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Sample records for nerve paralysis due

  1. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

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    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  2. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

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    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  3. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

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    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  4. Sound-induced facial synkinesis following facial nerve paralysis

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    Ma, Ming-San; van der Hoeven, Johannes H.; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2009-01-01

    Facial synkinesis (or synkinesia) (FS) occurs frequently after paresis or paralysis of the facial nerve and is in most cases due to aberrant regeneration of (branches of) the facial nerve. Patients suffer from inappropriate and involuntary synchronous facial muscle contractions. Here we describe two

  5. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

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    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  6. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture.

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    Schwartsmann, Carlos Roberto; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Huyer, Rodrigo Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  7. Ulnar nerve paralysis after forearm bone fracture

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    Carlos Roberto Schwartsmann

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Paralysis or nerve injury associated with fractures of forearm bones fracture is rare and is more common in exposed fractures with large soft-tissue injuries. Ulnar nerve paralysis is a rare condition associated with closed fractures of the forearm. In most cases, the cause of paralysis is nerve contusion, which evolves with neuropraxia. However, nerve lacerations and entrapment at the fracture site always need to be borne in mind. This becomes more important when neuropraxia appears or worsens after reduction of a closed fracture of the forearm has been completed. The importance of diagnosing this injury and differentiating its features lies in the fact that, depending on the type of lesion, different types of management will be chosen.

  8. Amblyopia Associated with Congenital Facial Nerve Paralysis.

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    Iwamura, Hitoshi; Kondo, Kenji; Sawamura, Hiromasa; Baba, Shintaro; Yasuhara, Kazuo; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    The association between congenital facial paralysis and visual development has not been thoroughly studied. Of 27 pediatric cases of congenital facial paralysis, we identified 3 patients who developed amblyopia, a visual acuity decrease caused by abnormal visual development, as comorbidity. These 3 patients had facial paralysis in the periocular region and developed amblyopia on the paralyzed side. They started treatment by wearing an eye patch immediately after diagnosis and before the critical visual developmental period; all patients responded to the treatment. Our findings suggest that the incidence of amblyopia in the cases of congenital facial paralysis, particularly the paralysis in the periocular region, is higher than that in the general pediatric population. Interestingly, 2 of the 3 patients developed anisometropic amblyopia due to the hyperopia of the affected eye, implying that the periocular facial paralysis may have affected the refraction of the eye through yet unspecified mechanisms. Therefore, the physicians who manage facial paralysis should keep this pathology in mind, and when they see pediatric patients with congenital facial paralysis involving the periocular region, they should consult an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Ethmoidal Mucocele Presenting as Oculomotor Nerve Paralysis

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    Kim, Dae Woo; Sohn, Hee-Young; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Kim, Jin-Pyeong; Ahn, Seong-Ki; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old male was admitted with an acute headache and sudden ptosis on the right side. No ophthalmological or neurological etiologies were apparent. A mucocele of the right posterior ethmoid sinus was observed with radiology. After the marsupialization of the mucocele via a transnasal endoscopic approach, the patient's symptoms (oculomotor nerve paralysis and headache) resolved in 4 weeks. Oculomotor paralysis is a rare symptom of an ethmoidal mucocele. In this article, we report this rare case along with a literature review. PMID:23799169

  10. Evaluation of Autologous Fascia Implantation With Controlled Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor for Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Paralysis Due to Long-term Denervation.

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    Nagai, Hiromi; Nishiyama, Koichiro; Seino, Yutomo; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Makito

    2016-06-01

    Paralyzed tissue due to long-term denervation is resistant to many treatments because it induces irreversible histological changes and disorders of deglutition or phonation. We sought to determine the effect of autologous transplantation of fascia into the vocal fold (ATFV) with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on long-term unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). Unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) section was performed on 20 rats. Five rats were implanted with autologous fascia only (fascia group), and 10 rats were implanted with autologous fascia and a gelatin hydrogel sheet with 1 μg (1 μg bFGF + fascia group) or 0.1 μg (0.1 μg bFGF + fascia group) of bFGF 4 months after RLN section. We evaluated the normalized glottal gap and laryngeal volume and histological changes 3 months after implantation. The normalized glottal gap was significantly reduced in the 3 fascia implantation groups. Normalized laryngeal volume, fat volume, and lateral thyroarytenoid muscle volume were significantly increased in the 2 fascia implantation with bFGF groups. The ATFV with controlled release of bFGF repaired the glottal gap and laryngeal volume after RLN section and may reduce the occurrence of aspiration and hoarseness. We speculate that this treatment improves laryngeal function in long-term RLN denervation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Kawasaki disease with facial nerve paralysis.

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    Larralde, Margarita; Santos-Muñoz, Andrea; Rutiman, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a multisystem disorder with varying clinical expression. We describe an instance of facial nerve paralysis in a patient with KD. A 5-month-old boy developed fever, irritability, and diarrhea, treated 8 days later with cefaclor and ibuprofen. Three days later a confluent, erythematous and papular rash appeared, his lips were reddened and swollen, and his white blood count and platelet count were 20,900/mm(3) and 558,000/mm(3), respectively. He was admitted to the hospital with a diagnosis of KD, and an echocardiogram showed a right coronary aneurysm. The patient then developed an acute, right-sided, facial nerve peripheral paralysis that resolved over the next 6 weeks. He was treated with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) 2 g/kg and aspirin 100 mg/kg/day with improvement of signs and symptoms. This report documents facial nerve paralysis as an uncommon complication of KD and points out that it may be a marker of increased risk of cardiovascular disease in this disorder.

  12. A case of isolated abducens nerve paralysis in maxillofacial trauma

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    Keskin, Elif Seda; Keskin, Ekrem; Atik, Bekir; Koçer, Abdülkadir

    2015-01-01

    Nervus abducens is a pure motor nerve located in the pons. It retracts the eyeball laterally by stimulating rectus lateralis muscle. In case of their paralysis, diplopia and restriction in the eye movements while looking sideways, are seen. Since the same signs are seen due to the muscle entrapment in blowout fractures, its differential diagnosis has importance in terms of the treatment protocol and avoiding unnecessary operations. In this article, we present a 22-year-old male patient who was referred to our department due to the prediagnosis of blowout fracture following maxillofacial trauma. However, he was diagnosed with abducens nerve paralysis after the consultations and analysis and his restriction of movement was resolved via systemic steroid treatment instead of unnecessary operation. PMID:26981484

  13. Bulbar Paralysis and Facial Paralysis due to Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

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    Liu, Min; Liu, Shixin; Liu, Bailong; Liu, Bin; Guo, Liang; Wang, Xu; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Shuo; Dong, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Skull-base metastasis (SBM) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely rare, and multiple cranial nerve paralysis due to SBM from HCC is also rare. We report a case of bulbar and facial paralysis due to SBM from HCC. A 46-year-old Chinese man presented with a hepatic right lobe lesion that was detected during a routine physical examination. After several failed attempts to treat the primary tumor and bone metastases, neurological examination revealed left VII, IX, X, and XI cranial nerve paralysis. Computed tomography of the skull base subsequently revealed a large mass that had destroyed the left occipital and temporal bones and invaded the adjacent structure. After radiotherapy (27 Gy, 9 fractions), the patient experienced relief from his pain, and the cranial nerve dysfunction regressed. However, the patient ultimately died, due to the tumor's progression. Radiotherapy is usually the best option to relieve pain and achieve regression of cranial nerve dysfunction in cases of SBM from HCC, although early treatment is needed to achieve optimal outcomes. The present case helps expand our understanding regarding this rare metastatic pathway and indicates that improved awareness of SBM in clinical practice can help facilitate timely and appropriate treatment.

  14. Transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after local anesthetic procedure

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rosmaninho; Lobo, I.; Caetano, M.; Taipa, R; Magalhães, M.; Costa, V; Selores, M.

    2012-01-01

    Complications may arise after laser therapy of the face. The most common ones are bleeding and infections; facial nerve paresis or paralysis is rarely reported. We describe a case of a transient peripheral facial nerve paralysis after laser therapy of an epidermal verrucous nevus localized at the left preauricular area.

  15. Acute flaccid paralysis due to rabies

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    J B Ghosh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two clinical forms of rabies are recognize: i a furious form associated with classical signs of excitation or phobic symptoms, ii Dumb rabies (paralytic rabies characterized by progressive paralysis without an initial furious phase wherein distinction from Guillain-Barrι Syndrome may be difficult. Paralytic rabies is more common in persons who have received postexposure vaccination. We report here the diagnostic dilemma of two cases of acute flaccid paralysis due to rabies.

  16. Delayed presentation of traumatic facial nerve (CN VII) paralysis.

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    Napoli, Anthony M; Panagos, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (Cranial Nerve VII, CN VII) can be a disfiguring disorder with profound impact upon the patient. The etiology of facial nerve paralysis may be congenital, iatrogenic, or result from neoplasm, infection, trauma, or toxic exposure. In the emergency department, the most common cause of unilateral facial paralysis is Bell's palsy, also known as idiopathic facial paralysis (IFP). We report a case of delayed presentation of unilateral facial nerve paralysis 3 days after sustaining a traumatic head injury. Re-evaluation and imaging of this patient revealed a full facial paralysis and temporal bone fracture extending into the facial canal. Because cranial nerve injuries occur in approximately 5-10% of head-injured patients, a good history and physical examination is important to differentiate IFP from another etiology. Newer generation high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly demonstrating these fractures. An understanding of this complication, appropriate patient follow-up, and early involvement of the Otolaryngologist is important in management of these patients. The mechanism as well as the timing of facial nerve paralysis will determine the proper evaluation, consultation, and management for the patient. Patients with total or immediate paralysis as well as those with poorly prognostic audiogram results are good candidates for surgical repair.

  17. Facial Nerve Paralysis seen in Pseudomonas sepsis with ecthyma gangrenosum

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    Suleyman Ozdemir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum is a skin lesion which is created by pseudomonas auriginosa. Peripheral facial paralysis and mastoiditis as a rare complication of otitis media induced by pseudomonas auriginosa.In this study, 4 months child who has ecthyma gangrenosum and facial nerve paralysis was reported. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(1.000: 126-130

  18. Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Rare Complication of Parotid Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Benign parotid neoplasm and inflammatory processes of the parotid resulting in facial paralysis are extremely rare. We report a 72-year-old Malay female with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus who presented with a painful right parotid swelling associated with right facial nerve palsy. The paralysis (Grade VI, House and Brackmann classification) remained after six months.

  19. Transtympanic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of the Literature.

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    Schaefer, Nathan; O'Donohue, Peter; French, Heath; Griffin, Aaron; Elliott, Devlin; Gochee, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Facial nerve paralysis because of penetrating trauma through the external auditory canal is extremely rare, with a paucity of published literature. The objective of this study is to review the literature on transtympanic facial nerve paralysis and increase physician awareness of this uncommon injury through discussion of its clinical presentation, management and prognosis. We also aim to improve patient outcomes in those that have sustained this type of injury by suggesting an optimal management plan. In this case report, we present the case of a 46-year-old white woman who sustained a unilateral facial nerve paresis because of a garfish penetrating her tympanic membrane and causing direct damage to the tympanic portion of her facial nerve. On follow-up after 12 months, her facial nerve function has largely returned to normal. Transtympanic facial nerve paralysis is a rare injury but can have a favorable prognosis if managed effectively.

  20. Nerve repair and cable grafting for facial paralysis.

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    Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, J David

    2008-05-01

    Facial nerve injury and facial paralysis are devastating for patients. Although imperfect, primary repair is currently the best option to restore facial nerve function. Cable, or interposition, nerve grafting is an acceptable alternative when primary repair is not possible. Several donor nerves are at the surgeon's disposal. Great auricular, sural, or medial and lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerves are all easily obtained. Both primary repair and interposition grafting typically result in better facial function than do other dynamic and static rehabilitation strategies. Proficient anastomotic technique and, when necessary, selection of an appropriate interposition graft will optimize patient outcomes. Promising research is under way that will enhance future nerve repair and grafting efforts.

  1. Isolated vagus nerve paralysis associated with internal carotid artery dissection.

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    Nakagawa, Hideki; Kusuyama, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2014-02-01

    Dysphagia and hoarseness caused by laryngopharyngeal paralysis associated with internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection is rare. We reported a case which recovered spontaneously. A 57-year old man visited our hospital complaining of dysphagia and hoarseness lasting for two weeks. Paralysis of right vocal fold and rotational movement of the posterior pharyngeal wall toward the left side during swallowing were observed. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed under diagnosis of isolated right vagus nerve paralysis, and dissection of the right ICA was revealed. He was treated conservatively, and both of laryngopharyngeal movement and the ICA dissection were improved completely. There is a possibility that laryngeal paralysis caused by ICA dissection has been misdiagnosed as an idiopathic paralysis.

  2. Voice range in superior laryngeal nerve paresis and paralysis.

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    Eckley, C A; Sataloff, R T; Hawkshaw, M; Spiegel, J R; Mandel, S

    1998-09-01

    Evaluation of Physiologic Frequency Range (PFR) and Musical Frequency Range (MRP) of Phonation was performed on 56 adults (singers and nonsingers) presenting with superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) paresis or paralysis confirmed by laryngeal electromyography. The most common etiology was neuritis (69.7%), followed by iatrogenic and unknown causes,each accounting for 10.2% of cases, and finally trauma (8.9%). Both female and male singers with SLN paresis or paralysis had significantly higher PFR and MPR than nonsingers. Female classical singers presented PFR and MPR of up to 10 semitones (ST) higher than nonclassical singers and nonsingers. The lowest PFR and musical ranges were found in patients with SLN paresis associated with recurrent laryngeal nerve paresis or paralysis. The authors suggest that voice range measurement is a useful parameter for analyzing the effects of SLN paresis or paralysis on voice and that it may also assist in measuring outcome following voice therapy.

  3. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis after upper third molar extraction.

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    Cakarer, Sirmahan; Can, Taylan; Cankaya, Burak; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Yazici, Sinem; Ayintap, Emre; Özden, Ali Veysel; Keskin, Cengizhan

    2010-11-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis (PFNP) after mandibular interventions has been reported in the literature. In most cases, paralysis begins immediately after the injection of the mandibular anesthesia, and duration of facial weakness is less than 12 hours. However, there are few documented cases of PFNP after maxillary dental or surgical procedures. A variety of mechanisms have been associated to PFNP, including viral reactivation, demyelination, edema, vasospasm, and trauma. The purpose of this presentation was to report a rare case of facial paralysis that occurred after an upper third molar extraction. The cause of the PFNP and the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in the management are emphasized.

  4. High resolution computed tomography for peripheral facial nerve paralysis

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    Koester, O.; Straehler-Pohl, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    High resolution computer tomographic examinations of the petrous bones were performed on 19 patients with confirmed peripheral facial nerve paralysis. High resolution CT provides accurate information regarding the extent, and usually regarding the type, of pathological process; this can be accurately localised with a view to possible surgical treatments. The examination also differentiates this from idiopathic paresis, which showed no radiological changes. Destruction of the petrous bone, without facial nerve symptoms, makes early suitable treatment mandatory.

  5. Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis as First Presentation of Lung Cancer

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    Shadi Hamouri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is rare, and its precise incidence is unknown. It is associated with a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies. To complicate its diagnosis, the clinical presentation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can be variable. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with bilateral facial nerve paralysis as first presentation of lung adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the only case describing bilateral facial nerve palsy as the first and only manifestation of lung adenocarcinoma.

  6. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

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    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  7. Bilateral traumatic paralysis of abducent nerves and clivus fracture: Case Report

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    Calderon-Miranda Willen Guillermo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Clivus fractures are a rare pathology, frecuently associated tohigh power trauma. Such injuries may be associated with vascular and cranial nerves lesions. The abducens nerve is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injuries due to its long intracranial course, since their real origin until the lateral rectus muscle. The unilateral abducens nerve palsy of 1- 2-7% occurs in patients with cranial trauma, bilateral paralysis is rare. We report a patient who presented bilateral abducens nerve palsy associated with a clivus fracture

  8. 两种激光并超短波治疗周围性面神经麻痹的疗效%Effect of two kinds of laser combined with ultrashort wave on peripheral facial nerve paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘青

    2002-01-01

    Background: Peripheral facial nerve paralysis referred to injury of peripheral nerve trunk and its branches due to direct or indirect force.Physiotherapy could decrease ischemia.Swelling of nerve tissue and degeneration of myelin sheath and axon.Helium neon laser.Semiconductor laser and ultrashort wave were adopted in this group of peripheral nerve paralysis, effect was obvious.

  9. Recurrent largngeal nerve paralysis: a laryngographic and computed tomographic study

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    Agha, F.P.

    1983-07-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a relatively common entity, usually resulting from a pathologic process of the vagus nerve or its recurrent larynegeal branch. It is rarely caused by intralargngeal lesions. Four teen patients with recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis (RLNP) were evaluated by laryngography, computed tomography (CT), or both. In the evaluation of the paramedian cord, CT was limited in its ability to differentiate between tumor or RLNP as the cause of the fixed cord, but it yielded more information than laryngography on the structural abnormalities of the larynx and pre-epiglottic and paralaryngeal spaces. Laryngography revealed distinct features of RLNP and is the procedure of choice for evaluation of functional abnormalities of the larynx until further experience with faster CT scanners and dynamic scanning of the larynx is gained.

  10. Unusual complication of otitis media with effusion: facial nerve paralysis.

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    Vayisoglu, Yusuf; Gorur, Kemal; Ozcan, Cengiz; Korlu, Savaş

    2011-07-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (FNP) is a very rare complication of otitis media with effusion (OME). There are few patients with OME and FNP in the literature. A 5-year-old girl was admitted to our department with right facial weakness. Right FNP and right OME were diagnosed on the examination. After medical treatment and ventilation tube insertion, FNP completely resolved. The symptoms, signs, and management of this patient are presented.

  11. Application of Shape Memory Alloys in Facial Nerve Paralysis

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    M Vloeberghs

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The Facial Nerve can be damaged at a peripheral level by a stroke or, for example by trauma or infection within the faceor the ear. In these cases the facial muscles are paralysed with little or no chance of spontaneous recovery. This research focuses on the potential utilisation of a Shape Memory Alloy(SMA to replace the function of the Facial Nerve, which willallow in conjunction with passive reconstructive methods, a patient to regain limited but active movement of the mouthcorner. Paralysis of the mouth corner is a very disabling bothfunctionally and cosmetically, speech and swallowing are hampered and the patient loses saliva, with presents a social problem.

  12. Three cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to painless thyroiditis

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    Debmalya Sanyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present three cases of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP due to painless thyroiditis presenting as acute quadriparesis. All responded to potassium supplementation and propranolol. TPP may be due to thyrotoxicosis of any etiology, commonly Grave′s disease. The absence of clinical signs of thyrotoxicosis can delay diagnosis and treatment. Thyroid function tests should be a routine evaluation in all cases of hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

  13. Delayed appearance of hypaesthesia and paralysis after femoral nerve block

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    Stefan Landgraeber

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a female patient who underwent an arthroscopy of the right knee and was given a continuous femoral nerve block catheter. The postoperative course was initially unremarkable, but when postoperative mobilisation was commenced, 18 hours after removal of the catheter, the patient noticed paralysis and hypaesthesia. Examination confirmed the diagnosis of femoral nerve dysfunction. Colour duplex sonography of the femoral artery and computed tomography of the lumbar spine and pelvis yielded no pathological findings. Overnight the neurological deficits decreased without therapy and were finally no longer detectable. We speculate that during the administration of the local anaesthetic a depot formed, localised in the medial femoral intermuscular septa, which was leaked after first mobilisation. To our knowledge no similar case has been published up to now. We conclude that patients who are treated with a nerve block should be informed and physician should be aware that delayed neurological deficits are possible.

  14. Recovery of Facial Nerve Paralysis After Temporal Nerve Reconstruction: A Case Report

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    Emamhadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Facial paralysis is common following accidents, trauma, viral infection or tumors. Case Presentation A 24-year-old male patient was referred to us with a history of sharp penetrating trauma to the right temporal region causing unilateral paralysis of the muscles of the right forehead. He was unable to scowl or elevate his right eyebrow and there were no folds on his right forehead. Anastomosis of branches of the temporal nerve was done one month after trauma following regular physical therapy sessions, outcome was good and paralysis of the muscles of the right forehead improved after several months. Conclusions Immediate repair of the facial nerve injury will improve the process of recovery and rehabilitation of the face and forehead muscles and may play a very important role in the patient’s mental satisfaction and improve their quality of life.

  15. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

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    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  16. Reanimation of reversible facial paralysis by the double innervation technique using an intraneural-dissected sural nerve graft.

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    Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko; Yano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    In treating reversible facial paralysis, cross-facial nerve grafting offers voluntary and emotional reanimation. In contrast, rapid re-innervation and strong neural stimulation can be obtained with hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover. In this article, we describe the method of a combination of these techniques as a one-stage procedure. A 39-year-old man presented with facial paralysis due to nerve avulsion within the stylomastoid foramen. The sural nerve was harvested and two branches were created at its distal end by intraneural dissection. One branch was anastomosed to the contralateral facial nerve, and the other branch was used for hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover, followed by connecting the proximal stump of the graft to the trunk of the paralysed facial nerve in an end-to-end fashion. At 9 months postoperatively, almost complete facial symmetry and co-ordinated movements of the mimetic muscles were obtained with no obvious tongue atrophy. Since our method can efficiently gather neural inputs from the contralateral facial nerve and the ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve, it may become a good alternative for reanimation of reversible facial paralysis when the ipsilateral facial nerve is not available.

  17. Unusual Clinical Presentation of Ethylene Glycol Poisoning: Unilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eray Eroglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene glycol (EG may be consumed accidentally or intentionally, usually in the form of antifreeze products or as an ethanol substitute. EG is metabolized to toxic metabolites. These metabolites cause metabolic acidosis with increased anion gap, renal failure, oxaluria, damage to the central nervous system and cranial nerves, and cardiovascular instability. Early initiation of treatment can reduce the mortality and morbidity but different clinical presentations can cause delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Herein, we report a case with the atypical presentation of facial paralysis, hematuria, and kidney failure due to EG poisoning which progressed to end stage renal failure and permanent right peripheral facial nerve palsy.

  18. Unusual clinical presentation of ethylene glycol poisoning: unilateral facial nerve paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Eray; Kocyigit, Ismail; Bahcebasi, Sami; Unal, Aydin; Sipahioglu, Murat Hayri; Kocyigit, Merva; Tokgoz, Bulent; Oymak, Oktay

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene glycol (EG) may be consumed accidentally or intentionally, usually in the form of antifreeze products or as an ethanol substitute. EG is metabolized to toxic metabolites. These metabolites cause metabolic acidosis with increased anion gap, renal failure, oxaluria, damage to the central nervous system and cranial nerves, and cardiovascular instability. Early initiation of treatment can reduce the mortality and morbidity but different clinical presentations can cause delayed diagnosis and poor prognosis. Herein, we report a case with the atypical presentation of facial paralysis, hematuria, and kidney failure due to EG poisoning which progressed to end stage renal failure and permanent right peripheral facial nerve palsy.

  19. Surgical treatment of posterior interosseous nerve paralysis in a tennis player☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Kenjiro; Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Oi, Takanori; Takagi, Yohei; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) paralysis in a tennis player. The PIN, a 2 cm section from a bifurcation point of the radial nerve, presented increased stiffness in the surgical findings and treated with free sural nerve grafting after excision of the degenerative portion of the PIN. We speculate that PIN paralysis associated with hourglass-like constriction can be caused and exacerbated by repetitive forearm pronation and supination in playing tennis. PMID:25104896

  20. [Clinical-electroneuromyographical characteristics of facial nerve paralysis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribova, N P; Galitskaia, O S

    2009-01-01

    A clinical-electroneuromyographical study of 40 children (32 (80%) of them aged from 12 to 17 years, mean age 13,9+/-1,8 years, and 8 (20%) - from 1 to 8 years, mean age 4,4+/-2,1 years) were studied in the acute period of facial nerve paralysis (FNP). Six (15%) children had FNP in the anamnesis. Among precipitating factors were the cold exposure the day before disease onset (20 (50%) patients), symptoms of flu (13 (32,5%) patients) and psycho-emotional tension (3 (7,5%) patients). No precipitation was noted in 4 (10%) children. The degree of muscle paresis was 81,9+/-7% that corresponded to clinical stages III-IV according to K. Rosler. An electroneuromyographical analysis of motor ortho- and antidromic response to the facial nerve stimulation on the side of paresis and on the contralateral side in patients and controls revealed the presence of proximal axon- and myelinopathy of facial nerve with the involvement of its own motorneurons and brain stem interneurons. The maintenance of wink reflex and F-wave blocks in the period over 3 weeks are prognostically unfavorable factors for restoration of mimic muscle function in the early stage of disease.

  1. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

  2. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks.

  3. Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paralysis is the loss of muscle function in part of your body. It happens when something goes ... way messages pass between your brain and muscles. Paralysis can be complete or partial. It can occur ...

  4. Acupuncture therapy to the head and face to treat post-trauma paralysis of peripheral fascial nerve dextra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihardja, H.; Meuratana, PA; Ibrahim, A.

    2017-08-01

    Damage to the facial nerve due to trauma from traffic accidents is the second most common cause of paralysis of the facial nerve. The treatments include both pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapy. Acupuncture is a method of treatment that applies evidence-based medical principles and uses anatomy, physiology, and pathology to place needles atcertain acupuncture points. This paper describes a 26-year-old female patient with right-side facial palsy following a traffic accident who had animproved Brackmann’s score after 12 sessions of acupuncture treatment. The acupuncture points were chosen based on Liu Yan’sbrain-clearing needling technique. Acupuncture can shorten healing time and improve the effect of treatment for facial-nerve paralysis.

  5. Solitary paralysis of the triceps muscle due to trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, K; Fujita, K; Yamada, M; Saura, R; Hirohata, K

    1992-01-01

    We report a rare solitary paralysis of the triceps muscle. The patient, an 18-year-old man who had had a work-related accident, sustained a severe contusion of the proximal posterolateral arm after being struck by a piece of lumber. This injury produced an extraordinary amount of soft-tissue swelling in the region of the trauma. After the accident it was noted that active flexion of the elbow was preserved, but active extension was absent. Three months after injury, surgical exploration of the radial nerve and its rami musculares to the three heads of the triceps muscle was undertaken. Dense adhesions were found fixing the rami musculares to the surfaces of the triceps muscle. Neurolysis of the rami musculares was performed, leading to complete recovery of the triceps muscle. The etiology of this isolated paralysis of the triceps muscle was determined to be dense adhesions compressing and compromising the function of the rami musculares to the three heads of the triceps muscle. These adhesions formed because of severe posttraumatic bleeding into the potential posterior humeral space, where the rami musculares are found.

  6. Masseteric-facial nerve transposition for reanimation of the smile in incomplete facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Incomplete facial paralysis occurs in about a third of patients with Bell's palsy. Although their faces are symmetrical at rest, when they smile they have varying degrees of disfigurement. Currently, cross-face nerve grafting is one of the most useful techniques for reanimation. Transfer of the masseteric nerve, although widely used for complete paralysis, has not to our knowledge been reported for incomplete palsy. Between December 2008 and November 2013, we reanimated the faces of 9 patients (2 men and 7 women) with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis with transposition of the masseteric nerve. Sex, age at operation, cause of paralysis, duration of denervation, recipient nerves used, and duration of follow-up were recorded. Commissural excursion, velocity, and patients' satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. The mean (SD) age at operation was 39 (±6) years and the duration of denervation was 29 (±19) months. There were no complications that required further intervention. Duration of follow-up ranged from 6-26 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement in both commissural excursion and velocity of more than two thirds in 6 patients, more than one half in 2 patients and less than one half in one. Qualitative evaluation showed a slight or pronounced improvement in 7/9 patients. The masseteric nerve is a reliable alternative for reanimation of the smile in patients with incomplete facial paralysis. Its main advantages include its consistent anatomy, a one-stage operation, and low morbidity at the donor site.

  7. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  8. Total Facial Nerve Decompression for Severe Traumatic Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Review of 10 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of traumatic facial nerve disorders is challenging. Facial nerve decompression is indicated if 90–95% loss of function is seen at the very early period on ENoG or if there is axonal degeneration on EMG lately with no sign of recovery. Middle cranial or translabyrinthine approach is selected depending on hearing. The aim of this study is to present retrospective review of 10 patients with sudden onset complete facial paralysis after trauma who underwent total facial nerve decompression. Operation time after injury is ranging between 16 and105 days. Excitation threshold, supramaximal stimulation, and amplitude on the paralytic side were worse than at least %85 of the healthy side. Six of 11 patients had HBG-II, one patient had HBG-I, 3 patients had HBG-III, and one patient had HBG-IV recovery. Stretch, compression injuries with disruption of the endoneurial tubules undetectable at the time of surgery and lack of timely decompression may be associated with suboptimal results in our series.

  9. Masseteric nerve for reanimation of the smile in short-term facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-02-01

    Our aim was to describe our experience with the masseteric nerve in the reanimation of short term facial paralysis. We present our outcomes using a quantitative measurement system and discuss its advantages and disadvantages. Between 2000 and 2012, 23 patients had their facial paralysis reanimated by masseteric-facial coaptation. All patients are presented with complete unilateral paralysis. Their background, the aetiology of the paralysis, and the surgical details were recorded. A retrospective study of movement analysis was made using an automatic optical system (Facial Clima). Commissural excursion and commissural contraction velocity were also recorded. The mean age at reanimation was 43(8) years. The aetiology of the facial paralysis included acoustic neurinoma, fracture of the skull base, schwannoma of the facial nerve, resection of a cholesteatoma, and varicella zoster infection. The mean time duration of facial paralysis was 16(5) months. Follow-up was more than 2 years in all patients except 1 in whom it was 12 months. The mean duration to recovery of tone (as reported by the patient) was 67(11) days. Postoperative commissural excursion was 8(4)mm for the reanimated side and 8(3)mm for the healthy side (p=0.4). Likewise, commissural contraction velocity was 38(10)mm/s for the reanimated side and 43(12)mm/s for the healthy side (p=0.23). Mean percentage of recovery was 92(5)mm for commissural excursion and 79(15)mm/s for commissural contraction velocity. Masseteric nerve transposition is a reliable and reproducible option for the reanimation of short term facial paralysis with reduced donor site morbidity and good symmetry with the opposite healthy side.

  10. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement in a Caucasian man.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2009-09-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a potentially fatal complication of hyperthyroidism, more common in Asian races, which is defined by a massive intracellular flux of potassium. This leads to profound hypokalaemia and muscle paralysis. Although the paralysis is temporary, it may be lethal if not diagnosed and treated rapidly, as profound hypokalaemia may induce respiratory muscle paralysis or cardiac arrest. The condition is often misdiagnosed in the west due to its comparative rarity in Caucasians; however it is now increasingly described in Caucasians and is also being seen with increasing frequency in western hospitals due to increasing immigration and population mobility. Here we describe the case of a patient with panhypopituitarism due to a craniopharyngioma, who developed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis due to excessive L-thyroxine replacement. This disorder has been described in Asian subjects but, to our knowledge, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis secondary to excessive L-thyroxine replacement has never been described in Caucasians.

  11. [Motor nerves of the face. Surgical and radiologic anatomy of facial paralysis and their surgical repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, C; Cyna-Gorse, F

    2015-10-01

    Motor innervation of the face depends on the facial nerve for the mobility of the face, on the mandibular nerve, third branch of the trigeminal nerve, which gives the motor innervation of the masticator muscles, and the hypoglossal nerve for the tongue. In case of facial paralysis, the most common palliative surgical techniques are the lengthening temporalis myoplasty (the temporal is innervated by the mandibular nerve) and the hypoglossal-facial anastomosis. The aim of this work is to describe the surgical anatomy of these three nerves and the radiologic anatomy of the facial nerve inside the temporal bone. Then the facial nerve penetrates inside the parotid gland giving a plexus. Four branches of the facial nerve leave the parotid gland: they are called temporal, zygomatic, buccal and marginal which give innervation to the cutaneous muscles of the face. Mandibular nerve gives three branches to the temporal muscles: the anterior, intermediate and posterior deep temporal nerves which penetrate inside the deep aspect of the temporal muscle in front of the infratemporal line. The hypoglossal nerve is only the motor nerve to the tongue. The ansa cervicalis, which is coming from the superficial cervical plexus and joins the hypoglossal nerve in the submandibular area is giving the motor innervation to subhyoid muscles and to the geniohyoid muscle.

  12. Recurrent nerve paralysis: Assessment of intrathoracic findings by computed tomography. Rekurrensparesen: Computertomographische Analyse intrathorakaler Befunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, S.; Knopp, M.V.; Kauczor, H.U.; Zuna, I.; Trost, U.; Haberkorn, U.; Kaick, G. van (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie)

    1992-09-01

    The long and singular course of the inferior (recurrent) laryngeal nerve makes it very vulnerable to infiltration by tumors of various locations. In particular, mediastinal and pulmonary lesions must be considered in the case of left vocal chord palsy. Recurrent nerve paralysis caused by a tumor indicates advanced disease. We retrospectively reviewed the computed tomography (CT) findings in 29 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma or mediastinal tumors and recurrent nerve paralysis with respect to the site, size and extent of the tumor and the lumph node status. The review revealed a marked predominance of left upper lobe tumors with extensive lymph node metastases to the anterior mediastinum and the aortopulmonary window. The extent of mediastinal involvement exceeded the average involvement in a control group of 30 randomly selected patients with bronchogenic carcinoma at the time of presentation. In all patients CT demonstrated tumor tissue which could have caused the paralysis at one or more sites along the anatomical course of the recurrent nerve. In most cases the tumor was located at the aortic arch. The left paratracheal region, right paratracheal region and right pulmonary apex were affected in one case each. We conclude that in patients with cancer, CT is a suitable method for localizing a recurrent nerve lesion. (orig.).

  13. Repair of ocular-oral synkinesis of postfacial paralysis using cross-facial nerve grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Yang, Chuan; Wang, Wei; Li, Wei

    2010-08-01

    We present the surgical techniques and results of cross-facial nerve grafting that have been developed in the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis. Eleven patients with ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis underwent the cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve transposition at a tertiary academic hospital between 2003 and 2009. The patient selection for the study was based on the degree of disfigurement and facial function parameter rating using the Toronto Facial Grading System. The procedures used were surgeries done in two stages. All cases were followed up for 2 months to 6 years after the second surgery. The degree of improvement was evaluated at 6 to 7 months after the procedures. Six of the patients were followed up for more than 2 years after the stage-two surgery and demonstrated significant reduction in the ocular-oral synkinetic movements. The Toronto Facial Grading System scores from the postoperative follow-ups increased an average of 16 points (28%), and the patients had achieved symmetrical facial movement. We concluded that cross-facial nerve grafting with facial nerve branch transposition is effective and can be considered as an option for the repair of ocular-oral synkinesis after facial paralysis in select patients.

  14. Unilateral Recurrent Laryngeal and Hypoglossal Nerve Paralysis Following Rhinoplasty: A Case Report and review of Articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bakhshaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Injury to cranial nerves IX, X, and XII is a known complication of laryngoscopy and intubation. Here we present a patient with concurrent hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis after rhinoplasty. Case Report: The patient was a 27-year-old woman who was candidate for rhinoplastic surgery. The next morning after the operation, the patient complained of dysphonia and a sore throat .7 days after the operation she was still complaining of dysphonia. She underwent a direct laryngoscopy, and right TVC paralysis was observed. Right hypoglossal nerve paralysis was also detected during physical cranial nerve function tests. Hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerve function was completely recovered after 5 and 7 months, respectively, and no complication was remained. Conclusion: Accurate and atraumatic intubation and extubation, true positioning of the head and neck, delicate and gentle packing of the oropharynx, and maintenance of mean blood pressure at a safe level are appropriate methods to prevent this complication during anesthesia and surgical procedures.

  15. Acupuncture plus TDP Treated 34 Cases of Radial Nerve Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Gui-xiang; HUANG Guo-qi

    2003-01-01

    In the treatment of 34 cases of radial nerve paralysisby puncturing the acupoints in Yangming meridians of the hand and foot, plus TDP radiation in the local areas after acupuncture, the total effective rate is 97.1%.

  16. 44 Cases of Peripheral Facial Paralysis Treated by the SXDZ-100 Nerve and Muscle Stimulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-sheng; CUI Cheng-bin; GAO Xin-yan; ZHU Bing; RONG Pei-jing

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effects of the Hua Tuo Manual Acupuncture Therapeutic Stimulator for peripheral facial paralysis.Methods:87 patients with peripheral facial paralysis were divided randomly into the SXDZ-100 Nerve and Muscle Stimulator treatment group (44 cases) and the G6805 Electric Stimulator control group (43 cases).The acupoints selected for both the two groups were local points as well as distal points as Hegu (LI 4), Waiguan (TE 5), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Taichong (LR 3).Effectiveness was compared between the two groups.Results:Both groups had a total effective rate of 100%.But the cure rate was 90.9% in the treatment group, and 73.0% in the control group, indicating a significant difference (P<0.05).No side effects were found in either of the two groups.Conclusion:The SXDZ-100 stimulator is more effective than the G6805 electroacupuncture stimulator for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis.

  17. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  18. Severe hypokalaemic paralysis and rhabdomyolysis due to ingestion of liquorice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); J.M. van der Klooster; D.M. Zuidgeest; R.J.T. Ouwendijk (Rob); A. Dees

    2005-01-01

    textabstractChronic ingestion of liquorice induces a syndrome with findings similar to those in primary hyperaldosteronism. We describe a patient who, with a plasma K+ of 1.8 mmol/l, showed a paralysis and severe rhabdomyolysis after the habitual consumption of natural liquorice. L

  19. Acute diaphragmatic paralysis caused by chest-tube trauma to phrenic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahum, E.; Ben-Ari, J.; Schonfeld, T. [Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Horev, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Petah Tiqva (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2001-06-01

    A 3{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old child developed unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after chest drain insertion. Plain chest X-ray demonstrated paravertebral positioning of the chest-tube tip, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed hematomas in the region of the chest-tube tip and the phrenic nerve fibers. The trauma to the phrenic nerve was apparently secondary to malposition of the chest tube. This is a rare complication and has been reported mainly in neonates. Radiologists should notify the treating physicians that the correct position of a chest drain tip is at least 2 cm distant from the vertebrae. (orig.)

  20. Manual therapy and neurodynamic mobilization in a patient with peroneal nerve paralysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Pillastrini, Paolo; Borboni, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a therapeutic intervention for peroneal nerve paralysis involving the sciatic nerve. A 24-year-old man presented with peroneal nerve paralysis with decreased sensation, severe pain in the popliteal fossa, and steppage gait, which occurred 3 days prior to the consultation. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography confirmed lumbar disk herniation with sciatic common peroneal nerve entrapment in the popliteal fossa. A combined treatment protocol of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization including soft tissue work of the psoas and hamstring muscles was performed. Outcome measures were assessed at pretreatment, 1 week posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up and included numeric pain rating scale, range of motion, pressure pain threshold, and manual muscle testing. Treatment interventions were applied for 3 sessions over a period of 1 week. Results showed reduction of the patient's subjective pain and considerable improvement in range of motion, strength, and sensation in his left foot, which was restored to full function. A combined program of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization reduced pain, increased range of motion and strength, and restored full function to the left leg in this patient who had severe functional impairment related to a compressed left common peroneal nerve.

  1. Results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the treatment of facial nerve paralysis after failed stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz A; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    Vestibular schwannoma treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) carries a risk of facial nerve (CNVII) palsy that is lower than that with microneurosurgery. The results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HHFA) have not been described yet in CNVII palsy after failed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Here we report a case series of the first four consecutive patients (three women; average age 58.5, age range: 46-74), who underwent HHFA due to failed SRS. All patients were admitted because of progressive peripheral facial nerve palsy. Three patients received retrosigmoid craniotomy due to tumor enlargement that resulted in facial nerve paralysis. All patients achieved satisfactory (House-Brackmann grade III) CNVII regeneration. No or minimal tongue atrophy occurred on the side of the anastomosis. Patients reported no problems with phonation or swallowing, except for the patients with preexisting lower cranial nerve deficits. HHFA effectively treats facial palsy after failed SRS with minimal risk of tongue atrophy and minimal morbidity. The results of the treatment are comparable to those achieved with patients without previous SRS.

  2. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be seen ...

  3. Recovery of Facial Nerve Paralysis After Temporal Nerve Reconstruction: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Emamhadi; Mahmoudi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Facial paralysis is common following accidents, trauma, viral infection or tumors. Case Presentation A 24-year-old male patient was referred to us with a history of sharp penetrating trauma to the right temporal region causing unilateral paralysis of the muscles of the right forehead. He was unable to scowl or elevate his right eyebrow and there were no folds on his right forehead. Anastomosis of branches of the tempo...

  4. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesolella Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved.

  5. Efficacy of glial growth factor and nerve growth factor on the recovery of traumatic facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mucahit; Karlidag, Turgut; Yalcin, Sinasi; Ozogul, Candan; Keles, Erol; Alpay, Hayrettin Cengiz; Yanilmaz, Muhammed

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Glial growth factor (GGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on nerve regeneration in facial nerve anastomosis. In this study, approximately a 1-mm segment was resected from the facial nerve and the free ends were anastomosed. All animals underwent the same surgical procedure and 30 rabbits were grouped randomly in three groups. Control group, the group without any medications; NGF group, the group receiving 250 ng/0.1 ml NGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis; GBF group, the group receiving 500 ng/0.1 ml GGF in the epineurium at the site of anastomosis. Medications were given at the time of surgery, and at 24 and 48 h postoperatively. After 2 months, the sites of anastomosis were excised and examined using the electron microscope. It was found that the best regeneration was in the group receiving GGF as compared to the control group in terms of nerve regeneration. Schwann cell and glial cell proliferation were found to be significantly higher in the group receiving GGF as compared to the group receiving NGF. Besides, the number of myelin debris, an indicator of degeneration, was significantly lower in the group with GGF as compared to NGF and control groups (p NGF in order to increase regeneration after nerve anastomosis in experimental traumatic facial nerve paralysis may be a hopeful alternative treatment option in the future. However, further studies on human studies are required to support these results.

  6. Phrenic nerve paralysis as the initial presentation in pleural sarcomatoid mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimoto, Go; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Yamadori, Ichiro; Sato, Toshio; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2014-05-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of persistent cough. A chest radiograph revealed an elevation of the right diaphragm. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a small nodule localized on the right mediastinum. Five months later, the nodule had grown and was diagnosed as malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) by a CT-guided needle biopsy. The patient underwent combined chemotherapy, but the disease progressed rapidly and he passed away. On autopsy, microscopic findings and immunohistological examinations supported the diagnosis of sarcomatoid mesothelioma. Therefore, we diagnosed this rare case as localized sarcomatoid MPM showing phrenic nerve paralysis as an initial presentation.

  7. Phrenic Nerve Paralysis as the Initial Presentation in Pleural Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Makimoto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of persistent cough. A chest radiograph revealed an elevation of the right diaphragm. Computed tomography (CT images revealed a small nodule localized on the right mediastinum. Five months later, the nodule had grown and was diagnosed as malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM by a CT-guided needle biopsy. The patient underwent combined chemotherapy, but the disease progressed rapidly and he passed away. On autopsy, microscopic findings and immunohistological examinations supported the diagnosis of sarcomatoid mesothelioma. Therefore, we diagnosed this rare case as localized sarcomatoid MPM showing phrenic nerve paralysis as an initial presentation.

  8. Phrenic Nerve Paralysis as the Initial Presentation in Pleural Sarcomatoid Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimoto, Go; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Yamadori, Ichiro; Sato, Toshio; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of persistent cough. A chest radiograph revealed an elevation of the right diaphragm. Computed tomography (CT) images revealed a small nodule localized on the right mediastinum. Five months later, the nodule had grown and was diagnosed as malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) by a CT-guided needle biopsy. The patient underwent combined chemotherapy, but the disease progressed rapidly and he passed away. On autopsy, microscopic findings and immunohistological examinations supported the diagnosis of sarcomatoid mesothelioma. Therefore, we diagnosed this rare case as localized sarcomatoid MPM showing phrenic nerve paralysis as an initial presentation. PMID:25076889

  9. [Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis due to Parsonage-Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissier-Ducamp, D; Martinez, S; Alagha, K; Charpin, D; Chanez, P; Palot, A

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 49-years-old patient who presented to the accident and emergency department with sudden onset dyspnea associated with acute shoulder pain. He was breathless at rest with supine hypoxemia. He had an amyotrophic left shoulder with localized paresis of the shoulder. Both hemi-diaphragms were elevated on chest X-rays. Pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive pattern and both phrenic nerve conduction velocities were decreased. At night, alveolar hypoventilation was evidenced by elevated mean capnography (PtcCO2: 57mmHg). Neuralgic amyotrophy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome was the final diagnosis. This syndrome is a brachial plexus neuritis with a predilection for the suprascapular and axillary nerves. Phrenic nerve involvement is rare but where present can be the most prominent clinical feature as in our case report.

  10. Outcome of tendon transfer for radial nerve paralysis: Comparison of three methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Ayatollahi Moussavi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tendon transfer for radial nerve paralysis has a 100 years history and any set of tendons that can be considered to be useful has been utilized for the purpose. The pronator tress is used for restoration of wrist dorsiflexion, while the flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpiulnaris, and flexor digitorum superficialis are variably used in each for fingers and thumb movements. The present study was a retrospective analysis, designed to compare three methods of tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy. Materials and Methods: 41 patients with irreversible radial nerve paralysis, who had underwent three different types of tendon transfers (using different tendons for transfer between March 2005 and September 2009, included in the study. The pronator teres was transferred for wrist extention. Flexor carpi ulnaris (group 1, n=18, flexor carpi radialis (group 2, n=10 and flexor digitorum superficialis (group 3, n=13 was used to achieve finger extention. Palmaris longus was used to achieve thumb extention and abduction. At the final examination, related ranges of motions were recorded and the patients were asked about their overall satisfaction with the operation, their ability, and time of return to their previous jobs, and in addition, disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH Score was measured and recorded for each patient. Results: The difference between the groups with regard to DASH score, ability, and time of return to job, satisfaction with the operation, and range of motions was not statistically significant (P>0.05. All of the patients had experienced functional improvement and overall satisfaction rate was 95%. No complication directly attributable to the operation was noted, except for proximal interphalangeal joint flexion contracture in three patents. Conclusion : The tendon transfer for irreversible radial nerve palsy is very successful and probably the success is not related to type of tendon used for transfer.

  11. Facial nerve paralysis after super-selective intra-arterial chemotherapy for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, S; Iwai, T; Oguri, S; Koizumi, T; Mitsudo, K; Tohnai, I

    2017-02-10

    Facial nerve paralysis (FNP) after super-selective intra-arterial chemotherapy (SSIAC) is a relatively rare local side effect of SSIAC to the maxillary artery (MA) or the middle meningeal artery (MMA). The incidence and prognosis of FNP after SSIAC in 381 patients with oral cancer (133 with catheterization of the MA, 248 without) was investigated retrospectively. Only three patients (two male and one female) had FNP, for an incidence of 0.8%. All patients with FNP had undergone catheterization of the MA, and the incidence of FNP in this group was 2.3% (3/133). One of the three patients with FNP had paralysis of the third branch of the trigeminal nerve. FNP occurred a mean of 8.7 days (range 5-11 days) after initial SSIAC, and the mean total dose of cisplatin was 55.8mg (range 42.5-67.2mg) and of docetaxel was 25.4mg (range 17.0-33.6mg). FNP resolved completely a mean of 12.7 months (range 6-19 months) after onset. Because the administration of anticancer agents via the MA or MMA carries a risk of FNP, this information will be useful when obtaining informed consent from patients before treatment.

  12. Management of Facial Paralysis due to Extracranial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Michael; Rolfes, Bryan N

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of advanced parotid or cutaneous malignancies often requires sacrifice of the facial nerve as well as resection of the parotid gland and surrounding structures. In addition to considerations regarding reinnervation and dynamic reanimation, reconstruction in this setting must take into account unique factors such as soft tissue volume deficits and the high likelihood of adjunctive radiation therapy. Furthermore, considerations of patient comorbidities including advanced age and poor long-term prognosis often influence reconstructive modality. The optimal reconstructive technique would provide potential for restoration of facial tone and voluntary movement as well as immediate restoration of facial support and function. Beyond considerations of facial movement and rest position, restoration of lost soft tissue volume is critical to obtain facial symmetry. To control long-term volume in the setting of adjunctive radiation therapy, vascularized tissue is required. In this chapter, we describe a comprehensive approach to the management of radical parotidectomy and similar facial defects that addresses these concerns and also describes management strategies over time. Specific techniques employed include anterolateral thigh free flaps, nerve grafting utilizing motor nerves to the vastus lateralis muscle, and orthodromic temporalis tendon transfer. Further considerations relative to the eye, forehead, and long-term facial refinement are also discussed.

  13. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis associated with transient thyrotoxicosis due to painless thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang Bo; Ahn, Jinhee; Oh, Min Young; Choi, Bo Gwang; Kang, Ji Hyun; Jeon, Yun Kyung; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, In Joo

    2012-07-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare manifestation of hyperthyroidism characterized by muscle weakness and hypokalemia. All ethnicities can be affected, but TPP typically presents in men of Asian descent. The most common cause of TPP in thyrotoxicosis is Graves' disease. However, TPP can occur with any form of thyrotoxicosis. Up to our knowledge, very few cases ever reported the relationship between TPP and painless thyroiditis. We herein report a 25-yr-old Korean man who suffered from flaccid paralysis of the lower extremities and numbness of hands. The patient was subsequently diagnosed as having TPP associated with transient thyrotoxicosis due to painless thyroiditis. The paralytic attack did not recur after improving the thyroid function. Therefore, it is necessary that early diagnosis of TPP due to transient thyrotoxicosis is made to administer definite treatment and prevent recurrent paralysis.

  14. Lower-Extremity Weakness in a Teenager Due to Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Matthew D

    2017-04-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic paralysis is the hallmark of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP). TPP is a potentially deadly complication of hyperthyroidism that occurs because of rapid and dramatic intracellular shift of potassium. This transference results in severe hypokalemia and clinically manifests itself as muscle weakness or paralysis. This condition predominantly affects males of Asian descent, and its presentation can range from mild to severe, as seen in our case. We present the case of a 15-year-old Asian-American male who presented to a tertiary-care pediatric emergency department complaining of generalized weakness and flaccid paralysis of his lower extremities. The differential for such a complaint is extremely broad, and the symptoms can result from etiologies arising from the cerebral cortex, the spinal cord, peripheral nerves, the neuromuscular junction, or even the muscles themselves. Our patient was found to have an extremely low serum potassium concentration, as well as an electrocardiogram that revealed a prolonged QT interval and right bundle branch block. The etiology of these abnormalities and the patient's symptoms was found to be undiagnosed and uncontrolled hyperthyroidism from Grave's disease, which resulted in this dramatic presentation of thyrotoxic hypokalemic paralysis. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: This entity is common in Asia but still somewhat rare in the United States and other Western countries. Our case illustrates that careful history taking and a focused diagnostic evaluation, in conjunction with having an awareness of this disease, can help expedite diagnosis and management, as well as avoid unnecessary and potential harmful testing in the emergency department setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Paralysis following stereotactic spinal irradiation in pigs suggests a tolerance constraint for single-session irradiation of the spinal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medin, P.M.; Foster, R.D.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Meyer, J.; Sayre, J.W.; Huang, H.; Oz, O.K.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Paralysis observed during a study of vertebral bone tolerance to single-session irradiation led to further study of the dose-related incidence of motor peripheral neuropathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During a bone tolerance study, cervical spinal nerves of 15 minipigs received

  16. Outcome of patients presenting with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in a tertiary centre--a five year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, I P; Lee, S C; Shashinder, S; Raman, R

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective study. The objective of this study is to review the factors influencing the outcome of treatment for the patients presented with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. The demographic data, clinical presentation and management of 84 patients with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) were collected from the medical record office, reviewed and analyzed from 2000 to 2005. Thirty-four (72.3%) out of 47 patients who were treated with oral prednisolone alone, fully recovered from Bell's palsy meanwhile 36 (97%) out of 37 patients who were treated with combination of oral prednisolone and acyclovir fully recovered. The difference was statistically significant. 42 (93.3%) out of 45 patients who presented within three days to our clinic, fully recovered while 28 (71.8%) out of 39 patients presented later then three days had full recovery from Bell's palsy. The difference was statistically significant. The outcome of full recovery is better with the patients treated with combined acyclovir and prednisolone compared with prednisolone alone. The patients who were treated after three days of clinical presentation, who were more than 50 years of age, who had concurrent chronic medical illness and facial nerve paralysis HB Grade IV to VI during initial presentation have reduced chance of full recovery of facial nerve paralysis.

  17. Rehabilitation of long-standing facial nerve paralysis with percutaneous suture-based slings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Long-standing facial paralysis creates significant functional and aesthetic problems for patients affected by this deficit. Traditional approaches to correct this problem have involved aggressive open procedures such as unilateral face-lifts and sling procedures using fascia and implantable materials. Unfortunately, our results with these techniques over the last 5 years have been suboptimal. The traditional face-lift techniques did not address the nasolabial fold to our satisfaction, and suture-based techniques alone, while offering excellent short-term results, failed to provide a long-term solution. This led to the development of a novel percutaneous technique combining the minimally invasive approach of suture-based lifts with the long-term efficacy of Gore-Tex-based slings. We report our results with this technique for static facial suspension in patients with long-standing facial nerve paralysis and our surgical outcomes in 13 patients. The procedure offers re-creation of the nasolabial crease and suspension of the oral commissure to its normal anatomic relationships. The recovery time is minimal, and the operation is performed as a short outpatient procedure. Long-term 2-year follow-up has shown effective preservation of the surgical results.

  18. Quantification of vocal fold motion using echography: application to recurrent nerve paralysis detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mike-Ely; Lefort, Muriel; Bergeret-Cassagne, Héloïse; Hachi, Siham; Li, Ang; Russ, Gilles; Lazard, Diane; Menegaux, Fabrice; Leenhardt, Laurence; Trésallet, Christophe; Frouin, Frédérique

    2015-03-01

    Recurrent nerve paralysis (RP) is one of the most frequent complications of thyroid surgery. It reduces vocal fold mobility. Nasal endoscopy, a mini-invasive procedure, is the conventional way to detect RP. We suggest a new approach based on laryngeal ultrasound and a specific data analysis was designed to help with the automated detection of RP. Ten subjects were enrolled for this feasibility study: four controls, three patients with RP and three patients without RP according to nasal endoscopy. The ultrasound protocol was based on a ten seconds B-mode acquisition in a coronal plane during normal breathing. Image processing included three steps: 1) automated detection of two consecutive closing and opening images, corresponding to extreme positions of vocal folds in the sequence of B-mode images, using principal component analysis of the image sequence; 2) positioning of three landmarks and robust tracking of these points using a multi-pyramidal refined optical flow approach; 3) estimation of quantitative parameters indicating left and right fractions of mobility, and motion symmetry. Results provided by automated image processing were compared to those obtained by an expert. Detection of extreme images was accurate; tracking of landmarks was reliable in 80% of cases. Motion symmetry indices showed similar values for controls and patients without RP. Fraction of mobility was reduced in cases of RP. Thus, our CAD system helped in the detection of RP. Laryngeal ultrasound combined with appropriate image processing helped in the diagnosis of recurrent nerve paralysis and could be proposed as a first-line method.

  19. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF LARGE AMPLITUDE ACTION POTENTIAL OF THE SUFFERED FACIAL MUSCLES IN INTRATEMPORAL FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任重; 惠莲

    1999-01-01

    Objctive. To testify the phenomenon that large amplitude action potential appears at the early stage oil facial paralysis, and to search for the mechanism through clinical and experimental studies. Patients(aninmls) and methods. The action potentials of the orbicular ocular and oral museles were recorded in 34 normal persons by electromyogram instrtiments. The normal range of amplitude percentage was found out according to the normal distribution, One hundred patients with facial paralysis were also studied. The action potentials of facial muscles were recorded ia 17 guinea pigs before and after the facial nerve was comp~ and the facial nerve was examined under electromicroscope before and after the compression.Results. The amplitude percentage of the suffered side to the healthy side was more than 153 percent in 6 of the 100 patients. Large amplitude action potential occured in 35 per cent guinea pigs which were performed the experiment of facial nerve compression. Electromicroscopic examination revealed separation of the lammae of the facial nerve's myelin sheath in the guinea pigs which exhibited large amplitude action potential Conclusion. The facial nerve exhibited a temporary over-excitability at the early stage of facial nerve injury in scane patients and guinea pigs. If the injury was limited in the myelin sheath, the prognods was relatively good.

  20. Facial nerve paralysis and partial brachial plexopathy after epidural blood patch: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radi Shahien

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Radi Shahien, Abdalla BowirratDepartment of Neurology, Ziv Medical Center, Zfat, IsraelAbstract: We report a complication related to epidural analgesia for delivery in a 24-year-old woman who was admitted with mild pre-eclampsia and for induction of labor. At the first postpartum day she developed a postdural puncture headache, which was unresponsive to conservative measures. On the fifth day an epidural blood patch was done, and her headache subsided. Sixteen hours later she developed paralysis of the right facial nerve, which was treated with prednisone. Seven days later she complained of pain in the left arm and the posterior region of the shoulder. She was later admitted and diagnosed with partial brachial plexopathy.Keywords: facial nerve paralysis, partial brachial plexopathy, epidural blood patch

  1. Nerve Transfer for Facial Paralysis Under Intravenous Sedation and Local Analgesia for the High Surgical Risk Elderly Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi, Carlos; Cardenas Mejia, Alexander; Cavadas, Pedro Carlos; Thione, Alessandro; Aramburo Garcia, Rigoberto; Rozen, Shai

    2016-07-01

    This case report describes an 86-year-old woman with complete peripheral right-sided facial paralysis resulting from resection of a cervical lipoma 14 months before surgery. Because of the high anesthetic risk, a masseter to facial nerve transfer was performed under combined light sedation and local anesthetic. Good functional and aesthetic outcomes were noted without complications. To our knowledge, nerve transfers under light sedation and local anesthesia have not been described in the literature and may be useful in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF LARGE AMPLITUDE ACTION POTENTIAL OF THE SUFFERED FACIAL MUSCLES IN INTRATEMPORAL FACIAL NERVE PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Ojective. To testify the phenomenon that large amplitude action potential appears at the early stage of facial paralysis, and to search for the mechanism through clinical and experimental studies. Patients(animals) and methods. The action potentials of the orbicular ocular and oral muscles were recorded in 34 normal persons by electromyogram instruments. The normal range of amplitude percentage was found out according to he normal distribution. One hundred patients with facial paralysis were also studied. The action potentials of facial muscles were recorded in 17 guinea pigs before and after the facial nerve was compressed and the facial nerve was examined under electromicroscope before and after the compression.Results. The amplitude percentage of the suffered ide to the healthy side was more than 153 percent in 6 of the 100 patients. Lare amplitude action potential ocured in 35 per cent guinea pigs which were performed the experiment of facial nrve compression. Electromicroscopic examination revealed separation of the lammae of the facial nerve's myelin sheath in the guinea pigs which exhibited large amplitude action potential.Conclusion. The facial nerve exhibited a temporary over-exciability at the early stage of facial nerve injury in some patients and guinea pigs. If the injury waslimited in the myelin sheath, te prognosis was relatively good.

  3. Comparison of hemihypoglossal nerve versus masseteric nerve transpositions in the rehabilitation of short-term facial paralysis using the Facial Clima evaluating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marré, Diego

    2012-11-01

    Masseteric and hypoglossal nerve transfers are reliable alternatives for reanimating short-term facial paralysis. To date, few studies exist in the literature comparing these techniques. This work presents a quantitative comparison of masseter-facial transposition versus hemihypoglossal facial transposition with a nerve graft using the Facial Clima system. Forty-six patients with complete unilateral facial paralysis underwent reanimation with either hemihypoglossal transposition with a nerve graft (group I, n = 25) or direct masseteric-facial coaptation (group II, n = 21). Commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity were measured using the Facial Clima system. Postoperative intragroup commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity means of the reanimated versus the normal side were first compared using a paired sample t test. Then, mean percentages of recovery of both parameters were compared between the groups using an independent sample t test. Onset of movement was also compared between the groups. Significant differences of mean commissural displacement and commissural contraction velocity between the reanimated side and the normal side were observed in group I but not in group II. Mean percentage of recovery of both parameters did not differ between the groups. Patients in group II showed a significantly faster onset of movement compared with those in group I (62 ± 4.6 days versus 136 ± 7.4 days, p = 0.013). Reanimation of short-term facial paralysis can be satisfactorily addressed by means of either hemihypoglossal transposition with a nerve graft or direct masseteric-facial coaptation. However, with the latter, better symmetry and a faster onset of movement are observed. In addition, masseteric nerve transfer avoids morbidity from nerve graft harvesting. Therapeutic, III.

  4. [Surgical treatment of benign recurrent goiter with pre-existing unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis--a report of experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, J; Pohle, T

    1996-01-01

    Operations for recurrent goiter are considered to range among the most difficult procedures in thyroid surgery, because the risk of a permanent recurrent nerve palsy increases to 10 or 30%. In case of pre-existing unilateral lesion of the nerve the danger of bilateral paralysis of the vocal chord will become even larger. The results from 29 patients with an intracapsular resection (nearly total removement of the thyroid tissue without the preparation of the recurrent nerve) are presented and compared with those found in 4 patients with an extracapsular approach. All four patients, where the operation was performed extracapsularly, must be tracheotomized although the palsy did recover within 21 days till 14 months. After an intracapsular resection of the recurrence at the side of an intact nerve (29 patients) a tracheotomy had not been necessary.

  5. Comprehensive approach in surgical reconstruction of facial nerve paralysis: a 10-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Eyal; Stahl, Shy; Barnea, Yoav; Leshem, David; Zaretski, Arik; Amir, Aharon; Meilik, Beni; Miller, Ehud; Shapira, Eyal; Abu Jabel, Amin; Weiss, Jerry; Arad, Ehud

    2010-04-01

    Facial paralysis presents diverse functional and aesthetic abnormalities. Reconstruction may be achieved by several methods. We reviewed the management and outcome of facial paralysis patients to establish principles on which a comprehensive reconstructive approach may be based. Records were reviewed of all patients operated for facial paralysis at our institution between 1998 and 2007. Ninety-five patients were included, of which 15 patients had static reconstruction alone, and 80 patients had dynamic reconstruction. Presented is our experience in reconstruction of facial paralysis over the past decade, delineating a comprehensive approach to this condition. Various surgical techniques are described.

  6. [Gold weight implants for lagophthalmos correction in chronic facial nerve paralysis (late results)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grusha, Y O; Fedorov, A A; Iskusnykh, N S; Bogacheva, N V; Kobzova, M V; Novikov, I A; Fettser, E I; Shchegoleva, T A

    2016-01-01

    Upper eyelid weigh gold implant is the widely accepted standard for the treatment of paralytic lagophthalmos (PL). To evaluate late outcomes of PL correction with chain gold implants. Chain gold implants were inserted in the upper eyelids of 70 patients with lagophthalmos due to chronic facial paralysis. A comprehensive ophthalmic examination was performed prior to surgery and then at months 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36. The results obtained prove the method highly effective. None of the patients developed any severe complications. Cases of implant removal were few. Some of the studied biometric parameters decreased significantly after surgery, while the upper eyelid excursion increased. The implant had no effect on the inner surface of the cornea and its peripheral thickness. Efficacy of the proposed eyelid implant has been convincingly demonstrated; late complications have been analyzed.

  7. Hypokalemic paralysis due to thyrotoxicosis accompanied by Gitelman′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Baldane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male patient was admitted with fatigue and muscle weakness. He had been on methimazole due to thyrotoxicosis for 2 weeks. Laboratory tests showed overt hyperthyroidism and hypokalemia. Potassium replacement was started with an initial diagnosis of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Later on, despite the euthyroid condition and potassium chloride treatment, hypokalemia persisted. Further investigations revealed hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism. The patient was considered to have Gitelman′s syndrome (GS and all genetic analysis was done. A c. 1145C>T, p.Thr382Met homozygote missense mutation located on solute carrier family 12, member gene 3, exon 9 was detected and GS was confirmed.

  8. Facial nerve paralysis and frey syndrome in an infant following removal of an internal mandibular distraction device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Sameer Mehbub; Golinko, Michael Samuel; Williams, Joseph Kerwin

    2013-05-01

    Mandibular distraction using an implantable device has become a widely accepted and utilized procedure for the treatment of retrognathia. Although excellent results have been reported and observed with distraction osteogenesis, complications such as facial nerve injury have been previously reported. Often, this injury is usually temporary and corrects over the course of time. Frey syndrome has been classically described as an injury or severance of the auricotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve. It is commonly seen as a complication of parotid surgery and has never been reported in association with mandibular distraction. The authors report a unique case of both facial nerve paralysis and Frey syndrome in a patient following the removal of an internal mandibular distraction device. A review of the literature along with diagnosis and management are discussed.

  9. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  10. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy following intranasal delivery of a genetically detoxified mutant of Escherichia coli heat labile toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J M Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An association was previously established between facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy and intranasal administration of an inactivated influenza virosome vaccine containing an enzymatically active Escherichia coli Heat Labile Toxin (LT adjuvant. The individual component(s responsible for paralysis were not identified, and the vaccine was withdrawn. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects participating in two contemporaneous non-randomized Phase 1 clinical trials of nasal subunit vaccines against Human Immunodeficiency Virus and tuberculosis, both of which employed an enzymatically inactive non-toxic mutant LT adjuvant (LTK63, underwent active follow-up for adverse events using diary-cards and clinical examination. Two healthy subjects experienced transient peripheral facial nerve palsies 44 and 60 days after passive nasal instillation of LTK63, possibly a result of retrograde axonal transport after neuronal ganglioside binding or an inflammatory immune response, but without exaggerated immune responses to LTK63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While the unique anatomical predisposition of the facial nerve to compression suggests nasal delivery of neuronal-binding LT-derived adjuvants is inadvisable, their continued investigation as topical or mucosal adjuvants and antigens appears warranted on the basis of longstanding safety via oral, percutaneous, and other mucosal routes.

  11. Pharyngolaryngeal paralysis in a patient with pharyngeal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohki, Masafumi; Komiyama, Sakurako; Tayama, Niro

    2015-02-01

    Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a rare disease, and its commonly reported symptoms include sore throat, dysphagia, and throat discomfort. The dysphagia in pharyngeal tuberculosis cases is not due to pharyngolaryngeal paralysis but due to odynophagia. Herein, we describe the first case of dysphagia caused by pharyngolaryngeal paralysis secondary to pharyngeal tuberculosis. An irregular mass at the right nasopharynx was detected in a 57-year-old female patient, along with dysphagia and hoarseness. She had poor right soft palate elevation, inadequate right velopharyngeal closure, poor constrictor pharyngus muscle contraction, and an immobilized right vocal cord, which collectively indicate right pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. Pathological examination and culture testing revealed pharyngeal tuberculosis. She was diagnosed with pharyngolaryngeal paralysis secondary to pharyngeal tuberculosis. The pharyngolaryngeal paralysis resolved after beginning anti-tuberculous treatment. Right pharyngolaryngeal paralysis was attributed to glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve impairment in the parapharyngeal space. Prior reports indicate that peripheral nerve paralysis, including recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis caused by tuberculous lymphadenitis, often recovers after anti-tuberculous treatment. Pharyngeal tuberculosis rarely causes dysphagia and hoarseness attributable to pharyngolaryngeal paralysis. The neuropathy may recover after anti-tuberculous treatment. Pharyngeal tuberculosis is a new potential differential diagnosis in pharyngolaryngeal paralysis.

  12. Ulnar nerve palsy due to axillary crutch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerendrakumar M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A young lady with residual polio, using axillary crutch since early childhood, presented with tingling, numbness and weakness in ulnar nerve distribution of five months duration. Ulnar motor conduction study revealed proximal conduction block near the axilla, at the point of pressure by the crutch while walking. Distal ulnar sensory conduction studies were normal but proximal ulnar sensory conduction studies showed absence of Erb′s point potential. These findings suggested the presence of conduction block in sensory fibers as well. Proper use and change of axillary crutch resulted in clinical recovery and resolution of motor and sensory conduction block.

  13. Surgical treatment of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ritvik P

    2009-03-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (facial paralysis (3 weeks to 2 yr) and chronic facial paralysis (>2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgical therapies are facial nerve decompression and facial nerve repair. For facial paralysis of intermediate duration, nerve transfer procedures are appropriate. For chronic facial paralysis, treatment typically requires regional or free muscle transfer. Static techniques of facial reanimation can be used for acute, intermediate, or chronic facial paralysis as these techniques are often important adjuncts to the overall management strategy.

  14. [Aneurysm of the internal carotid artery--a differential diagnosis of paralysis of the caudal cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscielny, S; Koch, J; Behrendt, W

    2003-09-01

    Paralysis of the caudal cranial nerves, e. g. the nervus glossopharyngeus, vagus and accessorius, may cause disorders in swallowing and speaking leading to a reduction in the patient's quality of life. Glomus tumors or malignant lesions of the skull base are a frequent cause of such lesions. We report on the case of a 48 year old patient who presented an acute lesion of these cranial nerves in combination with paresis of the nervus hypoglossus as a result of an aneurysm of the internal carotid artery directly underneath the base of the skull. The aneurysm was treated by parent vessel occlusion. The results of this procedure were a shrinkage of the aneurysm and an improvement in the neurological symptoms.

  15. Clinical management of microstomia due to the static treatment of facial paralysis and oral rehabilitation with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi, Firat; Guven, Erdem; Mutlu, Deniz

    2011-05-01

    Facial-nerve paralysis is seldom seen and may occur because of a broad spectrum of causes. The most commonly seen cause of facial paralysis is the Bell palsy; iatrogenic causes and tumors are relatively rare. Facial asymmetry, drooling, garbled speech, and difficulty in feeding: all adversely affect the psychosocial conditions of the patients. Fascial and tendon sling procedures may be performed for the static treatment of the unilateral permanent facial paralysis. These techniques are used both for the correction of the asymmetry of the face, especially by providing static support for the corner of the mouth, and to prevent drooling. Microstomia after a sling procedure is not a previously observed complication in the literature. A patient is presented with the surgical management of the complication of microstomia that had risen because of a static treatment of his unilateral facial paralysis via a tendon that passes circularly through his orbicularis oris muscle. Oral rehabilitation thereafter was maintained with the support of dental implants and fixed prosthodontics. The most efficient treatment protocol was decided with an interdisciplinary consultation of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, the plastic surgeon, and the prosthodontist.

  16. [Inspiratory stridor due to vocal cord paralysis in children with myelomeningocele and hydrocephalus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkers, H M

    1982-02-01

    Inspiratory stridor in combination with myelomeningocele and increased intracranial pressure is caused by bilateral vocal cord paralysis in children with Arnold-Chiari-deformation. The diagnosis of bilateral vocal cord paralysis can be established by direct laryngoscopy performed without general anesthesia. As emergency measures naso-tracheal intubation, tracheostomy and immediate ventricular puncture are recommended. Reduction of intracranial pressure has always to be performed within 24 hours. The bilateral vocal cord paralysis is totally reversible if the inracranial pressure is decreased timely. The bilateral vocal cord paralysis becomes irreversible when degeneration of the nucleus ambiguus occurs secondary to peripheral lesions of the nervus vagus.

  17. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  18. Transient total facial nerve paralysis: an unusual complication of transoral endoscopic-assisted management of subcondylar fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Young Man

    2012-05-01

    Endoscopic-assisted repair of subcondylar fractures is an additional tool for management; however, there is a steep learning curve. Generally, this technique allows good visualization of the fracture site for reduction through an incision with an acceptable cosmetic result. Recently, the surgical techniques and technology as well as the indications for endoscopic facial fracture repair are in development; there are few available data in the literature regarding detail complications and recovery processes following endoscopic fracture treatment. The purpose of this article was to reveal unusual complication following endoscopic repair of subcondylar fracture in terms of radiographic, photographic, and recovering orders of the facial nerve and facial reanimations. In our case, no damage to the facial nerve was observed intraoperatively, but the patient had total facial paralysis, immediately postoperatively. At long-term follow-up, the facial nerve function was recovered well within 6 months. The authors consider that transoral endoscopic-assisted open reduction constitutes a valid alternative to a transcutaneous approach for the reduction and fixation of subcondylar fractures. It provides the benefits of open reduction and internal fixation without the permanent complications, such as facial nerve injury.

  19. A new idea of electro-acupuncture treatment for peripheral facial paralysis and the nerve-endocrine hypothesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Yong Wu; Guang-Fu Wu; Xin-Yu Wang

    2016-01-01

    Based on the traditional Chinese medicine treatment of peripheral facial paralysis (PFP), this paper presents a new method of PFP. According to facial nerve distribution and innervation of the muscle, 10 points were selected and the intermittent wave of electro-acupuncture was performed for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. It is speculated that the possible mechanism of action is mainly dependent on the regulation of neuroendocrine system.%#摘要在传统中医治疗周围性面瘫的基础上,本文提出了一种针灸治疗周围性面瘫的新方法,根据面神经分布及其支配的肌肉进行选穴定位,共设计了10个穴,并以断续波行电针刺激治疗周围性面瘫;推测其可能的作用机制主要是依赖于神经-内分泌系统的调节作用。

  20. Initial assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on motion analysis using an optical flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsudin, Wan Syahirah W; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, Amirozi; Salleh, Hasriah

    2016-01-01

    An initial assessment method that can classify as well as categorize the severity of paralysis into one of six levels according to the House-Brackmann (HB) system based on facial landmarks motion using an Optical Flow (OF) algorithm is proposed. The desired landmarks were obtained from the video recordings of 5 normal and 3 Bell's Palsy subjects and tracked using the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) method. A new scoring system based on the motion analysis using area measurement is proposed. This scoring system uses the individual scores from the facial exercises and grades the paralysis based on the HB system. The proposed method has obtained promising results and may play a pivotal role towards improved rehabilitation programs for patients.

  1. Atraumatic Main-En-Griffe due to Ulnar Nerve Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswani, Yashant; Saifi, Shenaz

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is the most common form of treatable peripheral neuropathy. However, in spite of effective chemotherapeutic agents, neuropathy and associated deformities are seldom ameliorated to a significant extent. This necessitates early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical examination of peripheral nerves is highly subjective and inaccurate. Electrophysiological studies are painful and expensive. Ultrasonography circumvents these demerits and has emerged as the preferred modality for probing peripheral nerves. We describe a 23-year-old male who presented with weakness and clawing of the medial digits of the right hand (main-en-griffe) and a few skin lesions since eighteen months. The right ulnar nerve was thickened and exquisitely tender on palpation. Ultrasonography revealed an extensive enlargement of the nerve with presence of intraneural color Doppler signals suggestive of acute neuritis. Skin biopsy was consistent with borderline tuberculoid leprosy with type 1 lepra reaction. The patient was started on WHO multidrug therapy for paucibacillary leprosy along with antiinflammatory drugs. Persistence of vascular signals at two months' follow-up has led to continuation of the steroid therapy. The patient is compliant with the treatment and is on monthly follow-up. In this manuscript, we review multitudinous roles of ultrasonography in examination of peripheral nerves in leprosy. Ultrasonography besides diagnosing enlargement of nerves in leprosy and acute neuritis due to lepra reactions, guides the duration of anti-inflammatory therapy in lepra reactions. Further, it is relatively inexpensive, non-invasive and easily available. All these features make ultrasonography a preferred modality for examination of peripheral nerves.

  2. On a case of respiratory failure due to diaphragmatic paralysis and dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with nemaline myopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Taglia, Antonella; D'Ambrosio, Paola; PALLADINO, ALBERTO; Politano, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a rare congenital disease that generally occurs in childhood. We report a case of a 50-year-old man who presented with severe heart failure as the initial manifestation of nemaline myopathy. Soon after he developed acute restrictive respiratory failure due to the diaphragmatic paralysis. The diagnosis of "nemaline myopathy" was obtained on muscle biopsy performed one year later. After starting appropriate cardiological treatment and non-invasive ventilation, his cardiac a...

  3. Ulnar nerve entrapment in Guyon's canal due to a lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, O; Calisaneller, T; Gerilmez, A; Gulsen, S; Altinors, N

    2010-09-01

    Guyon's canal syndrome is an ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist or palm that can cause motor, sensory or combined motor and sensory loss due to various factors . In this report, we presented a 66-year-old man admitted to our clinic with a history of intermittent pain in the left palm and numbness in 4th and 5th finger for two years. His neurological examination revealed a sensory impairment in the right fifth finger. Also, physical examination displayed a subcutaneous mobile soft tissue in ulnar side of the wrist. Electromyographic examination confirmed the diagnosis of type-1 Guyon's canal syndrome. Under axillary blockage, a lipoma compressing the ulnar nerve was excised totally and ulnar nerve was decompressed. The symptoms were improved after the surgery and patient was symptom free on 3rd postoperative week.

  4. [Paralysis of the femoral nerve complicating ilio-psoas hemorrhage after iliac bone transplantation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestdagh, H

    1982-03-11

    The author reported an unusual complication of iliac bone transplantation for grafting of a tibial pseudarthrosis. In a patient having anticoagulant therapy, a large iliac haematoma developed in the donor site and extended deep to the iliacus muscle and through the osteomuscular gap into the retroperitoneal space. Moreover it spread downwards and entrapped the femoral nerve as it lies behind the iliac fascia, above the inguinal ligament. Both a paralytic ileus and a femoral nerve injury commanded surgical exploration through an oblique iliac approach; emptying of the clotted haematoma, section of the inguinal ligament and liberation of the femoral nerve enable to avoid definitive sequelae to the quadriceps but the time required is varying: three years after the accident, recovery is not complete in the operated patient probably owing to delayed surgery (three weeks).

  5. Sciatica due to malignant nerve sheath tumour of sciatic nerve in the thigh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma R

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST is a rare malignant neoplasm arising from the supportive non-neural component of the peripheral nerves. An unusual case of pain and weakness of the foot and calf muscles due to a giant MPNST of the sciatic nerve in the posterior compartment of the thigh is presented. The patient was already investigated as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc disease with a negative magnetic resonance imaging and then unsuccessfully operated elsewhere twice, with a misdiagnosis of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Neurosurgical referral prompted a diagnostic magnetic resonance study of the thigh, revealing the lesion, which was completely excised microsurgically with total relief in the pain and partial improvement in the weakness and sensations in the sole of the foot.

  6. Cross-face nerve grafting for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis: quantitative outcomes using the FACIAL CLIMA system and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego; Cabello, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Although in most cases Bell palsy resolves spontaneously, approximately one-third of patients will present sequela including facial synkinesis and paresis. Currently, the techniques available for reanimation of these patients include hypoglossal nerve transposition, free muscle transfer, and cross-face nerve grafting (CFNG). Between December 2008 and March 2012, eight patients with incomplete unilateral facial paralysis were reanimated with two-stage CFNG. Gender, age at surgery, etiology of paralysis denervation time, donor and recipient nerves, presence of facial synkinesis, and follow-up were registered. Commissural excursion and velocity and patient satisfaction were evaluated with the FACIAL CLIMA and a questionnaire, respectively. Mean age at surgery was 33.8 ± 11.5 years; mean time of denervation was 96.6 ± 109.8 months. No complications requiring surgery were registered. Follow-up period ranged from 7 to 33 months with a mean of 19 ± 9.7 months. FACIAL CLIMA showed improvement of both commissural excursion and velocity greater than 75% in 4 patients, greater than 50% in 2 patients, and less than 50% in the remaining two patients. Qualitative evaluation revealed a high grade of satisfaction in six patients (75%). Two-stage CFNG is a reliable technique for reanimation of incomplete facial paralysis with a high grade of patient satisfaction.

  7. Hypokalemic paralysis and respiratory failure due to excessive intake of licorice syrup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Oguzhan Ay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Licorice is the root of Glycyrrhiza glabra, which has a herbal ingredient, glycyrrhizic acid. Excessive intake of licorice may cause a hypermineralocorticoidism-like syndrome characterized by sodium and water retention, hypokalemia, hypertension, metabolic alkalosis, low-renin activity, and hypoaldosteronism. In this paper, an 34 years old man who admitted to the emergency department with respiratory failure and marked muscle weakness of all extremities that progressed to paralysis after excessive intake of licorice syrup was presented. It was aimed to draw attention to the necessity of questioning whether there is excessive intake of licorice or not in patients who admitted to emergency department with paralysis and dyspnea. Plasma potassium concentration of the patient was 1.4 mmol/L. The patient\\'s respiratory distress and loss of muscle strength recovered completely after potassium replacement. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(2.000: 387-391

  8. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis due to proximal renal tubular acidosis in a case with membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Gouranga; De, Dibyendu; Sinha, Pradip Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Proximal renal tubular acidosis (pRTA) is a rare disorder. Hypokalemia may be associated with it; occasionally leading to features like hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Though pRTA is a tubulointerstitial kidney disease, glomerulonephritis may occasionally lead to pRTA by tubular damage through leaking proteins, cytokines or by inflammatory infiltrates. In our reported case a 27 year old male had recurrent episodes of hypokalemic quadriparesis. Investigations revealed features of pRTA including hypokalemia and non-anion-gap hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. His urine pH dropped to 5 with NH4Cl loading test. Kidney biopsy showed membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with tubulointerstitial damage. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis and pRTA are uncommon associations of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

  9. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis due to dietary weight-loss supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, Emmanuel; Bercovici, Silvia; Niranjan, Selvanayagam; Paul, Nisha; Hemavathy, Bhakthavatsalam

    2011-05-01

    Herbal and dietary supplements for weight loss and in treatment of obesity are growing in popularity and acceptance in the United States. Most of these supplements can be obtained over the counter and can have serious adverse effects associated with their consumption. We describe 2 patients who developed thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis 2-3 weeks after consuming thyroxine-containing weight-loss supplements. This is the first known case of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis secondary to dietary supplements. It is important that patients and physicians are aware of the severe adverse reactions associated with dietary supplements. Physicians should as a routine inquire about herbal and dietary supplement consumption during all patient encounters.

  10. Effectiveness of the lower eyelid suspension using fascia lata graft for the treatment of lagophthalmos due to facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Cagatay, Halil Huseyin; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Olgun, Ali; Can, Efe; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate of functional and cosmetic effectiveness of lower eyelid sling technique with fascia lata graft in patients with lagophthalmos due to facial paralysis. Ten patients with a mean age of 55.1 ± 19.77 years who underwent lower eyelid sling surgery with a fascia lata graft between September 2011 and January 2014 were included in this prospective study. Preoperatively and postoperatively patients were evaluated in terms of corneal epithelial defects, Schirmer's test, and tear break-up time (TBUT). Cosmetically, vertical eyelid aperture, margin reflex distances 1 and 2 (MRD1 and MRD2) and scleral show were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. One patient had facial paralysis on the right side whereas the other 9 patients had facial paralysis on the left side. Preoperatively, 3 patients were detected with corneal ulcer, whereas 7 patients were detected with persistent corneal epithelial defects localized in the lower half of the cornea. In the 3 patients with preoperative corneal ulcer, the ulcer recovered with corneal opacity, whereas in the 7 patients with punctate epitheliopathy, postoperative corneal transparency was obtained. Lower eyelid sling technique with fascia lata graft is an effective technique for the repositioning of the lower eyelid and preventing the corneal complications.

  11. Effectiveness of the Lower Eyelid Suspension Using Fascia Lata Graft for the Treatment of Lagophthalmos due to Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selam Yekta Sendul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate of functional and cosmetic effectiveness of lower eyelid sling technique with fascia lata graft in patients with lagophthalmos due to facial paralysis. Material and Method. Ten patients with a mean age of 55.1±19.77 years who underwent lower eyelid sling surgery with a fascia lata graft between September 2011 and January 2014 were included in this prospective study. Preoperatively and postoperatively patients were evaluated in terms of corneal epithelial defects, Schirmer’s test, and tear break-up time (TBUT. Cosmetically, vertical eyelid aperture, margin reflex distances 1 and 2 (MRD1 and MRD2 and scleral show were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively. Results. One patient had facial paralysis on the right side whereas the other 9 patients had facial paralysis on the left side. Preoperatively, 3 patients were detected with corneal ulcer, whereas 7 patients were detected with persistent corneal epithelial defects localized in the lower half of the cornea. In the 3 patients with preoperative corneal ulcer, the ulcer recovered with corneal opacity, whereas in the 7 patients with punctate epitheliopathy, postoperative corneal transparency was obtained. Discussion. Lower eyelid sling technique with fascia lata graft is an effective technique for the repositioning of the lower eyelid and preventing the corneal complications.

  12. Case Report of Lewis and Sumner Syndrome with Bilateral Vagus Nerves Paralysis for 16 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasaghi, Attiyeh; Ashraf, Alireza; Shirzadi, Alireza; Petramfar, Peyman

    2016-12-01

    This report describes a patient with dysphonia for 16 years in combination with asymmetric and progressive decrease in sense and power of both upper and lower extremities for the past 3 years. Electrophysiological study revealed asymmetric conduction block and abnormal sensory action potential in 4 limbs. The vagus nerves palsy and abnormal electrodiagnosis of the limbs led us to diagnose the disease as Lewis and Sumner syndrome, also called multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy diagnosis, which improved by corticosteroid consumption to some extent. This case is uncommon by its long time presentation and progression. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral vagus nerve palsy in combination with upper and lower limbs' demyelinating neuropathy. In conclusion, persistent dysphonia can be a part of the presentation of demyelinating neuropathy.

  13. Multidimensional effects of voice therapy in patients affected by unilateral vocal fold paralysis due to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Camila Barbosa; Silveira, Paula Angélica Lorenzon; Guedes, Renata Lígia Vieira; Gonçalves, Aline Nogueira; Slobodticov, Luciana Dall'Agnol Siqueira; Angelis, Elisabete Carrara-de

    2017-08-24

    Patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis may demonstrate different degrees of voice perturbation depending on the position of the paralyzed vocal fold. Understanding the effectiveness of voice therapy in this population may be an important coefficient to define the therapeutic approach. To evaluate the voice therapy effectiveness in the short, medium and long-term in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis and determine the risk factors for voice rehabilitation failure. Prospective study with 61 patients affected by unilateral vocal fold paralysis enrolled. Each subject had voice therapy with an experienced speech pathologist twice a week. A multidimensional assessment protocol was used pre-treatment and in three different times after voice treatment initiation: short-term (1-3 months), medium-term (4-6 months) and long-term (12 months); it included videoendoscopy, maximum phonation time, GRBASI scale, acoustic voice analysis and the portuguese version of the voice handicap index. Multiple comparisons for GRBASI scale and VHI revealed statistically significant differences, except between medium and long term (p<0.005). The data suggest that there is vocal improvement over time with stabilization results after 6 months (medium term). From the 28 patients with permanent unilateral vocal fold paralysis, 18 (69.2%) reached complete glottal closure following vocal therapy (p=0.001). The logistic regression method indicated that the Jitter entered the final model as a risk factor for partial improvement. For every unit of increased jitter, there was an increase of 0.1% (1.001) of the chance for partial improvement, which means an increase on no full improvement chance during rehabilitation. Vocal rehabilitation improves perceptual and acoustic voice parameters and voice handicap index, besides favor glottal closure in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis. The results were also permanent during the period of 1 year. The Jitter value, when elevated, is

  14. 面神经减压治疗周围性面瘫的临床分析%Facial Nerve Decompression for Peripheral Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂智樱; 毛弈韬; 彭安全; 谢鼎华; 伍伟景

    2014-01-01

    目的:总结各种原因所致周围性面瘫行面神经减压术的经验和疗效。方法回顾分析37例周围性面瘫的临床资料、面神经减压的手术方式及疗效。结果37例中,包括颞骨骨折、中耳乳突手术后、中耳乳突炎、面神经瘤、听神经瘤及中耳癌等不同原因。术后随访3月至4年,其中25例面神经功能恢复至House-BrackmannⅠ、Ⅱ级(68%)。面瘫病程2月者。结论面神经减压术是治疗周围性面瘫的有效手段,对保守治疗恢复不满意、有手术指征的患者,应尽早行面神经减压术。%Objective To report efficacy of facial nerve decompression in treating peripheral facial paralysis of differ-ent causes. Methods The clinical data of 37 cases of peripheral facial paralysis, and surgical approaches as well as efficacy of facial nerve decompression were retrospectively analyzed. Results Causes of facial paralyhsis included temporal bone fracture, post-operative infection, middle ear cholesteatoma, facial neuroma, acoustic neuroma and middle ear carcinoma, etc. Among the 37 cases, 25 demonstrated satisfactory facial nerve recovery of House-Brackmann grade I-II during the fol-low-up period of three months to four years. The facial nerve recovery after decompression in patients with facial paralysis duration of less than two months was obviously better than in patients with facial paralysis duration of greater than two months. Conclusions Facial nerve decompression is an effective method for peripheral facial paralysis. Early decompression in patients with dissatisfied recovery during observation is recommended.

  15. Hypoglossal Nerve-Facial Nerve Transfer in the Treatment of Peripheral Facial Paralysis%舌下神经-面神经转接术治疗周围性面瘫研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡小康

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨舌下神经-面神经转接术治疗周围性面瘫的临床效果.方法:对17例面瘫患者给予舌下神经一面神经转接术,在术后2个月、半年以及一年随访观察其临床效果和并发症.结果:17例患者面部表情肌活动术后逐步恢复,不同程度的显现效果;17例患者均未出现舌肌萎缩及伸舌偏斜等并发症.结论:面神经损伤导致的面瘫,经过神经电生理学检查确定该损伤不可逆后通过舌下神经一面神经转接术治疗确有效果,且未见明显不良反应.%Objective:To evaluate the clinical effects of hypoglossal nerve-facial nerve transfer in the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis. Methods: 17 patients with facial paralysis were treated with hypoglossal nerve-facial nerve transfer surgery,2 months after surgery, six months and one year follow-up observation of clinical effects and complications. Results: 17 patients after facial muscle activity gradually restored,show varying degrees of effectiveness;genioglossus occurred in 17 patients no complications such as atrophy and Shenshe skew. Conclusions:Facial nerve injury caused by facial paralysis, after a neurological examination to determine the electrophysiological adopted after irreversible injury hypoglossal nerve-facial nerve transfer surgery does have effect, and no significant adverse reactions.

  16. Safety profile of bone marrow mononuclear stem cells in the rehabilitation of patients with posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis-a novel modality (phase one trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Sushil Kumar; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Modi, Manish; Gupta, Rijuneeta; Marwaha, Neelam

    2012-08-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to study the safety profile and role of mononuclear stem cells in the rehabilitation of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis not improving with conventional treatment. Study Design This is a prospective nonrandomized controlled trial. Study Setting This study is conducted at Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh between July, 2007 and December, 2008. Patients We included eight patients of either sex aged between 18 and 60 years of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis not improving with conventional treatment presented to PGIMER, Chandigarh between July 2007 and December 2008. Methods All patients underwent preoperative electroneuronography (ENoG), clinical photography, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) temporal bone. All patients then underwent facial nerve decompression and stem cell implantation. Stem cells processing was done in well-equipped bone marrow laboratory. Postoperatively, all patients underwent repeat ENoG and clinical photography at 3 and 6 months to assess for objective and clinical improvement. Clinical improvement was graded according to modified House-Brackmann grading system. Intervention Done All patients of posttraumatic facial nerve paralysis who were not improving with conventional surgical treatment were subjected to facial nerve decompression and stem cell implantation. Main Outcome Measures All patients who were subjected to stem cell implantation were followed up for 6 months to assess for any adverse effects of stem cell therapy on human beings; no adverse effects were seen in any of our patients after more than 6 months of follow-up. Results Majority of the patients were male, with motor vehicle accidents as the most common cause of injury in our series. Majority had longitudinal fractures on HRCT temporal bone. The significant improvement in ENoG amplitude was seen between preoperative and postoperative amplitudes on

  17. Combined spinal/general anesthesia with postoperative femoral nerve block for total knee replacement in a patient with familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Maria C

    2010-06-01

    Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is a rare genetic disorder in which the sodium channels in skeletal muscle cells have altered structure and function. Small elevations in serum potassium lead to inactivation of sodium channels, causing episodic weakness or paralysis. Exposure to cold, anesthesia, fasting, emotional stress, potassium ingestion, and rest after exercise can stimulate an attack. This case report describes a 65-year-old man with HYPP who was admitted for a right total knee arthroplasty. He had a history of arteriosclerotic heart disease and stenting 8 years earlier, previous inferior wall myocardial infarction with ejection fraction of 65%, anxiety, degenerative joint disease, well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a body mass index of 53.3 kg/m2. A combined spinal/general anesthetic with a femoral nerve block for postoperative pain control was chosen. Careful attention was given to monitoring and maintenance of core temperature, use of insulin and glucose to maintain normokalemia, and carbohydrate loading the night before surgery. The patient recovered from the anesthetic without complication and had pain relief for approximately 22 hours postoperatively because of the femoral nerve block. The patient was without weakness or paralysis related to HYPP in the postanesthesia care unit or throughout his hospitalization.

  18. Acute flaccid paralysis due to West nile virus infection in adults: A paradigm shift entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boby Varkey Maramattom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of acute flaccid paralysis (AFP with preceding fever are described. One patient had a quadriparesis with a florid meningoencephalitic picture and the other two had asymmetric flaccid paralysis with fasciculations at the onset of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging in two cases showed prominent hyperintensitities in the spinal cord and brainstem with prominent involvement of the grey horn (polio-myelitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF polymerase chain reaction was positive for West Nile virus (WNV in the index patient. All three cases had a positive WNV immunoglobulin M antibody in serum/CSF and significantly high titer of WNV neutralizing antibody in serum, clearly distinguishing the infection from other Flaviviridae such as Japanese encephalitis. WNV has been recognized in India for many decades; however, AFP has not been adequately described. WNV is a flavivirus that is spread by Culex mosquitoes while they take blood meals from humans and lineage 1 is capable of causing a devastating neuro-invasive disease with fatal consequences or severe morbidity. We describe the first three laboratory confirmed cases of WNV induced AFP from Kerala and briefly enumerate the salient features of this emerging threat.

  19. Seizure and unilateral facial nerve paralysis in a newborn with Dandy-Walker malformation – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a rare posterior fossa malformation. It can have a varied presentation depending on the age. A newborn presenting with neonatal seizure along with unilateral facial nerve palsy is rather a rare presentation of DWS and very few such cases were reported in the past. We are reporting a case of a newborn male baby presenting with neonatal seizure within 48 hrs of birth along with right sided LMN type facial nerve palsy which on due course of investigation revealed as a case of Dandy–Walker malformation. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 48-51 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9673

  20. "C3, 4, 5 Keeps the Diaphragm Alive." Is phrenic nerve palsy part of the pathophysiological mechanism in strangulation and hanging? Should diaphragm paralysis be excluded in survived cases?: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan J

    2010-03-01

    The phrenic nerve arises in the neck. It is formed from C3, C4, and C5 nerve fibers and descends along the anterior surface of the scalenus anterior muscle before entering the thorax to supply motor and sensory input to the diaphragm. Its anatomic location in the neck leaves the nerve vulnerable to traumatic injury. Phrenic nerve injury can arise as a result of transection, stretching or compression of the nerve, and may result in paralysis of the diaphragm. Consequences of diaphragm paralysis include respiratory compromise, gastrointestinal obstruction, and cardiac arrhythmias. There may be serious morbidity and onset of symptoms may be delayed. Cases of diaphragm paralysis occurring as a consequence of neck trauma are documented in the literature. In some cases, the forces involved are relatively minor and include whiplash injury, occurring in minor motor vehicle collisions, chiropractic manipulation, and compression of neck structures, including a case involving external neck compression by industrial machinery. It is concluded that phrenic nerve palsy might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism in strangulation and hanging, and clinical investigation to exclude diaphragm paralysis in survived cases should be considered.

  1. On a case of respiratory failure due to diaphragmatic paralysis and dilated cardiomyopathy in a patient with nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taglia, Antonella; D'Ambrosio, Paola; Palladino, Alberto; Politano, Luisa

    2012-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy is a rare congenital disease that generally occurs in childhood. We report a case of a 50-year-old man who presented with severe heart failure as the initial manifestation of nemaline myopathy. Soon after he developed acute restrictive respiratory failure due to the diaphragmatic paralysis. The diagnosis of "nemaline myopathy" was obtained on muscle biopsy performed one year later. After starting appropriate cardiological treatment and non-invasive ventilation, his cardiac and pulmonary functions improved substantially, remaining stable for over the 10 years since diagnosis. In the last two years the patient had a progressive deterioration of respiratory function, enabling him to attend daily activities. Few cases of respiratory failure in patients with adult-onset nemaline myopathy are reported, but the insidious onset in this case is even more unusual. This case highlights the wide spectrum of presenting features of adult-onset nemaline myopathy and the temporary efficacy of non invasive ventilation on respiratory function.

  2. Facial nerve paralysis due to intra-aural Hyalomma tick infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Müzeyyen; Devge, Cem; Tanrıöver, Ozlem; Pata, Yavuz Selim; Sönmezoğlu, Meral

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 33 year-old man from a village of the north-eastern part of central Anatolia admitted to the otolaryngology department of Yeditepe University Hospital with right facial asymmetry and pain on the right ear. A tick of the genus Hyalomma was observed in the external auditory canal of the right ear and it was removed with fine cup forceps under otomicroscopy. We are of the opinion that in patients presenting with sudden acute ear pain and facial palsy, the ear canal should be examined to exclude an infestation by ticks.

  3. Hypokalemic paralysis is not just a hypokalemic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesur, Mustafa; Ilgin, Sen Dagci; Baskal, Nilgun; Gullu, Sevim

    2008-06-01

    Although the commonest form of hypokalemic paralysis is the hereditary variety, some patients during course of thyrotoxicosis or with chronic potassium depletion, may exhibit episodic weakness. Approach to the patient with hypokalemic paralysis should be a careful search for the etiology and potassium replacement therapy. In this report, two hypokalemic paralysis cases are described. Case 1 is a 29-year-old Caucasian male who developed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. Case 2 is a 50-year-old female who experienced hypokalemic paralysis due to primary aldosteronism. Hypokalemic paralysis usually carries an underlying secret problem. Emergency department workers should give importance to etiological differentiation.

  4. Clinical Study on Acupuncture Treatment of Pseudobulbar Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军

    2004-01-01

    @@ Pseudobulbar paralysis is characterized by dysphagia and loss of pharyngeal reflex due to spastic weakness of the muscles innervated by the cranial nerves, i.e. the muscles of the face, the pharynx, and the tongue when the lesions is located in bilateral corticospinal tracts.

  5. [Different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) for central facial nerve paralysis after ischemic stroke: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Xin; Tian, Guang; Meng, Zhi-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Nong; Zhang, Chun-Hong; Shi, Xue-Min

    2014-07-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) on central facial nerve paralysis after ischemic stroke, and explore dose-effect relationship among different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) as well as its optimal treatment plan. According to different acupuncture stimulation intensities which were based on treatment time and needle insertion direction, fifty patients were randomly divided into a Hegu 1 group, a Hegu 2 group, a Hegu 3 group, a Hegu 4 group and a control group, ten cases in each one. Different stimulation intensities of acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4) combined with facial paralysis acupoints, including Yingxiang (LI 20), Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6) and Quanliao (SI 18), were applied in Hegu 1 to 4 groups; meanwhile acupuncture at stroke acupoints, including Neiguan (PC 6), Shuigou (GV 26) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6), and medication treatment were adopted. Except acupuncture at Hegu (LI 4), the treatment of the control group was identical as Hegu groups. The treatment duration lasted for 14 days. The House-Brackmann facial never grading systems (H-B), Toronto facial grading system (TFGS), degrees of facial never paralysis (DFNP), facial disability index (FDI) and clinical efficacy were compared among groups. (1) Compared before the treatment, H-B, TFGS, DFNP and physical function score in FDI were all improved significantly in the Hegu 1 to 4 groups (all P 0.05); all the scores in the control group were not evidently changed (all P > 0.05). (2) Compared with the control group, differences of H-B before and after treatment in the Hegu 1 to 4 groups, differences of TFGS in the Hegu 2 group and differences of DFNP in the Hegu 1 and Hegu 2 group were significantly improved (all P 0.05), in which the most evident change was found in Hegu 2 group. (3) The total effective rate was 90.0% (9/10), 100.0% (10/10), 90.0% (9/10) and 80.0% (8/10) in Hegu 1 to 4 groups, which were significantly higher than 60.0% (6/10) in the control group

  6. Mouse nerve growth factor in the treatment of Bell′s paralysis%鼠神经生长因子治疗贝尔麻痹

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳艳

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察应用鼠神经生长因子治疗贝尔麻痹的临床疗效。方法:选择急性 Bell 麻痹患者118例,随机分为观察组58例和对照组60例。两组患者均给予常规治疗,观察组患者在此基础上加用鼠神经生长因子。观察并记录两组患者7 d 后的临床疗效。结果:观察组患者的临床恢复情况要好于对照组,两组差异有统计学意义( P <0.05)。两组患者均无明显不良事件。结论:应用鼠神经生长因子治疗贝尔麻痹的临床疗效佳、依从性可,可推广使用。%Objective To observe the clinical curative effect of the application of mouse nerve growth factor in treating Bell′s paralys-is. Method 118 patients with acute Bell′s paralysis were selected and randomly divided into the observation group 58 cases and control group with 60 cases. Two groups of patients were given conventional treatment,the observation group were added based on mouse nerve growth factor for injection. To observe and record the clinical efficacy of two groups 7 days later. Results Recovery of the observation group was better than the control group,there is significant difference between the two groups(P < 0. 05). All patients of two groups were no ob-vious adverse events. Conclusion Clinical effect with mouse nerve growth factor treatment of Bell′s paralysis and compliance are good,it can be Widely used.

  7. 颞骨骨折导致的双侧周围性面瘫%Facial Nerve Decompression for Bilateral Facial Paralysis in Temporal Bone Fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓红; 刘菲; 王若雅; 韩维举

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this rieview is to study management of bilateral facial nerve paralysis in temporal bone fracture. Methods This is a retrospective review of 8 cases of bilateral facial paralysis after bilateral temporal bone frac-ture that were treated with facial nerve decompression on at least one side. High-resolution computed tomography, audiomet-rictests and electromyogram (EMG) were obtained. Evaluation of the facial nerve function according to the House-Brackmann (H-B) grading scale. The decision for surgery was based mainly on the results of afore mentioned evaluations. Timing and the efficacy of surgical intervention were evaluated by pre-vs. post-operative facial nerve function assessments, as well as com-parison between the operation side and the opposite side. Results All the 8 patients were male, aged between 19 and 49 years. Traffic accident was the most commom cause (5/8). Fracture was longitudinal in all 16 temporal bones, with immediate onset of facial paralysis. Preoperative facial nerve function is between gradesⅤ and Ⅵ, in H-B scale, and with l patient showing bilateral conductive hearing loss, 4 Ratients showing bilateral lugh-frequency sensorineural deafness and 3 Ratients showing normal hearing. Among 8 patients, Facial nerve decompression was performed in 11 ears. H-B gradeⅠ-Ⅱfacial nerve function were aclueved in all cases at follow up (more than l year in some). The only patient with bilateral conductive hearing loss also received bilateral ossicular reconstruction, followed by recovery to normal hearing. Conclusions Traffic crash continues to be themain cause of temporal bone fracture and hilaterd faial paralysis and hilaterd faial paralysis. Facial paralysis caused by tempo-ral bone trauma can be satisfactorily treated with decompression.%目的:探讨外伤后双侧颞骨纵形骨折致双侧周围性面瘫行面神经减压手术的适应症、手术时机及疗效。方法回顾性收集外伤后双侧颞骨骨折

  8. Facial Paralysis Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razfar, Ali; Lee, Matthew K; Massry, Guy G; Azizzadeh, Babak

    2016-04-01

    Facial nerve paralysis is a devastating condition arising from several causes with severe functional and psychological consequences. Given the complexity of the disease process, management involves a multispecialty, team-oriented approach. This article provides a systematic approach in addressing each specific sequela of this complex problem.

  9. Facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003028.htm Facial paralysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Facial paralysis occurs when a person is no longer able ...

  10. The effective stimulating pulse for restoration of blink function in unilateral facial nerve paralysis rabbits, verified by a simple FES system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Tan; Zhiqiang, Gao; Guodong, Feng; Yubin, Xue; Xiuyong, Ding; Tingting, Cui; Yang, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    The trains of 200 ms biphasic square pulses with the width of 9 ms delivered at 50 Hz were found to be the most suitable and effective mean as stimulation in FES system of restoring the blink function in unilateral facial nerve paralysis rabbit model. FES system is a reliable tool for these patients. Facial paralysis affects thousands of people every year. Many will have long term facial difficulties and the loss of the ability to blink the eye, which can lead to potential loss of the eye. Although many treatments exist, no one approach corrects all the deficits associated with the loss of orbicularis oculi function. FES is a means of providing movement in paralysed muscles to assist with practical activities and one possible way of restoring blink and other functions in these patients. Although some previous researches had investigated the effect of simple FES system on restoration of paralyzed facial muscles, there is still controversy about the appropriate details of the most effective stimulating pulses, such as the frequency, wave pattern and pulse width. Our aim is to find out the parameters of the most appropriate and effective stimulatin verify it by a simple FES system. 24 healthy adult male New Zealand white rabbits were accepted the surgery of right side facial nerve main trunk transaction under general anesthesia as the unilateral facial nerve paralysis models. The platinum tungsten alloy electrodes were implanted in orbicularis oculi muscle. The parameters of stimulus pulses were set to a 200 ms biphasic pulse with different waveforms (square, sine and triangle), different frequencies (25, 50, 100 Hz) and different widths from 1 to 9 ms. Next, we set up a simple FES system to verify the previous results as the stimulus signal. We observed the movement of the both sides of eyelid when eye blink induced by different kinds of pulses. In all animals, the three kinds of waveforms pulse with frequency of 25 Hz could not evoke the smooth blink movement

  11. Phrenic nerve paralysis during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation: a comparison between the first- and second-generation balloon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casado-Arroyo, R.; Chierchia, G.B.; Conte, G.; Levinstein, M.; Sieira, J.; Rodriguez-Manero, M.; Giovanni, G.; Baltogiannis, Y.; Wauters, K.; Asmundis, C. de; Sarkozy, A.; Brugada, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phrenic nerve palsy (PNP) is the most frequently observed complication during cryoballoon ablation (CB; Arctic Front, Medtronic, MN) occurring in roughly 7%-9% of the cases. The new second-generation cryoballoon ablation Arctic Front Advance (CB-A) (Arctic Front) has recently been launch

  12. 低频脉冲电诊断在面神经麻痹评定中的应用价值%The application value of low frequency pulse electrodiagnosis in the assessment of facial nerve paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈银海; 李萌; 张慧; 何井华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the value and significance of low frequency pulse electrodiagnosis to assess facial nerve paralysis.Method Neuromuscular electrical diagnostic instrument was used to detect curves of time intensity for frontalis muscle,orbicularis oculi muscle,orbicularis oris muscle in 50 cases of facial nerve paralysis,150 curves in all.Results In 50 cases of facial nerve paralysis,there were 7 normal patients,31 cases of part degeneration,12 cases of complete degeneration,with the positive rate of 86%.Among 150 curves of time intensity,there were 2l normal curves,96 curves of part degeneration,33 curves of complete degeneration,with the positive rate of 86%.Conclusion It has a certain value and significance of low frequency pulse electrodiagnosis for facial nerve paralysis evaluation.%目的 探讨低频脉冲电诊断对面神经麻痹评定的价值和意义.方法 采用神经肌肉电诊断仪对50例面神经麻痹患者进行强度时间检测,分别检测额肌、眼轮匝肌、口轮匝肌共150条曲线.结果 50例患者,正常7例,部分变性31例,完全变性12例,阳性率为86%; 150条曲线中,正常曲线21条,部分变性曲线96条,完全变性曲线33条,曲线的阳性率为86%.结论 低频脉冲电诊断对面神经麻痹的评定具有一定的价值和意义.

  13. Analysis of the clinical effects of transforaminal endoscopic discectomy on lumbar disk herniation combined with common peroneal nerve paralysis: a 2-year follow-up retrospective study on 32 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang YP

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ya-peng Wang,* Wei Zhang, Jian Zhang, Ya-peng Sun,* Ji-long An, Wen-yuan Ding Department of Spinal Surgery, The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Very few studies have discussed transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (TED in the treatment of common peroneal nerve paralysis induced by lumbar disk herniation (LDH. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of TED in the treatment of LDH combined with common peroneal nerve paralysis.Materials and methods: The clinical and follow-up data of 32 patients with common peroneal nerve paralysis induced by LDH undergoing TED from March 2011 to April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed in this study. Follow-up was conducted immediately after the surgery, as well as 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. The parameters (including muscle strength recovery of the anterior tibial muscle, leg pain visual analog scale score, neurological function Japanese Orthopaedic Association [JOA] score, MacNab scores in the last follow-up, and the intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded.Results: Three patients (9.4% had the anterior tibial muscle strength recovered to ≥ grade 4 immediately after the surgery. The anterior tibial muscle strength of patients recovered to basically stable form in the 6-month postoperative follow-up and that in the last follow-up were as follows: one case of grade 1, one case of grade 2, 28 cases of grade 4, and two cases of grade 5. The visual analog scale scores of leg pain were significantly reduced immediately after the surgery and also on 3, 12, and 24 months compared with preoperative period (all P<0.05. The postoperative JOA scores in the last follow-up were significantly higher than the preoperative JOA scores (P<0.05, and there were nine excellent cases (28.2%, 21 good cases (65.6%, one fair case (3.1% and one poor case (3.1% in the last follow-up, with

  14. 面神经减压术治疗外伤性周围性面瘫62例%Treatment of traumatic peripheral facial paralysis with facial nerve decompression ( 62 cases report)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋刈; 刘云亮; 刘昉; 陈娟

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the curative effect of facial nerve decompression in the treatment of traumatic peripheral facial paralysis. Methods 62 patients with traumatic peripheral facial paralysis, admitted into Fujian Provincial Hospital from 2000 to 2010, were reviewed. The therapeutic management and prognosis were summarized. Results Within a 3 months to 2 years' follow-up, the facial nerve function were improved to a varying degree in 57 patients, but not in the other 5 patients. Conclusion The facial nerve decompression is an effective management for traumatic facial paralysis.%目的 探讨面神经减压术治疗外伤性周围性面瘫疗效,总结面神经减压术治疗经验.方法 回顾性分析62例外伤性周围性面瘫患者的病历资料,总结治疗及预后情况.结果 随访3个月~2年,除5例无明显效果外,其他57例患者均有不同程度的恢复.结论 面神经减压术是治疗外伤性面瘫的有效手段.

  15. A Case of Hypokalemic Paralysis in a Patient With Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Frederic N.; Kar, Jitesh K.; Verduzco-Gutierrez, Monica; Zakaria, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Acute hypokalemic paralysis is characterized by muscle weakness or paralysis secondary to low serum potassium levels. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition where the patient excretes large volume of dilute urine due to low levels of antidiuretic hormone. Here, we describe a patient with neurogenic DI who developed hypokalemic paralysis without a prior history of periodic paralysis. A 30-year-old right-handed Hispanic male was admitted for refractory seizures and acute DI after developing a dental abscess. He had a history of pituitary adenoma resection at the age of 13 with subsequent pan-hypopituitarism and was noncompliant with hormonal supplementation. On hospital day 3, he developed sudden onset of quadriplegia with motor strength of 0 of 5 in the upper extremities bilaterally and 1 of 5 in both lower extremities with absent deep tendon reflexes. His routine laboratory studies revealed severe hypokalemia of 1.6 mEq/dL. Nerve Conduction Study (NCS) revealed absent compound motor action potentials (CMAPs) with normal sensory potentials. Electromyography (EMG) did not reveal any abnormal insertional or spontaneous activity. He regained full strength within 36 hours following aggressive correction of the hypokalemia. Repeat NCS showed return of CMAPs in all nerves tested and EMG revealed normal motor units and normal recruitment without myotonic discharges. In patients with central DI with polyuria, hypokalemia can result in sudden paralysis. Hypokalemic paralysis remains an important differential in an acute case of paralysis and early recognition and appropriate management is key. PMID:24707338

  16. Obstetrical paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S M; Nissenbaum, M M

    1975-04-01

    Most patients with obstetrical paralysis have some useful functional return, and early recognition and treatment help prevent rapidly developing shoulder contractures. Initial physical therapy includes passive range of motion exercises. Fixed contractures must be released prior to reconstructive surgery designed to improve funtion. An approach to the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of obstetrical paralysis is given.

  17. A Case of Transient, Isolated Cranial Nerve VI Palsy due to Skull Base Osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brijesh Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Otitis externa affects both children and adults. It is often treated with topical antibiotics, with good clinical outcomes. When a patient fails to respond to the treatment, otitis externa can progress to malignant otitis externa. The common symptoms of skull bone osteomyelitis include ear ache, facial pain, and cranial nerve palsies. However, an isolated cranial nerve is rare. Herein, we report a case of 54-year-old female who presented with left cranial nerve VI palsy due to skull base osteomyelitis which responded to antibiotic therapy.

  18. Comparison of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve transposition with a cross-facial nerve graft and muscle transplant for the rehabilitation of facial paralysis using the facial clima method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Vila, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    To compare quantitatively the results obtained after hemihypoglossal nerve transposition and microvascular gracilis transfer associated with a cross facial nerve graft (CFNG) for reanimation of a paralysed face, 66 patients underwent hemihypoglossal transposition (n = 25) or microvascular gracilis transfer and CFNG (n = 41). The commissural displacement (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) in the two groups were compared using the system known as Facial clima. There was no inter-group variability between the groups (p > 0.10) in either variable. However, intra-group variability was detected between the affected and healthy side in the transposition group (p = 0.036 and p = 0.017, respectively). The transfer group had greater symmetry in displacement of the commissure (CD) and commissural contraction velocity (CCV) than the transposition group and patients were more satisfied. However, the transposition group had correct symmetry at rest but more asymmetry of CCV and CD when smiling.

  19. A New Rerouting Technique for the Extensor Pollicis Longus in Palliative Treatment for Wrist and Finger Extension Paralysis Resulting From Radial Nerve and C5C6C7 Root Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laravine, Jennifer; Cambon-Binder, Adeline; Belkheyar, Zoubir

    2016-03-01

    Wrist and finger extension paralysis is a consequence of an injury to the radial nerve or the C5C6C7 roots. Despite these 2 different levels of lesions, palliative treatment for this type of paralysis depends on the same tendon transfers. A large majority of the patients are able to compensate for a deficiency of the extension of the wrist and fingers. However, a deficiency in the opening of the first web space, which could be responsible for transfers to the abductor pollicis longus, the extensor pollicis brevis, and the extensor pollicis longus (EPL), frequently exists. The aim of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a new EPL rerouting technique outside of Lister's tubercle. Another aim was to verify whether this technique allows a better opening of the thumb-index pinch in this type of paralysis. In the first part, we performed an anatomic study comparing the EPL rerouting technique and the frequently used technique for wrist and finger extension paralyses. In the second part, we present 2 clinical cases in which this new technique will be practiced. Preliminary results during this study favor the EPL rerouting technique. This is a simple and reproducible technique that allows for good opening of the first web space in the treatment of wrist and finger extension paralysis.

  20. Rare Presentation of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Zygomycosis: Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohebbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date.

  1. Paralysis: Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forum About Us Donate Living with Paralysis > Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Rehabilitation and exercise are key to enhancing your health and quality of life. Find a rehabilitation center near you and become familiar with different ...

  2. Periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand

    2008-01-01

    Periodic paralyses are rare diseases characterized by severe episodes of muscle weakness concomitant to variations in blood potassium levels. It is thus usual to differentiate hypokalemic, normokalemic, and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. Except for thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis and periodic paralyses secondary to permanent changes of blood potassium levels, all of these diseases are of genetic origin, transmitted with an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Periodic paralyses are channelopathies, that is, diseases caused by mutations in genes encoding ion channels. The culprit genes encode for potassium, calcium, and sodium channels. Mutations of the potassium and calcium channel genes cause periodic paralysis of the same type (Andersen-Tawil syndrome or hypokalemic periodic paralysis). In contrast, distinct mutations in the muscle sodium channel gene are responsible for all different types of periodic paralyses (hyper-, normo-, and hypokalemic). The physiological consequences of the mutations have been studied by patch-clamp techniques and electromyography (EMG). Globally speaking, ion channel mutations modify the cycle of muscle membrane excitability which results in a loss of function (paralysis). Clinical physiological studies using EMG have shown a good correlation between symptoms and EMG parameters, enabling the description of patterns that greatly enhance molecular diagnosis accuracy. The understanding of the genetics and pathophysiology of periodic paralysis has contributed to refine and rationalize therapeutic intervention and will be without doubts the basis of further advances.

  3. Transsacral S2-S4 nerve block for vaginal pain due to pudendal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cok, Oya Yalcin; Eker, H Evren; Cok, Tayfun; Akin, Sule; Aribogan, Anis; Arslan, Gulnaz

    2011-01-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is a type of neuropathic pain experienced predominantly while sitting, and causes a substantial decrease in quality of life in affected patients. Pudendal nerve block is a diagnostic and therapeutic option for pudendal neuralgia. Transsacral block at S2 through S4 results in pudendal nerve block, which is an option for successful relief of pain due to pudendal nerve injury. Herein is reported blockade of S2 through S4 using lidocaine and methylprednisolone for successful treatment of pudendal neuralgia in 2 patients with severe chronic vaginal pain. The patients, aged 44 and 58 years, respectively, were referred from the Gynecology Department to the pain clinic because of burning, stabbing, electric shock-like, unilateral pain localized to the left portion of the vagina and extending to the perineum. Their initial pain scores were 9 and 10, respectively, on a numeric rating scale. Both patients refused pudendal nerve block using classical techniques. Therefore, diagnostic transsacral S2-S4 nerve block was performed using lidocaine 1%, and was repeated using lidocaine 1% and methylprednisolone 80 mg after confirming block efficiency as demonstrated by an immediate decrease in pain scores. After 1 month, pain scores were 1 and 0, respectively, and both patients were free of pain at 6-month follow up. It is suggested that blockade of S2 through S4 using lidocaine and methylprednisolone is an effective treatment option in patients with chronic pudendal neuralgia when traditional pudendal nerve block is not applicable.

  4. 多层螺旋CT扫描及曲面重建在外伤性面瘫的应用价值%Applied Value of Multislice Spiral CT and Curved PlanarReformation for Traumatic Facial Nerve Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄少鹏; 叶青; 林美福; 陈娟; 王一红; 李瑞玉

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨多层螺旋CT(MSCT)扫描及面神经管曲面重建(CPR)在外伤性面瘫中的应用价值.方法 对15例外伤性面瘫患者的颞骨行MSCT高分辨率扫描,并通过工作站行CPR,观察面神经损伤平面,并选择相应的手术径路行面神经减压术.结果 术前MSCT扫描及CPR提示,3例面神经损伤主要在迷路段及膝状神经节的,采用颅中窝乳突联合径路;12例损伤主要位于膝状神经节以下,选择乳突径路.术中所见与术前CT提示均一致.术后随访6月~5年,15例患者Ⅰ级恢复7例、Ⅱ级恢复7例、Ⅲ级恢复1例.结论 MSCT扫描及CPR能清晰显示面神经管的全貌及其损伤部位,对外伤性面瘫的诊断及手术治疗具有重要意义.%Objective To investigate the applied value of multislice spiral CT(MSCT) and Curved planar reformation(CPR) for traumatic facial nerve paralysis and the guidance significance for surgery.Methods 15 cases of traumatic facial nerve paralysis were scanned by MSCT, Post processing images of facial nerve canal were completed by GE Advantage 4.2 work station. Different Surgical approaches of facial nerve decompression were selected according to the injured location described by MSCT and CPR.Results A combined middle fossa and transmastoid approach was chosen in 3 cases whose injured location above geniculate ganglion. A pure transmastoid route was performed in the other 12 cases whose injured location under geniculate ganglion. After 0.5-5 years' follow-up, 7 cases recovered to grade Ⅰ according to House-Brackmann facial nerve function scores, 7 cases recovered to grade Ⅱ and the other 1 case recovered to grade Ⅲ. Conclusion multislice spiral CT (MSCT) and Curved planar reformation (CPR)could help to study the facial nerve canal and describe precise localization for traumatic facial nerve paralysis, which provide reliable basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  5. [Vocal cord paralysis--analysis of a cohort of 400 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, R; Pickhard, A; Smith, E; Hansch, K; Weber, T; Hoffmann, T K; Brosch, S

    2015-02-01

    Vocal cord paralysis has diverse etiologies. In the present study, vocal chord paralysis caused by surgery/trauma was present in more than two thirds of the cases, followed by primary malignancy-associated paralysis. Thyroidectomy was the most common cause in bilateral paresis, especially if performed in recurrent or malignant disease. Voice therapy was promising in pa-tients with unilateral paresis and hoarseness as main symptom. Persistent dysphonia due to insufficiency of the glottic closure led to an operative glottis restricting procedure in only 6% of cases. In almost half the patients with dyspnea as the main symp-tom of bilateral vocal cord paresis, temporary tracheotomy or surgical glottis widening procedures had to be performed. The group of idiopathic and traumatic paresis patients showed the best spontaneous recovery within the first 12 months in comparison to primary malignancy-associated paralysis, which showed no recovery of the recurrens nerve.

  6. Lacrimal gland and perioptic nerve lesions due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis (2007: 9b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, M.; Demaerel, P.; Wilms, G. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Gool, S. van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Pediactrics, Leuven (Belgium); Casteels, I. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Ophthalmology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-12-15

    We report a patient presenting with bilateral lacrimal gland involvement and perioptic nerve sheath lesions due to Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) invasion. LCH is a rare multisystemic disease characterized by a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells. All organs may be involved with a clinical spectrum ranging from a solitary bone lesion to a severe life-threatening multisystem disease. Osteolytic orbital bone lesions with extension into the adjacent orbital soft tissues have been described. To our knowledge, lacrimal gland involvement has probably been described only once before. Perioptic nerve lesions are also very rare, having been described only three times before. (orig.)

  7. Wasted tongue in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders due to hypoglossal nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Shanthi

    2015-04-01

    We report two cases of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder with hypoglossal nerve involvement resulting in a wasted tongue associated with other brainstem symptoms of hypogeusia, hypersalivation, hiccough, increased sweating, hyperemesis and myelitis (in the second patient). This occurred due to involvement of the hypoglossal, tractus solitarius and dorsal vagal nuclei. Though the myelitis and other brainstem signs recovered the hypoglossal nerve involvement resulting in a unilateral wasted tongue did not. It is important to consider neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders in the differential diagnosis of a wasted tongue though its occurrence is rare.

  8. Spectrum of facial paralysis in chronic suppurative otitis media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam S Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of facial paralysis associated with Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM may vary depending on the duration and extent of paralysis and also the pathology affecting the nerve. Four illustrative cases are described. The literature is reviewed with regard to the management of the facial nerve in different situations.

  9. Müllerectomy for upper eyelid retraction and lagophthalmos due to facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Adam S; Frueh, Bartley R; Elner, Victor M

    2005-09-01

    Facial nerve palsy often results in symptoms of ocular irritation due to inadequate eyelid closure. Weakened protractor function results in relative upper eyelid retraction and contributes to lagophthalmos. To evaluate the role of müllerectomy in the comprehensive surgical treatment of ocular exposure due to facial nerve palsy. Thirty-four patients with chronic facial nerve palsy underwent unilateral transconjunctival removal of Müller muscle and were followed up for an average of 20 months postoperatively. Other procedures were performed to treat lower eyelid retraction, as required. Preoperative and postoperative ocular exposure symptoms, upper eyelid position, lagophthalmos, and keratopathy were compared. Of the 59 preoperative symptoms, 15 (25%) resolved and 39 (66%) improved. Upper eyelid position was lowered by an average of 1.35 mm (PLagophthalmos (P = .002) and corneal exposure (P<.001) were significantly improved. Three patients required levator aponeurosis repair, 2 for preexisting dehiscence and 1 for inadvertent aponeurosis transection. Müllerectomy is a rapid, safe, and reproducible surgical method for lowering the upper eyelid and reducing ocular exposure symptoms and signs due to chronic facial nerve palsy.

  10. 咬肌神经-面神经转位术对听神经瘤术后面瘫的治疗效果观察%Therapeutic Effect of the Masseter Nerve and Facial Nerve Transposition of Acoustic Neuroma Postoperative Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李斌

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigate the curative effect of masseter nerve and facial nerve transposition of facial paralysis after acoustic neuroma surgery.Methods Selected in our hospital to acoustic neuroma surgery patients with facial paralysis after 79 cases,al patients were to be masseter nerve and facial nerve transposition in the treatment of,for the observation of the therapeutic effect of patients.ResultsPatients after treatment,folow-up 1 year facial lip functions were significantly better than those before treatment,another 61 cases good action smile,10 subjects with mild to moderate recovery,8 cases of poor recovery,the 3 patients appeared parotid masseteric region of subsidence,but chewing function has not lost.Conclusion Masseter nerve and facial nerve transposition of auditory neuroma after operation,the effect of treatment of facial paralysis is good.%目的:探讨咬肌神经-面神经转位术对听神经瘤术后面瘫的治疗效果。方法选取听神经瘤术后面瘫患者79例,均予以咬肌神经-面神经转位术治疗,观察患者的治疗效果。结果患者治疗后、随访1年内面肌上唇上提功能均优于治疗前;61例微笑动作良好,10例中等程度恢复,8例恢复较差;其中3例患者出现腮腺咬肌区下陷,但是咀嚼功能并未丧失。结论咬肌神经-面神经转位术对听神经瘤术后面瘫的治疗效果好。

  11. A case of mental nerve paresthesia due to dynamic compression of alveolar inferior nerve along an elongated styloid process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooris, P.J.J.; Zijlmans, J.C.M.; Bergsma, J.E.; Mensink, G.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous paresthesia of the mental nerve is considered an ominous clinical sign. Mental nerve paresthesia has also been referred to as numb chin syndrome. Several potentially different factors have been investigated for their role in interfering with the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and causing

  12. Institutional Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1975-01-01

    Institutional paralysis of higher education is the result of the disjunction between faculty and administration; the disjunction between substantive planning and bugetary decision-making; the disjunction between departmental structures and functional areas of university concern; and the disjunction between the theory of direct democracy and its…

  13. Clinical analysis of the facial nerve paralysis after the temporal bone fracture with the craniocerebral trauma%颅脑外伤伴颞骨骨折合并周围性面瘫15例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜岚; 秦兆冰

    2009-01-01

    Objective To disscuse the management of facial nerve paralysis after the temporal bone fracture with the craniocerebral trauma.Methods The study design was a retrospective review of fifteen patients who underwent facial nerve paralysis after the temporal bone fracture with the craniocere-bral trauma.They all received the treatment of the neurosurgery.Results The follow up period was ran-ging from 2 months to 4 years.Two patients showed Ⅰ score of House-Brackmann recovery of facial nerve function in follow-up,eleven patients showed Ⅱ score and the last 2 showed Ⅲ score.Conclusions For the patients who underwent facial nerve paralysis after the temporal bone fracture with the craniocere-bral trauma,late facial nerve decompression may have still beneficial effects.%目的 探讨严重颅脑外伤患者的面瘫治疗时机、手术方法 及治疗效果.方法 回顾性分析2004年12月至2008年2月在我院治疗的颅脑外伤伴颞骨骨折合并周围性面瘫的病例15例,均经神经外科治疗后至我科进一步治疗周围性面瘫,进行术前评估、术中对照及术后随访的对比.结果 进行全面专科检查并综合患者全身情况,选择合适术式行面神经减压,术后随访2个月~4年,面神经功能恢复至I级2例,Ⅱ级11例,Ⅲ级2例.结论 对于颅脑外伤伴颞骨骨折合并周围性面瘫的患者,颅脑外伤急诊处理且生命体征平稳后,全面术前评估,积极进行面神经手术减压仍不失为积极有效的治疗措施.

  14. A case of mental nerve paresthesia due to dynamic compression of alveolar inferior nerve along an elongated styloid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooris, Peter J J; Zijlmans, Jan C M; Bergsma, J Eelco; Mensink, Gertjan

    2014-07-01

    Spontaneous paresthesia of the mental nerve is considered an ominous clinical sign. Mental nerve paresthesia has also been referred to as numb chin syndrome. Several potentially different factors have been investigated for their role in interfering with the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and causing mental nerve neuropathy. In the present case, the patient had an elongated calcified styloid process that we hypothesized had caused IAN irritation during mandibular movement. This eventually resulted in progressive loss of sensation in the mental nerve region. To our knowledge, this dynamic irritation, with complete recovery after resection of the styloid process, has not been previously reported.

  15. Acupuncture Treatment of Abducent Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任辉; 王涵; 武连仲; 杜元灏

    2006-01-01

    @@ Abducent paralysis is a kind of the pathological change of the cranial nerve, manifested mainly by the clinical symptoms of inward strabismus, limited abduction of the eyeball and double vision. It is believed in modern medicine that this disease can be caused by pathological change of the pons, basicranial metastatic carcinoma, elevated intracranial pressure, and also by inflammation in the head and face, rupture of local small blood vessels or traumatic injury. Now, Prof. WU Lian-zhong's experience in the treatment of abducent paralysis is reported in the following.

  16. Single-stage dynamic reanimation of the smile in irreversible facial paralysis by free functional muscle transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Jan; Bannasch, Holger; Stark, G Bjoern; Eisenhardt, Steffen U

    2015-03-01

    Unilateral facial paralysis is a common disease that is associated with significant functional, aesthetic and psychological issues. Though idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell's palsy) is the most common diagnosis, patients can also present with a history of physical trauma, infectious disease, tumor, or iatrogenic facial paralysis. Early repair within one year of injury can be achieved by direct nerve repair, cross-face nerve grafting or regional nerve transfer. It is due to muscle atrophy that in long lasting facial paralysis complex reconstructive methods have to be applied. Instead of one single procedure, different surgical approaches have to be considered to alleviate the various components of the paralysis. The reconstruction of a spontaneous dynamic smile with a symmetric resting tone is a crucial factor to overcome the functional deficits and the social handicap that are associated with facial paralysis. Although numerous surgical techniques have been described, a two-stage approach with an initial cross-facial nerve grafting followed by a free functional muscle transfer is most frequently applied. In selected patients however, a single-stage reconstruction using the motor nerve to the masseter as donor nerve is superior to a two-stage repair. The gracilis muscle is most commonly used for reconstruction, as it presents with a constant anatomy, a simple dissection and minimal donor site morbidity. Here we demonstrate the pre-operative work-up, the post-operative management, and precisely describe the surgical procedure of single-stage microsurgical reconstruction of the smile by free functional gracilis muscle transfer in a step by step protocol. We further illustrate common pitfalls and provide useful tips which should enable the reader to truly comprehend the procedure. We further discuss indications and limitations of the technique and demonstrate representative results.

  17. [The history of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis has been a recognized condition since Antiquity, and was mentionned by Hippocratus. In the 17th century, in 1687, the Dutch physician Stalpart Van der Wiel rendered a detailed observation. It was, however, Charles Bell who, in 1821, provided the description that specified the role of the facial nerve. Facial nerve surgery began at the end of the 19th century. Three different techniques were used successively: nerve anastomosis, (XI-VII Balance 1895, XII-VII, Korte 1903), myoplasties (Lexer 1908), and suspensions (Stein 1913). Bunnell successfully accomplished the first direct facial nerve repair in the temporal bone, in 1927, and in 1932 Balance and Duel experimented with nerve grafts. Thanks to progress in microsurgical techniques, the first faciofacial anastomosis was realized in 1970 (Smith, Scaramella), and an account of the first microneurovascular muscle transfer published in 1976 by Harii. Treatment of the eyelid paralysis was at the origin of numerous operations beginning in the 1960s; including palpebral spring (Morel Fatio 1962) silicone sling (Arion 1972), upperlid loading with gold plate (Illig 1968), magnets (Muhlbauer 1973) and transfacial nerve grafts (Anderl 1973). By the end of the 20th century, surgeons had at their disposal a wide range of valid techniques for facial nerve surgery, including modernized versions of older techniques.

  18. Significance of the Analysis of Early Motor Conduction of Facial Nerve Branches in Patients with Bell's Paralysis%贝尔麻痹患者早期面神经运动传导检测的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周敏杰; 卢娜; 周玲; 沈瑛

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析贝尔麻痹(Bell's麻痹)患者早期面神经运动传导检测指标,探讨其在贝尔麻痹早期诊断中的作用.方法 对22例贝尔麻痹患者在起病1周内进行双侧面神经运动传导对比检测,比较患、健侧面神经运动传导动作电位潜伏期、波幅,分析其与早期诊断的关系.结果 22例患者双侧面神经各支均引出运动传导动作电位,患侧面神经各支动作电位波幅较健侧明显下降,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);患侧面神经各支动作电位潜伏期与健侧相比,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 面神经颞支和颊支的运动传导波幅检测可作为面神经损伤的早期诊断指标之一.颧支受累较颞支和颊支相对少,它是否能作为损伤程度及预后判定的指标尚需进一步观察.%Objective To analyze the indicators of motor conduction of facial nerve branches in patients with Bell's paralysis , and discuss the function of motor conduction in the early diagnosis. Methods The motor conduction of healthy and affected sides in 22 patients with Bell's paralysis were detected and compared one week within onset. Compare the latent period and wave amplitude of the two sides as well as its relation with early diagnosis in both sides. Results The wave amplitude was detected in all patients, and the amplitude of facial nerve in affected side declined. There was a significant difference in wave amplitude between the affected side and unaffected side ( P <0. 05 ). The latency of facial nerve in both sides showed no statistical difference ( P >0. 05 ). Conclusion The wave amplitude in action potentials of temporal and buccal branches of facial nerve is one of the objective indexes for the early diagnosis of Bell's paralysis. Further observation is needed to determine whether it can be an index for injury level and prognosis.

  19. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Hemendra Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively, leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks. In our case, we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate. The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal. On the second postoperative day, following the suction drain removal and dressing, patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop. We reviewed theliterature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure. Key words: Radial nerve; Humeral fractures; Paralysis; Diaphyses

  20. Unilateral compression neuropathy of the hypoglossal nerve due to head suspension orthosis in mitochondriopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Hess, Barbara

    2004-12-01

    An 85-year-old woman with multisystem mitochondriopathy experienced tension headache, cervical pain, torque head-posture, and vertigo since 1980 for which she was continuously wearing a head-suspension-orthosis- since 1990. Since 1996 she developed severe left-sided weakness and wasting of the tongue. Needle-EMG of the left genioglossus muscle revealed abnormal spontaneous activity and reduced interference-pattern. No morphological alterations in the anatomical course of the hypoglossal nerve were found. Severe, unilateral weakness and wasting of the tongue was interpreted due to chronic compression of the hypoglossal nerve by long-standing use of a head-suspension-orthosis for cervical pain from cervical muscle weakness and resulting spinal degeneration.

  1. [Objective assessment of facial paralysis using local binary pattern in infrared thermography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xulong; Hong, Wenxue; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Zhenying

    2013-02-01

    Facial paralysis is a frequently-occurring disease, which causes the loss of the voluntary muscles on one side of the face due to the damages the facial nerve and results in an inability to close the eye and leads to dropping of the angle of the mouth. There have been few objective methods to quantitatively diagnose it and assess this disease for clinically treating the patients so far. The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Facial paralysis usually causes an alteration of the temperature distribution of body with the disease. This paper presents the use of the histogram distance of bilateral local binary pattern (LBP) in the facial infrared thermography to measure the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution for objective assessing the severity of facial paralysis. Using this new method, we performed a controlled trial to assess the facial nerve function of the healthy subjects and the patients with Bell's palsy respectively. The results showed that the mean sensitivity and specificity of this method are 0.86 and 0.89 respectively. The correlation coefficient between the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution and the severity of facial paralysis is an average of 0.657. Therefore, the histogram distance of local binary pattern in the facial infrared thermography is an efficient clinical indicator with respect to the diagnosis and assessment of facial paralysis.

  2. Isolated sleep paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep paralysis - isolated; Parasomnia - isolated sleep paralysis ... Episodes of isolated sleep paralysis last from a few seconds to 1 or 2 minutes. During these episodes the person is unable to move ...

  3. Reversible acute axonal polyneuropathy associated with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: impaired physiological nerve conduction due to thiamine deficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, S; Yokota, T; Shiojiri, T; Matunaga, T; Tanaka, H; Nishina, K; Hirota, H; Inaba, A; Yamada, M; Kanda, T; Mizusawa, H

    2003-05-01

    Acute axonal polyneuropathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff encephalopathy developed simultaneously in three patients. Nerve conduction studies (NCS) detected markedly decreased compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) with minimal conduction slowing; sympathetic skin responses (SSRs) were also notably decreased. Sural nerve biopsies showed only mild axonal degeneration with scattered myelin ovoid formation. The symptoms of neuropathy lessened within two weeks after an intravenous thiamine infusion. CMAPs, SNAPs, and SSRs also increased considerably. We suggest that this is a new type of peripheral nerve impairment: physiological conduction failure with minimal conduction delay due to thiamine deficiency.

  4. Difficulty in Clinical Evaluation of Radial Nerve Injury due to Multiple Trauma to the Humerus, Wrist, and Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balik Mehmet Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve damage is frequently encountered in humeral fractures. The radial nerve is primarily damaged when the humerus gets fractured, while secondary damage maybe due to post-traumatic manipulations and surgical exploration. High impact traumatic nerve injury, serious neuropathic pain, lack of response to therapeutic interventions, and indifference to the Tinel test are indications for surgical intervention. Since most humeral fracture-induced low impact radial nerve injuries resolve spontaneously, conservative therapy is preferred. We present a patient with humeral fracture-associated radial nerve injury, accompanied with digital amputation and flexor tendon avulsion on the same arm. These injuries required immediate surgery, thus rendering the clinical evaluation of the radial nerve impossible. We would like to highlight and discuss the inherent difficulties associated with multiple trauma of the upper arm.

  5. Developmental facial paralysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Anesti, Katerina

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the confusing nomenclature and pathogenesis of Developmental Facial Paralysis, and how it can be differentiated from other causes of facial paralysis present at birth. Differentiating developmental from traumatic facial paralysis noted at birth is important for determining prognosis, but also for medicolegal reasons. Given the dramatic presentation of this condition, accurate and reliable guidelines are necessary in order to facilitate early diagnosis and initiate appropriate therapy, while providing support and counselling to the family. The 30 years experience of our center in the management of developmental facial paralysis is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve embryology, anatomy, nerve physiology, and an appreciation of well-recognized mishaps during fetal development. It is hoped that a better understanding of this condition will in the future lead to early targeted screening, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment in this population of facially disfigured patients, which will facilitate their emotional and social rehabilitation, and their reintegration among their peers.

  6. [Surgical facial reanimation after persisting facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Facial reanimation following persistent facial paralysis can be managed with surgical procedures of varying complexity. The choice of the technique is mainly determined by the cause of facial paralysis, the age and desires of the patient. The techniques most commonly used are the nerve grafts (VII-VII, XII-VII, cross facial graft), dynamic muscle transfers (temporal myoplasty, free muscle transfert) and static suspensions. An intensive rehabilitation through specific exercises after all procedures is essential to archieve good results.

  7. [Peripheral nerve disease associated with acute renal failure due to bromate poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshimaru, M; Miyagawa, T; Sumiyoshi, S; Nomura, Y

    1976-08-01

    A case of 21 year old male with neuropathy caused by renal insufficiency was present. He had taken bromate (mixed powder of potassium bromate and sodium bromate) for the purpose of suicide and suffered from acute renal insufficiency and hard of hearing. Renal dysfunction improved gradually by peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis. However, on the 32th day after the onset, burning pain appeared in the bilateral feets. Following this, he began to complain of the disturbances of superficial and deep sensory below the ankle jerks and the weakness of his toes. Considering the clinical features, we supposed that the disturbance of the peripheral nerve was caused by uremia due to taking bromate. N. suralis was biopsied on the 80th day after the onset and examined electron microscopically. Electroscopical findings was as follows. Degeneration of the Schwann cells and irregularity or destruction of the myelin sheaths were observed. The axoplasm of the myelinated nerve fiber were relatively preserved as compared with the changes of the myelin sheaths. In the unmyelinated nerve fibers, cavity formations were observed. The findings of regeneration were not observed. From the electron microscopical findings, we speculate that the changes of the Schwann cells and the myelin sheaths are primary resulting from the disturbance of the metabolism of the Schwann cells. We speculate that anemia and hypoproteinemia caused by bromate disturbed regeneration.

  8. Vocal cord paralysis in a fighter pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturo, Stephen; Brennan, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    We present in this case report the return to flying duty of a pilot with vocal cord paralysis secondary to removal of a thymoma. We discuss the importance of glottic function as it pertains to the unique aviation environment. We also discuss the anatomy and physiology of the glottis, the evaluation for vocal cord paralysis, and surgical approaches for paralyzed vocal cords. Although the incidence of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis is low in the military aviation community, it is important to recognize that its sequelae can be managed so that the aviator may return to flight duties.

  9. 鼠神经生长因子治疗周围性面瘫疗效观察%Clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor in the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海洲; 那学武; 朱丽明; 李登辉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical efficacy of mouse nerve growth factor (mNGF) in the treatment of periph-eral facial paralysis. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 116 cases of hospitalized patients who were suffered from peripheral facial paralysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to treatment medicine , patients in mNGF group (60 cases) were treated with intramuscular mNGF, patients in control group(56 cases) were treated with intramuscular methyl-cobalamin,the other treatments were the same. The total efficiency were compared according to Fisch facial nerve grading sys-tem, and summarized the causes and age distribution characteristics. Results In the 116 cases,30~50 years old was prone to age of peripheral facial paralysis, facial neuritis and herpes zoster oticus were the main cause of disease. The cure rate and the total effective rate of mNGF group (56.7% and 96.7%) were higher than those of control group (35.7% and 85.7%), there was statistical significant differences(P<0.05). Conclusion Mouse nerve growth factor has good effect in treating peripheral facial paralysis, especially for Bell facial paralysis and Hunt syndrome.%目的:观察鼠神经生长因子(mNGF)治疗周围性面瘫的临床疗效。方法选取116例周围性面瘫患者,分为两组,实验组60例,给予mNGF肌注,对照组56例,给予甲钴胺肌注,其余治疗相同。比较治疗前后Fisch面神经分级系统综合评分及面神经功能,并总结其发病原因及年龄分布特点。结果30~50岁是周围性面瘫易发年龄,面神经炎及耳带状疱疹是主要发病原因,mNGF组的治疗痊愈率(56.7%)及总有效率(96.7%)高于对照组的治疗痊愈率(35.7%)及总有效率(85.7%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论鼠神经生长因子治疗周围性面瘫尤其是Bell面瘫及Hunt综合征疗效显著。

  10. MARATHON DESPITE UNILATERAL VOCAL FOLD PARALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Echternach

    2008-06-01

    physical analysis conspicuous results were shown concerning hoarseness, shimmer or jitter. The maximum-phonation-time was slightly restricted at 11 seconds. Both vocal dynamics and frequency spectrum showed normal ratings.Neck CT and thorax region MRT were performed, showing no pathology in the area of the recurrent nerve or the vagus.The patient was re-examined at the Clinic for Sports Medicine on the basis of the laryngological results. Neither in the internal sports medical examination nor in the physical analysis were conspicuous results shown. The flow characteristics registered breath-by-breath during the ergometry (bicycle- ergometry up to 125 W were completely unaffected up to maximal ventilation (Figure 2. The blood gases after exertion and the performance attained showed norm ratings.Two months after the examination the patient ran her first marathon. No respiratory complaints were experienced any more. Although there is one description of dyspnea due to a unilateral vocal fold paralysis published (Laccourreye et al., 2003, there are still no data regarding either the form of stress that goes together with laryngeally caused dyspnea or what machanism induces it. Both restriction of the breath cross-section and excessively high consumption of air during phonation may produce a subjective sensation of unspecific respiratory complaints. It was shown that, in vocal fold paralysis, inspirational flow is in fact reduced - in contrast to exspiratory flow (Beaty and Hoffman, 1999; Cantarella et al., 2003. However, neither the position of the fixed vocal fold nor the degree of breathiness had an influence on the breathing parameters (Cantarella et al., 2005. Beaty and Hoffman, 1999 found lower inspiratory flow rates after medialization thyreoplasty. No modification of the breathing parameters was shown after fat injection in the vocal fold (Cantarella et al., 2006. We are here describing an extraordinary achievement in an endurance form of athletics with a unilateral

  11. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  12. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  13. Vocal cord paralysis caused by stingray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Oh Jin; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Foreign bodies in the oral cavity and pharynx are commonly encountered in the emergency room and outpatient departments, and the most frequently observed of these foreign bodies are fish bones. Among the possible complications resulting from a pharyngeal foreign body, vocal cord fixation is extremely rare, with only three cases previously reported in the English literature. The mechanisms of vocal cord fixation can be classified into mechanical articular fixation, direct injury of the recurrent laryngeal nerve, or recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis secondary to inflammation. The case discussed here is different from previous cases. We report a rare case of vocal cord paralysis caused by the venom of a stingray tail in the hypopharynx.

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Relapse Presenting as Complete Monocular Vision Loss due to Optic Nerve Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam A. Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML involvement of the central nervous system is relatively rare, and detection of leptomeningeal disease typically occurs only after a patient presents with neurological symptoms. The case herein describes a 48-year-old man with relapsed/refractory AML of the mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement subtype, who presents with monocular vision loss due to leukemic eye infiltration. MRI revealed right optic nerve sheath enhancement and restricted diffusion concerning for nerve ischemia and infarct from hypercellularity. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis showed a total WBC count of 81/mcl with 96% AML blasts. The onset and progression of visual loss were in concordance with rise in peripheral blood blast count. A low threshold for diagnosis of CSF involvement should be maintained in patients with hyperleukocytosis and high-risk cytogenetics so that prompt treatment with whole brain radiation and intrathecal chemotherapy can be delivered. This case suggests that the eye, as an immunoprivileged site, may serve as a sanctuary from which leukemic cells can resurge and contribute to relapsed disease in patients with high-risk cytogenetics.

  15. Sleep paralysis and folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    Sleep paralysis is a relatively new term to describe what for hundreds of years many believed to be a visitation by a malevolent creature which attacked its victims as they slept. The first clinical description of sleep paralysis was published in 1664 in a Dutch physician's case histories, where it was referred to as, 'Incubus or the Night-Mare [sic]'. In 1977, it was discovered more than 100 previously healthy people from various South East Asian communities had died mysteriously in their sleep. The individuals affected were dying at a rate of 92/100,000 from Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome. No underlying cause was ever found, only that subsequent studies revealed a high rate of sleep paralysis and belief in the dab tsog (nightmare spirit) amongst members of the community. The nightmare/succubus is descended from Lilith. The earliest reference to Lilith is found in the Sumerian King list of 2400 BC known as Lilitu or she-demon, she bore children from her nocturnal unions with men. In other derivations, she was Adam's first wife who rather than 'obey' became a demon that preyed on women during childbirth. In modern Middle Eastern maternity wards, some women still wear amulets for protection. Today, clinical cause of these disturbances is sleep paralysis due to the unsuitable timing of REM sleep. During the 'Nightmare' episode, the sleeper becomes partially conscious during REM cycle, leaving the individual in a state between dream and wakefulness. For some, culture and the tradition of the nightmare is explanation enough.

  16. Paralysis that easily reverses: a case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Lohani, Saroj; Nazir, Salik; Juliano, Noelle

    2017-01-30

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a potentially life-threatening condition associated with recurrent episodes of muscle weakness and hypokalaemia due to hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis is often delayed or misdiagnosed due to its rarity in the western world and subtle features of hyperthyroidism on initial presentation. Here we present the case of a 25-year-old man who presented to the emergency department (ED) with sudden onset weakness of bilateral upper and lower extremities. His labs revealed hypokalaemia with elevated T4 and suppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone and he was diagnosed with thyrotoxic periodic paralysis. He was treated with potassium repletion, atenolol and methimazole with complete reversal of his paralysis within the next day. Unfortunately, he failed to keep the follow-up appointment after discharge, ran out of his methimazole and landed up in the ED again. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. 鼠神经生长因子在外伤性面神经麻痹患者中的应用价值探讨%Application value of mouse nerve growth factor in traumatic facial paralysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭兴实

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate and analyse the application value of mouse nerve growth factor in traumatic facial paralysis patients .Methods 50 cases of traumatic facial paralysis patients those who were treated in our hospital during August 2010 and August 2013 were selected as the study object , they were randomly divided into observation group and control group .All patients were given the treatment including anti infection , hormone, vitamin B1, vitamin B12, energy mixture with physiotherapy , other conventional treatments , facial muscle function training and massage care , patients the observation group were given mouse nerve growth factor additionally , compared the differences between the two groups .Results After the treatment , total efficiency of the observation group ( 92%) was higher than that of control group ( 68%) , the difference was statistically significant (χ2 =4.88,P<0.05).House-Brackmann score of facial nerve function of observation group were better than control group patients , I level (χ2 =8.04), III level (χ2 =5.37), IV level and above (χ2 =4.15), the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusions The application of mouse nerve growth factor in traumatic facial paralysis patients can improve treatment efficacy , alleviate the symptoms , promote health recovery, worth of clinical expansion .%目的:探讨分析鼠神经生长因子在外伤性面神经麻痹患者中的应用价值。方法以我院2010年8月至2013年8月间,收治的50例外伤性面神经麻痹患者为研究对象,随机分为观察组与对照组,所有患者均予以抗感染、激素、维生素B1、维生素B12、能量合剂辅助以理疗等常规治疗及表情肌功能训练等按摩护理,观察组患者在此基础予以鼠神经生长因子治疗,比较两组患者之间的差异。结果观察组治疗后总有效率92.0%优于对照组68.0%,其差异有统计学意义(χ2=4.88,P<0.05);观察组治疗

  18. Double Augmented Vertical Rectus Transposition for Large-Angle Esotropia Due to Sixth Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Vijayalakshmi, Perumalsamy; Shetty, Shashikant; Vora, Priyanka; Kalwaniya, Suresh

    2016-11-01

    To study the binocular alignment and ocular motility in patients with large-angle esotropia due to sixth nerve palsy treated with double augmented vertical recti transposition. This was a prospective interventional study. Fifteen patients with non-resolving sixth nerve palsy who underwent surgical correction were included in the study. Fourteen patients also underwent an additional medial rectus recession. Two patients with an associated small vertical deviation had a selective augmentation of one vertical rectus muscle. Binocular alignment, ocular motility, duction limitation, improvement in head posture, induced vertical deviations, and field of diplopia-free binocular single vision (when possible) were analyzed. Successful outcome was defined as a residual horizontal deviation of 10 prism diopters (PD) or less with no vertical deviation at final follow-up (6 months). The double augmented Hummelsheim procedure improved esotropia from 58.3 ± 10.8 PD preoperatively to 7.2 ± 5.1 PD postoperatively (P = .001). Three (20%) patients had residual deviation of greater than 10 PD, of which 1 patient had diplopia and was treated with prisms. Postoperative binocular field of vision was performed in 6 patients, the mean of which was 20° for abduction and 45° for adduction. Three of 6 patients had elimination of face turn and the rest had residual head posture of less than 5°. Two patients had an induced vertical deviation of less than 4 PD. In patients who had selective augmentation, the vertical deviation was completely corrected. The patients operated on with double augmentation of the Hummelsheim procedure combined with medial rectus recession had reduced mean primary esotropia and improved diplopia-free field of vision postoperatively. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(6):369-374.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Ulnar nerve entrapment in Guyon's canal due to recurrent carpal tunnel syndrome: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Ozgur; Calisaneller, Tarkan; Gulsen, Salih; Caner, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    Guyon's canal syndrome is a compression neuropathy of the ulnar nerve entrapment at the wrist. Compression of the ulnar nerve at the wrist by a ganglion, lipomas, diseases of the ulnar artery, fractures of the hamate and trauma are common etiologcal factors. Unlike Guyon's canal syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common nerve entrapment of the upper extremity. Although, open (OCTR) or endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) is highly effective in relieving pain, failure with carpal tunnel release is seldom seen. In this paper, we presented a patient with ulnar nerve entrapment associated with recurrent CTS and discussed the possible pathomechanism with a review of current literature.

  20. Pudendal Neuralgia Due to Pudendal Nerve Entrapment: Warning Signs Observed in Two Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploteau, Stephanie; Cardaillac, Claire; Perrouin-Verbe, Marie-Aimee; Riant, Thibault; Labat, Jean-Jacques

    2016-03-01

    Pudendal neuralgia is a chronic neuropathic pelvic pain that is often misdiagnosed and inappropriately treated. The Nantes criteria provide a basis for the diagnosis of pudendal neuralgia due to pudendal nerve entrapment. The 5 essential diagnostic criteria are pain situated in the anatomical territory of the pudendal nerve, worsened by sitting, the patient is not woken at night by the pain, and no objective sensory loss is detected on clinical examination. The fifth criterion is a positive pudendal nerve block. We have also clarified a number of complementary diagnostic criteria and several exclusion criteria that make the diagnosis unlikely. When pudendal neuralgia due to pudendal nerve entrapment is diagnosed according to the Nantes criteria, no further investigation is required and medical or surgical treatment can be proposed. Nevertheless, a number of warning signs suggesting other possible causes of pudendal neuralgia must not be overlooked. These warning signs (red flags) are waking up at night, excessively neuropathic nature of the pain (for example, associated with hypoesthesia), specifically pinpointed pain, which can suggest neuroma and pain associated with neurological deficit. In these atypical presentations, the diagnosis of pain due to pudendal nerve entrapment should be reconsidered and a radiological examination should be performed. The 2 cases described in this report (tumor compression of the pudendal nerve) illustrate the need to recognize atypical pudendal neuralgia and clarify the role of pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as MRI provides very valuable information for the evaluation of diseases involving the ischiorectal fossa. The presence of red flags must be investigated in all cases of pudendal neuralgia to avoid missing pudendal neuralgia secondary to a mechanism other than nerve entrapment.

  1. Acute bee paralysis virus [

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Acute bee paralysis virus [gbvrl]: 14 CDS's (15780 codons) fields: [triplet] [frequ...osomal protein / MAP kinase List of codon usage for each CDS (format) Homepage Acute bee paralysis virus ...

  2. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in acute secondary hyperkalemic paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkal R Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia manifests clinically with acute neuromuscular paralysis, which can simulate Guillain Barré syndrome (GBS and other causes of acute flaccid paralysis. Primary hyperkalemic paralysis occurs from genetic defects in the sodium channel, and secondary hyperkalemic paralysis (SHP from diverse causes including renal dysfunction, potassium retaining drugs, Addison′s disease, etc. Clinical characteristics of SHP have been addressed in a number of publications. However, electrophysiological evaluations of these patients during neuromuscular paralysis are infrequently reported and have demonstrated features of demyelination. The clinical features and electrophysiological abnormalities in secondary hyperkalemia mimic GBS, and pose diagnostic challenges. We report the findings of nerve conduction studies in a middle-aged man who was admitted with rapidly reversible acute quadriplegia resulting from secondary hyperkalemic paralysis.

  3. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in hypokalemic paralysis: Case report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C M; Nath, Kunal; Parekh, Jigar

    2014-01-01

    Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude declines during a paralytic attack in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). However, serial motor nerve conduction studies in hypokalemic paralysis have not been commonly reported. We report two cases with hypokalemic paralysis, who had severely reduced CMAPs in all motor nerves at presentation during the episode of quadriparesis. However, the amplitude of CMAPs increased and reached normal levels, as the serum potassium concentration and motor power returned to normal state.

  4. Reversible electrophysiological abnormalities in hypokalemic paralysis: Case report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C M Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Compound muscle action potential (CMAP amplitude declines during a paralytic attack in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP. However, serial motor nerve conduction studies in hypokalemic paralysis have not been commonly reported. We report two cases with hypokalemic paralysis, who had severely reduced CMAPs in all motor nerves at presentation during the episode of quadriparesis. However, the amplitude of CMAPs increased and reached normal levels, as the serum potassium concentration and motor power returned to normal state.

  5. 不同病因的周围性面神经麻痹外科治疗分析%Surgical treatment to facial nerve paralysis of different pathogeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伊海金; 刘丕楠; 郭泓; 王春红; 倪富强

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the surgical treatment to facial nerve paralysis of different pathogeny. Method: Thirty-seven patients were reviewed, including Bell's Palsy(5 patients), temporal bone fracture ( 20 patients),media otitis(cholesteatoma) (4 patients), facial neuroma and cranio-maxilly-facial operation trauma(8 patients). All the patients were treated by different surgical methods according different pathogeny. Result: The mean percentage facial function improvement (House-Brackmann Grade Ⅰ - Ⅱ )was 80% to Bell's Palsy and temporal bone fracture,100% to media otitis(cholesteatoma). Facial function of three patients improved from House-Brackmann Grade Ⅳ to Ⅲ,two patients had no obvious improvement about facial neuroma; three patients improved from Grade Ⅴ to Ⅲ ,one improved to Ⅳ about cranio-maxilly-facial operation trauma. Conclusion:Patients of facial nerve paralysis got better curative effect if treated by proper surgical therapy according different pathogeny.%目的:探讨不同病因的周围性面神经麻痹患者外科治疗的相关问题.方法:面神经麻痹患者37例,病因包括:贝尔面瘫5例,颞骨骨折20例,中耳乳突炎4例,内耳道面神经肿瘤3例,颅脑颌面手术损伤5例,针对不同病因采取相应外科治疗方式.结果:H-B分级Ⅰ~Ⅱ级恢复率:贝尔面瘫80%,颞骨骨折80%,中耳乳突炎100%;内耳道面神经肿瘤术后1例由Ⅳ级改善至Ⅲ级,2例术后无明显变化;颅脑颌面手术损伤行面-舌吻合者4例由Ⅴ级改善至Ⅲ级3例,Ⅳ级1例,行瘢痕切除+面神经探查减压术者1例由Ⅴ级改善至Ⅳ级.结论:针对不同病因导致的面神经麻痹,选择合适的手术治疗方法,可以取得良好效果.

  6. Facial paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sashank; Redett, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Facial paralysis can have devastating physical and psychosocial consequences. These are particularly severe in children in whom loss of emotional expressiveness can impair social development and integration. The etiologies of facial paralysis, prospects for spontaneous recovery, and functions requiring restoration differ in children as compared with adults. Here we review contemporary management of facial paralysis with a focus on special considerations for pediatric patients.

  7. Trauma-induced auditory nerve degeneration due to cerebellopontine(CP) angle manipulations:clinical and experimental experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsuji Sekiya

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for trauma-induced hearing disturbances due to auditory nerve degeneration, we established for the first time a rat experimental model in which auditory nerve degeneration due to compression injury of the cerebellopontine (CP) angle portion of the auditory nerve can be quantitatively evaluated. In this paper, Ⅰ demonstrate our clinical experience in CP angle surgery and some of the results of our experiments performed onthis rat experimental model. Trauma-induced hearing loss in CP angle operations has long been regarded as a sort of unavoidable "natural course"and therefore hopeless.I believe that this pessimistic view should be challenged and changed through new approaches in scientific research.

  8. [A case presenting with trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance due to circumscribed midbrain and upper pontine hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Furutani, Rikiya; Shiota, Jun-ichi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2003-07-01

    We describe a patient presenting with trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance due to circumscribed mesencephalic hemorrhage. A 36-year-old man with no past illness visited our hospital complaining of sudden onset of diplopia, dysesthesia of the left face and upper extremity, and acuphenes of the left ear. Neurological examination revealed left trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance of the left side almost above T11 level. Pain and temperature sensation were disturbed, but vibration, joint position, graphesthesia, kinesthesia, and discrimination sensation were spared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head, performed 7 days after onset, revealed acute to subacute phase hemorrhage at the right inferior colliculus. No abnormalities were identified on cerebral angiography. Symptoms gradually improved with conservative therapy. After about ten weeks, diplopia disappeared and area of sensory disturbance was reduced (disturbance of pain sensation reduced to about T4 level, temperature sensation to about T9). Segmental sensory disturbance usually accompanies spinal cord lesion. However, several cases of similar symptoms following cerebrovascular disease of the brainstem have been reported. Conversely, some reports have indicated that trochlear nerve palsy due to midbrain hemorrhage accompanies sensory disturbance contralateral to the lesion. The nature of sensory disturbance is thus variable. The present case suggests that segmental sensory disturbance might accompany trochlear nerve palsy caused by hemorrhage of the inferior colliculus, as intramedullary fibers of the trochlear nerve and spinothalamic tract are located nearby and somatotopy of the spinothalamic tract is preserved even at the level of the midbrain.

  9. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis: Three rare secondary causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Eswaradass Venkatesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic paralysis is a rare neuromuscular disorder, related to a defect in muscle ion channels, characterized by episodes of painless muscle weakness, which may be precipitated by heavy exercise, fasting, or high-carbohydrate meals. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis may be familial (primary or secondary. Here, we report three cases of secondary causes of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. On evaluation, case 1 had distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA due to Sjogren′s syndrome, case 2 had drug induced proximal RTA (Fanconi′s syndrome and case 3 had thyrotoxicosis. Clinician must be aware of causes of secondary PP as recognition and diagnosis can completely prevent further attacks of periodic paralysis. Each of the above case is rare, but completely treatable if diagnosed. Low dose steroids with bicarbonate replacement in case 1, stopping tenofovir in case 2 and carbimazole therapy in case 3 prevented further attacks of periodic paralysis and cardiopulmonary complications.

  10. Late ulnar paralysis. Study of seventeen cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansat, M; Bonnevialle, P; Fine, X; Guiraud, B; Testut, M F

    1983-01-01

    Seventeen cases of late ulnar paralysis treated by neurolysis-transposition are reported. The clinical characteristics of these paralysis are emphasized. A very prolonged symptom free interval, a rapid onset and a severe involvement. The ulnar transposition was most often done subcutaneously. Cubitus valgus and definite nerve compression proximal to the arcade of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle are almost always present. The results as regards the neuropathy are notable: no patient is completely cured and only half are improved. An anatomical study of the nerve path shows the essential role, in the compression of the nerve, of the muscular arcade of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle which acts in a way similar to the bridge of a violin. Hence, opening it longitudinally is the principal procedure of the neurolysis. This should be routine before the first signs of neuropathy occur in an elbow whose axis is out of alignment as a sequela of a childhood injury.

  11. A surgical case of frontal lobe epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia accompanied by olfactory nerve enlargement: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Noriaki; Uda, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nagai, Taiki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Kamei, Takamasa; Morino, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old man came to our clinic due to refractory general tonic seizure and an attack of unintended yelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated mild cortical hyperintensity on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) image in the left basal frontal area. Enlargement of the left olfactory nerve was also detected below the affected gyrus. Subtotal resection of the MRI-visible epileptogenic lesion was performed without any neurological deficit. The final pathological diagnosis was focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) type IIa. Seizures and yelling attacks subsided after surgery. Extracerebral abnormalities, including cranial nerve enlargement, are common in patients with hemimegalencephaly. However, such abnormalities are rare with FCD.

  12. Chronic Localized Back Pain Due to Posterior Cutaneous Nerve Entrapment Syndrome (POCNES): A New Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelens, Oliver B; Maatman, Robert C; Scheltinga, Marc R; van Laarhoven, Kees; Roumen, Rudi M

    2017-03-01

    Most patients with chronic back pain suffer from degenerative thoracolumbovertebral disease. However, the following case illustrates that a localized peripheral nerve entrapment must be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic back pain. We report the case of a 26-year-old woman with continuous excruciating pain in the lower back area. Previous treatment for nephroptosis was to no avail. On physical examination the pain was present in a 2 x 2 cm area overlying the twelfth rib some 4 cm lateral to the spinal process. Somatosensory testing using swab and alcohol gauze demonstrated the presence of skin hypo- and dysesthesia over the painful area. Local pressure on this painful spot elicited an extreme pain response that did not irradiate towards the periphery. These findings were highly suggestive of a posterior version of the anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome (ACNES), a condition leading to a severe localized neuropathic pain in anterior portions of the abdominal wall. She demonstrated a beneficial albeit temporary response after lidocaine infiltration as dictated by an established diagnostic and treatment protocol for ACNES. She subsequently underwent a local neurectomy of the involved superficial branch of the intercostal nerve. This limited operation had a favorable outcome resulting in a pain-free return to normal activities up to this very day (follow-up of 24 months).We propose to name this novel syndrome "posterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome" (POCNES). Each patient with chronic localized back pain should undergo simple somatosensory testing to detect the presence of overlying skin hypo- and dysesthesia possibly reflecting an entrapped posterior cutaneous nerve.Key words: Chronic pain, back pain, posterior cutaneous nerve entrapment, peripheral nerve entrapment, surgical treatment for pain, anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment.

  13. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojith Karandode Balakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at highlighting the importance of suspecting thyrotoxicosis in cases of recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis; especially in Asian men to facilitate early diagnosis of the former condition. A case report of a 28 year old male patient with recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis has been presented. Hypokalemia secondary to thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed as the cause of the paralysis. The patient was given oral potassium intervention over 24 hours. The patient showed complete recovery after the medical intervention and was discharged after 24 hours with no residual paralysis. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP is a complication of thyrotoxicosis, more common amongst males in Asia. It presents as acute flaccid paralysis in a case of hyperthyroidism with associated hypokalemia. The features of thyrotoxicosis may be subtle or absent. Thus, in cases of recurrent or acute flaccid muscle paralysis, it is important to consider thyrotoxicosis as one of the possible causes, and take measures accordingly.

  14. Periocular Reconstruction in Patients with Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Shannon S; Joseph, Andrew W; Douglas, Raymond S; Massry, Guy G

    2016-04-01

    Facial paralysis can result in serious ocular consequences. All patients with orbicularis oculi weakness in the setting of facial nerve injury should undergo a thorough ophthalmologic evaluation. The main goal of management in these patients is to protect the ocular surface and preserve visual function. Patients with expected recovery of facial nerve function may only require temporary and conservative measures to protect the ocular surface. Patients with prolonged or unlikely recovery of facial nerve function benefit from surgical rehabilitation of the periorbital complex. Current reconstructive procedures are most commonly intended to improve coverage of the eye but cannot restore blink.

  15. Management of the Eye in Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, John J

    2016-02-01

    The preoperative assessment of the eye in facial paralysis is a critical component of surgical management. The degree of facial nerve paralysis, lacrimal secretion, corneal sensation, and lower eyelid position must be assessed accurately. Upper eyelid loading procedures are standard management of lagophthalmos. Lower eyelid tightening repositions the lower eyelid and helps maintain the aqueous tear film. Eyelid reanimation allows an aesthetic symmetry with blinking and restores protective functions vital to ocular preservation. Patients often have multiple nervous deficits, including corneal anesthesia. Other procedures include tarsorrhaphy, spring implantation, and temporalis muscle transposition; associated complications have rendered them nearly obsolete.

  16. Prolonged nerve blockade in a patient treated with lithium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehavi A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Amit Lehavi, Boris Shenderey, Yeshayahu (Shai KatzDepartment of Anesthesiology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: We report a case of a patient, chronically treated with oral lithium, who presented with an extremely prolonged (42-hour duration of sensory and motor paralysis following an uneventful infraclavicular block for hand surgery that was performed under ultrasound guidance using bupivacaine and lidocaine. Due to its direct effect on nerve conduction of action potential, we propose that lithium may have had a role in the unusually prolonged duration of a peripheral nerve block.Keywords: nerve blockade, lithium, duration, anesthesia

  17. [Etiology, diagnosis, differential diagnosis and therapy of vocal fold paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, R; Hoffmann, T K; Rotter, N; Pickhard, A; Scheithauer, M O; Brosch, S

    2014-03-01

    Etiology of vocal fold paralysis is broad: e. g. iatrogenic/traumatic, associated with neoplasms or with systemic diseases. The cause of idiopathic paralysis is unknown. The main symptom of unilateral vocal fold paralysis is hoarseness because of a remaining glottic gap during phonation. Patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis typically have no impairment of the voice but dyspnea. Examination of patients with an idopathic vocal fold paralysis is a CT of the vagal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve from skull base to neck and mediastinum. Serological tests are not obligatory. Differential diagnosis of vocal fold immobility is vocal fold paralysis/neurological causes and arthrogene causes such as arytenoid subluxation, interarytenoid adhesion and vocal fold fixation in laryngeal carcinomas. Voice therapy is a promising approach for patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis, but not all patients benefit sufficiently. Temporary vocal fold augmentation by injection medialization results in satisfactory voice quality that is comparable with a thyroplasty. Patients with bilateral vocal fold immobility show typically dyspnea requiring immediate therapy such as temporary tracheotomy or reversible laterofixation of the paralyzed vocal chord. If the paralysis persists a definitive enlargement of the glottic airway by eg. arytenoidectomy needs to be performed.

  18. Periodic paralysis: understanding channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Rüdel, Reinhardt

    2002-01-01

    Familial periodic paralyses are typical channelopathies (i.e., caused by functional disturbances of ion channel proteins). The episodes of flaccid muscle weakness observed in these disorders are due to underexcitability of sarcolemma leading to a silent electromyogram and the lack of action potentials even upon electrical stimulation. Interictally, ion channel malfunction is well compensated, so that special exogenous or endogenous triggers are required to produce symptoms in the patients. An especially obvious trigger is the level of serum potassium (K+), the ion responsible for resting membrane potential and degree of excitability. The clinical symptoms can be caused by mutations in genes coding for ion channels that mediate different functions for maintaining the resting potential or propagating the action potential, the basis of excitability. The phenotype is determined by the type of functional defect brought about by the mutations, rather than the channel effected, because the contrary phenotypes hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP) and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) may be caused by point mutations in the same gene. Still, the common mechanism for inexcitability in all known episodic-weakness phenotypes is a long-lasting depolarization that inactivates sodium ion (Na+) channels, initiating the action potential.

  19. Facial paralysis and lymphocytic facial neuritis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) positive for simian retrovirus type D2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Anna L; Colby, Lesley A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2011-12-01

    Simian retrovirus type D (SRVD) is a naturally occurring betaretrovirus in nonhuman primates of the genus Macaca. Infection can lead to a variety of clinical, hematologic, and histopathologic abnormalities. We report an unusual clinical presentation of facial paralysis and histologic lymphocytic neuritis in an SRVD type 2 (SRVD2)-infected rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with a catheter-associated vena caval thrombus, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and multisystemic lymphoid hyperplasia. At initial presentation, a right atrial mass was detected by echocardiography. The macaque was clinically asymptomatic but had persistent anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperglobulinemia, and later neutropenia. It was seropositive for SRV and PCR-positive for SRVD 2. Approximately 1 mo after initial presentation, the macaque developed right facial paralysis and was euthanized. Histologic lesions included lymphoplasmacytic aggregates affecting multiple organs, consistent with SRV-related lymphoid hyperplasia. The right facial nerve showed lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. The nerve itself was negative immunohistochemically for SRV antigen, but antigen was present infrequently in pericapillary lymphoid cells within the facial nerve and abundantly within lymphoid aggregates in the adjacent parotid salivary gland, bone marrow, and soft tissue. Known neurotropic viruses could not be identified. Given the widespread inflammation in this macaque, particularly in the area surrounding the facial nerve, lymphocytic neuritis and facial paralysis likely were an indirect effect of SRV infection due to local extension of SRV-related inflammation in the surrounding tissue.

  20. Autoperipheral nerve implantation for the treatment of obsolete incomplete paralysis%自体周围神经植入治疗脊髓陈旧性不完全性断裂伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张少成; 马玉海; 许硕贵; 柳顺发; 张秋林; 逄育

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is often found in the clinic that apart from oppression and instability, there is much difference in sensibility and motion function recovery in patients who have similar imageological changes. Studies show that adhesion in the dura mater of spinal cord, traction of fibrous strip,traumatic scar, malacosis and cyst are the main causes.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical effects of spinal decompression and nerve tissue implantation for obsolete incomplete paralysis.DESIGN: Self-control observation.SETTING: Department of Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital of Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: We selected 28 patients with traumatic obsolete incom plete paralysis from the Department of Orthopaedics, Changhai Hospital of Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, from June 1994 to August 2002. Injured vertebral segments were T7-T9 (5 cases), T10-T12 (12 cases), and L1-2(11 cases). Sixteen patients had undergone decompression, fusion and internal fixation. Thirteen cases of them had undergone posterior decompression and pedicle screw internal fixation. The internal fixation devices had been removed in 7 patients before this procedure. Six cases of traumatic obsolete incomplete paralysis had been treated by hyperbaric oxygen. According to the classification of Frankel, 16 cases were degree B and 12 cases were degree C.METHODS: The dura mater of spinal cord was opened, and the fibrous bands adhering to the spinal cord from arachnoid, pia mater spinalis, ligamenta denticulatum, initial part of nerve root were complete relieved. Then the spinal cord with scar fibers contracted was opened by 3-6 incisions,which were 0.1-0.2 mm deep and longer than the scar part. Cyst found in the spinal cord in 6 cases was opened and the liquid in it was sucked. After that, we denuded spineurium and perineurium of the autogenous sural nerve graft, making the texture and appearance of the nerve look like cauda equine. The nerve was lined in

  1. [Sciatica due to unusual causes: Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, M; Korbaa, W; Zrour, S; Bejia, I; Touzi, M; Bergaoui, N

    2009-03-01

    Tarlov cysts and nerve roots anomalies usually involve lumbosacral roots and are often asymptomatic. MRI has enabled recognition of many conditions that used to be missed by CT or myelography investigations performed for back and leg pain. However, even without additional compressive impingement (disc hernia, spondylolisthesis or lumbar canal stenosis) these anomalies can be responsible for sciatica, motor deficit and bladder sphincter dysfunction. Tarlov cysts are perinervous dilatations of the dorsal root ganglion. CT and especially MRI can reveal these cysts and their precise relations with the neighboring structures. Delayed filling of the cysts can be visualized on the myelogram. MRI is more sensitive than CT myelography for a positive diagnosis of nerve root anomalies, a differential diagnosis with disc hernia and classification of these anomalies. Surgical treatment is indicated for symptomatic Tarlov cysts and nerve root anomalies resistant to conservative treatment. Better outcome is observed in patients with an additional compressive impingement component. We report two cases of sciatica: one caused by Tarlov cysts diagnosed by MRI and the other by nerve root anomalies diagnosed by CT myelography. In both cases, conservative treatment was undertaken. The clinical, radiological and therapeutic aspects of these disorders are discussed.

  2. Isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Neena S.; Parkar, Shubhangi R.; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  3. Isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, Neena S.; Shubhangi R Parkar; Tambe, Ravindra

    2005-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a cardinal symptom of narcolepsy. However, little is available in the literature about isolated sleep paralysis. This report discusses the case of a patient with isolated sleep paralysis who progressed from mild to severe SP over 8 years. He also restarted drinking alcohol to be able to fall asleep and allay his anxiety symptoms. The patient was taught relaxation techniques and he showed complete remission of the symptoms of SP on follow up after 8 months.

  4. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abbas, Haider; Kothari, Nikhil; Bogra, Jaishri

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare genetic disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of skeletal muscle weakness with associated hypokalemia which is precipitated by stress, cold, carbohydrate...

  5. Severe muscle atrophy due to spinal cord injury can be reversed in complete absence of peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Boncompagni

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, a new efficient treatment has been developed to treat paralyzed skeletal muscle of patients affected by spinal cord injury (SCI. The capability of the functional electrical stimulation (FES to improve trophism and in some cases muscle function, are now well documented both in animals after experimental cord lesion, and in humans, generally after traumatic cord lesion. This new findings makes FES an important tool for the rehabilitation of SCI patients. FES stimulation has been proven to be an effective method used to retard muscle atrophy and improve recovery after reinnervation. Sophisticated FES devices have been developed for restoring function in the upper and lower extremities, the bladder and bowel, and the respiratory system of SCI patients. However, there are SCI cases, such as those affected by flaccid paralysis, in which the musculature is not treated with FES rehabilitation therapy. This is because conventional FES apparatuses are designed for direct stimulation of peripheral nerves that need small currents to be depolarized, and are not effective in patients that have lost their peripheral nerves, and, therefore, require higher currents for the direct depolarization of the muscle fibers. Lack of muscle treatment generates, as a secondary problem, a long series of alterations to tissues other than muscle, such as bones (osteoporosis, skin (pressure sores, decubital ulcers, etc., that are a direct consequence of inactivity and poor blood supply to the denervated areas. These complications represent an extremely serious problem for the general health of the injured individuals, who usually have a shorter than normal life span. In the hopes of changing this common belief, an innovative rehabilitation procedure, based on FES, has been developed with the aim of reversing long-lasting muscle atrophy in the muscles of the lower extremities of SCI patients affected by complete lesion of the conus cauda, i.e. that have no

  6. Median Nerve Injury Due to High-Pressure Water Jet Injection: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Ufuk; Unal, Aysun

    2009-08-01

    High-pressure injuries that occur accidentally are potentially destructive injuries that often affect the nondominant hands of young men. A variety of products such as paint, gasoline, grease, fuel oil, cement, thinner and solvents have been reported as destructive agents. High-pressure water jet injection injuries to soft tissues have rarely been reported. In this study, we present the first case of median nerve injury due to high-pressure water jet injection by a water spray gun.

  7. Colesteatoma causando paralisia facial Cholesteatoma causing facial paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Gurgel Testa

    2003-10-01

    blood supply or production of neurotoxic substances secreted from either the cholesteatoma matrix or bacteria enclosed in the tumor. AIM: To evaluate the incidence, clinical features and treatment of the facial palsy due cholesteatoma. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical retrospective. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Retrospective study of 10 cases of facial paralysis due cholesteatoma selected through a survey of 206 decompressions of the facial nerve due various aetiologies realized in the last 10 years in UNIFESP-EPM. RESULTS: The incidence of facial paralysis due cholesteatoma in this study was 4,85%, with female predominance (60%. The average age of the patients was 39 years. The duration and severity of the facial palsy associated with the extension of lesion were important for the functional recovery of the facial nerve. CONCLUSION: Early surgical approach is necessary in these cases to improve the nerve function more adequately. When disruption or intense fibrous replacement occurs in the facial nerve, nerve grafting (greater auricular/sural nerves and/or hypoglossal facial anastomosis may be suggested.

  8. Microscopic bilateral posterior cordotomy in severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıman, Nesrin; Koca, Öncel; Boyacı, Zerrin; Levent, Ender; Soylu, Akın Cem; Alparslan, Sümeyye; Saygı, Attila

    2012-03-01

    Vocal cord paralysis is a rare cause of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Recurrent laryngeal nerve injury after thyroid gland surgery is one of the leading causes of acquired vocal cord paralysis. A 46-year-old woman with OSAS due to bilateral abductor vocal cord paralysis was presented. She had thyroidectomy 30 years ago and had a weak, breathy voice. She had been referred with a history of high-pitched snoring, apnea witnessed by her spouse, and excessive daytime sleepiness for the last 5 years. Full-night polysomnography revealed that her apnea-hypopnea index was 72/h and minimal oxygen saturation level was 81%. There was no REM and deep sleep periods. Ear-nose-throat consultation offered an endoscopic bilateral posterior cordotomy operation via microscopic suspension laryngoscopy (MLS) as a treatment option. Instead of using a nasal positive airway pressure (nCPAP) device, she was treated surgically. Her OSAS resolved completely within 5 months of the surgery. Her phonation was preserved, and symptoms such as snoring and hypersomnolance disappeared. In OSAS patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, MLS-associated bilateral posterior cordotomy can be a choice of treatment as an alternative to nCPAP application.

  9. Utilizing the reaction of degeneration test for individuals with focal paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland Thomas J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES is a modality sometimes used to help strengthen weak muscles. On occasion, however, the targeted muscles do not respond to the current delivered. No response to electrical stimulation should raise the consideration of unsuspected peripheral nerve damage. Two case studies are presented showing how absence of response was due to unsuspected peripheral neuropathy, which had not been considered in either of the original referral diagnoses. Case descriptions The first individual sustained head trauma and did not respond to NMES to facilitate finger flexor contractions in the left hand. This prompted a reaction of degeneration test (R/D test which revealed evidence of a median nerve lesion. The second individual presented with right ankle dorsiflexor and evertor paralysis following a right total hip replacement. The R/D test helped rule out a central nervous system lesion by revealing evidence of right peroneal nerve degeneration. Conclusion The case reports show how clinical suspicion followed by simple R/D testing can be used to screen for nerve damage, prompting further electrodiagnostic work up of individuals with profound weakness and or paralysis.

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Radiofrequency Treatment of Intercostal Nerves for the Prevention of Incidental Pain Arising Due to Rib Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Bhatnagar, Sushma; Khurana, Deepa; Joshi, Saurabh; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) arising due to rib metastasis is very distressing and often very difficult to manage by titration of traditional analgesics. This study is undertaken to determine the efficacy of radiofrequency (RF) treatment of intercostal nerves for the prevention of BTP. The RF treatment of the intercostal nerves was carried out in 25 patients with uncontrolled BTP arising out of the rib metastasis. The intensity and episode of BTP, background pain, opioid dose, functional status (Karnofky score), and quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36]) were noted at baseline visit and subsequently after the RF treatment. After the RF treatment, there was more than 50% decrease in both intensity and frequency of BTP in more than 50% of patients for 3 months, and there was more than 50% decrease in BTP opioid dose in more than 50% of patients throughout the study period. There was also significant improvement in background pain, functional status, and the quality of life after the RF. Interestingly, pain relief, lowering of opioid dose, and functional status improvement were found mostly in patients with mixed and neuropathic type of pain and in patients in whom the metastasis were confined to the ribs only. RF of the intercostal nerves is effective in preventing and deceasing the severity of BTP arising due to rib metastasis in selected group of patients with mixed and neuropathic type of pain and with the metastasis involving the ribs only.

  11. Ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block for pain control in an infant with a femur fracture due to nonaccidental trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Oron; Mansour, Karim; Fischer, Jason W J

    2012-02-01

    A 3-month-old infant girl was transferred to our emergency department (ED) with a subtrochanteric femoral neck fracture due to nonaccidental trauma. She received multiple doses of parenteral analgesics both before arrival and in our ED. We performed an ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block using 2.0 mL of 0.25% bupivicaine (approximately 1.25 mg/kg) before placing the patient in a Pavlik harness. Successful pain control was achieved within 15 minutes of the procedure allowing pain-free manipulation of the affected extremity. The patient required only a single dose of parenteral narcotics during the ensuing 18 hours. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block used in the ED for pain control in a pediatric patient.

  12. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  13. Imaging evaluation of vocal cord paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos; Magalhaes, Fabiana Pizanni; Dadalto, Gabriela Bijos; Moura, Marina Vimieiro Timponi de [Axial Centro de Imagem, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: marcelomgarcia@superig.com.br, e-mail: ce@axialmg.com.br

    2009-09-15

    Vocal cord paralysis is a common cause of hoarseness. It may be secondary to many types of lesions along the cranial nerve X pathway and its branches, particularly the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Despite the idiopathic nature of a great number of cases, imaging methods play a very significant role in the investigation of etiologic factors, such as thyroid and esophagus neoplasias with secondary invasion of the laryngeal recurrent nerves. Other conditions such as aortic and right subclavian artery aneurysms also may be found. The knowledge of local anatomy and related diseases is of great importance for the radiologist, so that he can tailor the examination properly to allow an appropriate diagnosis and therapy planning. Additionally, considering that up to 35% of patients with vocal cord paralysis are asymptomatic, the recognition of radiological findings indicative of this condition is essential for the radiologist who must warn the referring physician on the imaging findings. In the present study, the authors review the anatomy and main diseases related to vocal cord paralysis, demonstrating them through typical cases evaluated by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, besides describing radiological findings of laryngeal abnormalities indicative of this condition. (author)

  14. Clinical and experimental study on facial paralysis in temporal bone fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the main prognostic factors and significanceof facial nerve decompression for facial paralysis in temporal bone fracture.Methods: The main relative prognostic factors of 64 patients with facial paralysis were analyzed. An experimental model of facial paralysis was made. The expansion rates of facial nerve in the facial canal opening group and the facial canal non-opening group were measured and observed under electron microscope.Results: The main factors affecting the prognosis were facial nerve decompression and selection of surgery time. The expansion rate of facial nerve in the facial canal opening group was significantly higher than that of the facial canal non-opening group (t=7.53, P<0.01). The injury degree of the nerve fiber in the facial canal non-opening group was severe.Conclusions: Early facial nerve decompression is beneficial to restoration of the facial nerve function.

  15. Localization Examination of the Vagus Nerve in Determining the Cause of the Unilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis%迷走神经损伤定位检查有助于单侧声带麻痹的病因诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李进让; 赵丹珩

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨迷走神经损伤定位检查用于单侧声带麻痹病因诊断中的价值。方法对1例半年未能明确病因的单侧声带麻痹患者的诊疗过程进行回顾分析。结果本例因声音嘶哑半年就诊,在当地多家医院行相关医技检查均诊断为左侧特发性声带麻痹,予相应治疗症状无改善,来我院拟行声带自体脂肪注射术闭合声门。入我院后经追问病史、仔细查体及电子喉镜下吞咽功能检查发现左侧梨状窝有食物残留,考虑迷走神经节以上部位病变所致声带麻痹,经颅底增强MRI检查诊断为颈静脉孔区良性肿瘤。由于病变部位特殊,患者拒绝手术遂行伽马刀治疗,随访1年,肿瘤无变化。结论对于单侧声带麻痹患者切勿轻易诊断为单纯声带麻痹。电子喉镜下吞咽功能检查有助于确定迷走神经损伤部位,根据损伤部位有的放矢地进行检查,对单侧声带麻痹的病因诊断有临床指导价值。%Objective To evaluate the value of localization examination of the vagus nerve in determining the cause of the unilateral vocal cord paralysis. Methods The diagnostic process of a patient with unknown cause of unilateral vocal cord paralysis was retrospectively reviewed. Results The patient presented to our center for hoarseness for half a year. Idiopathic left side vocal cord paralysis was diagnosed because no positive findings were detected in many hospitals. After corresponding treatment, the vocal cord paralysis had no sign of recovery, and then the patient came to our hospital for improving his voice by autologous fat injection into the vocal fold. After medical history collection and careful physical examinations, the patient underwent electronic fibrolaryngoscope swallow study and the result showed residual food in the left pyriform sinus. Those find-ings suggested that damaged level of the vagus nerve was above the ganglion of the vagus nerve. Contrast enhanced

  16. Surgical Treatment of Facial Paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Ritvik P.

    2009-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis is one of the most complex areas of reconstructive surgery. Given the wide variety of functional and cosmetic deficits in the facial paralysis patient, the reconstructive surgeon requires a thorough understanding of the surgical techniques available to treat this condition. This review article will focus on surgical management of facial paralysis and the treatment options available for acute facial paralysis (2 yr). For acute facial paralysis, the main surgi...

  17. Bell's palsy before Bell : Evert Jan Thomassen a Thuessink and idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Graaf, R. C.; IJpma, F. F. A.; Nicolai, J-P A.; Werker, P. M. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the eponym for idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. It is named after Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), who, in the first half of the nineteenth century, discovered the function of the facial nerve and attracted the attention of the medical world to facial paralysis. Our knowledge of

  18. Bell's palsy before Bell : Evert Jan Thomassen a Thuessink and idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Graaf, R. C.; IJpma, F. F. A.; Nicolai, J-P A.; Werker, P. M. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the eponym for idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. It is named after Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), who, in the first half of the nineteenth century, discovered the function of the facial nerve and attracted the attention of the medical world to facial paralysis. Our knowledge of

  19. Bupivacaine Injection for Management of Lagophthalmos Due to Long-Standing Idiopathic Facial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shadravan, Mahla; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of bupivacaine injection into the orbicularis oculi muscle to treat lagophthalmos in patients with long-standing Bell palsy. In this prospective interventional case series, bupivacaine, 5 ml of a 0.750% solution, was injected into the preseptal and pretarsal area of the orbicularis oculi in each of 10 patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy. The measures of vertical eyelid apertures during open and closed eyes were made before the procedure and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. A total of 10 eyes including 2 men and 8 women with an average age of 43 years (26-64 years) were studied. The mean amount of lagophthalmos before injection and after 6 months of follow up were 3.9 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively (p = 0.01)). The mean amount of corneal exposure before injection and after 6 months of follow up was 1.05 mm and 0.25 mm, respectively (p lagophthalmos and epiphora.

  20. Bilateral abducens nerve and right facial nerve palsy occuring after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ismail Boyraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the nervus abducens, the 6th cranial nerve tend to be rare, usually occur suddenly following head injuries. A 43-year-old male patient presented with a history of fall from a height due to an occupational accident on the date of 11.01.2014. Cranial tomography demonstrated bilateral epidural hematoma. The epidural hematoma was drained during the operation. After the surgery, eye examination showed no vision loss, except limited bilateral lateral gaze. When the patient was unable to walk due to diplopia, he was advised to close one eye. On the right side, there were findings suggesting central facial paralysis. There may be multiple cranial nerve damage following head injury. Therefore, all cranial nerves should be thoroughly examined. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(2.000: 110-113

  1. [Objective assessment of facial paralysis using infrared thermography and formal concept analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu-Long; Hong, Wen-Xue; Liu, Jie-Min

    2014-04-01

    This paper presented a novel approach to objective assessment of facial nerve paralysis based on infrared thermography and formal concept analysis. Sixty five patients with facial nerve paralysis on one side were included in the study. The facial temperature distribution images of these 65 patients were captured by infrared thermography every five days during one-month period. First, the facial thermal images were pre-processed to identify six potential regions of bilateral symmetry by using image segmentation techniques. Then, the temperature differences on the left and right sides of the facial regions were extracted and analyzed. Finally, the authors explored the relationships between the statistical averages of those temperature differences and the House-Brackmann score for objective assessment degree of nerve damage in a facial nerve paralysis by using formal concept analysis. The results showed that the facial temperature distribution of patients with facial nerve paralysis exhibited a contralateral asymmetry, and the bilateral temperature differences of the facial regions were greater than 0.2 degrees C, whereas in normal healthy individuals these temperature differences were less than 0.2 degrees C. Spearman correlation coefficient between the bilateral temperature differences of the facial regions and the degree of facial nerve damage was an average of 0.508, which was statistically significant (p facial regions was greater than 0.2 degrees C, and all were less than 0.5 degrees C, facial nerve paralysis could be determined as for the mild to moderate; if one of the temperature differences of bilateral symmetry was greater than 0.5 degrees C, facial nerve paralysis could be determined as for serious. In conclusion, this paper presents an automated technique for the computerized analysis of thermal images to objectively assess facial nerve related thermal dysfunction by using formal concept analysis theory, which may benefit the clinical diagnosis and

  2. [Optimization of acupuncture treatment programs for facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, He-Ping; Lin, Tian-dong; Cai, Min; Huang, Xian-xun; Wang, Bang-bo; Gao, Wei-keng

    2010-02-01

    To optimize the acupuncture treatment programs for facial paralysis. Sixty-three patients of facial paralysis were randomly divided and treated according to the table of L9 (3)4 in orthogonal test. They were treated with different combined programs of 4 factors and 3 levels, including factor A (acupuncture op portunity), B (acupoints prescription), C (quantity of stimulus) and D (time of electroacupuncture). The change of facial nerve function score was observed to choose the best acupuncture treatment program for facial paralysis from factor A (acupuncture opportunity), B (acupoints prescription), C (quantity of stimulus), D (time of electroacupuncture) and their 3 levels in each factor. B (acupoints prescription) and D (time of electroacupuncture) were significant factors (P facial paralysis.

  3. Percutaneous nerve stimulation in chronic neuropathic pain patients due to spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsky, David Jos; Ettema, Frank Willem Leo; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of percutaneous (electrical) nerve stimulation (P(E)NS) in SCI patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In 18 weeks, 12 P(E)NS treatments were scheduled. Assessment with questionnaires was performed at baseline (T0), after 8 weeks (T8), 18 weeks (T18), and 12 weeks post-treatment (T30). From 26 screened patients, 17 were included. In total, 91.2% questionnaires were returned, 2 patients dropped out, and 4.2% of the patients reported minor side effects. Pain scores on the week pain diary measured with the numerical rating scale improved significantly at T8, from 6.5 at baseline to 5.4, and were still significantly improved at T18. Pain reduction of ≥ 30% directly after a session was reported in 64.6% sessions. In total, 6 patients experienced reduction in size of the pain areas at T18 and T30, with a mean reduction of 45.8% at T18 and 45.3% at T30. P(E)NS is feasible as an intervention in SCI patients and might have a positive effect on pain reduction in a part of this patient group. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell′s phenomenon, superior oblique (SO overaction, and lateral rectus (LR contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%, trauma (20%, inflammation (13%, aneurysm (7%, and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles.

  5. Vocal Cord Paralysis and its Etiologies: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Seyed Toutounchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vocal cord paralysis is a common symptom of numerous diseases and it may be due to neurogenic or mechanical fixation of the cords. Paralysis of the vocal cords is just a symptom of underlying disease in some cases; so, clinical diagnosis of the underlying cause leading to paralysis of the vocal cords is important. This study evaluates the causes of vocal cord paralysis.Methods: In a prospective study, 45 patients with paralyzed vocal cord diagnosis were examined by tests such as examination of the pharynx, larynx, esophagus, thyroid, cervical, lung, and mediastinum, brain and heart by diagnostic imaging to investigate the cause vocal cord paralysis. The study was ended by diagnosing the reason of vocal cord paralysis at each stage of the examination and the clinical studies.Results: The mean duration of symptoms was 18.95±6.50 months. The reason for referral was phonation changes (97.8% and aspiration (37.8% in the subjects. There was bilateral paralysis in 6.82%, left paralysis in 56.82% and right in 63.36% of subjects. The type of vocal cord placement was midline in 52.8%, paramedian in 44.4% and lateral in 2.8% of the subjects. The causes of vocal cords paralysis were idiopathic paralysis (31.11%, tumors (31.11%, surgery (28.89%, trauma, brain problems, systemic disease and other causes (2.2%.Conclusion: An integrated diagnostic and treatment program is necessary for patients with vocal cord paralysis. Possibility of malignancy should be excluded before marking idiopathic reason to vocal cord paralysis.

  6. [Peripheral paralysis of facial nerve in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steczkowska-Klucznik, Małgorzata; Kaciński, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral facial paresis is one of the most common diagnosed neuropathies in adults and also in children. Many factors can trigger facial paresis and most frequent are infectious, carcinoma and demyelinisation diseases. Very important and interesting problem is an idiopathic facial paresis (Bell's palsy). Actually the main target of scientific research is to assess the etiology (infectious, genetic, immunologic) and to find the most appropriate treatment.

  7. Bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis after kidney surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozzo, S; Carratù, P; Damiani, M F; Falcone, V A; Palumbo, A; Dragonieri, S; Resta, O

    2012-06-01

    A 57-year-old woman underwent an enucleoresection of her right kidney angiomyolipoma. Two weeks later she was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea at rest with orthopnea. The chest x-ray showed the elevation of both hemidiaphragms and the measurement of the sniff transdiaphragmatic pressure confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. A diaphragm paralysis can be ascribed to several causes, i.e. trauma, compressive events, inflammations, neuropathies, or it can be idiopathic. In this case, it was very likely that the patient suffered from post-surgery neuralgic amyotrophy. To our knowledge, there are only a few reported cases of neuralgic amyotrophy, also known as Parsonage-Turner Syndrome, which affects only the phrenic nerve as a consequence of a surgery in an anatomically distant site.

  8. Operative Management of Sciatic Nerve Palsy due to Impingement on the Metal Cage after Total Hip Revision: Case Report

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    Alessandro Bistolfi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a sciatic nerve palsy developed after a right total hip revision with a Burch-Schneider metal cage. A sciatalgic nerve pain appeared after surgery, while the palsy developed in about fifteen days. An electromyography showed the delay of the nerve impulse gluteal level. During the surgical exploration of the hip, a compression of the nerve on the metal cage was observed. The nerve was isolated, released from the fibrotic tissue and from the impingement, and was protected with a muscular flap. The recover from the pain was immediate, while the palsy recovered one month later.

  9. Clinical and Aetiological Spectrum of Hypokalemic Flaccid Paralysis in Western Odisha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Biranchi Narayan; Lenka, Sujit Kumar; Acharya, Manoranjan; Majhi, Chakradhar; Oram, Gouri; Tudu, Khetra Mohan

    2016-05-01

    To study the clinical profile of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis (HKFP) and to evaluate its causes. Fifty cases of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis (HKFP) admitted between November 2012 to October 2014 were taken up in the study. Serum potassium level Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) were diagnosed if there was spot/24 hour urine potassium excretion paralysis or cranial nerve palsy. Twenty-one cases (42%) have very low potassium hypokalemic paralysis (HHP) was found. Only 9 (18%) cases are hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP). HKFP is a hetergenous group of disease of which a significant number of patients had thyroid disorders mostly in the form of thyrotoxicosis followed by renal tubular dysfunctions like dRTA and GS; non-renal and prior renal loss of potassium like diarrhea, excessive sweating and vomiting respectively. Early recognition and prompt management of these conditions will give gratifying result and prevent further attacks in some cases.

  10. Acute Flaccid paralysis in adults: Our experience

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    Rupesh Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP is a complex clinical syndrome with a broad array of potential etiologies that vary with age. We present our experience of acute onset lower motor neuron paralysis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and thirty-three consecutive adult patients presenting with weakness of duration less than four weeks over 12 months period were enrolled. Detailed history, clinical examination, and relevant investigations according to a pre-defined diagnostic algorithm were carried out. The patients were followed through their hospital stay till discharge or death. Results: The mean age was 33.27 (range 13-89 years with male preponderance (67.7%. The most common etiology was neuroparalytic snake envenomation (51.9%, followed by Guillain Barre syndrome (33.1%, constituting 85% of all patients. Hypokalemic paralysis (7.5% and acute intermittent porphyria (4.5% were the other important conditions. We did not encounter any case of acute polio mylitis in adults. In-hospital mortality due to respiratory paralysis was 9%. Conclusion: Neuroparalytic snakebite and Guillain Barre syndrome were the most common causes of acute flaccid paralysis in adults in our study.

  11. Hypokalemic paralysis in a professional bodybuilder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Florian B; Domanovits, Hans; Laggner, Anton N

    2012-09-01

    Severe hypokalemia is a potentially life-threatening disorder and is associated with variable degrees of skeletal muscle weakness, even to the point of paralysis. On rare occasions, diaphragmatic paralysis from hypokalemia can lead to respiratory arrest. There may also be decreased motility of smooth muscle, manifesting with ileus or urinary retention. Rarely, severe hypokalemia may result in rhabdomyolysis. Other manifestations of severe hypokalemia include alteration of cardiac tissue excitability and conduction. Hypokalemia can produce electrocardiographic changes such as U waves, T-wave flattening, and arrhythmias, especially if the patient is taking digoxin. Common causes of hypokalemia include extrarenal potassium losses (vomiting and diarrhea) and renal potassium losses (eg, hyperaldosteronism, renal tubular acidosis, severe hyperglycemia, potassium-depleting diuretics) as well as hypokalemia due to potassium shifts (eg, insulin administration, catecholamine excess, familial periodic hypokalemic paralysis, thyrotoxic hypokalemic paralysis). Although the extent of diuretic misuse in professional bodybuilding is unknown, it may be regarded as substantial. Hence, diuretics must always be considered as a cause of hypokalemic paralysis in bodybuilders.

  12. Hypokalemic paralysis in a young obese female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Chang, Chin-Chun; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2012-08-16

    Profound hypokalemia with paralysis usually poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report on a 28-y-old obese Chinese female presenting with sudden onset of flaccid quadriparesis upon awaking in the morning. There is no family history of hyperthyroidism. She experienced body weight loss of 7 kg in 2 months. The most conspicuous blood biochemistry is marked hypokalemia (1.8 mmol/l) and hypophosphatemia (0.5 mmol/l) associated with low urine K(+) and phosphate excretion. Surreptitious laxatives and/or diuretics abuse-related hypokalemic paralysis were tentatively made. However, her relatively normal blood acid-base status and the absence of low urine Na(+) and/or Cl(-) excretion made these diagnoses unlikely. Furthermore, she developed rebound hyperkalemia (5.7 mmol/l) after only 80 mmol K(+) supplementation. Thyroid function test confirmed hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease. Control of the hyperthyroidism completely abolished her periodic paralysis. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) should be kept in mind as a cause of paralysis in female, even with obesity, despite its predominance in adult males. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis

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    Ferreiro, J.E.; Arguelles, D.J.; Rams, H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A case of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is reported in a Hispanic man with an unusual recurrence six weeks after radioactive iodine treatment. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis has now been well characterized in the literature: it occurs primarily in Orientals with an overwhelming male preponderance and a higher association of specific HLA antigens. Clinical manifestations include onset after high carbohydrate ingestion or heavy exertion, with progressive symmetric weakness leading to flaccid paralysis of the extremities and other muscle groups, lasting several hours. If hypokalemia is present, potassium administration may help abort the attack. Although propranolol can be efficacious in preventing further episodes, the only definitive treatment is establishing a euthyroid state. The pathophysiology is still controversial, but reflects altered potassium and calcium dynamics as well as certain morphologic characteristics within the muscle unit itself.

  14. Sudden flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, Mohammad; Peshin, Rohit; Ellis, Oliver; Grover, Karan

    2015-01-07

    Periodic thyrotoxic paralysis is a genetic condition, rare in the West and in Caucasians. Thyrotoxicosis, especially in western hospitals, is an easily overlooked cause of sudden-onset paralysis. We present a case of a 40-year-old man who awoke one morning unable to stand. He had bilateral lower limb flaccid weakness of 0/5 with reduced reflexes and equivocal plantars; upper limbs were 3/5 with reduced tone and reflexes. ECG sinus rhythm was at a rate of 88/min. PR interval was decreased and QT interval increased. Bloods showed potassium of 1.8 mEq/L (normal range 3.5-5), free T4 of 29.2 pmol/L (normal range 6.5-17) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of paralysis. He was discharged on carbimazole and propanolol, and follow-up was arranged in the endocrinology clinic.

  15. Normokalemic periodic paralysis revisited: does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnery, Patrick F; Walls, Timothy J; Hanna, Michael G; Bates, David; Fawcett, Peter R W

    2002-08-01

    Normokalemic periodic paralysis (normoKPP) is well established in the literature, but there are doubts as to whether it exists as a discrete entity. Retrospective clinical and molecular analysis has confirmed suspicions that most normoKPP families actually have a variant of hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP) due to a mutation of the muscle-specific sodium channel gene (SCN4A). However, the original normoKPP family described by Poskanzer and Kerr (Poskanzer DC, Kerr DNS. A third type of periodic paralysis, with normokalemia and favourable response to sodium chloride. Am J Med 1961;31:328-342) has remained unchallenged. We identified the Met1592Val mutation of SCN4A in an affected descendent of this original normoKPP family. This is the final piece in the puzzle: normoKPP is actually a variant of hyperKPP and is not a distinct disorder.

  16. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neki, N S

    2016-01-01

    Hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare life threatening complication of hyperthyroidism commonly occurring in young Asian males but sporadically found in other races. It is characterised by hypokalemia and acute onset paraparesis with prevalence of one in one hundred thousand (1 in 100000). The symptoms resolve promptly with potassium supplementation. Nonselective beta blockers like propranol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. We report a case of 22 year old male presenting with hyperthyroid periodic paralysis (HPP) having very low serum potassium level.

  17. Sleep Paralysis and Hallucinosis

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    Gregory Stores

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep paralysis is one of the many conditions of which visual hallucinations can be a part but has received relatively little attention. It can be associated with other dramatic symptoms of a psychotic nature likely to cause diagnostic uncertainty. Methods and results: These points are illustrated by the case of a young man with a severe bipolar affective disorder who independently developed terrifying visual, auditory and somatic hallucinatory episodes at sleep onset, associated with a sense of evil influence and presence. The episodes were not obviously related to his psychiatric disorder. Past diagnoses included nightmares and night terrors. Review provided no convincing evidence of various other sleep disorders nor physical conditions in which hallucinatory experiences can occur. A diagnosis of predormital isolated sleep paralysis was made and appropriate treatment recommended. Conclusions: Sleep paralysis, common in the general population, can be associated with dramatic auxiliary symptoms suggestive of a psychotic state. Less common forms are either part of the narcolepsy syndrome or (rarely they are familial in type. Interestingly, sleep paralysis (especially breathing difficulty features prominently in the folklore of various countries.

  18. The Price of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thweatt, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    There are situations in which people feel that it is perfectly acceptable to take no action at all, given a certain set of circumstances. Not only is this a generally unacceptable approach to problem solving, but this type of paralysis can have far reaching and unintended consequences. Since childhood, one has at times held out hope that if he/she…

  19. [Recurrence paralysis: computed tomographic analysis of intrathoracic findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, S; Knopp, M V; Kauczor, H U; Zuna, I; Trost, U; Haberkorn, U; van Kaick, G

    1992-09-01

    The long and singular course of the inferior (recurrent) laryngeal nerve makes it very vulnerable to infiltration by tumors of various locations. In particular, mediastinal and pulmonary lesions must be considered in the case of left vocal chord palsy. Recurrent nerve paralysis caused by a tumor indicates advanced disease. We retrospectively reviewed the computed tomography (CT) findings in 29 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma or mediastinal tumors and recurrent nerve paralysis with respect to the site, size and extent of the tumor and the lymph node status. The review revealed a marked predominance of left upper lobe tumors with extensive lymph node metastases to the anterior mediastinum and the aortopulmonary window. The extent of mediastinal involvement exceeded the average involvement in a control group of 30 randomly selected patients with bronchogenic carcinoma at the time of presentation. In all patients CT demonstrated tumor tissue which could have caused the paralysis at one or more sites along the anatomical course of the recurrent nerve. In most cases the tumor was located at the aortic arch. The left paratracheal region, right paratracheal region and right pulmonary apex were affected in one case each. We conclude that in patients with cancer, CT is a suitable method for localizing a recurrent nerve lesion.

  20. Paralisia facial bilateral Bilateral facial paralysis: a case report

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    J. Fortes-Rego

    1976-03-01

    Full Text Available É apresentado um caso de diplegia facial surgida após meningite meningocócica e infecção por herpes simples. Depois de discutir as diversas condições que o fenômeno pode apresentar-se, o autor inclina-se por uma etiologia herpética.A case of bilateral facial paralysis following meningococcal meningitis and herpes simplex infection is reported. The author discusses the differential diagnosis of bilateral facial nerve paralysis which includes several diseases and syndromes and concludes by herpetic aetiology.

  1. 面瘫动物模型的研究现状%Research status of animal model of acute peripheral facial paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昕蓉; 张勤修

    2012-01-01

    Acute peripheral facial paralysis is a disease with acute palsy flaccid of mimic muscles due to the damages to facial nerve either at facial nerve nucleus or beyond it. Because facial nerve is the longest cranial nerve which traverses in the bony fallopian canal, any lesion of the facial nerve could cause paralysis of the ipsilateral face. Acute peripheral dysfunction of the facial nerve becomes one of the most common otology diseases. It is hard to locate the lesion of facial nerve and to choose proper therapeutic regiment as soon as possible because of the complexity of the anatomy of facial nerve. So it is necessary to establish acute facial paralysis animal model to prompt further study of this disease. This article approached the methods to found acute facial paralysis animal models, analyzed the deficiencies existing in the models and suggested the new thread of this research.%急性周围性面瘫是面神经核及其以下面神经损伤导致的急性面部表情肌的迟缓性麻痹.因面神经是在骨管内行程最长的颅神经,易受外界因素影响、侵犯,所以急性周围性面瘫是耳科疾病中的常见病.且因面神经行程复杂,增大了面瘫定位和选择治疗方案的难度.急性周围性面瘫动物模型的建立为深入研究面瘫提供了一个手段.本文从面瘫动物造模机制、特点、适用范围及效度、目前存在的问题等方面对现常用的面瘫动物模型的研究现状进行综述.

  2. Left Phrenic Nerve Stimulation Due to Breakage of the Endocardial Right Ventricular Lead at the Costoclavicular Ligament

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    Mariko Fujimori, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 78-year-old man with a permanent pacemaker (PM implanted in his left prepectoral area reported twitches in his left lateral abdominal region. Chest X-rays revealed a broken right atrial (RA lead and a fracture of the right ventricular (RV lead at the left costoclavicular ligament. The electrocardiogram (ECG and the Holler ECG revealed atrial fibrillation (AF and an improperly functioning PM. We observed that the twitching seemed to correspond with each pacing beat and that it did not appear with his own beat. We suspected that the twitching was due to electric current leakage from the broken RV lead. We performed a PM re-implantation with a screw-in RV lead using the extrathoracic approach. After re-implantation the twitching disappeared. Costoclavicular ligament related electrode lead fractures are not uncommon and electric current leaks can be a source of problems in cardiac pacing. In this case, the electric current leak from the broken RV lead at the costoclavicular ligament stimulated the left phrenic nerve.

  3. Time Selection of Acupuncture Treatment for Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Li-xia; SHAO Ming-hai

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the optimal time for treating facial paralysis with acupuncture therapy. Methods: Eighty-six patients with facial paralysis in different disease durations were treated with same needling technique. Patients of the treatment group at the developing stage were dealt with moderate stimulation, and at the stationary stage and the recovery stage with strong stimulation. Patients of the control group at the developing stage were treated with drugs improving micro-circulation and nerve functions, and glucocorticoids, at the stationary stage and the recovery stage with the same methods as in the treatment group.Results: The cure rate in the treatment group and the control group were 88.1% and 68.2%respectively, and the former has shorter treatment course. Conclusion: Acupuncture therapy has better effect on facial paralysis than routine Westem medicine, and shorter treatment course.

  4. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  5. Treatment for periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, V; Meola, G; Links, T P; Panzeri, M; Rose, M R

    2008-01-23

    Primary periodic paralyses are rare inherited muscle diseases characterised by episodes of flaccid weakness affecting one or more limbs, lasting several hours to several days, caused by mutations in skeletal muscle channel genes. The objective of this review was to systematically review treatment of periodic paralyses. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (from January 1966 to July 2007), and EMBASE (from January 1980 to July 2007) and any other available international medical library sources from the University of Milan for randomised trials. We included randomised (including cross-over studies) and quasi-randomised trials in participants with primary periodic paralyses, in which any form of treatment, including physical therapy and alternative therapies, was compared to placebo or another treatment. Our primary outcome measure was the change in attack severity or frequency by eight weeks from the start of treatment. Our secondary outcome measures were: change in muscle strength and mass; change in Quality of Life, using Short Form 36 (SF36) or similar; preference of treatment strategy; adverse effects at eight weeks. Three studies met our inclusion criteria. In one study dichlorphenamide (DCP) vs placebo was tested in two groups of participants: 42 with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) and 31 with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperPP), based on clinical criteria. Thirty-four of 42 participants with hypokalemic periodic paralysis completed both treatment phases. For the 34 participants having attack rate data for both treatment phases, the mean improvement in attack rate (P = 0.02) and severity-weighted attack rate (P = 0.01) on DCP relative to placebo were statistically significant. Fifteen preferred DCP, three placebo and six their baseline medication. Twenty-four of 31 participants with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis completed both treatment phases: for the 16 participants who had attack rate data for both

  6. [Dynamic rehabilitation in facial paralysis with the surgical flap and temporalis muscle transposition without muscle lengthening: review and case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipkov, Kh; Anastasov, Iu

    2005-01-01

    There are various surgical procedures for the reanimation of patients with long-standing facial paralysis. Temporalis muscle transfer is reliable for the reanimation of long-standing facial paralysis often employed when facial nerve reinnervation. It can be used as well for the immediate treatment of complete facial paralysis (more than 1 year) because temporalis muscle transposition does not interfere with neuronal regeneration. During the last few years the techniques employing the tendon of the temporalis muscle for the rehabilitation of the oral commissure gain increasing importance. The authors analyse the different options for reanimation after facial paralysis and report on a case of facial reanimation via temporalis muscle transfer.

  7. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

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    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  8. Agreement between House-Brackmann Grading System and Facial Nerve Grading System 2.0 in Patients with Facial Nerve Paralysis%面神经分级2.0对周围性面神经麻痹的评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李阳; 冯国栋; 田旭; 薛玉斌; 赵阳; 吴海燕; 高志强

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较House-brackmann分级(HBGS)和面神经分级2.0(FNGS 2.0)对周围性面神经麻痹的评价效果。方法3名高年资医师和3名低年资医师分别使用HBGS和FNGS2.0分级方法,对50项周围性面神经麻痹患者的表情视频进行评价。对两种分级方法的重复性、一致性进行分析、比较。结果使用HBGS,低年资医生之间的评价一致性为39.5%,kappa值为0.30,高年资医生之间的评价一致性为56.5%,kappa值为0.43,两组之间具有显著性差异(p0.05);HBGS和FNGS2.0的总体相关性ICC值为0.760, SCC值为0.746,kappa值为0.42;FNGS2.0与口的相关性为71%。结论 HBGS与FNGS2.0中度相关;使用HBGS,评判者间的一致性受医生的经验水平影响很大,而使用FNGS2.0,评判者重复性和一致性较好,与评判者的经验无关,与口的运动有较强的相关性。%Objectives To analysis the correlation between House-brackmann Grading System (HBGS)and Facial Nerve Grading System2.0 (FNGS2.0) in evaluation of facial nerve paralysis. Methods Fifty video-recorded facial palsy pa-tients were graded by 3 residents and 3 experts using HBGS and FNGS2.0. Results Agreement percentage between residents for HBGS was 39.5%, and generalized kappa indicated only fair agreement(k=0.30);Agreement percentage between experts for HBGS was 56.5%, and generalized kappa indicated moderate agreement(k=0.43);The difference between the observer groups was statistically significant (P0.05);The overall intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.760,the Spearman correlation coefficient (SCC) was 0.746 and kappa coefficient was 0.42 (P<0.05);The exact agreements between regional assessment and FNGS 2.0 , were highest for the mouth (71%). Conclusions FNGS 2.0 shows moderate agreement with HBGS. For HBGS the interobserver agreement was influnced by the doctor’s experi-ence;For FNGS2.0, the intraobserver and interobserver agreement was high, with no relation

  9. Causes of Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is caused by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > Spina bifida A neural tube defect that causes incomplete closure in the spinal column. > Spinal cord injury Involves damage to the nerves within the bony protection of the spinal canal. > ...

  10. Clinical Efficacy of Electroneurography in Acute Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Hee

    2016-04-01

    The estimated incidence of acute facial paralysis is approximately 30 patients per 100000 populations annually. Facial paralysis is an extremely frightening situation and gives extreme stress to patients because obvious disfiguring face may cause significant functional, aesthetic, and psychological disturbances. For stressful patients with acute facial paralysis, it is very important for clinicians to answer the questions like whether or not their facial function will return to normal, how much of their facial function will be recovered, and how long this is going to take. It is also important for clinicians to treat the psychological aspects by adequately explaining the prognosis, in addition to providing the appropriate medical treatment. For decades, clinicians have used various electrophysiologic tests, including the nerve excitability test, the maximal stimulation test, electroneurography, and electromyography. In particular, electroneurography is the only objective measure that is useful in early stage of acute facial paralysis. In this review article, we first discuss the pathophysiology of injured peripheral nerve. And then, we describe about various electrophysiologic tests and discuss the electroneurography extensively.

  11. Clinical research on Jingjin therapy combined with nerve function reconstruction in treating spastic paralysis after cerebral infarction%经筋疗法联合神经功能重建系统治疗脑梗死后痉挛性瘫痪的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马健芸; 纪哲

    2014-01-01

    [目的]观察经筋疗法联合神经功能重建系统治疗中风后痉挛性瘫痪的疗效。[方法]将60例符合诊断及纳入标准患者按照随机数字表法随机分为对照组和观察组,每组各30例。对照组接受常规治疗,观察组在常规治疗基础上加用经筋疗法及神经功能重建系统,以 Ashworth、上肢运动功能评分(Fugl-Meyer)、巴氏指数(Barthel)以及美国国产卫生院神经功能缺损评分(NIHSS)、脑卒中患者临床神经功能缺损度评分标准(CSS)为评价指标,观察患者治疗前后肌张力、运动功能日常生活能力以及神经功能的变化。[结果]两种治疗方案均获得一定疗效,观察组疗效优于对照组(P﹤0.05或 P﹤0.01)。[结论]经筋疗法联合神经功能重建治疗系统的综合方案,治疗脑梗死后痉挛性瘫痪疗效显著,值得推广。%Objective] To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of Jingjin (musculature of meridian) therapy combined with nerve function reconstruction on limb spastic paralysis after cerebral infarction. [Methods] The 60 patients met with diagnosed and incorporated standard were randomly divided into control group and observation group according to the random number table, with 30 cases in each group. Control group accepted routine treatment; while observation group received Jinjing therapy combined nerve function reconstruction on the basis of routine therapy. Ashworth, Fugl-Meyer, Barthel, NIHSS and CSS were taken as the evaluation indexes. [Results] Two kinds of treatment plan obtained certain effect, the curative effect in observation group was better than that of control group (P﹤0.05 or P﹤0.01). [Conclusion] Comprehensive program of Jingjin therapy combined nerve function reconstruction can treat spastic paralysis after cerebral infarction. The effect is significant and it is worthy of promotion.

  12. Tuberculous Mastoiditis Presenting with Unilateral Hearing Loss,Facial Paralysis and Neck Mass

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    R. Safi-Khani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a rare cause of mastoiditis, but diagnosis is often delayed, with potentially serious results. Case: We report a case of tuberculous mastoiditis with unilateral hearing loss, facial paralysis, and cervical lymph adenopathy on presentation. Conclusion: Tuberculous mastoiditis must be considered in all cases of chronic refractory mastoiditis especially in the presence of demonstrable complications such as facial paralysis, other cranial nerve palsies, and destruction of middle ear osscicles.

  13. Delayed onset neuropathy along with recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy due to organophosphate poisoning and the role of physiotherapy rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimala Vijay Shetye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus poisoning is a major global cause of health problems and the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the developing countries. In this, the inhibition of acetyl-choline esterase and neurotoxic esterase along with nicotinic receptor involvement produces three well-identified and documented clinical phases: The initial cholinergic phase, which is a medical emergency often requiring management in an intensive care unit; the intermediate syndrome, during which prolonged ventilator care is necessary; and finally delayed neurotoxicity. Vocal cord paralysis is rare and leads to aphonia. Role of physiotherapy rehabilitation is substantial in all three stages and aims at early weaning off from mechanical ventilator until the functional independence and community integration of the patient.

  14. Comparative Study of Temporal Bone High-resolution CT and Intra-operative Findings in Patients with Traumatic Facial Nerve Paralysis%外伤性面瘫患者的颞骨高分辨率CT表现及其术中对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁辉; 金延方; 岳云龙; 李健东; 赵亮

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the value of the temporal bone high-resolution CT (HRCT) in traumatic facial paralysis. Materials and Methods HRCT with cross-sectional scanning and multi-planar reformation (MPR) was applied to 21 ears in patients with traumatic facial paralysis, and the imaging manifestations were retrospectively analyzed according to the surgical results. Results In the 21 ears, there were 15 ears with longitudinal fractures, 3 ears with transverse fractures, 3 ears with mixed type. 32 segments of facial nerve canal involvement were observed on HRCT, fracture involved in the facial nerve canal and the tympanic segment of the geniculate ganglion segment in 8 ears, only involved in the geniculate ganglion segment in 8 ears, involved in the labyrinthine segment and the geniculate ganglion segment in 2 ears, only involved in the tympanic segment in 1 ear, involved in the labyrinthine segment 1 ear, and the tympanic segment and after knee segment involvement 1 ear. 49 segments of facial nerve were involved in surgery. Compared with surgical results, HRCT had the full agreement with all segments involvement in 3 ears (3/21), 1 segment involvement in 10 ears (10/21), 2 segments involvement in 8 ears (8/21). Conclusion Temporal bone HRCT can underestimate the extent of damage, and provide important information for the clinical treatment of traumatic paralysis. However, HRCT will underestimate the damage extent of facial nerve canal compared with the surgical results, especially in post-knee segment and mastoid segment damage.%  目的探讨颞骨高分辨率CT(HRCT)在外伤性面瘫中的应用价值。资料与方法对外伤性面瘫患者的21侧耳行HRCT横断面扫描及多平面重组(MPR),对照其手术结果回顾性分析影像学表现。结果21耳中,纵行骨折15耳,横行骨折3耳,混合型3耳。HRCT共显示32段面神经管受累,其中,骨折同时累及面神经管膝状神经节段及鼓室段8耳,

  15. Low cost continuous femoral nerve block for relief of acute severe cancer related pain due to pathological fracture femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Cherian Koshy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathological fractures in cancer patient cause severe pain that is difficult to control pharmacologically. Even with good pain relief at rest, breakthrough and incident pain can be unmanageable. Continuous regional nerve blocks have a definite role in controlling such intractable pain. We describe two such cases where severe pain was adequately relieved in the acute phase. Continuous femoral nerve block was used as an efficient, cheap and safe method of pain relief for two of our patients with pathological fracture femur. This method was proved to be quite efficient in decreasing the fracture-related pain and improving the level of well being.

  16. [Rehabilitation of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, F

    2015-10-01

    Rehabilitation takes an important part in the treatment of facial paralysis, especially when these are severe. It aims to lead the recovery of motor activity and prevent or reduce sequelae like synkinesis or spasms. It is preferable that it be proposed early in order to set up a treatment plan based on the results of the assessment, sometimes coupled with an electromyography. In case of surgery, preoperative work is recommended, especially in case of hypoglossofacial anastomosis or lengthening temporalis myoplasty (LTM). Our proposal is to present an original technique to enhance the sensorimotor loop and the cortical control of movement, especially when using botulinum toxin and after surgery.

  17. A Paralysis of Social Policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Joel

    1992-01-01

    Reviews paralysis of U.S. social policy. Notes that, although federal government has implemented new social programs, programs either are provided on condition of willingness to work or are modest in scope. Linking paralysis with literature on government ineffectuality, traces origins of ineffectuality of political/economic policies of past 20…

  18. Clinical study of magnetic suction needle combined with chiropractic manipulative therapy in the treatment of cervicogenic facial nerve paralysis%磁吸针配合整脊手法治疗颈源性面神经麻痹的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟建兵; 邓龙刚; 魏运芳; 宋宗仁; 田野

    2012-01-01

    目的 通过磁吸针配合整脊手法治疗颈源性面神经麻痹达到标本兼治的目的,找到一种治疗颈源性面神经麻痹安全、有效的新方法.方法 将我院91例颈源性面神经麻痹患者随机分成两组,治疗组48例采用磁吸针配合整脊手法治疗,对照组43例采用磁吸针治疗,20次为1个疗程,疗程间休息3~5 d;1个疗程后对照组未愈患者转入治疗组治疗;参照Bell面瘫疗效标准,观察患者临床疗效.结果 第1个疗程治疗组治愈率(89.6%)、总有效率(100.0%)明显高于对照组(69.8%、86.0%),两组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);第1个疗程后治疗组总治愈率为100.0%.结论 磁吸针配合整脊手法治疗颈源性面神经麻痹效果显著.%Objective To find a safe and effective new method to treat cervicogenic facial nerve paralysis through magnetic suction needle combined with chiropractic manipulative therapy, in order to get goal treating both principal and secondary aspect of disease. Methods 91 patients with cervicogenic facial paralysis in our hospital were randomly divided into two groups, 48 cases in the treatment group were given magnetic suction needle combined with chiropractic manipulative therapy, and 43 cases in the control group were given magnetic suction needle treatment. Both groups took 20 times as a course of treatment, each course rested 3-5 days; After one course of treatment, the unhealed patients from the control group was transferred to the treatment group. Clinical efficacy was observed referenced with Bell facial paralysis curative effect standard from Shenzhen City Disease Clinic Guide. Results After the first course of treatment, the cure rate (89.6%) and the total efficiency rate (100.0%) of the treatment group were significantly higher than those of the control group (69.8%, 86.0%), there were significant differences between two groups (P < 0.05). After the first course of treatment, the total cure rate of treatment group was 100

  19. Isolated velopalatine paralysis associated with parvovirus B19 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares-Fernandes João P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of isolated velopalatine paralysis in an 8-year-old boy is presented. The symptoms were sudden-onset of nasal speech, regurgitation of liquids into the nose and dysphagia. Brain MRI and cerebrospinal fluid examination were normal. Infectious serologies disclosed an antibody arrangement towards parvovirus B19 that was typical of recent infection. In the absence of other positive data, the possibility of a correlation between the tenth nerve palsy and parvovirus infection is discussed.

  20. Posttraumatic Cholesteatoma Complicated by a Facial Paralysis: A Case Report

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    M. Chihani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The posttraumatic cholesteatoma is a rare complication of different types of the temporal bone damage. Its diagnosis is often done after several years of evolution, sometimes even at the stage of complications. A case of posttraumatic cholesteatoma is presented that was revealed by a facial nerve paralysis 23 years after a crash of the external auditory canal underlining the importance of the otoscopic and radiological regular monitoring of the patients with a traumatism of the temporal bone.

  1. Low-reactive-level laser treatment in facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Bologna, Elisangela; Castanho Garrini, Ana E.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Campos, Roberto A. d. C.

    2000-03-01

    This study was carried out with a 41-year-old female patient with facial paralysis as a consequence of facial nerve injury during neurosurgery. Low-reactive level laser treatment (LLLT) with a diode laser of 830 nm, 40 mw, continuous wave, spot area 3 mm2, was applied twice a week for 2 weeks, then 1 weekly session following up to 30 sessions, resulting in about 80% improvement of the motor activity.

  2. Congenital muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, and peripheral neuropathy due to merosin deficiency: Peripheral nerve histology of cauda equina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Hissong, M.D.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy, white matter abnormalities, and cardiomyopathy are associated findings with merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy. Although characterization of the neuropathy with nerve conduction studies has been well documented, limited research has been able to correlate histopathology with nerve biopsy in humans. Our understanding of the mechanism, described as a demyelinating neuropathy, is mainly derived from mouse model studies. We report a 23-year-old male who succumbed to respiratory failure and ultimately cardiac arrhythmia in the setting of an uncharacterized end stage progressive muscular disease complicated by cardiomyopathy and severe scoliosis. Autopsy revealed extensive muscular atrophy and replacement by fibroadipose tissue throughout the skeletal muscle and myocardium. Immunohistochemical analysis of the muscle biopsy showed a complete loss of merosin. Thus, the cause for both his muscular disease and demyelinating neuropathy was established with the diagnosis of merosin-deficient muscular dystrophy. Nerve biopsy obtained from the cauda equina showed clear evidence of segmental demyelination and remyelination, providing a better understanding of the proximal peripheral nerve histopathological changes in this disease entity.

  3. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  4. Rhabdomyolysis following severe hypokalemia caused by familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Lee; Kang, Jae-Young

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis continues to appear with increasing frequency and represents a medical emergency requiring rapid appropriate treatment. One of the unusual causes of nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis is hypokalemic periodic paralysis without secondary causes. Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic attacks of muscle weakness due to decreases in serum potassium. A 30-year-old woman who had 3 episodic attacks of hypokalemic periodic paralysis was admitted in emergency room with sudden onset symmetrical muscle weakness. After several hours, she started to complain myalgia and severe ache in both calves without any changes. Laboratory test showed markedly elevated creatine phosphokinase, lactic dehydrogenase levels with hypokalemia, rhabdomyolysis resulting from hypokalemia was diagnosed. Here, we report an unusual case of rhabdomyolysis caused by severe hypokalemia, which was suggested a result of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis. PMID:28255549

  5. Rhabdomyolysis following severe hypokalemia caused by familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Lee; Kang, Jae-Young

    2017-02-16

    Rhabdomyolysis continues to appear with increasing frequency and represents a medical emergency requiring rapid appropriate treatment. One of the unusual causes of nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis is hypokalemic periodic paralysis without secondary causes. Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic attacks of muscle weakness due to decreases in serum potassium. A 30-year-old woman who had 3 episodic attacks of hypokalemic periodic paralysis was admitted in emergency room with sudden onset symmetrical muscle weakness. After several hours, she started to complain myalgia and severe ache in both calves without any changes. Laboratory test showed markedly elevated creatine phosphokinase, lactic dehydrogenase levels with hypokalemia, rhabdomyolysis resulting from hypokalemia was diagnosed. Here, we report an unusual case of rhabdomyolysis caused by severe hypokalemia, which was suggested a result of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

  6. Diaphragm muscle fiber function and structure in humans with hemidiaphragm paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welvaart, W N; Paul, M A; van Hees, H W H; Stienen, G J M; Niessen, J W M; de Man, F S; Sieck, G C; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A; Ottenheijm, C A C

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies proposed that mechanical inactivity of the human diaphragm during mechanical ventilation rapidly causes diaphragm atrophy and weakness. However, conclusive evidence for the notion that diaphragm weakness is a direct consequence of mechanical inactivity is lacking. To study the effect of hemidiaphragm paralysis on diaphragm muscle fiber function and structure in humans, biopsies were obtained from the paralyzed hemidiaphragm in eight patients with hemidiaphragm paralysis. All patients had unilateral paralysis of known duration, caused by en bloc resection of the phrenic nerve with a tumor. Furthermore, diaphragm biopsies were obtained from three control subjects. The contractile performance of demembranated muscle fibers was determined, as well as fiber ultrastructure and morphology. Finally, expression of E3 ligases and proteasome activity was determined to evaluate activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The force-generating capacity, as well as myofibrillar ultrastructure, of diaphragm muscle fibers was preserved up to 8 wk of paralysis. The cross-sectional area of slow fibers was reduced after 2 wk of paralysis; that of fast fibers was preserved up to 8 wk. The expression of the E3 ligases MAFbx and MuRF-1 and proteasome activity was not significantly upregulated in diaphragm fibers following paralysis, not even after 72 and 88 wk of paralysis, at which time marked atrophy of slow and fast diaphragm fibers had occurred. Diaphragm muscle fiber atrophy and weakness following hemidiaphragm paralysis develops slowly and takes months to occur.

  7. [Influence of steroid therapy local injection of steroidal in the region of the stylomastoid foramen and physiotherapy on the recovery of stapedial reflex in patients with facial nerve paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowska, Jolanta; Czernicki, Jan; Zalewski, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    There are much more publications which informates about positive effects of advisability propose steroid's cure in patients with facial nerve palsy. The aim of the studies was to evaluate the influence of steroidal and physical treatment on the recovery of stapedial reflex and of functions of the damaged nerve. The studies were performed on 37 patients with palsy of facial nerve. Taking into account the stapedial reflex (before the beginning of the treatment) and local injection of steroidal in the region of the stylomastoid foramen, the patients were divided into two groups: I group--21 persons with lacking stapedial reflex, who were not given steroid, II group--16 persons with lacking stapedial reflex who received steroid. Evaluation of results of treatment was performed by means of the Pietruski, House and Brackmann scales, registration of stapedial reflex and accommodation coefficient. The results indicate that local steroid in palsy facial nerve is the treatment of choice in cases of intratemporal branches injury (lack of stapedial reflex) and shortens of duration of stapedial reflex and the nerve function recovery.

  8. Visual experiences during paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Whitham

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available RationaleParalysed human volunteers (n=6 participated in an electroencephalographic study after which they undertook studies of attempted eye movement. The interventions tested a central, intentional component to one’s internal visual model.Methods Six subjects reclined in a supported chair and were ventilated after paralysis (cisatracurium, 20 mg intravenously. In illumination, subjects were requested to focus alternately on the faces of investigators standing on the left and the right within peripheral vision. In darkness, subjects were instructed to look away from a point source of light. Subjects were to report their experiences after reversal of paralysis.Results During attempted eye movement in illumination, one subject had an illusion of environmental movement but four subjects perceived faces as clearly as if they were in central vision. In darkness, four subjects reported movement of the target light in the direction of attempted eye movements and three could control the movement of the light at will. ConclusionThe hypothesis that internal visual models receive intended ocular-movement-information directly from oculomotor centres is strengthened by this evidence.

  9. Retrospective study of the functional recovery of men compared with that of women with long-term facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Sex is likely to play an important part in reanimation of the face after paralysis, with women being superior in terms of resistance to neural injury and regeneration. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the sex of the patient on the recovery of facial paralysis after surgical reanimation by comparing the degree of restored movement between men and women with long-standing paralysis that was reanimated by transfer of the hypoglossal nerve or cross-face nerve grafting. Between 1999 and 2010 we operated on 174 patients with facial paralysis. Of these we studied 26 cases (19 women and 7 men) with complete long-standing paralysis reanimated with either cross-face nerve grafting (n=14) or transfer of the hemihypoglossal nerve (n=12). The degree of movement restored was recorded in each case. Statistical analysis showed that in cases with long-standing paralysis women had significantly more movement restored than men for both cross-face nerve grafting (p=0.02) and hypoglossal transposition (p=0.04). We conclude that, after a neural injury, women tend to maintain the viability of the facial musculature longer than men, which suggests that they are more resistant to both denervation and the development of muscular atrophy. Whether this phenomenon can be explained by neural or muscular processes, or both, warrants further studies.

  10. Median nerve neuropathy in the forearm due to recurrence of anterior wrist ganglion that originates from the scaphotrapezial joint: Case Report

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    Okada Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Median nerve neuropathy caused by compression from a tumor in the forearm is rare. Cases with anterior wrist ganglion have high recurrence rates despite surgical treatment. Here, we report the recurrence of an anterior wrist ganglion that originated from the Scaphotrapezial joint due to incomplete resection and that caused median nerve neuropathy in the distal forearm. Case presentation A 47-year-old right-handed housewife noted the appearance of soft swelling on the volar aspect of her left distal forearm, and local resection surgery was performed twice at another hospital. One year after the last surgery, the swelling reappeared and was associated with numbness and pain in the radial volar aspect of the hand. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the multicystic lesion originated from the Scaphotrapezial joint and had expanded beyond the wrist. Exploration of the left median nerve showed that it was compressed by a large ovoid cystic lesion at the distal forearm near the proximal end of the carpal tunnel. We resected the cystic lesion to the Scaphotrapezial joint. Her symptoms disappeared 1 week after surgery, and complications or recurrent symptoms were absent 13 months after surgery. Conclusions A typical median nerve compression was caused by incomplete resection of an anterior wrist ganglion, which may have induced widening of the cyst. Cases with anterior wrist ganglion have high recurrence rates and require extra attention in their treatment.

  11. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffily, Lucia; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2013-01-01

    Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA), is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP) represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP. PMID:24288639

  12. Recurrent Vocal Fold Paralysis and Parsonage-Turner Syndrome

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    Marcus Vinicius Pinto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parsonage-Turner syndrome, or neuralgic amyotrophy (NA, is an acute brachial plexus neuritis that typically presents with unilateral shoulder pain and amyotrophy but also can affect other peripheral nerves, including the recurrent laryngeal nerve. Idiopathic vocal fold paralysis (VFP represents approximately 12% of the VFP cases and recurrence is extremely rare. Methods and Results. We report a man with isolated recurrent unilateral right VFP and a diagnosis of NA years before. Conclusions. We emphasize that shoulder pain and amyotrophy should be inquired in any patient suffering from inexplicable dysphonia, and Parsonage-Turner syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of idiopathic VFP.

  13. Facial paralysis and the role of free muscle transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuker, R M

    2015-10-01

    Facial paralysis can have significant functional, psychological and aesthetic concerns that alter the lives of our patients. These effects can be functional, affecting the eye, nose and mouth, or aesthetic, affecting the symmetry of the face and particularly the mimetic function of smile. Several reanimation procedures have been described to address this. In this chapter, we will outline our technique for reanimation utilizing segmental gracilis muscle transplants to the face. These are innervated either by the contralateral normal 7th nerve via a cross face nerve graft, or a different ipsilateral motor where no 7th nerve is available or would not produce the required result. The other ipsilateral motor that we have found extremely effective is the motor nerve to masseter. This can power a segmental gracilis muscle transplant and lead to excursion that is near normal. These techniques will be described in detail.

  14. Preventing Sciatic Nerve Injury due to Intramuscular Injection: Ten-Year Single-Center Experience and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyik, Sirma; Geyik, Murat; Yigiter, Remzi; Kuzudisli, Samiye; Saglam, Sadullah; Elci, Mehmet Ali; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Sciatic nerve injury is the most frequent and serious complication of intramuscular gluteal injection. This study aims to highlight the incidence and causes of this continuing problem and to discuss the relevant literature. problems is relatively rare. We suggest a double quadrant drawing technique in each gluteal region. We also draw attention to this issue with postgraduate and in-service training programs of medical staff, and providing continuity in education can reduce this serious complication.

  15. Accidental injury of the inferior alveolar nerve due to the extrusion of calcium hydroxide in endodontic treatment: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yooseok; Roh, Byoung-Duck; Kim, Yemi; Kim, Taehyeon; Kim, Hyungjun

    2016-02-01

    During clinical endodontic treatment, we often find radiopaque filling material beyond the root apex. Accidental extrusion of calcium hydroxide could cause the injury of inferior alveolar nerve, such as paresthesia or continuous inflammatory response. This case report presents the extrusion of calcium hydroxide and treatment procedures including surgical intervention. A 48 yr old female patient experienced Calcipex II extrusion in to the inferior alveolar canal on left mandibular area during endodontic treatment. After completion of endodontic treatment on left mandibular first molar, surgical intervention was planned under general anesthesia. After cortical bone osteotomy and debridement, neuroma resection and neurorrhaphy was performed, and prognosis was observed. But no improvement in sensory nerve was seen following surgical intervention after 20 mon. A clinician should be aware of extrusion of intracanal medicaments and the possibility of damage on inferior alveolar canal. Injectable type of calcium hydroxide should be applied with care for preventing nerve injury. The alternative delivery method such as lentulo spiral was suggested on the posterior mandibular molar.

  16. Sleep paralysis as spiritual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufford, David J

    2005-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the sleep paralysis experience from both a cultural and a historical perspective. The robust, complex phenomenological pattern that represents the subjective experience of sleep paralysis is documented and illustrated. Examples are given showing that, for a majority of subjects, sleep paralysis is taken to be a kind of spiritual experience. This is, in part, because of the very common perception of a non-physical 'threatening presence' that is part of the event. Examples from various cultures, including mainstream contemporary America which has no widely known tradition about sleep paralysis, are used to show that the complex pattern and spiritual interpretation are not dependent on cultural models or prior learning. This is dramatically contrary to conventional explanations of apparently 'direct' spiritual experiences, explanations that are summed up as the 'Cultural Source Hypothesis.' This aspect of sleep paralysis was not recognized through most of the twentieth century. The article examines the way that conventional modern views of spiritual experience, combined with medical ideas that labeled 'direct' spiritual experiences as psychopathological, and mainstream religious views of such experiences as heretical if not pathological, suppressed the report and discussion of these experiences in modern society. These views have resulted in confusion in the scientific literature on sleep paralysis with regard to its prevalence and core features. The article also places sleep paralysis in the context of other 'direct' spiritual experiences and offers an 'Experiential Theory' of cross-culturally distributed spiritual experiences.

  17. PLICATURA DIAFRAGMÁTICA EN PACIENTE CON PARÁLISIS DEL HEMIDIAFRAGMA DERECHO TRAS CIRUGÍA CARDÍACA / Diaphragmatic plicature in a patient presenting a paralysis of the right hemidiaphragm after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Osorio Gómez

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The paralysis of the hemidiaphragm can take place due to different causes, one of them is heart surgery, but it has as common factor the presence of phrenic nerve paralysis. The case of a 53 year-old woman who had received the implant of a mitral prosthesis two years ago and now required an emergency reintervention due to a prosthetic thrombosis is presented in this article. The mechanical artificial ventilation was prolonged and it was impossible to be stopped due to a great elevation of the right hemidiaphragm. The use of a surgical treatment was decided and the technique of diaphragmatic plicature was implemented. The patient was extubated the fifth day after the last surgical intervention, was treated with non-invasive ventilation during three more days and was finally discharged after 16 days of having underwent the plicature.

  18. Risk factors for recurrent laryngeal nerve neuropraxia postthyroidectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheahan, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Despite preservation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN), transient vocal cord paralysis (VCP) occurs after 1.2% to 10.9% of thyroidectomies. The objective of this study was to study risk factors for transient VCP after thyroidectomy.

  19. Scorpion toxins for the reversal of BoNT-induced paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Colin A; Adler, Michael; Borrell, Andrew; Janda, Kim D

    2013-12-15

    The botulinum neurotoxins, characterized by their neuromuscular paralytic effects, are the most toxic proteins known to man. Due to their extreme potency, ease of production, and duration of activity, the BoNT proteins have been classified by the Centers for Disease Control as high threat agents for bioterrorism. In an attempt to discover effective BoNT therapeutics, we have pursued a strategy in which we leverage the blockade of K(+) channels that ultimately results in the reversal of neuromuscular paralysis. Towards this end, we utilized peptides derived from scorpion venom that are highly potent K(+) channel blockers. Herein, we report the synthesis of charybdotoxin, a 37 amino acid peptide, and detail its activity, along with iberiotoxin and margatoxin, in a mouse phrenic nerve hemidiaphragm assay in the absence and the presence of BoNT/A.

  20. Renal tubular acidosis presenting as respiratory paralysis: Report of a case and review of literature

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    Kalita J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory paralysis due to renal tubular acidosis (RTA is rare. We report a 22-year-old lady who developed severe bulbar, respiratory and limb paralysis following respiratory infection. She had hypokalemia (1.6 meq/L and hyperchloremic (110 meq/l acidosis (pH 7.1. She was diagnosed as distal RTA by ammonium chloride test. She improved following sodium bicarbonate and potassium supplementation. RTA should be differentiated from familial periodic paralysis (FPP because acetazolamide used in FPP aggravates RTA and sodium bicarbonate used in RTA aggravates hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

  1. Electroacupuncture at Zusanli Prevents Severe Scalds-Induced Gut Ischemia and Paralysis by Activating the Cholinergic Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn injuries may result in gastrointestinal paralysis, and barrier dysfunction due to gut ischemia and lowered vagus excitability. In this study we investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA at Zusanli (ST36 could prevent severe scalds-induced gut ischemia, paralysis, and barrier dysfunction and whether the protective role of EA at ST36 is related to the vagus nerve. 35% burn area rats were divided into six groups: (a EAN: EA nonchannel acupoints followed by scald injury; (b EA: EA at ST36 after scald injury; (c VGX/EA: vagotomy (VGX before EA at ST36 and scald injury; (d VGX/EAN: VGX before EAN and scald injury; (e atropine/EA: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at ST36; (f atropine/EAN: applying atropine before scald injury and then EA at nonchannel acupoints. EA at the Zusanli point significantly promoted the intestinal impelling ratio and increased the amount of mucosal blood flow after scald injury. The plasma diamine oxidase (DAO and intestinal permeability decreased significantly after scald injury in the EA group compared with others. However, EA after atropine injection or cervical vagotomy failed to improve intestinal motility and mucosa blood flow suggesting that the mechanism of EA may be related to the activation of the cholinergic nerve pathway.

  2. Inuit interpretations of sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Samuel; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2005-03-01

    Traditional and contemporary Inuit concepts of sleep paralysis were investigated through interviews with elders and young people in Iqaluit, Baffin Island. Sleep paralysis was readily recognized by most respondents and termed uqumangirniq (in the Baffin region) or aqtuqsinniq (Kivalliq region). Traditional interpretations of uqumangirniq referred to a shamanistic cosmology in which the individual's soul was vulnerable during sleep and dreaming. Sleep paralysis could result from attack by shamans or malevolent spirits. Understanding the experience as a manifestation of supernatural power, beyond one's control, served to reinforce the experiential reality and presence of the spirit world. For contemporary youth, sleep paralysis was interpreted in terms of multiple frameworks that incorporated personal, medical, mystical, traditional/shamanistic, and Christian views, reflecting the dynamic social changes taking place in this region.

  3. The Phenomenon of Sleep Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of sleep where vivid dreams occur (known as REM sleep), your arms and legs are temporarily paralyzed so ... alien abductions." Since breathing can be irregular during REM sleep, those experiencing sleep paralysis may feel like they' ...

  4. 小儿坐骨神经注射性麻痹的肌电图观察%Electromyography observation of sciatic nerve paralysis caused by injection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晓丽

    2004-01-01

    背景:肌电图检测是确诊注射性坐骨神经损伤重要方法之一,但其早期异常表现,异常程度与病程的相关性及各项指标的差异比较尚缺乏深入研究.目的:探讨注射性坐骨神经损伤的电生理特点.设计:以诊断为依据临床观察分析.地点和对象:104例南京医科大学附属脑科医院门诊确诊患儿,年龄4个月~14岁,病前均有明确臀部肌肉注射史,既往无其他神经肌肉疾病.干预:应用丹迪Neuromatic 2000 M型肌电仪检测患儿的患肢肌电图.主要观察指标:检测患儿的患肢腓总神经和胫神经/胫后神经的感觉传导速度(sensory conduction velocity,SCV)、运动传导速度(motor conduction velocity,MCV)、末端运动潜伏期(distal motor latency,dML)和末端复合肌肉动作电位波幅(distal compound muscle action potential amplitude,dCMAPA)、感觉神经动作电位波幅(sensory nerve action potential ampli-tude,SNAPA);同时检测坐骨神经支配肌的针极肌电图.结果:肌注后2~7 d已可检出多项电生理异常.腓总神经支的神经传导速度(nerve conduction velocity,NCV)异常率(68.0%)明显高于胫神经支(43.5%)(x2=12.199,P<0.005).腓总神经SCV,SNAPA和dML,dCMAPA异常程度与病程正相关(r=0.306 8,P<0.005;r=0.296 3,P<0.005;r=0.337 6,P<0.001;r=0.215 7,P<0.05).8个月以上病程患儿的SCV, SNAPA和dML异常程度明显增加(F=3.105,P<0.05;F=4.095,P<0.01;F=5.904,P<0.01),较8个月内有显著差异.腓总神经NCV各项配对t检验发现运动纤维dML和dCMAPA异常程度重于感觉纤维SCV和SNAPA(t=2.070,P<0.05;t=3.520,P<0.001).结论:化学药物对神经髓鞘传导功能有直接损伤.坐骨神经运动纤维的电生理异常早于且重于感觉纤维.腓总神经运动传导功能检测是本病早期诊断的重要依据.8个月以上病程的损伤神经恢复难度增加.%BACKGROUND: Electromyography(EMG)is one of the important methods in the diagnosis of sciatic nerve

  5. Familial Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semih KORKUT, Hayati KANDİŞ, Harun GÜNEŞ, Esin KORKUT

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an autosomal dominantly inherited congenital diseasecharacterized by intermittent attacks of muscle weakness lasting for a few hours to a few daysand occurring a few times a year or once a day. Due to the shift of potassium into muscle cells,serum potassium level is decreased during attacks and it is in the normal range between twoattacks. A 21 year old male patient seen in the emergency department due to a hypokalemicparalysis attack occurring without any obvious triggering factor was presented in this article.

  6. Light and electron microscopic lesions in peripheral nerves of broiler chickens due to roxarsone and lasalocid toxicoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D G; Vanhooser, S L; Stair, E L

    1995-01-01

    This paper characterizes the light microscopic and ultrastructural lesions in peripheral nerves caused by feeding lasalocid and roxarsone to broiler chickens. The birds were given three different doses of each compound: the standard industrial dose, 150% of the standard dose, and 200% of the standard dose. It was necessary to deprive the birds of water for 4 hours daily and heat-stress them in order to reproduce the lesion. Each compound caused mild microscopic lesions of swollen axons, digestion chambers, shrunken axons, or vacuoles where axons were missing. Ultrastructural changes included formation of myelin ellipsoids, vacuoles within or beneath the myelin sheath, and unraveling of myelin. These lesions were most frequently found in the birds receiving lasalocid.

  7. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    OpenAIRE

    Atolini Junior, Nédio; Jorge Junior, José Jarjura; Gignon, Vinícius de Faria; Kitice, Adriano Tomio; Prado, Letícia Suriano de Almeida; Santos, Vânia Gracia Wolff

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the y...

  8. [Late ulnar paralysis. Study of a series of 17 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansat, M; Bonnevialle, P; Fine, X; Guiraud, B; Testut, M F

    1984-02-16

    Seventeen cases of late ulnar paralysis treated by neurolysis-transposition are reported. The clinical characteristics of these paralyses are emphasized: very prolonged symptom free interval, rapid onset and severe involvement. Ulnar transposition was most often done subcutaneously. Cubitus valgus and definite nerve compression proximal to the arcade of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle are almost always present. The results as regards the neuropathy are undependable: no patient is completely cured and only half are improved. An anatomical study of the nerve path shows the essential role, in the compression of the nerve, of the muscular arcade of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle which acts in a way similar to the bridge of a violin. Hence, opening it longitudinally is the principal step of neurolysis. This should be routine before the first signs of neuropathy occur in an elbow whose axis is out of alignment as a sequela of a childhood injury.

  9. Etiologic and therapeutic analysis in patients with hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chih-Chien; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Chiang, Wen-Fang; Chau, Tom; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-03-01

    Hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis represents a group of heterogeneous disorders with a large potassium (K(+)) deficit. Rapid diagnosis of curable causes with appropriate treatment is challenging to avoid the sequelae of hypokalemia. We prospectively analyzed the etiologies and therapeutic characteristics of hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis. Over an 8-year period, patients with hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis were enrolled by excluding those with hypokalemic periodic paralysis due to acute shift of K(+) into cells. Blood and spot urine samples were collected for the measurements of electrolytes, pH, and biochemistries. Intravenous potassium chloride (KCl) at a rate of 10-20 mmol/h was administered until muscle strength recovered. We had identified 58 patients with hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis from 208 consecutive patients with hypokalemic paralysis, and their average K(+) concentration was 1.8 ± 0.2 mmol/L. Among patients with low urinary K(+) excretion (n = 17), chronic alcoholism, remote diuretic use, and anorexia/bulimia nervosa were the most common causes. Among patients with high urinary K(+) excretion (n = 41) and metabolic acidosis, renal tubular acidosis and chronic toluene abuse were the main causes, while primary aldosteronism, Gitelman syndrome, and diuretics were the leading diagnoses with metabolic alkalosis. The average KCl dose needed to restore muscle strength was 3.8 ± 0.8 mmol/kg. Initial lower plasma K(+), volume depletion, and high urinary K(+) excretion were associated with higher recovery KCl dosage. During therapy, patients with paradoxical hypokalemia (n = 32) who required more KCl supplementation than patients without (4.1 ± 0.7 vs 3.4 ± 0.7 mmol/kg, P hypokalemic nonperiodic paralysis may aid in early diagnosis. Patients with initial lower plasma K(+), renal K(+) wasting, and hypovolemia required higher recovery K(+) dosage. Paradoxical hypokalemia is prone to develop in hypovolemic patients even during K(+) supplementation with

  10. [Professor Wu Bing-huang's experiences in acupuncture treatment of facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-e; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Chuan-jiang

    2008-03-01

    Professor WU Bing-huang's unique experiences in acupuncture treatment of facial paralysis are introduced. He excellently uses anatomical and pathological knowledge of facial nerves, selecting acupoints according to nervous distribution, selecting needling methods according to the nervous trend, selecting acupuncture stimulation amount according to pathological changes and judging prognosis according to affected position.

  11. [Observation on therapeutic effect of aponeurotic system penetration needling on peripheral facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai-sheng; Huang, Man-wei; Wang, Qiong-mei

    2006-03-01

    To observe therapeutic effect of aponeurotic system penetration needling on peripheral facial paralysis. One hundred and ten cases of peripheral facial paralysis were randomly divided into a Jingjin group (n=68) and a control group (n=42). The therapeutic effects of acute stage, resting stage and sequela stage, and the relation between the facial nerve lesion degree and the therapeutic effect were investigated. The effective rates of the two needling methods were respectively 98.5% and 90.5%, the Jing1in group being better than the control group (P acupuncture was obvious, and the therapeutic effect at the sequela stage and for the patient of nerve faulty type in the Jingjin group were better than that of the control group (P Acupuncture and moxibustion has definite therapeutic effect on facial paralysis at the acute stage and in the patient of nerve active type, and aponeurotic system penetration needling can be used for the patient of facial paralysis at the sequela stage or with nerve faulty type.

  12. A CLINICAL AND NEUROELECTROPHYSIOLO-GICAL STUDY OF HYPERKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高秀贤; 汤晓芙; 杜华; 李本红

    1995-01-01

    A case of atypical hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is reported. The diagnosis was confirmed by hyperkalemic test, cold water test, and differentiation of attack period and rest period by the measurement of motor nerve conduction amplitude. Etio-pathology of this disease is discussed from the view of neuroelec-trophysiology.

  13. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 1; Experimental study on the enhancement mechanism used in viewing vascular permeability of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    Although there have recently been numerous reports of enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy, the mechanism of enhancement remains largely unknown. In the present study, animal models with experimentally induced facial paralysis were prepared, and the vascular permeabilities of normal and damaged facial nerves were assessed using Evans blue albumin (EBA) as a tracer. The Gd-DTPA contents in normal and compressively damaged facial nerves were also investigated. In the normal intratemporal facial nerve, EBA remained in the vessels, and did not leak into the endoneurium. In contrast, vascular permeability was very high in the epineurium and the geniculate ganglion which showed leakage of large amounts of EBA from vessels. At the site of compression in the damaged nerve, EBA leakage was also seen in the endoneurism, indicating accentuated vascular permeability. This accentuation of vascular permeability shifted toward the distal side. However, no EBA leakage was seen on the side proximal to the site of compression. Significantly higher Gd-DTPA contents were obtained in the facial nerve on the paralytic side than in that on the normal side (p<0.001). As for differences between the distal and proximal sides, the distal side had a significantly higher Gd-DTPA content (p<0.01). Assessment of vascular permeability with EBA revealed accentuated vascular permeability on the side distal to the site of compression. These results showed the presence of a blood nerve barrier (BNB) in the facial nerve. Furthermore, the present findings suggest that the enhancement of the facial nerve on the affected side is caused by BNB destruction due to nerve damage and subsequent Gd-DTPA leakage from the vessels. Furthermore, it is suggested that the facial nerve enhancement appears to occur mainly on the distal side of the damaged portion of the nerve. (author).

  14. Ultraestrutura do nervo facial intratemporal em pacientes com paralisia facial idiopática: estudo de evidências de infecção viral Intratemporal facial nerve ultrastructure in patients with idiopathic facial paralysis: viral infection evidence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Aló Maluza Florez

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A etiologia da paralisia facial periférica idiopática (PFPI ainda é uma incógnita, no entanto, alguns autores aventam a possibilidade de ser uma infecção viral. OBJETIVO: Analisar a ultraestrutura do nervo facial procurando evidências virais que possam nos fornecer dados etiológicos. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram estudados 20 pacientes com PFP, com graus de moderado a severo, de ambos os sexos, entre 18-60 anos, provenientes de Ambulatório de Distúrbios do Nervo Facial. Os pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos: Estudo, onze pacientes com PFPI e Controle, nove pacientes com Paralisia Facial Periférica Traumática ou Tumoral. Foram estudados fragmentos de bainha do nervo facial ou fragmentos de seus cotos, que durante a cirurgia de reparação do nervo facial, seriam desprezados ou encaminhados para estudo anatomopatológico. O tecido foi fixado em glutaraldeído 2% e analisado em Microscopia Eletrônica de Transmissão. RESULTADO: Observamos no grupo estudo atividade celular intensa de reparação com aumento de fibras colágenas, fibroblastos com organelas desenvolvidas, isentos de partículas virais. No grupo controle esta atividade de reparação não foi evidente, mas também não foram observadas partículas virais. CONCLUSÃO: Não foram encontradas partículas virais, no entanto, houve evidências de intensa atividade de reparação ou infecção viral.The etiology of idiopathic peripheral facial palsy (IPFP is still uncertain; however, some authors suggest the possibility of a viral infection. AIM: to analyze the ultrastructure of the facial nerve seeking viral evidences that might provide etiological data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We studied 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy (PFP, with moderate to severe FP, of both genders, between 18-60 years of age, from the Clinic of Facial Nerve Disorders. The patients were broken down into two groups - Study: eleven patients with IPFP and Control: nine patients with trauma or tumor

  15. A clinician's guide to recurrent isolated sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the empirical and clinical literature on sleep paralysis most relevant to practitioners. During episodes of sleep paralysis, the sufferer awakens to rapid eye movement sleep-based atonia combined with conscious awareness. This is usually a frightening event often accompanied by vivid, waking dreams (ie, hallucinations). When sleep paralysis occurs independently of narcolepsy and other medical conditions, it is termed "isolated" sleep paralysis. Although the more specific diagnostic syndrome of "recurrent isolated sleep paralysis" is a recognized sleep-wake disorder, it is not widely known to nonsleep specialists. This is likely due to the unusual nature of the condition, patient reluctance to disclose episodes for fear of embarrassment, and a lack of training during medical residencies and graduate education. In fact, a growing literature base has accrued on the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical impact of this condition, and a number of assessment instruments are currently available in both self-report and interview formats. After discussing these and providing suggestions for accurate diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and patient selection, the available treatment options are discussed. These consist of both pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions which, although promising, require more empirical support and larger, well-controlled trials.

  16. Sporadic hypokalemic paralysis caused by osmotic diuresis in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu, Venugopalan Y; Kattadimmal, Anoop; Rao, Suparna A; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu

    2014-07-01

    A wide variety of neurological manifestations are known in patients with diabetes mellitus. We describe a 40-year-old man who presented with hypokalemic paralysis. On evaluation, we found that the cause of the hypokalemia was osmotic diuresis induced by marked hyperglycemia due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The patient had an uneventful recovery with potassium replacement, followed by glycemic control with insulin. Barring a few instances of symptomatic hypokalemia in the setting of diabetic emergencies, to our knowledge uncomplicated hyperglycemia has not been reported to result in hypokalemic paralysis.

  17. Fifty Cases of Paralysis of Intestine due to Thoraco-lumbar Spine Fracture Treated with Wulai Powder for Mounting on Shenque%吴莱散敷贴神阙治疗胸腰椎骨折后肠麻痹50例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱华; 王懋成; 吴楚光; 黄孙科; 肖宇明

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical curative effect of Wulai Powder(WLP) for mounting on Shenque (CV 8) on paralysis of intestine due to thoraco-lumbar spine fracture.Methods:One hundred patients with paralysis of intestine due to thoraco-lumbar spine fracture who were treated in our hospital between September of 2012 and November of 2013 were chosen as the research objects,and randomly divided into the treatment group and the control group,with 50 cases in each group.The ones in the treatment group were given WLP mixed with vinegar for mounting on Shenque (CV 8),while the ones in the control group were treated with neostigmine methylsulfate.Results:The effective rate of the treatment group was 98%,while that of the control group was 82%;And the treatment group was better than the control group(P < 0.05).Three days later and six days later after the treatment,TCM syndrome scores of the treatment group were all better than those of the control group (P < 0.05).Conclusion:WLP for mounting on Shenque (CV 8) has a remarkable clinical curative effect on paralysis of intestine due to thoraco-lumbar spine fracture.%目的:观察吴莱散敷贴神阙治疗胸腰椎骨折后肠麻痹的临床疗效.方法:选取2012年9月-2013年11月在本院住院治疗的胸腰椎骨折后肠麻痹患者100例,随机分为治疗组与对照组,每组50例.治疗组给予吴莱散10 g醋调敷贴神阙治疗,对照组给予甲硫酸新斯的明治疗.结果:对照组有效率为98%,对照组有效率为82%,治疗组优于对照组(P<0.05);治疗组治疗3d后、治疗6d后中医证候积分均优于对照组(P<0.05).结论:吴莱散敷贴神阙治疗胸腰椎骨折后肠麻痹疗效显著.

  18. 带蒂筋膜管的耳大神经移植治疗面神经缺失性损伤%Treating defective damage of facial nerve with great auricular nerve grafting covered by pediculated fascial tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋立新

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the curative effect of grafting great auricular nerve with pediculated fascial tube in defective damage of facial nerve.Method All the patients in the study were treated by grafting great auricular nerve which was covered by pediculated fascial tube near facial nerve trunk.Result The 3 otogenic fascial paralysis patients had grade III recovery of facial nerve function(30% ~ 38% ) 2.0 to 2.5 years after the nerve grafting operation; 2 post- traumatic facial paralysis patients had grade II recovery of facial nerve function (69% ~ 71% ) 2.5 to 3.5 years after the nerve grafting operation.Conclusion The grafting of pediculated fascial tube surrounded great auricular nerve can provide a biological environment with excellent blood supply for the plerosis and regeneration of nerves and can accelerate the functional recovery of nerves after the nerve grafting.

  19. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3 weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  20. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons’ Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Urrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  1. Bell's palsy before Bell: Evert Jan Thomassen à Thuessink and idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Graaf, R C; IJpma, F F A; Nicolai, J-P A; Werker, P M N

    2009-11-01

    Bell's palsy is the eponym for idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. It is named after Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), who, in the first half of the nineteenth century, discovered the function of the facial nerve and attracted the attention of the medical world to facial paralysis. Our knowledge of this condition before Bell's landmark publications is very limited and is based on just a few documents. In 1804 and 1805, Evert Jan Thomassen à Thuessink (1762-1832) published what appears to be the first known extensive study on idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. His description of this condition was quite accurate. He located several other early descriptions and concluded from this literature that, previously, the condition had usually been confused with other afflictions (such as 'spasmus cynicus', central facial paralysis and trigeminal neuralgia). According to Thomassen à Thuessink, idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis and trigeminal neuralgia were related, being different expressions of the same condition. Thomassen à Thuessink believed that idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis was caused by 'rheumatism' or exposure to cold. Many aetiological theories have since been proposed. Despite this, the cold hypothesis persists even today.

  2. Hypokalemic paralysis and acid-base balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Casagranda

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of hypokalemic paralysis are reported, presenting to the Emergency Department. The first is a patient with a hypokalemic periodic paralysis with a normal acid-base status, the second is a case of hypokalemic flaccid paralysis of all extremities with a normal anion gap metabolic acidosis, the last is a patient with a hypokalemic distal paralysis of right upper arm with metabolic alkalosis. Afterwards some pathophysiologic principles and the clinical aspects of hypokalemia are discussed and an appropriate approach to do in Emergency Department, to identify the hypokalemic paralysis etiologies in the Emergency Department, is presented, beginning from the evaluation of acid-base status.

  3. Etiology of hypokalemic paralysis in Korea: data from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wi, Jung-Kook; Lee, Hong Joo; Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Joo Hee; Chin, Sang Ouk; Rhee, Sang Youl; Moon, Ju-Young; Lee, Sang-Ho; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Ihm, Chun-Gyoo; Lee, Tae-Won

    2012-12-01

    Recognizing the underlying causes of hypokalemic paralysis seems to be essential for the appropriate management of affected patients and their prevention of recurrent attacks. There is, however, a paucity of documented reports on the etiology of hypokalemic paralysis in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed 34 patients with acute flaccid weakness due to hypokalaemia who were admitted during the 5-year study period in order to determine the spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in Korea and to identify the differences in clinical parameters all across the causes of hypokalemic paralysis. We divided those 34 patients into 3 groups; the 1(st) group, idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP), the 2(nd), thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), and the 3rd group, secondary hypokalemic paralysis (HP) without TPP. Seven of the patients (20.6%) were diagnosed as idiopathic HPP considered the sporadic form, and 27 patients (79.4%) as secondary HP. Among the patients diagnosed as secondary HP, 16 patients (47.1%) had TPP. Patients of secondary hypokalemic paralysis without TPP required a longer recovery time compared with those who had either idiopathic HPP or TPP. This is due to the fact that patients of secondary HP had a significantly negative total body potassium balance, whereas idiopathic HPP and TPP were only associated with intracellular shift of potassium. Most of the TPP patients included in our study had overt thyrotoxicosis while 3 patients had subclinical thyrotoxicosis. This study shows that TPP is the most common cause of hypokalemic paralysis in Korea. And we suggest that doctors should consider the presence of TPP in patients of hypokalemic paralysis even if they clinically appear to be euthyroid state.

  4. HYPOKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS: AGE OF ONSET IN A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

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    M. H. Harirchian

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a familial channelopathy inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The first attack of paralysis may be evolved at any age, but has been reported to be most common in the second decade, so that some authorities believe that an episodic weakness beginning after age 25 is almost never due to primary periodic paralysis. In this retrospective study, we reviewed 50 patients admitted in two hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 1992-2001 with acute flaccid weakness and hypokalemia, twenty-three of whom fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Two patients showed first attack below age 15, 8 in 15-20, 4 in 20-25, 3 in 25-35, 4 in 35-45, and 2 beyond age 45. In our study, in contrast to previous ones, the first attack was beyond age 20 in 13 patients (56.5% and beyond 25 in 9 (39 %. Age at first attack is more than other studies, which seems to be due to a difference between our epidemiological characteristics compared to that in the West. In other words, in our epidemiological condition, periodic weakness, although started beyond second decade of age, could be due to primary periodic paralysis if secondary hypokalemia had been ruled out.

  5. Overview of facial paralysis: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Thuy-Anh N; Limb, Charles J

    2008-05-01

    Facial paralysis represents the end result of a wide array of disorders and heterogeneous etiologies, including congenital, traumatic, infectious, neoplastic, and metabolic causes. Thus, facial palsy has a diverse range of presentations, from transient unilateral paresis to devastating permanent bilateral paralysis. Although not life-threatening, facial paralysis remains relatively common and can have truly severe effects on one's quality of life, with important ramifications in terms of psychological impact and physiologic burden. Prognosis and outcomes for patients with facial paralysis are highly dependent on the etiologic nature of the weakness as well as the treatment offered to the patient. Facial plastic surgeons are often asked to manage the sequelae of long-standing facial paralysis. It is important, however, for any practitioner who assists this population to have a sophisticated understanding of the common etiologies and initial management of facial paralysis. This article reviews the more common causes of facial paralysis and discusses relevant early treatment strategies.

  6. A Case of Associated Laryngeal Paralysis Caused by Varicella Zoster Virus without Eruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keishi Fujiwara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with significant weakness of the left soft palate, paralysis of the left vocal cord, and left facial nerve palsy. Although the patient showed no herpetic eruption in the pharyngolaryngeal mucosa and auricle skin, reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV was confirmed by serological examination. She was diagnosed with zoster sine herpete. After treatment with antiviral drugs and corticosteroids, her neurological disorder improved completely. When we encounter a patient with associated laryngeal paralysis, we should consider the possibility of reactivation of VZV even when no typical herpetic eruption is observed.

  7. Post Traumatic Delayed Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy (FNP): Diagnostic Dilemma of Expressionless Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy [FNP] is a rare condition. Mostly it is idiopathic. Post traumatic bilateral FNP is even more rare and having unique neurosurgical considerations. Post traumatic delayed presentation of bilateral FNP is socially debilitating and also having diagnostic challenge. Due to lack of facial asymmetry as present in unilateral facial paralysis, it is difficult to recognize. We are presenting a case of delayed onset bilateral FNP who developed FNP after 12 days of head injury with a brief discussion of its diagnostic dilemma and management along with literature review.

  8. Significance of locating the blood vessels and nerves of temporal muscle in dynamical correction of late-stage facial paralysis using temporal muscular fascia%颞肌神经血管定位在颞肌筋膜法动力性矫正晚期面神经麻痹中的意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志奇; 齐向东; 徐达传

    2004-01-01

    背景:颢肌筋膜法动力性矫正晚期面神经麻痹(以下简称面瘫)的手术中,存在颞肌血管神经定位困难的问题.为明确颞肌的精细解剖而设计了此次实验.目的:通过分组进行人类颞肌的血管神经分束研究,以阐明颞肌动力修复晚期面瘫的显微解剖应用基础.设计:随机对照的研究.单位:南方医科大学南方医院整形外科及解剖教研室.对象:收集2000年自愿遗体捐助的20具24 h内死亡的新鲜尸体头部标本,其中男性12具,女性8具,年龄在16~50岁,平均30岁,死因均为感染或肿瘤等疾病,随机分为4组.方法:分别用氧化铅、墨汁或甲基丙烯酸树脂进行血管灌注,并进行神经显微解剖染色,结果拍摄照片,在计算机中进行图像叠加,从而形成血管神经的分束构筑图.主要观察指标:①颞肌形态.②颢肌前动脉、颞深后动脉及颞中动脉直径、长度和分布面积百分比.③颞深前神经、颞深后神经及颞中神经直径、长度和分布面积百分比.④颞肌静脉的分布.⑤颞肌神经血管的分束.结果:颞肌具有可利用的、有独立神经血管支配的三个肌肉分区,互相之间有丰富的吻合支.结论:晚期面瘫眼、鼻和口部畸形的动力矫正可选用对应的颞肌神经血管束一期完成.%BACKGROUND: In the operation of dynamical correction of late-stage facial paralysis using temporal muscular fascia, it is difficult to locate the blood vessels and nerves of temporal muscle. This experiment is designed to clarify the precise anatomy of temporal muscle.OBJECTIVE: To study the neurovascular bundles of human temporal muscle through grouping studies to clarify the application basis of microanatomy for dynamical repairing of late-stage facial paralysis by temporal muscle.DESIGN: A randomized controlled study.SETTING: Plastic Surgery of South Hospital and Anatomical Teaching and Research Office of Southern Medical University.PARTICIPANTS: Head

  9. Fibromyalgia in hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, F R; Thid, S; Kyllerman, M

    1998-01-01

    A 43-year-old woman presented at the age of 38 with joint pains and muscle stiffness. Tender points were found fulfilling ACR criteria (1) for fibromyalgia. She had well developed muscles and decreasing muscle power since the age of 35. Muscle pains increased after exercise. Her 10-year-old son had similar symptoms and one paralytic attack. Muscle pain and fatigue increasing with age were found by history in three close relatives. Forearm cold water test produced myotonia in both mother and son. Electromyography was normal and muscle biopsy showed minor unspecific changes. Biochemical investigation of muscle mitochondrial function was normal. Peroral potassium load test produced complete muscle paralysis at a potassium serum level of 5.0 mmol/l. Autosomal dominant hyperkalemic periodic paralysis was diagnosed. Frequent carbohydrate enriched meals, peroral bendroflumethiazide and restriction to submaximal exercise improved muscle and joint pain. Salbutamol peroral spray relieved the periodic weakness.

  10. Neuromuscular retraining for facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diels, H J; Combs, D

    1997-10-01

    Neuromuscular retraining is an effective method for rehabilitating facial musculature in patients with facial paralysis. This nonsurgical therapy has demonstrated improved functional outcomes and is an important adjunct to surgical treatment for restoring facial movement. Treatment begins with an intensive clinical evaluation and incorporates appropriate sensory feedback techniques into a patient-specific, comprehensive, home therapy program. This article discusses appropriate patients, timelines for referral, and basic treatment practices of facial neuromuscular retraining for restoring function and expression to the highest level possible.

  11. Familial congenital peripheral facial paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Portillo Vallenas, Roberto; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Aldave, Raquel; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Reyes, Juan; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; Castañeda, César; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, EsSalud, Lima, Perú; VERA, JOSÉ; Hospital Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen, Servicio de Neurología. Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study 29 individuals belonging to four familiar generations in whom 9 cases of facial paralysis was found in 2 generations. Setting: Neurophysiology Service, Guillermo Almenara Irigoyen National Hospital. Material and Methods: Neurological exam and electrophysiologic (EMG and VCN), otorrhinolaryngologic, radiologic, electroencephalographic, dermatoglyphic and laboratory studies were performed in 7 of the 9 patients (5 men and 2 women). Results: One case of right peripheral facia...

  12. Bilateral diaphragm paralysis after simultaneous cardiac surgery and Nuss procedure in the infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Tabata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 15-month-old boy with bilateral diaphragm paralysis after simultaneous cardiac surgery for tetralogy of Fallot, and Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum, is presented. Extubated one day after his first operation, the boy suffered severe respiratory distress soon after, due to bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. Diaphragm paralysis restricted abdominal respiration, while thoracic respiration was inhibited by metallic bar after the Nuss Procedure, which combined prevented extubation for 47 days. Thoracoplasty, such as the Nuss Procedure, should not be performed simultaneously with cardiac surgery because abdominal and thoracic respiration can be restricted in infants, causing prolonged, severe, post-surgical respiratory failure.

  13. A clinician’s guide to recurrent isolated sleep paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpless BA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Brian A Sharpless Clinical Psychology Program, American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Washington DC, Arlington, VA, USA Abstract: This review summarizes the empirical and clinical literature on sleep paralysis most relevant to practitioners. During episodes of sleep paralysis, the sufferer awakens to rapid eye movement sleep-based atonia combined with conscious awareness. This is usually a frightening event often accompanied by vivid, waking dreams (ie, hallucinations. When sleep paralysis occurs independently of narcolepsy and other medical conditions, it is termed “isolated” sleep paralysis. Although the more specific diagnostic syndrome of “recurrent isolated sleep paralysis” is a recognized sleep–wake disorder, it is not widely known to nonsleep specialists. This is likely due to the unusual nature of the condition, patient reluctance to disclose episodes for fear of embarrassment, and a lack of training during medical residencies and graduate education. In fact, a growing literature base has accrued on the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical impact of this condition, and a number of assessment instruments are currently available in both self-report and interview formats. After discussing these and providing suggestions for accurate diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and patient selection, the available treatment options are discussed. These consist of both pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions which, although promising, require more empirical support and larger, well-controlled trials.Keywords: sleep disorder, rapid eye movement, hallucinations, parasomnia, sleep–wake disorders, narcolepsy

  14. A clinician’s guide to recurrent isolated sleep paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the empirical and clinical literature on sleep paralysis most relevant to practitioners. During episodes of sleep paralysis, the sufferer awakens to rapid eye movement sleep-based atonia combined with conscious awareness. This is usually a frightening event often accompanied by vivid, waking dreams (ie, hallucinations). When sleep paralysis occurs independently of narcolepsy and other medical conditions, it is termed “isolated” sleep paralysis. Although the more specific diagnostic syndrome of “recurrent isolated sleep paralysis” is a recognized sleep–wake disorder, it is not widely known to nonsleep specialists. This is likely due to the unusual nature of the condition, patient reluctance to disclose episodes for fear of embarrassment, and a lack of training during medical residencies and graduate education. In fact, a growing literature base has accrued on the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical impact of this condition, and a number of assessment instruments are currently available in both self-report and interview formats. After discussing these and providing suggestions for accurate diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and patient selection, the available treatment options are discussed. These consist of both pharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions which, although promising, require more empirical support and larger, well-controlled trials. PMID:27486325

  15. Sleep Paralysis: phenomenology, neurophysiology and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Solomonova, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    Sleep paralysis is an experience of being temporarily unable to move or talk during the transitional periods between sleep and wakefulness: at sleep onset or upon awakening. Feeling of paralysis may be accompanied by a variety of vivid and intense sensory experiences, including mentation in visual, auditory, and tactile modalities, as well as a distinct feeling of presence. This chapter discusses a variety of sleep paralysis experiences from the perspective of enactive cognition and cultural ...

  16. [Case report: isolated facial paralysis with a tick.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz, Melek Kezban; Erdoğan, Murat; Doğan, Nihal; Birdane, Leyla; Cingi, Cemal; Cingi, Emre

    2010-01-01

    Tick-borne diseases are seen all over the world and their importance rises increasingly. It is noticeably important that disease and death rates due to tick-bites in our country in different areas increased in 2008. In Turkey, the numbers of diseases which are transmitted by ticks are considerably large and all of them are not detected. Reports of isolated facial paralysis cases due to tick infestation in the ear are infrequent in literature. The development of isolated facial paralysis due to ticks can be explained by several theories. This article reports a case report of a 3 year- old girl who was bought to our clinic with severe left ear pain and paresthesia on the left half of her face. She couldn't close her left eye and she lisped. The tick was removed from her external auditory canal surgically.

  17. A CLINICAL STUDY OF ACUPUNCTURE TREATMENT FOR FACIAL PARALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TOH Foh Fook

    2002-01-01

    @@ Peripheral facial paralysis is a common disease with manifestation of facial paralysis. The author's clinical observation on 50 cases of facial paralysis treated mainly with acupuncture showed an effeclive rate of 98%, and the remarkable effectiveness was reported as follow.

  18. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  19. Hamstring transfer for quadriceps paralysis in post polio residual paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish J Patwa

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: H to Q transfer in the presence of quadriceps paralysis with good power in hamstring is a better alternative than supracondylar osteotomy because it is a dynamic correction and it produces some degree of recurvatum with increasing stability of knee in extension while walking. While inserting hamstring over patella the periosteum is not cut in an I-shaped fashion to create a flap which gives additional strength to new insertion and also patella act as a fulcrum during the extension of knee by producing the bowstring effect.

  20. Anaesthetic Management of A Patient with Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis- A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitra, S; Korula, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Summary We report the anaesthetic management of a patient with hypokalemic periodic paralysis who underwent hepaticojejunostomy for stricture of the common bile duct. Patients with this disorder, who are apparently normal, can develop sudden paralysis as they are exposed to many of the predisposing factors, perioperatively. The complications due to this rare genetic disorder, the factors that can precipitate these problems and preventive measures are discussed. PMID:20640129

  1. Anaesthetic Management of A Patient with Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Chitra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the anaesthetic management of a patient with hypokalemic periodic paralysis who underwent hepaticojejunostomy for stricture of the common bile duct. Patients with this disorder, who are apparently normal, can develop sudden paralysis as they are exposed to many of the predisposing factors, perioperatively. The complications due to this rare genetic disorder, the factors that can precipitate these problems and preventive measures are dis-cussed.

  2. Unusual case of West Nile Virus flaccid paralysis in a 10-year-old child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabet, Farouq I; Servinsky, Sarah E; Naz, Fareeha; Kovas, Teresa E; Raghib, Timur O

    2013-05-01

    West Nile virus infection is asymptomatic in most cases. West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease includes encephalitis, meningitis, and/or acute flaccid paralysis. In children, acute flaccid paralysis as the solo presentation of West Nile virus disease is rare. It develops abruptly and progresses rapidly early in the disease course. We report on a 10-year-old child who presented with a slowly progressive left leg flaccid paralysis over 4 weeks. He tested positive for West Nile virus in both blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Spinal MRI showed enhancement of the ventral nerve roots. This was also supported by electrophysiological studies. One week after the plateauing of his left leg paralysis, he was readmitted to the hospital with left hand weakness. Complete recovery of his recurrent weakness was observed after prompt 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin G therapy. However, no improvement was noticed in the left foot drop. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of West Nile virus disease in children presented with a slowly progressive flaccid paralysis, and a recurrent weakness recovered after intravenous immunoglobulin G administration.

  3. Post-Traumatic Bilateral Facial Paralysis Associated with Temporal Bone Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Syed Shahid; Al Rouq, Fawzia; Meo, Imran

    2015-10-01

    Bilateral traumatic facial paralysis is a very rare clinical condition. Loss of taste sensation, associated with bilateral traumatic paralysis, is even rarer and has not been well described in the literature. In this report, a 23-year old male, who developed bilateral facial paralysis with loss of taste sensation and hearing impairment, following a motor vehicle accident, is presented. He had initially presented with unconsciousness for about 2 hours after he sustained closed head injury after a motor vehicle accident. Initial Computed Tomography (CT) scans revealed a small epidural hematoma, right temporal bone fracture and air densities around the basal cistern. On the 4th day after trauma, he was noted to have incomplete closure of both eyes and was feeling difficulty with chewing and drooling of saliva. Electrodiagnostic testing confirmed the diagnosis of bilateral facial paralysis-House-Brackmann (HB) grade V. Electroneuronography (ENoG) showed degeneration of 90% nerve fibres bilaterally. The high-resolution CT scans showed bilateral temporal bone fractures. At 3 months of follow-up, the patient had partial recovery of facial nerve function bilaterally and improvement in HB classification to grade III and ENoG of 60% was observed.

  4. Facial paralysis reconstruction in children and adolescents with central nervous system tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panossian, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Facial paralysis remains a vexing problem in the treatment of posterior cranial fossa tumors in children. Fortunately, current techniques are available to reconstruct the paralyzed face in restoring balance, symmetry, and amelioration of functional sequelae. The restoration of structure and function of the paralyzed face is tantamount to proper social integration and psychosocial rehabilitation. In addition, the facial nerve is important in preventing drying of the eyes, drooling, and speech abnormalities, among other functions. The most visible evidence of facial paralysis is stark asymmetry, especially with animation. This is perhaps the most troubling aspect of facial paralysis and the one that leads to the greatest amount of psychosocial stress for the child and family members. Management strategies include early and late intervention. Early reconstructive goals focus on preservation and strengthening of intact motor end plates through native stimulatory pathways. Late reconstructive efforts are centered on surgically reconstructing permanently lost function based on each third of the face. Use of adjunct modalities such as chemical or surgical denervation and myectomies are also critical tools in restoring symmetry. Physical therapy plays a large role in both early and late facial nerve paralysis in optimizing cosmetic and functional outcome.

  5. Quality-of-life improvement after free gracilis muscle transfer for smile restoration in patients with facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Robin W; Bhama, Prabhat; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-01-01

    Facial paralysis can contribute to disfigurement, psychological difficulties, and an inability to convey emotion via facial expression. In patients unable to perform a meaningful smile, free gracilis muscle transfer (FGMT) can often restore smile function. However, little is known about the impact on disease-specific quality of life. To determine quantitatively whether FGMT improves quality of life in patients with facial paralysis. Prospective evaluation of 154 FGMTs performed at a facial nerve center on 148 patients with facial paralysis. The Facial Clinimetric Evaluation (FaCE) survey and Facial Assessment by Computer Evaluation software (FACE-gram) were used to quantify quality-of-life improvement, oral commissure excursion, and symmetry with smile. Free gracilis muscle transfer. Change in FaCE score, oral commissure excursion, and symmetry with smile. There were 127 successful FGMTs on 124 patients and 14 failed procedures on 13 patients. Mean (SD) FaCE score increased significantly after successful FGMT (42.30 [15.9] vs 58.5 [17.60]; paired 2-tailed t test, P Free gracilis muscle transfer has become a mainstay in the management armamentarium for patients with severe reduction in oral commissure movement after facial nerve insult and recovery. We found a quantitative improvement in quality of life after FGMT in patients who could not recover a meaningful smile after facial nerve insult. Quality-of-life improvement was not statistically different between donor nerve groups or facial paralysis types.

  6. SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE: CASE REPORT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE:: Case Report BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE:: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumour are discussed with literature review. CLINICAL PRESENTATION:: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left sided tongue wasting. On examination there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2cm x 2cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral sub occipital craniotomy was carried out in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumour was not attempted due to its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed and neuropathology confirmed a low grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient is scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION:: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focussed on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted in the MRI scan, a pre-operative angiogram should be performed with a view for embolisation.We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved a good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumours and regular follow up with MRI scans.

  7. SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE: CASE REPORT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raza, Kazim

    2011-01-25

    SOLITARY PARAGANGLIOMA OF THE HYPOGLOSSAL NERVE:: Case Report BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE:: We report the case history of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma in a 64-year-old woman. The surgical difficulties encountered in the removal of this challenging tumour are discussed with literature review. CLINICAL PRESENTATION:: A 64-year-old woman presented with a short history of dysphonia, occasional dysphagia, tinnitus, altered taste, and unilateral left sided tongue wasting. On examination there was left lower motor hypoglossal paralysis. Imaging showed a discrete enhancing lobulated mass, measuring 2cm x 2cm, in the region of the hypoglossal nerve extending into the hypoglossal canal suggestive of hypoglossal paraganglioma. A left dorsolateral sub occipital craniotomy was carried out in the sitting position. The hypoglossal nerve appeared to be enlarged and the jugular foramen was normal. Complete surgical debulking of the tumour was not attempted due to its vascular nature. The nerve was decompressed and neuropathology confirmed a low grade paraganglioma arising from the hypoglossal nerve. The patient is scheduled to receive stereotactic radiation for further management. CONCLUSION:: When a case of solitary hypoglossal paraganglioma is encountered in clinical practice, the aim of management should be mainly focussed on achieving a diagnosis and preserving the hypoglossal nerve function. If there is evidence of vascularity in the lesion noted in the MRI scan, a pre-operative angiogram should be performed with a view for embolisation.We decompressed the hypoglossal canal and achieved a good improvement in the patient\\'s symptoms. We recommend stereotactic radiosurgery for remnant and small hypoglossal tumours and regular follow up with MRI scans.

  8. Clinical and biochemical spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in North: East India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok K Kayal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute hypokalemic paralysis, characterized by acute flaccid paralysis is primarily a calcium channelopathy, but secondary causes like renal tubular acidosis (RTA, thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP, primary hyperaldosteronism, Gitelman′s syndrome are also frequent. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with hypokalemic paralysis. Materials And Methods: All patients who presented with acute flaccid paralysis with hypokalemia from October 2009 to September 2011 were included in the study. A detailed physical examination and laboratory tests including serum electrolytes, serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK, urine analysis, arterial blood gas analysis, thyroid hormones estimation, and electrocardiogram were carried out. Patients were further investigated for any secondary causes and treated with potassium supplementation. Result: The study included 56 patients aged 15-92 years (mean 36.76 ± 13.72, including 15 female patients. Twenty-four patients had hypokalemic paralysis due to secondary cause, which included 4 with distal RTA, 4 with Gitelman syndrome, 3 with TPP, 2 each with hypothyroidism, gastroenteritis, and Liddle′s syndrome, 1 primary hyperaldosteronism, 3 with alcoholism, and 1 with dengue fever. Two female patients were antinuclear antibody-positive. Eleven patient had atypical presentation (neck muscle weakness in 4, bladder involvement in 3, 1 each with finger drop and foot drop, tetany in 1, and calf hypertrophy in 1, and 2 patient had respiratory paralysis. Five patients had positive family history of similar illness. All patients improved dramatically with potassium supplementation. Conclusion: A high percentage (42.9% of secondary cause for hypokalemic paralysis warrants that the underlying cause must be adequately addressed to prevent the persistence or recurrence of paralysis.

  9. Clinical and biochemical spectrum of hypokalemic paralysis in North: East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Ashok K.; Goswami, Munindra; Das, Marami; Jain, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Background: Acute hypokalemic paralysis, characterized by acute flaccid paralysis is primarily a calcium channelopathy, but secondary causes like renal tubular acidosis (RTA), thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), primary hyperaldosteronism, Gitelman’s syndrome are also frequent. Objective: To study the etiology, varied presentations, and outcome after therapy of patients with hypokalemic paralysis. Materials And Methods: All patients who presented with acute flaccid paralysis with hypokalemia from October 2009 to September 2011 were included in the study. A detailed physical examination and laboratory tests including serum electrolytes, serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK), urine analysis, arterial blood gas analysis, thyroid hormones estimation, and electrocardiogram were carried out. Patients were further investigated for any secondary causes and treated with potassium supplementation. Result: The study included 56 patients aged 15-92 years (mean 36.76 ± 13.72), including 15 female patients. Twenty-four patients had hypokalemic paralysis due to secondary cause, which included 4 with distal RTA, 4 with Gitelman syndrome, 3 with TPP, 2 each with hypothyroidism, gastroenteritis, and Liddle’s syndrome, 1 primary hyperaldosteronism, 3 with alcoholism, and 1 with dengue fever. Two female patients were antinuclear antibody-positive. Eleven patient had atypical presentation (neck muscle weakness in 4, bladder involvement in 3, 1 each with finger drop and foot drop, tetany in 1, and calf hypertrophy in 1), and 2 patient had respiratory paralysis. Five patients had positive family history of similar illness. All patients improved dramatically with potassium supplementation. Conclusion: A high percentage (42.9%) of secondary cause for hypokalemic paralysis warrants that the underlying cause must be adequately addressed to prevent the persistence or recurrence of paralysis. PMID:23956566

  10. Oculomotor paralysis: 3D-CISS MR imaging with MPR in the evaluation of neuralgic manifestation and the adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiaoli; Liang Changhu [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jing-wu Road No. 324, Jinan 250021 (China); Liu Cheng [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jing-wu Road No. 324, Jinan 250021 (China)], E-mail: sdsxl2005@126.com; Liu Shuwei; Deng Kai; He Jingzhen [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jing-wu Road No. 324, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of three-dimensional (3D) constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) in displaying the relationship between the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures for patients with oculomotor paralysis. Materials and methods: 17 consecutive patients with oculomotor paralysis were examined with 3D-CISS and conventional spin-echo (SE) sequences on a 1.5-Tesla MR system. Original transverse and MPR images were used for image interpretation. The features of the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures were identified. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all patients. Results: Through 3D-CISS with MPR images, obvious relationship of the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures was demonstrated on 17 patients. Of those oculomotor nerves, 15 were compressed by the arteries (n = 15), one by the craniopharyngioma (n = 1), and another one by the neurofibroma (n = 1). Conclusion: 3D-CISS MR imaging with MPR provides an excellent way to characterize the relationship between the nerve and its adjacent structures in the cisternal segment of the oculomotor nerve in the patients with oculomotor paralysis. Moreover, this method shows anatomical details for imaging diagnosis and surgical procedure.

  11. Development of a method that eliminates false-positive results due to nerve growth factor interference in the assessment of fulranumab immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Schantz, Allen; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Cannon, Michael; Shankar, Gopi

    2014-05-01

    Fulranumab, a human IgG2 monoclonal antibody that neutralizes nerve growth factor (NGF), is currently in development for the treatment of pain. Our initial immunogenicity test method was found to be prone to NGF interference, leading to a high apparent incidence of anti-drug antibody (ADA) in phase 1 studies. The ADA immunoassay comprised a homogeneous bridging electrochemiluminescence (ECL) format with biotin and ruthenium-labeled fulranumab bound together ("bridged") by ADA in test samples for detection. In this assay, NGF produced a false-positive signal due to its ability to bridge fulranumab molecules. Thus, we developed a specificity assay to eliminate the NGF false-positive results. We encountered the challenge of eliminating drug interference as well as drug target interference, and discovered that the acid-dissociation-based pretreatment of samples used for mitigating drug interference dramatically increased drug target interference. Several strategies were investigated to eliminate the NGF interference; yet only one strategy specifically removed NGF and produced true fulranumab-specific ADA results by using competitive inhibition with fulranumab and utilizing an alternative NGF binding antibody to eliminate NGF interference. Using this new method, we confirmed that the high apparent anti-fulranumab antibody incidence (>60%) in clinical study samples was in fact due to fulranumab-bound NGF released during the acid-dissociation step of the ADA testing method. We conclude that our revised method accurately identifies anti-fulranumab antibodies by incorporating steps to eliminate fulranumab and NGF interference. We advise that acid-dissociation pretreatment must not be universally applied to improve ADA assays without investigating its bioanalytical risks versus benefits.

  12. A CASE REPORT: THYROTOXIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS: A DIAGNOSTIC CHALLENGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP is an alarming and potentially lethal complication of hyperthyroidism characterised by muscle paralysis and hypokalaemia. A 32 year old Asian male, presented at our institute with bilateral lower limb weakness, which was preceded by heavy exercise. He had no history suggestive of sensory, cranial nerve, bladder or bowel involvement. He had two similar episodes in past 1 year which were mild, recovered within few hours. No family member had similar symptoms. On examination: Pt. had sinus tachycardia, fine tremors. Motor system examination showed the presence of paresis 3/5 of lower limbs. Sensory system examination was within normal limits. Rest of the neurological and systemic examination was otherwise normal. Investigations revealed: Serum electrolyte: Sodium - 138 mEq/L, Potassium - 2.2mEq/L, Chloride - 112mEq/L. Electrocardiogram: sinus tachycardia. Immediate supplementation with Potassium Chloride I.V was given. Recurrent episodes of flaccid paralysis with quick recovery in the hospital were suggestiv e of a periodic paralysis. On further investigation Thyroid profile was: FT3 - 8.6pmol/L (4 – 7.4 , FT4 - 28.7pmol/L (10 - 19 , TSH - 0.005 uIU/ml (0.4 – 4.2. Anti TPO – 10.2 IU/ml (0.00 – 40.00 IU/ml, USG thyroid: normal, Urine electrolytes: normal. The diagnosis at initial presentation was delayed like most cases of TPP because of the subtleness of the clinical features of thyrotoxicosis. Treatments with low - dose potassium supplements, nonselective beta - blockers, and antithyroid drugs were initiated. Pa tient’s follow - up was done after 4weeks with thyroid profile, CBC, electrolytes which were normal. Patient followed up till 6months where he was asymptomatic. Diagnosis requires obtaining a complete history which will result in early diagnosis, appropriate treatment and prevention of severe cardiopulmonary complications. Practitioners should consider obtaining a screening TSH in patients with

  13. Facial paralysis reconstruction with Gore-Tex Soft-Tissue Patch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konior, R J

    1992-11-01

    No procedure perfectly restores a face paralyzed by surgical ablation of the facial nerve. Although dynamic reconstructive procedures are preferred for treating patients with complete facial paralysis, various conditions contraindicate their use, making static suspension of the paralyzed face a reasonable surgical alternative. Expanded polytef soft-tissue patch (polytetrafluoroethylene; Gore-Tex Soft-Tissue Patch, Gore-Tex, W. L. Gore & Assoc Inc., Flagstaff, Ariz) was used to help correct midfacial and perioral asymmetries in 11 patients with complete unilateral facial paralysis. All patients had previous surgical ablation of the facial nerve and were not considered good candidates for dynamic facial reconstruction. Midfacial and perioral asymmetries were improved in all patients using this technique of static soft-tissue suspension. One postoperative infection and two cases of postoperative suture extrusion were observed in the patient population. Other complications associated with the use of Gore-Tex Soft-Tissue Patch for facial suspension were limited to technical factors.

  14. Inspections of causes in vocal cord paralysis with diagnostic imaging. Cases with malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Masaki; Yuyama, Seiichirou; Kaneko, Madoka; Furukawa, Shigeru; Kubota, Akira; Hiiragi, Koichi; Ooishi, Kiminao; Sawaki, Shuji; Igari, Hidenori.

    1988-02-01

    The vocal cord paralysis may be caused by the occult type malignancies. The tumor occupies along the route of the vagus nerve or recurrent laryngeal nerve. To detect such a malignant tumor, it is advocated that the diagnosis should be performed with various kind of figures, such as X-ray picture, CT and ultrasonography. Consequently 13 cases were diagnosed to the malignant tumors among 31 vocal cord paralysis cases. They were thyroid cancer, lung cancer, esophageal cancer and others. CT and ultrasonography were very useful for the evaluation of the mass lesions in the head and neck area. Additionally, the fine needle aspiration biopsy under the ultrasonographic imaging was available to diagnose whether the mass lesions were benign or malignant.

  15. Tick paralysis cases in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Remondegui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Tick paralysis (TP occurs worldwide and is caused by a neurotoxin secreted by engorged female ticks that affects the peripheral and central nervous system. The clinical manifestations range from mild or nonspecific symptoms to manifestations similar to Guillain-Barré syndrome, bulbar involvement, and death in 10% of the patients. The diagnosis of TP is clinical. To our knowledge, there are no formal reports of TP in humans in South America, although clusters of TP among hunting dogs in Argentina have been identified recently. In this paper, clinical features of two cases of TP occurring during 1994 in Jujuy Province, Argentina, are described.

  16. Pulmonary mucormycosis presenting with vocal cord paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gayathri Devi, H. J.; Mohan Rao, K.N.; K M Prathima; Moideen, Riyaz

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary mucormycosis is a relatively uncommon infection. It can present in various forms. Very few cases of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis have been described in the literature. We report a case of pulmonary mucormycosis presenting as vocal cord paralysis in an uncontrolled diabetic patient.

  17. [Hypokalemic periodic paralysis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areta-Higuera, J D; Algaba-Montes, M; Oviedo-García, A Á

    2014-01-01

    Periodic paralysis is a rare disorder that causes episodes of severe muscle weakness that can be confused with other diseases, including epilepsy or myasthenia gravis. Hyperkalemic and hypokalemic paralysis are included within these diseases, the latter being divided into periodic paralysis (familial, thyrotoxic or sporadic) and non-periodic paralysis. In this regard, we present a case of familial hypokalemic periodic paralysis in an eighteen year-old female who was diagnosed with epilepsy in childhood, as well as a subclinical hypothyroidism (for which she received replacement therapy) months ago. The diagnosis was made by the anamnesis and the confirmation of hypokalemia. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Nerve biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nerve ... A nerve biopsy is most often done on a nerve in the ankle, forearm, or along a rib. The health care ... feel a prick and a mild sting. The biopsy site may be sore for a few days ...

  19. Burkitt's non-Hodgkins lymphoma presenting as facial nerve palsy in HIV-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, H; Nelson, M

    2011-02-01

    An isolated facial nerve palsy is rare as the presentation of a central nervous system lymphoma. In this case series, we present the clinical features of three HIV-positive patients presenting with facial nerve palsies due to HIV-associated Burkitt's lymphoma. These patients had a non-resolving facial paralysis, which occurred during a late stage of HIV. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed a lymphocytosis with elevated protein and low glucose levels. The diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma was made on histology which showed the characteristic 'starry sky' appearance due to scattered tangible body-laden macrophages. The patients were commenced on the intensive chemotherapy regimen of CODOX-M/IVAC. Two patients died of disease progression and the third patient died of chemotherapy toxicity. This case series highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for underlying malignancy when a patient presents with a persistent facial paralysis in the later stages of HIV infection.

  20. A STUDY ON CLINICAL AND AETIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF HYPOKALAEMIC PARALYSIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekathi Vidyasagar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is a rare disorder characterised by transient attacks of flaccid paralysis of varying intensity and frequency. Although mostly familial in aetiology, several sporadic cases with different causes have been reported. There are two groups of disorders predominantly that causes hypokalaemic paralysis. One group is due to transcellular shift of potassium and other is due to loss of potassium from body either through GI tract or through renal system. MATERIAL AND METHODS Here we report a study on the clinical and aetiological profile of 30 cases of hypokalaemic paralysis admitted in our institution between January 2014 to January 2016. RESULTS The aetiological workup of all the patients was done which revealed thyrotoxic periodic paralysis as the major cause in 12 of 30 patients. Three rare causes of hypokalaemia have been diagnosed which included Bartter’s syndrome, Mixed Connective tissue disorder, Sjogren’s syndrome. Vomiting and diarrhoea was seen in 12 of 30 patients. CONCLUSION Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis is a heterogenous group of disorder. A significant number of patients had thyroid disorders mostly in the form of thyrotoxicosis, non-renal and renal loss of potassium like diarrhoea and vomiting. Early recognition and prompt management of these conditions is essential to prevent residual deformity and further attacks in future.

  1. Sarcoidosis with Major Airway, Vascular and Nerve Compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sekiguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a 60-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with progressive dyspnea, cough and wheeze. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed innumerable bilateral inflammatory pulmonary nodules with bronchovascular distribution and a mediastinal and hilar infiltrative process with calcified lymphadenopathy leading to narrowing of lobar bronchi and pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed left vocal cord paralysis and significant narrowing of the bilateral bronchi with mucosal thickening and multiple nodules. Transbronchial biopsy was compatible with sarcoidosis. Despite balloon angioplasty of the left lower lobe and pulmonary artery, and medical therapy with oral corticosteroids, her symptoms did not significantly improve. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report describes the first case of pulmonary sarcoidosis resulting in major airway, vascular and nerve compromise due to compressive lymphadenopathy and suspected concurrent granulomatous infiltration. Its presentation mimicked idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis.

  2. A review of the factors causing paralysis in wild birds: Implications for the paralytic syndrome observed in the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne, Christian; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Therkildsen, Ole Roland

    2012-02-01

    We reviewed paralysis in wild birds with a special focus on the Baltic Sea paralytic syndrome recently described by Balk et al. (2009) by assessing multiple causative factors. The review showed that paralysis may occur in various species and that the aetiology can be divided into biotoxins, nutritional deficiencies, environmental contaminants and infectious diseases. The review also showed that the symptoms are influenced by age, sex and species of the affected individual. It seemed that paralysis may be treated or relieved by e.g. thiamine injections or additives. Due to a lack of extensive diagnostic studies, the potentially negative effects of paralysis at the population level of wild birds remain unsolved. We recommend that when investigating paralysis in wild birds, a holistic study approach including multiple factors are undertaken in order to pinpoint cause-and-effect relationships as well as the potential impacts on wild bird populations including those in the Baltic Sea.

  3. Neuron-Specific Deletion of the Nf2 Tumor Suppressor Impairs Functional Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Toledo, Andrea; Baader, Stephan L.; von Maltzahn, Julia; Irintchev, Andrey; Bauer, Reinhard; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to axons of the central nervous system (CNS), axons of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) show better, but still incomplete and often slow regeneration following injury. The tumor suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumor syndrome Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), has recently been shown to have RhoA regulatory functions in PNS neurons—in addition to its well-characterized, growth-inhibitory activity in Schwann cells. Here we report that the conditional knockout of merlin in PNS neurons leads to impaired functional recovery of mice following sciatic nerve crush injury, in a gene-dosage dependent manner. Gross anatomical or electrophysiological alterations of sciatic nerves could not be detected. However, correlating with attenuated RhoA activation due to merlin deletion, ultrastructural analysis of nerve samples indicated enhanced sprouting of axons with reduced caliber size and increased myelination compared to wildtype animals. We conclude that deletion of the tumor suppressor merlin in the neuronal compartment of peripheral nerves results in compromised functional regeneration after injury. This mechanism could explain the clinical observation that NF2 patients suffer from higher incidences of slowly recovering facial nerve paralysis after vestibular schwannoma surgery. PMID:27467574

  4. Treatment of Pseudobulbar Paralysis by Scalp Acupuncture and Sublingual Needling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘裕民

    2004-01-01

    @@ Pseudobulbar or supranuclear paralysis is one of the severe complications after stoke. Clinically, it is characterized by dysphagia (difficulty in swallowing), dyslalia (impairment of utterance with abnormality of the external speech organs) and hoarseness due to bilateral lesions of the corticospinal tract. It may lead to malnutrition and disturbance of metabolism subsequent to dysphagia, or pulmonary infections due to swallowing of foreign bodies into the trachea, and or even death due to suffocation. We have treated such patients by scalp acupuncture1 plus the sublingual needling art initiated by Dr. Liu Jisheng (刘济生). The therapeutic results are satisfactory and reported as follow.

  5. The functional anatomy of suggested limb paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeley, Quinton; Oakley, David A; Toone, Brian; Bell, Vaughan; Walsh, Eamonn; Marquand, Andre F; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J; Williams, Steven C R; Mehta, Mitul A; Halligan, Peter W

    2013-02-01

    Suggestions of limb paralysis in highly hypnotically suggestible subjects have been employed to successfully model conversion disorders, revealing similar patterns of brain activation associated with attempted movement of the affected limb. However, previous studies differ with regard to the executive regions involved during involuntary inhibition of the affected limb. This difference may have arisen as previous studies did not control for differences in hypnosis depth between conditions and/or include subjective measures to explore the experience of suggested paralysis. In the current study we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the functional anatomy of left and right upper limb movements in eight healthy subjects selected for high hypnotic suggestibility during (i) hypnosis (NORMAL) and (ii) attempted movement following additional left upper limb paralysis suggestions (PARALYSIS). Contrast of left upper limb motor function during NORMAL relative to PARALYSIS conditions revealed greater activation of contralateral M1/S1 and ipsilateral cerebellum, consistent with the engagement of these regions in the completion of movements. By contrast, two significant observations were noted in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions. In conjunction with reports of attempts to move the paralysed limb, greater supplementary motor area (SMA) activation was observed, a finding consistent with the role of SMA in motor intention and planning. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, BA 24) was also significantly more active in PARALYSIS relative to NORMAL conditions - suggesting that ACC (BA 24) may be implicated in involuntary, as well as voluntary inhibition of prepotent motor responses.

  6. Force assessment in periodic paralysis after electrical muscle stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John W; Sakamoto, Carl; Parry, Gareth J; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2002-03-01

    To obtain an objective measure of muscle force in periodic paralysis, we studied ankle dorsiflexion torque during induced paralytic attacks in hyperkalemic and hypokalemic patients. SUBJECTS, PATIENTS, AND METHODS: Dorsiflexor torque after peroneal nerve stimulation was recorded during provocative tests on 5 patients with hypokalemic or hyperkalemic disorders and on 2 control subjects (1995-2001). Manual strength assessment was simultaneously performed in a blinded fashion. Standardized provocation procedures were used. The loss of torque in hyperkalemic patients roughly paralleled the loss of clinically detectable strength, whereas in the hypokalemic patients, pronounced torque loss occurred well before observed clinical effects. No dramatic changes occurred in the control subjects. Torque amplitude decreased more than 70% in all patients during the provocation tests; such decreases were associated with alterations induced in serum potassium concentrations. Stimulated torque measurement offers several advantages in characterizing muscle dysfunction in periodic paralysis: (1) it is independent of patient effort; (2) it can show a definitely abnormal response early during provocative maneuvers; and (3) characteristics of muscle contraction can be measured that are unobservable during voluntary contraction. Stimulated torque measurements can characterize phenotypic muscle function in neuromuscular diseases.

  7. Reanimation of the middle and lower face in facial paralysis: review of the literature and personal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, Shadi; MacQuillan, Anthony; Grobbelaar, Adriaan O

    2011-04-01

    Facial paralysis refers to a condition in which all or portions of the facial nerve are paralysed. The facial nerve controls the muscles of facial expression, paralysis which results in a lack of facial expression which is not only an aesthetic issue, but has functional consequences as the patient cannot communicate effectively. The treatment of long-standing facial paralysis has challenged plastic surgeons for centuries, and still the ultimate goal of normality of the paralysed hemi-face with symmetry at rest as well as the generation of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection has not yet fully been reached. Until the end of the 19th century, the treatment of this condition involved non-surgical means such as ointments, medicines and electrotherapy. With the advent and refinement of microvascular surgical techniques in the latter half of the 20th century, vascularised free muscle transfers coupled with cross-facial nerve grafts were introduced, allowing the possibility of spontaneous emotion being restored to the paralysed face became reality. The aim of this article is to revisit the surgical evolution and current options available as well as outcomes for patients suffering from facial paralysis concentrating on middle and lower face reanimation.

  8. [Hypoglycaemic periodic paralysis in hyperthyroidism patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochvíl, J; Masopust, J; Martínková, V; Charvát, J

    2008-11-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) is a rare disorder characterised by acute, potentially fatal atacks of muscle weakness or paralysis. Massive shift of potassium into cells is caused by elevated levels of insulin and catecholamines in the blood. Hypophosphatemia and hypomagnesemia may be also present. Acidobasic status usually is not impaired. HPP occurs as familiar (caused by ion channels inherited defects) or acquired (in patients with hyperthyroidism). On the basis of two clinical cases we present a review of hypokalemic periodic paralysis in hyperthyroid patients. We discuss patogenesis, clinical and laboratory findings as well as the principles of prevention and treatment of this rare disorder.

  9. Functional and electrophysiological evaluation of the effect of laser therapy in the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Takamoto, Marcia; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Campos, Roberto A. d. C.; Castanho Garrini, Ana E.; Bologna, Elisangela D.; Settanni, Flavio

    2001-04-01

    This clinical case report relates to a total of 4 patients, carriers of idiopathic facial paralysis, treated with Low Level Laser Therapy using a Gallium-Aluminum-Arsenide diode laser of 780 nm, 50 mW, continuous wave emission, spot size 3 mm2 and total dosage of 20 joules per session distributed to the peripheral trajectory of the injured nerve in a point by point contact mode. Altogether 24 treatment sessions were performed in a period of 12 consecutive weeks twice a week All treated patients presented recovery signs from the initial degree of paralysis.

  10. Current Situation and Evaluation of Clinical Studies on Acupuncture and Moxibustion Treatment of Peripheral Facial Paralysis at Selected Stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; WU Xi; HU Ka-ming; CHEN Xiao-qin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Peripheral facial paralysis is a frequently encountered disease with a high incidence, and it is one of the most common diseases in acupuncture and moxibustion treatment. Because there are rich literatures in clinical studies on acupuncture and moxibustion treatment for this disease, and clinically, it is divided into different stages, in the present paper the current situation of clinical studies about acupuncture and moxibustion treatment for peripheral facial paralysis according to different stages in resent years are analyzed and evaluated including the stage division,the optimal time for treatment, location of injured nerves and assessment of the therapeutic effect, etc.

  11. Evaluation of Semon's Law in Laryngeal Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hedayaty

    1957-01-01

    Full Text Available We have discussed hi t . ] . IS orica and clinical aspects of Semon's L concernIng the hevaviOur of the vocal cords' aw net ve paralysis and the exist' diff In the recurrent laryngeal Althou h ' mg I erent theories for its explanation. g One may fwd certain truth in neverthless, it seemsfl' SOmeof the old theories, ar more ogical and satisfactor the explanation of th S 'L y to us to search e ernon s aw throu h the anatomy of the SU . I g Our new knowledge of penor aryngeal nerve in man d i which innervate the .t' an ItS motor fibers In erarytenOld muscle.

  12. [Summery and recommendations for acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Qiang; Yu, Su; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2011-12-01

    Articles on acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis were picked up from CNKI database. The retrieved original studies were evaluated and summarized. The problems of acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis were analyzed, and concrete solutions were proposed. Problems that differential diagnosis, prognosis, treatment of severe facial paralysis, and identification of sequelae and compliation were not embasized in clinical treatment of facial paralysis. Consequently, the effectiveness of acupuncture for peripheral facial paralysis will be improved by sloving above problems.

  13. Normokalemic periodic paralysis is not a distinct disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Wha; Kim, Sung-Jo; Heo, Tae-Hwe; Kim, Man-Ho; Kim, June-Bum

    2012-12-01

    Recent molecular studies of the original cases of normokalemic periodic paralysis (normoKPP) have raised suspicions that these families actually had hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (hyperKPP) due to mutations in the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene SCN4A. However, there is still a debate about the existence of normoKPP. We screened 230 individuals with primary periodic paralysis for mutations in the SCN4A, CACNA1S, and KCNJ2 genes. All patients had either a hyperKPP or a hypoKPP phenotype, and none had a normoKPP phenotype. In 4 hyperKPP patients from 2 families, molecular analyses revealed Arg675Gly and Arg675Gln mutations of SCN4A, which were previously reported to cause normoKPP. Each patient exhibited the characteristic clinical and laboratory features (including hyperkalemia during spontaneous attacks) of hyperKPP. Our findings support the notion that normoKPP is not a distinct disease. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis: causal or incidental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Garg, Ravindra Kumar

    2014-05-15

    Dengue-associated hypokalemic paralysis is considered an important but under-emphasized neuromuscular complication of dengue virus infection. Review of the published literature reveals that 35 instances of hypokalemic paralysis associated with dengue have been recorded from the Indian subcontinent and all but two, were males. The median age of presentation is 29 years and moderate to severe grade pure motor quadriparesis is precipitated during the phase of defervescence of moderate to high-grade fever. Recovery starts within 12h of potassium supplementation and is usually complete in a couple of days. Redistribution or increased loss of potassium from the body is speculated as the pathophysiological mechanism involved in the causation of hypokalemia. It is not possible to derive the exact etiopathological correlation from the published literature either due to a lack of comprehensive reporting or inadequate work-up of the patients. Curious is the fact that only 35 patients had manifest-paralysis when more than two-thirds affected with the dengue virus exhibit hypokalemia; whether this indicates a genetically mediated channel disorder or an incidental association remains to be seen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tick paralysis: first zoonosis record in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosabah, Amira A Abd El-rahman; Morsy, Tosson A

    2012-04-01

    Tick paralysis caused by the secretion of toxin with saliva while taking a blood meal is an important veterinary disease, but is rare in humans. Although it has certain geographical proclivities, it exists worldwide. Tick paralysis was demonstrated for the first time in Egypt among four children living in rural area at Giza Governorate. The clinical pictures were confused with rabies; myasthensia gravis; botulism; diphtheritic polyneuropathy encountered in rural areas. The recovery of tick infesting the four little children and negative clinical and laboratory data of all diseases denoted tick paralysis. The encountered ticks infesting their animals were Rhipicephalus sanguineus on dogs, Hyalomma dromedarii on camels and Hyalomma anatolicum excavatum and Haemaphysalis sp. on goats. The case was recognized as first record of tick paralysis in Egypt.

  16. DIAGNOSTICATION OF HYPERKALEMIC PERIODIC PARALYSIS IN HORSES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S.E. GEORGESCU; MARIA ADINA MANEA; ANCA DINISCHIOTU; C.D. TESIO; MARIETA COSTACHE

    2013-01-01

    Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is a muscle disease which has been firstreported in 1985 in the USA, in a group of 4 horses with episodic weaknessassociated with intermittent serum hyperkalemia...

  17. Voltage Sensors in Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Researchers at the National Hospital, Queen Square, London, UK, conducted automated DNA sequencing of the S4 regions of CACNA1S and SCN4A in 83 patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP.

  18. Equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: review and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, J M

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to present an up-to-date summary of the signs, diagnosis, treatment, and implications of equine hyperkalemic periodic paralysis. The review encompasses all original articles published between 1986 and early 1993. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is the result of a genetic mutation in the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait; most affected horses are heterozygotes. The classical signs are muscle fasciculation, spasm, and weakness associated with hyperkalemia. However, these signs are only rarely observed in affected horses. Potential sequelae to attacks are abrasions and involuntary recumbency; these problems are not specific for hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, but they occur more frequently in hyperkalemic periodic paralysis-affected horses. It is also likely that hyperkalemic periodic paralysis results in greater muscle mass. There are suggestions that homozygotes may be more severely affected and show signs of upper respiratory obstruction as foals. The practitioner needs to be aware of the tests for hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, and their limitations, so that he can properly diagnose this condition. The industry has the difficult problem of deciding whether or not testing should be mandatory and the fate of positive horses.

  19. Anatomical study of sciatic nerve and common peroneal nerve compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzhao Jia; Qing Xia; Jinmin Sun; Qiang Zhou; Weidong Wang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many diseases of the common peroneal nerve are a result of sciatic nerve injury. The present study addresses whether anatomical positioning of the sciatic nerve is responsible for these injuries. OBJECTIVE: To analyze anatomical causes of sciatic nerve and common peroneal nerve injury by studying the relationship between the sciatic nerve and piriformis. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Observe and measure repeatedly. The experiment was conducted in the Department of Anatomy, Tianjin Medical College between January and June 2005. MATERIALS: Fifty-two adult cadavers 33 males and 19 females, with a total of 104 hemispheres, and fixed with formaldehyde, were provided by Tianjin Medical College and Tianjin Medical University. METHODS: A posterior cut was made from the lumbosacral region to the upper leg, fully exposing the piriformis and path of the sciatic nerve. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Anatomical characteristics of the tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve. (2) According to different areas where the sciatic nerve crosses the piriformis, the study was divided into two types--normal and abnormal. Normal is considered to be when the sciatic nerve passes through the infrapiriform foramen. Remaining pathways are considered to be abnormal. (3) Observe the relationship between the suprapiriform foramen, infrapiriform foramen, as well as the superior and inferior space of piriformis. RESULTS: (1) The nerve tract inside the common peroneal nerve is smaller and thinner, with less connective tissue than the tibial nerve. When pathological changes or variations of the piriformis, or over-abduction of the hip joint, occur, injury to the common peroneal nerve often arises due to blockage and compression. (2) A total of 76 hemispheres (73.08%) were normal, 28 were abnormal (26.92%). The piriformis can be injured, and the sciatic nerve can become compressed, when the hip joint undergoes intorsion, extorsion, or abduction. (3) The structures between the infrapiriform and

  20. 3 dimensional volume MR imaging of intratemporal facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hyun Ung; Moon, Woong Jae [Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of 3 dimensional volume MR imaging technique for demonstrating the facial nerves and to describe MR findings in facial palsy patients and evaluate the significance of facial nerve enhancement. We reviewed the MR images of facial nerves obtained with 3 dimensional volume imaging technique before and after intravenous administration of Gadopentetate dimeglumine in 13 cases who had facial paralysis and 33 cases who had no facial palsy. And we analyzed the detectability of ananatomical segments of intratemporal facial nerves and facial nerve enhancement. When the 3 dimensional volume MR images of 46 nerves were analyzed subjectively, the nerve courses of 43(93%) of 46 nerves were effectively demonstrated on 3 dimensional volume MR images. Internal acoustic canal portions and geniculate ganglion of facial nerve were well visualized on axial images and tympanic and mastoid segments were well depicted on oblique sagittal images. 10 of 13 patients(77%) were visibly enhanced along at least one segment of the facial nerve with swelling or thickening, and nerves of 8 of normal 33 cases(24%) were enhanced without thickening or swelling. MR findings of facial nerve parelysis is asymmetrical thickening of facial nerve with contrast enhancement. The 3 dimensional volume MR imaging technique should be a useful study for the evaluation of intratemporal facial nerve disease.

  1. An uncommon case of dyspnea with unilateral laryngeal paralysis in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerat, Justine; Lacoste, Marie; Prechoux, Jean-Marc; Aubry, Karine; Nadalon, Sylvie; Ly, Kim Heang; Bessede, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    A 61-year-old man with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and normal BMI complained of dyspnea. Nasofibroscopy revealed a global and major oedema of the glottis and supraglottis and also a paralysis of the left vocal fold. CT-scan pointed out a spontaneous hyperdensity of the left arytenoid cartilage. A tracheostomy was performed. Clinical examination revealed large hands and macroglossy with high IGF1 rate. MRI confirmed a supracentimetric pituitary adenoma. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a case of acute respiratory distress due to unilateral larynx paralysis leading to acromegaly diagnosis. This is due to submucosal hypertrophy and vocal cord immobility.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation: Surgical technique of implantation and revision and related morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Flavio; Zicca, Anna; Barba, Carmen; Guerrini, Renzo; Genitori, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    Indications for vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy include focal, multifocal epilepsy, drop attacks (tonic/atonic seizures), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-related multifocal epilepsy, and unsuccessful resective surgery. Surgical outcome is about 50-60% for seizures control, and may also improve mood, cognition, and memory. On this basis, VNS has also been proposed for the treatment of major depression and Alzheimer's' disease. The vagus nerve stimulator must be implanted with blunt technique on the left side to avoid cardiac side effects through the classic approach for anterior cervical discectomy. The actual device is composed of a wire with three helical contacts (two active contacts, one anchoring) and a one-pin battery. VNS is usually started 2 weeks after implantation with recommended settings of stimulation (1.0-2.0 mA; 500 μs pulse width; 20-30 Hz; 30 s ON, 5 min OFF). The complications of VNS therapy are early (related to surgery) and late (related to the device and to stimulation of the vagus nerve). Early complications include the following: intraoperative bradycardia and asystole during lead impedance testing, peritracheal hematoma, infections (3-8%), and vagus nerve injury followed by hoarseness, dyspnea, and dysphagia because of left vocal cord paralysis. Delayed morbidity due to the device includes late infections or problems in wound healing; other more rare events are due to late injury of the nerve. Late complications due to nerve stimulation include delayed arrhythmias, laryngopharyngeal dysfunction (hoarseness, dyspnea, and coughing), obstructive sleep apnea, stimulation of phrenic nerve, tonsillar pain mimicking glossopharyngeal neuralgia, and vocal cord damage during prolonged endotracheal intubation. The laryngopharyngeal dysfunction occurs in about 66% of patients and is usually transitory and due to the stimulation of the inferior (recurrent) laryngeal nerve. A true late paralysis of the left vocal cord

  3. Anomalous Innervation of the Median Nerve in the Arm in the Absence of the Musculocutaneous Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed Raza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus innervates the upper extremities. While variations in the formation of the brachial plexus and its terminal branches are quite common, it is uncommon for the median nerve to innervate the muscles of the arm. During the dissection of an elderly male cadaver at the Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India, in 2016, the coracobrachialis muscle was found to be supplied by a direct branch from the lateral root of the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve was absent. The branches of the median nerve supplied the biceps brachii and brachialis muscles and the last branch continued as the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm. These variations may present atypically in cases of arm flexor paralysis or sensory loss on the lateral forearm. Knowledge of these variations is important in surgeries and during the administration of regional anaesthesia near the shoulder joint and upper arm.

  4. Vocal cord paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ericka F; Blumin, Joel H

    2009-12-01

    Vocal fold paralysis (VFP) is an increasingly commonly identified problem in the pediatric patient. Diagnostic and management techniques honed in adult laryngologic practice have been successfully applied to children. Iatrogenic causes, including cardiothoracic procedures, remain a common cause of unilateral VFP. Neurologic disorders predominate in the cause of bilateral VFP. Diagnosis with electromyography is currently being evaluated in children. Treatment of VFP is centered around symptomology, which is commonly divided between voice and airway concerns. Speech therapy shows promise in older children. Surgical management for unilateral VFP with injection laryngoplasty is commonly performed and well tolerated. Laryngeal reinnervation is currently being applied to the pediatric population as a permanent treatment and offers several advantages over laryngeal framework procedures. For bilateral VFP, tracheotomy is still commonly performed. Glottic dilation procedures are performed both openly and endoscopically with a high degree of success. VFP is a well recognized problem in pediatric patients with disordered voice and breathing. Some patients will spontaneously recover their laryngeal function. For those who do not, a variety of reliable techniques are available for rehabilitative treatment.

  5. [Clinical efficacy on peripheral facial paralysis at acute stage treated with opposing needling technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Zhongyi; Chen, Yuelai; Zong, Lei; Li, Jing; Tao, Ying; Zeng, Liang; Hou, Wenguang

    2015-01-01

    To compare the differences in clinical efficacy on peripheral facial paralysis at acute stage between the opposing needling technique and routine acupuncture at the affected side so as to provide the evidence on the acupuncture treatment for peripheral facial paralysis at acute stage. Forty patients were rando- mized into an opposing needling technique group (19 cases) and an affected side needling technique group (21 cases). The basic medication was same in the two groups. The acupoints were Fengchi (GB 20), Yangbai (GB 14) to Yuyao (EX-HN 4) (penetrating needling method), Jingming (BL 1), Chengqi (ST 1), Xiaguan (ST 7), Jiache (ST 6) to Dicang (ST 4), Hegu (LI 4) and Zusanli (ST 36). In supplementation, in the opposing needling technique group, the acupoints were stimulated on the face of healthy side. In the affected side needling technique group, the acupoints were stimulated on the face of the affected side. The treatment was given three times a week, for 4 weeks. House-Brackmann (H-B) facial nerve function assessment was used to evaluate facial nerve function before and after treatment in the patients of the two groups. The efficacy was compared between the two groups. The facial nerve function was recovered in the two groups and the total effective rate was 100.0% in the two groups (P>0.05). The curative rate was 68.4% (13/19) in the opposing needling technique group and better than 47.6% (10/21) in the affected side needling technique group (Pfacial nerve function in peripheral facial paralysis at acute stage and apparently shortens the curative time. The efficacy is better than that in acupuncture on the affect- ed side of the face.

  6. A case of neurofibromatosis developing facial paralysis following treatment with a gamma knife

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    Hosomi, Yoshikazu [Kobe Rosai Hospital (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis is generally classified into types I and II: the latter may be life-threatening when the acoustic nerve tumor becomes enlarged. The author reports on a patient with bilateral acoustic nerve tumors, as well as large tumors at the neck and sacral regions, who developed facial nerve paralysis following surgery in which a gamma knife was used. The patient, a 30-year-old woman with no family history of neurofibromatosis, had a prominent neurofibroma at the pharyngeal region surgically removed when she was about 23. The procedure left her with dysfunctions of the vocal cords and lingual movements. At the age of 30 (March 2001), a tumor originating at S1 of the sacral nerve plexus was removed, which caused her leg movements to be restricted. Later, an acoustic nerve tumor was found to have enlarged; and in July 2001, the left acoustic nerve tumor was extirpated by using a gamma knife. Starting in early 2002, her left facial movements appeared to be compromised but during the follow-up observation period, she regained the movements. Patients with neurofibromatosis are often plagued by the development of multiple tumors and surgical sequelae. One is reminded that it is necessary to plan treatment with sufficient consideration given to quality of life (QOL) (including the problem of an acoustic nerve tumor that may develop in future) as well as individual patients wishes. (author)

  7. [Correlation between facial nerve functional evaluation and efficacy evaluation of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhang-ling; Li, Cheng-xin; Jiang, Yue-bo; Zuo, Cong; Cai, Yun; Wang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    To assess and grade facial nerve dysfunction according to the extent of facial paralysis in the clinical course of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy, and to observe the interrelationship between the grade, the efficacy and the period of treatment, as well as the effect on prognosis. The authors employed the House-Brackmann scale, a commonly used evaluation scale for facial paralysis motor function, and set standards for eye fissure and lips. According to the improved scale, the authors assessed and graded the degree of facial paralysis in terms of facial nerve dysfunction both before and after treatment. The grade was divided into five levels: mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe dysfunction and complete paralysis. The authors gave acupuncture treatment according to the state of the disease without artificially setting the treatment period. The observation was focused on the efficacy and the efficacy was evaluated throughout the entire treatment process. Fifty-three cases out of 68 patients with Bell's palsy were cured and the overall rate of efficacy was 97%. Statistically significant differences (Pfacial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy was correlated with the damage level of the disease (correlation coefficient r=0.423, Pfacial nerve dysfunction (Pfacial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy is reduced in correlation with an increase in facial nerve dysfunction, and the period of treatment varies in need of different levels of facial nerve dysfunction. It is highly necessary to assess and grade patients before observation and treatment in clinical study, and choose corresponding treatment according to severity of damage of the disease.

  8. Clinic-Radiological Study of facial paralysis. Estudio clinico-radiologico de la paralisis facial

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    Olier, J.; Bacaicoa, M.C.; Guridi, J.; Gil, J.L.; Elcarte, F.; Delgado, G. (Hospital de Navarra Pamplona (Spain))

    1992-01-01

    We have gathered 159 cases of facial paralysis from recent records in our hospital, including paralyses of central as well as peripheral origin, and presenting as the only symptom or as one of several major symptoms of the discomfort of each patient. Sixty-four percent of them were studied by CT scan and/or MR, confirming the existence of alterations in the pathway of nerve pair VII in 50% of the patients who underwent radiological study. Idiopathic facial paralysis was the most common type (42% of the total); while tumors and post-traumatic findings were the most constant radiological findings. From the analysis of the data, the importance of the clinical criteria for selection of the patients in the study and the protocol for radiological diagnosis employed can be deduced. (author)

  9. [Observation on therapeutic effect of acupuncture on spontaneous facial paralysis in acute stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Run-Fen; Huang, Shi-Xi

    2011-07-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect and to explore the best opportunity of acupuncture on spontaneous facial paralysis in acute stage. By prospective cohort study, 80 patients were divided into an observation group (n = 59) and a control group (n = 21). The course of disease was less than 5 days in the observation group and more than 7 days in the control group and had not received acupuncture treatment. They were all treated with acupuncture at Sibai (ST 2), Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6) and Cuanzhu (BL 2) etc. for 8 weeks. The facial nerve function grading (House-Brackmann, HB) and facial disable index (FDI) before treatment, 8 days after onset, 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks and 3 months after treatment were evaluated. Both two groups could decrease HB grading and increase FDI score (all P Acupuncture can improve the therapeutic effect, shorten the treatment course and reduce the sequelae incidence of spontaneous facial paralysis in acute stage.

  10. Extensor digitorum brevis and extensor hallusis brevis transplantation for treatment of long-standing facial pa-ralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei-qing; FANG Bai-rong; FANG Xue-quan; WANG Chang-jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of free transplan-tation of denervated muscles and vessels in the treatment of long-standing facial paralysis.Methods: A total of 26 patients with facial paralysis (10 males and 16 females, aged 16-65 years, mean: 47 years) were enrolled in this study to receive transplantation of denervated extensor digitorum brevis (EDB) and extensor hallusis brevis (EHB). The muscle tendon was slung to the ala nasi, the middle point of the nasolabial sulcus, the angu-lus otis and the chin to correct the nasal and oral deformity. The muscle belly was buried around the nerves that inner-vated the masseter muscle. Microsurgery was applied to anastomosing the tarsus lateral vessels to the superficial temporalis vessels.Results: After operation, all the patients immediately obtained satisfied static appearance. The movement of the paralyzed comer of the mouth could be obtained one month later and the smile of the paralyzed side could be restored after 3 months of training. And 88% patients achieved per-fect results, 8% obtained satisfactory results, and 4% got improvement 6 months after operation according to Stennert's paresis scoring system.Conclusions: Free transplantation of denervated muscles and vessels for the treatment of long-standing fa-cial paralysis, which seldom causes atrophy or liquefaction of the transferred muscles, can maintain muscle viability and induce reliable nerve regeneration. Therefore, it is a safe and efficient treatment method for the patients suffer-ing from facial paralysis.

  11. [Study on clinical effectiveness of acupuncture and moxibustion on acute Bell's facial paralysis: randomized controlled clinical observation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Li, Ning; Liu, Yi; Huang, Chang-qiong; Zhang, Yong-ling

    2006-03-01

    To investigate the adverse effects of acupuncture on the prognosis, and effectiveness of acupuncture combined with far infrared ray in the patient of acute Bell's facial paralysis within 48 h. Clinically randomized controlled trial was used, and the patients were divided into 3 groups: group A (early acupuncture group), group B (acupuncture combined with far infrared ray) and group C (acupuncture after 7 days). The facial nerve functional classification at the attack, 7 days after the attack and after treatment, the clinically cured rate of following-up of 6 months, and the average cured time, the cured time of complete facial paralysis were observed in the 3 groups. There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in the facial nerve functional classification 7 days after the attack, the clinically cured rate of following-up of 6 months and the average cured time (P > 0.05), but the cured time of complete facial paralysis in the group A and the group B were shorter than that in the group C (P facial paralysis can be treated with acupuncture and moxibustion, and traditional moxibustion can be replaced by far infrared way.

  12. Treatment of facial peripheral paralysis with wasp cream guasha in 42 cases%神蜂精刮痧治疗周围性面瘫42例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈潮

    2002-01-01

    Background: Peripheral facial paralysis is a common disease with facial nerve paralysis, facial mimetic muscle dyscinesia, and deviation of the eye and mouth. It is commonly considered that peripheral facial paralysis might be correlated with virus infection, rheumatism, ischemia, immunity. Pathological changes included edema, denaturation, atrophy, and ischemia of facial nerve. In traditional Chinese medicine, peripheral facial paralysis is caused by stagnation of qi and blood, malnutrition of channels and vessels, and cizhongbusou. Curing rheumatism, warming yang and supplementing qi, relaxing stagnation, regulating qi and blood should be emphasized in treatment. Guasha belongs to massage and is characterized by easy operation, and reliable therapeutic effect. Guasha can stimulate nerve strongly, improve metabolism, and enhance immunity and promoting blood circulation. " Head is the center of all yangs" . According to principle of acupoint selection along channels, guasha of channels distributed in neck, shoulder, hand, and region with yang channels of hand and foot, in combination with external wasp cream with antiinflammation and removing stagnation, self local massage,and functional exercise of facial muscles are effective in improving blood circulation of head and face,remove edema of facial nerve,promote recovery of facial muscles.

  13. Literature study on clinical treatment of facial paralysis in the last 20 years using Web of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Feng, Ling; Du, Liang; Zhang, Anxiang; Tang, Tian

    2012-01-01

    only other year during the study period saw such a drop is 1993. Specifically, there are 192 published articles on facial paralysis treated by rehabilitation in the past two decades, far more than the output of physiotherapy treatment. Physiotherapy treatment scored only 25 articles including acupuncture treatment, with over 80% of these written by Chinese researchers and clinicians. Ranked by regions, USA is by far the most productive country in terms of the number of publications on facial paralysis rehabilitation and physiotherapy research. Seeing from another angle, the journals that focus on otolaryngology published the most number of articles in rehabilitation and physiotherapy studies, whereas most acupuncture studies on facial paralysis were published in the alternative and complementary medicine journals. CONCLUSION: Study of facial paralysis remains an area of active investigation and innovation. Further clinical studies in humans addressing the use of growth factors or stem cells continue to successful facial nerve regeneration. PMID:25767492

  14. Imaging the hypoglossal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Pedro [Department of Radiology, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central-Hospital de Sao Jose, Rua Jose Antonio Serrano, 1150-199 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: tojais.pedro@gmail.com

    2010-05-15

    The hypoglossal nerve is a pure motor nerve. It provides motor control to the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles thus being essential for normal tongue movement and coordination. In order to design a useful imaging approach and a working differential diagnosis in cases of hypoglossal nerve damage one has to have a good knowledge of the normal anatomy of the nerve trunk and its main branches. A successful imaging evaluation to hypoglossal diseases always requires high resolution studies due to the small size of the structures being studied. MRI is the preferred modality to directly visualize the nerve, while CT is superior in displaying the bony anatomy of the neurovascular foramina of the skull base. Also, while CT is only able to detect nerve pathology by indirect signs, such as bony expansion of the hypoglossal canal, MRI is able to visualize directly the causative pathological process as in the case of small tumors, or infectious/inflammatory processes affecting the nerve. The easiest way to approach the study of the hypoglossal nerve is to divide it in its main segments: intra-axial, cisternal, skull base and extracranial segment, tailoring the imaging technique to each anatomical area while bearing in mind the main disease entities affecting each segment.

  15. Thyrotoxic, hypokalemic periodic paralysis (THPP) in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zubeidi, Hiba; Demeterco, Carla; Jones, Kenneth Lee

    2015-01-01

    Periodic paralysis associated with hyperthyroidism and hypokalemia is an uncommon disorder reported primarily in Asian males and rarely in children. We report three Hispanic adolescent males who were seen with Graves' disease (GD) and THPP. The method used was chart review. Two of these boys presented with episodes of paralysis and were diagnosed with GD. The third was initially seen with hyperthyroidism and developed weakness and paralysis when his disease progressed because of therapeutic noncompliance. Hypokalemia was documented in two of the three patients with the third not seen during paralysis. Intravenous K⁺ was required in only one case. All three boys were treated with antithyroid medications and β blockers, and the musculoskeletal symptoms resolved in all three when hyperthyroidism was controlled after 2 weeks of treatment. The duration for each episode of weakness and paralysis varied in each case and resolved within 15 min to 2 h in case 1, 1-5 h in case 2, and 24 h in case 3. THPP is considered uncommon except in Asian males and rare in childhood and adolescence. Its occurrence in these three Hispanic boys suggests that it may occur more frequently in the young and in the USA than has been suspected, especially with the changing national demographics. We believe that our experience should raise the awareness of THPP among pediatric care providers.

  16. When is facial paralysis Bell palsy? Current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Anwar

    2005-05-01

    Bell palsy is largely a diagnosis of exclusion, but certain features in the history and physical examination help distinguish it from facial paralysis due to other conditions: eg, abrupt onset with complete, unilateral facial weakness at 24 to 72 hours, and, on the affected side, numbness or pain around the ear, a reduction in taste, and hypersensitivity to sounds. Corticosteroids and antivirals given within 10 days of onset have been shown to help. But Bell palsy resolves spontaneously without treatment in most patients within 6 months.

  17. Lip Forces and Chewing Efficiency in Children with Peripheral Facial Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilea, Aranka; Cristea, Alexandru; Dudescu, Cristian M; Hurubeanu, Lucia; Vâjâean, Cosmin; Albu, Silviu; Câmpian, Radu S

    2015-08-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis is accompanied by facial motor disorders and also, by oral dysfunctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the lip forces and chewing efficiency in a group of children with peripheral facial paralysis. The degree of peripheral facial paralysis in the study group (n 11) was assessed using the House-Brackmann scale. The control group consisted of 21 children without facial nerve impairment. To assess lip forces, acrylic vestibular plates of three sizes were used: large (LVP), medium (MVP) and small (SVP). The lip force was recorded with a force transducer coupled with the data acquisition system. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated by the ability to mix two differently colored chewing gums. The images were processed with Adobe Photoshop CS3 (Delaware Corporation, San Jose, California, United States) and the number of pixels was quantified with the Image J software (DHHS/NIH/NIMH/RSB, Maryland, United States). For statistical analysis, the following statistical analysis were used: Pearson or Spearman correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression analysis, multiple logistic regression analysis, and optimal cutoff values for muscular dysfunction. There were statistically significant differences between lip forces in the following three groups: p=0.01 (LVP), p=0.01 (MVP), and p=0.008 (SVP). The cutoff values of lip forces in the study group were as follows: 7.08 N (LVP), 4.89 N (MVP), and 4.24 N (SVP). There were no statistically significant differences between the masticatory efficiency in the two groups (p=0.25). Lip forces were dependent on the degree of peripheral facial paralysis and age, but not on gender. In peripheral facial paralysis in children, a significant decrease of lip forces, but not masticatory efficiency, occurs.

  18. Evidence and recommendation. Intermitent neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery is usefulness for reduction of recurrent nerve palsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis PARDAL-REFOYO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Clinical Question. In a patient with thyroid disease [patient], submitted to thyroidectomy [intervention], the use of neuromonitoring against the single visual identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN [comparison], offers advantages? [result]. Material and Methods: Literature review in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library data descriptors and search strategy: (((((((laryngeal OR larynx AND nerve AND monitoring AND thyroidectomy AND meta-analysis. 10 items in English or Spanish of which 7 were selected for the qualitative study were obtained. Results: Level of evidence. Evidence for the lower incidence of transient unilateral paralysis in patients with neuromonitoring is moderate-high. Evidence on the lower incidence of permanent unilateral paralysis of RLN with NM is low. Evidence on the lower incidence of bilateral paralysis of RLN with neuromonitoring is low. Conclusions: Recommendation. Concerning the reduction of transient paralysis of the RLN the recommendation of the use of neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery is strongly in favor. Regarding permanent paralysis recommendation is weak in favor (no recommendation against. Regarding prevention of bilateral laryngeal paralysis recommendation for weak. The decision to use NM cannot be based on the incidence of RLN paralysis.

  19. [Facial paralysis: functional and aesthetic rehabilitation techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveze, A; Paris, J

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a permanent facial paralysis can be devastating to a patient, because of the cosmetic, functional and psychological disorders. Our society places on physical appearance and leads to isolation of patients who are embarrassed with their paralyzed face. The objectives of the facial rehabilitation is to correct the functional and cosmetic losses of the patient. The main functional goals are to protect the eye and reestablish oral competence. The primary cosmetic goals are to create balance and symmetry of the face at rest and to reestablish the coordinated movement of the facial musculature. The surgeon should be familiar with the variety of options available so that an individual plan can be developed based on each patient's clinical picture. History of the facial paralysis, its etiology and the duration of the paralysis are of particular interest as they orientate the rehabilitation plan strategy.

  20. Periodic paralysis: clinical evaluation in 20 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Harumi Tengan

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty patients with periodic paralysis were evaluated and the aspects studied included epidemiological data, clinical manifestations, ancillary tests, treatment and evolution. Sixteen patients had the hypokalemic form (5 familiar, 5 sporadic, 5 thyrotoxic and 1 secondary. No patient with the normokalemic form was detected. Predominance of men was found (14 patients, especially in the cases with hyperthyroidism (5 patients. No thyrotoxic patient was of oriental origin. Only 4 patients had the hyperkalemic form (3 familiar, 1 sporadic. Attacks of paralysis began during the first decade in the hyperkalemic form and up to the third decade in the hypokalemic. In both forms the attacks occurred preferentially in the morning with rest after exercise being the most important precipitating factor. Seventy five percent of the hyperkalemic patients referred brief attacks (<12 hours. Longer attacks were referred by 43% of the hypokalemic patients. The majority of the attacks manifested with a generalized weakness mainly in legs, and its frequency was variable. Creatinokinase was evaluated in 10 patients and 8 of them had levels that varied from 1,1 to 5 times normal. Electromyography was done in 6 patients and myotonic phenomenon was the only abnormality detected in 2 patients. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, especially acetazolamide, were used for prophylactic treatment in 9 pacients with good results in all. Although periodic paralysis may be considered a benign disease we found respiratory distress in 5 patients, permanent myopathy in 1, electrocardiographic abnormalities during crises in 4; death during paralysis occurred in 2. Therefore correct diagnosis and immediate treatment are crucial. This study shows that hyperthyroidism is an important cause of periodic paralysis in our country, even in non oriental patients. Hence endocrine investigation is mandatory since this kind of periodic paralysis will only be abated after return to the euthyroid state.

  1. Technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT in patients with hemiconvulsions followed by Todd`s paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M.; Sejima, Hitoshi; Ozasa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Seiji [Department of Pediatrics, Shimane Medical University, 89-1 Enya-cho, Izumo, Shimane 693 (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    We performed technetium-99m-hexamethylpropylene- amineoxime (Tc-HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography in two patients with prolonged hemiconvulsions followed by transient hemiparesis (Todd`s paralysis). In both cases, a prolonged post-ictal cerebral hyperperfusion state of approximately 24 h was observed, even after the neurological deficits had resolved. The cerebral hyperperfusion in both cases was of much longer duration than that in previously reported cases of single and uncomplicated focal seizures. The prolonged cerebral hyperperfusion might have been due to impairment of the cerebrovascular autoregulation in seizures followed by Todd`s paralysis. (orig.) With 2 figs., 9 refs.

  2. CLINICAL ANALYSIS ON THE TREATMENT OF FACIAL PARALYSIS BY ACUPUNCTURE, MOXIBUSTION PLUS CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-sha; SHEN Wei-hong

    2005-01-01

    Objective:To observe the therapeutic effect of the integrated acupuncture-moxibustion and herbal therapies for facial paralysis. Methods: A total of 68 cases of facial paralysis were treated by integration of acupuncture-moxibustion and herbal therapies. For facial palsy patients with wind-phlegm blocking meridian-collaterals and wind-stirring due to yin deficiency types in the acute stage, Modified respectively; and for those in convalescent stage and sequela stage, Replenishing Blood) + Qian Zheng San (Powder for Treating Wry-mouth) and Recuperation) were employed. Results: After the treatment, the curative rate of the 68 cases accounted for 90% of the total cases, the remarkably effective 6%, the improved 3% and the poor 1% respectively. Conclusion: The therapeutic effectiveness of the integrated treatment of acupuncture-moxibustion and herbal therapies for facial paralysis is certain.

  3. Prolonged Paralysis Following Emergent Cesarean Section with Succinylcholine Despite Normal Dibucaine Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Matthew; Grose, Brian; Howell, Stephen; Wilson, Colin; Lenz, Jackson; Driver, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged paralysis due to a quantitative or qualitative deficiency of pseudocholinesterase activity is an uncommon but known side effect of succinylcholine. We describe a patient who experienced prolonged paralysis following administration of succinylcholine for general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation for an emergent cesarean section despite laboratory evidence of normal enzyme function. The patient required mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit for several hours following surgery. The patient was extubated following return of full muscle strength and had a good outcome. The enzyme responsible for the metabolism of succinylcholine, pseudocholinesterase, was determined to be low in quantity in this patient but was functionally normal. This low level, by itself, was unlikely to be solely responsible for the prolonged paralysis. The patient likely had an abnormal pseudocholinesterase enzyme variant that is undetectable by standard laboratory tests.

  4. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  5. Evaluation and management of the patient with postoperative facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadlock, Tessa

    2012-05-01

    Postoperative facial paralysis comprises a spectrum of injuries ranging from mild, temporary weakness to severe, permanent paralysis, affecting as little as one muscle group to as much as the full hemiface. Herein is presented an introductory review of iatrogenic facial paralysis, from initial evaluation and decision making to the full range of conservative and operative management.

  6. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis: a short clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Aggarwal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis (TPP is a potentially lethal manifestation of hyperthyroidism which is characterized by hypokalemia and muscular weakness. It mainly affects Asian men in the age group of 20 to 40 years. Immediate supplementation with oral or intravenous potassium will help to not only abort the acute attack of paralysis but will also prevent serious and life threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Non selective beta blockers like propranolol can also be used to ameliorate and prevent subsequent paralytic attack. Acetazolamide has no role in the treatment of TPP. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 539-542

  7. [HYPP: hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in the horse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M M

    1999-03-15

    Hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis(HYPP) is characterized by intermittent episodes of muscular tremor, weakness, and collapse, and is probably caused by abnormal electrolyte transport in the muscle cell membrane. During an episode of HYPP, most animals are severely hyperkalaemic. HYPP is a hereditary disease and occurs only in American Quarter horses or crossbreds. Because these horses are now being imported into the Netherlands, HYPP should be included in the differential diagnosis of horses showing signs of muscle tremor, paresis, or paralysis. The present article reviews the literature on HYPP and describes a case showing typical signs of the disease.

  8. Treatment of hypokalemic periodic paralysis with topiramate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Darren M; Strober, Jonathan B

    2011-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP), the most common form of periodic paralysis, is a disorder characterized by attacks of transient muscle weakness associated with a drop in serum potassium level.The mainstay of treatment is potassium supplementation and drugs that inhibit the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. In this report we describe 11-year-old twins with hypoPP who were treated with topiramate, an anti-epileptic drug known to have carbonic anhydrase inhibitory properties. The patients experienced a decrease in the severity of their attacks upon initiation of treatment. Topiramate may warrant further investigation as a treatment option in hypoPP.

  9. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Damar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Management of intraparotid FNS is troublesome because of the facial nerve paralysis. In this report we presented a case of intraparotid schwannoma in a 55-year-old male patient complaining of a painless mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy in left parotid gland. Clinical features, preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis, and difficulties during management are discussed with the review of the literature.

  10. Detecting unilateral phrenic paralysis by acoustic respiratory analysis.

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    José Antonio Fiz

    Full Text Available The consequences of phrenic nerve paralysis vary from a considerable reduction in respiratory function to an apparently normal state. Acoustic analysis of lung sound intensity (LSI could be an indirect non-invasive measurement of respiratory muscle function, comparing activity on the two sides of the thoracic cage. Lung sounds and airflow were recorded in ten males with unilateral phrenic paralysis and ten healthy subjects (5 men/5 women, during progressive increasing airflow maneuvers. Subjects were in sitting position and two acoustic sensors were placed on their back, on the left and right sides. LSI was determined from 1.2 to 2.4 L/s between 70 and 2000 Hz. LSI was significantly greater on the normal (19.3±4.0 dB than the affected (5.7±3.5 dB side in all patients (p = 0.0002, differences ranging from 9.9 to 21.3 dB (13.5±3.5 dB. In the healthy subjects, the LSI was similar on both left (15.1±6.3 dB and right (17.4±5.7 dB sides (p = 0.2730, differences ranging from 0.4 to 4.6 dB (2.3±1.6 dB. There was a positive linear relationship between the LSI and the airflow, with clear differences between the slope of patients (about 5 dB/L/s and healthy subjects (about 10 dB/L/s. Furthermore, the LSI from the affected side of patients was close to the background noise level, at low airflows. As the airflow increases, the LSI from the affected side did also increase, but never reached the levels seen in healthy subjects. Moreover, the difference in LSI between healthy and paralyzed sides was higher in patients with lower FEV1 (%. The acoustic analysis of LSI is a relevant non-invasive technique to assess respiratory function. This method could reinforce the reliability of the diagnosis of unilateral phrenic paralysis, as well as the monitoring of these patients.

  11. Facial Nerve in Foetal Cadavers: An Anatomical Study with Clinical Relevance

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    Kotian SR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Facial nerve paralysis is a major complication of parotid surgery and is widely reported. Little attention is paid to the facial nerve trunk in children. The facial nerve trunk in children and infants can be easily injured since they lie close to the surface. The present study therefore intends to describe the variability in the facial nerve trunk and its branching pattern in foetuses. Methods: The study was done bilaterally in 30 formalin-fixed foetuses (15 females, 15 males, age ranging from 21.0 to 35.5 weeks of gestation. The length of the facial nerve trunk was measured and bifurcation and trifurcation of the trunk was examined. Variability in the branching pattern was also noted. Results: The most common facial nerve trunk branching type was bifurcation (53.33%, followed by trifurcation (33.33%. Multiple branching of the facial nerve was also observed in 13.34% of the cases. Other variations related to the facial nerve were also noted. The mean length of the facial nerve trunk was 7.15 ± 2.12 mm. There was no significant difference between the right and left sides and in case of males and female foetuses. Conclusion: Facial nerve injury during parotid surgery is a main cause of paediatric facial paralysis. The length of the facial nerve trunk therefore must be accurately known in any surgical procedure planned in the area. The main furcation of the facial nerve should also receive special attention.

  12. Cerebrolysin as a nerve growth factor for treatment of acquired peripheral nervous system diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sherifa Ahmad Hamed

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is a drug consisting of low-molecular-weight neurotrophic peptides and free amino acids. Cerebrolysin has been shown to ameliorate the effects of oxidative stress, reduce apoptosis, and promote neuronal growth in several degenerative and acquired central nervous system insults, including dementias, stroke, and traumatic injuries. Little is known about its therapeutic efficacy in peripheral nervous system diseases. In this study, we clinically evaluated the effects of cerebrolysin on peripheral nervous system lesions. We evaluated the clinical efficacy of cerebrolysin in six patients with the following conditions who failed to respond to conventional therapies: (1) atonic bladder due to inflammatory radiculitis; (2) paraplegia due to inflammatory radiculoneuropathy; (3) post-traumatic brachial plexopathy; (4) compressive radial nerve injury; (5) post-traumatic facial nerve paralysis; and (6) diabetic ophthalmoplegia. Our results showed that cerebrolysin was more associated with rapid neurological recovery after various peripheral nerve lesions than other therapies including steroids and supportive therapies such as vitamins and antioxidants. The present results support the therapeutic efficacy of cerebrolysin in the treatment of acquired peripheral nervous system diseases.

  13. Debates to personal conclusion in peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction: A 30-year experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital

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    David Chwei-Chin Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been achieved in the science and management of peripheral nerve injuries over the past 40 years. Yet there are many questions and few answers. The author, with 30 years of experience in treating them at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, addresses debates on various issues with personal conclusions. These include: (1 Degree of peripheral nerve injury, (2 Timing of nerve repair, (3Technique of nerve repair, (4 Level of brachial plexus injury,(5 Level of radial nerve injury,(6 Traction avulsion amputation of major limb, (7 Proximal Vs distal nerve transfers in brachial plexus injuries and (8 Post paralysis facial synkinesis.

  14. 经筋刺法治疗周围性面瘫经验浅谈%The clinical experience on the treatment of facial paralysis based on the JingJin acupuncture ;therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭蕴萍; 石学敏

    2015-01-01

    Facial paralysis is such a disease that eyelid closure is not complete with spat to a side askew, also known as the “askew eye mouth”. It often happens due to the deficiency of vital Qi, overwork, emotional change, cold or hot wind evil, which can cause the bullishness of resistance, dysfunction of JingJin. The disease can occur at any age, attack urgently, and be shown in face, with the relationship with Shaoyang, Yangming and Taiyang meridian. It belongs to the peripheral facial paralysis in Western medicine. Facial paralysis is caused by the nonspecific inflammation of facial nerve. The JingJin acupuncture therapy in the treatment of peripheral facial paralysis is based on the reinforcement theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and rich clinical experience. It can reinforce Qi, blood and meridians, promote local blood circulation, improve local oxygen and accelerate the absorption of nerve edema, making facial muscles to recover, and showing obvious effects.%面瘫是以口角向一侧歪斜、眼睑闭合不全为主的病证,又称为“口眼歪斜”,其发生常与正气不足、劳累过度、情志不舒、风寒或风热之毒邪乘虚而入,导致经气闭阻,经筋功能失调。该症可发生任何年龄,发病急,病位在面部,与少阳、阳明、太阳经的经筋相关。经筋刺法治疗周围性面瘫,是根据中医经筋理论及临床经验创立的,以补气血,通经络,促进局部血液循环,改善局部供氧,加速神经水肿的吸收,从而使面部肌肉恢复其功能,效果明显。

  15. Objective Assessment of Facial Paralysis Using Local Binary Pattern in Infrared Thermography%基于红外热像LBP的面瘫客观评估方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘旭龙; 洪文学; 张涛; 吴振英

    2013-01-01

    Facial paralysis is a frequently-occurring disease, which causes the loss of the voluntary muscles on one side of the face due to the damages the facial nerve and results in an inability to close the eye and leads to dropping of the angle of the mouth. There have been few objective methods to quantitatively diagnose it and assess this disease for clinically treating the patients so far. The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a con-tralateral symmetry. Facial paralysis usually causes an alteration of the temperature distribution of body with the disease. This paper presents the use of the histogram distance of bilateral local binary pattern (LBP) in the facial infrared thermography to measure the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution for objective assessing the severity of facial paralysis. Using this new method, we performed a controlled trial to assess the facial nerve function of the healthy subjects and the patients with Bell's palsy respectively. The results showed that the mean sensitivity and specificity of this method are 0. 86 and 0. 89 respectively. The correlation coefficient between the asymmetry degree of facial temperature distribution and the severity of facial paralysis is an average of 0. 657. Therefore, the histogram distance of local binary pattern in the facial infrared thermography is an efficient clinical indicator with respect to the diagnosis and assessment of facial paralysis.%面瘫是一种多发的面神经疾病,表现为面部一侧横纹肌运动失调.目前,尚缺乏一种客观量化的诊断和评估方法.正常人体面部的温度分布双侧对称,面瘫通常会使这种温度分布的对称性发生改变.因此,本文提出利用面部温度分布的不对称度来客观评估面瘫的严重度,利用面部红外热像图健患双侧的局部二值模式(LBP)的直方图距离来表示面部温度分布的不对称度.对面瘫患者和健康人群作对照试验,结果表明:此方

  16. Episodic weakness and Charcot-marie-tooth disease due to a mitochondrial MT-ATP6 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panosyan, Francis B; Tawil, Rabi; Herrmann, David N

    2017-06-01

    Episodic muscle weakness is the hallmark of a heterogeneous group of disorders known as periodic paralysis. A majority are due to single nucleotide mutations causing membrane depolarization. We report 2 family members with chronic, slowly progressive, distal axonal neuropathy, or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2) and episodic weakness resembling periodic paralysis. Next generation sequencing (NGS) identified a mitochondrial MT-ATP6 mutation m.9185T>C (p.Leu220Pro) in both patients, consistent with a previous report of an association with this phenotype. The episodic weakness has been responsive to acetazolamide therapy for a few decades. By contrast, the underlying axonal neuropathy is quite progressive despite treatment with acetazolamide. Mitochondrial DNA mutations should be considered in patients with a history of episodic weakness and axonal inherited neuropathy (CMT2). The episodic weakness is responsive to acetazolamide therapy, and electrophysiological testing for periodic paralysis with a long exercise protocol is negative in these cases. Muscle Nerve 55: 922-927, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cultural variation in the clinical presentation of sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Joop T V M

    2005-03-01

    Sleep paralysis is one of the lesser-known and more benign forms of parasomnias. The primary or idiopathic form, also called isolated sleep paralysis, is illustrated by showing how patients from different cultures weave the phenomenology of sleep paralysis into their clinical narratives. Clinical case examples are presented of patients from Guinea Bissau, the Netherlands, Morocco, and Surinam with different types of psychopathology, but all accompanied by sleep paralysis. Depending on the meaning given to and etiological interpretations of the sleep paralysis, which is largely culturally determined, patients react to the event in specific ways.

  18. Malignant otitis externa with bilateral cranial nerve involvement: Report of a unique case

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    Somnath Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant otitis externa is an inflammatory condition caused by pseudomonas infection usually in the elderly diabetics, or an immunosuppressive condition that presents with diffuse otitis externa along with excruciating pain and granulations tissue in the external auditory meatus. Facial paralysis is common along with occasional involvement of other cranial nerves. Case report describing a patient of malignant otitis externa who presented to a tertiary referral hospital of eastern India. This patient had ipsilateral facial and tenth cranial nerve paralysis along with delayed-onset contralateral sixth and twelfth cranial nerve palsy. The patient was treated initially with intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibody followed by tympanic platectomy, facial nerve decompression and medialisation thyroplasty. The contralateral cranial nerve palsy was managed conservatively with partial recovery of function. Malignant otitis externa, though a common disease, may occasionally present with uncommon or unexplained presentations. The management of these cases should be prompt and aggressive and specifically address each of the debilitating complications.

  19. GOLD WEIGHTS IN FACIAL PARALYSIS (REVISITED)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZECHA, PJ; ROBINSON, PH; VANOORT, RP; COENRAADS, PJ

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study of 11 patients with facial paralysis was undertaken. Correction of lagophthalmos was accomplished by inserting a dental gold weight into the upper eyelid. All weights were assessed and adjusted to fit the patient's individual need. The primary objective was to achieve adequate

  20. GOLD WEIGHTS IN FACIAL PARALYSIS (REVISITED)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZECHA, PJ; ROBINSON, PH; VANOORT, RP; COENRAADS, PJ

    A retrospective study of 11 patients with facial paralysis was undertaken. Correction of lagophthalmos was accomplished by inserting a dental gold weight into the upper eyelid. All weights were assessed and adjusted to fit the patient's individual need. The primary objective was to achieve adequate

  1. Subtle changes in myelination due to childhood experiences: label-free microscopy to infer nerve fibers morphology and myelination in brain (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasecka, Alicja; Tanti, Arnaud; Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Mechawar, Naguib; Cote, Daniel C.

    2017-02-01

    Adverse childhood experiences have lasting detrimental effects on mental health and are strongly associated with impaired cognition and increased risk of developing psychopathologies. Preclinical and neuroimaging studies have suggested that traumatic events during brain development can affect cerebral myelination particularly in areas and tracts implicated in mood and emotion. Although current neuroimaging techniques are quite powerful, they lack the resolution to infer myelin integrity at the cellular level. Recently demonstrated coherent Raman microscopy has accomplished cellular level imaging of myelin sheaths in the nervous system. However, a quantitative morphometric analysis of nerve fibers still remains a challenge. In particular, in brain, where fibres exhibit small diameters and varying local orientation. In this work, we developed an automated myelin identification and analysis method that is capable of providing a complete picture of axonal myelination and morphology in brain samples. This method performs three main procedures 1) detects molecular anisotropy of membrane phospholipids based on polarization resolved coherent Raman microscopy, 2) identifies regions of different molecular organization, 3) calculates morphometric features of myelinated axons (e.g. myelin thickness, g-ratio). We applied this method to monitor white matter areas from suicides adults that suffered from early live adversity and depression compared to depressed suicides adults and psychiatrically healthy controls. We demonstrate that our method allows for the rapid acquisition and automated analysis of neuronal networks morphology and myelination. This is especially useful for clinical and comparative studies, and may greatly enhance the understanding of processes underlying the neurobiological and psychopathological consequences of child abuse.

  2. Molecular basis for hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R H

    At least one form of periodic paralysis is a direct consequence of a mutation in a skeletal muscle, voltage-sensitive sodium channel--it was observed that many individual with this disease developed low serum potassium levels during paralytic episodes. Some families had hyperkalemic paralysis with serum potassium levels of 6 or 7 mEg/L during paralytic crises. In both hypokalemic and hyperkalemic paralysis one of the precipitants is a period of rest after exertion. In hypokalemic periodic paralysis carbohydrates may initiate weakness. In both hyper- and hypokalemic forms, the disorder is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. During hypokalemic and hyperkalemic paralysis, one might respectively anticipate muscle hyperpolarization or depolarization. Has been observed a potassium-related abnormality of sodium conductance in the pathogenesis at least of the hyperkalemic form of periodic paralysis. The fact that TTX reverses the physiological defect suggested the hypothesis that the primary problem might be a mutation in a TTX-sensitive sodium channel. The protein consists of some 2000 amino acids with characteristic intracytoplasmic and extracellular domains as well a four remarkably conserved membrane spanning domains, each composed of six transmembrane of a polymorphism of the human sodium channel with hyperkalemic paralysis. When multipoint analysis was used to test for coinheritance of the disease with both Na-2 and growth hormone polymorphisms, a lod score of 7 was obtained. That is, the ratio of the probability of linkage to non-linkage is 10 million to one. When extracellular potassium is increased to 10 mM, the affected myotubes demonstrate strikingly abnormal channel behavior characterized by prolonged open times or repetitive opens throughout the voltage step. Potassium implicate as a primary factor triggering an abnormal sodium channel gating mode and, as a result, aberrant sodium current behavior. It was estimated that, for the normal channel, the

  3. A comprehensive approach to long-standing facial paralysis based on lengthening temporalis myoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbè, D; Bussu, F; Iodice, A

    2012-06-01

    Long-standing peripheral monolateral facial paralysis in the adult has challenged otolaryngologists, neurologists and plastic surgeons for centuries. Notwithstanding, the ultimate goal of normality of the paralyzed hemi-face with symmetry at rest, and the achievement of a spontaneous symmetrical smile with corneal protection, has not been fully reached. At the beginning of the 20(th) century, the main options were neural reconstructions including accessory to facial nerve transfer and hypoglossal to facial nerve crossover. In the first half of the 20(th) century, various techniques for static correction with autologous temporalis muscle and fascia grafts were proposed as the techniques of Gillies (1934) and McLaughlin (1949). Cross-facial nerve grafts have been performed since the beginning of the 1970s often with the attempt to transplant free-muscle to restore active movements. However, these transplants were non-vascularized, and further evaluations revealed central fibrosis and minimal return of function. A major step was taken in the second half of the 1970s, with the introduction of microneurovascular muscle transfer in facial reanimation, which, often combined in two steps with a cross-facial nerve graft, has become the most popular option for the comprehensive treatment of long-standing facial paralysis. In the second half of the 1990s in France, a regional muscle transfer technique with the definite advantages of being one-step, technically easier and relatively fast, namely lengthening temporalis myoplasty, acquired popularity and consensus among surgeons treating facial paralysis. A total of 111 patients with facial paralysis were treated in Caen between 1997 and 2005 by a single surgeon who developed 2 variants of the technique (V1, V2), each with its advantages and disadvantages, but both based on the same anatomo-functional background and aim, which is transfer of the temporalis muscle tendon on the coronoid process to the lips. For a comprehensive

  4. Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for the treatment of established facial paralysis following ablative surgery in the parotid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori; Asato, Hirotaka; Ueda, Kazuki; Yamada, Atsushi

    2004-05-01

    Neurovascular free-muscle transfer for facial reanimation was performed as a secondary reconstructive procedure for 45 patients with facial paralysis resulting from ablative surgery in the parotid region. This intervention differs from neurovascular free-muscle transfer for treatment of established facial paralysis resulting from conditions such as congenital dysfunction, unresolved Bell palsy, Hunt syndrome, or intracranial morbidity, with difficulties including selection of recipient vessels and nerves, and requirements for soft-tissue augmentation. This article describes the authors' operative procedure for neurovascular free-muscle transfer after ablative surgery in the parotid region. Gracilis muscle (n = 24) or latissimus dorsi muscle (n = 21) was used for transfer. With gracilis transfer, recipient vessels comprised the superficial temporal vessels in 12 patients and the facial vessels in 12. For latissimus dorsi transfer, recipient vessels comprised the facial vessels in 16 patients and the superior thyroid artery and superior thyroid or internal jugular vein in four. Facial vessels on the contralateral side were used with interpositional graft of radial vessels in the remaining patient with latissimus dorsi transfer. Cross-face nerve grafting was performed before muscle transfer in 22 patients undergoing gracilis transfer. In the remaining two gracilis patients, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the primary recipient nerve. Dermal fat flap overlying the gracilis muscle was used for cheek augmentation in one patient. In the other 23 patients, only the gracilis muscle was used. With latissimus dorsi transfer, the ipsilateral facial nerve stump was used as the recipient nerve in three patients, and a cross-face nerve graft was selected as the recipient nerve in six. The contralateral facial nerve was selected as the recipient nerve in 12 patients, and a thoracodorsal nerve from the latissimus dorsi muscle segment was crossed through the upper lip

  5. Decreased Nerve Conduction Velocity in Football Players

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    Daryoush Didehdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower limbs nerves are exposed to mechanical injuries in the football players and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of football on the lower leg nerves. Materials and Methods: Nerve conduction studies were done on 35 male college students (20 football players, 15 non active during 2006 to 2007 in the Shiraz rehabilitation faculty. Standard nerve conduction techniques using to evaluate dominant and non dominant lower limb nerves. Results: The motor latency of deep peroneal and tibial nerves of dominant leg of football players and sensory latency of superficial peroneal, tibial and compound nerve action potential of tibial nerve of both leg in football players were significantly prolonged (p<0.05. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of tibial and common peroneal in football players were significant delayed (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that football is sport with high contact and it causes sub-clinical neuropathies due to nerve entrapment.

  6. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively.

  7. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

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    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  8. Acute flaccid paralysis surveillance: A 6 years study, Isfahan, Iran

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    Alireza Emami Naeini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Poliomyelitis is still an endemic disease in many areas of the world including Africa and South Asia. Iran is polio free since 2001. However, due to endemicity of polio in neighboring countries of Iran, the risk of polio importation and re-emergence of wild polio virus is high. Case definition through surveillance system is a well-defined method for maintenance of polio eradication in polio free countries. Methods: In a cross-sectional survey from 2007 to 2013, we reviewed all the records of under 15 years old patients reported to Acute Flaccid Paralysis Committee (AFPC in Isfahan province, Iran. All cases were visited by members of the AFPC. Three stool samples were collected from each reported case within 2 weeks of onset of paralysis and sent to National Polio Laboratory in Tehran, Iran, for poliovirus isolation. Data were analyzed by SSPS software (version 22. Student′s t-test and Chi-square was used to compare variables. Statistical significance level was set at P 94%, with six doses of oral polio vaccine (OPV. Accurate surveillance for poliomyelitis is essential for continuing eradication.

  9. [Fear paralysis--still a possible cause of crib death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaada, B

    1995-03-10

    There is overwhelming evidence that prone sleeping entails more risk of sudden infant death than supine sleeping does. However, no generally accepted biological explanation of this phenomenon has been found. In a viewpoint article in Acta Paediatrica in 1994 the author has re-emphasized that the fear paralysis reflex (tonic immobility) could be a cause of sudden infant death. The response consists of immobility, apnea, profound bradycardia and vasoconstriction. The bradycardia may proceed to irreversible asystole and silent death within a few minutes. In infant monkeys, this innate, atavistic reflex, which is prompted by aversive environmental fear-producing events, has the same age distribution as sudden infant death syndrome between the 2nd and 5th month of life. Main triggering stimuli are: restraint of movement (preventing flight) and sudden exposure to unfamiliar environments and persons, events for which the organism appears to be unprepared. Movements of the extremities are more restrained in the prone than in the supine position with greater chance of eliciting fear paralysis responses and death in prone sleepers. This biological mechanism presumably also applies to the winter peak (restraint due to overwrapping), sleeping outdoors (overwrapping) and co-sleeping in the same bed as another (parent).

  10. One-Sided Weakness Admitted with Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis

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    Fatih Yaman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP is a genetic disorder that characterized by recurrent attacks of skeletal muscle weakness with associated hypokalemia which is precipitated by hypotermia, stress, infection, carbonhydrate load, glucose infusion, metabolic alkalosis, general anesthesia, steroids and licorice root. 52-year-old male patient while working in a cold enviroment, began to complain of weakness in the arms and legs. The patient was brought to the emergency department due to the continuation of weakness complaints in the left arm and leg.The neurological examination had 5/5 strength in the upper-right and lower-right extremities, 3/5 strength in the upper-left and lower-left extremities. Serum electrolytes: Potassium: 2.7 mEq/L, 1.9 mEq/L control. There was no evidence of bleeding and infarction in Computerized Brain Tomography and Brain MR. After intravenous infusion of potassium, at the third hour the patient%u2019s neurological symptoms resolved completely, patient was mobilized. In this case we present one-sided weakness admitted to the emergency department, the diagnosis of patient with HPP. We aimed to emphasize that this diagnosis should be keeping in mind that among the causes paralysis and delayed diagnose and treatment may be mortal in HPP.

  11. A Clinical Study on Acupuncture Treatment of Facial Paralysis TOH Foh FooK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FookTF

    2002-01-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis is a common disease with manifestation of facial paralysis.The author's clinical observation on 50 cases of facial paralysis treated mainly with acupuncture showed an effective rate of 98%,and the remarkable effectiveness was reported as follows.50 cases of outpatients which consisted of 14 males and 36 females were observed.The oldest was 61 years and the youngest 24 years,with an average age of 36 years.33 cases had facial paralysis on the right side and other 17 cases on the left side.The shortest duration was one day and the longest 19 months.Treatment was done once every other day and a course comprised of ten treatments.Main acupoints:Chengqi(ST 1),Sibai(ST 2),Juliao(ST 3),Dicang(ST 4),Jiache(ST 6),Xiaguan (ST 7),Sizhukong (TE 23),and Hegu(LI 4),etc.were all adopted in every treatement.Complementary acupoints were Yingxiang (Li 20),Cuanzhou (BL 2),Yangbai(GB 14),and Chengjiang(CV 24).Methods:Gauge 28 filiform needles(1 cun at length) were used.In the needling process,manipulations of even reinforcing and reducing in combination with lifting-thrusting and twirling-rotating were abopted.The needling sensation was made to increase only within the patient's bearable threshold and the needles were withdrawn immediately following manipulating the needles for a while (about 3 min).Shallow insertion of acupuncture needles was carried out throughout the whole treatment process.Criteria of the therapeutic effect:Cure:The clinical synptoms disappeared ompletely after treatment (facial muscle was normal).Effective:Some symptoms were improved but facial expression was still slay.No effect:Symptoms remained the same after the therapy.Results:80% of the 50 cases,namely 27 cases with left facial paralysis and 13 cases with right side facial paralysis,were cured.7 cases(14%) showed significant improvement,2cases(4%) effectiveness,and 1 case(2%) no effect,thus the total effective rate was 98%.Conclusion:Patients with shorter duration of disease

  12. Multiple Variations of the Nerves of Gluteal Region and their Clinical Implications

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    Prasad AM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of nerves of gluteal region is important for clinicians administering intramuscular injections, for orthopedic surgeons dealing with the hip surgeries and possibly for physiotherapists managing the painful conditions and paralysis of this region. We report multiple variations of the nerves of gluteal region through this article. In the current case, the sciatic nerve was absent. The common peroneal and tibial nerves arose from sacral plexus and reached the gluteal region through greater sciatic foramen above and below piriformis respectively. The common peroneal nerve gave a muscular branch to the gluteus maximus. The inferior gluteal nerve and posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh arose from a common trunk. The common trunk was formed by three roots. Upper and middle roots arose from sacral plexus and entered gluteal region through greater sciatic foramen respectively above and below piriformis. The lower root arose from the pudendal nerve and joined the common trunk. We discuss the clinical implications of the variations.

  13. Literature study on clinical treatment of facial paralysis in the last 20 years using Web of Science Comparison between rehabilitation, physiotherapy and acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoge Zhang; Ling Feng; Liang Du; Anxiang Zhang; Tian Tang

    2012-01-01

    study period saw such a drop is 1993. Specifically, there are 192 published articles on facial paralysis treated by rehabilitation in the past two decades, far more than the output of physiotherapy treatment. Physiotherapy treatment scored only 25 articles including acupuncture treatment, with over 80% of these written by Chinese researchers and clinicians. Ranked by regions, USA is by far the most productive country in terms of the number of publications on facial paralysis rehabilitation and physiotherapy research. Seeing from another angle, the journals that focus on otolaryngology published the most number of articles in rehabilitation and physiotherapy studies, whereas most acupuncture studies on facial paralysis were published in the alternative and complementary medicine journals.CONCLUSION: Study of facial paralysis remains an area of active investigation and innovation. Further clinical studies in humans addressing the use of growth factors or stem cells continue to successful facial nerve regeneration.

  14. Literature study on clinical treatment of facial paralysis in the last 20 years using Web of Science: Comparison between rehabilitation, physiotherapy and acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoge; Feng, Ling; Du, Liang; Zhang, Anxiang; Tang, Tian

    2012-01-15

    by rehabilitation in the past two decades, far more than the output of physiotherapy treatment. Physiotherapy treatment scored only 25 articles including acupuncture treatment, with over 80% of these written by Chinese researchers and clinicians. Ranked by regions, USA is by far the most productive country in terms of the number of publications on facial paralysis rehabilitation and physiotherapy research. Seeing from another angle, the journals that focus on otolaryngology published the most number of articles in rehabilitation and physiotherapy studies, whereas most acupuncture studies on facial paralysis were published in the alternative and complementary medicine journals. Study of facial paralysis remains an area of active investigation and innovation. Further clinical studies in humans addressing the use of growth factors or stem cells continue to successful facial nerve regeneration.

  15. [Peripheral facial paralysis: the role of physical medicine and rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Catarina

    2011-12-01

    Peripheral facial paralysis (PFP) is a consequence of the peripheral neuronal lesion of the facial nerve (FN). It can be either primary (Bell`s Palsy) or secondary. The classical clinical presentation typically involves both stages of the hemiface. However, there may be other symptoms (ex. xerophthalmia, hyperacusis, phonation and deglutition changes) that one should recall. Clinical evaluation includes rigorous muscle tonus and sensibility search in the FN territory. Some useful instruments allow better objectivity in the patients' evaluation (House-Brackmann System, Facial Grading System, Functional Evaluation). There are clear referral criteria to Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Treatment of Bell`s Palsy may include pharmacotherapy, neuromuscular training (NMT), physical methods and surgery. In the NMT field the several treatment techniques are systematized. Therapeutic strategies should be problem-oriented and adjusted to the patient's symptoms and signs. Physical methods are reviewed. In about 15-20 % of patients permanent sequelae subside after 3 months of evolution. PFP is commonly a multidisciplinary condition. Therefore, it is important to review strategies that Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation may offer.

  16. Management of unilateral true vocal cord paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlur, Jennifer; Hartnick, Christopher J

    2012-12-01

    Historically, information gained from the treatment of unilateral true vocal cord paralysis (UVCP) in adults was the same used to treat children. Today, there is a growing body of literature aimed specifically at the treatment of this condition in children. It is an area of growing interest as UVCP can significantly impact a child's quality of life. Children with UVCP may present with stridor, dysphonia, aspiration, feeding difficulties, or a combination of these symptoms. Diagnosis relies on laryngoscopy, but other adjuncts such as ultrasound and laryngeal electromyography may also be helpful in making the diagnosis and forming a treatment plan. In many instances, there is effective compensation by the contralateral vocal fold, making surgical intervention unnecessary. Children who cannot compensate for a unilateral defect may suffer from significant dysphonia that can affect their quality of life because their ability to be understood may be diminished. In these patients, treatment in the form of medialization or reinnervation of the affected recurrent laryngeal nerve may be warranted. UVCP is a well recognized problem in pediatric patients with disordered voice and feeding problems. Some patients will spontaneously recover their laryngeal function. For those who do not, a variety of reliable techniques are available for rehabilitative treatment. Improved diagnostics and a growing understanding of prognosis can help guide therapy decisions along with the goals and desires of the patient and his or her family.

  17. Fascia implantation with fibroblast growth factor on vocal fold paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiromi; Nishiyama, Koichiro; Seino, Yutomo; Kimura, Yu; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Makito

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to determine the effect of autologous transplantation of fascia into the vocal fold (ATFV) with controlled release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) in a rat model. Unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) section was performed on 15 rats. Ten rats received an autologous fascia implant and gelatin hydrogel with or without bFGF (1 μg) to their larynxes (fascia only, "fascia group"; bFGF + fascia, "fascia + bFGF group"), while the rest underwent RLN transection ("RLN section group"). Four months later, evaluation of the laryngeal glottal gap and histological analysis were performed. The glottal gap was significantly reduced in the fascia + bFGF group, and fat volume increased significantly relative to the RLN section. The volume of the remaining fascia in the bFGF + fascia group was significantly greater than that of the fascia group. ATFV with controlled release of bFGF may compensate for diminished laryngeal volume in UVFP by reducing resorption of the implanted fascia and increasing fat volume. Our findings suggest that this modality may represent an attractive option for treating UVFP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Gao Yuchun's experience of facial paralysis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjun; Cui, Linhua; Yuan, Jun; He, Li; Xie, Zhanqing; Xue, Weihua; Li, Mei; Zhang, Zhenwei; Gao, Yuchun; Kang, Suobin

    2015-05-01

    To introduce professor Gao Yuchun's clinical experience and treating characteristics of facial paralysis treated with acupuncture and moxibustion. Professor Gao pays attention to yangming when he selects acupoints for clinical syndrome, and directs acupoints selection based on syndrome differentiation in different levels of jingjin, meridians and zangfu; he praises opposing needling technique and reinforcing the deficiency and reducing the excess highly; the acupuncture manipulation is gentle,shallow and slow for reducing the healthy side and reinforcing the affected side, and through losing its excess to complement its deficiency; besides, he stresses needle retaining time and distinguishes reinforcing and reducing. Facial paralysis is treated with key factors such as acupoints selecting based on yangming, acupuncture manipulation, needle retaining time, etc. And the spleen and stomach is fine and good at transportation and transformation; the meridians is harmonious; the qi and blood is smooth. The clinical efficacy is enhanced finally.

  19. Thyrotoxic Hypokalemic Periodic Paralysis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Atmaca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is a rare complication of thyrotoxicosis. This clinic condition is often encountered in Asian populations and male gender while thyrotoxicosis is frequently seen in women. The escape of potassium into cell is the mechanism responsible for this disease and its etiology is not completely known. Thyroid hormones, carbohydrate rich diet, alcohol consumption and excessive exercise are regarded as the precipitating factors. This clinical picture is generally difficult to define at first attack. Here, we report a forty-two-year-old male patient with Basedow-Graves disease who was diagnosed as having thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis during the first paralytic attack. His symptoms improved after potassium replacement and treatment with beta-blocker and antithyroid drugs. The permanent cure was achieved with radioactive iodine ablation therapy. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 69-71

  20. In-vivo spinal nerve sensing in MISS using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Xu, Weiliang; Broderick, Neil

    2016-04-01

    In modern Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS), lack of visualization and haptic feedback information are the main obstacles. The spinal cord is a part of the central nervous system (CNS). It is a continuation of the brain stem, carries motor and sensory messages between CNS and the rest of body, and mediates numerous spinal reflexes. Spinal cord and spinal nerves are of great importance but vulnerable, once injured it may result in severe consequences to patients, e.g. paralysis. Raman Spectroscopy has been proved to be an effective and powerful tool in biological and biomedical applications as it works in a rapid, non-invasive and label-free way. It can provide molecular vibrational features of tissue samples and reflect content and proportion of protein, nucleic acids lipids etc. Due to the distinct chemical compositions spinal nerves have, we proposed that spinal nerves can be identified from other types of tissues by using Raman spectroscopy. Ex vivo experiments were first done on samples taken from swine backbones. Comparative spectral data of swine spinal cord, spinal nerves and adjacent tissues (i.e. membrane layer of the spinal cord, muscle, bone and fatty tissue) are obtained by a Raman micro-spectroscopic system and the peak assignment is done. Then the average spectra of all categories of samples are averaged and normalized to the same scale to see the difference against each other. The results verified the feasibility of spinal cord and spinal nerves identification by using Raman spectroscopy. Besides, a fiber-optic Raman sensing system including a miniature Raman sensor for future study is also introduced. This Raman sensor can be embedded into surgical tools for MISS.

  1. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  2. Neoplastic causes of nonacute facial paralysis: A review of 221 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonetti, John P; Marzo, Sam J; Anderson, Douglas A; Sappington, Joshua M

    2016-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to assess the clinical presentation of patients with tumor-related nonacute complete peripheral facial weakness or an incomplete partial facial paresis and to provide an algorithm for the evaluation and management of these patients. Our study population was made up of 221 patients-131 females and 90 males, aged 14 to 79 years (mean: 49.7)-who had been referred to the Facial Nerve Disorders Clinic at our tertiary care academic medical center over a 23-year period with a documented neoplastic cause of facial paralysis. In addition to demographic data, we compiled information on clinical signs and symptoms, radiologic and pathologic findings, and surgical approaches. All patients exhibited gradual-onset facial weakness or facial twitching. Imaging identified an extratemporal tumor in 128 patients (58%), an intratemporal lesion in 55 patients (25%), and an intradural mass in 38 (17%). Almost all of the extratemporal tumors (99%) were malignant, while 91% of the intratemporal and intradural tumors were benign. A transtemporal surgical approach was used in the 93 intratemporal and intradural tumor resections, while the 128 extratemporal lesions required a parotidectomy with partial temporal bone dissection. The vast majority of patients (97%) underwent facial reanimation. We conclude that gradual-onset facial paralysis or twitching may occur as a result of a neoplastic invasion of the facial nerve along its course from the cerebellopontine angle to the parotid gland. We caution readers to beware of a diagnosis of "atypical Bell's palsy."

  3. Focal epileptic seizures mimicking sleep paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Ossola, Maria; Colnaghi, Silvia; Arbasino, Carla

    2009-03-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common parasomnia. The diagnostic criteria for SP, as reported in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, are essentially clinical, as electroencephalography (EEG)-polysomnography (PSG) is not mandatory. We describe a subject whose sleep-related events fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SP, even though her visual hallucinations were elementary, repetitive and stereotyped, thus differing from those usually reported by patients with SP. Video/EEG-PSG documented the focal epileptic nature of the SP-like episodes.

  4. [Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar Jiménez, J; Ruiz Serrato, A E; Bautista Galán, C; Guerrero León, M Á

    2013-01-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an uncommon complication of thyrotoxicosis, characterized by attacks of generalized muscular weakness associated with hypokalemia in patients with hyperthyroidism, most frequently with Graves-Basedow disease. Treatment with antithyroid drugs and potassium supplements reversed the symptoms and the episodes of acute muscular weakness did not reappear. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. [Clinical features of hypokalemic periodic paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Chun-yun; Gao, Yan-ming

    2009-12-18

    To explore the clinical features of hypokalemic periodic paralysis, and compare clinical features of primary group with those of thyrotoxicosis secondary group. Clinical data of 44 patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in Peking University First Hospital from 1996 December to 2008 December were retrospectively analyzed. There were 22 patients in primary group, and 22 in thyrotoxicosis group. Identical clinical features of both the groups: (1)It had a predilection in young men. (2)Main symptoms were limb movement disorder and fatigue, and paralysis recurrent attacked in most patients. (3) 40.9% to 68.2% patients had obvious incentives, and the common ones were a heavy meal, sweet drinks, or strenuous exercise. (4) Serum potassium levels of the two groups were obviously lower than the normal range. (5)In 20% patients of primary group and 25% patients of thyrotoxicosis secondary group, CK levels were higher than normal, while LDH and HBDH levels were normal. (6)The doses of potassium replishment were not correlated to serum potassium levels at the onset. Different clinical features of the two groups: (1) Patients of thyrotoxicosis group had hypermetabolism symptoms and thyroid dysfunction. Patients of primary group had no hypermetabolism symptoms, and all of them were euthyroid. (2)Serum potassium levels of thyrotoxicosis secondary group were lower than those of primary group significantly [(2.25 +/- 0.67) vs (2.78 +/- 0.49) mmol/L, P=0.007]. (3) Hyperkalemia is easier than primary group to rebound in thyrotoxicosis secondary group, after replenishment of potassium. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis has its clinical features, and patients with early diagnosis and replenishment of potassium in time have good prognosis. The doses of potassium replenishment are not determined by serum potassium levels at the onset. Hyperkalemia is easier to rebound in thyrotoxicosis secondary group after replenishment of potassium, serum potassium levels should be monitored closely

  6. Selective activation of the human tibial and common peroneal nerves with a flat interface nerve electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, M. A.; Freeberg, M.; Pinault, G. J. C.; Anderson, J.; Hoyen, H.; Tyler, D. J.; Triolo, R. J.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation has been shown effective in restoring basic lower extremity motor function in individuals with paralysis. We tested the hypothesis that a flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) placed around the human tibial or common peroneal nerve above the knee can selectively activate each of the most important muscles these nerves innervate for use in a neuroprosthesis to control ankle motion. Approach. During intraoperative trials involving three subjects, an eight-contact FINE was placed around the tibial and/or common peroneal nerve, proximal to the popliteal fossa. The FINE's ability to selectively recruit muscles innervated by these nerves was assessed. Data were used to estimate the potential to restore active plantarflexion or dorsiflexion while balancing inversion and eversion using a biomechanical simulation. Main results. With minimal spillover to non-targets, at least three of the four targets in the tibial nerve, including two of the three muscles constituting the triceps surae, were independently and selectively recruited in all subjects. As acceptable levels of spillover increased, recruitment of the target muscles increased. Selective activation of muscles innervated by the peroneal nerve was more challenging. Significance. Estimated joint moments suggest that plantarflexion sufficient for propulsion during stance phase of gait and dorsiflexion sufficient to prevent foot drop during swing can be achieved, accompanied by a small but tolerable inversion or eversion moment.

  7. Hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, F. J.; Lee, E. T.

    1990-01-01

    A case of hyperthyroid periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male is reported, the disorder in this race being described only once before. He presented with complete paralysis below the neck, and his admission potassium of 1.3 mEq/L is the lowest reported in the literature. Correction of the hypokalemia resolved his symptoms. Radionuclide imaging and thyroid function tests revealed the presence of hyperthyroidism which was managed medically. The pathophysiology of hyperthyroid hypokalemic periodic paralysis is discussed. PMID:2304102

  8. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a Hispanic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumo, Lawrence A.; Terzian, Christian; Brannan, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of a Hispanic male presenting with acute onset of bilateral lower extremity weakness, without any antecedent viral or bacterial illness, dietary changes, infiltrative orbitopathy, diffuse goiter, infiltrative dermopathy, and family history of periodic paralysis, who was later found to have Graves' disease. This demonstrates a rare case of periodic paralysis as the initial presentation of hyperthyroidism. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is common in Asian and Hispanic individuals and uncommon in whites and African Americans. PMID:12069220

  9. Artificial facial nerve reflex restores eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujuan Wang; Keyong Li; Jingquan Liu; Dongyue Xu; Yuefeng Rui; Chunsheng Yang

    2010-01-01

    To date, treatment of peripheral facial paralysis has focused on preservation of facial nerve integrity. However, with seriously damaged facial nerve cases, it is difficult to recover anatomical and functional integrity using present therapies. Therefore, the present study utilized artificial facial nerve reflex to obtain orbicularis oculi muscle (OOM) electromyography signals on the uninjured side through the use of implanted recording electrodes. The implanted electrical chips analyzed facial muscle motion on the uninjured side and triggered an electrical stimulator to emit current pulses, which resulted in stimulation of injured OOM contraction and maintained bilateral symmetry and consistency. Following signal recognition, extraction, and computer analysis, electromyography signals in the uninjured OOM resulted in complete eyelid closure, which was consistent with the voltage threshold for eye closure. These findings suggested that artificial facial nerve reflex through the use of implanted microelectronics in unilateral peripheral facial paralysis could restore eyelid closure following orbicularis oculi muscle denervation.

  10. [Clinical trials of treatment of acute facial paralysis with pain by blood-letting plus acupuncture in patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le-Rong; Wang, Hai-Long; Lu, Jia-Qing

    2015-04-01

    To observe the clinical therapeutic effect of blood-letting plus acupuncture intervention for acute facial paralysis with pain (damp-heat type of liver and gallbladder). A total of 120 cases of acute facial paralysis with pain were randomly and equally divided into control group and treatment group. Patients of the control group were treated by simple acupuncture therapy only, and patients of the treatment group treated by acupuncture plus bloodletting at the ipsilateral Yangbai(GB 14) and Quanliao (SI 18), and Dazhui (GV 14) and Yifeng (TE 17), alternatively. Shallow-acupuncture stimulation of ipsilateral Cuanzhu (BL 2), Sizhukong (TE 23), Sibai (ST 2), Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6), Yingxiang (SP 9), and bilateral Hegu (LI 4), Yanglingquan (GB 34) and Xingjian (LR 2) was administered for 30 min, once daily for one month. The patients' facial pain degree was evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), and the pain duration during acute stage was recorded. The facial nerve function and facial nerve function recovery (grade II) time were determined by using Sunnybrook Facial Grading scale and House-Brackmann (HB) grading scale, respectively. In comparison with pre-treatment, the post-aurem pain scores after the first treatment and after the acute stage were significantly decreased, and the facial nerve function scores after the treatment were significantly increased in both control and treatment groups (P facial nerve function recovery (HB) of the treatment group were considerably lower than those of the control group (P facial palsy patients in the control and treatment groups, 16 (27.6%) and 24 (40.7%) were cured, 18 (31.0%) and 23 (39.0%) experienced marked improvement, 15 (25.9%) and 10 (16.9%) were improved, and 9 (15.5%) and 2 (3.4%) were failed, with the effective rate being 85.0% and 96.6%, respectively. Bloodletting combined acupuncture is effective in the treatment of acute facial paralysis with pain.

  11. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  12. Lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A; Barber, Jacques P

    2011-10-01

    To determine lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis. Keyword term searches using "sleep paralysis", "isolated sleep paralysis", or "parasomnia not otherwise specified" were conducted using MEDLINE (1950-present) and PsychINFO (1872-present). English and Spanish language abstracts were reviewed, as were reference lists of identified articles. Thirty five studies that reported lifetime sleep paralysis rates and described both the assessment procedures and sample utilized were selected. Weighted percentages were calculated for each study and, when possible, for each reported subsample. Aggregating across studies (total N=36,533), 7.6% of the general population, 28.3% of students, and 31.9% of psychiatric patients experienced at least one episode of sleep paralysis. Of the psychiatric patients with panic disorder, 34.6% reported lifetime sleep paralysis. Results also suggested that minorities experience lifetime sleep paralysis at higher rates than Caucasians. Sleep paralysis is relatively common in the general population and more frequent in students and psychiatric patients. Given these prevalence rates, sleep paralysis should be assessed more regularly and uniformly in order to determine its impact on individual functioning and better articulate its relation to psychiatric and other medical conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairunnisaa, Aida; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yazid, Haniza; Basri, Hassrizal Hassan; Yaacob, Sazali; Chin, Lim Chee

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostic process of facial paralysis requires qualitative assessment for the classification and treatment planning. This result is inconsistent assessment that potential affect treatment planning. We developed a facial-paralysis diagnostic system based on 3D reconstruction of RGB and depth data using a standard structured-light camera - Kinect 360 - and implementation of Active Appearance Models (AAM). We also proposed a quantitative assessment for facial paralysis based on triangular model. In this paper, we report on the design and development process, including preliminary experimental results. Our preliminary experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of our quantitative assessment system to diagnose facial paralysis.

  14. Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis triggered by high carbohydrate diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hennawy, Adel S; Nesa, Mushammat; Mahmood, Aza K

    2007-01-01

    Thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis is an uncommon disorder characterized by elevated thyroid hormone, muscle weakness or paralysis, and intracellular shifts of potassium leading to hypokalemia. This article presents a case of thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis in a 22-year old Hispanic man with nonfamilial thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis triggered by a high carbohydrate diet. Laboratory studies showed elevated thyroid hormone, decreased thyroid-stimulating hormone, and hypokalemia. Rapid reduction in thyroid hormone levels by giving antithyroid drugs such as propylthiouracil and prompt potassium therapy with frequent measurements of serum potassium levels during therapy to avoid catastrophic hyperkalemia when potassium starts to shift back from intracellular to extracellular compartments can lead to successful outcome.

  15. Hysterical conversion paralysis in an adolescent boy with lumbar spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Tadahiro; Tonogai, Ichiro; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Jha, Subash C; Fukuta, Shoji; Higashino, Kosaku; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-05-01

    We describe a case of recurrent hysterical paralysis triggered by low back pain because of lumbar spondylolysis. A 16-year-old male soccer player was referred to our institution with five previous episodes of acute paralysis triggered by severe low back pain. We performed direct surgical repair of the terminal-stage bilateral spondylolysis at L4 using a hook-rod system. His chronic low back pain was completely resolved, and no further episodes of hysterical paralysis have occurred after surgery. Spine surgeons should be aware of possible hysterical conversion paralysis when there is discrepancy between radiological and neurological findings.

  16. [An analysis of the risk factors for the severity of paralysis in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Ru-xiang; Zou, Liang-yu; Li, Zhuo-xing

    2010-03-01

    To analyze the independent factors for the severity of paralysis in the patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP). Eighty patients admitted with HOPP were reviewed. Using univariate analysis and multivariate analysis, the independent factors for the severity of paralysis were revealed. A total of 76 cases were male and 4 female with a mean age of (26.3 +/- 4.5) years. Univariate analysis showed that patients with low serum magnesium level, low serum potassium level, high serum creatine kinase level, changes of electrocardiogram, chest distress and palpitation, nausea and vomiting as well as muscular soreness had more severe paralysis, while multivariate analysis revealed that serum magnesium 200 U/L (OR 1.1, 95%CI 1.0 - 1.1, P paralysis. Low serum magnesium level, low serum potassium level and high serum creatine kinase level are the independent risk factors for more severe paralysis in patients with HOPP.

  17. Intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation for preservation of facial nerve function in patients with large acoustic neuroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bai-yun; TIAN Yong-ji; LIU Wen; LIU Shu-ling; QIAO Hui; ZHANG Jun-ting; JIA Gui-jun

    2007-01-01

    Background Although various monitoring techniques have been used routinely in the treatment of the lesions in the skull base, iatrogenic facial paresis or paralysis remains a significant clinical problem. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation on preservation of facial nerve function.Method From January to November 2005, 19 patients with large acoustic neuroma were treated using intraoperative facial motor evoked potentials monitoring with transcranial electrical stimulation (TCEMEP) for preservation of facial nerve function. The relationship between the decrease of MEP amplitude after tumor removal and the postoperative function of the facial nerve was analyzed.Results MEP amplitude decreased more than 75% in 11 patients, of which 6 presented significant facial paralysis (H-B grade 3), and 5 had mild facial paralysis (H-B grade 2). In the other 8 patients, whose MEP amplitude decreased less than 75%, 1 experienced significant facial paralysis, 5 had mild facial paralysis, and 2 were normal.Conclusions Intraoperative TCEMEP can be used to predict postoperative function of the facial nerve. The decreased MEP amplitude above 75 % is an alarm point for possible severe facial paralysis.

  18. [Intractable facial paralysis treated with different acupuncture and acupoint embedding therapies: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Min; Feng, Hua; Jin, Changxu; Xu, Lei; Lin, Tianyun

    2015-10-01

    To compare the clinical therapeutic effects on intractable facial paralysis among acupuncture, acupoint catgut embedding and PDS embedding. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients of intractable facial paralysis were randomized into an acupuncture group, a catgut embedding group and a PDS embedding group, 93 cases in each one. Cuanzhu (BL 2), Yuyao (EX-HN 4), Taiyang (EX-HN 5), Xuanlu (GB 5), Dicang (ST 4), Jiache (ST 6), Quanliao (SI 18), Qianzheng (Extra), Xiaguan (ST 7) and Fengchi (GB 20) on the affected side and bilateral Hegu (LI 4) and Zusanli (ST 36) were selected in the three groups. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture was applied to those acupoints, once every two days; 10 treatments made one session; the successive three sessions were required. In the catgut embedding group and the PDS embedding group, catgut and PDS were embedded separately, once every 10 days; 3 treatments made one session and the successive two sessions were required. The therapeutic cycle was 2 months in the three groups. The therapeutic results were analyzed statistically 2 months later. The scores of Sunnybrook facial nerve grading system and the facial nerve electroneurography (ENoG) were used for the efficacy assessment before and after treatment in the three groups. After treatment, the score of Sunnybrook facial nerve grading system was improved apparently after treatment as compared with that before treatment in any of the three groups (all P acupuncture group (both P 0.05). After treatment, ENoG wave ampli tude values in the frontal muscle and orbicularisoris muscle on the affected side were improved as compared with those before treatment in the three groups (all P acupuncture group (all P 0.05). In the acupuncture group, ENoG wave amplitudes on the affected side were lower than those on the healthy side (both P Acupuncture, catgut embedding and PDS embedding at acupoints all achieve the therapeutic effects on intractable facial paralysis. However, the acupoint embedding

  19. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  20. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-09-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons.

  1. Post-traumatic acute bilateral facial nerve palsy - a management dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute bilateral facial nerve paralysis is a rare clinical entity, and its management remains very controversial (operative or conservative. Here we are presenting a case of acute onset bilateral facial nerve palsy following head injury with bilateral temporal bone fracture with clinico-radiographic contrary. Patient was managed conservatively with complete recovery. By this article, authors want to stress on combining clinical examination and radiological findings for decision making of this rare entity and tried to evaluate the management.

  2. Nerve conduction and electromyography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N M; Oware, A

    2012-07-01

    Nerve conduction studies (NCS) and electromyography (EMG), often shortened to 'EMGs', are a useful adjunct to clinical examination of the peripheral nervous system and striated skeletal muscle. NCS provide an efficient and rapid method of quantifying nerve conduction velocity (CV) and the amplitude of both sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) and compound motor action potentials (cMAPs). The CV reflects speed of propagation of action potentials, by saltatory conduction, along large myelinated axons in a peripheral nerve. The amplitude of SNAPs is in part determined by the number of axons in a sensory nerve, whilst amplitude of cMAPs reflects integrated function of the motor axons, neuromuscular junction and striated muscle. Repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS) can identify defects of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) transmission, pre- or post-synaptic. Needle EMG examination can detect myopathic changes in muscle and signs of denervation. Combinations of these procedures can establish if motor and/or sensory nerve cell bodies or peripheral nerves are damaged (e.g. motor neuronopathy, sensory ganglionopathy or neuropathy), and also indicate if the primary target is the axon or the myelin sheath (i.e. axonal or demyelinating neuropathies). The distribution of nerve damage can be determined as either generalised, multifocal (mononeuropathy multiplex) or focal. The latter often due to compression at the common entrapment sites (such as the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, cubital tunnel, radial groove, fibular head and tarsal tunnel, to name but a few of the reported hundred or so 'entrapment neuropathies').

  3. An analysis of treating peripheral facial paralysis by the penetration needling%透刺法治疗周围性面瘫经验浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕素利

    2015-01-01

    周围性面瘫是指特发性面神经麻痹,又称贝耳麻痹,指原因不明、急性发病的单侧周围性面神经麻痹,是临床常见病、多发病.笔者结合近10年临床经验,采用针灸穴位透刺治疗面瘫,面部肌肉功能恢复满意,且有效减少了周围性面瘫的恢复时间,现总结经验,求同道批评指正.%The peripheral facial paralysis refers to idiopathic facial paralysis, also known as the Bell paralysis,caused by unknown, acute onset of unilateral peripheral facial nerve paralysis, and is a common clinical disease. According to nearly 10 years of clinical experience, treating peripheral facial paralysis by the penetration needling can effectively reduce the recovery time. Now the experience was summed up.

  4. Bilateral facial nerve palsy in a newly diagnosed diabetic patient with associated herpes labialis

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    Manish Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a very rare condition, usually following neurologic, neoplastic, traumatic, infective or metabolic causes. We present here a case of 29-year-old male, diagnosed on admission as diabetic with herpes labialis and bilateral facial paralysis. As the differentials are extensive, diagnostic workup and subsequent treatment should be done keeping various etiological factors in mind.

  5. Post-Traumatic Isolated Bilateral Sixth Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Here we discussed an unusual case of head injury with bilateral sixth nerve palsy without any other neurological deficit. A 40-year-old male was admitted with double vision after an episode of head injury. Case Presentation On examination bilateral lateral rectus palsy was present. No other positive finding recorded in general physical, neurological and ophthalmological examinations. Conclusions Bilaterality of the abducent nerve paralysis is uncommon. It is usually associated with major head injury with brain stem injury and associated neurological findings.

  6. Discussion on mechanism of eye acupuncture in treating apoplectic paralysis%眼针治疗中风偏瘫的作用机制探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏欣; 海英

    2011-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicinal therapy of the eye acupuncture is one of superior microacupuncture therapies which was invented by famous acupuncture professor Peng Jing-shan. Through needling points around the eye, the treatment can treat the diseases of whole body, especially for curing apoplectic paralysis. This article expounded and analyzed the mechanism of eye acupuncture in treating apoplectic paralysis through medical theory, biological holographic theory, modern nerves anatomy and nerves physiology.%眼针疗法主要是通过针刺眼周穴区治疗全身疾病,尤其在治疗中风偏瘫方面疗效卓著.本文从中医学理论、生物全息理论、现代神经解剖学及神经生理学等方面进行分析、阐述,探讨眼针治疗中风后偏瘫的机理.

  7. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland: Anastamosis of the facial nerve with the great auricular nerve after radical parotidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir Osman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland is a rare and slowly growing, but highly malignant tumor. Surgical resection of a malignant parotid tumor should include resection of the facial nerve when the nerve is involved in the tumor. Facial nerve reconstruction is required after nerve resection. A 14 year-old female presented with complaints of painless enlargement of the right parotid gland and facial asymmetry. Physical examination revealed a firm mass in the region of the parotid gland as well as right facial paralysis. Biopsy obtained from the mass showed an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the parotid gland. A radical parotidectomy with a modified radical neck dissection was carried out. Grafting material for the facial reconstruction was harvested from the great auricular nerve. The proximal main trunk and each distal branch of the facial nerve were coapted with the greater auricular nerve. The patient received radiotherapy after surgery and was seen to achieve grade IV facial function one year after surgery. Thus, the great auricular nerve is appropriate grafting material for coaptation of each distal branch of the facial nerve.

  8. Razi's description and treatment of facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmood; Kalantar Hormozi, Abdoljalil; Asadi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    In the modern medical era, facial paralysis is linked with the name of Charles Bell. This disease, which is usually unilateral and is a peripheral facial palsy, causes facial muscle weakness in the affected side. Bell gave a complete description of the disease; but historically other physicians had described it several hundred years prior although it had been ignored for different reasons, such as the difficulty of the original text language. The first and the most famous of these physicians who described this disease was Mohammad Ibn Zakaryya Razi (Rhazes). In this article, we discuss his opinion.

  9. Temporary divergence paralysis in viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Stef L M; Gan, Ivan M

    2008-06-01

    A 43-year-old woman who reported diplopia and headache was found to have comitant esotropia at distance fixation and normal alignment at reading distance (divergence paralysis). Eye movement, including abduction, was normal as was the rest of the neurologic examination. Brain MRI was normal. Lumbar puncture showed an elevated opening pressure and a cerebrospinal fluid formula consistent with viral meningitis. The patient was treated with intravenous fluids and analgesics and with a temporary prism to alleviate diplopia. Within 3 weeks, she had fully recovered. This is the first report of divergence palsy in viral meningitis.

  10. Chinese Herbal Medicine in Treating 22 DiabeticFacial Paralysis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-one cases were cured, among which 13 cases cured within one course, and 8 within two courses; the paralysis existed continuously in 1 case, perhaps due to old age and protracted course of disease. After the comprehensive treatment, the pre-existing neuromuscular complications were obviously remitted. Follow-up of all patients for 1-6 years revealed that, except one case that failed to recover completely, no case relapsed.

  11. [One case of postoperative facial paralysis after first branchial fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Xu, Yaosheng

    2015-12-01

    Pus overflow from patent's fistula belew the left face near mandibular angle 2 years agowith a little pain. Symptoms relieved after oral antibiotics. This symptom frequently occurred in the past six months. Postoperative facial paralysis occurred after surgery, and recovered after treatment. It was diagnosed as the postoperative facial paralysis after first branchial fistula surgery.

  12. Like a Deer in the Headlights: The Paralysis of Stuckness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Nathe, Ben

    2008-01-01

    When describing how they experience moments of not-knowing, youth workers often talk about a sense of paralysis, as though their uncertainty becomes physically constraining. This chapter describes the first of five themes associated with youth workers' experiences of not knowing what to do: the paralysis of stuckness. In addition to describing and…

  13. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the ulnar nerve. This ... syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve covering ( ...

  14. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  15. Nerve biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  17. [Hypoglossal nerve neuropraxia after shoulder hemiarthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, L; Camarena, P; Koo, M; Sabaté, A; Armengol, J

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of hypoglossal nerve damage after shoulder hemiarthroplasty with the patient in "beach chair" position, performed with general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation, and without complications. An ultrasound-guided interscalene block was previously performed in an alert patient. After the intervention, the patient showed clinical symptomatology compatible with paralysis of the right hypoglossal nerve that completely disappeared after 4 weeks. Mechanisms such as hyperextension of the neck during intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure, excessive hyperextension, or head lateralization during surgery have been described as causes of this neurological damage. We discuss the causes, the associated factors and suggest preventive measures. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Case of Bartter syndrome presenting with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Ozgür; Koyun, Mustafa; Akman, Sema; Güven, Ayfer Gür; Haspolat, Senay

    2006-03-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis can occur secondarily to excessive potassium loss. Thyrotoxicosis, diuretic ingestions, hyperaldosteronism, barium poisoning, Gitelman syndrome, and Bartter syndrome are among the disorders causing secondary hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Clinical presentation of Bartter syndrome with hypokalemic periodic paralysis is rare. A 12-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital because of transient paralysis. He had been suffering from transient weakness attacks for 2 years and had had a total of 10 attacks, lasting 1 to 3 days. He had growth retardation, polyuria, and polydipsia. Laboratory examinations revealed hypokalemic alkalosis, normomagnesemia, hypercalciuria, and hyperaldosteronism. The clinical and laboratory findings were in accordance with Bartter syndrome. He has been followed up for 6 months and has suffered no further paralytic attacks under indomethacin therapy. This case highlights the importance of blood pH measurement in patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis; it might prevent misdiagnosis and mismanagement in such diseases.

  19. Transection of peripheral nerves, bridging strategies and effect evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJkema-Paassen, J; Jansen, K; Gramsbergen, A; Meek, MF

    2004-01-01

    Disruption of peripheral nerves due to trauma is a frequently Occurring clinical problem. Gaps in the nerve are bridged by guiding the regenerating nerves along autologous grafts or artificial guides. This review gives an overview oil the different methods of nerve repair techniques. Conventional su

  20. 瞬目反射在急性面神经炎中的应用价值%The value of blink reflex in facial paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    战丽; 梁冰; 周阳

    2011-01-01

    [目的]探讨瞬目反射对面神经炎早期诊断和病变范围评估的价值.[方法]对60例面神经炎患者在发病1~7 d内进行瞬目反射检查并与神经电图检查作对照.[结果]瞬目反射异常率为100%(60/60),神经电图异常率为46.6%(28/60),差异有统计学意义.瞬目反射提示单纯面神经损害68.3%(41/60),面神经、脑干和三叉神经联合损害19例.[结论]瞬目反射是面神经炎早期诊断的敏感指标,对评估病变范围有助.%[Objective] To explore the value of blink reflex examination on the early diagnosis and extent of facial paralysis.[ Mothods] 60 cases of facial paralysis patients accepted blink reflexes examination and compared with nerve eleetronystagmography examination within 1 to 7 days. [ Results] The blink reflex abnormality rate was 100% (60/60), abnormal nerve diagram was 46.6% (28/60), the ditterenee was statistically significant. Blink reflex in facial nerve damage alone suggested a pure facial nerve damage 68.3%(41/60). Facial nerve, brainstem, and extensive damage to the trigeminal nerve were examined in 19 cases. [Conclusion] The facial blink reflex is a sensitive marker of early diagnosis on facial paralysis and is helpful for the assessment of the extent of the disease.

  1. Endoscopic laterofixation in bilateral vocal cords paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, Zawadzka-Glos; Magdalena, Frackiewicz; Mieczyslaw, Chmielik

    2010-06-01

    Vocal cords paralysis is the second most frequent cause of laryngeal stridor in children. Symptoms of congenital vocal cords paralysis can occur shortly after birth or later. Vocal cords paralysis can be unilateral or bilateral. Symptoms of unilateral paralysis include hoarse weeping or stridor during a deep inhalation. In children unilateral vocal cords paralysis often retreats spontaneously or can be completely compensated. Children with bilateral vocal cords paralysis present mainly breathing disorders while phonation is normal. Symptoms are different, starting from complete occlusion of respiratory tracts and ending on small symptoms connected with the lack of effort tolerance. When symptoms are severe, patients from this group require a tracheotomy. The lack of restoration of normal function of vocal cords or lack of complete compensation and maintenance of symptoms are an indication for surgical treatment. The aim of this study is to present results of the treatment of bilateral vocal cords paralysis in children using the endoscopic method of laterofixation of vocal cords. In the Pediatric ENT Department between 1998 and 2009 sixty four children with dyspnoea and/or phonation disorders caused by vocal cords paralysis were treated. In ten cases laterofixation of vocal cords was performed, in most cases with good result. In this article the authors present the method of endoscopic laterofixation and achieved results. Endoscopic laterofixation of vocal cords in children is a safe and an easy method of surgical treatment of bilateral vocal cords paralysis. This method can be used as a first and often as a one stage treatment of vocal cords paralysis. In some cases this procedure is insufficient and has to be completed with other methods. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  3. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nofal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion:  Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis.

  4. Peripheral nerve imaging: Not only cross-sectional area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafico, Alberto Stefano

    2016-08-28

    Peripheral nerve imaging is recognized as a complement to clinical and neurophysiological assessment in the evaluation of peripheral nerves with the ability to impact patient management, even for small and difficult nerves. The European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology, suggest to use ultrasound (US) for nerve evaluation due to the fact that, in sever anatomical area, magnetic resonance imaging is not able to give additional informations. US could be considered the first-choice approach for the assessment of peripheral nerves. The relative drawback of peripheral nerve US is the long learning curve and the deep anatomic competence to evaluate even small nerves. In the recent years, the role of US in peripheral nerve evaluation has been widened. In the past, nerve US was mainly used to assess nerve-cross sectional area, but now more advanced measurements and considerations are desirable and can boost the role of peripheral nerve US. Nerve echotexture evaluation was defined in 2010: The ratio between the hypoechoic and hyperechoic areas of peripheral nerves on US was called "nerve density". For evaluation of patients who have peripheral neuropathies, the role of peripheral nerve is US wider than simple cross-sectional area evaluation. Quantitative measurements describing the internal fascicular echotexture of peripheral nerves introduce the concept of considering US as a possible quantitative imaging biomarker technique. The potential of nerve US has started to be uncovered. It seems clear that only cross-sectional area measurement is no more sufficient for a comprehensive US evaluation of peripheral nerves.

  5. Schwannomatosis of the sciatic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Maruyama, Shigeki; Mizuno, Kosaku [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    A 52-year-old woman with schwannomatosis in the left sciatic nerve is presented. The patient had no stigmata of neurofibromatosis (NF) type 1 or 2. Cutaneous or spinal schwannomas were not detected. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the sciatic nerve revealed more than 15 tumors along the course of the nerve. Histological examination revealed schwannomas consisting of Antoni A and B areas. Immunohistochemical study showed most cells reacting intensely for S-100 protein. The patient underwent conservative follow-up treatment due to the minimal symptoms. The relationship of the disease with NF-2 and plexiform schwannoma is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Lessons learned from muscle fatigue: implications for treatment of patients with hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Jean-Marc; Hayward, Lawrence J

    2012-12-01

    Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HyperKPP) is a disease characterized by periods of myotonic discharges and paralytic attacks causing weakness, the latter associated with increases in plasma [K(+)]. The myotonic discharge is due to increased Na(+) influx through defective Na(+) channels that triggers generation of several action potentials. The subsequent increase in extracellular K(+) concentration causes excessive membrane depolarization that inactivates Na(+) channels triggering the paralysis. None of the available treatments is fully effective. This paper reviews the capacity of Na(+) K(+)ATPase pumps, KATP and ClC-1 Cl(-) channels in improving membrane excitability during muscle activity and how using these three membrane components we can study future and more effective treatments for HyperKPP patients. The review of current patents related to HyperKPP reinforces the need of novel approaches for the treatment of this channelopathy.

  7. Isolated sleep paralysis and fearful isolated sleep paralysis in outpatients with panic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A; McCarthy, Kevin S; Chambless, Dianne L; Milrod, Barbara L; Khalsa, Shabad-Ratan; Barber, Jacques P

    2010-12-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) has received scant attention in clinical populations, and there has been little empirical consideration of the role of fear in ISP episodes. To facilitate research and clinical work in this area, the authors developed a reliable semistructured interview (the Fearful Isolated Sleep Paralysis Interview) to assess ISP and their proposed fearful ISP (FISP) episode criteria in 133 patients presenting for panic disorder treatment. Of these, 29.3% met lifetime ISP episode criteria, 20.3% met the authors' lifetime FISP episode criteria, and 12.8% met their recurrent FISP criteria. Both ISP and FISP were associated with minority status and comorbidity. However, only FISP was significantly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, body mass, anxiety sensitivity, and mood and anxiety disorder symptomatology.

  8. [Discussion on acupuncture for flaccid paralysis from "treating flaccid paralysis by yangming alone"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Shendan; Zong, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Theories regarding"treating flaccid paralysis by yangming alone" are summarized, and the treatment effects of "yangming is the sea of five viscera and six organs", "yangming is in charge of smoothing the tendon and muscle, while tendon and muscle is in charge of connecting bones and movement" and "tendon and muscle is the crossing point of yin meridians and yang meridians, which is converged in yangming" are explained. With medical cases from later generations, it is summarized that besides "using yangming alone", "mainly using yang-ming" and "multiple meridians and acupoints" can also be recommend, indicating that focus should be paid not only on yangming, but also on,syndrome differentiation and treatment, and accompanying symptoms should be emphasized to regulate the body. The commonly used acupoints for flaccid paralysis are summarized to guide the clinical treatment and manipulation.

  9. 手法治疗周围性面瘫的临床观察%Clinical Observation on Peripheral Facial Paralysis with the Manipulation Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    操红艳; 周晓

    2013-01-01

      目的:观察周围性面瘫的手法治疗效果,并探讨其作用机制。方法:32例周围性面瘫均进行手法治疗。结果:痊愈27例,好转4例,无效1例,总有效率96.8%。结论:手法治疗周围性面瘫安全、方便、效果明显。其原理为通过对面瘫肌群的逆时针按摩,使面瘫肌群局部的毛细血管扩张,血流加快,增强了局部血液循环,加速炎症代谢产物吸收,消除面神经水肿,改善面神经和面瘫肌群的营养,从而恢复面瘫肌群的弹性。%Objective:To observe the efficacy of manipulation treating peripheral facial paralysis, and to explore its mechanism of action. Methods:32 cases of peripheral facial paralysis were all treated with message. Results:27 cases were cured, with 4 cases improved and 1 case ineffective, the total efficiency was 96.8%. Conclusion:Peripheral facial paralysis with manipulation therapy is safe, convenient and obviously effective. According to anticlockwise massage on facial paralysis muscles, which makes telangiectasia of facial local muscles and blood flow accelerate, enhancing the cir-culation of local blood, accelerating the absorption of inflammatory metabolites, eliminating edema of facial nerve and improving nutrition of facial nerve and muscle, so as to restore the elasticity of facial muscle, the above statement is the principle of manipulation treating peripheral facial paraly-sis.

  10. Concomitant abducens and facial nerve palsies following blunt head trauma associated with bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Min-Jeong; Han, Sang-Beom; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-07-15

    A 22-year-old man was referred for horizontal diplopia that worsened on left gaze. He had been admitted for a head trauma caused by a traffic accident. Brain CT scan showed a longitudinal fracture of the left temporal bone with extension to the left carotid canal and central skull base, including sphenoid lateral wall and roof, and left orbit medial wall non-displaced fracture. Prism cover test revealed 20 prism diopters of esotropia and abduction limitation in the left eye. Hess screening test results were compatible with left abducens nerve paralysis. Symptoms suggesting complete lower motor neuron palsy of the left facial nerve, such as unilateral facial drooping, inability to raise the eyebrow and difficulty closing the eye, were present. As there was no improvement in facial paralysis, the patient received surgical intervention using a transmastoidal approach. Three months postoperatively, prism cover test showed orthotropia, however, the facial nerve palsy persisted.

  11. Comparative study of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis from idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: An experience from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, J; Goyal, G; Bhoi, S K; Chandra, S; Misra, U K

    2012-07-01

    There is paucity of reports on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) from India. We report the patients with TPP and compare them with idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (IHPP). Patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) treated during the past 11 years were evaluated retrospectively. Their demographic parameters, family history, clinical features, precipitating factors, severity of weakness, laboratory parameters and rapidity of recovery were recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters of TPP and IHPP were compared. During the study period, we managed 52 patients with HPP; nine (17.3%) of whom had TPP and 27 (52%) had IHPP. The demographic, precipitating factors, number of attacks and severity of limb weakness were similar between the TPP and IHPP groups, except in the IHPP group, bulbar weakness was present in four and respiratory paralysis in six, needing artificial ventilation in two patients. Serum potassium was significantly lower in TPP (2.21 ± 0.49) compared with IHPP (2.67 ± 0.59, P = 0.04). Four patients with TPP had subclinical thyrotoxicosis and two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. Rebound hyperkalemia occurred in both TPP and IHPP (three versus eight patients). The recovery was faster in IHPP (26.7 ± 15.4 h) compared with TPP (34.0 ± 14.0 h), but was statistically insignificant. TPP constitutes 17.3% of HPP, and absence of clinical features of thyrotoxicosis and subclinical hyperthyroidism in TPP is not uncommon. Clinical features, demographic profile and rebound hyperkalemia are similar in both TPP and IHPP. The serum potassium level is significantly low in the TPP compared with the IHPP group.

  12. Comparative study of thyrotoxic periodic paralysis from idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis: An experience from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kalita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There is paucity of reports on thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP from India. We report the patients with TPP and compare them with idiopathic hypokalemic periodic paralysis (IHPP. Materials and Methods: Patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP treated during the past 11 years were evaluated retrospectively. Their demographic parameters, family history, clinical features, precipitating factors, severity of weakness, laboratory parameters and rapidity of recovery were recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters of TPP and IHPP were compared. Results: During the study period, we managed 52 patients with HPP; nine (17.3% of whom had TPP and 27 (52% had IHPP. The demographic, precipitating factors, number of attacks and severity of limb weakness were similar between the TPP and IHPP groups, except in the IHPP group, bulbar weakness was present in four and respiratory paralysis in six, needing artificial ventilation in two patients. Serum potassium was significantly lower in TPP (2.21 ± 0.49 compared with IHPP (2.67 ± 0.59, P = 0.04. Four patients with TPP had subclinical thyrotoxicosis and two had subclinical hyperthyroidism. Rebound hyperkalemia occurred in both TPP and IHPP (three versus eight patients. The recovery was faster in IHPP (26.7 ± 15.4 h compared with TPP (34.0 ± 14.0 h, but was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: TPP constitutes 17.3% of HPP, and absence of clinical features of thyrotoxicosis and subclinical hyperthyroidism in TPP is not uncommon. Clinical features, demographic profile and rebound hyperkalemia are similar in both TPP and IHPP. The serum potassium level is significantly low in the TPP compared with the IHPP group.

  13. Shoulder posture and median nerve sliding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilley Andrew

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with upper limb pain often have a slumped sitting position and poor shoulder posture. Pain could be due to poor posture causing mechanical changes (stretch; local pressure that in turn affect the function of major limb nerves (e.g. median nerve. This study examines (1 whether the individual components of slumped sitting (forward head position, trunk flexion and shoulder protraction cause median nerve stretch and (2 whether shoulder protraction restricts normal nerve movements. Methods Longitudinal nerve movement was measured using frame-by-frame cross-correlation analysis from high frequency ultrasound images during individual components of slumped sitting. The effects of protraction on nerve movement through the shoulder region were investigated by examining nerve movement in the arm in response to contralateral neck side flexion. Results Neither moving the head forward or trunk flexion caused significant movement of the median nerve. In contrast, 4.3 mm of movement, adding 0.7% strain, occurred in the forearm during shoulder protraction. A delay in movement at the start of protraction and straightening of the nerve trunk provided evidence of unloading with the shoulder flexed and elbow extended and the scapulothoracic joint in neutral. There was a 60% reduction in nerve movement in the arm during contralateral neck side flexion when the shoulder was protracted compared to scapulothoracic neutral. Conclusion Slumped sitting is unlikely to increase nerve strain sufficient to cause changes to nerve function. However, shoulder protraction may place the median nerve at risk of injury, since nerve movement is reduced through the shoulder region when the shoulder is protracted and other joints are moved. Both altered nerve dynamics in response to moving other joints and local changes to blood supply may adversely affect nerve function and increase the risk of developing upper quadrant pain.

  14. Psychological contents and social effects associated to peripheral facial paralysis: a speech-language approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva, Mabile Francine Ferreira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The peripheral facial paralysis (PFP results from the reduction or interruption of the axonal transport to the seventh cranial nerve resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial movements. The facial deformity and limitation of movements, besides affecting the aesthetics and functionality, can significantly interfere with interpersonal communication. Objective: Investigate the psychological contents and other social effects associated to PFP in adult subjects, performing a comparative analysis in three groups of subjects with PFP: at flaccid, recovery and sequel phases. Method: Quantitative and qualitative research. 16 adult subjects, from both sexes, aging between 43 and 88 years old, with PFP. Procedure: Open interviews with subjects. The material was recorded in audio and video, literally transcribed, systematized through categorical and statistical analysis. Results: The subjects bearing sequels presented higher statistical significance of psychological contents and social effects associated to PFP. Followed, respectively, by those that were on flaccid and recovery phases. The results suggest that the speech-language therapist, besides performing functional and aesthetical rehabilitation with the subject with PFP, needs to be aware of psychological and social aspects that may be involved, in order to evaluate and seek to reduce the degree of psychological distress and promote the social adjustment of these patients. Conclusion: The biopsychosocial approach to patients with PFP revealed a wide and significant range of subjective contents that warrant new studies that may contribute to the effectiveness of the speech-language clinical method to approach this medical condition.

  15. Clinical Observation on Peripheral Facial Paralysis Treated by Acupuncture plus Facial Paralysis Rehabilitative Exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bao-cheng; LIU Ping; HUANG Guo-qi

    2005-01-01

    In order to observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture plus facial paralysis rehabilitative exercise in the treatment of facial paralysis, 49 cases were treated by acupuncture plus facial paralysis rehabilitative exercise, and 45 cases were treated by single acupuncture for comparison. The total effective rate was 91.8% in the former and 62.2% in the latter. There is a significant difference (P < 0.01) in the effective rate between the two groups.%为观察针刺结合面瘫康复操治疗周围性面神经麻痹的治疗作用,采用针刺结合面瘫康复操治疗49例,并与单纯针刺治疗45例进行对照比较.前者总有效率为91.8%,后者总有效率为62.2%,两照组有效率有显著性差异(P<0.01).

  16. Swallowing therapy--a prospective study on patients with neurogenic dysphagia due to unilateral paresis of the vagal nerve, Avellis' syndrome, Wallenberg's syndrome, posterior fossa tumours and cerebellar hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosiegel, M; Höling, R; Heintze, M; Wagner-Sonntag, E; Wiseman, K

    2005-01-01

    No studies exist dealing with the outcome of dysphagic patients with posterior fossa (IV. ventricle) tumours (PFT) or cerebellar hemorrhage (CH), and the outcome of patients with Wallenberg's syndrome (WS) after functional swallowing therapy (FST) has so far not been studied in detail. Patients and methods. 208 patients with neurogenic dysphagia (ND) who were consecutively admitted for functional swallowing therapy (FST) over a 3 year period to our hospital were examined clinically, by use of a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and/or fibreoptic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). The most frequent etiology was stroke (48%), followed by CNS tumours (13%). In the present study we defined three groups. Group 1 comprised 8 patients with PFT or CH. Group 2 consisted of 27 patients with WS, which was the leading cause among patients with non-hemispheric stroke. Since in WS a vagal nerve paresis due to affection of the Nucleus ambiguus occurs, 8 patients with Avellis' syndrome or unilateral paresis of the vagal nerve served as controls and were defined as group 3. Findings. In the three groups, functional feeding status showed significant improvement after FST comprising methods of restitution, compensation and adaptation, each of which were applied in more than 80% of patients. Outcome was, however, significantly worse in group 1 as compared to group 2 and in group 2 as compared to group 3. Dysfunction of the upper esophageal sphincter and reflex triggering were significantly more severely disturbed in groups 1 and 2 as compared to group 3. Group 1 showed significantly more severe disturbances of the oral phase as compared to groups 2 and 3. After FST, more than 50% (5/8) of group 1 and 30% (8/27) of WS patients (group 2) were dependent on tube feeding, whereas all patients of group 3 were full-oral feeders. Interpretation. This is the first study dealing with the outcome of dysphagic patients with PFT or CH. Based on our results it can be assumed that in these

  17. The role of CD4(+) T cells in biphasic hind limb paralysis induced by the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D) in DBA/2 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Makio; Ohtsuka, Ryoichi; Nakayama, Yumi; Doi, Kunio

    2004-01-01

    DBA/2 CrSlc mice infected with the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC-D) (10 PFU/head) developed biphasic hind limb paralysis due to spinal cord lesion. The early phase lesion was characterized by demyelination with infiltration of macrophages in the funiculus lateraris and the late phase lesion by degeneration of motor neurons with infiltration of CD4(+) T cells in the cornu ventrale. In the present study, treatment with anti-Mac1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) or anti-CD4 MAb prior to virus infection (-3 to -1 days) reduced the early phase lesion and the incidence of the first paralysis. Signals of viral RNAs were observed only in a few oligodendrocytes in the funiculus lateraris. Treatment with anti-CD4 MAb from 31 to 33 days post infection when mice showed recovery from the first paralysis reduced the late phase lesion and prevented the second paralysis. Signals of viral RNAs were still detected in a few degenerated neurons in the cornu ventrale. These results indicate that while macrophages and CD4(+) T cells participate in the early phase lesion and paralysis and only CD4(+) T cells in the late phase lesion and paralysis.

  18. Thyrotoxic Periodic Paralysis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, M. J.; Vinagre, I.; Sojo, L.; Cubero, J. M.; Pérez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 37-year-old man with a 4-month history of episodic muscular weakness, involving mainly lower-limbs. Hypokalemia was documented in one episode and managed with intravenous potassium chloride. Hyperthyroidism was diagnosed 4 months after onset of attacks because of mild symptoms. The patient was subsequently diagnosed as having thyrotoxic periodic paralysis associated with Graves’ disease. Treatment with propranolol and methimazol was initiated and one year later he remains euthyroid and symptom free. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis is a rare disorder, especially among Caucasians, but it should always be considered in patients with acute paralysis and hypokalemia, and thyroid function should be evaluated. PMID:19625499

  19. Facial paralysis as a presenting symptom of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilavsky, Efraim; Scheuerman, Oded; Marcus, Nofar; Hoffer, Vered; Garty, Ben Zion

    2006-06-01

    Facial paralysis may occur as a complication of central nervous system leukemias in children, but it is rarely a presenting symptom. This report describes an 8-month-old child who presented with peripheral facial palsy, failure to thrive, anemia, and otitis media. Antibiotic and steroid treatment led to an improvement in the clinical condition, but not the paralysis. At readmission 3 weeks later, physical examination revealed bluish, firm, palpable masses on the scalp and facial areas, and laboratory and imaging studies confirmed the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia. This case should alert physicians to consider hematologic malignancies in children with facial paralysis.

  20. Nanofibrous nerve conduit-enhanced peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xu; Mi, Ruifa; Hoke, Ahmet; Chew, Sing Yian

    2014-05-01

    Fibre structures represent a potential class of materials for the formation of synthetic nerve conduits due to their biomimicking architecture. Although the advantages of fibres in enhancing nerve regeneration have been demonstrated, in vivo evaluation of fibre size effect on nerve regeneration remains limited. In this study, we analyzed the effects of fibre diameter of electrospun conduits on peripheral nerve regeneration across a 15-mm critical defect gap in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. By using an electrospinning technique, fibrous conduits comprised of aligned electrospun poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microfibers (981 ± 83 nm, Microfiber) or nanofibers (251 ± 32 nm, Nanofiber) were obtained. At three months post implantation, axons regenerated across the defect gap in all animals that received fibrous conduits. In contrast, complete nerve regeneration was not observed in the control group that received empty, non-porous PCL film conduits (Film). Nanofiber conduits resulted in significantly higher total number of myelinated axons and thicker myelin sheaths compared to Microfiber and Film conduits. Retrograde labeling revealed a significant increase in number of regenerated dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in the presence of Nanofiber conduits (1.93 ± 0.71 × 10(3) vs. 0.98 ± 0.30 × 10(3) in Microfiber, p regeneration. These results could provide useful insights for future nerve guide designs.

  1. Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus in Honeybee Queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiri, Esmaeil; Meixner, Marina; Büchler, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) is known as a disease of worker honey bees. To investigate pathogenesis of the CBPV on the queen, the sole reproductive individual in a colony, we conducted experiments regarding the susceptibility of queens to CBPV. Results from susceptibility experiment showed...... a similar disease progress in the queens compared to worker bees after infection. Infected queens exhibit symptoms by Day 6 post infection and virus levels reach 1011 copies per head. In a transmission experiment we showed that social interactions may affect the disease progression. Queens with forced...... contact to symptomatic worker bees acquired an overt infection with up to 1011 virus copies per head in six days. In contrast, queens in contact with symptomatic worker bees, but with a chance to receive food from healthy bees outside the cage appeared healthy. The virus loads did not exceed 107...

  2. [HYPP--hyperkalemic periodic paralysis in horses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilmann, M

    1993-12-01

    A literature review of the clinical syndrome HYPP (Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) affecting Quarter Horses is given. HYPP is characterized by sporadic attacks of muscle tremors, weakness and/or collapse, lasting for variable periods of time. Diagnosis is based on physical findings in association with hyperkalemia. In horses with HYPP, the regulation of ion transport through the sodium channels in the muscle cells occasionally fails, causing uncontrollable muscle twitching. Further investigations into molecular genetics reveals a mutation in the gene responsible for sodium and potassium regulation. The identification of this gene mutation is the basis for the blood test used to diagnose HYPP. HYPP is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Treatment of HYPP attacks by intravenous application of calcium gluconate, bicarbonate and glucose results in rapid recovery. Consequent dietary management and daily administration of acetazolamide effectively controls the disease.

  3. Isolated Sleep Paralysis: Fear, Prevention, and Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian Andrew; Grom, Jessica Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about isolated sleep paralysis (ISP), and no empirically supported treatments are available. This study aims to determine: the clinical impact of ISP, the techniques used to prevent or disrupt ISP, and the effectiveness of these techniques. 156 undergraduates were assessed with lifetime ISP using a clinical interview. 75.64% experienced fear during ISP, and 15.38% experienced clinically significant distress/interference, while 19.23% attempted to prevent ISP, and 79.31% of these believed their methods were successful. Regarding disruption, 69.29% made attempts, but only 54.12% reported them effective. Disruption was more common than prevention, but several techniques were useful. Encouraging individuals to utilize these techniques and better monitor their symptoms may be an effective way to manage problematic ISP.

  4. [Flaccid paralysis surveillance in the Latium Region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, A M; Santi, A L; Ciapetti, C; Fiore, L; Novello, F; Vellucci, L; De Stefano, F; Fara, G M

    2000-01-01

    The goal of World Health Organization is to reach the global eradication of poliomyelitis during the first decade of the third millennium. To achieve the certification of the eradication of the disease the main strategy is the Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance. In Italy the active AFP surveillance was performed at national level since 1997. In the Latium region the active surveillance was performed since January 1997 by the laboratory of virology of Institute of Hygiene G Sanarelli which established a regional hospital network. During the years of survey 7 cases were found in 1997 (0.87/100,000), 4 in 1998 (0.5/100,000), 2 in 1999 (0.25/100,000) and 2 in 2000. No wild polioviruses were detected.

  5. Paralysis recovery in humans and model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerton, V. Reggie; Roy, Roland R.

    2002-01-01

    Considerable evidence now demonstrates that extensive functional and anatomical reorganization following spinal cord injury occurs in centers of the brain that have some input into spinal motor pools. This is very encouraging, given the accumulating evidence that new connections formed across spinal lesions may not be initially functionally useful. The second area of advancement in the field of paralysis recovery is in the development of effective interventions to counter axonal growth inhibition. A third area of significant progress is the development of robotic devices to quantify the performance level of motor tasks following spinal cord injury and to 'teach' the spinal cord to step and stand. Advances are being made with robotic devices for mice, rats and humans.

  6. Transient left vocal cord paralysis during laparoscopic surgery for an oesophageal hiatus hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, A; Plocharska, E; Stanowski, E; Koziarski, T; Chmurzynska, A

    1999-07-01

    A 45-year-old male, with symptoms of many years standing of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, was subjected, under general anaesthesia, to laparoscopic fundoplication. Tracheal intubation yielded no problems but great difficulties were encountered during tube insertion into the oesophagus. After surgery, aphonia developed. Laryngological examination demonstrated paralysis of the left vocal cord. Voice strength returned to the pre-operative status after 3 months, and laryngological examination confirmed normal mobility of both cords. The possible cause of the complication was damage to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve which occurred during insertion of the tube into the oesophagus. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease causing 'acid laryngitis' can create conditions favouring this type of complication.

  7. [Professor HE Tianyou's clinical experience of acupuncture and medicine on intractable facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fenghua; Yao, Xuhong; Yan, Xingke; Zhang, Yongkui; Jing, Xiaohui; He, Tianyou

    2015-02-01

    Professor HE Tianyou's unique understanding and treatment characteristics for intractahle facial paralysis are introduced. In clinical practice professor HE highly values acupoint selection and manipulation application, and integrates Chinese and western medicine to flexibly choose acupoints and formulate prescriptions according to syndrome differentiation and location differentiation, besides, he creates several specialized manipulation methods including "tug-of war opposite acupuncture method" and "tractive flash cupping". Based on strengthening body and dredging collaterals. more attention is given on stimulation to local paralyzed facial nerves; meanwhile acupuncture and medication are combined to improve clinical efficacy. During the treatment, the important role of psychological counseling on patient's anxiety is emphasized, and comprehensive treatment is given physically and psychologically in order to achieve the purpose of total rehabilitation.

  8. 针灸治疗急性期周围性面瘫探讨%Investigation of Acupuncture Therapy for Peripheral Facial Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白茹; 马铁明

    2012-01-01

    Facial nerves paralysis, namely the facial nerve paralysis. It is called Kouyan Woxie by Traditional Chinese medicine and can he treated effectively with acupuncture treatment. Although, there is a big problem on the best acupuncture time, many data have shown that it can be achieved the better curative effect in the acute phase and the effect is directly related to the prognosis of paralysis. This article introduced acupuncture effect from the acupuncture time, location, treatment stimulus and so on and aimed to clean the best treatment of the acute phase of facial nerves paralysis and provid the theoretical guidance for shortening the period of treatment, and improving the recovery rate.%周围性面瘫,即面神经麻痹,中医学称为“口眼斜”,是针灸治疗的有效病种之一.尽管对于针灸治疗的最佳介入时机存在争议,但是多项资料已经表明,针灸在急性期介入能够取得更好的疗效,且急性期的治疗效果如何更直接关系到面瘫的预后.文章从针刺时机、取穴以及治疗方法和刺激量等几个方面对急性期周围性面瘫的针灸疗效进行理论探讨,进一步明晰了急性期周围性面瘫的最佳治疗方案,为缩短疗程,提高恢复率提供了理论指导.

  9. Does primary brachial plexus surgery alter palliative tendon transfer surgery outcomes in children with obstetric paralysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Safiye

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surgical management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy can generally be divided into two groups; early reconstructions in which the plexus or affected nerves are addressed and late or palliative reconstructions in which the residual deformities are addressed. Tendon transfers are the mainstay of palliative surgery. Occasionally, surgeons are required to utilise already denervated and subsequently reinnervated muscles as motors. This study aimed to compare the outcomes of tendon transfers for residual shoulder dysfunction in patients who had undergone early nerve surgery to the outcomes in patients who had not. Methods A total of 91 patients with obstetric paralysis-related shoulder abduction and external rotation deficits who underwent a modified Hoffer transfer of the latissimus dorsi/teres major to the greater tubercle of the humerus tendon between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively analysed. The patients who had undergone neural surgery during infancy were compared to those who had not in terms of their preoperative and postoperative shoulder abduction and external rotation active ranges of motion. Results In the early surgery groups, only the postoperative external rotation angles showed statistically significant differences (25 degrees and 75 degrees for total and upper type palsies, respectively. Within the palliative surgery-only groups, there were no significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative abduction and external rotation angles. The significant differences between the early surgery groups and the palliative surgery groups with total palsy during the preoperative period diminished postoperatively (p 0.05, respectively for abduction but not for external rotation. Within the upper type palsy groups, there were no significant differences between the preoperative and postoperative abduction and external rotation angles. Conclusions In this study, it was found that in patients with total

  10. Episodic weakness and vacuolar myopathy in hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basali, Diana; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-11-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman who presented with a 20 year history of gradually progressive lower extremity weakness, characterized by knee buckling with occasional falls and foot dragging. She also experienced difficulty in lifting her arms above her shoulders. The primary periodic paralyses are rare disorders caused by dysfunctional ion channels in skeletal muscle. The hypokalemic type is generally an autosomal dominant condition, due to missense mutations in the alpha subunits of the skeletal muscle L-type calcium channel genes, CACN1AS, or the skeletal muscle sodium channel gene, SCN4A. The affected patients typically present with episodic weakness. For our patient, the consumption of foods high in carbohydrates seemed to precipitate the episodes of weakness. Her family history was significant for six blood relatives, including three sons and three relatives on the paternal side, who had experienced similar symptoms. A biopsy of the left rectus femoralis muscle showed vacuolar myopathic changes in the scattered muscle fibers, accompanied by occasional degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers. There was no evidence of inflammation on the biopsy. The vacuoles were often associated with increased acid phosphatase staining. An electron microscopic examination showed that the vacuolar changes were due to T-tubule dilation, a characteristic of hypokalemic periodic paralysis. Other metabolic etiologies of vacuolar myopathy, such as acid phosphatase (lysosomal) associated acid maltase deficiency (a glycogen storage disease), need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic results in sixth nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruna Violeta-Ioana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors aim to assess through a retrospective study the efficiency of different therapeutic methods used in VIth nerve palsy. 60 patients with VIth nerve palsy, admitted and treated in Oftapro Clinic, were divided into two groups: a group with partial dysfunction (paresis of sixth nerve and a group with the complete abolition of neuromuscular function (VIth nerve palsy. Initial examination included assessment of neuromuscular function, binocular vision and existence of medial rectus muscle contracture (ipsi- and contralateral and contralateral lateral rectus inhibitory palsy. Neuromuscular dysfunction was graded from - 8 (paralysis to 0 (normal abduction. Therapeutic modalities ranged from conservative treatment (occlusion, prism correction, botulinum toxin chemodenervation and surgical treatment: medial rectus recession + lateral rectus resection, in cases of paresis, and transposition procedures (Hummelscheim and full tendon transfer in cases of sixth nerve palsy. Functional therapeutic success was defined as absence of diplopia in primary position, with or without prism correction, and surgical success was considered obtaining orthoptic alignment in primary position or a small residual deviation (under 10 PD. 51 patients had unilateral dysfunction, and 9 patients had bilateral VI-th nerve dysfunction. 8 patients had associated fourth or seventh cranial nerves palsy. The most common etiology was traumatic, followed by tumor and vascular causes. There were 18 cases of spontaneous remission, partial or complete (4-8 months after the onset, and 6 cases enhanced by botulinum toxin chemodenervation. 17 paretic eyes underwent surgery, showing a very good outcome, with restoration of binocular single vision. The procedure of choice was recession of medial rectus muscle, combined with resection of lateral rectus muscle. All patients with sixth nerve palsy underwent surgery, except one old female patient, who refused surgery. Hummelscheim procedure was

  12. Hypokalemic paralysis in a middle-aged female with classic Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wen-Fang; Lin, Shih-Hung; Chan, Jenq-Shyong; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2014-02-01

    Inherited classic Bartter syndrome (cBS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubular disorder resulting from inactivating mutations in the asolateral chloride channel (C1C-Kb) and usually presents in early infancy or childhood with mild to moderate hypokalemia. Profound hypokalemic paralysis in patients with cBS is extremely rare, especially in middle age. A 45-year-old Chinese female patient was referred for evaluation of chronic severe hypokalemia despite regular K+ supplementation (1 mmol/kg/d). She had had two episodes of muscle paralysis due to severe hypokalemia (K+ 1.9 - 2.1 mmol/l) in the past 3 years. She denied vomiting, diarrhea, or the use of laxatives or diuretics. Her blood pressure was normal. Biochemical studies showed hypokalemia (K+ 2.5 mmol/l) with renal potassium wasting, metabolic alkalosis (HCO3- 32 mmol/l), normomagnesemia (Mg2+ 0.8 mmol/l), hypercalciuria (calcium to creatinine ratio 0.5 mmol/mmol; normal paralysis and should be considered in adult patients with hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis.

  13. Laryngeal paralysis in dogs: An update on recent knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan M. Kitshoff

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal paralysis is the effect of an inability to abduct the arytenoid cartilages during inspiration, resulting in respiratory signs consistent with partial airway obstruction. The aetiology of the disease can be congenital (hereditary laryngeal paralysis or congenital polyneuropathy, or acquired (trauma, neoplasia, polyneuropathy, endocrinopathy. The most common form of acquired laryngeal paralysis (LP is typically seen in old, large breed dogs and is a clinical manifestation of a generalised peripheral polyneuropathy recently referred to as geriatric onset laryngeal paralysis polyneuropathy. Diagnosing LP based on clinical signs, breed and history has a very high sensitivity (90% and can be confirmed by laryngeal inspection. Prognosis after surgical correction depends on the aetiology: traumatic cases have a good prognosis, whereas tumour-induced or polyneuropathy-induced LP has a guarded prognosis. Acquired idiopathic LP is a slow progressive disease, with dogs reaching median survival times of 3–5 years after surgical correction.

  14. A calcium channel mutant mouse model of hypokalemic periodic paralysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Fenfen; Mi, Wentao; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O; Burns, Dennis K; Fu, Yu; Gray, Hillery F; Struyk, Arie F; Schneider, Martin F; Cannon, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) is a familial skeletal muscle disorder that presents with recurrent episodes of severe weakness lasting hours to days associated with reduced serum potassium (K+...

  15. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis as first sign of thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifanescu, R A; Danciulescu Miulescu, R; Carsote, M; Poiana, C

    2013-03-15

    periodic paralysis related to hypokalemia is seldom reported in thyrotoxicosis, and it usually occurs in Asian males. Two Romanian (Caucasian) young patients presented with hypokalemic paralysis. TSH, FT4, TT3 was measured by immunochemiluminescence. Case report 1. Patient O.R, aged 19, presented marked asthenia and lower limbs paralysis, following high carbohydrate meal. He declared 10 kg weight loss on hypocaloric diet and mild sweating. Biochemical data revealed moderate hypokalemia (K+=2.6 mmol/L) and thyrotoxicosis (TSHparalysis, with hypokalemia, precipitated by effort, without any sign of thyrotoxicosis. Biochemical data revealed severe hypokalemia (K+=1.8 mmol/L) and thyrotoxicosis (TSHhypokalemic periodic paralysis occurring in young Caucasian teenagers with mild thyrotoxicosis underlined the importance of thyroid screening in patients with symptomatic hypokalemia, even in the absence of symptoms and signs of thyrotoxicosis.

  16. Echovirus 19 associated with a case of acute flaccid paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesson, Alison M; Choo, Chong Ming; Troedson, Christopher; Thorley, Bruce R; Roberts, Jason A

    2013-03-01

    Acute flaccid paralysis can be caused by many members of the enterovirus genus, most notably the three poliviruses types 1 to 3. We report the case of acute flaccid paralysis caused by echovirus 19. The Western Pacific region has been declared polio free by the WHO since 2000. Australia is now using inactivated polio vaccine in the National Immunization Schedule. This vaccine does not carry the extremely rare risk of vaccine associated acute flaccid paralysis but it does leave our newly vaccinated population open gastrointestinal infection with polioviruses and the risk of circulation of the wild-type virus. Continued surveillance of cases of acute flaccid paralysis is to detect polioviruses is essential until poliovirus is completely eradicated.

  17. A young man presenting with paralysis after vigorous exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubran, Christopher; Narain, Rajay; Malik, Luqmaan; Saeed, Saad Aldeen

    2012-08-27

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is a rare metabolic disorder characterised by muscular weakness and paralysis in predisposed thyrotoxic patients. Although patients with TPP are almost uniformly men of Asian descent, cases have been reported in Caucasian and other ethnic populations. The rapid increase in ethnic diversity in Western and European nations has led to increase in TPP reports, where it was once considered exceedingly rare. Correcting the hypokalaemic and hyperthyroid state tends to reverse the paralysis. However, failure to recognise the condition may lead to delay in diagnosis and serious consequences including respiratory failure and death. We describe a young man who was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism who presented with acute paralysis. The clinical characteristics, pathophysiology and management of TTP are reviewed.

  18. Mini-temporalis transposition: a less invasive procedure of smile restoration for long-standing incomplete facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Yang, Xianxian; Wang, Wei; Li, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Facial paralysis is a common craniofacial deformity that is responsible for significant psychological and functional impairment. Free muscle transfer in 2 stages and latissimus dorsi transfer in one stage may be the most effective surgical procedure for achieving a symmetrical spontaneous smile for a patient with complete facial paralysis. However, these 2 procedures are unsuitable for many incomplete patients. The authors introduce a less invasive procedure, termed mini-temporalis transposition that is able to achieve a symmetrical spontaneous smile in incomplete patients. Through a zigzag incision into the temporal region, the middle third of the temporalis is transferred and elongated with the palmaris longus tendon or combined with the deep temporal fascia. The strips are anchored to key points at the modiolus and the middle of the ipsilateral orbicularis oris muscle through a small intraoral incision and subcutaneous tunnel. The key points are marked during preoperative smile analysis. This procedure was applied to 15 patients with long-standing incomplete facial paralysis. All patients obtained improvements in smile symmetry after the operation, and patients' satisfaction was high. In addition, no damage to residual facial nerve functions or development of procedure-induced complications (such as a facial contour defect, lip eversion or puckering, or skin tethering) was observed in any of the patients. Nevertheless, slight temporal hollowing was observed in 4 patients, and mild bulkiness over the zygomatic arch was a common observation. In summary, the mini-temporalis transfer technique is a safe and effective method of smile restoration for long-standing incomplete facial paralysis.

  19. A clinician’s guide to recurrent isolated sleep paralysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpless BA

    2016-01-01

    Brian A Sharpless Clinical Psychology Program, American School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University, Washington DC, Arlington, VA, USA Abstract: This review summarizes the empirical and clinical literature on sleep paralysis most relevant to practitioners. During episodes of sleep paralysis, the sufferer awakens to rapid eye movement sleep-based atonia combined with conscious awareness. This is usually a frightening event often accompanied by vivid, waking dreams (ie, hallucination...

  20. Neonatal peripheral facial paralysis' evaluation with photogrammetry: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca Filho, Gentil Gomes; de Medeiros Cirne, Gabriele Natane; Cacho, Roberta Oliveira; de Souza, Jane Carla; Nagem, Danilo; Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; Moran, Cristiane Aparecida; Abreu, Bruna; Pereira, Silvana Alves

    2015-12-01

    Facial paralysis in newborns can leave functional sequelae. Determining the evolution and amount of functional losses requires consistent evaluation methods that measure, quantitatively, the evolution of clinical functionality. This paper reports an innovative method of facial assessment for the case of a child 28 days of age with unilateral facial paralysis. The child had difficulty breast feeding, and quickly responded to the physical therapy treatment.