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, and dialysis dependence (P > .05 for all). Likewise, they had similar rates of distal origin grafts (13.6% vs 12.5%; P = .85), critical limb ischemia indications (P = .53), and prior arterial bypass (58% vs 47%; P = .08

  2. Evaluation of segmental left ventricular wall motion by equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nostrand, D; Janowitz, W R; Holmes, D R; Cohen, H A

    1979-01-01

    The ability of equilibrium gated radionuclide ventriculography to detect segmental left ventricular (LV) wall motion abnormalities was determined in 26 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Multiple gated studies obtained in 30 degrees right anterior oblique and 45 degrees left anterior oblique projections, played back in a movie format, were compared to the corresponding LV ventriculograms. The LV wall in the two projections was divided into eight segments. Each segment was graded as normal, hypokinetic, akinetic, dyskinetic, or indeterminate. Thirteen percent of the segments in the gated images were indeterminate; 24 out of 27 of these were proximal or distal inferior wall segments. There was exact agreement in 86% of the remaining segments. The sensitivity of the radionuclide technique for detecting normal versus any abnormal wall motion was 71%, with a specificity of 99%. Equilibrium gated ventriculography is an excellent noninvasive technique for evaluating segmental LV wall motion. It is least reliable in assessing the proximal inferior wall and interventricular septum.

  3. Adductor magnus: An EMG investigation into proximal and distal portions and direction specific action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Matthew L; Pizzari, Tania; Rath, Leanne; Tucker, Kylie; Semciw, Adam I

    2018-05-01

    Cadaveric studies indicate that adductor magnus is structurally partitioned into at least two regions. The aim of this study was to investigate the direction-specific actions of proximal and distal portions of adductor magnus, and in doing so determine if these segments have distinct functional roles. Fine-wire EMG electrodes were inserted into two portions of adductor magnus of 12 healthy young adults. Muscle activity was recorded during maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) across eight tests (hip flexion/extension, internal/external rotation, abduction, and adduction at 0°, 45°, and 90° hip flexion). Median activity within each action (normalized to peak) was compared between segments using repeated measures nonparametric tests (α = 0.05). An effect size (ES = z-score/√sample size) was calculated to determine the magnitude of difference between muscle segments. The relative contribution of each muscle segment differed significantly during internal rotation (P magnus has at least two functionally unique regions. Differences were most evident during rotation. The different direction-specific actions may imply that each segment performs separate roles in hip stability and movement. These findings may have implications on injury prevention and rehabilitation for adductor-related groin injuries, hamstring strain injury, and hip pathology. Clin. Anat. 31:535-543, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Changes in facial nerve function, morphology and neurotrophic factor III expression following three types of facial nerve injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Wang, Haibo; Fan, Zhaomin; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Haiyan

    2011-01-01

    To study the changes in facial nerve function, morphology and neurotrophic factor III (NT-3) expression following three types of facial nerve injury. Changes in facial nerve function (in terms of blink reflex (BF), vibrissae movement (VM) and position of nasal tip) were assessed in 45 rats in response to three types of facial nerve injury: partial section of the extratemporal segment (group one), partial section of the facial canal segment (group two) and complete transection of the facial canal segment lesion (group three). All facial nerves specimen were then cut into two parts at the site of the lesion after being taken from the lesion site on 1st, 7th, 21st post-surgery-days (PSD). Changes of morphology and NT-3 expression were evaluated using the improved trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry techniques ,respectively. Changes in facial nerve function: In group 1, all animals had no blink reflex (BF) and weak vibrissae movement (VM) at the 1st PSD; The blink reflex in 80% of the rats recovered partly and the vibrissae movement in 40% of the rats returned to normal at the 7th PSD; The facial nerve function in 600 of the rats was almost normal at the 21st PSD. In group 2, all left facial nerve paralyzed at the 1st PSD; The blink reflex partly recovered in 40% of the rats and the vibrissae movement was weak in 80% of the rats at the 7th PSD; 8000 of the rats'BF were almost normal and 40% of the rats' VM completely recovered at the 21st PSD. In group 3, The recovery couldn't happen at anytime. Changes in morphology: In group 1, the size of nerve fiber differed in facial canal segment and some of myelin sheath and axons degenerated at the 7th PSD; The fibres' degeneration turned into regeneration at the 21st PSD; In group 2, the morphologic changes in this group were familiar with the group 1 while the degenerated fibers were more and dispersed in transection at the 7th PSD; Regeneration of nerve fibers happened at the 21st PSD. In group 3, most of the fibers

  5. [Clinical experience in facial nerve tumors: a review of 27 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Chunfu; Chi, Fanglu; Zhou, Liang; Chen, Bing; Li, Huawei

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the clinical manifestations and the diagnosis of the facial nerve tumor according to the clinical information, and evaluate the different surgical approaches depending on tumor location. Twenty-seven cases of facial nerve tumors with general clinical informations available from 1999.9 to 2006.12 in the Shanghai EENT Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty (74.1%) schwannomas, 4 (14.8%) neurofibromas ,and 3 (11.1%) hemangiomas were identified with histopathology postoperatively. During the course of the disease, 23 patients (85.2%) suffered facial paralysis, both hearing loss and tinnitus affected 11 (40.7%) cases, 5 (18.5%) manifested infra-auricular mass and the others showed some of otalgia or vertigo or ear fullness or facial numbness/twitches. CT or/and MRI results in 24 cases indicated that the tumors originated from the facial nerve. Intra-operative findings showed that 24 (88.9%) cases involved no less than 2 segments of the facial nerve, of these 24 cases 87.5% (21/24) involved the mastoid portion, 70.8% (17/24) involved the tympanic portion, 62.5% (15/24) involved the geniculate ganglion, only 4.2% (1/24) involved the internal acoustic canal (IAC), and 3 cases (11.1%) had only one segments involved. In all of these 27 cases, the tumors were completely excised, of which 13 were resected followed by an immediate facial nerve reconstruction, including 11 sural nerve cable graft, 1 facial nerve end-to-end anastomosis and 1 hypoglossal-facial nerve end-to-end anastomosis. Tumors were removed with preservation of facial nerve continuity in 2 cases. Facial nerve tumor is a rare and benign lesion, and has numerous clinical manifestations. CT and MRI can help surgeons to make a right diagnosis preoperatively. When and how to give the patients an operation depends on the patients individually.

  6. Distal phalanx amputation with delayed presentation and successful reconstruction with reposition and flap after 2 weeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Braga-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic finger amputations are common, causing significant functional and cosmetic deficits. Microsurgical replantation techniques are the mainstay of treatment for most such injuries although they require adequate conservation of the amputated segment for a successful result. In distal finger amputations, replantation is the procedure of choice, as long as the amputated fragment is viable. If replantation is not an option, reposition + flap using a neurovascular flap can be an efficient option, as this offers improved skin coverage. To the best of our knowledge, this case illustrates the longest cold ischaemic time with a successful outcome.

  7. Peripheral nerve injury in developing rats reorganizes representation pattern in motor cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Donoghue, J P; Sanes, J N

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the effect of neonatal nerve lesions on cerebral motor cortex organization by comparing the cortical motor representation of normal adult rats with adult rats that had one forelimb removed on the day of birth. Mapping of cerebral neocortex with electrical stimulation revealed an altered relationship between the motor cortex and the remaining muscles. Whereas distal forelimb movements are normally elicited at the lowest threshold in the motor cortex forelimb area, the same stim...

  8. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  9. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  10. Motor branches of the ulnar nerve to the forearm: an anatomical study and guidelines for selective neurectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulos, Renata; Leclercq, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Precise knowledge of motor nerve branches is critical to plan selective neurectomies for the treatment of spastic limbs. Our objective is to describe the muscular branching pattern of the ulnar nerve in the forearm and suggest an ideal surgical approach for selective neurectomy of the flexor carpi ulnaris. The ulnar nerve was dissected under loop magnification in 20 upper limbs of fresh frozen cadavers and its branches to the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) and to the flexor digitorum profundus muscle (FDP) were quantified. We measured their diameter, length and distance between their origin and the medial epicondyle. The point where the ulnar artery joined the nerve was observed. The position in which the ulnar nerve gave off each branch was noted (ulnar, posterior or radial) and the Martin-Gruber connection, when present, had its origin observed and its diameter measured. The ulnar nerve gave off two to five muscular branches, among which, one to four to the FCU and one or two to the FDP. In all cases, the first branch was to the FCU. It arose on average 1.4 cm distal to the epicondyle, but in four specimens it arose above or at the level of the medial epicondyle (2.0 cm above in one case, 1.5 cm above in two cases, and at the level of the medial epicondyle in one). The first branch to the FDP arose on average 5.0 cm distal to the medial epicondyle. All the branches to FDP but one arose from the radial aspect of the ulnar nerve. A Martin-Gruber connection was present in nine cases. All motor branches arose in the proximal half of the forearm and the ulnar nerve did not give off branches distal to the point where it was joined by the ulnar artery. The number of motor branches of the ulnar nerve to the FCU varies from 2 to 4. An ideal approach for selective neurectomy of the FCU should start 4 cm above the medial epicondyle, and extend distally to 50% of the length of the forearm or just to the point where the ulnar artery joins the nerve.

  11. Distal protection filter device efficacy with carotid artery stenting: comparison between a distal protection filter and a distal protection balloon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iko, Minoru; Tsutsumi, Masanori; Aikawa, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa; Go, Yoshinori; Nii, Kouhei; Abe, Gorou; Ye, Iwae; Nomoto, Yasuyuki; Kazekawa, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to compare the effectiveness of the embolization prevention mechanism of two types of embolic protection device (EPD)-a distal protection balloon (DPB) and a distal protection filter (DPF). Subjects were 164 patients scheduled to undergo carotid artery stenting: a DPB was used in 82 cases (DPB group) from April 2007 until June 2010, and a DPF was used in 82 cases (DPF group) from July 2010 to July 2011. Rates of positive findings on postoperative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and stroke incidence were compared. Positive postoperative DWI results were found in 34 cases in the DPB group (41.4 %), but in only 22 cases in the DPF group (26.8 %), and there was only a small significant difference within the DPF group. In the DPB group, there was one case of transient ischemic attack (TIA) (1.2 %) and four cases of brain infarction (2 minor strokes, 2 major strokes; 4.9 %), compared to the DFP group with one case of TIA (1.2 %) and no cases of minor or major strokes. In this study, significantly lower rates of occurrence of DWI ischemic lesions and intraoperative embolization were associated with use of the DPF compared to the DPB.

  12. Mini-implant-supported Molar Distalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporary anchorage devices popularly called mini-implants or miniscrews are the latest addition to an orthodontist′s armamentarium. The following case report describes the treatment of a 16-year-old girl with a pleasant profile, moderate crowding and Angle′s Class II molar relationship. Maxillary molar distalization was planned and mini-implants were used to preserve the anterior anchorage. After 13 months of treatment, Class I molar and canine relation was achieved bilaterally and there was no anterior proclination. Thus, mini-implants provide a viable option to the clinician to carry out difficult tooth movements without any side effects.

  13. Periosteal osteoblastoma of the distal femur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Akisue, Toshihiro; Marui, Takashi; Hitora, Toshiaki; Kawamoto, Teruya; Nagira, Keiko; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Kurosaka, Masahiro [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe (Japan); Fujita, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi, Hyogo (Japan)

    2004-02-01

    Osteoblastomas located on the surface of the cortical bone, so-called periosteal osteoblastomas, are extremely rare. We report on a case of periosteal osteoblastoma arising from the posterior surface of the right distal femur in a 17-year-old man. Roentgenographic, computed tomographic, magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic features of the case are presented. Periosteal osteoblastoma should be radiologically and histologically differentiated from myositis ossificans, avulsive cortical irregularity syndrome, osteoid osteoma, parosteal osteosarcoma, periosteal osteosarcoma, and high-grade surface osteosarcoma. Although periosteal osteoblastoma is rare, this tumor should be included in the differential diagnosis of surface-type bone tumors. (orig.)

  14. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  15. Variable phenotypic expression and onset in MYH14 distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype in a large, multigenerational North American family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyadurai, Stanley; Arnold, W David; Kissel, John T; Ruhno, Corey; Mcgovern, Vicki L; Snyder, Pamela J; Prior, Thomas W; Roggenbuck, Jennifer; Burghes, Arthur H; Kolb, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) causes distal-predominant weakness without prominent sensory loss. Myosin heavy chain disorders most commonly result in distal myopathy and cardiomyopathy with or without hearing loss, but a complex phenotype with dHMN, myopathy, hoarseness, and hearing loss was reported in a Korean family with a c.2822G>T mutation in MYH14. In this study we report phenotypic features in a North American family with the c.2822G>T in MYH14. Clinical and molecular characterization was performed in a large, 6-generation, Caucasian family with MYH14 dHMN. A total of 11 affected and 7 unaffected individuals were evaluated and showed varying age of onset and severity of weakness. Genotypic concordance was confirmed with molecular analysis. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated distal motor axonal degeneration without myopathy in all affected subjects tested. Mutation of MYH14 can result in a range of neuromuscular phenotypes that includes a dHMN and hearing loss phenotype with variable age of onset. Muscle Nerve 56: 341-345, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Endolymphatic Sac Enlargement in a Girl with a Novel Mutation for Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Severe Deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rink Nikki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA is caused by mutations of genes encoding subunits of the H+-ATPase (ATP6V0A4 and ATP6V1B1 expressed in α-intercalated cells of the distal renal tubule and in the cochlea. We report on a 2-year-old girl with distal RTA and profound speech delay which was initially misdiagnosed as autism. Genetic analysis showed compound heterozygous mutations with one known and one novel mutation of the ATP6V1B1 gene; cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed bilateral enlargement of the endolymphatic sacs of the inner ear. With improved cooperation, audiometric testing showed that hearing loss was most profound on the right, where endolymphatic sac enlargement was greatest, demonstrating a clear link between the degree of deafness and the degree of inner ear abnormality. This case indicates the value of MRI for diagnosis of inner ear involvement in very young children with distal RTA. Although citrate therapy quickly corrects the acidosis and restores growth, early diagnosis of deafness is crucial so that hearing aids can be used to assist acquisition of speech and to provide enough auditory nerve stimulation to assure the affected infants remain candidates for cochlear implantation.

  17. Local delivery of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor improves facial nerve regeneration after late repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barras, Florian M; Kuntzer, Thierry; Zurn, Anne D; Pasche, Philippe

    2009-05-01

    Facial nerve regeneration is limited in some clinical situations: in long grafts, by aged patients, and when the delay between nerve lesion and repair is prolonged. This deficient regeneration is due to the limited number of regenerating nerve fibers, their immaturity and the unresponsiveness of Schwann cells after a long period of denervation. This study proposes to apply glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on facial nerve grafts via nerve guidance channels to improve the regeneration. Two situations were evaluated: immediate and delayed grafts (repair 7 months after the lesion). Each group contained three subgroups: a) graft without channel, b) graft with a channel without neurotrophic factor; and c) graft with a GDNF-releasing channel. A functional analysis was performed with clinical observation of facial nerve function, and nerve conduction study at 6 weeks. Histological analysis was performed with the count of number of myelinated fibers within the graft, and distally to the graft. Central evaluation was assessed with Fluoro-Ruby retrograde labeling and Nissl staining. This study showed that GDNF allowed an increase in the number and the maturation of nerve fibers, as well as the number of retrogradely labeled neurons in delayed anastomoses. On the contrary, after immediate repair, the regenerated nerves in the presence of GDNF showed inferior results compared to the other groups. GDNF is a potent neurotrophic factor to improve facial nerve regeneration in grafts performed several months after the nerve lesion. However, GDNF should not be used for immediate repair, as it possibly inhibits the nerve regeneration.

  18. [A Distal Bile Duct Carcinoma Patient Who Underwent Surgical Resection for Liver Metastasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Sosuke; Izumiya, Yasuhito; Kimura, Yu; Nakashima, Shingo; Kin, Syuichi; Kawakami, Sadao

    2018-03-01

    A 70-year-old man with distal bile duct carcinoma underwent a subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy without adjuvant chemotherapy. One and a half years after the surgery, elevated levels of serum SPan-1(38.1 U/mL)were observed and CT scans demonstrated a solitary metastasis, 25mm in size, in segment 8 of the liver. The patient received 2 courses of gemcitabine-cisplatin combination chemotherapy. No new lesions were detected after chemotherapy and the patient underwent a partial liver resection of segment 8. The pathological examination revealed a metachronous distant metastasis originating from the bile duct carcinoma. Subsequently, the patient received S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy for 6 months. Following completion of all therapies, the patient survived without tumor recurrence for 3 years and 10 months after the initial operation. Thus, surgical interventions might be effective in improving prognosis among selected patients with postoperative liver metastasis of bile duct carcinoma.

  19. Calcium-binding protein expression in peritoneal endometriosis-associated nerve fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcena de Arellano, M L; Münch, S; Arnold, J; Helbig, S; Schneider, A; Mechsner, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies demonstrated the potential involvement of nerve fibres in the chronic inflammatory process of endometriosis. We aimed to characterize nerve fibres in the proximal and distal areas of the peritoneal endometriotic lesions in order to understand the chronic inflammatory process in endometriosis. Peritoneal endometriotic lesions (proximal area) (n = 17), the matching unaffected peritoneum (distal area) and healthy peritoneum of patients without endometriosis (n = 15) were analysed with the neuronal markers PGP 9.5, calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin. Peritoneal fluids of women with and without endometriosis were used for Western blot analysis and for the neuronal growth assay. The protein expression of neuronal PC-12 cells incubated with peritoneal fluids was analysed. The overall nerve fibre density was significantly reduced in the distal area of the lesion when compared with the proximal area or with healthy peritoneum. The density of calbindin-, calretinin- and parvalbumin-positive nerve fibres was significantly increased in the endometriosis group. Calretinin expression was elevated in the peritoneal fluid of women with symptomatic endometriosis when compared with women with asymptomatic endometriosis. Furthermore, PC-12 cells incubated with peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis showed a higher proliferation rate and a stronger neurite outgrowth than the control group. PC-12 cells incubated in peritoneal fluids of women with endometriosis expressed less calretinin but more calbindin than the control group. Calcium-binding proteins seem to be increased in endometriosis-associated nerve fibres and might play an important role in the chronic inflammatory condition and the pain pathogenesis of endometriosis. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  20. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  1. 弥散张量成像的脑神经示踪重建及临床应用研究%Three-dimensional reconstruction of cranial nerves and clinical exploration based on diffusion tensor tractography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马峻; 苏少波; 赵岩; 李勇刚; 岳树源

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨应用弥散张量成像进行脑神经(CNs)纤维束示踪、可视化重建的可行性,并尝试将其应用于颅底肿瘤术前规划.方法 利用3.0T磁共振对10例健康志愿者,10例颅底肿瘤患者进行稳态采集快速成像、弥散张量成像扫描,3D Slicer软件完成脑神经纤维示踪、重建,病变患者重建肿瘤三维影像,通过手术观察及神经电生理监测确认脑神经的位置.结果 CNⅡ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ、Ⅵ、Ⅶ~Ⅷ、Ⅹ、Ⅻ成像良好,肿瘤、水肿与相关脑神经的三维空间关系通过纤维示踪与三维重建得以呈现,经过手术验证准确无误.结论联合应用弥散张量成像及3D Slicer软件是正常及病理状态下脑神经可视化重建切实可行的方案,具有良好的临床应用前景.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of 3-dimensional reconstruction of cranial nerves (CNs) via diffusion imaging tractography,and attempt to apply in the preoperative plan of skull base tumor.Methods 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scans,including 3D-FSPGR,FIESTA and DTI,were used to collect information of 10 healthy subjects and 10 skull base tumor patients.DTI data were integrated into the 3D-Slicer for fiber tracking,overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves.3D reconstructions of tumors were achieved to perform neighbor,encasing,invading relationship between lesion and nerves whose location was then recorded during surgery by surgical observation and neurophysiological monitoring.Results Detailed fibers of the cranialnerves were depicted.Optic pathway showed perfect 3D streamline body,especially the posterior of optic chiasm.Oculomotor nerve coursed from the brainstem to the cavernous sinus distally,which also had high fidelity.Trigeminal nerve allowed visualization of gasserian ganglion as cisternal segment.Cisternal parts of abducent nerve,facial/ vestibulocochlear nerve,vagus nerve,hypoglossal nerve were also imaged well.Moreover,the 3D

  2. Segmentation, advertising and prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galeotti, Andrea; Moraga González, José

    This paper explores the implications of market segmentation on firm competitiveness. In contrast to earlier work, here market segmentation is minimal in the sense that it is based on consumer attributes that are completely unrelated to tastes. We show that when the market is comprised by two

  3. Sipunculans and segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanninger, Andreas; Kristof, Alen; Brinkmann, Nora

    2009-01-01

    mechanisms may act on the level of gene expression, cell proliferation, tissue differentiation and organ system formation in individual segments. Accordingly, in some polychaete annelids the first three pairs of segmental peripheral neurons arise synchronously, while the metameric commissures of the ventral...

  4. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  5. The efficacy of a scaffold-free Bio 3D conduit developed from human fibroblasts on peripheral nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Yurie

    Full Text Available Although autologous nerve grafting is the gold standard treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, several alternative methods have been developed, including nerve conduits that use supportive cells. However, the seeding efficacy and viability of supportive cells injected in nerve grafts remain unclear. Here, we focused on a novel completely biological, tissue-engineered, scaffold-free conduit.We developed six scaffold-free conduits from human normal dermal fibroblasts using a Bio 3D Printer. Twelve adult male rats with immune deficiency underwent mid-thigh-level transection of the right sciatic nerve. The resulting 5-mm nerve gap was bridged using 8-mm Bio 3D conduits (Bio 3D group, n = 6 and silicone tube (silicone group, n = 6. Several assessments were conducted to examine nerve regeneration eight weeks post-surgery.Kinematic analysis revealed that the toe angle to the metatarsal bone at the final segment of the swing phase was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (-35.78 ± 10.68 versus -62.48 ± 6.15, respectively; p < 0.01. Electrophysiological studies revealed significantly higher compound muscle action potential in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (53.60 ± 26.36% versus 2.93 ± 1.84%; p < 0.01. Histological and morphological studies revealed neural cell expression in all regions of the regenerated nerves and the presence of many well-myelinated axons in the Bio 3D group. The wet muscle weight of the tibialis anterior muscle was significantly higher in the Bio 3D group than the silicone group (0.544 ± 0.063 versus 0.396 ± 0.031, respectively; p < 0.01.We confirmed that scaffold-free Bio 3D conduits composed entirely of fibroblast cells promote nerve regeneration in a rat sciatic nerve model.

  6. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-02-27

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation.

  7. Dermal pocketing following distal finger replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhaindran, Mark E; Paavilainen, Pasi; Tan, David M K; Peng, Yeong Pin; Lim, Aymeric Y T

    2010-08-01

    Replantation is an ideal technique for reconstruction following fingertip amputation as it provides 'like for like' total reconstruction of the nail complex, bone pulp tissue and skin with no donor-site morbidity. However, fingertips are often not replanted because veins cannot be found or are thought to be too small to repair. Attempts at 'cap-plasty' or pocketing of replanted tips with and without microvascular anastomosis have been done in the past with varying degrees of success. We prospectively followed up a group of patients who underwent digital replantation and dermal pocketing in the palm to evaluate the outcome of this procedure. There were 10 patients with 14 amputated digits (two thumbs, five index, four middle, two ring and one little) who underwent dermal pocketing of the amputated digit following replantation. Among the 14 digits that were treated with dermal pocketing, 11 survived completely, one had partial atrophy and two were completely lost. Complications encountered included finger stiffness (two patients) and infection of the replanted fingertip with osteomyelitis of the distal phalanx (one patient). We believe that this technique can help increase the chance of survival for distal replantation with an acceptable salvage rate of 85% in our series. Copyright 2009 British Associa