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Sample records for nerve compression secondary

  1. suprascapular nerve entrapment secondary to compression at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-16

    Feb 16, 2010 ... entrapment syndrome in English literature (2,3) but in fact the first description of suprascapular nerve entrapment was provided by André ... suprascapular nerve injury proximal to the branch to supraspinatus muscle. ... suprascapular notch, most of the time the reason is supraglenoid cyst as reported by ...

  2. Ultrastructural changes of compressed lumbar ventral nerve roots following decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.; Al-Sayyad, Mohammad J.

    2006-01-01

    To study whether there will be permanent lumbar nerve rot scanning or degeneration secondary to continuous compression followed by decompression on the nerve roots, which can account for postlaminectomy leg weakness or back pain. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faulty of Medicine, king Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during 2003-2005. Twenty-six adult male New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study. The ventral roots of the left fourth lumbar nerve were clamped for 2 weeks then decompression was allowed by removal of the clips. The left ventral roots of the fourth lumbar nerve were excised for electron microscopic study. One week after nerve root decompression, the ventral root peripheral to the site of compression showed signs of Wallerian degeneration together with signs of regeneration. Schwann cells and myelinated nerve fibers showed severe degenerative changes. Two weeks after decompression, the endoneurium of the ventral root showed extensive edema with an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyentilated nerve fibers, and fibroblasts proliferation. Three weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers with diminution of the endoneurial edema, and number of macrophages and an increase in collagen fibrils. Five and 6 weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed marked diminution of the edema, macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. The enoneurium was filed of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and collagen fibrils. Decompression of the compressed roots of a spinal nerve is followed by regeneration of the nerve fibers and nerve and nerve recovery without endoneurial scarring. (author)

  3. Dual pathology proximal median nerve compression of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Siun M

    2013-12-01

    We report an unusual case of synchronous pathology in the forearm- the coexistence of a large lipoma of the median nerve together with an osteochondroma of the proximal ulna, giving rise to a dual proximal median nerve compression. Proximal median nerve compression neuropathies in the forearm are uncommon compared to the prevalence of distal compression neuropathies (eg Carpal Tunnel Syndrome). Both neural fibrolipomas (Refs. 1,2) and osteochondromas of the proximal ulna (Ref. 3) in isolation are rare but well documented. Unlike that of a distal compression, a proximal compression of the median nerve will often have a definite cause. Neural fibrolipoma, also called fibrolipomatous hamartoma are rare, slow-growing, benign tumours of peripheral nerves, most often occurring in the median nerve of younger patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such dual pathology in the same forearm, giving rise to a severe proximal compression of the median nerve. In this case, the nerve was being pushed anteriorly by the osteochondroma, and was being compressed from within by the intraneural lipoma. This unusual case highlights the advantage of preoperative imaging as part of the workup of proximal median nerve compression.

  4. The "hierarchical" Scratch Collapse Test for identifying multilevel ulnar nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Gontre, Gil; Tang, David; Boyd, Kirsty U; Yee, Andrew; Damiano, Marci S; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-09-01

    The Scratch Collapse Test (SCT) is used to assist in the clinical evaluation of patients with ulnar nerve compression. The purpose of this study is to introduce the hierarchical SCT as a physical examination tool for identifying multilevel nerve compression in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. A prospective cohort study (2010-2011) was conducted of patients referred with primary cubital tunnel syndrome. Five ulnar nerve compression sites were evaluated with the SCT. Each site generating a positive SCT was sequentially "frozen out" with a topical anesthetic to allow determination of both primary and secondary ulnar nerve entrapment points. The order or "hierarchy" of compression sites was recorded. Twenty-five patients (mean age 49.6 ± 12.3 years; 64 % female) were eligible for inclusion. The primary entrapment point was identified as Osborne's band in 80 % and the cubital tunnel retinaculum in 20 % of patients. Secondary entrapment points were also identified in the following order in all patients: (1) volar antebrachial fascia, (2) Guyon's canal, and (3) arcade of Struthers. The SCT is useful in localizing the site of primary compression of the ulnar nerve in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome. It is also sensitive enough to detect secondary compression points when primary sites are sequentially frozen out with a topical anesthetic, termed the hierarchical SCT. The findings of the hierarchical SCT are in keeping with the double crush hypothesis described by Upton and McComas in 1973 and the hypothesis of multilevel nerve compression proposed by Mackinnon and Novak in 1994.

  5. Acetabular paralabral cyst causing compression of the sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caoimhe Byrne, MB BCh BAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetabular paralabral cysts are common. They vary in their clinical presentation and may be asymptomatic or cause pain and restriction at the hip joint. In rare instances they may cause symptoms by compressing local neurovascular structures. We report a case of symptomatic compression of the sciatic nerve by a posteriorly displaced acetabular paralabral cyst.

  6. Accuracy of Clinical Tests in Detecting Disk Herniation and Nerve Root Compression in Subjects With Lumbar Radicular Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedahl, Harald; Jönsson, Bo; Annertz, Mårten; Frobell, Richard B

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of 3 commonly used neurodynamic tests (slump test, straight-leg raise [SLR] test, femoral neurodynamic test) and 2 clinical assessments to determine radiculopathy (radiculopathy I, 1 neurologic sign; radiculopathy II, 2 neurologic signs corresponding to 1 specific nerve root) in detecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (extrusion, subarticular nerve root compression, and foraminal nerve root compression). Validity study. Secondary care. We included subjects (N=99; mean age, 58y; 54% women) referred for epidural steroid injection because of lumbar radicular symptoms who had positive clinical and MRI findings. Positive clinical findings included the slump test (n=67), SLR test (n=50), femoral neurodynamic test (n=7), radiculopathy I (n=70), and radiculopathy II (n=33). Positive MRI findings included extrusion (n=27), subarticular nerve compression (n=14), and foraminal nerve compression (n=25). Not applicable. Accuracy of clinical tests in detecting MRI findings was evaluated using sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristics analysis with area under the curve (AUC). The slump test had the highest sensitivity in detecting extrusion (.78) and subarticular nerve compression (1.00), but the respective specificity was low (.36 and .38). Radiculopathy I was most sensitive in detecting foraminal nerve compression (.80) but with low specificity (.34). Only 1 assessment had a concurrent high sensitivity and specificity (ie, radiculopathy II) in detecting subarticular nerve compression (.71 and .73, respectively). The AUC for all tests in detecting extrusion, subarticular nerve compression, and foraminal nerve compression showed ranges of .48 to .60, .63 to .82, and .33 to .57, respectively. In general, the investigated neurodynamic tests or assessments for radiculopathy lacked diagnostic accuracy. The slump test was the most sensitive test, while radiculopathy II was the most specific test. Most interestingly, no

  7. Effects of graded mechanical compression of rabbit sciatic nerve on nerve blood flow and electrophysiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yayama, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Yoshitaka; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Takeno, Kenichi; Awara, Kosuke; Mwaka, Erisa S; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-04-01

    Entrapment neuropathy is a frequent clinical problem that can be caused by, among other factors, mechanical compression; however, exactly how a compressive force affects the peripheral nerves remains poorly understood. In this study, using a rabbit model of sciatic nerve injury (n=12), we evaluated the time-course of changes in intraneural blood flow, compound nerve action potentials, and functioning of the blood-nerve barrier during graded mechanical compression. Nerve injury was applied using a compressor equipped with a custom-made pressure transducer. Cessation of intraneural blood flow was noted at a mean compressive force of 0.457+/-0.022 N (+/-SEM), and the compound action potential became zero at 0.486+/-0.031 N. Marked extravasation of Evans blue albumin was noted after 20 min of intraneural ischemia. The functional changes induced by compression are likely due to intraneural edema, which could subsequently result in impairment of nerve function. These changes may be critical factors in the development of symptoms associated with nerve compression. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CT evaluation of optic nerve compression in thyroid eye disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, L.; Giatt, H.J.; Burde, R.M.; Gado, M.

    1986-01-01

    In thyroid eye disease, visual loss due to optic nerve compression by enlarged muscles near the orbital apex requires prompt surgical decompression and must be differentiated from visual loss due to other mechanisms. Seventy-two high-resolution orbital CT scans of patients with thyroid eye disease were analyzed. From a coronal reconstruction, an easily measured ''apical index'' was determined. Average apical indices for orbits without optic neuropathy (41.0%) and with optic neuropathy (70.2%) were significantly different (P < .001). With the aid of the apical index, CT findings can be used to predict which patients with thyroid eye disease have optic nerve compression

  9. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the scratch collapse test in peroneal nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillenwater, Justin; Cheng, Jonathan; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2011-10-01

    The scratch collapse test is a recently described provocative test for diagnosis of peripheral nerve compression. The scratch collapse test was studied prospectively in 24 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of common peroneal nerve compression neuropathy. The diagnosis was confirmed by history, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic testing. Provocative testing by the scratch collapse test and Tinel's sign was performed. The scratch collapse test showed a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.99, while the Tinel's sign showed 0.65 and 0.99, respectively. The scratch collapse test is a sensitive and specific provocative test that compares favorably to existing clinical tests and aids in the diagnosis of common peroneal neuropathy. Diagnostic, II.

  11. [Compression syndrome of the superficial fibular nerve. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piza-Katzer, H; Pilz, E

    1997-05-01

    The case of a female patient complaining of dysaesthesia and paraesthesia on the dorsum of her right foot and digits which failed to respond to conservative treatment is presented. 10 cm above the lateral malleolus, a muscle bulge of 2 cm was detected. Hoffmann-Tinel's sign was positive at this site. The diagnosis of nerve entrapment was confirmed by a conduction velocity block. Through an incision centered over the muscle bulge, the superficial fibular nerve was identified. It was found to be compressed by fascia. Fascial release and epineuriotomy resulted in complete recovery. Entrapment of the sensory superficial fibular nerve in the patient is thought to have been caused by prolonged work-related kneeling and squatting over many years.

  12. Gastric Lymphoma with Secondary Trigeminal Nerve Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warissara Rongthong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma is scarce. Here, I report the case of 64-year-old Thai male diagnosed as gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma with secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. He had previously received one cycle of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP, followed by five cycles of rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP with intrathecal methotrexate (MTX and cytarabine (Ara-C. One month after the last cycle of R-CHOP, he developed a headache and numbness on the left side of his face. MRI revealed thickening of the left trigeminal nerve. He received one intrathecal injection of MTX and Ara-C, followed by systemic chemotherapy. After receiving intrathecal chemotherapy, his symptoms disappeared. Clinical response and MRI studies suggested secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. Two months later, our patient’s secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma had progressed. Salvage whole brain irradiation (36 Gy with boost dose (50 Gy along the left trigeminal nerve was given. Unfortunately, our patient developed heart failure and expired during the radiotherapy session. In conclusion and specific to secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL, radiotherapy may benefit patients who fail to respond to systemic chemotherapy and palliative treatment. The results this report fail to support the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma.

  13. Venous compressions of the nerves in the lower limbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, M; Stevanato, G; Ionta, B; Cesaroni, A; Bianchi, E; Morselli, C; Grippaudo, F R

    2012-06-01

    The lower limbs are frequently involved in neurovascular compression syndromes, owing to their anatomical, vascular and muscular characteristics and to the orthostatic position. These syndromes were identified by exclusion, using neuroimaging techniques and treated by microsurgical techniques. Eight patients with a neurovascular compression syndrome due to venous vascular lesions in the lower limbs (popliteal fossa, proximal and medial third of the inferior limb, tarsal tunnel) were selected. The symptomatology was characterized by pain, Tinel's sign, hyperalgesia, allodynia, numbness along the nerve course and foot weakness: all were exacerbated by the standing position, thus suggesting a neurovascular compression syndrome. Diagnostic tools comprised Doppler ultrasonography, Electromyography, CT 3D and MRI. Treatment consisted of microsurgery with neurovascular dissection. Following surgical treatment, rapid pain relief and a partial recovery of neurological deficits (including the ability to walk) was observed within 8-10 months. An early diagnosis of NCS using various neuroimaging techniques and prompt treatment may improve the response to surgical therapy. The aim of the case studies described is to improve understanding of these pathologies thus enabling correct clinical decisions.

  14. Neurovascular compression of cranial nerves: CT and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Llanos, Julio; Sinner, Ricardo; Nagel, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The compression of a nervous structure by an aberrant vessel may be asymptomatic or produce an important symptoms, in these cases CT and MRI show relevant information. Materials and Methods: Between January 1998 and March 2001, we studied 27 patients: 8 with trigeminal neuralgia, 7 with hemi facial spasm, 4 vertigo and tinnitus, 2 hemianopsia, 1 with neuralgia of the amygdalin fossa, 1 with bitonal voice, 1 with tongue deviation with fascicular movements, 2 essential hypertension and 1 with severe headache. All of them had a neurologic evaluation from 2 specialists and 2 neuro radiologists interpreted the results. Results: The CT and RMI images with special sequences allowed to prove the compression of the entry segments of the V, VII, IX, X and XII cranial nerves, of the optic chiasma and the ventrolateral aspect of the medulla oblongata in close relation with the vasopressor centre. Also they demonstrate a rare vessel in the Silvio aqueduct avoiding the normal flow of the CSF. Of the total of patients that were studied, 37% had surgical confirmation. Conclusion: CT and RMI are sensitive and specific methods for the detection of vascular compressions of nervous structures. (author)

  15. Unusual radial nerve injury by a locking compression plate for humerus fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinaci, Ahmet; Kloen, Peter; Videler, Annemieke; Kreulen, Mick

    2014-01-01

    The management of primary and secondary radial nerve palsy associated with humeral shaft fractures is still controversial. Radial nerve function is likely to return spontaneously after primary as well as secondary radial nerve palsy in the absence of any level of neurotmesis. Identification and

  16. Nerve damage secondary to removal of fractured PICC fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Qian Q; Wang, Yun X; Xu, Qiong H; Liu, Xia; Li, Ying J

    2016-07-12

    To increase awareness of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) fracture and necessary nursing assessment to identify development of nerve injury after removal of the PICC fracture. This is a case review of a cancer patient with fractured PICC and the postoperative symptoms leading to nerve injury. The reason for PICC fracture is the fragility of silicon. Secondary surgical intervention of a PICC fragment resulted in nerve damage from a hematoma placing pressure on the median nerve in the arm. It is necessary to use power injectable polyurethane PICCs. It is vital to have a clear understanding of signs and symptoms of nerve impingement in the arm when monitoring a post-operative patient. Assessment of neurological status, circulation, swelling and patient complaints of pain are all necessary functions of the nurse in caring for this type of patient.

  17. The Role of MRI in Diagnosing Neurovascular Compression of the Cochlear Nerve Resulting in Typewriter Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y J; Jeon, Y J; Choi, B S; Koo, J-W; Song, J-J

    2017-06-01

    Typewriter tinnitus, a symptom characterized by paroxysmal attacks of staccato sounds, has been thought to be caused by neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve, but the correlation between radiologic evidence of neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve and symptom presentation has not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine whether radiologic evidence of neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve is pathognomonic in typewriter tinnitus. Fifteen carbamazepine-responding patients with typewriter tinnitus and 8 control subjects were evaluated with a 3D T2-weighted volume isotropic turbo spin-echo acquisition sequence. Groups 1 (16 symptomatic sides), 2 (14 asymptomatic sides), and 3 (16 control sides) were compared with regard to the anatomic relation between the vascular loop and the internal auditory canal and the presence of neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve with/without angulation/indentation. The anatomic location of the vascular loop was not significantly different among the 3 groups (all, P > .05). Meanwhile, neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve on MR imaging was significantly higher in group 1 than in group 3 ( P = .032). However, considerable false-positive (no symptoms with neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve on MR imaging) and false-negative (typewriter tinnitus without demonstrable neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve) findings were also observed. Neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve was more frequently detected on the symptomatic side of patients with typewriter tinnitus compared with the asymptomatic side of these patients or on both sides of control subjects on MR imaging. However, considering false-positive and false-negative findings, meticulous history-taking and the response to the initial carbamazepine trial should be regarded as more reliable diagnostic clues than radiologic evidence of neurovascular compression of the cochlear nerve.

  18. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  19. The auriculotemporal nerve in etiology of migraine headaches: compression points and anatomical variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chim, Harvey; Okada, Haruko C; Brown, Matthew S; Alleyne, Brendan; Liu, Mengyuan T; Zwiebel, Samantha; Guyuron, Bahman

    2012-08-01

    The auriculotemporal nerve has been identified as one of the peripheral trigger sites for migraine headaches. However, its distal course is poorly mapped following emergence from the parotid gland. In addition, a reliable anatomical landmark for locating the potential compression points along the course of the nerve during surgery has not been sufficiently described. Twenty hemifaces on 10 fresh cadavers were dissected to trace the course of the auriculotemporal nerve from the inferior border of the zygomatic arch to its termination in the temporal scalp. The compression points were mapped and the distances were measured from the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus, which was used as a fixed anatomical landmark. Three potential compression points along the course of the auriculotemporal nerve were identified. Compression points 1 and 2 corresponded to preauricular fascial bands. Compression point 1 was centered 13.1±5.9 mm anterior and 5.0±7.0 mm superior to the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus, whereas compression point 2 was centered at 11.9±6.0 mm anterior and 17.2±10.4 mm superior to the most anterosuperior point of the external auditory meatus. A significant relationship was found between the auriculotemporal nerve and superficial temporal artery (compression point 3) in 80 percent of hemifaces, with three patterns of interaction: a single site of artery crossing over the nerve (62.5 percent), a helical intertwining relationship (18.8 percent), and nerve crossing over the artery (18.8 percent). Findings from this cadaver study provide information relevant to the operative localization of potential compression points along the auriculotemporal nerve.

  20. How should we grade lumbar disc herniation and nerve root compression? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiping; Fredrickson, Vance; Resnick, Daniel K

    2015-06-01

    MRI is the gold standard for evaluating the relationship of disc material to soft tissue and neural structures. However, terminologies used to describe lumbar disc herniation and nerve root compression have always been a source of confusion. A clear understanding of lumbar disc terminology among clinicians, radiologists, and researchers is vital for patient care and future research. Through a systematic review of the literature, the purpose of this article is to describe lumbar disc terminology and comment on the reliability of various nomenclature systems and their application to clinical practice. PubMed was used for our literature search using the following MeSH headings: "Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intervertebral Disc Displacement" and "Lumbar Vertebrae" and terms "nomenclature" or "grading" or "classification". Ten papers evaluating lumbar disc herniation/nerve root compression using different grading criteria and providing information regarding intraobserver and interobserver agreement were identified. To date, the Combined Task Force (CTF) and van Rijn classification systems are the most reliable methods for describing lumbar disc herniation and nerve root compression, respectively. van Rijn dichotomized nerve roots from "definitely no root compression, possibly no root compression, indeterminate root compression, possible root compression, and definite root compression" into no root compression (first three categories) and root compression (last two categories). The CTF classification defines lumbar discs as normal, focal protrusion, broad-based protrusion, or extrusion. The CTF classification system excludes "disc bulges," which is a source of confusion and disagreement among many practitioners. This potentially accounts for its improved reliability compared with other proposed nomenclature systems. The main issue in the management of patients with lumbar disc disease and nerve root compression is correlation of imaging findings with clinical

  1. Pronator syndrome and other nerve compressions that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; LaStayo, Paul C

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide a comprehensive review of compressive neuropathies that may mimic carpal tunnel syndrome, provide the clinician with information to differentially diagnose these median nerve compression sites, and provide an evidence-based opinion regarding conservative intervention techniques for the various compression syndromes. While rare in comparison to carpal tunnel syndrome, pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome are proximal median nerve compressions that may be suspected if a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome fails to respond to conservative or surgical intervention. Differential diagnosis is based largely on the symptoms, patterns of paresthesia, and specific patterns of muscle weakness. Due to the relative rarity of pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, few controlled studies exist to determine the most effective treatment techniques. Based on sound anatomical and biomechanical considerations, anecdotal experience, and available research, however, treatment strategies for pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome compression neuropathies can be divided into 4 major categories: (1) rest/immobilization, (2) modalities, (3) nerve gliding, and (4) nonconservative treatment.

  2. Diagnostic value of MRI for nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. Clinical and anatomic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Kageyama, Kazuhiro; Katakura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken in 26 patients with surgically proven nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. The findings on coronary images were compared with those of selective radiculography to assess the diagnostic ability of MRI to determine the site of nerve root compression. Intermission and partial defect, which reflect nerve root compression, were seen in only 5 (19.2%) of 26 nerve roots on MRI, as compared with 20 (76.9%) on radiculography. Thus MRI alone was difficult to diagnose nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. Furthermore, the optimum angle of coronary views was determined in 13 cadavers. Para-sagittal views were found to be optimal for the observation of the whole running of the nerve root. Three-dimensional MRI was found to have a potential to diagnose nerve root compression in the intervertebral foramen and the distal part of the intervertebral foramen. (N.K.)

  3. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  4. MR imaging of spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: changes of intervertebral foramen and nerve root compression

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    Kim, Ji Hyung [Ajou Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-01

    To evaluate the factors affecting intervertebral foramen stenosis and nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. We investigated 120 intervertebral foramina of 60 patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis who had undergone lumbar MRI. A retrospective review of their MR images revealed the degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression. The relationship between disk height diminution following spondylolysis and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis was also evaluated. Forty eight of 60 patients showed a similar degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis, and in 12 patients the degree of stenosis was different. In 110 intervertebral foramina, stenosis of both the superior and inferior compartments of intervertebral foramina was demonstrated. In 37 of 120 cases (30.8%), stenosis was mild ; in 44 of 120 (36.7%) it was modcrate, and in 29 of 120 (24.2%) it was severe. Stenosis of the inferior compartment was demonstrated in ten of 120 intervertebral foramina (8.3%). Nerve root compression was caused by posterior bulging of the intervertebral disk (65/120), descent of the pedicle (51/120), an isthmic bony segment above the site of spondylolytic (44/120), a bony spur formed at a spondylolytic site (11/120), and fibrocartilaginous callus at a spondylolytic site (5/48). In all cases there was degenerative change of the intervertebral disk at the affected level. There was no relationship between degree of disk height diminution and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis (p > 0.05). The degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis are variable, and MRI demonstrates them precisely. There was no positive relationship between degree of nerve root compression at an intervertebral foramen and degree of spondylolysis and degeneration of an intervertebral foramen. The degree of nerve root compression is believed to be another criterion for describing

  5. MR imaging of spondylolytic spondylolisthesis: changes of intervertebral foramen and nerve root compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Chung, Tae Sub; Kim, Young Soo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the factors affecting intervertebral foramen stenosis and nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis. We investigated 120 intervertebral foramina of 60 patients with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis who had undergone lumbar MRI. A retrospective review of their MR images revealed the degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression. The relationship between disk height diminution following spondylolysis and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis was also evaluated. Forty eight of 60 patients showed a similar degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis, and in 12 patients the degree of stenosis was different. In 110 intervertebral foramina, stenosis of both the superior and inferior compartments of intervertebral foramina was demonstrated. In 37 of 120 cases (30.8%), stenosis was mild ; in 44 of 120 (36.7%) it was modcrate, and in 29 of 120 (24.2%) it was severe. Stenosis of the inferior compartment was demonstrated in ten of 120 intervertebral foramina (8.3%). Nerve root compression was caused by posterior bulging of the intervertebral disk (65/120), descent of the pedicle (51/120), an isthmic bony segment above the site of spondylolytic (44/120), a bony spur formed at a spondylolytic site (11/120), and fibrocartilaginous callus at a spondylolytic site (5/48). In all cases there was degenerative change of the intervertebral disk at the affected level. There was no relationship between degree of disk height diminution and degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis (p > 0.05). The degree of intervertebral foramen stenosis and causes of nerve root compression in spondylolytic spondylolisthesis are variable, and MRI demonstrates them precisely. There was no positive relationship between degree of nerve root compression at an intervertebral foramen and degree of spondylolysis and degeneration of an intervertebral foramen. The degree of nerve root compression is believed to be another criterion for describing

  6. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, D M

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks.

  7. Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of arachnoidal adhesion and its neuroendoscopic confirmation for trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Ishikawa, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of the arachnoidal adhesion around the trigeminal nerve was effective for typical trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

  8. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salga, Marjorie [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Jourdan, Claire [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Handi-Resp, (EA4047), Versailles (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Neurophysiology, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Medical Imaging, Garches (France); Denormandie, Philippe [Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Garches (France); Genet, Francois [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Military Medical Service, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clamart (France)

    2014-09-14

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  9. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salga, Marjorie; Jourdan, Claire; Durand, Marie-Christine; Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves; Denormandie, Philippe; Genet, Francois

    2015-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  10. Usefulness of MRI and its limitation in the diagnosis of intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunogi, Junichi; Hasue, Mitsuo; Hamanaka, Ikki; Kaneoka, Tsuneharu; Shinko, Yuichiro (Japan Red Cross Central Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-04-01

    To determine the diagnostic value of MRI for intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression, parasagittal images, available in a total of 86 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, were reviewed in retrospect. Twenty surgical patients had intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression, and the other 66 patients without this condition were served as controls. Intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression was frequently associated with obstruction or constriction of the intervertebral foramina. MRI is considered useful for detecting the presence and constriction of the intervertebral foramina. MRI had a higher false positive rate in the elderly and patients with spondylolisthesis or multiple intervertebral degeneration. In detecting the site of compression lesions, including herniation of the intervertebral foramina, horizontal, coronal, and oblique coronal images were helpful. To increase the sensitivity of MRI in intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression, it should be recommended that the form and constriction of the intervertebral foramina be determined on parasagittal images, findings on parasagittal images be compared with those on horizontal images, and MRI be combined with coronal and oblique coronal images, and the other imaging diagnostic methods, such as radiculomyelography and CT. (N.K.).

  11. Usefulness of MRI and its limitation in the diagnosis of intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunogi, Junichi; Hasue, Mitsuo; Hamanaka, Ikki; Kaneoka, Tsuneharu; Shinko, Yuichiro

    1992-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic value of MRI for intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression, parasagittal images, available in a total of 86 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, were reviewed in retrospect. Twenty surgical patients had intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression, and the other 66 patients without this condition were served as controls. Intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression was frequently associated with obstruction or constriction of the intervertebral foramina. MRI is considered useful for detecting the presence and constriction of the intervertebral foramina. MRI had a higher false positive rate in the elderly and patients with spondylolisthesis or multiple intervertebral degeneration. In detecting the site of compression lesions, including herniation of the intervertebral foramina, horizontal, coronal, and oblique coronal images were helpful. To increase the sensitivity of MRI in intra- and extraforaminal nerve root compression, it should be recommended that the form and constriction of the intervertebral foramina be determined on parasagittal images, findings on parasagittal images be compared with those on horizontal images, and MRI be combined with coronal and oblique coronal images, and the other imaging diagnostic methods, such as radiculomyelography and CT. (N.K.)

  12. The importance of secondary and ternary twinning in compressed Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirry, W.; Nixon, M.; Cazacu, O.; Coghe, F.; Rabet, L.

    2011-01-01

    Twin formation during uniaxial compression of high-purity α-Ti at room temperature is investigated for both quasi-static and dynamic conditions using electron backscatter diffraction techniques. The initial texture is favorable for {101-bar 2} twinning, yet it is observed that secondary and ternary twins occur for both strain rates, showing a higher propensity in the dynamic case. While secondary twins may explain the difference in texture change and strain hardening between the two loading conditions, the ternary twins mainly contribute to grain fractioning.

  13. Neurilemmoma of Deep Peroneal Nerve Sensory Branch : Thermographic Findings with Compression Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seung Jun; Zhang, Ho Yeol

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of neurilemmoma of deep peroneal nerve sensory branch that triggered sensory change with compression test on lower extremity. After resection of tumor, there are evoked thermal changes on pre- and post-operative infrared (IR) thermographic images. A 52-year-old female presented with low back pain, sciatica, and sensory change on the dorsal side of the right foot and big toe that has lasted for 9 months. She also presented with right tibial mass sized 1.2 cm by 1.4 cm. Ultrasonographic imaging revealed a peripheral nerve sheath tumor arising from the peroneal nerve. IR thermographic image showed hyperthermia when the neurilemoma induced sensory change with compression test on the fibular area, dorsum of foot, and big toe. After surgery, the symptoms and thermographic changes were relieved and disappeared. The clinical, surgical, radiographic, and thermographic perspectives regarding this case are discussed.

  14. Reduction in nerve root compression by the nucleus pulposus after Feng's Spinal Manipulation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Gao, Yan; Yang, Wendong; Feng, Tianyou

    2013-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were enrolled in this study. Of these, 48 were treated with Feng's Spinal Manipulation, hot fomentation, and bed rest (treatment group). The remaining 46 patients were treated with hot fomentation and bed rest only (control group). After 3 weeks of treatment, clinical parameters including the angle of straight-leg raising, visual analogue scale pain score, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score for low back pain were improved. The treatment group had significantly better improvement in scores than the control group. Magnetic resonance myelography three-dimensional reconstruction imaging of the vertebral canal demonstrated that filling of the compressed nerve root sleeve with cerebrospinal fluid increased significantly in the treatment group. The diameter of the nerve root sleeve was significantly larger in the treatment group than in the control group. However, the sagittal diameter index of the herniated nucleus pulposus and the angle between the nerve root sleeve and the thecal sac did not change significantly in either the treatment or control groups. The effectiveness of Feng's Spinal Manipulation for the treatment of symptoms associated with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation may be attributable to the relief of nerve root compression, without affecting the herniated nucleus pulposus or changing the morphology or position of the nerve root. PMID:25206408

  15. Intraosseous Lipoma of the Proximal Radius with Extra Osseous Extension leading to Posterior Interosseous Nerve Compression: HRUS Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, S; Ahluwalia, V Verma; Saharan, P Singh; Gupta, A Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Benign musculoskeletal lipomatous lesions are common in both soft tissue and bone. Imaging features of benign lipomatous lesions are often pathognomonic. Ultrasound (US) has been used to examine both soft tissue and bone tumors, allowing targeted CT or MRI examination of the region of interest. A 46-year-old female presented with a four year history of palpable mass lesion just below the lateral aspect of right elbow with clinical evidence of posterior interosseous nerve compression. X-ray showed the presence of a radiolucency mass in relation to radius. HRUS demonstrated a hyperechoic mass in soft tissue with a focal irregularity in bony cortex of radius. The mass lesion compressed the posterior interosseous nerve. Although CT and MRI diagnose them accurately, but ultrasound characteristics are also conclusive for extra osseous component. This case highlights the importance of HRUS for evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors and any secondary changes in a readily available cost effective dynamic modality and thus guide for treatment planning accordingly.

  16. Changes in excursion and strain in the rat sciatic nerve under cauda equina compression induced by epidural balloon inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Ta-Wei; Su, Fong-Chin; Chien, Jui-Teng; Lee, Jung-Shun; Huang, Yi-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Healthy nerves are able to stretch and glide as responses to normal physiological movement. Injury to the nerve may alter the nerve's mechanical properties and result in neuropathy. Whether cauda equina compression alters the mechanical properties of the sciatic nerve is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the changes in excursions and strains of the sciatic nerve in vivo after acute cauda equina compression was induced by epidural balloon compression. An animal comparative study with induced cauda equina compression was designed for in situ measurements of nerve properties. Twenty-six adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups. The balloon group (n=10) underwent epidural compression induced by inflation of an embolectomy balloon catheter that was inserted through an L6 laminotomy. The control group (n=10) underwent laminotomy but without compression. The normal group (n=6) received no back surgery. This model of neuropathy was confirmed with electrophysiological examination. The excursions and strains of the sciatic nerve in response to the modified straight leg-raising (SLR) test were measured in situ and analyzed. The scales of the excursions were lower in the balloon group than in the other two groups, in both 90° flexion and extension of the knee. The balloon group was more sensitive to positional changes. The strain was significantly higher under the condition of epidural balloon compression. We concluded that cauda equina compression decreased the excursion and increased the strain of the sciatic nerve in response to a modified SLR test. These findings might indicate one of the mechanisms of the pain provoked by the SLR test and also possibly contribute to an understanding of the pathogenesis of the neuropathy in the lower limbs of patients with cauda equina compression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  18. Increased MR signal intensity secondary to chronic cervical cord compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M; Sakamoto, Y; Miyawaki, M; Bussaka, H

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of 128 patients with compressive lesions of the cervical spinal canal were reviewed to determine whether a high signal intensity lesion within the spinal cord was present on T2 and proton density weighted spin echo images. Such high signal intensity was observed in 24 cases or 18.8%. The incidence was higher in herniated disk (32.4%), atlanto-axial dislocation (28.6%), and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (22.7%), whereas the abnormality was found sporadically in cervical spondylosis and vertebral body tumors. The high intensity lesion on T2 weighted images was generally observed in patients with constriction or narrowing of the spinal cord. The lesion was not demonstrated on T1 weighted spin echo images. Spinal cord constriction or localized narrowing seemed to be the most important predisposing factor in producing such a high signal intensity. The pathophysiologic basis of such an abnormality was presumed to be myelomalacia or cord gliosis secondary to a long-standing compressive effect of the spinal cord.

  19. Increased MR signal intensity secondary to chronic cervical cord compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Miyawaki, M.; Bussaka, H.

    1987-11-01

    Magnetic resonance images of 128 patients with compressive lesions of the cervical spinal canal were reviewed to determine whether a high signal intensity lesion within the spinal cord was present on T2 and proton density weighted spin echo images. Such high signal intensity was observed in 24 cases or 18.8%. The incidence was higher in herniated disk (32.4%), atlanto-axial dislocation (28.6%), and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (22.7%), whereas the abnormality was found sporadically in cervical spondylosis and vertebral body tumors. The high intensity lesion on T2 weighted images was generally observed in patients with constriction or narrowing of the spinal cord. The lesion was not demonstrated on T1 weighted spin echo images. Spinal cord constriction or localized narrowing seemed to be the most important predisposing factor in producing such a high signal intensity. The pathophysiologic basis of such an abnormality was presumed to be myelomalacia or cord gliosis secondary to a long standing compressive effect of the spinal cord.

  20. The scratch collapse test in the diagnosis of compression of the median nerve in the proximal forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Isidro; Delgado, Pedro J

    2017-11-01

    Our purpose was to review the clinical usefulness of the scratch collapse test (SCT) in the diagnosis of proximal entrapment of the median nerve in the forearm. Eighteen consecutive cases were reviewed. The diagnosis was based on the patient's symptoms and signs. The SCT was positive in the affected forearm in all clinical assessments before surgery and it was negative in all after median nerve release. An anatomical reason for nerve compression was identified in all cases at operation. The SCT is a useful tool for the diagnosis of the proximal entrapment of the median nerve. IV.

  1. Percutaneous vertebroplasty in the treatment of vertebral body compression fracture secondary to osteogenesis imperfecta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rami, Parag M.; Heatwole, Eric V.; Boorstein, Jeffrey M. [Center for Vascular and Interventional Radiology, St. Vincent Mercy Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States); McGraw, Kevin J. [Riverside Methodist Hospital, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty, a minimally invasive interventional radiological procedure, has recently been used effectively for the treatment of symptomatic vertebral body compression fractures. Primary indications for vertebroplasty include osteoporotic compression fracture, osteolytic vertebral metastasis and myeloma, and vertebral hemangioma. We present a case and extend the indication of percutaneous vertebroplasty in a patient with a vertebral body compression fracture secondary to osteogenesis imperfecta. (orig.)

  2. Reliability and diagnostic validity of the slump knee bend neurodynamic test for upper/mid lumbar nerve root compression: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Kate; Pinnington, Mark A

    2011-03-01

    It has been proposed that neurodynamic examination can assist differential diagnosis of upper/mid lumbar nerve root compression; however, the diagnostic validity of many of these tests has yet to be established. This pilot study aimed to establish the diagnostic validity of the slump knee bend neurodynamic test for upper/mid lumbar nerve root compression in subjects with suspected lumbosacral radicular pain. Two independent examiners performed the slump knee bend test on subjects with radicular leg pain. Inter-tester reliability was calculated using the kappa coefficient. Slump knee bend test results were compared with magnetic resonance imaging findings, and diagnostic accuracy measures were calculated including sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios. Orthopaedic spinal clinic, secondary care. Sixteen patients with radicular leg pain. All four subjects with mid lumbar nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging were correctly identified with the slump knee bend test; however, it was falsely positive in two individuals without the condition. Inter-tester reliability for the slump knee bend test using the kappa coefficient was 0.71 (95% confidence interval 0.33 to 1.0). Diagnostic validity calculations for the slump knee bend test (95% confidence intervals) were: sensitivity, 100% (40 to 100%); specificity, 83% (52 to 98%); positive predictive value, 67% (22 to 96%); negative predictive value, 100% (69 to 100%); positive likelihood ratio, 6.0 (1.58 to 19.4); and negative likelihood ratio, 0 (0 to 0.6). Results indicate good inter-tester reliability and suggest that the slump knee bend test has potential to be a useful clinical test for identifying patients with mid lumbar nerve root compression. Further investigation is needed on larger numbers of patients to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Attenuation of Robust Glial Scar Formation Facilitates Functional Recovery in Animal Models of Chronic Nerve Compression Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Diana; Tapadia, Minal D; Palispis, Winnie; Luu, Michele; Wang, Weiping; Gupta, Ranjan

    2017-12-20

    Late surgery for chronic nerve compression injuries usually improves sensation but rarely reverses motor atrophy. We hypothesized that a persistent glial scar after chronic nerve compression injury might account for poor motor recovery and that degradation of the glial scar as an adjunct to surgical decompression would improve functional recovery. A previously described model of chronic nerve compression injury was created in C57BL/6 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats, and the nerves were harvested early or late after electrophysiological confirmation of the injury. Western blot, polymerase chain reaction, and quantitative immunohistochemical analyses were performed to determine levels of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and extracellular matrix molecules. Subsets of mice were treated either with surgical decompression alone or with decompression coupled with intraepineurial injection of a low dose (0.1 μgμL) or a high dose (0.2 μg/μL) of chondroitinase ABC at 6 weeks after injury. Aggrecan showed the greatest change in mRNA and protein levels at the early and late time points following creation of the chronic nerve compression injury. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis revealed early aggrecan upregulation localized primarily to the endoneurium and late upregulation localized to the perineurium and epineurium (p injury resulted in marked attenuation of decorin and aggrecan expression with functional improvement in nerve conduction velocity. Significant upregulation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and other extracellular matrix components contributes to the pathogenesis of compression neuropathies in murine models. The administration of chondroitinase ABC degrades these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans and improves functional recovery after chronic nerve compression injury; thus, it can be considered as a possible therapeutic adjunct.

  4. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsay M; Skeen, Todd M

    2013-03-15

    An 11-year-old spayed female Siberian Husky was evaluated because of a 2-week history of progressive paraparesis. Results of neurologic examination were consistent with a T3-L3 myelopathy. There were no abnormalities on CBC, and hypercalcemia was noted on serum biochemical analysis. Several hypoechoic splenic nodules were evident on abdominal ultrasonography, and results of fine-needle aspiration cytology were consistent with splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). Two compressive, extradural masses in the dorsal epidural space of the thoracolumbar region of the spinal cord were seen on MRI images. A dorsal laminectomy was performed to remove the extradural spinal masses. Results of histologic examination of tissue samples were consistent with EMH. Following surgery, clinical signs of paraparesis resolved, and there was no recurrence of the masses 24 months after surgery. Extramedullary hematopoesis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs in which results of diagnostic imaging indicate a epidural mass. In human patients, spinal EMH usually occurs secondary to an underlying hematologic disease, but it can also occur spontaneously. Treatment options reported for humans include surgical decompression, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and blood transfusion. The dog of this report responded favorably to surgical decompression and was clinically normal 2 years after surgery.

  5. Interest of the "compress test" in diagnosis of nerve injury in hand wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigorre, N; Petit, A; Saint-Cast, Y; Jeudy, J; Cesari, B; Rabarin, F; Fouque, P A; Raimbeau, G

    2017-06-01

    Hand wounds are a common cause of emergency department admission. Digital nerve lesions are found in 5% of palm wounds. Early diagnosis reduces the risk of morbidity, sequelae and litigation. Screening for digital nerve injury by the usual tests is difficult in an emergency context. We assessed the diagnostic value of the simple "compress test" to screen for pulp sensibility disorder and the factors that may influence the value of this examination, with a view to validating routine use. A retrospective study included 821 palm wounds treated between January 2014 and May 2016. There were 605 male and 216 patients; mean age, 42.8 years (range: 18-90 years). The dominant hand was involved in 307 cases (37.4%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios of the compress test were calculated. Diagnostic value was also calculated according to age, gender, affected digit, dominant side and examiner's experience. Clinical deficit was found in 412 cases (50.2%). A digital nerve lesion was found intraoperatively in 277 cases (33.6%). Test sensitivity was 87.3%, specificity 68.6%, positive predictive value 58.5%, negative predictive value 91.4%, positive likelihood ratio 2.78 and negative likelihood ratio 0.18. The test was more effective for thumb wounds and for examination by a junior surgeon. There were no differences according to injured side, innervation territory or gender. This clinical test is reliable, with very good negative predictive value and good sensitivity, allowing its use in routine clinical practice. Nevertheless, surgical exploration of deep palm injuries should remain the rule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Value of CT in the evaluation of nerve root compression in the lumbar herniated disc disease: comparative study with myelography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Il; Ku, Yong Woon; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Su [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-04-15

    High resolution computed tomography is the most accurate diagnostic tool to define a lumbar herniated disc disease, because it provides a complete in vivo analysis of bony framework of lumbar spine as well as the supporting soft tissue structures and neural elements. The purpose of this study is to estimate the valve of CT in athe evaluation of nerve root compression caused by herniated disc disease. We analyzed 52 roots of 26 patients of single level herniated disc disease with definite evidence of bilateral or unilateral neurologic deficit who had both CT and myelography at Pusan National University Hospital from May 1983 to March, 1987. The results were as follows: 1. Sensitivity and specificity of CT is 77% and 81%, respectively in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 2. Sensitivity and specificity of myelography is 77% and 81% respectively, in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumbar herniated disc disease. 3. The results of this study indicate that high resolution CT was equivalent to myelography in the diagnosis of nerve root compression caused by lumar herniated disc disease.

  7. [Effects of real-time audiovisual feedback on secondary-school students' performance of chest compressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelairas-Gómez, Cristian; Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; Vilas-Pintos, Elisardo; Prieto Saborit, José Antonio; Barcala-Furelos, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    To describe the quality of chest compressions performed by secondary-school students trained with a realtime audiovisual feedback system. The learners were 167 students aged 12 to 15 years who had no prior experience with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). They received an hour of instruction in CPR theory and practice and then took a 2-minute test, performing hands-only CPR on a child mannequin (Prestan Professional Child Manikin). Lights built into the mannequin gave learners feedback about how many compressions they had achieved and clicking sounds told them when compressions were deep enough. All the learners were able to maintain a steady enough rhythm of compressions and reached at least 80% of the targeted compression depth. Fewer correct compressions were done in the second minute than in the first (P=.016). Real-time audiovisual feedback helps schoolchildren aged 12 to 15 years to achieve quality chest compressions on a mannequin.

  8. Case of acute optic nerve compression caused by tuberculum sellae meningioma with optic canal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Y

    2012-05-01

    sellae meningioma can cause acute visual symptoms due to optic canal involvement. Early consultation with a neurosurgeon is necessary. Visual evoked potentials and optical coherence tomography are sensitive and helpful in following patients with optic nerve compression.Keywords: optic nerve compression, tuberculum sellae meningioma, optic canal involvement, pattern visual evoked potentials, optical coherence tomography

  9. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Radiology Department, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  10. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1 present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2 design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool

  11. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Yang, Yu; Chen, Chun; Bu, Jiajun; Zhang, Yin; Ye, Xiuzi

    2008-03-31

    With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1) present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2) design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers) compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool for academic users. Extensive tests have shown that

  12. Spinal cord compression secondary to bone metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Bhatia, Komal; Vaid, Ashok Kumar; Pavithran, Keechelat; Sharma, Jai Bhagwan; Hazarika, Digant; Jena, Amarnath

    2006-01-01

    Bone metastases are rare in primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Spinal cord compression (SCC) due to bone metastases occur commonly in patients with lung and breast carcinomas, and metastatic HCC is an unusual cause of SCC. Spinal cord compression is an oncologic emergency and treatment delays can lead to irreversible consequences. Thus, the awareness that SCC could be a potential complication of bone metastases due to HCC is of significance in initiation of early treatment that can improve the quality of life and survival of the patients, if diagnosed earlier. This paper describes four cases of primary HCC with varied manifestations of SCC due to bone metastases. The first patient presented primarily with the symptoms of bone pains corresponding to the bone metastases sites rather than symptoms of associated hepatic pathology and eventually developed SCC. The second patient, diagnosed as having HCC, developed extradural SCC leading to paraplegia during the course of illness, for which he underwent emergency laminectomy with posterior fixation. The third patient developed SCC soon after the primary diagnosis and had to undergo emergency laminectomy. Post laminectomy he had good neurological recovery. The Fourth patient presented primarily with radicular pains rather than frank paraplegia as the first manifestation of SCC. PMID:16937544

  13. Effects of Cantharellus Cibarius Hydro-Alcoholic Extract on NT3, NGF Gene Expression after Sciatic Nerve Compression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR Ajami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The expression of neurotrophic factors, which cause increasing of the survival and regeneration of neurons, is changed in response to nerve injury. Cantharellus cibarius has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. So, the aim of present study was to determine the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius on expression level of NT3 gene after sciatic nerve compression in rats. Methods: First the hydro-alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius was prepared by the Soxhlet method. In this study, 36 Wistar male rats , 250-300 gr, were randomly divided into 3 groups consisted of 12 rats in each group. They were control, compression (1, 7, 14 and 28 days and experimental (1, 7, 14 and 28 days groups. Experimental groups were treated by 75 mg / kg of hydro-alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius and to induce the stress in control group, saline serum was injected. In compression and experimental groups, the sciatic nerve of right leg was compressed for 60 seconds. The first injection of extract in the experimental group was performed intraperitoneally and immediately after the compression and the second one was injected 7 days later. Then, the sampling was performed of lumbar spinal cord on 1, 7, 14 and 28 days in compression and experimental groups and the total RNA was extracted from the spinal cord segments, cDNA was synthesized and after that the alteration of gene expression of NT3 and NGF samples was studied real time PCR method and Data were analyzed by Tukey test and SPSS 16 softwere. Results: The expression of NT3 and NGF showed significant increase in compression group compared to the control group, (p<0.05. Also, it is shown significant increase of expression of NT3 and NGF in the experimental group compared to the compression group, (p<0.05. Conclusion: According to these findings, hydro alcoholic extract of Cantharellus cibarius has an anti oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects that increase the

  14. Oxygen-ozone therapy for herniated lumbar disc in patients with subacute partial motor weakness due to nerve root compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olio, Massimo; Princiotta, Ciro; Cirillo, Luigi; Budai, Caterina; de Santis, Fabio; Bartolini, Stefano; Serchi, Elena; Leonardi, Marco

    2014-10-31

    Intradiscal oxygen-ozone (O2-O3) chemonucleolysis is a well-known effective treatment for pain caused by protruding disc disease and nerve root compression due to bulging or herniated disc. The most widely used therapeutic combination is intradiscal injection of an O2-O3 mixture (chemonucleolysis), followed by periradicular injection of O2-O3, steroid and local anaesthetic to enhance the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. The treatment is designed to resolve pain and is administered to patients without motor weakness, whereas patients with acute paralysis caused by nerve root compression undergo surgery 24-48h after the onset of neurological deficit. This paper reports on the efficacy of O2-O3 chemonucleolysis associated with anti-inflammatory foraminal injection in 13 patients with low back pain and cruralgia, low back pain and sciatica and subacute partial motor weakness caused by nerve root compression unresponsive to medical treatment. All patients were managed in conjunction with our colleagues in the Neurosurgery Unit of Bellaria Hospital and the IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences, Bologna. The outcomes obtained are promising: 100% patients had a resolution of motor weakness, while 84.6% had complete pain relief. Our results demonstrate that O2-O3 therapy can be considered a valid treatment option for this category of patients.

  15. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  16. Diagnosis of glaucoma using telemedicine--the effect of compression on the evaluation of optic nerve head cup-disc ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, D; Lewis, J; Piccolo, M; Bedell, H

    2000-01-01

    A photograph of the optic nerve head requires a lot of disk space (over 1 MByte) for storage and may require substantial bandwidth and time for transmission to a remote practitioner for a second opinion. To test whether compression degrades the image quality of the images, 302 slides were digitized at an optical resolution of 2400 pixels/inch (945 pixels/cm) and 30 bit/pixel. The images were saved both in non-compressed TIFF format and in compressed JPEG (compression ratio of 60) format. A blinded observer measured the optic nerve head cup-disc ratio for all three groups: the original slides, uncompressed TIFF and compressed JPEG images. The results showed that digital images were less accurate than slides. However, compression, even up to a ratio of 40, did not make matters worse.

  17. Disabling Vertigo and Tinnitus Caused by Intrameatal Compression of the Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery on the Vestibulocochlear Nerve: A Case Report, Surgical Considerations, and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei-Razavi, Hamid; Darvish, Omid; Schick, Uta

    2013-01-01

    Microvascular compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve is known as a cause of tinnitus and vertigo in the literature, but our review of the literature shows that the compression is usually located in the cerebellopontine angle and not intrameatal. We present a case of intrameatal compression of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) on the vestibulocochlear nerve of a 40-year-old woman with symptoms of disabling vertigo and intermittent high-frequency tinnitus on the left side without any hearing loss for ∼ 4 years. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show any abnormality, but magnetic resonance angiography showed a left intrameatal AICA loop as a possible cause of the disabling symptoms. After the exclusion of other possible reasons for disabling vertigo, surgery was indicated. The intraoperative findings proved the radiologic findings. The large AICA loop was found extending into the internal auditory canal and compressing the vestibulocochlear nerve. The AICA loop was mobilized and separated from the vestibulocochlear nerve. The patient's symptoms resolved immediately after surgery, and no symptoms were noted during 2 years of follow-up in our clinic. Her hearing was not affected by the surgery. In addition to other common reasons, such as acoustic neuroma, disabling vertigo and tinnitus can occur from an intrameatal arterial loop compression of the vestibulocochlear nerve and may be treated successfully by drilling the internal acoustic meatus and separating the arterial conflict from the vestibulocochlear nerve. PMID:25083388

  18. [Evaluation of grip strength in normal and obese Wistar rats submitted to swimming with overload after median nerve compression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradinia, Josinéia Gresele; Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Kunz, Regina Inês; Errero, Tatiane Kamada; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2015-01-01

    To verify the functionality through muscle grip strength in animals with obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) and in control animals, which suffered compression of the right median nerve, and treated with swimming with overload. During the first five days of life, neonatal Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG. The control group received a hypertonic saline solution. Forty-eight rats were divided into six groups: G1 (control); G2 (control + injury); G3 (control + injury + swimming); G4 (obese); G5 (obese + injury); G6 (obese + injury + swimming). The animals in groups G2, G3, G5 and G6 were submitted to compression of the median nerve and G3 and G6 groups were treated, after injury, with swimming exercise with load for three weeks. The swimming exercise had a progressive duration, according to the week, of 20, 30 and 40minutes. Muscle strength was assessed using a grip strength meter preoperatively and on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st days after surgery. The results were expressed and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. When the grip strength was compared among assessments regardless of group, in the second assessment the animals exhibited lower grip strength. G1 and G4 groups had greater grip strength, compared to G2, G3, G4 and G6. The swimming exercise with overload has not been effective in promoting improvement in muscle grip strength after compression injury of the right median nerve in control and in obese-MSG rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. A review of nerve conduction studies in cases of suspected compression neuropathies of the upper limb.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neligan, A

    2010-01-01

    Entrapment neuropathies, particularly those affecting upper limbs, are common reasons for referral for nerve conduction studies (NCS). However, concordance between clinical findings and NCS findings, especially in patients being considered for intervention including decompressive surgery, has not been assessed.

  1. Diagnostic ability of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness measurements and neurologic hemifield test to detect chiasmal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chan Hee; Lee, Si Hyung; Kim, Bum-Tae; Hwang, Sun Chul; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2012-08-09

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the diagnostic ability of the neurologic hemifield test (NHT) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurements to detect chiasmal compression. Thirty-seven patients with chiasmal compression, 35 patients with glaucoma, and 30 patients with glaucoma suspect were enrolled. The NHT score was established from a 30-2 visual field pattern deviation probability plot. Each test point value was calculated for a number that was inversely proportional to its pattern deviation probability. The NHT score was the absolute value of the difference in the sum of the point scores for two symmetrical regions of 16 points on either side of the vertical meridian. RNFL thickness was scored from 0 to 10 according to the pattern of RNFL loss and probability of abnormality. Solely present nasal or temporal RNFL defects were scored high, and exclusively appearing superior or nasal RNFL defects were scored low. The differences in the NHT and RNFL scores among the three groups were compared. Diagnostic ability was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The NHT and RNFL scores were significantly higher in patients with chiasmal compression than in patients with glaucoma and glaucoma suspect. The area under the ROC curve (AROC) was 0.734 of the NHT score and 0.613 of the RNFL score. When AROC was calculated using the NHT and RNFL scores concurrently, AROC was increased to 0.807. The NHT score and RNFL score have diagnostic ability to detect chiasmal compression, and simultaneous assessment of NHT and RNFL scores improves the diagnostic power.

  2. Evaluation of peripheral compression and auditory nerve fiber intensity coding using auditory steady-state responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Encina Llamas, Gerard; M. Harte, James; Epp, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    . Evaluation of these properties provides information about the health state of the system. It has been shown that a loss of outer hair cells leads to a reduction in peripheral compression. It has also recently been shown in animal studies that noise over-exposure, producing temporary threshold shifts, can......The compressive nonlinearity of the auditory system is assumed to be an epiphenomenon of a healthy cochlea and, particularly, of outer-hair cell function. Another ability of the healthy auditory system is to enable communication in acoustical environments with high-level background noises...

  3. A Case Report About Cluster-Tic Syndrome Due to Venous Compression of the Trigeminal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Coo, Ilse; van Dijk, J Marc C; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; Haan, Joost

    2017-04-01

    The term "cluster-tic syndrome" is used for the rare ipsilateral co-occurrence of attacks of cluster headache and trigeminal neuralgia. Medical treatment should combine treatment for cluster headache and trigeminal neuralgia, but is very often unsatisfactory. Here, we describe a 41-year-old woman diagnosed with cluster-tic syndrome who underwent microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve, primarily aimed at the "trigeminal neuralgia" part of her pain syndrome. After venous decompression of the trigeminal nerve both a decrease in trigeminal neuralgia and cluster headache attacks was seen. However, the headache did not disappear completely. Furthermore, she reported a decrease in pain intensity of the remaining cluster headache attacks. This case description suggests that venous vascular decompression in cluster-tic syndrome can be remarkably effective, both for trigeminal neuralgia and cluster headache. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  4. Investigation into Regeneration Mechanism of Hydroalcoholic Lavender (Lavandula officianalis Extract through the Evaluation of NT3 Gene Expression after Sciatic Nerve Compression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Naderi Allaf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Retrograde transport to the alpha motoneurons causes spinal degeneration. The neurotrophic factor (NT3 increases the number of myelinated axons in the dorsal root, leads to differentiation and survival of sensory neurons, parasympathetic motoneurons and prevents cell death. Lavender is a plant in the family Lamiaceae which is reported to have antioxidant, antispasmodic, diuretic, anti-asthmatic, refrigerant, and antipyretic effects. This study examined NT3 gene expression changes after sciatic nerve compression in rats, in the presence of Lavandula officinalis extract. Materials and Methods: Lavender Soxhlet hydroalcoholic extraction was prepared. 36 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups including control, compression and treatment (compression group + hydroalcoholic extract of Lavender injections 75mg/kg groups. In controls the muscle was opened without damage to gain access to the sciatic nerve. In compression and treatment groups, the sciatic nerve (right leg was compressed. The extract was injected intraperitoneally in two occasions. A biopsy was taken from the spinal cord segments L4-L6 on day 28, total RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized and NT3 gene expression changes were analyzed by ANOVA test by using SPSS software. Results: The results showed that NT3 gene expression had a significant reduction in compression group compared to the control group (p<0.001 and it had a significant increase in treatment group compared with the compression group (p<0.001. Conclusion: A significant increase in gene expression shows that Lavandula officinalis hydroalcoholic extract improves nerve regeneration via NT3 gene expression.

  5. A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Mens, Jan; El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Peul, Wilco C; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2016-05-01

    To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

  6. Clarification of Eponymous Anatomical Terminology: Structures Named After Dr Geoffrey V. Osborne That Compress the Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon; Mitwalli, Madhawi; Tubbs, R Shane; Brown, Justin M

    2017-05-01

    In 1957, Dr Geoffrey Osborne described a structure between the medial epicondyle and the olecranon that placed excessive pressure on the ulnar nerve. Three terms associated with such structures have emerged: Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia. As anatomical language moves away from eponymous terminology for descriptive, consistent nomenclature, we find discrepancies in the use of anatomic terms. This review clarifies the definitions of the above 3 terms. We conducted an extensive electronic search via PubMed and Google Scholar to identify key anatomical and surgical texts that describe ulnar nerve compression at the elbow. We searched the following terms separately and in combination: "Osborne's band," "Osborne's ligament," and "Osborne's fascia." A total of 36 papers were included from 1957 to 2016. Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia were found to inconsistently describe the etiology of ulnar neuritis, referring either to the connective tissue between the 2 heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle as described by Dr Osborne or to the anatomically distinct fibrous tissue between the olecranon process of the ulna and the medial epicondyle of the humerus. The use of eponymous terms to describe ulnar pathology of the elbow remains common, and although these terms allude to the rich history of surgical anatomy, these nonspecific descriptions lead to inconsistencies. As Osborne's band, Osborne's ligament, and Osborne's fascia are not used consistently across the literature, this research demonstrates the need for improved terminology to provide reliable interpretation of these terms among surgeons.

  7. Cochleovestibular Nerve Compression Syndrome Caused by Intrameatal Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Loop: Synthesis of Best Evidence for Clinical Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giacomo; Messina, Raffaella; Carai, Andrea; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Savioli, Alessandra; Randi, Franco; De Benedictis, Alessandro; Cossu, Silvia; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Marras, Carlo Efisio

    2016-12-01

    Intrameatal cochleovestibular neurovascular conflict is a rare condition with specific clinical and therapeutic implications. Although surgery is commonly indicated in other neurovascular conflicts, for this subset of patients there is little evidence to guide treatment decisions. Moving from a case description, we performed a review of the literature on this topic to systematically present the best available evidence to guide clinical decisions. We performed a literature review on reported cases of surgically treated intrameatal anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)-cochleovestibular nerve neurovascular conflict, analyzing preoperative clinical data, surgical techniques, and outcomes. We analyzed the levels of evidence using the King's College guidelines. We found 35 studies of neurovascular compression of the cochleovestibular nerve by AICA for 536 patients operated on to resolve their neurovascular conflict. Only 4 of these studies describe intrameatal AICA neurovascular conflicts, for 9 cases, including our own. Tinnitus was the most frequent symptom (9/9), followed by vertigo (2/9). Our case was the only one showing unilateral hearing loss. Surgery consisted of microsurgical mobilization of the AICA loop performed through a retrosigmoid craniotomy. Tinnitus and vertigo resolved after surgery in all cases, whereas hearing loss did not improve after surgery. Surgical treatment offers the best results for tinnitus and vertigo, but it seems to have no effect on hearing loss, not even at long-term follow-up. Microvascular decompression should be proposed to intrameatal symptomatic patients before the onset of hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Compressed 3D and 2D digital images versus standard 3D slide film for the evaluation of glaucomatous optic nerve features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Simrenjeet; Rudnisky, Chris; Arora, Sourabh; Kassam, Faazil; Douglas, Gordon; Edwards, Marianne C; Verstraten, Karin; Wong, Beatrice; Damji, Karim F

    2018-03-01

    Clinicians can feel confident compressed three-dimensional digital (3DD) and two-dimensional digital (2DD) imaging evaluating important features of glaucomatous disc damage is comparable to the previous gold standard of stereoscopic slide film photography, supporting the use of digital imaging for teleglaucoma applications. To compare the sensitivity and specificity of 3DD and 2DD photography with stereo slide film in detecting glaucomatous optic nerve head features. This prospective, multireader validation study imaged and compressed glaucomatous, suspicious or normal optic nerves using a ratio of 16:1 into 3DD and 2DD (1024×1280 pixels) and compared both to stereo slide film. The primary outcome was vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR) and secondary outcomes, including disc haemorrhage and notching, were also evaluated. Each format was graded randomly by four glaucoma specialists. A protocol was implemented for harmonising data including consensus-based interpretation as needed. There were 192 eyes imaged with each format. The mean VCDR for slide, 3DD and 2DD was 0.59±0.20, 0.60±0.18 and 0.62±0.17, respectively. The agreement of VCDR for 3DD versus film was κ=0.781 and for 2DD versus film was κ=0.69. Sensitivity (95.2%), specificity (95.2%) and area under the curve (AUC; 0.953) of 3DD imaging to detect notching were better (p=0.03) than for 2DD (90.5%; 88.6%; AUC=0.895). Similarly, sensitivity (77.8%), specificity (98.9%) and AUC (0.883) of 3DD to detect disc haemorrhage were better (p=0.049) than for 2DD (44.4%; 99.5%; AUC=0.72). There was no difference between 3DD and 2DD imaging in detecting disc tilt (p=0.7), peripapillary atrophy (p=0.16), grey crescent (p=0.1) or pallor (p=0.43), although 3D detected sloping better (p=0.013). Both 3DD and 2DD imaging demonstrates excellent reproducibility in comparison to stereo slide film with experts evaluating VCDR, notching and disc haemorrhage. 3DD in this study was slightly more accurate than 2DD for evaluating

  9. Nerve Root Compression Increases Spinal Astrocytic Vimentin in Parallel With Sustained Pain and Endothelial Vimentin in Association With Spinal Vascular Reestablishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jenell R; Lee, Jasmine; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2017-10-01

    Temporal immunohistochemistry analysis of spinal cord tissue from a rat model of cervical radiculopathy. The goal was to measure spinal endothelial and astrocytic vimentin expression after a painful nerve root compression to define spinal cellular expression of vimentin in the context of pain. The intermediate filament, vimentin, is expressed in a variety of cell types in the spinal cord and is modulated in response to neural pathologies. Early after nerve root compression spinal astrocytes become activated and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) breakdown occurs in parallel with development of pain-related behaviors; these spinal responses remain activated as does the presence of pain. In addition to vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression is a hallmark of astrocyte activation. In contrast, vascular endothelial cells down-regulate vimentin expression in parallel with vascular breakdown. It is not known whether spinal astrocytes and endothelial cells modulate their expression of vimentin in response to a painful neural injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured and spinal cord tissue was harvested at days 1 and 7 after a unilateral nerve root compression in rats. Vimentin was coimmunolabeled with GFAP to label astrocytes and von Willebrand factor (VWF) for endothelial cells in the spinal cord on the side of injury. Spinal astrocytic vimentin increases by day 7 after nerve root compression, corresponding to when mechanical hyperalgesia is maintained. Spinal endothelial vimentin increases as early as day 1 after a painful compression and is even more robust at day 7. The delayed elevation in spinal astrocytic vimentin corresponding to sustained mechanical hyperalgesia supports its having a relationship with pain maintenance. Further, since BSCB integrity has been shown to be reestablished by day 7 after a painful compression, endothelial expressed vimentin may help to fortify spinal vasculature contributing to BSCB stability. N/A.

  10. Isolated Infraspinatus Atrophy Secondary to Suprascapular Nerve Neuropathy Results in Altered Shoulder Muscles Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contemori, Samuele; Biscarini, Andrea

    2018-01-24

    Isolated infraspinatus atrophy (IIA) is a common condition among overhead-activity athletes, which affects the hitting shoulder and is caused by suprascapular nerve injury. The loss of infraspinatus function could lead to altered activity of the glenohumeral and scapulothoracic muscles and compromise the optimal shoulder function. To assess the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity patterns, relationships, and response latencies of relevant shoulder girdle muscles in professional volleyball players with IIA and in healthy control players. Cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Twenty-four male professional volleyball players (12 players with diagnosed IIA and 12 healthy players) recruited from local volleyball teams. sEMG activity of anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper, middle and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior was recorded and evaluated during a movement of shoulder abduction in the scapular plane, monitored with an optoelectronic motion capture system. sEMG activity, relationships, and response latencies of the selected muscles were analyzed with ANOVA models, to highlight statistical differences within and between groups. Athletes with IIA demonstrated significant higher deltoid and trapezius muscles activity, and lower serratus anterior activity, compared with the contralateral shoulder and with healthy athletes. The shoulder with IIA also showed a higher activity ratios between the upper trapezius and the other scapulothoracic muscles, in addition to anticipated activation of the upper trapezius and delayed activation of the serratus anterior, with regard to the onset of shoulder movement. The present study highlighted altered shoulder muscle activity levels, scapulothoracic muscles imbalances, and abnormal scapulothoracic recruitment patterns in the hitting shoulder of professional volleyball players with IIA, secondary to suprascapular nerve neuropathy. Such shoulder girdle muscles impairments may compromise the optimal

  11. Relationship between the internal laryngeal nerve and the triticeal cartilage: a potentially unrecognized compression site during anterior cervical spine and carotid endarterectomy operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Dixon, Joshua F; Loukas, Marios; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2010-06-01

    The triticeal cartilage has received scant attention in the literature. To date, its relationship to the nearby internal laryngeal nerve has not been studied. Therefore, to elucidate further this anatomic relationship and its potential surgical implications, this study was performed. Eighty-six adult cadaveric sides underwent dissection of the internal laryngeal nerve near its penetration of the thyrohyoid membrane. The relationship of this nerve to the triticeal cartilage was documented. Measurements and histological analysis were performed on all cartilage specimens. We identified triticeal cartilage in 51% of the specimens and found it to be hyaline in nature. The triticeal cartilage was located in the upper, middle, and lower thirds of the thyrohyoid membrane in 14%, 66%, and 20% of sides, respectively. Regardless of the position of the triticeal cartilage within the thyrohyoid membrane, the internal laryngeal nerve crossed directly over the triticeal cartilage on 59% of sides. When present, the internal laryngeal nerve will cross over the triticeal cartilage in the majority of individuals. This relationship should be borne in mind during surgical manipulation in this area and when placing retractors during anterior neck operations including cervical discectomy/fusion and carotid endarterectomy. Compression of the internal laryngeal nerve against the solid triticeal cartilage can cause laryngeal nerve palsy and increase the risk of resultant postoperative aspiration.

  12. Paranode Abnormalities and Oxidative Stress in Optic Nerve Vulnerable to Secondary Degeneration: Modulation by 670 nm Light Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charis R Szymanski

    Full Text Available Secondary degeneration of nerve tissue adjacent to a traumatic injury results in further loss of neurons, glia and function, via mechanisms that may involve oxidative stress. However, changes in indicators of oxidative stress have not yet been demonstrated in oligodendrocytes vulnerable to secondary degeneration in vivo. We show increases in the oxidative stress indicator carboxymethyl lysine at days 1 and 3 after injury in oligodendrocytes vulnerable to secondary degeneration. Dihydroethidium staining for superoxide is reduced, indicating endogenous control of this particular reactive species after injury. Concurrently, node of Ranvier/paranode complexes are altered, with significant lengthening of the paranodal gap and paranode as well as paranode disorganisation. Therapeutic administration of 670 nm light is thought to improve oxidative metabolism via mechanisms that may include increased activity of cytochrome c oxidase. Here, we show that light at 670 nm, delivered for 30 minutes per day, results in in vivo increases in cytochrome c oxidase activity co-localised with oligodendrocytes. Short term (1 day 670 nm light treatment is associated with reductions in reactive species at the injury site. In optic nerve vulnerable to secondary degeneration superoxide in oligodendrocytes is reduced relative to handling controls, and is associated with reduced paranode abnormalities. Long term (3 month administration of 670 nm light preserves retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to secondary degeneration and maintains visual function, as assessed by the optokinetic nystagmus visual reflex. Light at a wavelength of 670 nm may serve as a therapeutic intervention for treatment of secondary degeneration following neurotrauma.

  13. Comparison of MR versus CT myelography and plain CT in the diagnosis of nerve compression in acute low-back pain patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornbury, J.R.; Fryback, D.G.; Turski, P.A.; Javid, M.; McDonald, J.V.; Beinlich, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on how to determine if MR could replace CT-myelography or plain CT in the diagnosis of disk-caused nerve compression in patients with acute low back pain. Ninety-five outpatients were recruited from surgical and nonsurgical clinics. Each patient underwent MR (n = 95) and either CT-myelography (n = 63) or plain Ct (n = 32). Patients were followed up for 6-12 months. Fifty-six patients underwent surgical intervention, while 39 patients were treated conservatively. Retrospective blinded readings were done by using forced choice diagnoses and probability estimates. An expert panel (neurosurgeon and neurologist) determined the true diagnosis and probability of nerve compression in each case. Diagnosis was based on all record information including surgical findings (but excluding imaging results to reduce incorporation bias). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed based on the blinded reading results and panel-determined true diagnoses. Subgroup analysis also will be presented

  14. Malignant Triton Tumor of the Sciatic Nerve as a Secondary Malignancy after Extended Field Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy of Hodgkin's Disease

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    Mirko Nitsche

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Late effects of therapy for Hodgkin's disease include secondary malignancies like leukemia, lymphoma or solid tumors developing after long periods of latency. Ionizing radiation often causes the last group. The highest risks have been described for induced breast and lung cancers. We are the first to report a malignant triton tumor (MTT as a secondary malignancy after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. MTT is a very rare subtype of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors with rhabdomyoblastic differentiation and an aggressive course of disease.

  15. Músculo pronador redondo: variações anatômicas e predisposição para a compressão do nervo mediano Pronator teres muscle: anatomical variations and predisposition for the compression of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Clóris de Carvalho

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available O nervo mediano pode ser comprimido em nível de músculo pronador redondo (MPR, resultando na síndrome do pronador redondo. Objetivou-se analisar a constituição do MPR e sua relação com o nervo mediano na dissecação de 100 membros superiores humanos, oriundos de laboratórios de anatomia. Em 72% dos casos, o nervo mediano passou entre as cabeças umeral e ulnar do MPR. Em 15% a cabeça ulnar esteve ausente, com o nervo mediano passando posteriormente a cabeça umeral ou através dela. Em 9% a cabeça ulnar se fez representar por um feixe fibroso. Em 2% o nervo mediano passou através da cabeça ulnar e em 2% através da cabeça umeral, mesmo na presença da cabeça ulnar. Os dados sugerem que as variações na relação músculo/nervo representam fatores potenciais para a compressão do nervo mediano, por tornarem mais restrita a passagem desse nervo no antebraço.The median nerve can be compressed at the level of pronator teres muscle (PTM, resulting in the pronator teres syndrome. This work aim was to analyze the PTM and its relationship with the median nerve. In order to do so, we have dissected 100 human upper limbs from anatomy laboratories. In 72% of the cases, the median nerve passed between the umeral and ulnar heads of PTM. In 15% of the cases, the ulnar head was absent, with the median nerve passing behind the umeral head or through it. In 9%, a fibrous bundle represented the ulnar head. In 2%, the median nerve passed through the ulnar head and in 2% through the umeral head, even in the presence of the ulnar head. The data suggest that the variations in the relationship muscle/nerve represent potential factors for the median nerve compression, for they make the passage for this nerve in the forearm even narrower.

  16. The morphological and functional effects of exercise in the aquatic environment, performed before and/or after sciatic nerve compression in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakihata, Camila Mayumi Martin; Malanotte, Jéssica Aline; Karvat, Jhenifer; Brancalhão, Rose Meire Costa; de Fátima Chasko Ribeiro, Lucinéia; Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of exercise in the aquatic environment, performed before and/or after sciatic nerve compression in Wistar rats on morphological and functional parameters. Twenty-five Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: control (C), lesion (L), trained+lesion (TL), lesion+exercise (LE), and training+lesion+exercise (TLE), who underwent right sciatic nerve compression on day 21 of the experiment. The TL and TLE groups were submitted to a jumping exercise in a water environment for 20 days prior to injury and the LE and TLE groups after injury. The functional analysis was carried out using the sciatic functional index (SFI). On the last day of the experiment, the right sciatic nerves were collected, processed and analysed according to morphology and morphometry. The C group showed higher SFI in relation to the other groups. In the morphometric analysis, in comparison to C, all groups showed a decrease in the diameter of the injured nerve fibre, the myelin sheath and an increase in the percentage of connective tissue. There was a decrease in axon diameter in L, TL, and LE groups and a decrease in the density of nerve fibres in the TL and LE groups. The exercise did not affect functional recovery. However, the exercise prior to the injury improved morphology of the nervous tissue, and when performed pre- and postinjury, there was also an improvement in nerve regeneration, but this was not the case with exercise performed after the injury demonstrating worse results.

  17. Visual prognosis in compressive optic neuropathy secondary to sphenoid sinus mucocele: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Emily; Howard, Martha A; Vining, Eugenia M; Becker, Richard D; Silbert, Jonathan; Lesser, Robert L

    2018-01-05

    Sphenoid sinus mucoceles (SSMs) are rare, benign lesions that can expand, often presenting with ocular symptoms-decreased vision, diplopia, visual field defects, proptosis, and external ophthalmoplegia. Reported cases are few, visual compromise varies, and factors affecting visual prognosis are poorly characterized. We investigate whether prompt surgical intervention (within 2 weeks of visual symptom onset) affects best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) regained in patients with vision loss secondary to compressive SSM. We present a retrospective review of three cases and published literature to date. Our primary outcome was BCVA regained after surgical intervention; secondary outcomes included change in visual field defect and ophthalmological symptoms other than vision loss. Our three cases of SSM varied in onset, ranging from several hours to several months with patients aged from 13 to 80 years. All patients had severe vision loss to light perception (LP) or worse. Rapid neuro-imaging and urgent surgical intervention improved vision to count fingers at best. Of the two patients who underwent prompt decompression, one improved from no LP to LP and the other did not recover any vision. The patient who had visual loss for 3 months before intervention improved from LP to 20/400. Findings from our literature search, which yielded 12 cases of urgent intervention, supported the variability in visual prognosis despite prompt surgical intervention. SSMs are rare, pathologically benign lesions which can expand to cause ocular involvement. Prompt diagnosis and surgical decompression are recommended, but visual recovery may be limited even with urgent intervention.

  18. [Horner's syndrome and paresthesia in the trigeminal nerve territory secondary to epidural analgesia for labor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Céline; Macedo, Ana Luísa; Almeida, Valentina

    2018-03-01

    Currently, epidural analgesia is a common procedure for labor analgesia. Although it is considered a safe technique, it is not without complications. Horner's syndrome and paresthesia within the trigeminal nerve distribution are rare complications of epidural analgesia. We report a case of a pregnant woman who developed Horner's syndrome and paresthesia within the distribution of the trigeminal nerve following epidural analgesia for the relief of labor pain. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Morphology and morphometry of the ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle in relation to median nerve compression at the proximal forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurses, I A; Altinel, L; Gayretli, O; Akgul, T; Uzun, I; Dikici, F

    2016-12-01

    The pronator syndrome is a rare compression neuropathy of the median nerve. Ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle may cause compression at proximal forearm. Detailed morphologic and morphometric studies on the anatomy of the ulnar head of pronator teres is scarce. We dissected 112 forearms of fresh cadavers. We evaluated the morphology and morphometry of the ulnar head of pronator teres muscle. The average ulnar head width was 16.3±8.2mm. The median nerve passed anterior to the ulnar head at a distance of 50.4±10.7mm from the interepicondylar line. We classified the morphology of the ulnar head into 5 types. In type 1, the ulnar head was fibromuscular in 60 forearms (53.6%). In type 2, it was muscular in 23 forearms (20.5%). In type 3, it was just a fibrotic band in 18 forearms (16.1%). In type 4, it was absent in 9 forearms (8%). In type 5, the ulnar head had two arches in 2 forearms (1.8%). In 80 forearms (71.5%: types 1, 3, and 5), the ulnar head was either fibromuscular or a fibrotic band. Although the pronator syndrome is a rare compression syndrome, the ulnar head of pronator teres is reported as the major cause of entrapment in the majority of the cases. The location of the compression of the median nerve in relation to the ulnar head of pronator teres muscle and the morphology of the ulnar head is important for open or minimally-invasive surgical treatment. Sectional study. Basic science study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Lycium barbarum (wolfberry reduces secondary degeneration and oxidative stress, and inhibits JNK pathway in retina after partial optic nerve transection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongying Li

    Full Text Available Our group has shown that the polysaccharides extracted from Lycium barbarum (LBP are neuroprotective for retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in different animal models. Protecting RGCs from secondary degeneration is a promising direction for therapy in glaucoma management. The complete optic nerve transection (CONT model can be used to study primary degeneration of RGCs, while the partial optic nerve transection (PONT model can be used to study secondary degeneration of RGCs because primary degeneration of RGCs and secondary degeneration can be separated in location in the same retina in this model; in other situations, these types of degeneration can be difficult to distinguish. In order to examine which kind of degeneration LBP could delay, both CONT and PONT models were used in this study. Rats were fed with LBP or vehicle daily from 7 days before surgery until sacrifice at different time-points and the surviving numbers of RGCs were evaluated. The expression of several proteins related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and the c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathways were detected with Western-blot analysis. LBP did not delay primary degeneration of RGCs after either CONT or PONT, but it did delay secondary degeneration of RGCs after PONT. We found that LBP appeared to exert these protective effects by inhibiting oxidative stress and the JNK/c-jun pathway and by transiently increasing production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1. This study suggests that LBP can delay secondary degeneration of RGCs and this effect may be linked to inhibition of oxidative stress and the JNK/c-jun pathway in the retina.

  1. Lumbar nerve root avulsions with secondary ipsilateral hip dysplasia in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyzoidis, Konstandinos; Vranos, Georgios; Petropoulou, Calliope; Argyropoulou, Paraskevi I.; Argyropoulou, Maria I.; Sarmas, Ioannis

    2002-01-01

    We report on an 8-year-old child with avulsions of the left L3, L4 and L5 nerve roots and traumatic meningoceles that were not associated with lumbar spine or pelvic girdle fractures. The patient had a history of a road traffic accident. Plain radiographs of the pelvis revealed left hip dysplasia. The magnetic resonance imaging findings of the lumbar spine are illustrated. The pathogenesis of lumbar nerve root avulsions and their association with ipsilateral hip dysplasia are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Isolated unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy secondary to an atlantooccipital joint juxtafacet synovial cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Farhat, Hamad; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Morcos, Jacques J

    2009-03-01

    Juxtafacet cysts of the atlantooccipital joint that present with isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy are rare and may mimic more common pathological entities. The authors report on the third such case in the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis, imaging hallmarks, preoperative recognition, and surgical management of this lesion, and provide a review of the literature. The authors discuss their experience with the treatment of a 67-year-old woman who presented with an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy caused by a nonenhancing cystic septated lesion abutting the lateral medulla just medial to the left hypoglossal canal. The lesion was presumed to be a necrotic hypoglossal schwannoma or epidermoid tumor. Intradural surgical exploration failed to demonstrate an intradural lesion, but confirmed the presence of an extradural mass caudal to the hypoglossal nerve. Extradural exploration revealed a synovial cyst of the atlantooccipital joint, which was then resected. Postoperatively, the patient developed worsening dysphagia and hoarseness. Failure to recognize this rare entity preoperatively resulted in unnecessary intradural exploration and cranial nerve morbidity. In retrospect, the preoperative diagnosis of this lesion was suggested by lack of central enhancement, absence of dumbbell formation and the presence of erosive synovial changes. Regardless, the extreme rarity of this lesion at this location will always make its recognition challenging.

  3. Ge nanobelts with high compressive strain fabricated by secondary oxidation of self-assembly SiGe rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Li, Cheng; Lin, Guangyang

    2015-01-01

    Curled Ge nanobelts were fabricated by secondary oxidation of self-assembly SiGe rings, which were exfoliated from the SiGe stripes on the insulator. The Ge-rich SiGe stripes on insulator were formed by hololithography and modified Ge condensation processes of Si0.82Ge0.18 on SOI substrate. Ge...... nanobelts under a residual compressive strain of 2% were achieved, and the strain should be higher before partly releasing through bulge islands and breakage of the curled Ge nanobelts during the secondary oxidation process. The primary factor leading to compressive strain is thermal shrinkage of Ge...... nanobelts, which extrudes to Ge nanobelts in radial and tangent directions during the cooling process. This technique is promising for application in high-mobility Ge nano-scale transistors...

  4. Lower lip paresthesia as a sequel of mental nerve irritation secondary to periradicular periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mahmoud Riyahi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to present a case report describing lower lip paresthesia following failed endodontic treatment and development of periapical lesion. A 42-year-old female presented difficulty in swallowing with pain in right mandibular second premolar and numbness in the right side of her lower lip. Radiographic examination revealed inadequate root canal and a large periapical lesion in the mental nerve area. The lesion appeared extending into the inferior alveolar canal causing irritation of inferior alveolar nerve and its mental branch. Following root canal retreatment, there was improvement of the clinical symptoms and gradual reduction in size of the lesion. A full resolution of symptoms was demonstrated 4 months after successful endodontic therapy. It was concluded that careful clinical and radiographic diagnosis followed by proper endodontic treatment proved to be successful in treating lower lip paresthesia occurred following failed root canal therapy.

  5. Use of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster to treat localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic injury of peripheral nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Illanes G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerardo Correa-Illanes,1 Ricardo Roa,2 José Luis Piñeros,2 Wilfredo Calderón31Rehabilitation Department, 2Burns and Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Trabajador, 3Plastic Surgery Department, Hospital del Salvador, Santiago, ChileObjective: The efficacy of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP has previously been demonstrated in post-traumatic localized neuropathic pain. This study evaluated the use of LMP in localized neuropathic pain secondary to traumatic peripheral nerve injury.Patients and methods: This prospective observational study enrolled patients with traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves that were accompanied by localized neuropathic pain of more than 3 months duration. Demographic variables, pain intensity (measured using the numeric rating scale; NRS, answers to the Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4 questionnaire, and the size of the painful area were recorded.Results: Nineteen patients were included, aged (mean ± standard deviation 41.4 ± 15.7 years. Nerve injuries affected the upper (eight patients or lower (11 patients limbs. The mean duration of pain before starting treatment with LMP was 22.6 ± 43.5 months (median 8 months. Mean baseline values included: NRS 6.7 ± 1.6, painful area 17.8 ± 10.4 cm2 (median 18 cm2, and DN4 score 6.7 ± 1.4. The mean duration of treatment with LMP was 19.5 ± 10.0 weeks (median 17.4 weeks. Mean values after treatment were: NRS 2.8 ± 1.5 (≥3 point reduction in 79% of patients, ≥50% reduction in 57.9% of patients and painful area 2.1 ± 2.3 cm2 (median 1 cm2, ≥50% reduction in 94.7% of patients. Functional improvement after treatment was observed in 14/19 patients (73.7%.Conclusion: LMP effectively treated traumatic injuries of peripheral nerves which presented with chronic localized neuropathic pain, reducing both pain intensity and the size of the painful area.Keywords: chronic post-surgical pain, chronic post-traumatic pain, 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, neuropathic pain

  6. Characteristic anatomical conformation of the vertebral artery causing vascular compression against the root exit zone of the facial nerve in patients with hemifacial spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Soo; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2015-03-01

    Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is caused by tortuous offending vessels near the facial nerve root exit zone. However, the definitive mechanism of offending vessel formation remains unclear. We hypothesized that vascular angulation and tortuosity, probably caused by uneven vertebral artery blood flow, result in vascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone. The authors observed two anatomical characteristics of the vertebrobasilar arterial system in 120 subjects in the surgical group and 188 controls. The presence of the dominant vertebral artery (DVA) and laterality of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) were observed. We also analyzed the morphological characteristics of the surgical group showing the presence of DVA. The morphological characteristics were classified into three types: type I had the VBJ and DVA on the same side, type II had the VBJ within 2 mm of the midline, and type III had the VBJ opposite the DVA. The DVA was more prevalent in the surgical group than in the control group (71 % versus 54 %, P DVA on the left (P DVA on the right (P DVA, which corresponds with the laterality of the HFS. In the surgical group with the DVA and HFS on the same side, type I was predominant, but in the surgical group with a contralateral DVA and HFS, type III was predominant. The presence of a DVA and shifting of the VBJ on the same side plays a role in the angulation and tortuosity of vessels in the perivertebrobasilar junction, resulting in neurovascular compression of the facial nerve root exit zone and thereby causing HFS.

  7. OSTEOID OSTEOMA OF THE HAMATE AS A CAUSE OF COMPRESSION NEUROPATHY OF THE ULNAR NERVE IN GUYON CANAL (CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Semenkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid  osteoma of the wrist bones is rare and its diagnostics is complicated. A clinical case of the surgical treatment of the patient with osteoid osteoma is presented. The clinical manifestations included  pain, extensors  tenosynovitis and neuropathy of the ulnar nerve in guyon’s canal. The diagnosis was confirmed by computer tomography, ultrasonography and electromyography. Partial resection of the hamate including pathology area, and mobilization of the ulnar nerve in the wrist enabled authors  to obtain a good functional outcome.

  8. Delayed treatment of secondary degeneration following acute optic nerve transection using a combination of ion channel inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanael J Yates

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that a combined application of several ion channel inhibitors immediately after central nervous system injury can inhibit secondary degeneration. However, for clinical use, it is necessary to determine how long after injury the combined treatment of several ion channel inhibitors can be delayed and efficacy maintained. In this study, we delivered Ca2+ entry-inhibiting P2X7 receptor antagonist oxidized-ATP and AMPA receptor antagonist YM872 to the optic nerve injury site via an iPRECIO@ pump immediately, 6 hours, 24 hours and 7 days after partial optic nerve transection surgery. In addition, all of the ion channel inhibitor treated rats were administered with calcium channel antagonist lomerizine hydrochloride. It is important to note that as a result of implantation of the particular pumps required for programmable delivery of therapeutics directly to the injury site, seromas occurred in a significant proportion of animals, indicating infection around the pumps in these animals. Improvements in visual function were observed only when treatment was delayed by 6 hours; phosphorylated Tau was reduced when treatment was delayed by 24 hours or 7 days. Improvements in structure of node/paranode of Ranvier and reductions in oxidative stress indicators were also only observed when treatment was delayed for 6 hours, 24 hours, or 7 days. Benefits of ion channel inhibitors were only observed with time-delayed treatment, suggesting that delayed therapy of Ca2+ ion channel inhibitors produces better neuroprotective effects on secondary degeneration, at least in the presence of seromas.

  9. Does pain relief by CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids predict pain relief after decompression surgery for cervical nerve root compression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Alexander; Dietrich, Tobias J; Farshad, Mazda

    2016-10-01

    The relationship of pain relief from a recently presented CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids to surgical decompression as a treatment for single-level cervical radiculopathy is not clear. This retrospective study aimed to compare the immediate and 6-week post-injection effects to the short- and long-term outcomes after surgical decompression, specifically in regard to pain relief. Patients (n = 39, age 47 ± 10 years) who had undergone CT-guided indirect injection with local anesthetics and steroids as an initial treatment for single cervical nerve root radiculopathy and who subsequently needed surgical decompression were included retrospectively. Pain levels (VAS scores) were monitored before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after injection (n = 34), as well as 6 weeks (n = 38) and a mean of 25 months (SD ± 12) after surgical decompression (n = 36). Correlation analysis was performed to find potential associations of pain relief after injection and after surgery to investigate the predictive value of post-injection pain relief. There was no correlation between immediate pain relief after injection (-32 ± 27 %) and 6 weeks later (-7 ± 19 %), (r = -0.023, p = 0.900). There was an association by tendency between immediate pain relief after injection and post-surgical pain relief at 6 weeks (-82 ± 27 %), (r = 0.28, p = 0.08). Pain relief at follow-up remained high at -70 ± 21 % and was correlated with the immediate pain amelioration effect of the injection (r = 0.37, p = 0.032). Five out of seven patients who reported no pain relief from injection had a pain relief from surgery in excess of 50 %. The amount of immediate radiculopathic pain relief after indirect cervical nerve root injection is associated with the amount of pain relief achieved at long-term follow-up after surgical decompression of single-level cervical radiculopathy

  10. Anterior Interosseous Nerve Neuropraxia Secondary to Shoulder Arthroscopy and Open Subpectoral Long Head Biceps Tenodesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah T. Steed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthroscopic rotator cuff tendon repair is a common elective procedure performed by trained orthopaedic surgeons with a relatively low complication rate. Specifically, isolated neuropraxia of the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN is a very rare complication of shoulder arthroscopy. An analysis of peer-reviewed published literature revealed only three articles reporting a total of seven cases that describe this specific complication following standard shoulder arthroscopic procedures. This article reports on three patients diagnosed with AIN neuropraxia following routine shoulder arthroscopy done by a single surgeon within a three-year period. All three patients also underwent open biceps tenodesis immediately following completion of the arthroscopic procedures. The exact causal mechanism of AIN neuropraxia following shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis is not known. This case report reviews possible mechanisms with emphasis on specific factors that make a traction injury the most likely etiology in these cases. We critically analyze our operating room setup and patient positioning practices in light of the existing biomechanical and cadaveric research to propose changes to our standard practices that may help to reduce the incidence of this specific postoperative complication in patients undergoing elective shoulder arthroscopy with biceps tenodesis.

  11. Compressive neuropathy of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve: a study by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogéria Nobre Rodrigues

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To assess the prevalence of isolated findings of abnormalities leading to entrapment of the lateral plantar nerve and respective branches in patients complaining of chronic heel pain, whose magnetic resonance imaging exams have showed complete selective fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle. Materials and Methods: Retrospective, analytical, and cross-sectional study. The authors selected magnetic resonance imaging of hindfoot of 90 patients with grade IV abductor digiti quinti muscle atrophy according to Goutallier and Bernageau classification. Patients presenting with minor degrees of fatty muscle degeneration (below grade IV and those who had been operated on for nerve decompression were excluded. Results: A female prevalence (78.8% was observed, and a strong correlation was found between fatty muscle atrophy and plantar fasciitis in 21.2%, and ankle varices, in 16.8% of the patients. Conclusion: Fatty atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle is strongly associated with neuropathic alterations of the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve. The present study showed a significant association between plantar fasciitis and ankle varices with grade IV atrophy of the abductor digiti quinti muscle.

  12. Spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis: A rareness in a young adult with thalassemia major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Shehab; Soliman, Ashraf T; De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Kohla, Samah; Soliman, Dina; Khirfan, Diala; Tambuerello, Adriana; Talaat, Mohamed; Nashwan, Abdulqadir; Caparrotti, Palmira; Yassin, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    We report a case of a thalassemia major male patient with back pain associated to severe weakness in lower extremities resulting in the ability to ambulate only with assistance. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of  thoracic and lumbosacral spine was requested. A posterior intraspinal extradural mass lesion compressing the spinal cord at the level of thoracic T5-8 was present, suggesting an extramedullary hematopoietic centre, compressing the spinal cord. He was treated successfully with thalassemia major alone. The patient was treated with blood transfusion, dexamethasone, morphine and paracetamol, followed by radiotherapy in 10 fractions to the spine (daily fraction of 2Gy from T3 to T9, total dose 20 Gy). His pain and neurologic examination quickly improved. A new MRI of the spine, one week after radiotherapy, showed an improvement of the extramedullary hematopoietic mass compression. In conclusion, EMH should be considered in every patient with ineffective erythropoiesis and spinal cord symptoms. MRI is the most effective method of demonstrating EMH. The rapid recognition and treatment can dramatically alleviate symptoms. There is still considerable controversy regarding indications, benefits, and risks of each of modality of treatment due to the infrequency of this disorder.

  13. Supra-scapular nerve entrapment by ganglion cyst. Value of imaging modalities; Compression kystique du nerf sus-scapulaire. Interet de l`imagerie. A propos de 6 cas et revue de la litterature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Ph.; Roger, B.; Tardieu, M.; Ghebontni, L.; Thelen, Ph.; Richard, O.; Grenier, Ph. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-09-01

    Six cases of supra-scapular nerve entrapment by a ganglion cyst within the spino-glenoid notch or developed from the glenoid labrum are reported. Causes of injury or entrapment of the supra-scapular nerve are described including traction or kinking of the nerve, trauma, repetitive exercise, or compression by ganglion cyst. The patients had non specific pain, weakness, and atrophy of the spinatus musculature. Electromyography showed evidence of denervation atrophy. Patients had plain radiographs, arthrography, CT-arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR-arthrography. Masses that caused supra-scapular nerve entrapment were well localized and characterized with magnetic resonance imaging, reflecting the superior soft-tissue contrast of this modality. In addition, MRI may demonstrate atrophy of the spinatus muscles. MR-arthrography allows to visualize lesions of the glenoid labrum and in some cases, demonstrates cysts filling. (authors). 35 refs.

  14. Study of Knocking Effect in Compression Ignition Engine with Hydrogen as a Secondary Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivabalakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this project is detecting knock during combustion of biodiesel-hydrogen fuel and also the knock is suppressed by timed injection of diethyl ether (DEE with biodiesel-hydrogen fuel for different loads. Hydrogen fuel is an effective alternate fuel in making a pollution-free environment with higher efficiency. The usage of hydrogen in compression ignition engine leads to production of knocking or detonation because of its lower ignition energy, wider flammability range, and shorter quenching distance. Knocking combustion causes major engine damage, and also reduces the efficiency. The method uses the measurement and analysis of cylinder pressure signal for various loads. The pressure signal is to be converted into frequency domain that shows the accurate knocking combustion of fuel mixtures. The variation of pressure signal is gradually increased and smoothly reduced to minimum during normal combustion. The rapid rise of pressure signal has occurred during knocking combustion. The experimental setup was mainly available for evaluating the feasibility of normal combustion by comparing with the signals from both fuel mixtures in compression ignition engine. This method provides better results in predicting the knocking feature of biodiesel-hydrogen fuel and the usage of DEE provides complete combustion of fuels with higher performance, and lower emission.

  15. Steady Secondary Flows Generated by Periodic Compression and Expansion of an Ideal Gas in a Pulse Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeffrey M.

    1999-01-01

    This study establishes a consistent set of differential equations for use in describing the steady secondary flows generated by periodic compression and expansion of an ideal gas in pulse tubes. Also considered is heat transfer between the gas and the tube wall of finite thickness. A small-amplitude series expansion solution in the inverse Strouhal number is proposed for the two-dimensional axisymmetric mass, momentum and energy equations. The anelastic approach applies when shock and acoustic energies are small compared with the energy needed to compress and expand the gas. An analytic solution to the ordered series is obtained in the strong temperature limit where the zeroth-order temperature is constant. The solution shows steady velocities increase linearly for small Valensi number and can be of order I for large Valensi number. A conversion of steady work flow to heat flow occurs whenever temperature, velocity or phase angle gradients are present. Steady enthalpy flow is reduced by heat transfer and is scaled by the Prandtl times Valensi numbers. Particle velocities from a smoke-wire experiment were compared with predictions for the basic and orifice pulse tube configurations. The theory accurately predicted the observed steady streaming.

  16. Facial nerve palsy secondary to Epstein-Barr virus infection of the middle ear in pediatric population may be more common than we think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelnik, Katarina; Matos, Aleš

    2017-11-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a rare complication of acute otitis media (AOM). The general understanding is that this complication has a bacterial cause although bacteria can be isolated from the middle ear only in approximately two-thirds of cases of AOM. Detection of viral agents from specimens obtained during myringotomy in patients with AOM suggests a possible role of viruses in the etiology of this disease. We studied 5 otherwise healthy 17- to 27-month-old children who were referred to the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervicofacial Surgery from December 2012 to January 2016 because of AOM and ipsilateral facial nerve palsy. In all cases, serological tests were indicative of a primary Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and no other causative pathogens were identified during hospitalization. In one patient, the technique of in situ hybridization (ISH) detected EBV-specific ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequences within tissue sections obtained during mastoidectomy. The aim of this article is to alert clinicians that AOM induced facial nerve palsy secondary to an acute EBV infection in the pediatric population is very likely more common than originally thought. To our knowledge until the present case series, only 2 cases of AOM induced facial nerve palsy secondary to an acute EBV infection have been reported and no cases of EBV infection proven by the ISH technique showing the presence of EBV-specific RNA sequences in patient's tissue biopsies have been reported until now.

  17. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation via the peroneal nerve is superior to graduated compression socks in reducing perceived muscle soreness following intense intermittent endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Richard A; Dodd, Matthew J; Paley, Victoria R

    2014-10-01

    A novel technique of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) via the peroneal nerve has been shown to augment limb blood flow which could enhance recovery following exercise. The present study examined the effects of NMES, compared to graduated compression socks on muscle soreness, strength, and markers of muscle damage and inflammation following intense intermittent exercise. Twenty-one (age 21 ± 1 years, height 179 ± 7 cm, body mass 76 ± 9 kg,) healthy males performed a 90-min intermittent shuttle running test on three occasions. Following exercise, the following interventions were applied: passive recovery (CON), graduated compression socks (GCS) or NMES. Perceived muscle soreness (PMS) and muscle strength (isometric maximal voluntary contraction of knee extensors and flexors) were measured and a venous blood sample taken pre-exercise and 0, 1, 24, 48 and 72 h following exercise for measurement of creatine kinase (CK) and Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and IL-6 and CRP concentrations. PMS increased in all conditions immediately, 1 and 24 h post-exercise. At 24 h PMS was lower in NMES compared to GCS and CON (2.0 ± 1.6, 3.2 ± 2.1, 4.6 ± 2.0, respectively). At 48 h PMS was lower in NMES compared to CON (1.3 ± 1.5 and 3.1 ± 1.8, respectively). There were no differences between treatments for muscle strength, CK and LDH activity, IL-6 and CRP concentrations. The novel NMES technique is superior to GCS in reducing PMS following intense intermittent endurance exercise.

  18. The Study of Effects of Aqueous and Alcoholic Extracts of Portulaca oleracea Leaves on NT3 Gene Expression in Degeneration of Alpha Neurons after Sciatic Nerve Compression in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokoufe Hejazi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The injuries of peripheral nervous system cause the death of a number of motor cells of the spinal cord. Neurotrophins family genes such as NT3 involve in neuronal survive after nerve injury and their expression changes after it. With due attention to the expansion of portulaca pleracea in the world study was conducted to determine the effects of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of Potulaca oleracea on the NT3 gene expression after sciatic nerve compression in rat. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 88 male wistar rats that randomly were divided in 13 groups of 6 each. They consisted of control group, 4 compression groups (The sciatic nerve was compressed with locker pincer and 8 treatment groups: compression + treatment with dose of 75 mg/kg of alcoholic and aqueous extract of Portulaca oleracea on days 1 and 7 (never compression was done on the first day. In all groups, Total RNA was extracted from the lumbar spinal cord segment in 1, 7, 14, 28 days and cDNA was synthesized, then NT3 expression changes were compared in groups. Results: There was a significant increase in NT3 gene expression in the compression group compared to control (p<0.001. The NT3 gene expression shows significant increase (p<0.05 in the treatment groups with alcoholic extract (except 1& 28 days. Also, there was no significant difference in gene expression between treatment group with acqueous extract and compression group in 1 and 7 days. A significant decrease was seen in the treatment groups with aqueous extract of purslane compared to compression (p<0.05. The NT3 gene expression shows significant increase in the treatment groups with alcoholic extract compared to treatment groups with aqueous extract in all days (p<0.05. Conclusion: The results reveal the Portulaca oleracea leaves extracts increase the NT3 gene expression after sciatic nerve injury. This effect is more in alcoholic extract than aqueous extract.

  19. The tibial nerve compression test for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis-A simple and reliable physical examination for use by primary care physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Shu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kin, Akihiro; Baba, Ichiro; Kurokawa, Yoshitaka; Neo, Masashi

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and suitability of the 'Tibial Nerve Compression Test (TNCT)' as a screening tool for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSS). A total of 108 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital for surgical treatment or diagnosis of LSS were included in this study. Fifty healthy volunteers were examined as a control group. The severity of tenderness was scored (tenderness score) and measured on a visual analogue scale (P-VAS score). These scores were compared between the LSS and control groups. Moreover, they were compared before and after the operation among operated patients. The positive tenderness rate was significantly higher (92.6% [100/108]) in the LSS group than in the control group (30% [15/50]). The sensitivity and specificity of TNCT (95% confidence interval) were 0.93 (0.88-0.96) and 0.70 (0.61-0.77), respectively. Positive tenderness rates and P-VAS scores were significantly higher in the LSS group (p Test is a useful screening tool for LSS diagnosis in a primary care setting. Level II, diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. MRI of optic nerve and postchiasmal visual pathways and visual evoked potentials in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, M.B.; Hawkins, C.P.; Williams, R.; Haq, N.; Pelosi, L.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the relationship between abnormalities shown by MRI and functional disturbances in the visual pathway as assessed by the visual evoked potential (VEP) in 25 patients with established multiple sclerosis (MS); only 4 of whom had a history of acute optic neuritis. Optic nerve MRI was abnormal in 19 (76 %) and is thus useful in detecting subclinical disease. Optic nerve total lesion length and area on the STIR sequence was found to correlate significantly with prolongation of the VEP latency. This may reflect a predominantly demyelinating rather than inflammatory origin for the signal change in the optic nerve. (orig.)

  1. Uso da corrente catódica de alta voltagem sobre a dor em compressão nervosa experimental Use of high-voltage cathodic current for pain in experimental nerve compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladson Ricardo Flor Bertolini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da corrente catódica de alta voltagem sobre a dor em um modelo experimental de ciatalgia. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados 16 ratos Wistar, machos, submetidos a um modelo de ciatalgia experimental no membro pélvico direito. Os sujeitos foram divididos em grupo simulacro (GS e grupo tratado com corrente catódica (GP- por 20 min diários durante 10 dias. O modelo de compressão foi realizado com amarria por fio catgut 4.0 cromado, em quatro pontos ao longo do nervo isquiático. A avaliação da nocicepção foi realizada, de forma funcional, com o tempo de elevação da pata (TEP, e à pressão, pelo limiar de retirada, via analgesímetro eletrônico. Os dados foram coletados antes do modelo de ciatalgia (AV1, três dias depois da compressão (antes, AV2, e após o tratamento, AV3, após o quinto dia de tratamento (AV4 e em seguida ao décimo dia de tratamento (AV5. RESULTADOS: Pela avaliação funcional, em ambos os grupos houve aumento da nocicepção, sem redução da mesma em qualquer momento da avaliação. À pressão, no entanto, o GS mostrou redução do limiar de retirada em todos os momentos, enquanto o GP- apresentou redução do limiar apenas inicialmente - em AV5 o limiar foi restaurado. CONCLUSÃO: Não houve alteração na nocicepção pela avaliação funcional; porém, à pressão, o tratamento com corrente catódica mostrou efeito com a somatória de terapias.OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of high-voltage cathodic current on pain from a sciatica experimental model. METHODS: A total of 16 male Wistar rats were submitted to the sciatica experimental model in the right hind paw. They were divided into sham group (GS and group treated with cathodic current (GP- for 20 min/daily, for 10 days. The model of sciatic compression was performed with a 4.0-chromic catgut thread tie in four points of the sciatic nerve. Assessment of nociception was performed by measuring the time during which the animal held its hind

  2. Combined preoperative traction with instrumented posterior occipitocervical fusion for severe ventral brainstem compression secondary to displaced os odontoideum: technical report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Snyder, Brian D; Emans, John B; Proctor, Mark R; Hedequist, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Severe os odontoideum causing ventral brainstem compression is a rare and difficult entity to treat. It is generally accepted that severe os odontoideum causing ventral brainstem compression and neurological deficits warrants surgical treatment. This often requires both anterior and posterior procedures. Anterior approaches to the craniocervical junction are fraught with complications, including infection and risk of injury to neurovascular structures. External traction systems traditionally require long-term bedrest. The authors report 2 cases of severe ventral brainstem compression secondary to displaced os odontoideum and describe their use of extended preoperative halo vest traction to reduce the severe kyphosis and improve neurological function, followed by posterior occipitocervical fusion. Postoperatively both patients showed remarkable improvements in their neurological function and kyphotic deformity. Preoperative halo vest traction combined with posterior occipitocervical fusion appears to be a safe and effective method to treat brainstem compression by severe os odontoideum. It allows for adequate decompression of ventral neural structures and improvement of neurological function, but it is not hindered by the risks of anterior surgical approaches and does not restrict patients to strict bedrest as traditional traction systems. This method of halo vest traction and posterior-only approaches may be transferable to other cervical instability issues with both anterior and posterior pathologies.

  3. Ultrasonographic findings of posterior interosseous nerve syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, You Dong; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ultrasonographic findings associated with posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) syndrome. Approval from the Institutional Review Board was obtained. A retrospective review of 908 patients' sonographic images of the upper extremity from January 2001 to October 2010 revealed 10 patients suspicious for a PIN abnormality (7 male and 3 female patients; mean age of 51.8±13.1 years; age range, 32 to 79 years). The ultrasonographic findings of PIN syndrome, including changes in the PIN and adjacent secondary changes, were evaluated. The anteroposterior diameter of the pathologic PIN was measured in eight patients and the anteroposterior diameter of the contralateral asymptomatic PIN was measured in six patients, all at the level immediately proximal to the proximal supinator border. The size of the pathologic nerves and contralateral asymptomatic nerves was compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Swelling of the PIN proximal to the supinator canal by compression at the arcade of Fröhse was observed in four cases. Swelling of the PIN distal to the supinator canal was observed in one case. Loss of the perineural fat plane in the supinator canal was observed in one case. Four soft tissue masses were noted. Secondary denervation atrophy of the supinator and extensor muscles was observed in two cases. The mean anteroposterior diameter of the pathologic nerves (n=8, 1.79±0.43 mm) was significantly larger than that of the contralateral asymptomatic nerves (n=6, 1.02±0.22 mm) (P=0.003). Ultrasonography provides high-resolution images of the PIN and helps to diagnose PIN syndrome through visualization of its various causes and adjacent secondary changes.

  4. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  5. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb secondary to lumbar discal hernia compression: a rarity? Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cello, P; Izzo, S; Pugliese, F; Di Poce, I; Orsini, A; Izzo, L; Mazzone, G; Biancucci, F; Sinaimeri, G; Valabrega, S; Almansour, M; Izzo, P

    2016-01-01

    This case report is about a 70-years-old female patient, suffering from discal hernia, with compression of the iliac vein, that led to the formation of deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs. The angio-CT scan revealed the starting point of the L4- L5 compression where a voluminous discal hernia caused deep vein thrombosis, with the involvement the femoro-popliteal venous axis. Blood samples and PET-CT scans excluded other possible etiologic factors. This case demonstrates how a voluminous discal hernia can cause venous thrombosis.

  6. Deep vein thrombosis of the lower limb secondary to lumbar discal hernia compression: a rarity? Review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    DI CELLO, P.; IZZO, S.; PUGLIESE, F.; DI POCE, I.; ORSINI, A.; IZZO, L.; MAZZONE, G.; BIANCUCCI, F.; SINAIMERI, G.; VALABREGA, S.; ALMANSOUR, M.; IZZO, P.

    2016-01-01

    This case report is about a 70-years-old female patient, suffering from discal hernia, with compression of the iliac vein, that led to the formation of deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs. The angio-CT scan revealed the starting point of the L4–L5 compression where a voluminous discal hernia caused deep vein thrombosis, with the involvement the femoro-popliteal venous axis. Blood samples and PET-CT scans excluded other possible etiologic factors. This case demonstrates how a voluminous di...

  7. Bilateral elevation of interleukin-6 protein and mRNA in both lumbar and cervical dorsal root ganglia following unilateral chronic compression injury of the sciatic nerve

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubový, P.; Brázda, Václav; Klusáková, I.; Hradilová-Svíženská, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 55 (2013) E-ISSN 1742-2094 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Unilateral nerve injury * Contralateral reaction * Remote ganglia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.902, year: 2013

  8. Initial placement and secondary displacement of a new suture-method catheter for sciatic nerve block in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, T S; Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C

    2017-01-01

    electromyography and cold sensation. After return of motor and sensory function, volunteers performed standardised physical exercises; injection of the same study medication was repeated in the same leg and followed by motor and sensory assessments. Fifteen of 16 (94%; 95%CI 72-99%) initial catheter placements...... displacement was 5 mm. Catheters with secondary block failure were displaced between 6 and 10 mm. One catheter was displaced 1.8 mm that resulted in a decrease in maximum voluntary isometric contraction of less than 20%. After repeat test injection, 14 of the 16 volunteers had loss of cold sensation. Neither...

  9. Lumbar Nerve Root Occupancy in the Foramen in Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Hitesh N.; Song, Hae-Ryong; Yang, Jae Hyuk

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is common in patients with achondroplasia because of narrowing of the neural canal. However, it is unclear what causes stenosis, narrowing of the central canal or foramina. We performed a morphometric analysis of the lumbar nerve roots and intervertebral foramen in 17 patients (170 nerve roots and foramina) with achondroplasia (eight symptomatic, nine asymptomatic) and compared the data with that from 20 (200 nerve roots and foramina) asymptomatic patients without achondroplasia presenting with low back pain without neurologic symptoms. The measurements were made on left and right parasagittal MRI scans of the lumbar spine. The foramen area and root area were reduced at all levels from L1 to L5 between the patients with achondroplasia (Groups I and II) and the nonachondroplasia group (Group III). The percentage of nerve root occupancy in the foramen between Group I and Group II as compared with the patients without achondroplasia was similar or lower. This implied the lumbar nerve root size in patients with achondroplasia was smaller than that of the normal population and thus there is no effective nerve root compression. Symptoms of lumbar stenosis in achondroplasia may be arising from the central canal secondary to degenerative disc disease rather than a true foraminal stenosis. Level of Evidence: Level I, prognostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18259829

  10. Aortic dissection presenting with secondary pulmonary hypertension caused by compression of the pulmonary artery by dissecting hematoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hun; Ryu, Sang Wan; Choi, Yong Sun; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2004-01-01

    The rupture of an acute dissection of the ascending aorta into the space surrounding the pulmonary artery is an uncommon occurrence. No previous cases of transient pulmonary hypertension caused by a hematoma surrounding the pulmonary artery have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a case of acute aortic dissection presenting as secondary pulmonary hypertension

  11. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  12. Secondary Central Nerve System Lymphoma With Intratumoral Hemorrhage Suggested as Intravascular Lymphoma by Autopsy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yutaro; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Suyama, Kennichiro; Mochida, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2017-11-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL) is a rare type of extranodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), which often infiltrates the central nervous system (CNS) during the clinical course. Cerebral hemorrhage in patients with CNS lymphoma at presentation is rare. Herein, we describe a case of secondary CNS lymphoma with intratumoral hemorrhage, which was suggested as IVL from autopsy findings. A 76-year-old Japanese man with a history of treatment for B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was transferred to our hospital in an ambulance for generalized convulsions. Brain CT scan revealed a high-density tumor with edema and intratumoral hemorrhage in the left temporal lobes. He died in a rapid course, and autopsy revealed a focal hemorrhage with diffuse infiltration of lymphoma cells in the left temporal lobe and findings suggestive of IVL. Furthermore, the autopsy revealed a discrepancy in the CD20 immunostaining of lymphoma cells between the brain and other organs. Clinicians should not eliminate CNS lymphoma from the differential diagnosis of intracranial tumor with hemorrhage. Although many patients with IVL have rapidly progressive courses, it is very important to diagnose IVL at the initial onset, even in serious situations, to consider CNS prophylaxis.

  13. Endovascular Treatment for Iliac Vein Compression Syndrome: a Comparison between the Presence and Absence of Secondary Thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Wen Sheng; Gu, Jian Ping; He, Xu; Chen, Liang; Su, Hao Bo; Chen, Guo Ping; Song, Jing Hua; Wang, Tao [Nanjing First Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2009-04-15

    To evaluate the value of early identification and endovascular treatment of iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS), with or without deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Three groups of patients, IVCS without DVT (group 1, n = 39), IVCS with fresh thrombosis (group 2, n = 52) and IVCS with non-fresh thrombosis (group 3, n = 34) were detected by Doppler ultrasonography, magnetic resonance venography, computed tomography or venography. The fresh venous thrombosis were treated by aspiration and thrombectomy, whereas the iliac vein compression per se were treated with a self-expandable stent. In cases with fresh thrombus, the inferior vena cava filter was inserted before the thrombosis suction, mechanical thrombus ablation, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, stenting or transcatheter thrombolysis. Stenting was performed in 111 patients (38 of 39 group 1 patients and 73 of 86 group 2 or 3 patients). The stenting was tried in one of group 1 and in three of group 2 or 3 patients only to fail. The initial patency rates were 95% (group 1), 89% (group 2) and 65% (group 3), respectively and were significantly different (p = 0.001). Further, the six month patency rates were 93% (group 1), 83% (group 2) and 50% (group 3), respectively, and were similarly significantly different (p = 0.001). Both the initial and six month patency rates in the IVCS patients (without thrombosis or with fresh thrombosis), were significantly greater than the patency rates of IVCS patients with non-fresh thrombosis. From the cases examined, the study suggests that endovascular treatment of IVCS, with or without thrombosis, is effective

  14. Use of a Real-Time Training Software (Laerdal QCPR®) Compared to Instructor-Based Feedback for High-Quality Chest Compressions Acquisition in Secondary School Students: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortegiani, Andrea; Russotto, Vincenzo; Montalto, Francesca; Iozzo, Pasquale; Meschis, Roberta; Pugliesi, Marinella; Mariano, Dario; Benenati, Vincenzo; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Gregoretti, Cesare; Giarratano, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    High-quality chest compressions are pivotal to improve survival from cardiac arrest. Basic life support training of school students is an international priority. The aim of this trial was to assess the effectiveness of a real-time training software (Laerdal QCPR®) compared to a standard instructor-based feedback for chest compressions acquisition in secondary school students. After an interactive frontal lesson about basic life support and high quality chest compressions, 144 students were randomized to two types of chest compressions training: 1) using Laerdal QCPR® (QCPR group- 72 students) for real-time feedback during chest compressions with the guide of an instructor who considered software data for students' correction 2) based on standard instructor-based feedback (SF group- 72 students). Both groups had a minimum of a 2-minute chest compressions training session. Students were required to reach a minimum technical skill level before the evaluation. We evaluated all students at 7 days from the training with a 2-minute chest compressions session. The primary outcome was the compression score, which is an overall measure of chest compressions quality calculated by the software expressed as percentage. 125 students were present at the evaluation session (60 from QCPR group and 65 from SF group). Students in QCPR group had a significantly higher compression score (median 90%, IQR 81.9-96.0) compared to SF group (median 67%, IQR 27.7-87.5), p = 0.0003. Students in QCPR group performed significantly higher percentage of fully released chest compressions (71% [IQR 24.5-99.0] vs 24% [IQR 2.5-88.2]; p = 0.005) and better chest compression rate (117.5/min [IQR 106-123.5] vs 125/min [115-135.2]; p = 0.001). In secondary school students, a training for chest compressions based on a real-time feedback software (Laerdal QCPR®) guided by an instructor is superior to instructor-based feedback training in terms of chest compression technical skill acquisition. Australian

  15. Tractography of lumbar nerve roots: initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Vincent; Budzik, Jean-Francois; Thuc, Vianney le; Cotten, Anne [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service de Radiologie et d' Imagerie musculo-squelettique, Lille Cedex (France); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille 2, UDSL, Lille (France); Bera-Louville, Anne [Service de Rhumatologie, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aims of this preliminary study were to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fibre tracking (FT) of the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in the DTI parameters of the lumbar nerves between healthy volunteers and patients suffering from disc herniation. Nineteen patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 19 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography of the L5 or S1 nerves was performed. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) values were calculated from tractography images. FA and MD values could be obtained from DTI-FT images in all controls and patients. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (p=0.0001) and of the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.0001). MD was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than in the contralateral nerve root (p=0.0002) and in the nerve roots of volunteers (p=0.04). DTI with tractography of the lumbar nerves is possible. Significant changes in diffusion parameters were found in the compressed lumbar nerves. (orig.)

  16. Optic Nerve Injury in a Patient with Chronic Allergic Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribhi Hazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision.

  17. Degeneration and regeneration of motor and sensory nerves: a stereological study of crush lesions in rat facial and mental nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barghash, Ziad; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Al-Bishri, Awad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degeneration and regeneration of a sensory nerve and a motor nerve at the histological level after a crush injury. Twenty-five female Wistar rats had their mental nerve and the buccal branch of their facial nerve compressed unilaterally against a glass rod...... for 30 s. Specimens of the compressed nerves and the corresponding control nerves were dissected at 3, 7, and 19 days after surgery. Nerve cross-sections were stained with osmium tetroxide and toluidine blue and analysed using two-dimensional stereology. We found differences between the two nerves both...... in the normal anatomy and in the regenerative pattern. The mental nerve had a larger cross-sectional area including all tissue components. The mental nerve had a larger volume fraction of myelinated axons and a correspondingly smaller volume fraction of endoneurium. No differences were observed...

  18. Nerve conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS contains the brain and the spinal cord and the PNS consists of thousands of nerves that connect the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve ...

  19. Peripheral Facial Nerve Palsy after Therapeutic Endoscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal...

  20. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  1. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica

  2. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang, E-mail: njmu_wangdehang@126.com

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •In the present study, we first elected ROIs corresponding to the proximal, medial, and distal levels of the lumbar foraminal zone. •The ROC analysis for FA values of distal nerves indicated a high level of reliability in the diagnosis of sciatica. •The declining trend of FA values from proximal to distal along the nerve tract may correlate with the disparity of axonal regeneration at different levels. •DTI is able to quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots and has a higher sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing sciatica than conventional MR imaging. •DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and probable localization of nerve compression. -- Abstract: Objective: To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Materials and methods: Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5–S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3–S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. Results: The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. Conclusions: DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica.

  3. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra; Carlos Alberto Duque Parra

    2006-01-01

    It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH). In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a co...

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging with quantitative evaluation and fiber tractography of lumbar nerve roots in sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yin; Zong, Min; Xu, Xiaoquan; Zou, Yuefen; Feng, Yang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chuanbing; Wang, Dehang

    2015-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate nerve roots by measuring fractional anisotropy (FA) values in healthy volunteers and sciatica patients, visualize nerve roots by tractography, and compare the diagnostic efficacy between conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI. Seventy-five sciatica patients and thirty-six healthy volunteers underwent MR imaging using DTI. FA values for L5-S1 lumbar nerve roots were calculated at three levels from DTI images. Tractography was performed on L3-S1 nerve roots. ROC analysis was performed for FA values. The lumbar nerve roots were visualized and FA values were calculated in all subjects. FA values decreased in compressed nerve roots and declined from proximal to distal along the compressed nerve tracts. Mean FA values were more sensitive and specific than MR imaging for differentiating compressed nerve roots, especially in the far lateral zone at distal nerves. DTI can quantitatively evaluate compressed nerve roots, and DTT enables visualization of abnormal nerve tracts, providing vivid anatomic information and localization of probable nerve compression. DTI has great potential utility for evaluating lumbar nerve compression in sciatica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Galen; Gastpar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upp...

  6. A Huge Capital Drop with Compression of Femoral Vessels Associated with Hip Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Takasago

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A capital drop is a type of osteophyte at the inferomedial portion of the femoral head commonly observed in hip osteoarthritis (OA, secondary to developmental dysplasia. Capital drop itself is typically asymptomatic; however, symptoms can appear secondary to impinge against the acetabulum or to irritation of the surrounding tissues, such as nerves, vessels, and tendons. We present here a case of unilateral leg edema in a patient with hip OA, caused by a huge bone mass occurring at the inferomedial portion of the femoral head that compressed the femoral vessels. We diagnosed this bone mass as a capital drop secondary to hip OA after confirming that the mass occurred at least after the age of 63 years based on a previous X-ray. We performed early resection and total hip arthroplasty since the patient’s hip pain was due to both advanced hip OA and compression of the femoral vessels; moreover, we aimed to prevent venous thrombosis secondary to vascular compression considering the advanced age and the potent risk of thrombosis in the patient. A large capital drop should be considered as a cause of vascular compression in cases of unilateral leg edema in OA patients.

  7. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of symptomatic nerve root of patients with lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Yawara; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamashita, Masaomi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Munetaka; Orita, Sumihisa; Kamoda, Hiroto; Arai, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Masuda, Yoshitada; Ochi, Shigehiro; Kikawa, Takashi; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika

    2011-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can provide valuable structural information that may be useful for evaluating pathological changes of the lumbar nerve root. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) neurography has recently been introduced as an alternative way to visualize nerves, but to date, quantitative DWI and MR neurography have not been applied to evaluate the pathology of lumbar nerve roots. Our purpose was to visualize lumbar nerve roots and to analyze their morphology by MR neurography, and to measure the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks using 1.5-T MR imaging. Ten consecutive patients (median age, 48.0 and range, 20-72 years) with monoradicular symptoms caused by a lumbar herniated disk and 14 healthy volunteers were studied. Regions of interests were placed on the lumbar roots at dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and distal spinal nerves on DWI to quantify mean ADC values. The spinal nerve roots were also visualized by MR neurography. In the patients, mean ADC values were significantly greater in the compressed DRG and distal spinal nerves than in intact nerves. MR neurography also showed abnormalities such as nerve swelling at and below the compression in the symptomatic nerve root. Increased ADC values were considered to be because of edema and Wallerian degeneration of compressed nerve roots. DWI is a potential tool for analysis of the pathophysiology of lumbar nerve roots compressed by herniated disks. (orig.)

  9. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  10. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  11. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kishore; Ahmed, Rafeeq; Bajantri, Bharat; Singh, Amandeep; Abbas, Hafsa; Dejesus, Eddy; Khan, Rana Raheel; Niazi, Masooma; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2017-01-01

    Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor. PMID:28553221

  12. Compression-Based Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rezagah, Farideh Ebrahim; Jalali, Shirin; Erkip, Elza; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Modern compression algorithms exploit complex structures that are present in signals to describe them very efficiently. On the other hand, the field of compressed sensing is built upon the observation that "structured" signals can be recovered from their under-determined set of linear projections. Currently, there is a large gap between the complexity of the structures studied in the area of compressed sensing and those employed by the state-of-the-art compression codes. Recent results in the...

  13. Complete paralysis of the quadriceps secondary to post-traumatic iliopsoas hematoma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, N; Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Chemla, N; Herman, S

    2015-01-01

    Paralysis of the femoral nerve secondary to compression by a hematoma of the iliopsoas is rarely post-traumatic. The acute surgical removal of hematoma seems the treatment of choice. The main objective of this systematic review was to determine the optimal delay between the trauma and surgery, to obtain a total functional recovery. A search was performed via PubMed. The inclusion criteria were the studies in English language, reporting the results of the treatment of femoral nerve palsy secondary to compression by a post-traumatic hematoma of the iliopsoas. The primary evaluation criterion was the clinical recovery of femoral nerve function. The secondary criteria were the delay of recovery and the delay between the trauma and surgery. Thirteen studies were identified, only case reports. Sixteen patients were included, mean age 16.6 ± 3.4 years, 11 men and 5 women. The injury was associated with the sports practice in 12/16 (75 %) cases. Neurological symptoms developed about 5 days after injury. Femoral palsy was complete in 8 patients and partial in 8 patients. The mean delay between the injury and the diagnosis was 7.3 (2-25) days in conservative group and 17.8 (4-45) days in surgical group. Seven patients were managed conservatively, 6 partial paralysis and 1 total paralysis, and 9 surgically, 7 total paralysis and 2 partial paralysis. The recovery was total in 13/14 patients (seven surgical treatment and six conservative management) and partial in one patient who was managed conservatively despite a total paralysis. The delay of total recovery varied from 1 month to 6 weeks in conservative group and 3 months to 2 years in surgical group. This systematic review seems to indicate that whatever the delay, surgery is necessary in case of complete paralysis of the femoral nerve secondary to compression from a post-traumatic hematoma of the iliopsoas muscle.

  14. 3D-MR myelography (3D-MRM) for the diagnosis of lumbal nerve root compression syndrome. A comparison with conventional myelography. 3D-MR Myelographie (3D-MRM) zur Diagnose von lumbalen Nervenwurzelkompressionssyndromen. Vergleichsstudie zu konventioneller Myelographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, K.E.W. (Neuroradiologische Abt., Neurochirurgische Klinik, Nuernberg-Erlangen Univ., Erlangen (Germany)); Hollenbach, H.P.; Huk, W.J.

    1994-11-01

    65 patients with nerve root compression syndrome were examined using a new type of MR-technique, which is comparable to the conventional X-ray myelography. The results of the prospective case study were compared with previous clinical experiences (1). For the examinations a 1.0 T whole body MR-system (Siemens Magnetom Impact) was used. A strong T[sub 2]*-weighted 3D-FISP sequence (TR=73 ms, TE=21 ms, [alpha]=7 ) was applied in sagittal orientation using a circularly polarized oval spine coil. To obtain fat suppression a frequency selective 1-3-3-1 prepulse was applied prior to the imaging sequence. The acquired 3D-data set was evaluated using a Maximum Intensity Projection (MIP) program. Our results confirmed earlier experiences which showed that the diagnostic sensitivity of 3D-MR myelography (3D-MRM) is comparable to that of conventional X-ray myelography. In cases of severe spinal canal stenosis and spondylolisthesis, and in cases of postoperative scar tissue with nerve root compressions, the sensitivity of the 3D-MRM is higher as compared to that of conventional X-ray myelography. (orig.)

  15. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  16. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  17. Omental pedicle transposition and suture repair of peripheral nerve ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The peripheral nervous system is able to regenerate after injury. Etiologies of injuries include penetrating injury, crush, traction, and ischemia compression. However, the presence of various nerve injury treatments such as coaptation and another technique to attain functional nerve regeneration are still inadequate.

  18. Axillary Nerve Reconstruction: Anterior-Posterior Exposure With Sural Nerve Cable Graft Pull-Through Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Heather L; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-12-01

    Deltoid paralysis after axillary nerve injury results in limitations in shoulder function and stability. In the setting of an isolated axillary nerve injury with no clinical or electromyographic evidence of recovery that is within 6 to 9 months postinjury, the authors' preferred technique to reinnervate the deltoid is to reconstruct the axillary nerve with sural nerve grafting. Intraoperative neuromuscular electrophysiology is critical to determine the continuity of the axillary nerve before proceeding with reconstruction. The majority of the time, both an anterior and posterior incision and dissection of the axillary nerve is required to adequately delineate the zone of injury. This also ensures that both proximally and distally, uninjured axillary nerve is present before graft inset and also facilitates the ability to perform a meticulous microsurgical inset of the nerve graft posteriorly. The nerve graft must be pulled through from posterior to anterior to span the zone of injury and reconstruct the axillary nerve. Careful infraclavicular brachial plexus dissection is necessary to prevent further injury to components of the brachial plexus in the setting of a scarred bed. Patients will require postoperative therapy to prevent limitations in shoulder range of motion secondary to postoperative stiffness. This paper presents a detailed surgical technique for axillary nerve reconstruction by an anterior-posterior approach with a pull-through technique of a sural nerve cable graft.

  19. Experimental chronic entrapment of the sciatic nerve in adult hamsters: an ultrastructural and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prinz R.A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entrapment neuropathy is a group of clinical disorders involving compression of a peripheral nerve and interference with nerve function mostly through traction injury. We have investigated the chronic compression of peripheral nerves as an experimental procedure for detecting changes in ultrastructural nerve morphology. Adult hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus, N = 30 were anesthetized with a 25% pentobarbital solution and received a cuff around the right sciatic nerve. Left sciatic nerves were not operated (control group. Animals survived for varying times (up to 15 weeks, after which they were sacrificed and both sciatic nerves were immediately fixed with a paraformaldehyde solution. Experimental nerves were divided into segments based upon their distance from the site of compression (proximal, entrapment and distal. Semithin and ultrathin sections were obtained and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural changes were qualitatively described and data from semithin sections were morphometrically analyzed both in control and in compressed nerves. We observed endoneurial edema along with both perineurial and endoneurial thickening and also the existence of whorled cell-sparse structures (Renaut bodies in the subperineurial space of compressed sciatic nerves. Morphometric analyses of myelinated axons at the compression sites displayed a remarkable increase in the number of small axons (up to 60% in comparison with the control axonal number. The distal segment of compressed nerves presented a distinct decrease in axon number (up to 40% comparatively to the control group. The present experimental model of nerve entrapment in adult hamsters was shown to promote consistent histopathologic alterations analogous to those found in chronic compressive neuropathies.

  20. Channel box compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamizo, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuki.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention reduces the volume of spent fuel channel boxes of power plant facilities to eliminate secondary wastes, suppress generation of radiation sources and improve storage space efficiency. The device has a box-like shape. A support frame is disposed on the lateral side of the box for supporting spent channel boxes. A horizontal transferring unit and a vertical transferring compression unit driven by a driving mechanism are disposed in the support frame. Further, the compression unit may have a rotational compression roller so as to move freely in the transferring unit. In addition, the transferring unit and the driving mechanism may be disposed outside of pool water. With such a constitution, since spent channel boxes are compressed and bent by horizontal movement of the transferring unit and the vertical movement of the compression unit, no cut pieces or cut powders are generated. Further, if the transferring unit and the driving mechanism are disposed outside of the pool water, it is not necessary to make them waterproof, which facilitates the maintenance. (I.S.)

  1. Bio-crude production from secondary pulp/paper-mill sludge and waste newspaper via co-liquefaction in hot-compressed water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Linghong; Champagne, Pascale; Xu, Chunbao

    2011-01-01

    Co-liquefaction of secondary pulp/paper-mill sludge (solids concentration: 1.6 wt%) and waste newspaper with a total solids concentration of 11.3 wt% was investigated with and without the addition of catalysts in a 75 ml Parr High-Pressure reactor at temperatures of 250-380 o C for 20 min. The yield of heavy oil (HO) without catalyst was between 16.7 and 28.0 wt% within this temperature range, and peaked at 350 o C. The addition of HCO 2 H, FeS, or KOH at 5 wt% of the total solids (on a dry basis) was found to enhance the HO yield at 300 o C, particularly HCO 2 H, which increased the yield of HO from 24.9 to 34.4 wt%. More interestingly, synergistic effects between secondary pulp/paper-mill sludge and waste newspaper were observed in the co-liquefaction operations. For example, the HO yield attained was 26.9 wt% at 300 o C in the co-liquefaction of the mixture of 33 wt% sludge and 67 wt% waste newspaper, and was noted to be 9 wt% and 6 wt% higher than the yields obtained from liquefaction of sludge and waste newspaper alone, respectively. The HOs from liquefaction or co-liquefaction at 300 o C for 20 min exhibited significantly higher energy contents (HHV ≥ 30 MJ/kg), almost doubled those (-tilde 16 MJ/kg) of the original feedstocks.

  2. MR of acoustic neuromas; Relationship to cranial nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-08-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author).

  3. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  4. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  5. Avaliação do trofismo muscular de sóleos de ratos wistar após compressão nervosa e tratamento com corrente de alta voltagem Evaluación del tropismo del músculo sóleo de ratas wistar después de la compresión del nervio y tratamiento con corriente de alto voltaje Assessment of wistar rats' soleus muscle trophism after nerve compression and treatment with high-voltage current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladson Ricardo Flor Bertolini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a corrente de alta voltagem sobre o trofismo de sóleos de ratos com compressão de nervo isquiático. Dezoito ratos distribuídos em: GS - compressão nervosa e simulacro; GP+ - compressão e tratado com corrente anódica; GP- - compressão e catódica. Ao final, os sóleos foram dissecados e pesados em balança analítica. Em seguida foram montadas lâminas de cortes transversais, observadas em microscópio óptico de luz comum e digitalizadas, para análise do menor diâmetro de 100 fibras por músculo. RESULTADOS: todos os grupos apresentaram menor trofismo pelas duas formas de avaliação (p0,05. CONCLUSÃO: a corrente de alta voltagem não inibiu a hipotrofia em sóleos submetidos à compressão nervosa.OBJETIVO: Evaluar la corriente de alto voltaje en el tropismo del sóleo de ratas con la compresión del nervio ciático. Dieciocho ratas se dividieron en: GS - compresión del nervio y la falsa; GP+ - compresión y tratados con corriente anódica; GP- - compresión y el cátodo. Por último, fueron los sóleos disecados y pesados ​​en una balanza analítica. Luego diapositivas de secciones transversales fueron montadas para la observación al microscopio de luz común y digitalizadas para el análisis de menor diámetro de 100 fibras por músculo. RESULTADOS: Todos los grupos mostraron menor tropismo, las dos formas de evaluación (p 0,05. CONCLUSIÓN: La corriente de alto voltaje no inhibe la atrofia en el músculo sóleo se sometieron a la compresión del nervio.AIM: to evaluate the high voltage current on the tropism of rats soleus with sciatic nerve compression. Eighteen rats were divided into: GS - nerve compression and sham; GP + - compression and treated with anodic current; GP - compression and cathode. Finally, the soleus were dissected and weighed on an analytical balance. Then slides were mounted cross sections observed in light microscope and digitized for analysis of smaller diameter of 100 fibers per

  6. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell?s palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the...

  7. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  8. Flank hernia secondary to phenol nerve block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Al-Hilli, Z

    2010-09-01

    The management of patients with chronic pain is challenging. The aim of treatment is alleviation of symptoms in an attempt to increase functional capacity. Interventional procedures, such as chemical neurolysis are adopted when other techniques fail to provide adequate pain control.

  9. A Rare Case of Painful Trigeminal Neuropathy Secondary to Lateral Medullary Infarct: Neuroimaging and Electrophysiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Tang; Lo, Chung-Ping; Chen, Ying-Chu; Tu, Min-Chien

    2015-06-01

    To report a rare case of painful trigeminal neuropathy after lateral medullary infarct and probe its underlying pathogenesis on the basis of neuroimaging and electrophysiological study. A 45-year-old man presented acute onset of unsteady gait followed by paroxysmal and electric shock-like headache in the distribution of ophthalmic branch of left trigeminal nerve in 2 days. Neurological examinations showed hypoesthesia in the distribution of mandibular branch of left trigeminal nerve and left appendicular ataxia. Muscle powers and deep tendon reflexes were normal. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed infarct within the left cerebellum and middle portion of dorsolateral medulla. Vascular compression at the root entry zone of trigeminal nerve was excluded. Painful trigeminal neuropathy secondary to lateral medullary infarct was diagnosed. Ancillary blink reflex study 3 days after the stroke event showed abnormal late responses (R2), either ipsilateral or contralateral, after stimulation of left supraorbital nerve, suggesting left medullary lesion. Followup study 3 weeks later demonstrated normalization in absolute latencies of bilateral late responses, in line with remission of pain paroxysms on low-dose gabapentin treatment. Painful trigeminal neuropathy attributed to lateral medullary infarct is a unique disease entity. Ophthalmic branch involvement, coexisting sensory deficits, absence of triggers, and rapid evolvement and remission are its characteristics. Our neuroimaging study delineated ischemic stroke pathology within descending tract and spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve. Serial electrophysiological studies provide evidences supporting ephaptic transmission as the main pathogenesis concordant with dynamics of neuropathic pain and therapeutic implications.

  10. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  11. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  12. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  13. Ulnar nerve entrapment complicating radial head excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Parfait Bienvenu Bouhelo-Pam

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several mechanisms are involved in ischemia or mechanical compression of ulnar nerve at the elbow. Presentation of case: We hereby present the case of a road accident victim, who received a radial head excision for an isolated fracture of the radial head and complicated by onset of cubital tunnel syndrome. This outcome could be the consequence of an iatrogenic valgus of the elbow due to excision of the radial head. Hitherto the surgical treatment of choice it is gradually been abandoned due to development of radial head implant arthroplasty. However, this management option is still being performed in some rural centers with low resources. Discussion: The radial head plays an important role in the stability of the elbow and his iatrogenic deformity can be complicated by cubital tunnel syndrome. Conclusion: An ulnar nerve release was performed with favorable outcome. Keywords: Cubital tunnel syndrome, Peripheral nerve palsy, Radial head excision, Elbow valgus

  14. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Syndrome from Thermal Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay A. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Due to anatomical proximity to bone, the radial nerve is the most frequently injured major nerve of the upper extremity, frequently secondary to fractures (Li et al. (2013. We describe an incidence when a branch of the radial nerve is injured as a result of a thermal injury. Observation. Radial nerve injury can occur anywhere along the anatomical course with varied etiologies, but commonly related to trauma. The most frequent site is in the proximal forearm involving the posterior interosseous branch. However, problems can occur at the junction of the middle and proximal thirds of the humerus and wrist radially. When the radial nerve is injured by a burn, a new rehabilitation dynamic arises. Not only does one agonize about the return of nerve function but also fret about the skin grafts that replaced the devitalized tissue housing that compartment. Discussion. Although posterior interosseous nerve syndrome has been described in the context of many different etiologies, it has not previously been discussed in relation to burn injuries. In this case, not only did the patient’s rehabilitation involve aggressive therapy for return of sensation and function of the arm, but also prevention of contracture normally seen in replacement of full thickness burns.

  15. Neuroprotection for Nerve Agent-Induced Brain Damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newmark, Jonathan; Ballough, Gerald P; Filbert, Margaret G

    2002-01-01

    ... secondary to exposure to nerve agents. Preliminary work in this laboratory has demonstrated proof of concept using a compound not yet approved for clinical use by the US Food and Drug Administration...

  16. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  17. Raman spectroscopy of non-penetrating peripheral nerve damage in swine: a tool for spectral pathology of nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilwa, Katherine E.; Slaughter, Tiffani; Elster, Eric A.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2015-03-01

    Over 30% of combat injuries involve peripheral nerve injury compared to only 3% in civilian trauma. In fact, nerve dysfunction is the second leading cause of long-term disability in injured service members and is present in 37% of upper limb injuries with disability. Identification and assessment of non-penetrating nerve injury in trauma patients could improve outcome and aid in therapeutic monitoring. We report the use of Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive, non-destructive method for detection of nerve degeneration in intact nerves due to non-penetrating trauma. Nerve trauma was induced via compression and ischemia/reperfusion injury using a combat relevant swine tourniquet model (>3 hours ischemia). Control animals did not undergo compression/ischemia. Seven days post-operatively, sciatic and femoral nerves were harvested and fixed in formalin. Raman spectra of intact, peripheral nerves were collected using a fiber-optic probe with 3 mm diameter spot size and 785 nm excitation. Data was preprocessed, including fluorescence background subtraction, and Raman spectroscopic metrics were determined using custom peak fitting MATLAB scripts. The abilities of bivariate and multivariate analysis methods to predict tissue state based on Raman spectroscopic metrics are compared. Injured nerves exhibited changes in Raman metrics indicative of 45% decreased myelin content and structural damage (pinflammation of nerve tissue samples were confirmed via histology. This study demonstrates the non-invasive ability of Raman spectroscopy to detect nerve degeneration associated with non-penetrating injury, relevant to neurapraxic and axonotmetic injuries; future experiments will further explore the clinical utility of Raman spectroscopy to recognize neural injury.

  18. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  19. Sixth Nerve Palsy from Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, Ségolène; Maeder, Philippe; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Kawasaki, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient who had an isolated sixth nerve palsy due to a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma. The sixth nerve palsy appeared acutely and then spontaneously resolved over several months, initially suggesting a microvascular origin of the palsy. Subsequent recurrences of the palsy indicated a different pathophysiologic etiology and MRI revealed the lesion at the petrous apex. Surgical resection improved the compressive effect of the lesion at Dorello's canal and clinical improvement was observed. A relapsing-remitting sixth nerve palsy is an unusual presentation of this rare lesion.

  20. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  1. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  2. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...... glaucoma patients is six times higher at a perfusion pressure of 30 mmHg, which corresponds to a level where the optic nerve is hypoxic in experimental animals, as compared to perfusion pressure levels above 50 mmHg where the optic nerve is normoxic. Medical intervention can affect optic nerve oxygen......-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, which indicates that prostaglandin metabolism plays a role. Laboratory studies suggest that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors might be useful for medical treatment of optic nerve and retinal ischemia, potentially in diseases such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. However, clinical...

  3. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  4. A 2-year follow-up survey of 523 cases with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chun-qing; Zhang, Li-hai; Liu, Xian-fei; Tang, Pei-fu

    2015-01-01

    We performed a 2-year follow-up survey of 523 patients with peripheral nerve injuries caused by the earthquake in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province, China. Nerve injuries were classified into three types: type I injuries were nerve transection injuries, type II injuries were nerve compression injuries, and type III injuries displayed no direct neurological dysfunction due to trauma. In this study, 31 patients had type I injuries involving 41 nerves, 419 had type II injuries involving 823 nerves, and 73 had type III injuries involving 150 nerves. Twenty-two patients had open transection nerve injury. The restoration of peripheral nerve function after different treatments was evaluated. Surgical decompression favorably affected nerve recovery. Physiotherapy was effective for type I and type II nerve injuries, but not substantially for type III nerve injury. Pharmacotherapy had little effect on type II or type III nerve injuries. Targeted decompression surgery and physiotherapy contributed to the effective treatment of nerve transection and compression injuries. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for nerve injury severity declined with increasing duration of being trapped. In the first year after treatment, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center score for grades 3 to 5 nerve injury increased by 28.2% to 81.8%. If scores were still poor (0 or 1) after a 1-year period of treatment, further treatment was not effective. PMID:25883624

  5. Recurrent acute low back pain secondary to lumbar epidural calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziade, M.; Zufferey, P.; So, A.K.L. [Centre Hospitalier Vaudois, Service de Rhumatologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-06-15

    Epidural calcification is a rare cause of back pain, and spontaneous epidural calcification has not been reported previously. We describe a patient with acute low back pain and signs of lumbar nerve root compression due to epidural calcification, as demonstrated by CT-scan and MRI. Radiological signs of spondylodiscitis led to a search for an infectious cause, which was negative, and her symptoms responded rapidly to NSAID treatment alone. Her symptoms recurred 18 months later, and further imaging studies again revealed epidural calcification, but with a changed distribution. Her symptoms were relieved once more by NSAID treatment alone. We propose that epidural calcification secondary to aseptic spondylodiscitis is the main cause of acute back pain in this patient. A possible mechanism may be the pro-inflammatory effects of calcium pyrophosphate or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition within the epidural space. (orig.)

  6. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  7. A study of retrograde degeneration of median nerve forearm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a disorder of the hand which results from compression of the median nerve within its fibro-osseous tunnel at the wrist. The slowing in the forearm motor conduction velocity suggests the presence of retrograde degeneration. Existing studies conflict regarding a correlation ...

  8. Optimising the image of the intradural nerve root: the value of MR radiculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, P.A.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1996-10-01

    We evaluated the additional value of MR radiculography for increasing the sensitivity and specificity of MRI with regard to nerve root compression in patients with sciatica. The single slices of a heavily T 2-weighted oblique coronal image set were reformatted with a maximum intensity projection protocol. This image resembles a classical contrast radiculogram and shows the intradural nerve root and its sleeve. In 43 patients studied with a standard MRI examination there was a need for further assessment of nerve root compression in 19 (44 %). In 13 (68 %) of these, MR radiculography made a definite verdict possible. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    project was to develop an alternative to autologous nerve grafts used in repair of peripheral nerve injuries in war and civilian life. Based on our...gradient compositions tested in Aim 1 in preparation to studies in the large animal model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . As it was not...this specific aim was to test the efficacy of optimized nanofiber nerve guide in a canine model of peripheral nerve injury and repair . Peripheral nerve

  10. Isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy due to an inflammatory process within the sella and parasellar regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Hwang, Michelle S; Strickland, Ben A; Khishfe, Basem

    2016-01-01

    Isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy raises concern about a serious intracranial condition. Abducens nerve palsy is a common isolated palsy due to its susceptibility to injury along its long course. Non-traumatic isolated abducens nerve palsy is often caused by a mass that indirectly stretches and compresses the nerve. Pathological processes directly causing bilateral isolated involvement of the abducens nerve are rare. We describe a 24-year-old man who presented with isolated bilateral abducens nerve palsy. Radiological imaging and laboratory tests were consistent with an aggressive bacterial infectious process located in the sellar region with parasellar extension. If promptly addressed, sixth cranial nerve palsy appears to be reversible with aggressive medical therapy and endoscopic sinus surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels that bring oxygen to your nerves. Damaged nerves may stop sending messages, or may send messages slowly or at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. Symptoms may include Numbness in your ...

  13. [Accident-induced lesions of the facial nerve in relation to the extent of pyramidal pneumatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoori, S; Limberg, C

    1985-12-01

    Perilabyrinthine pneumatisation of the petrous pyramid constitutes a risk factor for the facial nerve in its labyrinthine part in a fracture of the temporal bone because serious splintering of bone is possible. Splinters dislocated into the Fallopian canal may damage the nerve seriously. On the other hand a perineural haematoma can flow out of the canal into the neighbouring cells through dehiscences or through the fractured canal walls and a compression of the nerve may be avoided. The decision to undertake early surgical intervention must take into account the degree of pneumatisation of the pyramid in posttraumatic lesions of the facial nerve. The timing and extent of recovery cannot be predicted.

  14. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves...

  15. Iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein resulting in acute lower leg edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seung Bae; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Jeong, Yeon Jun

    2006-01-01

    The clinical manifestations related to iliopsoas bursitis can vary due to compression of the adjacent structure such as the common femoral vein, nerve and bladder. We report here on a rare case of iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein that resulted in acute lower leg edema

  16. Iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein resulting in acute lower leg edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seung Bae; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Sang Yong; Jeong, Yeon Jun [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-08-15

    The clinical manifestations related to iliopsoas bursitis can vary due to compression of the adjacent structure such as the common femoral vein, nerve and bladder. We report here on a rare case of iliopsoas bursitis with compression of the common femoral vein that resulted in acute lower leg edema.

  17. Multiple Scalp Infarctions and Bilateral Orbital Compression in A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with bilateral orbital compression syndrome and multiple scalp infarctions, treated conservatively but at the end she undergoes operative orbital decompression when she start to developsings of optic nerve dysfunction and rapidly increasing hematomas to prevent loss of vision and to speed recovery, The ophthalmologist ...

  18. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Tahir MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy.

  19. Compound palmar ganglion causing compressive neuropathy of the median nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tribhuwan Narayan Singh Gaur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB of synovial sheath of tendon is uncommon, it is a severe form of extrapulmonary TB, diagnosis is obvious on clinical grounds in later stages, but is always confirmed by histopathology. Here, we are presenting a case of a 50-year-old female, who presented to us with gradual increasing swelling in her left hand and wrist and numbness over left thenar eminence. The patient was successfully treated with debulking operation and anti-tubercular drugs. Tubercular tenosynovitis of wrist and hand is a severe form of extrapulmonary TB. Intraoperatively, the presence of rice body or melon seed bodies is pathognomonic for confirming the diagnosis. Early diagnosis and intervention give good prognosis.

  20. Changes of medium-latency SEP-components following peripheral nerve lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straschill Max

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal studies have demonstrated complex cortical reorganization following peripheral nerve lesion. Central projection fields of intact nerves supplying skin areas which border denervated skin, extended into the deafferentiated cortical representation area. As a consequence of nerve lesions and subsequent reorganization an increase of the somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs was observed in cats when intact neighbouring nerves were stimulated. An increase of SEP-components of patients with nerve lesions may indicate a similar process of posttraumatic plastic cortical reorganization. Methods To test if a similar process of post-traumatic plastic cortical reorganization does occur in humans, the SEP of intact neighbouring hand nerves were recorded in 29 patients with hand nerve lesions. To hypothetically explain the observed changes of SEP-components, SEP recording following paired stimulation of the median nerve was performed in 12 healthy subjects. Results Surprisingly 16 of the 29 patients (55.2% showed a reduction or elimination of N35, P45 and N60. Patients with lesions of two nerves showed more SEP-changes than patients with a single nerve lesion (85.7%; 6/7 nerves; vs. 34.2%; 13/38 nerves; Fisher's exact test, p Conclusion The results of the present investigation do not provide evidence of collateral innervation of peripherally denervated cortical neurons by neurons of adjacent cortical representation areas. They rather suggest that secondary components of the excitatory response to nerve stimulation are lost in cortical areas, which surround the denervated region.

  1. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the underside of the brain, ... eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These muscles move the eye up and down, right and ... nerve 4th cranial nerve 6th ...

  2. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    rodents as a function of time after surgery. As predicted, those animals in the negative control group (no repair following nerve deficit injury ...80% of penetrating injuries being associated with peripheral nerve damage, typically involve large segmental nerve deficits. Standard repair uses...technology for repair of peripheral nerve injuries involving significant neural deficit with improved functional outcomes for the wounded warrior. The

  3. "Isolated" Suprascapular Neuropathy: Compression, Traction, or Inflammation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hanneur, Malo; Maldonado, Andres A; Howe, Benjamin M; Mauermann, Michelle L; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-02-26

    Several hypotheses have been proposed for the pathophysiology of suprascapular nerve (SSN) palsy, including compression, traction, and nerve inflammation. To provide insight into the pathophysiology of isolated nontraumatic SSN palsy by performing critical reinterpretations of electrodiagnostic (EDX) studies and magnetic resonance (MR) images of patients with such diagnosis. We retrospectively reviewed all patients referred to our institution for the past 20 yr with a diagnosis of nontraumatic isolated suprascapular neuropathy who had an upper extremity EDX study and a shoulder or brachial plexus MR scan. Patient charts were reviewed to analyze their initial clinical examination, and their original EDX study and MR images were reinterpreted by an experienced neurologist and a musculoskeletal radiologist, respectively, both blinded from the authors' hypothesis and from each other's findings. Fifty-nine patients were included. Fifty of them (85%) presented with at least 1 finding that was inconsistent with an isolated SSN palsy. Forty patients (68%) had signs on physical examination beyond the SSN distribution. Thirty-one patients (53%) had abnormalities on their EDX studies not related to the SSN. Twenty-two patients (37%) had denervation atrophy in other muscles than the spinati, or neural hyperintensity in other nerves than the SSN on their MR scans, without any evidence of SSN extrinsic compression. The great majority of patients with presumed isolated SSN palsy had clinical, electrophysiological, and/or imaging evidence of a more diffuse pattern of neuromuscular involvement. These data strongly support an inflammatory pathophysiology in many cases of "isolated" SSN palsy.

  4. Radial to axillary nerve transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaclocha, Vicente; Herrera, Juan Manuel; Rivera-Paz, Marlon; Martínez-Gómez, Deborah; Vanaclocha, Leyre

    2018-01-01

    Axillary nerve injury is common after brachial plexus injuries, particularly with shoulder luxation. Nerve grafting is the traditional procedure for postganglionic injuries. Nerve transfer is emerging as a viable option particularly in late referrals. At the proximal arm the radial and axillary nerves lie close by. Sacrificing one of the triceps muscle nerve branches induces little negative consequences. Transferring the long head of the triceps nerve branch is a good option to recover axillary nerve function. The surgical technique is presented in a video, stressing the steps to achieve a successful result. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/WbVbpMuPxIE .

  5. Evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration through biomaterial conduits via micro-CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pixley, Sarah K; Hopkins, Tracy M; Little, Kevin J; Hom, David B

    2016-12-01

    Hollow nerve conduits made of natural or synthetic biomaterials are used clinically to aid regeneration of peripheral nerves damaged by trauma or disease. To support healing, conduit lumen patency must be maintained until recovery occurs. New methods to study conduit structural integrity would provide an important means to optimize conduits in preclinical studies. We explored a novel combined technique to examine structural integrity of two types of nerve conduits after in vivo healing. Micro-CT imaging with iodine contrast was combined with histological analysis to examine two different nerve conduits after in vivo nerve reconstruction in rats. Sciatic nerve gaps in adult Lewis rats were reconstructed with poly(caprolactone) (PCL, 1.6 cm gap, 14-week survival) or silicone (1 cm gap, 6-week survival) conduits (N = 12 total). Conduits with regenerating tissues were imaged by micro-CT with iodine contrast and compared to the histology (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining for axons) of regenerated tissues after iodine removal. PCL nerve conduits showed extensive breakage throughout their length, but all showed successful nerve growth through the conduits. The silicone conduits remained intact, although significant constriction was uniquely detected by micro-CT, with 1 of 6 animals showing incomplete tissue regeneration. Micro-CT with iodine contrast offers a unique and valuable means to determine 3D structural integrity of nerve conduits and nerve healing following reconstruction. Furthermore, this paper shows that even if conduit compression and degradation occur, nerve regeneration can still take place.

  6. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  7. Optic Nerve Drusen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve. Ocular ultrasound, CT scan and/or fundus photography can also aid in the diagnosis. Drusen can ... Medical Disclaimer Search Site ▶ AAPOS Headquarters 655 Beach Street San Francisco, CA 94109-1336 Phone: (415) 561- ...

  8. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you do certain activities such as public speaking, singing or exercising, or when you're eating if ... of life. Research is still mixed on the benefits of vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of ...

  9. Laryngeal nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms include: Difficulty speaking Difficulty swallowing Hoarseness Injury to the left and right laryngeal nerves at the same time can cause a breathing problem. This can be an urgent medical problem.

  10. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  11. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  12. Primary optic nerve sheath meningioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremic, Branislav [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Pitz, Susanne (eds.) [University Eye Hospital, Mainz (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Optic nerve sheath meningioma (ONSM) is a rare tumour. Cases are usually separated into primary ONSM, which arises either intraorbitally or, less commonly, intracanalicularly, and secondary ONSM, which arises intracranially and subsequently invades the optic canal and orbit. This is the first book to cover all important aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of primary ONSM. After a general introduction, individual chapters discuss the clinical presentation, clinical examination and diagnosis, imaging, and histology. Treatment options are then addressed in detail, with special emphasis on external beam radiation therapy, and in particular stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy. The latter has recently produced consistently good results and is now considered the emerging treatment of choice for the vast majority of patients with primary ONSM. This well-illustrated book will prove invaluable to all practitioners who encounter primary ONSM in their clinical work. (orig.)

  13. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  14. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are a rare group ofcongenital anatomical anomalies. Various types of anomaliesof the lumbosacral nerve roots have been documentedin the available international literature. Ttheseanomalies may consist of a bifid, conjoined structure, ofa transverse course or of a characteristic anastomizedappearance. Firstly described as an incidental findingduring autopsies or surgical procedures performed forlumbar disk herniations and often asymptomatic, lumbosacralnerve root anomalies have been more frequentlydescribed in the last years due to the advances made inradiological diagnosis.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masao; Nukui, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hajime; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou.

    1991-01-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author)

  16. Ultrasound of the sural nerve: Normal anatomy on cadaveric dissection and case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsack, Dries, E-mail: dries.belsack@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Jette, Brussels (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd, E-mail: tjeerd.jager@asz.be [Department of Radiology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Merestraat 80, 9300 Aalst (Belgium); Scafoglieri, Aldo, E-mail: aldo.scafoglieri@vub.ac.be [Department of Experimental Anatomy, Free University Brussels, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Jette (Belgium); Vanderdood, Kurt, E-mail: kvanderd@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Maaslandziekenhuis, Dr H van der Hoffplein 1, 6162 Sittard-Geleen, Sittard (Netherlands); Van Hedent, Eddy, E-mail: eddy.vanhedent@asz.be [Department of Radiology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Merestraat 80, 9300 Aalst (Belgium); Vanhoenacker, Filip, E-mail: filip.vanhoenacker@telenet.be [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Maarten, Duffel-Mechelen, Rooienberg 25, 2570 Duffel (Belgium); Marcelis, Stefaan, E-mail: stefaan.marcelis@sintandriesstielt.be [Department of Radiology, Sint Andriesziekenhuis, Krommewalstraat 11, 8700 Tielt (Belgium); De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, UZ Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Jette, Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-11-01

    The sural nerve is a small sensory nerve innervating the lateral aspect of the ankle and foot. Clinical symptoms of pathology may present as atypical sensory changes in this region. We present the normal anatomy and ultrasound technique for examination of the sural nerve based on an anatomical dissection, as well as imaging in a normal volunteer. We also present a case series (n = 10) of different conditions of the sural nerve that we encountered based on a review of interesting cases from 4 institutions. The pathological conditions included neuropathy related to stripping or venous laser surgery, compression by abscess, Lyme disease, nerve tumors, traumatic transsection, and encasement by fibrous plaque and edema. Ultrasound with its exquisite resolution is the preferred imaging method for examining the sural nerve in patients with unexplained sensory changes at the lateral aspect of the ankle and foot.

  17. Unveil Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiteng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of compressed sensing theory. We take a genuine look at both experimental results and theoretical works. We answer the following questions: 1) What can compressed sensing really do? 2) More importantly, why?

  18. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  19. Unilateral isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to pathologically adherent PICA fusiform aneurysm – A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuma, Mike E.; Goto, Tetsuya; Hanaoka, Yoshiki; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro; Ohaegbulam, Samuel C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy due to mechanical compression by a vascular lesion is rare. Case Description: We report the case of a 72-year-old man who presented with a 4-year history of swallowing disturbance and subsequently progressively worsening left-sided tongue atrophy. He was referred to our department by a neurologist due a magnetic resonance imaging detected left vertebral artery compression of the medulla. Neurological examination was unremarkable except for left hypoglossal nerve dysfunction, which presented as left-sided atrophy and impaired movement of the tongue. Three-dimensional computed tomography angiography showed proximal left posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) origin fusiform aneurysm. Microvascular decompression was done through a left transcondylar fossa approach. Intraoperative findings were thickened arachnoid around the lower cranial nerves, fusiform aneurysm of the left PICA at its origin from the left vertebral artery which was severely adherent to and compressing the left hypoglossal nerve rootlets. Conclusion: The PICA has a very close relationship to the hypoglossal nerve, and its fusiform dilatation could cause isolated hypoglossal nerve dysfunction. Pathological adhesions between hypoglossal rootlets and the PICA aneurysm wall could be a possible contributor in the development and progression of hypoglossal nerve palsy. PMID:28680733

  20. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  1. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  2. Compression test assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotis, A. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A compression test assembly is described which prevents buckling of small diameter rigid specimens undergoing compression testing and permits attachment of extensometers for strain measurements. The test specimen is automatically aligned and laterally supported when compressive force is applied to the end caps and transmitted to the test specimen during testing.

  3. An unusual case of suprascapular nerve neuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakides Theodoros

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Suprascapular nerve neuropathy constitutes an unusual cause of shoulder weakness, with the most common etiology being nerve compression from a ganglion cyst at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch. We present a puzzling case of a man with suprascapular nerve neuropathy that may have been associated with an appendectomy. The case was attributed to nerve injury as the most likely cause that may have occurred during improper post-operative patient mobilization. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian man presented to an orthopedic surgeon with a history of left shoulder weakness of several weeks' duration. The patient complained of pain and inability to lift minimal weight, such as a glass of water, following an appendectomy. His orthopedic clinical examination revealed obvious atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 2 of 5 muscle strength scores on flexion resistance and external rotation resistance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse high signal intensity within the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and early signs of minimal fatty infiltration consistent with denervation changes. No compression of the suprascapular nerve in the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch was noted. Electromyographic studies showed active denervation effects in the supraspinatus muscle and more prominent in the left infraspinatus muscle. The findings were compatible with damage to the suprascapular nerve, especially the part supplying the infraspinatus muscle. On the basis of the patient's history, clinical examination, and imaging studies, the diagnosis was suspected to be associated with a possible traction injury of the suprascapular nerve that could have occurred during the patient's transfer from the operating table following an appendectomy. Conclusion Our case report may provide important insight into patient transfer techniques used by hospital personnel, may elucidate the clinical significance of careful

  4. Stretch-induced nerve injury: a proposed technique for the study of nerve regeneration and evaluation of the influence of gabapentin on this model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Machado

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rat models currently employed for studies of nerve regeneration present distinct disadvantages. We propose a new technique of stretch-induced nerve injury, used here to evaluate the influence of gabapentin (GBP on nerve regeneration. Male Wistar rats (300 g; n=36 underwent surgery and exposure of the median nerve in the right forelimbs, either with or without nerve injury. The technique was performed using distal and proximal clamps separated by a distance of 2 cm and a sliding distance of 3 mm. The nerve was compressed and stretched for 5 s until the bands of Fontana disappeared. The animals were evaluated in relation to functional, biochemical and histological parameters. Stretching of the median nerve led to complete loss of motor function up to 12 days after the lesion (P<0.001, compared to non-injured nerves, as assessed in the grasping test. Grasping force in the nerve-injured animals did not return to control values up to 30 days after surgery (P<0.05. Nerve injury also caused an increase in the time of sensory recovery, as well as in the electrical and mechanical stimulation tests. Treatment of the animals with GBP promoted an improvement in the morphometric analysis of median nerve cross-sections compared with the operated vehicle group, as observed in the area of myelinated fibers or connective tissue (P<0.001, in the density of myelinated fibers/mm2 (P<0.05 and in the degeneration fragments (P<0.01. Stretch-induced nerve injury seems to be a simple and relevant model for evaluating nerve regeneration.

  5. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  6. Compressible effect algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudder, Stan

    2004-08-01

    We define a special type of additive map J on an effect algebra E called a compression. We call J(1) the focus of J and if p is the focus of a compression then p is called a projection. The set of projections in E is denoted by P(E). A compression J is direct if J( a) ≤ a for all a ɛ E. We show that direct compressions are equivalent to projections onto components of cartesian products. An effect algebra E is said to be compressible if every compression on E is uniquely determined by its focus and every compression on E has a supplement. We define and characterize the commutant C(p) of a projection p and show that a compression with focus p is direct if and only if C(p) = E. We show that P(E) is an orthomodular poset. It is proved that the cartesian product of effect algebras is compressible if and only if each component is compressible. We then consider compressible sequential effect algebras, Lüders maps and conditional probabilities.

  7. Sciatic nerve injuries following femoral shaft fractures: Does the time interval from injury to surgery matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Saberi, Alia; Andalib, Sasan

    2016-08-01

    Sciatic nerve injuries following fractures of femoral shaft are uncommon complications. The patients with such deficits present with sciatic nerve palsy. A few cases of sciatic nerve injuries secondary to femoral shaft fractures have thus far been reported. If such patients fail to improve spontaneously, they may require surgical exploration. The present paper gives an account of surgical exploration in patients presenting with sciatic nerve injuries following femoral shaft fractures. Clinical outcomes were assessed in 14 patients undergoing surgical exploration of sciatic nerve injuries following femoral shaft fractures. There was a significant negative correlation between the time interval from injury to surgery and motor function recovery. Furthermore, a negative but non-significant correlation was seen between the time interval from injury to surgery and sensory recovery. Early exploration of sciatic nerve injuries following femoral shaft fractures can be beneficial if the nerve injury does not improve spontaneously. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Has the median nerve involvement in rheumatoid arthritis been overemphasized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Singh, Rajesh

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a well and widely recognized cause of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). In the rheumatoid wrist, synovial expansion, joint erosions and ligamentous laxity result in compression of the median nerve due to increased intracarpal pressure. We evaluated the published studies to determine the prevalence of CTS and the characteristics of the median nerve in RA and its association with clinical parameters such as disease activity, disease duration and seropositivity. A total of 13 studies met the eligibility criteria. Pooled data from 8 studies with random selection of RA patients revealed that 86 out of 1561 (5.5%) subjects had CTS. Subclinical CTS, on the other hand, had a pooled prevalence of 14.0% (30/215). The cross sectional area of the median nerve of the RA patients without CTS were similar to the healthy controls. The vast majority of the studies (8/13) disclosed no significant relationship between the median nerve findings and the clinical or laboratory parameters in RA. The link between RA and the median nerve abnormalities has been overemphasized throughout the literature. The prevalence of CTS in RA is similar to the general population without any correlation between the median nerve characteristics and the clinical parameters of RA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  10. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances.......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  11. Usefulness of ultrasound assessment of median nerve mobility in carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gi-Young; Kwon, Dong Rak; Seok, Jung Im; Park, Dong-Soon; Cho, Hee Kyung

    2018-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common peripheral compression neuropathy of the upper extremity. Recently, dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging has shown differences in median nerve mobility between the affected and unaffected sides in CTS. Purpose The present study was performed to compare the median nerve mobility between patients with CTS and healthy individuals, and to correlate median nerve mobility with the severity of CTS. Material and Methods A total of 101 patients (128 wrists) with CTS and 43 healthy individuals (70 wrists) were evaluated. Electrodiagnostic studies were initially conducted to determine the neurophysiological grading scale (NGS). The cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve and the grade of median nerve mobility were measured using US. Results The mean grade of median nerve mobility in the CTS group (1.9) was significantly lower than that in the control group (2.6; P mobility and distal motor latency of the median nerve (r = -0.218, P = 0.015), NGS (r = -0.207, P = 0.020) and CSA of the median nerve (r = -0.196, P = 0.028). Conclusion The grade of median nerve mobility was negatively correlated with the severity of CTS. US assessment of median nerve mobility may be useful in diagnosing and determining the severity of CTS.

  12. Long-nerve grafts and nerve transfers demonstrate comparable outcomes for axillary nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Johnsen, Parker H; Lee, Steve K; Feinberg, Joseph H

    2014-07-01

    To compare the functional and EMG outcomes of long-nerve grafts to nerve transfers for complete axillary nerve palsy. Over a 10-year period at a single institution, 14 patients with axillary nerve palsy were treated with long-nerve grafts and 24 patients were treated with triceps-to-axillary nerve transfers by the same surgeon (S.W.W.). Data were collected prospectively at regular intervals, beginning before surgery and continuing up to 11 years after surgery. Prior to intervention, all patients demonstrated EMG evidence of complete denervation of the deltoid. Deltoid recovery (Medical Research Council [MRC] grade), shoulder abduction (°), improvement in shoulder abduction (°), and EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation were compared between cohorts. There were no significant differences between the long-nerve graft cohort and the nerve transfer cohort with respect to postoperative range of motion, deltoid recovery, improvement in shoulder abduction, or EMG evidence of deltoid reinnervation. These data demonstrate that outcomes of long-nerve grafts for axillary nerve palsy are comparable with those of modern nerve transfers and question a widely held belief that long-nerve grafts do poorly. When healthy donor roots or trunks are available, long-nerve grafts should not be overlooked as an effective intervention for the treatment of axillary nerve injuries in adults with brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Superficial radial neuropathy and brachioradial motor nerve palsy associated with proximal radius osteochondroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Oğuzhan; Yücel, Mehmet; Ulaş, Umit; Eroğlu, Erdal; Odabaşi, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The cutaneous branch of the radial nerve (superficial radial nerve, SRN) might be compressed or injured at various anatomical sites along its course in the forearm. Compression of the SRN occurring at the proximal third of the forearm is unusual. A 22-year-old man was admitted with pain and paraesthesia over the lateral aspect of his right wrist and thumb and pain at the elbow for six months. In electrodiagnostic testing, a sensory nerve action potential from the right SRN could not be recorded, while it was normal on the left. In a needle electromyography study, denervation potentials have been seen in the right brachioradial muscle and a decrease in interference pattern signals was also found. An exophytic lesion of the proximal radius was observed in radiographs. Computed tomography evaluation revealed an osteochondroma of the proximal radius. Neuropathies of the SRN and the brachioradial motor branch of the radial nerve are thought to be associated with proximal radial osteochondroma.

  14. Posterior Interosseous Nerve Palsy Caused by Parosteal Lipoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Salama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old woman presented with weakness in her right-hand and wrist extensors and swelling in the proximal part of the right forearm. Electromyography (EMG confirmed involvement of posterior interosseous nerve at the level of proximal forearm. MR imaging demonstrated the characteristics of lipoma which extended on the anterolateral aspect of the right forearm and at the level of the radius neck. The lesion was parosteal lipoma causing compression and paralysis of the posterior interosseous nerve without sensory deficit. In this paper, posterior interosseous nerve palsy due to compression of a parosteal lipoma recovered after excision of the lipoma followed by intensive rehabilitation for six month. Surgical excision should be performed to ensure optimal recovery from the nerve paralysis.

  15. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  16. Degeneration of auditory nerve fibers in guinea pigs with severe sensorineural hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Steven; Ramekers, Dyan; Smeets, Emma M; Hendriksen, Ferry G J; Klis, Sjaak F L; Versnel, Huib

    Damage to and loss of the organ of Corti leads to secondary degeneration of the spiral ganglion cell (SGC) somata of the auditory nerve. Extensively examined in animal models, this degeneration process of SGC somata following deafening is well known. However, degeneration of auditory nerve axons,

  17. Nerve Transfers in Tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ida K

    2016-05-01

    Hand and upper extremity function is instrumental to basic activities of daily living and level of independence in cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Nerve transfer surgery is a novel and alternate approach for restoring function in SCI. This article discusses the biologic basis of nerve transfers in SCI, patient evaluation, management, and surgical approaches. Although the application of this technique is not new; recent case reports and case series in the literature have increased interest in this field. The challenges are to improve function, achieve maximal gains in function, avoid complications, and to primum non nocere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Specialized Nerve Tests: EMG, NCV and SSEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grouped according to where they leave the spinal column. There are eight pairs of neck (cervical) nerves, 12 pairs of upper back (thoracic) nerves, five pairs of lower back (lumbar) nerves, five pairs of pelvis (sacral) nerves and ...

  19. Nerve Transfer versus Interpositional Nerve Graft Reconstruction for Posttraumatic, Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, John C; Agrawal, Nikhil A; Seruya, Mitchel

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare functional outcomes between nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures in the setting of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries. A systematic review was performed using the PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane databases to identify all cases of isolated, posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries in patients aged 18 years or older. Patients who underwent axillary nerve reconstruction were included and categorized by technique: graft or transfer. Demographics were recorded, including age, time to operation, and presence of concomitant injuries. Functional outcomes were evaluated, including British Medical Research Council strength and range of motion for shoulder abduction. Ten retrospective studies met criteria, for a total of 66 patients (20 nerve grafts and 46 nerve transfers). Median time from injury to operation was equivalent across the nerve graft and nerve transfer groups (8.0 months versus 7.0 months; p = 0.41). Postoperative follow-up was 24.0 months for nerve grafting versus 18.5 months for nerve transfer (p = 0.13). Clinically useful shoulder abduction, defined as British Medical Research Council grade M3 or greater, was obtained in 100 percent of nerve graft patients versus 87 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.09). Grade M4 or better strength was obtained in 85 percent of nerve graft patients and 73.9 percent of nerve transfer patients (p = 0.32). Significant differences in functional outcomes between nerve graft and transfer procedures for posttraumatic axillary nerve injuries are not apparent at this time. Prospective outcomes studies are needed to better elucidate whether functional differences do exist. Therapeutic, IV.

  20. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  1. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  2. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve....... Studies of different metabolic neuropathies have assessed the influence of uremia, diabetes and ischemia, and the use of these methods in toxic neuropathies has allowed pinpointing damaging factors. Various mutations in ion channels associated with central nervous system disorders have been shown to have...

  3. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  4. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta block...

  5. Optic nerve sheath meningiomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeed, Peerooz; Rootman, Jack; Nugent, Robert A.; White, Valerie A.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Koornneef, Leo

    2003-01-01

    To study the natural history and growth of optic nerve sheath meningiomas and evaluate their management outcome. Clinicopathologic retrospective noncomparative case series. A retrospective study of 88 patients who were treated between 1976 and 1999 at the University of British Columbia and the

  6. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  7. zlib compression library

    OpenAIRE

    Gailly, Jean-loup; Adler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    (taken from http://www.gzip.org/ on 2004-12-01) zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW ca...

  8. Turbojet-exhaust-nozzle secondary-airflow pumping as an exit control of an inlet-stability bypass system for a Mach 2.5 axisymmetric mixed-compression inlet. [Lewis 10- by 10-ft. supersonic wind tunnel test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    The throat of a Mach 2.5 inlet that was attached to a turbojet engine was fitted with large, porous bleed areas to provide a stability bypass system that would allow a large, stable airflow range. Exhaust-nozzle, secondary-airflow pumping was used as the exit control for the stability bypass airflow. Propulsion system response and stability bypass performance were obtained for several transient airflow disturbances, both internal and external. Internal airflow disturbances included reductions in overboard bypass airflow, power lever angle, and primary-nozzle area, as well as compressor stall. Nozzle secondary pumping as a stability bypass exit control can provide the inlet with a large stability margin with no adverse effects on propulsion system performance.

  9. [A rare cause of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamiati, W; Kably, M I; Kadiri, R

    2005-09-01

    Aneurysm of the cervical carotid artery is rare and usually presents with ischemic symptoms as opposed to local mass effect. The authors report a case of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy secondary to mass effect from a cervical internal carotid artery aneurysm.

  10. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy as a complication of friction massage in tennis elbow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Wang, Han-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    Friction massage is a commonly used physical therapy that is usually safe and without complication. We report an unusual case of posterior interosseous nerve palsy that arose after friction massage. Electrophysiologic findings confirmed a focal neuropathy 4-6 cm distal to the lateral epicondyle. The neurologic symptoms resolved completely 2 mos after discontinuation of friction massage. This case experience broadens the spectrum of etiologies of posterior interosseous nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies may be a useful adjunct to a thorough physical examination to confirm the diagnosis and is important to prognostic evaluation, if unexplained neurologic symptoms develop after certain physical therapy procedures. Further treatment includes avoiding compression and observation.

  11. Possible role of alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranieri Maurizio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent findings on the antioxidant effects of pretreatment with α-lipoic acid (α-LA on the crush injury of rat sciatic nerve confirm the possible usefulness of α-LA administration in humans with peripheral nerve injuries. We discussed this issue in relation with our recent results in which the combined employment of α-LA and γ-linolenic acid with a rehabilitation program for six weeks reduced sensory symptoms and neuropathic pain in patients with compressive radiculopathy syndrome from disc-nerve root conflict in comparison with patients submitted to rehabilitation program alone for six weeks.

  12. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  13. Late-Onset Radial Nerve Palsy Associated with Conservatively Managed Humeral Fracture. A Case Report and Suggested Classification System

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelgawad, Amr Atef; Wassef, Andrew; Ebraheim, Nabil A.

    2009-01-01

    Radial nerve palsy can occur with humerus fracture, either at the time of injury (primary) or during reduction (secondary). Late-onset radial nerve palsy (not immediately related to injury or reduction) has been very seldom reported in the English literature. We describe a case of late-onset radial nerve palsy, which developed 9 weeks after an attempted closed management of a midshaft humerus fracture. Exploration of the nerve was performed. The radial nerve was found to be stretched over the...

  14. Clinical and imaging characteristics of foraminal nerve root disorders of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tomio; Tani, Takayuki; Suzuki, Norio; Aonuma, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed cases of lumbar nerve root compression at intervertebral foramina, by comparing 19 cases of foraminal stenosis (FS), and 38 cases of foraminal hernia (FH) with 21 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (LCS). Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, intervertebral disc degeneration, anatomical measurements of the nerve root foramina and the MRI findings were reviewed. The scores for pain in the lower extremities, and walking ability were both lowest in the FS group. The scores for low back pain, lower extremities, and sensory disturbances were lowest in the FH group. Anterior-posterior diameters of the nerve root foramina were smaller in the FS group and FH group than in the LCS group. More degenerated discs and short length of upper part of the nerve root foramina were seen in FS group than in the other groups. The MRI images of so-called black out nerve root foramina were positive in 63.6% of FS cases, 75% of FH cases. (author)

  15. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the iatrogenic peripheral nerve injuries in upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabay, Nuri [Department of Radiology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: nurikarabay@gmail.com; Toros, Tulgar [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: tulgartoros@yahoo.com; Ademoglu, Yalcin [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: yalcinademoglu@yahoo.com; Ada, Sait [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hand and Microsurgery and Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EMOT) Hospital, 1418 Sok. No: 14 Kahramanlar, 35230 Izmir (Turkey)], E-mail: sait_ada@yahoo.com

    2010-02-15

    The aim of our study is to assess the efficiency of the ultrasonography (US) in the diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. This study includes nine patients (six radial, one median and two posterior interosseous (PIO) nerves) with peripheral nerve injury diagnosed by clinical and electrophysiological methods in the last 3 years. Preoperatively, an ultrasonographic examination was performed and correlated with physical exam and surgical findings. Five patients, who were diagnosed as peripheral nerve transection by US, underwent surgery. The ultrasonographic findings were concordant with the intraoperative findings. Axonal swelling alone was found in the remaining three patients, who were treated conservatively because of preserved nerve continuity without display of nerve compression. In one patient, we were unable to visualize the nerve due to obesity and soft tissue edema. High-resolution US provide morphological information about the exact location, intensity and extent of the nerve injuries, facilitating the preoperative diagnosis. Thus, US may be a useful method for planning optimal treatment strategy in especially iatrogenic nerve injuries.

  16. Wegener granulomatosis causing compressive optic neuropathy in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay K; Ahmad, Amjad Z

    2009-01-01

    Wegener granulomatosis is an uncommon illness in children that is known to cause myriad ophthalmic complications, but it is rarely a cause of compressive optic neuropathy. A 17-year-old Hispanic boy with Wegener granulomatosis developed unilateral loss of vision, pain, and proptosis of the left eye. CT findings revealed enlargement of bilateral lacrimal glands with compression of the left optic nerve. The patient was admitted for high-dose intravenous corticosteroids and daily oral cyclophosphamide treatment. The patient's vision, pain, and proptosis improved dramatically, and he is now stable on mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone.

  17. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  18. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Tushar Divakar; See, Siew Ju

    2015-01-01

    A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  19. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  20. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thoracic spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic synovial sarcoma: case report Compresión de la medula espinal torácica por metástasis secundaria de sarcoma sinovial: relato de caso Compressão da medula espinhal torácica por metástase secundária de sarcoma sinovial: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Arnold

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon malignant soft tissue neoplasm, occurring primarily in adolescents and young adults. It is prevalent in the periarticular soft tissues near large joints of the extremities and rarely involves the trunk. Metastases are not uncommon and usually involve the lungs; metastasis to the thoracic spine is rare. We report the case of a 47-year-old man with a history of synovial sarcoma of the lower back, with subsequent metastases to the lung, penis, and perineum (all previously resected, presenting with a 3-month history of low back pain and lower extremity paresthesias. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated multiple lesions involving multiple contiguous vertebral bodies, with the mass at T12 compressing the spinal cord. The patient underwent T11-T12 laminectomy, transpedicular decompression, tumor debulking, and posterior fixation and fusion. The patient died six months later due to disease progression. Although not curative, decompression and stabilization of the spine are often necessary in patients who present spinal cord compression.El sarcoma sinovial es una neoplasia rara de los tejidos blandos que afecta adolescentes y adultos jóvenes. Su mayor prevalencia es en las grandes articulaciones de las extremidades y raramente ataca el tronco. Las lesiones metastásicas son raras y generalmente atacan los pulmones, siendo que las metástasis de columna torácica son raras. Será relatado el cuadro clínico de un paciente de 47 años de edad con tres meses de historia de dolor lumbar y presentando metástasis de sarcoma sinovial en la columna lumbar. La resonancia magnética demostraba lesiones contiguas del cuerpo vertebral y compresión del canal vertebral al nivel de T12. El paciente fue sometido a la laminectomía de T11-T12, descompresión transpedicular, remoción de tejido tumoral y artrodesis con fijación posterior. El paciente fue a óbito después de seis meses debido a la progresión de la enfermedad

  2. Peripheral nerve ultrasound in cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Luciana; Leadbetter, Ruth; Mulroy, Eoin; Chancellor, Andrew M; Mossman, Stuart; Roxburgh, Richard

    2017-07-01

    We report preliminary findings of nerve ultrasound in patients with cerebellar ataxia neuropathy vestibular areflexia syndrome (CANVAS) who have sensory impairment due to dorsal root ganglionopathy. The ultrasound cross-sectional area (CSA) of median and ulnar nerves of 7 CANVAS patients was compared with 7 age- and gender-matched controls and with the mean CSA of our reference population. The nerve CSA of CANVAS patients was significantly smaller than that of controls at all sites (P CANVAS patients fell outside the normal control range and was >2 standard deviations below the reference mean. The small nerves in CANVAS probably reflect nerve thinning from axonal loss secondary to ganglion cell loss. Our data show a role for ultrasound in the diagnosis of CANVAS ganglionopathy. This may also be applicable to ganglionopathy from other causes. Muscle Nerve 56: 160-162, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Crystal Structures of Brain Group-VIII Phospholipase A2 in Non-aged Complexes with the Organophosphorus Nerve Agents Soman and Sarin†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Todd M.; Samanta, Uttamkumar; Kirby, Stephen D.; Cerasoli, Douglas M.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Insecticide and nerve agent organophosphorus compounds are potent inhibitors of the serine hydrolase superfamily of enzymes. Nerve agents, such as sarin, soman, tabun and VX exert their toxicity by inhibiting human acetycholinesterase at nerve synapses. Following the initial phosphonylation of the active site serine, the enzyme may reactivate spontaneously or through reaction with an appropriate nucleophilic oxime. Alternatively, the enzyme-nerve agent complex can undergo a secondary process,...

  4. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  5. Pudendal nerve block and obstetric simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Guedes-Martins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pudendal nerve block was fi rst described in 1908. This is an effective technique of analgesia for the later stages of labor. But the use of analgesic techniques able to relieve pain from the early stages of labor (such as the neuraxial techniques led the pudendal block for a secondary choice. Even though, it is a simple and safe technique, usually performed by the obstetrician and with an associated low risk of bleeding or infection. Pudendal nerve block is a technique with scarce training opportunities in clinical practice. Therefore, training of this procedure using obstetric simulators should be considered. Moreover, its practice in simulated scenarios allows familiarization of multidisciplinary teams on its application in different contexts, either emergent or non-emergent intra-partum situations. The objectives of this work are: (1 to conduct a review of the pudendal nerve block for labor analgesia, focusing on its the main advantages and limitations, (2 to rethink its use in the absence of contraindications or other analgesic techniques, (3 to remind the technique of execution through simulation applied to Obstetrics.

  6. Parapharyngeal space schwannoma of hypoglossal nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surya Kanta Pradhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal schwannomas are rare benign neoplasms located in a difficult anatomical region. Most of them are asymptomatic and some presents late. Neurological deficit is a late finding, and it occurs only when the lesion is very large and compresses contiguous structures. Computed tomography (CT guided fine needle aspiration cytology along with preoperative CT and magnetic resonance imaging can detect and diagnose it correctly and helps in proper planning and management. Total surgical excision is the treatment of choice. The approach is different as per the site, but trans-cervical approach is preferred. Recurrence is rare after complete excision. We are presenting a very rare parapharyngeal schwannoma arising from the hypoglossal nerve that was excised by trans-cervical approach without any complications and less morbidity as compared to other described approaches.

  7. [Long head of the triceps brachii in axillary nerve injury: anatomy and clinical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezzouk, J; Durandeau, A; Vital, J M; Fabre, T

    2002-10-01

    Earlier work has demonstrated possible paralysis of the long head of the triceps brachii (LTB) after surgical repair of traumatic injury to the axillary nerve. Anatomy textbooks describe the motor branch of the LTB arising from the radial nerve within the body of the triceps. We studied the position of the motor branch for the LTB to determine its exact origin. Three groups were studied: Group I included 9 traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve associated with clinical involvement of the LTB; Group II included 20 secondary posterior trunks dissected from cadaver specimens; Group III included 15 dissections of the infraclavicular plexus with complete dissection of the secondary posterior trunk. The position of the axillary nerve injury was retrieved from the operative reports for Group I. The precise origin of the motor branch for the LTB was identified for Group II. Neurostimulation was used to identify the origin of the motor branch for the LTB in Group III. For Group I: injury to the axillary nerve was situated 10 mm (mean) from the bifurcation of the secondary posterior trunk in 6 cases and at the bifurcation in 3. Type IV injury was identified in 4 cases and type V in 5. For Group II: the motor branch for the LTB arose 6 mm (mean) from the bifurcation of the secondary posterior branch in 13 cases, at the bifurcation in 5, and 10 mm proximally in 2, but never from the radial nerve. For Group III: the motor branch for the LTB arose 4.5 mm (mean) from the bifurcation of the secondary posterior trunk in 11 cases, at the bifurcation in 4, and never from the radial nerve. Observed injuries to the axillary nerve with an associated paralysis of the long head of the triceps brachii were located proximally and were severe. Our dissections always located the motor branch of the LTB arising from the axillary nerve or the secondary posterior branch. We thus deducted that associated LTB paralysis is a sign of poor prognosis. In patients with axillary nerve injury it is a

  8. Testing framework for compression methods

    OpenAIRE

    Štoček, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    There are many algorithms for data compression. These compression methods often achieve different compression rate and also use computer resources differently. In practice a combination of compression is usually used instead of standalone compression methods. The software tool can be evolved, where we can easily combine existing compression methods to new one and test it consequently. Main goal of this work is to propound such tool and implement it. Further goal is to implement basic library ...

  9. RESULTS OF COMPRESSION TESTING ON PSEUDO-COHESIVE SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofrikhter Vadim Grigor’evich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural non-treated sand reinforced with randomly oriented short polypropylene fibers of 12 mm in length was tested to determine creep characteristics. This study is a part of the research aimed at encouraging fibrosand (FRS application in subsoils, embankments and retaining wall constructions. Fiber content was accounted for 0.93 %. Twin specimens were put to creep tests (1-D compression using the two curve method. The test results were analyzed and checked with the use of ageing, hardening and hereditary creep theories. On the basis of approximation of the test results the creep deformation equation at constant stress for tested fibrosand was obtained. The assessment of fibrosand secondary compression was carried out by the FORE method. As a result, the value of the void ratio by the end of the secondary compression had been eu=0.7041. For determination of the beginning of the secondary compression the rate equation was superimposed on the empirical curve. The point of the graph divergence is the beginning of the secondary compression process. The secondary compression had begun by the time moment being equal to 9360 min. The void ratio by the beginning of the secondary compression had amounted to 0.70574. Fibrosand is a specific type of improved soil relating to so-called pseudo-cohesive soil. This type of soil is characterized by cohesion like cohesive soils, but, at the same time, by the filtration coefficient of about 1 m per day like non-cohesive soils. Pseudo-cohesive soil testing helps to understand the distinctive features of the stress-strain state of this kind of materials. Municipal solid waste also relates to them.

  10. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  11. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V

    2016-12-14

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  12. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sullivan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  13. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb – excluding carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-trau‑ matic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assess‑ ment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology – both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrap‑ ment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tun‑ nel syndrome, Guyon’s canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg’s disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonog‑ raphy 2012; 12 (49: 120–163 – Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the exam‑ ple of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles. The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established – echogenicity and

  14. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  15. Compressed air injection technique to standardize block injection pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ban C H; Li, Lisa X Y; Pillay, Jennifer J

    2006-11-01

    Presently, no standardized technique exists to monitor injection pressures during peripheral nerve blocks. Our objective was to determine if a compressed air injection technique, using an in vitro model based on Boyle's law and typical regional anesthesia equipment, could consistently maintain injection pressures below a 1293 mmHg level associated with clinically significant nerve injury. Injection pressures for 20 and 30 mL syringes with various needle sizes (18G, 20G, 21G, 22G, and 24G) were measured in a closed system. A set volume of air was aspirated into a saline-filled syringe and then compressed and maintained at various percentages while pressure was measured. The needle was inserted into the injection port of a pressure sensor, which had attached extension tubing with an injection plug clamped "off". Using linear regression with all data points, the pressure value and 99% confidence interval (CI) at 50% air compression was estimated. The linearity of Boyle's law was demonstrated with a high correlation, r = 0.99, and a slope of 0.984 (99% CI: 0.967-1.001). The net pressure generated at 50% compression was estimated as 744.8 mmHg, with the 99% CI between 729.6 and 760.0 mmHg. The various syringe/needle combinations had similar results. By creating and maintaining syringe air compression at 50% or less, injection pressures will be substantially below the 1293 mmHg threshold considered to be an associated risk factor for clinically significant nerve injury. This technique may allow simple, real-time and objective monitoring during local anesthetic injections while inherently reducing injection speed.

  16. Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Arteries Juxtaposed with the Internal Acoustic Meatus and Their Relationship to the Cranial Nerve VII/VIII Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Fernando; Kassem, Mohammad W; Iwanaga, Joe; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Demerdash, Amin; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-08-16

    Vascular loops in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and their relationship to cranial nerves have been used to explain neurological symptoms. The anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) has variable branches producing vascular loops that can compress the facial cranial nerve (CN) VII and vestibulocochlear (CN VIII) nerves. AICA compression of the facial-vestibulocochlear nerve complex can lead to various clinical presentations, including hemifacial spasm (HFS), tinnitus, and hemiataxia. The formation of arterial loops inside or outside of the internal auditory meatus (IAM) can cause abutment or compression of CN VII and CN VIII. Twenty-five (50 sides) fresh adult cadavers underwent dissection of the cerebellopontine angle in the supine position. In regard to relationships between the AICA and the nerves of the facial/vestibulocochlear complex, 33 arteries (66%) traveled in a plane between the facial/nervus intermedius nerves and the cochlear and vestibular nerves. Five arteries (10%) traveled below the CN VII/VIII complex, six (12%) traveled posterior to the nerve complex, four (8%) formed a semi-circle around the upper half of the nerve complex, and two (4%) traveled between and partially separated the nervus intermedius and facial nerve proper. Our study found that the majority of AICA will travel in a plane between the facial/nervus intermedius nerves and the cochlear and vestibular nerves. Although the relationship between the AICA and porus acusticus and AICA and the nerves of the CN VII/VIII complex are variable, based on our findings, some themes exist. Surgeons should consider these with approaches to the cerebellopontine angle.

  17. Nerve cross-bridging to enhance nerve regeneration in a rat model of delayed nerve repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    Full Text Available There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1 CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2 CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE, respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays.

  18. Compressive creep of silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.R.M. da; Melo, F.C.L. de; Cairo, C.A.; Piorino Neto, F.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon nitride samples were formed by pressureless sintering process, using neodymium oxide and a mixture of neodymium oxide and yttrio oxide as sintering aids. The short term compressive creep behaviour was evaluated over a stress range of 50-300 MPa and temperature range 1200 - 1350 0 C. Post-sintering heat treatments in nitrogen with a stepwise decremental variation of temperature were performed in some samples and microstructural analysis by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy showed that the secondary crystalline phase which form from the remnant glass are dependent upon composition and percentage of aditives. Stress exponent values near to unity were obtained for materials with low glass content suggesting grain boundary diffusion accommodation processes. Cavitation will thereby become prevalent with increase in stress, temperature and decrease in the degree of crystallization of the grain boundary phase. (author) [pt

  19. After microvascular decompression to treat trigeminal neuralgia, both immediate pain relief and recurrence rates are higher in patients with arterial compression than with venous compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Gu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Guan; Guo, Jun; Lin, Xin; Zhang, Shuguang; Qian, Chunfa

    2017-07-04

    We explored differences in postoperative pain relief achieved through decompression of the trigeminal nerve compressed by arteries and veins. Clinical characteristics, intraoperative findings, and postoperative curative effects were analyzed in 72 patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by microvascular decompression. The patients were divided into arterial and venous compression groups based on intraoperative findings. Surgical curative effects included immediate relief, delayed relief, obvious reduction, and invalid result. Among the 40 patients in the arterial compression group, 32 had immediate pain relief of pain (80.0%), 5 cases had delayed relief (12.5%), and 3 cases had an obvious reduction (7.5%). In the venous compression group, 12 patients had immediate relief of pain (37.5%), 13 cases had delayed relief (40.6%), and 7 cases had an obvious reduction (21.9%). During 2-year follow-up period, 6 patients in the arterial compression group experienced recurrence of trigeminal neuralgia, but there were no recurrences in the venous compression group. Simple artery compression was followed by early relief of trigeminal neuralgia more often than simple venous compression. However, the trigeminal neuralgia recurrence rate was higher in the artery compression group than in the venous compression group.

  20. Common peroneal nerve entrapment with the communication ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sciatic nerve divides into tibial nerve and common peroneal nerve at the level of superior angle of popliteal fossa and variations in its branching pattern are common. The most common nerve entrapment syndrome in the lower limbs is common peroneal nerve entrapment at fibular head. Invariably it can also be trapped in ...

  1. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  2. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  3. Biaxial compression test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Fixture and technique have been developed for predicting behavior of stiffened skin panels under biaxial compressive loading. Tester can load test panel independently in longitudinal and transverse directions. Data can also be obtained in combined mode.

  4. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  5. Aplasia of the optic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel C W; Man, Eric M W; Cheng, Sunny C S

    2015-08-01

    Aplasia of the optic nerve is an extraordinarily rare congenital anomaly that affects one or both optic nerves and is associated with the absence of the central retinal vessel and retinal ganglion cells. We report a case of unilateral optic nerve aplasia in a 4-month-old infant who was found to have left microphthalmos on routine postnatal checkup. Family history, antenatal history, and systemic evaluation were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging showed absent left optic nerve with left microphthalmos. The optic chiasm was present and slightly deviated towards the right side. The remaining cerebral and ocular structures were normal.

  6. Variant palmaris profundus enclosed by an unusual loop of the median nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHOU, HSIU-CHU; JENG, HELLEN; KO, TSUI-LING; PAI, MAN-HUI; CHANG, CHIU-YUN; WU, CHING-HSIANG

    2001-01-01

    According to the usual description in most anatomy texts, the median nerve in the forearm passes between the 2 heads of pronator teres. It continues distally between flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus almost to the retinaculum. Muscular branches leave the nerve near the elbow and supply all superficial muscles of the anterior part of the forearm except flexor carpi ulnaris. Many variations of the median nerve in the forearm have been reported (Urban & Krosman, 1992). The palmaris profundus is also a rare anomaly of the forearm (Dyreby & Engber, 1982). It originates from the radial side of the common flexor tendon in the proximal forearm and inserts into the undersurface of the palmar aponeurosis. The origin of palmaris profundus may be close to the median nerve and its branches, and may be involved in compressive neuropathy of the anterior interosseous nerve. Its tendon crossing through the carpal canal has been implicated in the carpal tunnel syndrome (reviewed by Lahey & Aulicino, 1986). In some cases, palmaris profundus was found enclosed in a common fascial sheath with the median nerve (Stark, 1992; Sahinoglu et al. 1994). To indicate its close association with the median nerve, the palmaris profundus was also named ‘musculus comitans nervi mediani’ (Sahinoglu et al. 1994). This article reports an unusual loop of the median nerve encircling an anomalous palmaris profundus in the forearm, which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been previously described. PMID:11693311

  7. Localized hypertrophic neuropathy of the sciatic nerve in children: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, Adrien; Treguier, Catherine; Bruneau, Bertrand; Marin, Franck; Gandon, Yves; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Riffaud, Laurent; Violas, Philippe; Michel, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Localized hypertrophic neuropathy (LHN) of the sciatic nerve in children is a rare condition characterized by a painless neurological deficit in the sciatic nerve territory. To demonstrate the role of MRI using a specific protocol and describe the primary findings in LHN. Imaging in four children (age 2 years to 12 years) is presented. All children presented with lower limb asymmetry. Three had a steppage gait. LHN was confirmed by electrophysiological studies and by MRI of the whole sciatic nerve with a dedicated protocol covering the lumbar spine and the lower limb. There were four direct MRI findings: (1) linear and focal hypertrophy with progressive enlargement of a peripheral nerve or plexus diameter, (2) abnormal hyperintensity of the nerve on T2-weighted images, (3) preserved fascicular configuration, and (4) variable enhancement after intravenous gadolinium administration. In addition there were atrophy and fatty infiltration of innervated muscles. MRI was helpful for determining the extent of lesions and in excluding peripheral nerve compression or tumour. MRI of the whole sciatic nerve is the method of choice for diagnosing LHN of the sciatic nerve. (orig.)

  8. Localized hypertrophic neuropathy of the sciatic nerve in children: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, Adrien; Treguier, Catherine; Bruneau, Bertrand; Marin, Franck; Gandon, Yves; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hopital Sud, 16 Boulevard de Bulgarie, BP 90347, Rennes cedex 2 (France); Riffaud, Laurent [University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France); Violas, Philippe [University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France); Michel, Anne [University Hospital, Department of Neurological Functional Explorations, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France)

    2012-08-15

    Localized hypertrophic neuropathy (LHN) of the sciatic nerve in children is a rare condition characterized by a painless neurological deficit in the sciatic nerve territory. To demonstrate the role of MRI using a specific protocol and describe the primary findings in LHN. Imaging in four children (age 2 years to 12 years) is presented. All children presented with lower limb asymmetry. Three had a steppage gait. LHN was confirmed by electrophysiological studies and by MRI of the whole sciatic nerve with a dedicated protocol covering the lumbar spine and the lower limb. There were four direct MRI findings: (1) linear and focal hypertrophy with progressive enlargement of a peripheral nerve or plexus diameter, (2) abnormal hyperintensity of the nerve on T2-weighted images, (3) preserved fascicular configuration, and (4) variable enhancement after intravenous gadolinium administration. In addition there were atrophy and fatty infiltration of innervated muscles. MRI was helpful for determining the extent of lesions and in excluding peripheral nerve compression or tumour. MRI of the whole sciatic nerve is the method of choice for diagnosing LHN of the sciatic nerve. (orig.)

  9. Treatment and Follow Up Outcomes of Patients with Peroneal Nerve Injury: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Dagistan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Trap neuropathy is characterized by compression of the peripheral nerve into fibro osseous channels in trespassing areas of body segments. Peroneal nerve is the most frequently injured nerve in traumatic injuries of the lower extremities. In the present study, we investigated functional results of surgical treatment of patients with peroneal nerve injury who delayed visiting our clinics after the damage; we also aimed to observe the effects of this delay on prognosis. We interpreted postoperative results of the patients with EMG and physical examination findings. Material and Method: Subjects with peroneal nerve damage who visited our clinics between 2012 and 2015 were included in the present study. EMG and muscle motor strength tests were conducted pre and postoperatively for clinical assessment. Results: Of the 16 patients in the study population, 7 were men and 9 were women. The median age of the subjects was 49.6 years (14-77 years. Admission time was 9 months after injury. Causes of the peroneal nerve damage were as follows: prosthesis surgery in 4 (25%, ankle damage in 2 (12.5%, excessive squatting by agriculture workers in 4 (25%, aggressive exercise in 2 (12.5%, bone fracture in 2 (12.5%, and unknown origin in 2 (12.5%. Discussion: Peroneal nerve injury usually occurs by compression of the nerve at the head or neck of the fibula. Results of decompression surgery are usually compromising in non-traumatic nerve palsies. Period of duration between injury and diagnosis and muscular atrophy are main factors associated with success of treatment.

  10. Deterministic Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    programs. Examples of such algorithms are the interior point methods [51, 52], Lasso modification to LARS [106, 171], homotopy methods [99], weighted...component analysis . IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(2):40–42, 2002. [171] S. J. Kim, K. Koh, M. Lustig, S. Boyd, and D. Gorinevsky. A method for...53 7.3 Analysis of the GAME Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 III Expander-Based Compressed Sensing 61 8 Efficient Compressed

  11. Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Gleichman, Sivan; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying compressed sensing is that a signal, which is sparse under some basis representation, can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. However, prior knowledge of the sparsity basis is essential for the recovery process. This work introduces the concept of blind compressed sensing, which avoids the need to know the sparsity basis in both the sampling and the recovery process. We suggest three possible constraints on the sparsity basis that can ...

  12. Accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve transfer to restore shoulder exorotation in otherwise spontaneously recovered obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Uitdehaag, Bernard M J; Strijers, Rob L M; Frans, Nollet; Holl, Kurt; Fellner, Franz A; Vandertop, W Peter

    2006-10-01

    A systematic follow-up of infants with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion of C5 and C6 or the superior trunk showing satisfactory spontaneous recovery of shoulder and arm function except for voluntary shoulder exorotation, who underwent an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer to improve active shoulder exorotation, to evaluate for functional recovery, and to understand why other superior trunk functions spontaneously recover in contrast with exorotation. In 54 children, an accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer was performed as a separate procedure at a mean age of 21.7 months. Follow-up examinations were conducted before and at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 36 months after operation and included scoring of shoulder exorotation and abduction. Intraoperative reactivity of spinatus muscles and additional needle electromyographic responses were registered after electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves. Histological examination of suprascapular nerves was performed. Trophy of spinatus muscles was followed by magnetic resonance imaging scanning. The influence of perinatal variables and results of ancillary investigations on outcome were evaluated. Exorotation improved from 70 degrees to functional levels exceeding 0 degrees, except in two patients. Abduction improved in 27 patients, with results of 90 degrees or more in 49 patients. Electromyography at 4 months did not show signs of denervation in 39 out of 40 patients. Intraoperative electrostimulation of suprascapular nerves elicited spinatus muscle reaction in 44 out of 48 patients. Histology of suprascapular nerves was normal. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans showed only minor wasting of spinatus muscles in contrast with major wasting after successful operations. An accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer is effective to restore active exorotation when performed as the primary or a separate secondary procedure in children older than 10 months of age. Contradictory spontaneous recovery of other superior

  13. An unusual ulnar nerve-median nerve communicating branch.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoogbergen, M M; Kauer, J M

    1992-01-01

    Branching of the ulnar nerve distal to the origin of the dorsal cutaneous branch was investigated in 25 hands in one of which an anatomical variation was observed. This finding may be of importance in the evaluation of certain entrapment phenomena of the ulnar nerve or unexplained sensory loss after trauma or surgical intervention in that particular area.

  14. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  15. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  16. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    The most common neurological defect in traumatic anterior glenohumeral dislocation is isolated axillary nerve palsy. Most recover spontaneously; however, some have persistent axillary neuropathy. An intact rotator cuff may compensate for an isolated axillary nerve injury; however, given the high rate of rotator cuff pathology with advancing age, patients with an axillary nerve injury are at risk for complete shoulder disability. To review reconstruction of the axillary nerve to alleviate shoulder pain, augment shoulder stability, abduction and external rotation to alleviate sole reliance on the rotator cuff to move and stabilize the shoulder. A retrospective review of 10 patients with an isolated axillary nerve injury and an intact rotator cuff who underwent a triceps nerve branch to axillary nerve transfer was performed. Patient demographics, surgical technique, deltoid strength, donor-site morbidity, complications and time to surgery were evaluated. Ten male patients, mean age 38.3 years (range 18 to 66 years), underwent a triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary nerve injury 7.4 months (range five to 12 months) post-traumatic shoulder dislocation. Deltoid function was British Medical Research Council grade 0/5 in all patients preoperatively and ≥3/5 deltoid strength in eight patients at final follow-up (14.8 months [range 12 to 25 months]). There were no complications and no donor-site morbidity. A triceps to axillary nerve transfer for isolated axillary neuropathy following traumatic shoulder dislocation improved shoulder pain, stability and deltoid strength, and potentially preserves shoulder function with advancing age by alleviating sole reliance on the rotator cuff for shoulder abduction and external rotation.

  17. The Surgical Management of Facial Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Rovak, Jason M.; Tung, Thomas H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    The surgical management of facial nerve injuries is dependent upon a thorough understanding of facial nerve anatomy, nerve physiology, and microsurgical techniques. When possible, primary neurorrhaphy is the “gold standard” repair technique. Injuries resulting in long nerve gaps or a significant delay between the time of injury and repair requires alterative techniques, such as nerve grafts, nerve transfers, regional muscle transfers, free tissue transfers, and static procedures. Scrupulous t...

  18. Neuromas of the calcaneal nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Dellon, A L

    2001-11-01

    A neuroma of a calcaneal nerve has never been reported. A series of 15 patients with heel pain due to a neuroma of a calcaneal nerve are reviewed. These patients previously had either a plantar fasciotomy (n = 4), calcaneal spur removal (n = 2), ankle fusion (n = 2), or tarsal tunnel decompression (n = 7). Neuromas occurred on calcaneal branches that arose from either the posterior tibial nerve (n = 1), lateral plantar nerve (n = 1), the medial plantar nerve (n = 9), or more than one of these nerves (n = 4). Operative approach was through an extended tarsal tunnel incision to permit identification of all calcaneal nerves. The neuroma was resected and implanted into the flexor hallucis longus muscle. Excellent relief of pain occurred in 60%, and good relief in 33%. One patient (17%) had no improvement and required resection of the lateral plantar nerve. Awareness that the heel may be innervated by multiple calcaneal branches suggests that surgery for heel pain of neural origin employ a surgical approach that permits identification of all possible calcaneal branches.

  19. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  20. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  2. Right hypoglossal nerve paralysis after tracheal intubation for aesthetic breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Al-Benna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic and functional complications caused by general anesthesia have been rarely described after aesthetic surgery. We report a case of unilateral right hypoglossal nerve paralysis following the use of a cuffed endotracheal airway in a 24-year-old woman undergoing aesthetic breast surgery. Neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the head failed to provide additional insights into the cause of the nerve injury. Postoperatively, the patient was carefully monitored and made a full recovery within 2 weeks without any pharmacological treatment. The transient hypoglossal nerve paralysis seemed to be due to neuropraxia. In this patient, we postulate that the right hypoglossal nerve was compressed between the endotracheal tube cuff and the hyoid bone, which was inflated with 30 cm H 2 O. Patients undergoing aesthetic surgery must be appropriately and adequately informed that postoperative aesthetic and functional deficits can occur due to anesthesia as well as the surgery.

  3. The Relation Between Rotation Deformity and Nerve Root Stress in Lumbar Scoliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Lee, Hwan-Mo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Chun, Heoung-Jae; Kang, Kyoung-Tak

    Even though several finite element models of lumbar spine were introduced, there has been no model including the neural structure. Therefore, the authors made the novel lumbar spine finite element model including neural structure. Using this model, we investigated the relation between the deformity pattern and nerve root stress. Two lumbar models with different types of curve pattern (lateral bending and lateral bending with rotation curve) were made. In the model of lateral bending curves without rotation, the principal compressive nerve root stress on the concave side was greater than the principal tensile stress on the convex side at the apex vertebra. Contrarily, in the lateral bending curve with rotational deformity, the nerve stress on the convex side was higher than that on the concave side. Therefore, this study elicit that deformity pattern could have significantly influence on the nerve root stress in the lumbar spine.

  4. A rare case of intraneural ganglion cyst involving the tibial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Purvak; Schucany, William G

    2012-04-01

    Cystic lesions around the knee are a relatively common occurrence. Several types of cysts have been reported, including synovial, bursal, and ganglion. Ganglion cysts are not lined by synovial cells. Their location is highly variable, with occurrences described in the fat pads near the tibia or femur, muscles, nerves, and arteries. Intraneural ganglia are rare nonneoplastic cysts caused by the accumulation of thick mucinous fluid within the epineurium of peripheral nerves, encased in a dense fibrous capsule. These cysts can cause compression of the adjacent nerve fascicles, resulting in pain, paresthesias, weakness, muscle denervation, and atrophy. They are most commonly manifested by local and radiating pain, but sensory and motor deficits have also been described. Involvement of the tibial nerve is exceptionally rare, with ganglion cyst in a young woman. We also discuss the imaging features, differential considerations, proposed pathogenesis and anatomic origin, and treatment of this rare entity.

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekçi, Hakan; Kaptan, Hülagu

    2017-06-15

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an approach mainly used in cases of intractable epilepsy despite all the efforts. Also, its benefits have been shown in severe cases of depression resistant to typical treatment. The aim of this study was to present current knowledge of vagus nerve stimulation. A new value has emerged just at this stage: VNS aiming the ideal treatment with new hopes. It is based on the placement of a programmable generator on the chest wall. Electric signals from the generator are transmitted to the left vagus nerve through the connection cable. Control on the cerebral bioelectrical activity can be achieved by way of these signal sent from there in an effort for controlling the epileptic discharges. The rate of satisfactory and permanent treatment in epilepsy with monotherapy is around 50%. This rate will increase by one-quarters (25%) with polytherapy. However, there is a patient group roughly constituting one-thirds of this population, and this group remains unresponsive or refractory to all the therapies and combined regimes. The more the number of drugs used, the more chaos and side effects are observed. The anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) used will have side effects on both the brain and the systemic organs. Cerebral resection surgery can be required in some patients. The most commonly encountered epilepsy type is the partial one, and the possibility of benefiting from invasive procedures is limited in most patients of this type. Selective amygdala-hippocampus surgery is a rising value in complex partial seizures. Therefore, as epilepsy surgery can be performed in very limited numbers and rather developed centres, success can also be achieved in limited numbers of patients. The common ground for all the surgical procedures is the target of preservation of memory, learning, speaking, temper and executive functions as well as obtaining a good control on seizures. However, the action mechanism of VNS is still not exactly known. On the other hand

  6. Hypoglossal nerve paralysis in a child after a dental procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Simona D; Schiavone, Laura; La Mendola, Flavia M C; Timpanaro, Tiziana; Cucuzza, Maria Elena; Greco, Filippo; Smilari, Pierluigi; Fiumara, Agata; Praticò, Andrea Domenico

    2018-02-06

    Unilateral palsy of the hypoglossal nerve is a rare complication of orthodontic procedures. The main reported causes of HNP are: orthopedic and otorhinolaryngology surgical interventions, and in particular maneuvers involving compression or overstretching of the hypoglossal nerve, dental procedures and traumas, and also infections, motoneuron disorders, tumors, vascular diseases. Diagnosis is usually performed by electrophysiology studies (EMG-VCN), and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to exclude other causes. The prognosis depends on the location and extension of the damage. Currently there is not a standardized treatment approach except the speech therapy, although, in some cases, the high-dose steroid treatment could be useful. We describe the case of a ten-year-old female, who was admitted in our Unit after a deviation of the tongue associated with dysarthria and dysphagia, occurred after the application of a mobile orthodontic device. Copyright © 2018 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  7. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  8. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  9. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, C; Druschky, K F; Sturm, U; Neundörfer, B; Fahlbusch, R

    1988-09-02

    Nineteen patients with isolated suprascapular entrapment neuropathy were seen between 1980 and 1986. A neurogenic cause and absence of other deficits were confirmed by electromyography. Electroneurographic tests were performed in 13 and demonstrated delayed conduction time and (or) reduction in stimulus response amplitude. In 16 patients there was an acute or chronic mechanical cause (direct pressure on the suprascapular nerve, forced dislocation of the shoulder blade). Two types of paralysis could be distinguished, an upper one affecting both the infra- and the supraspinatus muscles (12 patients), and a lower one involving only the infraspinatus muscle (4 patients). In two patients an inflammatory cause was considered likely, while in one the cause remained unclear. Restricting movement brought about an improvement in most patients, while in one the neurophysiological parameters improved after neurosurgical intervention, without complete clinical restoration.

  10. Prognosis for sixth nerve palsy arising from paranasal sinus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig; Suh, Jeffrey D; Henriquez, Oswaldo A; Schlosser, Rodney J; Ramakrishnan, Vijay R; Chiu, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    The abducens nerve, cranial nerve VI (CNVI), is the medial-most nerve in the cavernous sinus. Its close proximity to the sphenoid sinus makes it susceptible to injury, invasion, or compression from a sphenoid pathology leading to horizontal gaze diplopia. A wide range of literature describes myriad causes for CNVI palsy, but there is a lack of references that point to paranasal sinus pathology as an etiology, as well as the prognosis and timeline for resolution. Here, we describe a series of patients that presented with CNVI palsy, their management, and prognosis for recovery. This study was designed to evaluate and understand prognostic factors predicting disease course and likelihood of resolution in patients with abducens nerve palsy. A multi-institutional retrospective review was performed of all patients presenting with CNVI palsy between 2009 and 2012. The demographic data, radiological features, treatment regimens, and disease courses were analyzed. Fifteen patients at four institutions were identified. Seven patients had neoplasms originating from the paranasal sinuses, three suffered from allergic fungal sinusitis, three patients had invasive fungal sinusitis, one patient had fibrous skull base dysplasia, and one had chronic bacterial sinusitis. The average follow-up time from presentation was 9 months (range, 1-16 months). Thirteen patients underwent surgery, three received chemotherapy, and four had radiation therapy. CNVI palsy resolved in 50% of the cases, with an average time to resolution of 6 weeks (range, 2-12 weeks). Paranasal sinus pathology is a rare cause of CNVI palsy. A number of factors may help to predict prognosis in these patients. Masses compressing, but not destroying or invading, the cavernous sinus had optimal posttreatment outcomes with full resolution occurring as early as 2 weeks. Destructive lesions that invaded CNVI and its vasculature, i.e., invasive fungus, were negative indicators for recovery. Knowledge of factors that affect

  11. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  12. Image data compression investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  13. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  14. Relief of upper airway obstruction with hypoglossal nerve stimulation in the canine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goding, G S; Eisele, D W; Testerman, R; Smith, P L; Roertgen, K; Schwartz, A R

    1998-02-01

    Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was investigated as a method to relieve an induced upper airway obstruction. Six dogs were implanted with a cuff electrode applied to each hypoglossal nerve and a pulse generator. After 4 weeks, the hypoglossal nerve was stimulated (50% duty cycle) for up to 8 weeks. At 12 weeks a double tracheotomy was placed, with a negative pressure intermittently applied to the upper limb, simulating inspiratory airway pressure. Unilateral hypoglossal nerve stimulation improved peak upper airway flow from an average of 0.1 L/s to 1.6 L/s (P = 0.0001). Seventy-seven percent of the maximum possible flow (explanted tracheotomy tube) was obtained with unilateral stimulation. Histopathological evaluation revealed no nerve damage secondary to chronic stimulation. This study provides support for clinical trials of hypoglossal stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Functional assessment of sciatic nerve reconstruction : Biodegradable poly (DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Dijkstra, [No Value; Den Dunnen, WFA; Ijkema-Paassen, J; Schakenraad, JM; Gramsbergen, A; Robinson, PH

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare functional nerve recovery after reconstruction with a biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guide filled with modified denatured muscle tissue (MDMT), or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve recovery using walking track analysis (measurement of the

  16. Absent menstrual periods - secondary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenorrhea - secondary; No periods - secondary; Absent periods - secondary; Absent menses - secondary; Absence of periods - secondary ... Secondary amenorrhea can occur due to natural changes in the body. For example, the most common cause of secondary ...

  17. [Development of peripheral nerve surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sames, M

    1998-03-01

    In the submitted review the author deals with the development of peripheral nerve surgery (PN) from ancient times to the present time incl. hithero unpublished details. He analyses in great detail the period of the last 40 years which is divided into three stages--the mechanical, biological period and the period of neurotrophism. From the Second World War to the sixties the period bears the term mechanical. The results of reinnervation during this period were not satisfactory as the nerves were connected without the use of a microscope, in major defects they were connected under considerable traction and the only criterion was the resistance against dehiscence. Significant improvement of results of regeneration of PN was recorded during the biological period. Mechanical ideas were overcome and biological and physiological reactions of the peripheral nerves were taken into account. Suture of nerves under traction was refuted and into clinical practice the surgical microscope, microsurgical technique and microsurgical autotransplantation with a nervous graft were introduced. The anatomical structure of the nerve with a plexiform pattern of the fascicles became however the limitation of surgical methods. After discovery of NGF (nerve growth factor) we can speak of the onset of a new period, neurotrophism. In laboratory experiments many substances are studied and theoretically new non-surgical possibilities how to promote regeneration lie ahead. However they cannot be applied yet in clinical practice. In injuries of peripheral nerves the only correct reconstruction method is still microsuture of the nerve and in case of losses microsurgical autotransplantation using a nerve graft.

  18. The role of ultrasound imaging in the evaluation of peripheral nerve in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto, E-mail: atagliafico@sirm.org [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Panico, Nicoletta [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Resmini, Eugenia [Department of Endocrinological and Medical Sciences (DiSEM), Center of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Derchi, Lorenzo E. [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Ghio, Massimo [Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Genova (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    Background: Patients affected by scleroderma may complain of sensory disturbances especially in the hands. Purpose: To study the imaging features of upper limb nerves in patients affected by scleroderma (SSc). Materials and method: Twenty-five patients affected only by SSc were prospectively evaluated with high-resolution US and magnetic resonance (MRI) or computer tomography (CT) when necessary (2 patients). Median and ulnar nerves were evaluated bilaterally. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the symptomatic patients (n = 10). Results of imaging studies were correlated with disease duration, autoimmunity and immunosuppression. Nerves of SSc patients were compared with a control group of 90 patients matched for age and body mass index. Results: The prevalence of sensory disturbances revealed by clinical examination was 40%. In symptomatic SSc patients (n = 10) US evaluation revealed nerve abnormalities in 70% of cases (n = 7/10). n = 2 had a carpal tunnel syndrome. n = 5 had cubital tunnel syndrome. In two of them CT and MR were necessary to identify the compressed nerve at the level of the elbow due to the presence of calcifications. There was no association between the presence of an entrapment neuropathy and disease duration, autoantibodies and immunosuppression. Conclusion: Ultrasound, CT and MR may detect nerve abnormalities in 70% of SSc patients complaining of neurologic disturbances in the hands. The results of imaging studies support the hypothesis of a vascular dependent neuropathy in SSc.

  19. Study of Variations in the Branching Pattern of Lower Subscapular Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havaldar, Pavan Prahlad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Variations in the origin of lower subscapular nerve of the posterior cord of brachial plexus are important during surgical approaches to the axilla and upper arm, administration of anesthetic blocks, interpreting effects of nervous compressions and in repair of plexus injuries. The patterns of origin show population differences. Data from the South Indian population is scarce. Objective: To describe the variations in the origin of the lower subscapular nerve of the posterior cord of brachial plexus in the South Indian population. Materials and Methods: Forty brachial plexuses from 20 formalin fixed cadavers were explored by gross dissection. Origin and order of branching of lower subscapular nerve was recorded. Representative photographs were then taken using a digital camera (Sony Cyber shot R, W200, 7.2 Megapixels). Results: Lower subscapular nerves had origin from axillary nerve in 57.5% of specimens, in 37.5% specimens, it was originating from the posterior cord and in 5% of specimens it arose from common trunk. Conclusion: Lower subscapular nerves in studied population display a wide range of variations. Anesthesiologists administering local anesthetic blocks, clinicians interpreting effects of nerve injuries of the upper limb and surgeons operating in the axilla should be aware of these patterns to avoid in advertent injury. PMID:25584202

  20. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernandez, Maria G. H.; Jasso, Jose L. C.; Lira, Maricela O. F.; Flores, Mariana A.; Balderrama, Vicente L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p 000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  1. Post-evaluation of the neurophaties treatment post-trauma with therapeutic laser. Model in sciatic nerve of frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Antonio S.; Ocampo, Arcelia F. M.; Hernández, María G. H.; Jasso, José L. C.; Lira, Maricela O. F.; Flores, Mariana A.; Balderrama, Vicente L.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compound nerve action potential amplitude and latency measured to determine the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated in a model of stimulated frog sciatic nerve laser at 810 nm as perioperative treatment after injury. It used 30 bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) to obtain 60 sciatic nerves forming four groups, groups 1 and 2 worked with nerves in vitro, were dissected in humid chambers for placing isolated organ, was recorded on compound nerve action potential, the second group laser was applied at 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 hours and at the same time were placed in 10% formalin. Groups 3 and 4 are worked in vivo localizing the nerve and causing damage through compression, occurred over the compound nerve action potential to assess the degree of myelination and the number of fibers stimulated, the group 4 was applied to 810 nm laser (500 Hz, 10 J, 200 mW) after injury, after 48 hours, three frogs were sacrificed by introducing the nerves in 10% formalin. The latency recorded by stimulating the sciatic nerve of frog to 0.5 mA and 100 ms in groups 1 and 2 show significant differences (p000), as to the extent, if any statistically significant difference. (p<0.001 and p<0.000). The laser produces a favorable response in the treatment of paresthesia (post-traumatic neuropathy).

  2. Outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, M; Al-Shawi, A; Gschwind, C R; Warwick, D J; Tonkin, M A

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates the outcome of axillary nerve injuries treated with nerve grafting. Thirty-six patients were retrospectively reviewed after a mean of 53 months (minimum 12 months). The mean interval from injury to surgery was 6.5 months. Recovery of deltoid function was assessed by the power of both abduction and retropulsion, the deltoid bulk and extension lag. The deltoid bulk was almost symmetrical in nine of 34 cases, good in 22 and wasted in three. Grade M4 or M5* was achieved in 30 of 35 for abduction and in 32 of 35 for retropulsion. There was an extension lag in four patients. Deltoid bulk continued to improve with a longer follow-up following surgery. Nerve grafting to the axillary nerve is a reliable method of regaining deltoid function when the lesion is distal to its origin from the posterior cord.

  3. Central Mandibular Nerve Sheath Myxoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Ghazi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nerve sheath myxoma has been described as a rare neural tumor arising from Schwann cells. It is observed most frequently in the central area of the face, neck and upper extremities. In the past the term neurothekeoma was used as synonym for nerve sheath myxoma but according to new reports, they are separate entities which can be confirmed by immunohistochemistry as in our case. Oral involvement of this tumor is extremely rare. Here, we present an unusual case of nerve sheath myxoma in the mandible of a 22-year old female patient. This case appears to be the first myxomatous variant which is centrally located in the mandible.

  4. Adductor canal block versus femoral nerve block for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaeger, Pia; Zaric, Dusanka; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm

    2013-01-01

    Femoral nerve block (FNB), a commonly used postoperative pain treatment after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), reduces quadriceps muscle strength essential for mobilization. In contrast, adductor canal block (ACB) is predominately a sensory nerve block. We hypothesized that ACB preserves quadriceps...... muscle strength as compared with FNB (primary end point) in patients after TKA. Secondary end points were effects on morphine consumption, pain, adductor muscle strength, morphine-related complications, and mobilization ability....

  5. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  6. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate

  7. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  8. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  9. Multiple snapshot compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbrauker, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    For sound fields observed on an array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the multiple source signals at unknown directions-of-arrival (DOAs) using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem expressing the field at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition...

  10. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the compression of infrared images with three codecs: JPEG2000, JPEG-XT and HEVC. Results are evaluated in terms of SNR, Mean Relative Squared Error (MRSE) and the HDR-VDP2 quality metric. JPEG2000 and HEVC perform fairy similar and better than JPEG-XT. JPEG2000 performs...

  11. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  12. Nerve damage associated with inferior alveolar nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrel, M A; Bryan, J; Regezi, J

    1995-08-01

    The authors reviewed 12 cases in which altered sensation occurred in the distribution of the inferior alveolar or lingual nerves following injection of a local anesthetic for restorative treatment only. Most patients suffered only partial damage, but recovery was poor. The exact mechanism of the nerve damage is unknown, but a number of theories are proposed. The extent of this problem is also unknown, but many more cases probably exist than have been reported to date.

  13. Nerve Transfers for Treatment of Isolated Axillary Nerve Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Wheelock, Margie; Clark, Tod A; Giuffre, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Almost one-half of all dislocations involve the shoulder and may also involve the axillary nerves, which may influence functional recovery and result in persistent shoulder neuropathy. Although individuals with intact rotator cuffs may be able to compensate for axillary nerve dysfunction, the injury may become problematic in later years, especially given the increasing incidence of rotator cuff tears in aging populations, thus placing increased importance on the immediate success of acute man...

  14. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.H.J. van Veen (Natasja); P.G. Nicholls (Peter); W.C.S. Smith (Cairns); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy.

  15. Ultrahigh Pressure Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Laser-based dynamic compression provides a new opportunity to study the lattice structure and other properties of geological materials to ultrahigh pressure conditions ranging from 100 - 1000 GPa (1 TPa) and beyond. Such studies have fundamental applications to understanding the Earth's core as well as the interior structure of super-Earths and giant planets. This talk will review recent dynamic compression experiments using high-powered lasers on materials including Fe-Si, MgO, and SiC. Experiments were conducted at the Omega laser (University of Rochester) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford). At Omega, laser drives as large as 2 kJ are applied over 10 ns to samples that are 50 microns thick. At peak compression, the sample is probed with quasi-monochromatic X-rays from a laser-plasma source and diffraction is recorded on image plates. At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a 40-J laser with a 10-ns pulse. The sample is probed with X-rays form the LCLS free electron laser providing 1012 photons in a monochromatic pulse near 10 keV energy. Diffraction is recorded using pixel array detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray beam, the sample can be probed at various times relative to the shock wave transiting the sample. By controlling the shape and duration of the incident laser pulse, either shock or ramp (shockless) loading can be produced. Ramp compression produces less heating than shock compression, allowing samples to be probed to ultrahigh pressures without melting. Results for iron alloys, oxides, and carbides provide new constraints on equations of state and phase transitions that are relevant to the interior structure of large, extrasolar terrestrial-type planets.

  16. Schwannosis induced medullary compression in VACTERL syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Treacy, A

    2011-10-21

    A 7-year-old boy with a history of VACTERL syndrome was found collapsed in bed. MRI had shown basilar invagination of the skull base and narrowing of the foramen magnum. Angulation, swelling and abnormal high signal at the cervicomedullary junction were felt to be secondary to compression of the medulla. Neuropathologic examination showed bilateral replacement of the medullary tegmentum by an irregularly circumscribed cellular lesion which was composed of elongated GFAP\\/S 100-positive cells with spindled nuclei and minimal atypia. The pathologic findings were interpreted as intramedullary schwannosis with mass effect. Schwannosis, is observed in traumatized spinal cords where its presence may represent attempted, albeit aberrant, repair by inwardly migrating Schwann cells ofperipheral origin. In our view the compressive effect of the basilar invagination on this boy\\'s medulla was of sufficient magnitude to have caused tumoral medullary schwannosis with resultant intermittent respiratory compromise leading to reflex anoxic seizures.

  17. Use of tubulization (nerve conduits in repairing nerve defects in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Maria Sénès

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In peripheral nerve repairing in children by using nerve conduits, the outcome has been widely effective even when dealing with mixed and motor nerve, thus nerve tubulization might be considered as an alternative to nerve grafting. Conversely, considering the uncertain result obtained in brachial plexus repairing, the conduits cannot be considered as afirst choice of treatment in brachial plexus reconstruction.

  18. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  19. Decreased Nerve Conduction Velocity in Football Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Didehdar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower limbs nerves are exposed to mechanical injuries in the football players and the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of football on the lower leg nerves. Materials and Methods: Nerve conduction studies were done on 35 male college students (20 football players, 15 non active during 2006 to 2007 in the Shiraz rehabilitation faculty. Standard nerve conduction techniques using to evaluate dominant and non dominant lower limb nerves. Results: The motor latency of deep peroneal and tibial nerves of dominant leg of football players and sensory latency of superficial peroneal, tibial and compound nerve action potential of tibial nerve of both leg in football players were significantly prolonged (p<0.05. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of tibial and common peroneal in football players were significant delayed (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded that football is sport with high contact and it causes sub-clinical neuropathies due to nerve entrapment.

  20. Lesions in nerves and plexus after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, W.

    1978-01-01

    Apart from the typical, radiation-induced changes in the skin, common secondary findings were oedemas, radiation-induced ulceration, fibroses of the mediastinum and lungs, pleura adhesions, and osteoradionecroses. In one patient with radiogenic paresis of the plexus brachialis, irradiation of the spinal cord because of epidural metastases of a mammary carcinoma resulted in radiation myelopathy which was verified by laminectomy. Observations of radiogenic lesions of the plexus brachialis show that the usual site of the lesion in the vasomotoric nerve bundle is the axilla. The lesion is assumed to be caused mainly by an overlapping of the axillary, infraclavicular and supraclavicular fields of irradiation which results in a dose peak in the axilla. (orig./AJ) 891 AJ/orig.- 892 MKO [de

  1. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    decellularized nerve allograft for inferior alveolar nerve reconstruction: a case report. Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery : official journal of...the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. 2011 Feb;69(2):550-3. PubMed PMID: 21145638. Epub 2010/12/15. eng. 16. Gunn S, Cosetti M...Massachusetts General Hospital (protocol #2012N000117) and was also granted ACURO approval on 11/19/2012. Task 2b. Rodent surgeries for segmental deficit

  2. Difficulty in Clinical Evaluation of Radial Nerve Injury due to Multiple Trauma to the Humerus, Wrist, and Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balik Mehmet Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve damage is frequently encountered in humeral fractures. The radial nerve is primarily damaged when the humerus gets fractured, while secondary damage maybe due to post-traumatic manipulations and surgical exploration. High impact traumatic nerve injury, serious neuropathic pain, lack of response to therapeutic interventions, and indifference to the Tinel test are indications for surgical intervention. Since most humeral fracture-induced low impact radial nerve injuries resolve spontaneously, conservative therapy is preferred. We present a patient with humeral fracture-associated radial nerve injury, accompanied with digital amputation and flexor tendon avulsion on the same arm. These injuries required immediate surgery, thus rendering the clinical evaluation of the radial nerve impossible. We would like to highlight and discuss the inherent difficulties associated with multiple trauma of the upper arm.

  3. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  4. Incidence of facial nerve sacrifice in parotidectomy for primary and metastatic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendseid, Brian; Li, Shawn; Thuener, Jason; Rezaee, Rod; Lavertu, Pierre; Fowler, Nicole; Zender, Chad

    2017-10-01

    The parotid gland may become involved by primary parotid malignancies and secondarily by metastases from other primary sites. Surgical resection of these tumors can be technically challenging due to the intimate relationship of the parotid gland and the facial nerve. The primary aim of this project was to determine the incidence of facial nerve sacrifice in parotidectomy for primary and secondary malignancies of the parotid. A retrospective chart review of was performed. Patients who received parotidectomy with final pathology consistent with a malignant neoplasm were included. The primary outcome studied was necessity for facial nerve sacrifice. Co-variates included preoperative facial nerve function, preoperative pain, superficial versus total parotidectomy and pathologic diagnosis. Univariate analysis was performed using student t-test to determine odds ratios. We identified 75 patients who had a parotidectomy for a malignant process in our review. 30 patients had facial nerve sacrifice: 14 total and 16 partial sacrifices. Patients were more likely to require facial nerve sacrifice when they presented with preoperative facial nerve dysfunction [100% vs 19.6%, p=0.0006, OR 154.3, CI (8.66-2750.9)], pre-op pain [76.5% vs. 29.3%, p=0.001, OR 7.84, CI (2.23-27.50)], and required excision of both superficial and deep lobes of the parotid gland [64.9% vs 15.8%, p=0.0001, OR 9.85, CI (3.27-29.66)]. Our data illustrates that many patients with normal facial nerve function, even in the setting of malignancy, can have their facial nerve preserved. Pain, deep lobe involvement and preoperative facial nerve dysfunction are associated with an increased risk of needing at least partial facial nerve sacrifice in the setting of parotid gland malignancies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  6. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  7. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  8. High-voltage electrical stimulation improves nerve regeneration after sciatic crush injury Estimulação elétrica de alta voltagem favorece a regeneração nervosa após compressão do nervo isquiático

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana M. Teodori

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerve injury causes prolonged functional limitation being a clinical challenge to identify resources that accelerates its recovery. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of high-voltage electrical stimulation (HVES on the morphometric and functional characteristics of the regenerated nerve after crush injury in rats. METHODS: Twenty Wistar rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups: Control (CON - without injury and without HVES; Denervated (D - sciatic nerve crush only; Denervated + HVES - sciatic nerve crush and HVES; SHAM - without injury but HVES. The HVES and SHAM groups were stimulated (100 Hz; minimum voltage of 100 V, 20 μs, 100 μs interpulse interval for 30 min/day, 5 days/week. The sciatic functional index (SFI was evaluated before the injury and at the 7th, 14th and 21st postoperatory (PO days. Neural components and the area density of connective tissue, blood vessels and macrophages were analyzed. RESULTS: Axonal diameter was higher on the HVES than on D group, reaching almost 80% above the control values after 21 days (pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Lesões nervosas periféricas provocam limitação funcional prolongada, sendo um desafio para a clínica identificar recursos que acelerem sua recuperação. OBJETIVOS: Investigar a influência da estimulação elétrica de alta voltagem (EEAV sobre a morfologia e a função do nervo regenerado após esmagamento em ratos. MÉTODOS: Vinte ratos Wistar foram divididos nos grupos: controle (CON - sem lesão e sem EEAV; desnervado (D - esmagamento do nervo isquiático; desnervado + EEAV (EEAV - esmagamento do nervo e EEAV; SHAM - sem lesão, porém submetido à EEAV. Os grupos EEAV e SHAM foram estimulados (100 Hz, tensão mínima de 100 V; 20 μs e 100 μs interpulso 30 min/dia, 5 dias/semana. O índice funcional do ciático (IFC foi avaliado antes da lesão, nos 7º, 14º e 21º dias pós-operatório (PO. Componentes neurais, densidade de área de tecido conjuntivo, de

  9. Peripheral nerve injuries in weight training: sites, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Keith R; Brahma, Barunashish; McGillicuddy, John E

    2005-07-01

    Direct trauma, compression caused by muscle hypertrophy or other soft tissue changes, or excessive stretching of a peripheral nerve in the upper extremity may lead to uncommon-but potentially serious-complications. Clinicians are seeing more of these injuries as weight training, power lifting, bodybuilding, cross-training, and general physical conditioning with weights become more popular. Symptoms of pain, weakness, paresthesia, or palsy; physical exam findings; electromyography; and nerve conduction studies are used to make the diagnosis. Most conditions respond well to conservative measures, such as rest from the offending exercise and correction of poor technique, but surgery may be required for complete clinical resolution in severe cases.

  10. Thrombosed persistent median artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome associated with bifurcated median nerve: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salter, M.; Sinha, N. R.; Szmigielski, W.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a sporadically occurring abnormality due to compression of median nerve. It is exceedingly rare for it to be caused by thrombosis of persistent median artery. Case Report: A forty two year old female was referred for ultrasound examination due to ongoing wrist pain, not relived by pain killers and mild paraesthesia on the radial side of the hand. High resolution ultrasound and Doppler revealed a thrombosed persistent median artery and associated bifurcated median nerve. The thrombus resolved on treatment with anticoagulants. Conclusions: Ultrasound examination of the wrist when done for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome should preferably include looking for persistent median artery and its patency. (authors)

  11. The compression of wood/thermoplastic fiber mats during consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl R. Englund; Michael P. Wolcott; John C. Hermanson

    2004-01-01

    Secondary processing of non-woven wood and wood/thermoplastic fiber mats is generally performed using compression molding, where heated platens or dies form the final product. Although the study and use of wood-fiber composites is widespread, few research efforts have explicitly described the fundamentals of mat consolidation. In contrast, the wood composite literature...

  12. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S......[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(log⁡N) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(log⁡log⁡N) query time...

  13. Nerve fascicle transfer using a part of the C-7 nerve for spinal accessory nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xuan; Shen, Yun-Dong; Feng, Jun-Tao; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Spinal accessory nerve (SAN) injury results in a series of shoulder dysfunctions and continuous pain. However, current treatments are limited by the lack of donor nerves as well as by undesirable nerve regeneration. Here, the authors report a modified nerve transfer technique in which they employ a nerve fascicle from the posterior division (PD) of the ipsilateral C-7 nerve to repair SAN injury. The technique, first performed in cadavers, was then undertaken in 2 patients. METHODS Six fresh cadavers (12 sides of the SAN and ipsilateral C-7) were studied to observe the anatomical relationship between the SAN and C-7 nerve. The length from artificial bifurcation of the middle trunk to the point of the posterior cord formation in the PD (namely, donor nerve fascicle) and the linear distance from the cut end of the donor fascicle to both sites of the jugular foramen and medial border of the trapezius muscle (d-SCM and d-Traps, respectively) were measured. Meanwhile, an optimal route for nerve fascicle transfer (NFT) was designed. The authors then performed successful NFT operations in 2 patients, one with an injury at the proximal SAN and another with an injury at the distal SAN. RESULTS The mean lengths of the cadaver donor nerve fascicle, d-SCM, and d-Traps were 4.2, 5.2, and 2.5 cm, respectively. In one patient who underwent proximal SAN excision necessitated by a partial thyroidectomy, early signs of reinnervation were seen on electrophysiological testing at 6 months after surgery, and an impaired left trapezius muscle, which was completely atrophic preoperatively, had visible signs of improvement (from grade M0 to grade M3 strength). In the other patient in whom a distal SAN injury was the result of a neck cyst resection, reinnervation and complex repetitive discharges were seen 1 year after surgery. Additionally, the patient's denervated trapezius muscle was completely resolved (from grade M2 to grade M4 strength), and her shoulder pain had disappeared

  14. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuar RIM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ‘watch and see’ the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important to release the nerve tension before transferring the patient to the operation room. If close reduction fails, we proceed to explore the nerve together with open reduction of the fracture. In iatrogenic nerve injury, we recommend nerve exploration to determine the surgical procedure that is causing the injury. Primary nerve exploration will allow early assessment of the injured nerve and minimize subsequent surgery.

  15. Chance Fracture Secondary to a Healed Kyphotic Compression Osteoporotic Fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teh KK

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Chance fracture is an unstable vertebral fracture, which usually results from a high velocity injury. An elderly lady with a previously healed osteoporotic fracture of the T12 and L1 vertebra which resulted in a severe kyphotic deformity subsequently sustained a Chance fracture of the adjacent L2 vertebrae after a minor fall. The previously fracture left her with a deformity which resulted in significant sagittal imbalance therefore predisposing her to this fracture. This case highlights the importance of aggressive treatment of osteoporotic fractures in order to prevent significant sagittal imbalance from resultant (i.e. kyphotic deformity.

  16. Spinal cord compression secondary to hemangiosarcoma in a saddlebred stallion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, S

    1999-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma in the spinal canal was diagnosed in a 25-year-old stallion showing progressive and symmetrical 4-limb ataxia, proprioceptive deficits, and weakness. On necropsy, an extradural mass consisting of spindle-shaped cells and numerous free erythrocytes was found at the level of C7-T1. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed a neoplasm of endothelial origin. PMID:10646067

  17. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Anitori, Laura; Baraniuk, Richard; Maleki, Arian; Otten, Matern; van Rossum, Wim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm, we demonstrate that the behavior of the CFAR processor is independent of the combination with the non-linear recovery and therefore its performance can be predicted us...

  18. Recursive Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Freris, Nikolaos M.; Öçal, Orhan; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a recursive algorithm for performing compressed sensing on streaming data. The approach consists of a) recursive encoding, where we sample the input stream via overlapping windowing and make use of the previous measurement in obtaining the next one, and b) recursive decoding, where the signal estimate from the previous window is utilized in order to achieve faster convergence in an iterative optimization scheme applied to decode the new one. To remove estimation bias, a two-step ...

  19. Universal Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Jalali, Shirin; Poor, H. Vincent

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of developing universal algorithms for compressed sensing of stochastic processes is studied. First, R\\'enyi's notion of information dimension (ID) is generalized to analog stationary processes. This provides a measure of complexity for such processes and is connected to the number of measurements required for their accurate recovery. Then a minimum entropy pursuit (MEP) optimization approach is proposed, and it is proven that it can reliably recover any stationary ...

  20. Kalman Filtered Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Vaswani, Namrata

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing time sequences of spatially sparse signals (with unknown and time-varying sparsity patterns) from a limited number of linear "incoherent" measurements, in real-time. The signals are sparse in some transform domain referred to as the sparsity basis. For a single spatial signal, the solution is provided by Compressed Sensing (CS). The question that we address is, for a sequence of sparse signals, can we do better than CS, if (a) the sparsity pattern of ...

  1. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms.

  2. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan, E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Holland, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform.

  3. The Role of Nerve Exploration in Supracondylar Humerus Fracture in Children with Nerve Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Anuar RIM; Gooi SG; Zulkiflee O

    2015-01-01

    The supracondylar humerus fracture (SCHF) in children is common and can be complicated with nerve injury either primarily immediate post-trauma or secondarily posttreatment. The concept of neurapraxic nerve injury makes most surgeons choose to ?watch and see? the nerve recovery before deciding second surgery if the nerve does not recover. We report three cases of nerve injury in SCHF, all of which underwent nerve exploration for different reasons. Early reduction in the Casualty is important ...

  4. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Maeseneer, Michel, E-mail: Michel.demaeseneer@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Brigido, Monica Kalume, E-mail: Mbrigido@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Antic, Marijana, E-mail: Misscroa@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Lenchik, Leon, E-mail: Llenchik@wakehealth.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Milants, Annemieke, E-mail: Annemieke.Milants@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vereecke, Evie, E-mail: Evie.Vereecke@kuleuven-kulak.be [Department of Anatomy, KULAK, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Campus Kortrijk, Kortrijk (Belgium); Jager, Tjeerd [Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Shahabpour, Maryam, E-mail: Maryam.Shahabpour@uzbrussel.be [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  5. Ultrasound of the elbow with emphasis on detailed assessment of ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maeseneer, Michel; Brigido, Monica Kalume; Antic, Marijana; Lenchik, Leon; Milants, Annemieke; Vereecke, Evie; Jager, Tjeerd; Shahabpour, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Medial and lateral tendons: the different muscles forming these tendons can be followed up to the insertion. The imaging anatomy is reviewed. •Medial and lateral ligaments: the anatomy is complex and specialized imaging planes and arm positions are necessary for accurate assessment. •Biceps tendon: the anatomy of the distal biceps and lacertus fibrosus are discussed and illustrated with cadaveric correlation. •US imaging of the nerves about the elbow and visualization of the possible compression points is discussed. -- Abstract: The high resolution and dynamic capability of ultrasound make it an excellent tool for assessment of superficial structures. The ligaments, tendons, and nerves about the elbow can be fully evaluated with ultrasound. The medial collateral ligament consists of an anterior and posterior band that can easily be identified. The lateral ligament complex consists of the radial collateral ligament, ulnar insertion of the annular ligament, and lateral ulnar collateral ligament, easily identified with specialized probe positioning. The lateral ulnar collateral ligament can best be seen in the cobra position. On ultrasound medial elbow tendons can be followed nearly up to their common insertion. The pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, palmaris longus, and flexor digitorum superficialis can be identified. The laterally located brachioradialis and extensor carpi radialis longus insert on the supracondylar ridge. The other lateral tendons can be followed up to their common insertion on the lateral epicondyle. The extensor digitorum, extensor carpi radialis brevis, extensor digiti minimi, and extensor carpi ulnaris can be differentiated. The distal biceps tendon is commonly bifid. For a complete assessment of the distal biceps tendon specialized views are necessary. These include an anterior axial approach, medial and lateral approach, and cobra position. In the cubital tunnel the ulnar nerve is covered by the ligament of Osborne

  6. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  7. Neurapraxia of the common peroneal nerve - A rare complication resulting from wearing a KBM prosthesis: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.F.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Rietman, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    This clinical note describes a 47-year-old man who had a traumatic amputation of the left lower leg. Two months after wearing a Kondylen Bettung Munster (KMB) prosthesis, he developed a compression neuropathy of the common peroneal nerve of his right leg after sitting cross-legged. This troublesome

  8. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2010-05-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX-XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry.

  9. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesolella, Massimo; Ricciardiello, Filippo; Tafuri, Domenico; Varriale, Roberto; Testa, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved. Hoarseness associated with a dilated left atrium in a patient with mitral valve stenosis was initially described by Ortner more than a century ago. Since then several non malignant, cardiovascular, intrathoracic disease that results in embarrassment from recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy usually by stretching, pulling or compression; thus, the correlations of these pathologies was termed as cardiovocal syndrome or Ortner's syndrome. The reported case illustrates that life-threatening cardiovascular comorbidities can cause hoarseness and that an impaired recurrent laryngeal nerve might be correctable.

  10. Secondary dyslipidaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    metabolism of lipoprotein particles, most often the triglyceride (TG)-rich particles. Under normal metabolic conditions these patients may be entirely normal, but when exposed to one of the secondary causes this 'excessive metabolic load' precipitates an ever-worsening cycle of impairment in lipoprotein metabolism.

  11. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A. (Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction.

  12. Dysfunctional penile cholinergic nerves in diabetic impotent men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, R.; Saenz de Tejada, I.; Goldstein, I.; Krane, R.J.; Wotiz, H.H.; Cohen, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Impotence in the diabetic man may be secondary to a neuropathic condition of the autonomic penile nerves. The relationship between autonomic neuropathy and impotence in diabetes was studied in human corporeal tissue obtained during implantation of a penile prosthesis in 19 impotent diabetic and 15 nondiabetic patients. The functional status of penile cholinergic nerves was assessed by determining their ability to accumulate tritiated choline (34), and synthesize (34) and release (19) tritiated-acetylcholine after incubation of corporeal tissue with tritiated-choline (34). Tritiated-choline accumulation, and tritiated-acetylcholine synthesis and release were significantly reduced in the corporeal tissue from diabetic patients compared to that from nondiabetic patients (p less than 0.05). The impairment in acetylcholine synthesis worsened with the duration of diabetes (p less than 0.025). No differences in the parameters measured were found between insulin-dependent (11) and noninsulin-dependent (8) diabetic patients. The ability of the cholinergic nerves to synthesize acetylcholine could not be predicted clinically with sensory vibration perception threshold testing. It is concluded that there is a functional penile neuropathic condition of the cholinergic nerves in the corpus cavernosum of diabetic impotent patients that may be responsible for the erectile dysfunction

  13. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  14. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Dissecting aneurysm of vertebral artery manifestating as contralateral abducens nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jin Sue; Lee, Sang Hyung; Son, Young-Je; Chung, Young Seob

    2013-03-01

    Isolated abducens nerve paresis related to ruptured vertebral artery (VA) aneurysm is rare. It usually occurs bilaterally or ipsilaterally to the pathologic lesions. We report the case of a contralateral sixth nerve palsy following ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. A 38-year-old man was admitted for the evaluation of a 6-day history of headache. Abnormalities were not seen on initial computed tomography (CT). On admission, the patient was alert and no signs reflecting neurologic deficits were noted. Time of flight magnetic resonance angiography revealed a fusiform dilatation of the right VA involving origin of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The patient suddenly suffered from severe headache with diplopia the day before the scheduled cerebral angiography. Neurologic examination disclosed nuchal rigidity and isolated left abducens nerve palsy. Emergent CT scan showed high density in the basal and prepontine cistern compatible with ruptured aneurismal hemorrhage. Right vertebral angiography illustrated a right VA dissecting aneurysm with prominent displaced vertebrobasilar artery to inferiorly on left side. Double-stent placement was conducted for the treatment of ruptured dissecting VA aneurysm. No diffusion restriction signals were observed in follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain stem. Eleven weeks later, full recovery of left sixth nerve palsy was documented photographically. In conclusion, isolated contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with ruptured VA aneurysm may develop due to direct nerve compression by displaced verterobasilar artery triggered by primary thick clot in the prepontine cistern.

  16. [Effects of local corticoids on the nerve fiber. Experimental study (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalon, G; Roffe, J L; Pellissier, J F; Chrestian, M; Benaim, L; Bureau, H

    1982-05-13

    The intra-operative establishment of some impairments of the median nerve, in patients who are operated for carpal tunnel syndrome and who previously received several local injections of corticoids, led the authors to try to see the respective responsibility of the compression and of the injection in the degenerative process. In 60- dog cubital nerves, it has been possible, to study different parameters by intra and perineural (recurrent or not injections: the puncture, the dilatation, the solvents, the benzylic alcool and two long action corticoids very often used (triamcinolone acetonide, cortivazol). In the first of our series, the injections were done around the nerve and inside the nerve under visual or blind control (as for an infiltration). The nerves are then cut off after 1, 2, or 3 months. In the second of our series, the injections were done in the same way, but recurrently on the first, second and third month, and the nerve was cut off within the fourth month. An electrophysiological study was performed before taking the samples; they were then prepared for reading on the optical and electron microscope. The results show lesions characterized by an epineural spumous sediment, a localized decrease in the large fibers under the perineurium in the first and second series. These impairments seem to be diminishing with time. However when the injections are done recurrently, the lesions are more important, showing a wallerian degeneration and regeneration.

  17. Reversible Isolated Accessory Nerve Palsy due to a Large Thrombosed Vertebral Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisayasu Saito

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Isolated accessory nerve palsy due to intracranial disorders is uncommon because intracranial accessory nerve injury usually occurs in case of a skull base tumor or trauma, resulting in one of multiple cranial nerve palsies. We report a very rare case of isolated accessory nerve palsy due to a large thrombosed aneurysm of the intracranial vertebral artery. Full recovery was achieved after surgery. Case Report: A patient complaining of transient numbness in the right side was referred to our hospital. An MRI indicated a large thrombosed aneurysm of the right vertebral artery. The aneurysm severely compressed the medulla oblongata. First, the proximal vertebral artery (VA was clipped with an aneurysm clip to reduce the pressure inside the aneurysm. However, cerebral angiography revealed a partial recanalization of the right VA. The patient then underwent coil embolization of the right VA just proximal to the aneurysm clip. Subsequently, the right VA was completely obliterated. The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit. Two weeks later, however, she complained of right shoulder pain. Physical and neurological examinations demonstrated atrophy of the right trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscle, leading to a deepening of the right supraclavicular fossa. The symptoms were considered to result from the right isolated accessory nerve palsy. Follow-up MRI showed that the VA aneurysm gradually decreased in size over a period of several months. At the same time, her symptoms disappeared completely. Conclusion: We should keep in mind that isolated accessory nerve palsy can be caused by a large or giant vertebral aneurysm.

  18. Extramedullary hematopoiesis within the clivus: an unusual cause of lower cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Davis L; Lindstrom, Katherine; Raghavan, Prashant; Jane, John

    2010-12-01

    We report one year follow up of a case of extramedullary hematopoiesis within the clivus. The imaging findings, brief clinical course, and endoscopic transphenoidal approach are described. A 29-year-old female with thalassemia developed worsening cranial nerve signs. After imaging studies discovered a large clival mass, she underwent endoscopic transphenoidal biopsy of the lesion. Neural compression from exuberant erythrogenesis within tissue normally quiescent of red blood cell production was found to be the etiology of her neural deficit. Treatment for this condition is generally non-operative unless significant neural compression is present. Radiotherapy and anti-neoplastic agents have been used with success.

  19. Nerve excitability in the rat forelimb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Ria; Moldovan, Mihai; Rosberg, Mette Romer

    2017-01-01

    a novel setup to explore the ulnar nerve excitability in rodents. We provide normative ulnar data in 11 adult female Long Evans rats under anaesthesia by comparison with tibial and caudal nerves. Additionally, these measures were repeated weekly on 3 occasions to determine the repeatability of these tests....... Results Nerve excitability assessment of ulnar nerve proved to be a longitudinally repeatable measure of axonal function mature in rats, as were measures in tibial and caudal nerves. Comparison with existing method: Ulnar nerve motor excitability measures were different from the caudal and tibial...

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of optic nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gala, Foram

    2015-01-01

    Optic nerves are the second pair of cranial nerves and are unique as they represent an extension of the central nervous system. Apart from clinical and ophthalmoscopic evaluation, imaging, especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plays an important role in the complete evaluation of optic nerve and the entire visual pathway. In this pictorial essay, the authors describe segmental anatomy of the optic nerve and review the imaging findings of various conditions affecting the optic nerves. MRI allows excellent depiction of the intricate anatomy of optic nerves due to its excellent soft tissue contrast without exposure to ionizing radiation, better delineation of the entire visual pathway, and accurate evaluation of associated intracranial pathologies

  1. The Use of Degradable Nerve Conduits for Human Nerve Repair: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Meek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of peripheral nerve injury continues to be a major clinical challenge. The most widely used technique for bridging defects in peripheral nerves is the use of autologous nerve grafts. This technique, however, has some disadvantages. Many alternative experimental techniques have thus been developed, such as degradable nerve conduits. Degradable nerve guides have been extensively studied in animal experimental studies. However, the repair of human nerves by degradable nerve conduits has been limited to only a few clinical studies. In this paper, an overview of the available international published literature on degradable nerve conduits for bridging human peripheral nerve defects is presented for literature available until 2004. Also, the philosophy on the use of nerve guides and nerve grafts is given.

  2. Spinal cord compression--an oncologic emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, A R

    1990-08-01

    Spinal cord compression secondary to epidural metastatic tumor is an emergency clinical situation that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment if permanent neurologic damage is to be prevented. Physicians caring for patients with cancer must maintain a high index of suspicion for this problem. Back pain is a common clinical situation in the general population but in the cancer patient, one should consider this sign indicative of possible spinal cord compression even though a long tumor-free interval has occurred since the original diagnosis of neoplasm. The diagnosis is established by thorough neurologic examination, plain x-rays, myelography, CT and MRI scanning. Once the diagnosis is established, treatment is instituted with steroids, decompressive surgery and postoperative irradiation or external irradiation alone depending upon the emergent nature of the clinical situation. Regardless of the initial treatment, patients with spinal cord compression require management in a multi-disciplinary fashion. Early therapy will result in the best relief of symptoms and maintenance of the ability to walk. The ultimate prognosis of such patients is very dismal in view of the metastatic nature of their disease but prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary to prevent devastating sequelae for the patients and their families.

  3. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lau

    Full Text Available To investigate: (1 the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2 the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD in Asian women based on phantom study.We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD measurement software (Volpara to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA slabs.Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p0.05.Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  4. Mammographic compression in Asian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. Methods We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35–80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Results Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p0.05). Conclusions Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD. PMID:28419125

  5. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  6. Progress of nerve bridges in the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Q

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Qiang Ao Department of Tissue Engineering, School of Fundamental Science, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, Peoples’ Republic of China Abstract: Clinical repair of a nerve defect is one of the most challenging surgical problems. Autologous nerve grafting remains the gold standard treatment in addressing peripheral nerve injuries that cannot be bridged by direct epineural suturing. However, the autologous nerve graft is not readily available, and the process of harvesting autologous nerve graft results in several complications. Thus, it is necessary to explore an alternative to autologous nerve graft. In the last few decades, with significant advances in the life sciences and biotechnology, a lot of artificial nerve grafts have been developed to aim at the treatment of peripheral nerve disruptions. Artificial nerve grafts range from biological tubes to synthetic tubes and from nondegradable tubes to degradable tubes. Among them, acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are two kinds of the most promising substitutes for nerve autografts. The history, research status, and prospect of acellular nerve allografts and artificial nerve repair conduits are described briefly in this review. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, repair, acellular nerve graft, nerve conduit

  7. The impact of motor and sensory nerve architecture on nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Arash; Borschel, Gregory H; Luciano, Janina P; Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Hayashi, Ayato; Hunter, Daniel A; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2008-08-01

    Sensory nerve autografting is the standard of care for injuries resulting in a nerve gap. Recent work demonstrates superior regeneration with motor nerve grafts. Improved regeneration with motor grafting may be a result of the nerve's Schwann cell basal lamina tube size. Motor nerves have larger SC basal lamina tubes, which may allow more nerve fibers to cross a nerve graft repair. Architecture may partially explain the suboptimal clinical results seen with sensory nerve grafting techniques. To define the role of nerve architecture, we evaluated regeneration through acellular motor and sensory nerve grafts. Thirty-six Lewis rats underwent tibial nerve repairs with 5 mm double-cable motor or triple-cable sensory nerve isografts. Grafts were harvested and acellularized in University of Wisconsin solution. Control animals received fresh motor or sensory cable isografts. Nerves were harvested after 4 weeks and histomorphometry was performed. In 6 animals per group from the fresh motor and sensory cable graft groups, weekly walking tracks and wet muscle mass ratios were performed at 7 weeks. Histomorphometry revealed more robust nerve regeneration in both acellular and cellular motor grafts. Sensory groups showed poor regeneration with significantly decreased percent nerve, fiber count, and density (parchitecture (size of SC basal lamina tubes) plays an important role in nerve regeneration in a mixed nerve gap model.

  8. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  9. Nerve entrapment after hamstring injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja; Konerding, Moritz A

    2012-09-01

    Hamstring muscle injuries are a frequent cause of athletic sequelae, and the frequency of reinjuries is high. Frequently, disability in sport is the consequence and performance is limited. A case report of a soccer player who was unable to play his sport after a minor hamstring muscle injury is presented. We introduce a previously undescribed lesion featured by a scar compromising a motor branch of the sciatic nerve to the long head of the biceps femoris muscle. Resection of the involved branch of the nerve resulted in complete pain relief and full sport capacity. This case report demonstrates that in very rare cases, a scar tissue-induced intramuscular entrapment of a branch of the sciatic nerve must be considered as a reason for athletic incapacity after minor hamstring injury. Both the degree of a muscular injury and its specific location within the injured muscle may therefore influence the functional outcome.

  10. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern discov...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  11. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  12. Compression test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus for compressive testing of a test specimen may comprise vertically spaced upper and lower platen members between which a test specimen may be placed. The platen members are supported by a fixed support assembly. A load indicator is interposed between the upper platen member and the support assembly for supporting the total weight of the upper platen member and any additional weight which may be placed on it. Operating means are provided for moving the lower platen member upwardly toward the upper platen member whereby an increasing portion of the total weight is transferred from the load indicator to the test specimen.

  13. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  14. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  15. Three-dimensional short-range MR angiography and multiplanar reconstruction images in the evaluation of neurovascular compression in hemifacial spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Lee, Jae Gue; Rhee, Bong Arm [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three-dimensional(3D) short-range MR angiography(MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction(MPR) imaging in hemifacial spasm(HS). Materials and Methods : Two hundreds patients with HS were studied using a 1.5T MRI system with a 3D time-of-flight(TOF) MRA sequence. To reconstruct short-range MRA, 6-10 source images near the 7-8th cranial nerve complex were processed using a maximum-intensity projection technique. In addition, an MPR technique was used to investigate neurovascular compression. We observed the relationship between the root-exit zone(REZ) of the 7th cranial nerve and compressive vessel, and identified the compressive vessels on symptomatic sides. To investigate neurovascular contact, asymptomatic contralateral sides were also evaluated. Results : MRI showed that in 197 of 200 patients there was vascular compression or contact with the facial nerve REZ on symptomatic sides. One of the three remaining patients was suffering from acoustic neurinoma on the symptomatic side, while in two patients there were no definite abnormal findings.Compressive vessels were demonstrated in all 197 patients; 80 cases involved the anterior inferior cerebellar artery(AICA), 74 the posterior cerebellar artery(PICA), 13 the vertebral artery(VA), 16 the VA and AICA, eight the VA and PICA, and six the AICA and PICA. In all 197 patients, compressive vessels were reconstructed on one 3D short-range MRA image without discontinuation from vertebral or basilar arteries. 3D MPR studies provided additional information such as the direction of compression and course of the compressive vessel. In 31 patients there was neurovascular contact on the contralateral side at the 7-8th cranial nerve complex. Conclusion : Inpatients with HS, 3D short-range MRA and MPR images are excellent and very helpful for the investigation of neurovascular compression and the identification of compressive vessels.

  16. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  17. The role of the superior laryngeal nerve in esophageal reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medda, B. K.; Jadcherla, S.; Shaker, R.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) in the following esophageal reflexes: esophago-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex (EUCR), esophago-lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation reflex (ELIR), secondary peristalsis, pharyngeal swallowing, and belch. Cats (N = 43) were decerebrated and instrumented to record EMG of the cricopharyngeus, thyrohyoideus, geniohyoideus, and cricothyroideus; esophageal pressure; and motility of LES. Reflexes were activated by stimulation of the esophagus via slow balloon or rapid air distension at 1 to 16 cm distal to the UES. Slow balloon distension consistently activated EUCR and ELIR from all areas of the esophagus, but the distal esophagus was more sensitive than the proximal esophagus. Transection of SLN or proximal recurrent laryngeal nerves (RLN) blocked EUCR and ELIR generated from the cervical esophagus. Distal RLN transection blocked EUCR from the distal cervical esophagus. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus except the most proximal few centimeters activated secondary peristalsis, and SLN transection had no effect on secondary peristalsis. Slow distension of all areas of the esophagus inconsistently activated pharyngeal swallows, and SLN transection blocked generation of pharyngeal swallows from all levels of the esophagus. Slow distension of the esophagus inconsistently activated belching, but rapid air distension consistently activated belching from all areas of the esophagus. SLN transection did not block initiation of belch but blocked one aspect of belch, i.e., inhibition of cricopharyngeus EMG. Vagotomy blocked all aspects of belch generated from all areas of esophagus and blocked all responses of all reflexes not blocked by SLN or RLN transection. In conclusion, the SLN mediates all aspects of the pharyngeal swallow, no portion of the secondary peristalsis, and the EUCR and ELIR generated from the proximal esophagus. Considering that SLN is not

  18. Cauda Equina Syndrome Secondary to Complicated Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. ter Horst

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with cauda equina syndrome and sepsis. The symptoms were attributed to a complicated episode of sigmoid diverticulitis. MRI showed that the diverticulitis had caused an intra-abdominal fistula to a presacrally localized abscess expanding into the spinal canal, compressing the cauda equina nerves. Although Hartmann's procedure was performed, the neurological symptoms persisted, causing the patient to remain partially paraplegic. This case report illustrates that cauda equina syndrome is a condition that can also be caused by intra-abdominal pathology such as diverticulitis.

  19. Hourglass-like constriction of the suprascapular nerve: a contraindication for minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigasio, Adolfo; Marcoccio, Ignazio

    2018-02-01

    Suprascapular nerve (SSN) entrapment is usually ascribed to static or dynamic compression. When no cause of compression is found, SSN entrapment is defined as idiopathic. Focal hourglass-like constriction (H-LC) of the SSN that results in muscle paralysis represents an unusual condition that may be misinterpreted and erroneously diagnosed as SSN entrapment or as neuralgic amyotrophy. With the aim of finding clinical and surgical clues that could differentiate the traditional form of idiopathic SSN entrapment from the rare H-LC, a series of 6 cases of SSN palsy caused by H-LC is presented. All but 1 supraspinatus muscle recovered M5 muscle strength. The Constant shoulder score was excellent in 3 patients, good in 1, fair in 1, and poor in 1. If a diagnosis is not made in time, H-LC may evolve from mild to severe nerve torsion that may require a shift in surgical procedure from epineurotomy and external neurolysis to focal resection and suture. If an incorrect therapy is chosen, the chance of recovery might be definitively compromised with the persistence of muscle palsy. Conversely, when SSN palsy persists despite notch decompression, especially when it is performed with a limited open approach or arthroscopically, concerns about the real etiology and location of nerve compression responsible for the nerve palsy may arise. When approaching SSN pathology, H-LC should be considered as a potential cause of nerve palsy, as it may represent a contraindication for a limited open approach or arthroscopic decompression. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Following Ilioinguinal Nerve Block ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intramuscular sodium diclofenac 75 mg was administered intraoperatively into the contralateral gluteal muscle. A 5–6‑cm oblique incision was made from the .... Mechanism of femoral nerve palsy complicating percutaneous ilioinguinal field block. Br J Anaesth 1997;78:314‑6. 19. Chan PY, Lee MP, Cheung HY, Chung CC, ...

  1. Functional nerve recovery after bridging a 15 mm gap in rat sciatic nerve with a biodegradable nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Klok, F; Robinson, PH; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of nerve function was evaluated after bridging a 15 mm sciatic nerve gap in 51 rats with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guide. Recovery of function was investigated by analysing the footprints, by analysing video recordings of gait, by electrically eliciting the

  2. Atypic geniculate neuralgia: atypic anatomic correlation of cranial nerve roots and AICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Füsun Demirçivi; Duransoy, Yusuf Kurtuluş; Camlar, Mahmut

    2009-08-01

    Geniculate neuralgia is a rare cause of craniofacial pains. The anterior inferior cerebellar artery is the offending vessel which compress nervus intermedius in the patients with typical geniculate neuralgia. We report a patient whose pain was atypical for either geniculate neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia. At operation the anterior inferior cerebellar artery was coursing with the nerves and was separated. After the decompression the pain resolved immediately.

  3. Behavioral models of pain states evoked by physical injury to the peripheral nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Linda S.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    Physical injury or compression of the root, dorsal root ganglion, or peripheral sensory axon leads to well-defined changes in biology and function. Behaviorally, humans report ongoing painful dysesthesias and aberrations in function, such that an otherwise innocuous stimulus will yield a pain report. These behavioral reports are believed to reflect the underlying changes in nerve function after injury, wherein increased spontaneous activity arises from the neuroma and dorsal root ganglion and...

  4. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  5. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  6. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries....... That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(logN) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP...... derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(loglogN) query time. Hence, our data structures has the same time and space complexity as for random access in SLPs. We utilize the fingerprint data structures to solve the longest common extension problem in query time O(logNlogℓ) and O...

  7. Respiratory sounds compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2008-04-01

    Recently, with the advances in digital signal processing, compression of biomedical signals has received great attention for telemedicine applications. In this paper, an adaptive transform coding-based method for compression of respiratory and swallowing sounds is proposed. Using special characteristics of respiratory sounds, the recorded signals are divided into stationary and nonstationary portions, and two different bit allocation methods (BAMs) are designed for each portion. The method was applied to the data of 12 subjects and its performance in terms of overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values was calculated at different bit rates. The performance of different quantizers was also considered and the sensitivity of the quantizers to initial conditions has been alleviated. In addition, the fuzzy clustering method was examined for classifying the signal into different numbers of clusters and investigating the performance of the adaptive BAM with increasing the number of classes. Furthermore, the effects of assigning different numbers of bits for encoding stationary and nonstationary portions of the signal were studied. The adaptive BAM with variable number of bits was found to improve the SNR values of the fixed BAM by 5 dB. Last, the possibility of removing the training part for finding the parameters of adaptive BAMs for each individual was investigated. The results indicate that it is possible to use a predefined set of BAMs for all subjects and remove the training part completely. Moreover, the method is fast enough to be implemented for real-time application.

  8. Free compression tube. Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    During the flight of vehicles, their propulsion energy must overcome gravity, to ensure the displacement of air masses on vehicle trajectory, to cover both energy losses from the friction between a solid surface and the air and also the kinetic energy of reflected air masses due to the impact with the flying vehicle. The flight optimization by increasing speed and reducing fuel consumption has directed research in the aerodynamics field. The flying vehicles shapes obtained through studies in the wind tunnel provide the optimization of the impact with the air masses and the airflow along the vehicle. By energy balance studies for vehicles in flight, the author Ioan Rusu directed his research in reducing the energy lost at vehicle impact with air masses. In this respect as compared to classical solutions for building flight vehicles aerodynamic surfaces which reduce the impact and friction with air masses, Ioan Rusu has invented a device which he named free compression tube for rockets, registered with the State Office for Inventions and Trademarks of Romania, OSIM, deposit f 2011 0352. Mounted in front of flight vehicles it eliminates significantly the impact and friction of air masses with the vehicle solid. The air masses come into contact with the air inside the free compression tube and the air-solid friction is eliminated and replaced by air to air friction.

  9. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you ... how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the ...

  11. Sciatic nerve injury caused by a stretching exercise in a trained dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Ho Yong; Lim, Oh Kyung; Bae, Keun Hwan; Park, Seok Min; Lee, Ju Kang; Park, Ki Deok

    2013-12-01

    Sciatic nerve injury after stretching exercise is uncommon. We report a case of an 18-year-old female trained dancer who developed sciatic neuropathy primarily involving the tibial division after routine stretching exercise. The patient presented with dysesthesia and weakness of the right foot during dorsiflexion and plantarflexion. The mechanism of sciatic nerve injury could be thought as hyperstretching alone, not caused by both hyperstretching and compression. Electrodiagnostic tests and magnetic resonance imaging revealed evidence of the right sciatic neuropathy from the gluteal fold to the distal tibial area, and partial tear of the left hamstring origin and fluid collection between the left hamstring and ischium without left sciatic nerve injury. Recovery of motor weakness was obtained by continuous rehabilitation therapy and some evidence of axonal regeneration was obtained by follow-up electrodiagnostic testing performed at 3, 5, and 12 months after injury.

  12. Ulnar nerve injury due to lateral traction device during shoulder arthroscopy: Was it avoidable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nerve injuries reported during shoulder arthroscopy in a beach chair, or lateral position is related to inappropriate patient positioning or excess traction. The lateral decubitus position is more vulnerable for traction-related neuropraxia. The present case serves as an important lesson from an avoidable situation of “having a one track mind” of the surgical team during the arthroscopic repair of shoulder instability performed in the lateral decubitus position. The operating surgeon must supervise the appropriate positioning of the patient on operation table and adequate padding of vulnerable bony points before beginning of shoulder arthroscopy to prevent any position-related nerve injuries. This is probably the first case to illustrate an unusual cause of ulnar nerve compression particularly related to the use of an additional traction device in the arthroscopic repair of shoulder instability performed in lateral decubitus position, which has not been previously defined.

  13. Contralateral eye surgery with adjustable suture for management of third nerve palsy with aberrant regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Thi Thanh Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant regeneration of the third nerve following its palsy is commonly seen after trauma and compressive lesions. This phenomenon is thought to result due to misdirection of the regenerating axons. Surgical management is a great challenge in the third nerve palsy owing to multiple muscle involvement and is often accompanied by ptosis and poor Bell's phenomenon. We present a case of a 27-year-old male who developed isolated complete third nerve palsy of the left eye following head trauma. Features of aberrant regeneration were seen after 6 months, namely, inverse Duane's sign and Pseudo-Von Graefe's sign. He underwent recess-resect procedure in the unaffected eye with adjustable suture technique which not only corrected the deviation but also the ptosis by utilizing the oculomotor synkinesis. Thus, contralateral eye surgery combined with adjustable suture technique resulted in an accurate alignment of the eye and obviated the need for ptosis correction.

  14. Iatrogenic suprascapular nerve injury after repair of type II SLAP lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Koh, Yong-Gon; Sung, Chang-Hun; Moon, Hong-Kyo; Park, Young-Sik

    2010-07-01

    Suprascapular neuropathy after an arthroscopic repair of a SLAP lesion is theoretically possible, but it has been rarely reported. We present a case of suprascapular nerve injury at the spinoglenoid notch as a complication of an improperly inserted suture anchor after repair of a type II SLAP lesion. The diagnosis was confirmed by the magnetic resonance imaging findings and an electrodiagnostic study, and direct compression of the nerve was visualized under repeat arthroscopy. An anatomic study of the superior glenoid shows that the available bone stock of the superior glenoid rim for the anchor insertion is found to decrease posteriorly. During the repair of a SLAP lesion, surgeons should consider the possibility of an iatrogenic injury to the suprascapular nerve by an improperly inserted suture anchor. Copyright (c) 2010 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes Following Closed Axillary Nerve Injury: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Joseph W; Eichinger, Josef K

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a 43-year-old male who sustained an axillary nerve injury secondary to a glenohumeral joint dislocation at a young age, and who has served over 20 years in the military with near normal shoulder function. In addition, we review the literature for the natural history of axillary nerve injury. A 43-year-old male sustained a left anterior glenohumeral dislocation in a motor vehicle accident as an 18-year-old. Following prompt manual reduction and subsequent physical therapy, the patient developed a permanent axillary nerve palsy. Despite the development of complete atrophy of his deltoid musculature and persistent sensory loss in the axillary nerve distribution, he experienced restoration of function with minimal to no deficit. Ultimately, he enlisted in the military 4 years after the injury and has served 22 years, which includes combat deployments with normal shoulder function and absence of pain. Axillary nerve injury is a relatively common injury after anterior glenohumeral joint dislocation. There is little known about the long-term outcome of patient's with permanent axillary nerve injury. This case suggests that it is possible for a young athletic individual to function at a high level of activity after permanent loss of axillary nerve function. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  16. Isolated paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle: surgical release of the distal segment of the long thoracic nerve in 52 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Nail, L R; Bacle, G; Marteau, E; Corcia, P; Favard, L; Laulan, J

    2014-06-01

    Isolated serratus anterior (SA) paralysis is a rare condition that is secondary to direct trauma or overuse. Patients complain of neuropathic pain and/or muscle pain secondary to overexertion of the other shoulder stabilizing muscles. As the long thoracic nerve (LTN) passes along the thorax, it can be compressed by blood vessels and/or fibrotic tissue. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the outcomes of surgical release of the distal segment of the LTN in cases of isolated SA paralysis. This was a retrospective study of 52 consecutive cases operated on between 1997 and 2012. The average patient age was 32 years (range 13-70). Patients had been suffering from paralysis for an average of 2 years (range 4-259 months); the paralysis was complete in 52% of cases. Every patient underwent a preoperative electroneuromyography (ENMG) assessment to confirm that only the SA was affected and there were no signs of re-innervation. Every patient had abnormal intraoperative findings. There were no complications. All patients showed at least partial improvement following the procedure. The improvement was excellent or good in 45 cases (86.7%), moderate in 4 cases (7.7%) and slight in 3 cases (5.6%). In 32 cases (61.5%), the winged scapula was completely corrected; it was less prominent in 19 cases and was unchanged in one case. The best outcomes following surgical release occurred in patients who presented without preoperative or neuropathic pain and were treated within 18 months of paralysis. Isolated SA paralysis due to mechanical injury resembles entrapment neuropathy. We discovered signs of LTN compression or restriction during surgery. Surgical release of the distal segment of the LTN is a simple, effective treatment for pain that provides complete motor recovery when performed within the first 12 months of the paralysis. IV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Two Levels of Waviness Are Necessary to Package the Highly Extensible Nerves in Rorqual Whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillie, Margo A; Vogl, A Wayne; Gil, Kelsey N; Gosline, John M; Shadwick, Robert E

    2017-03-06

    Peripheral nerves are susceptible to stretch injury [1-4] and incorporate structural waviness at the level of the axons, fascicles, and nerve trunk to accommodate physiological increases in length [5, 6]. It is unknown whether there are limits to the amount of deformation that waviness can accommodate. In rorqual whales, a sub-group of baleen whales, nerves running through the ventral groove blubber (VGB) associated with the floor of the mouth routinely experience dramatically large deformations. In fact, some of these nerves more than double their length during lunge feeding and then recoil to a short, compressed state after each lunge [7-9]. It is unknown how these nerves have adapted to operate in both extended and recoiled states. Using micro-CT and mechanics, we have discovered that the VGB nerves from fin whales require two levels of waviness to prevent stretch damage in both extended and recoiled states. The entire nerve core itself is highly folded when recoiled and appears buckled. This folding provides slack for extension but unavoidably generates large stretches at the bends that could damage nerve fascicles within the core. The strain at the bends is minimized by the specific waveform adopted by the core [10, 11], while the existing bending strains are accommodated by a second level of waviness in the individual fascicles that avoids stretch of the fascicle itself. Structural hierarchy partitions the waviness between the two length scales, providing a mechanism to maintain total elongation while preventing the stretching of fascicles at the bends when recoiled. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  19. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  20. Comparison of nerve regenerative efficacy between decellularized nerve graft and nonwoven chitosan conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaba, Hiroki; Terada-Nakaishi, Michiko; Wang, Wei; Itoh, Soichiro; Nozaki, Kosuke; Nagai, Akiko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-05-12

    Recently decellularized nerves with various methods are reported as highly functional nerve grafts for the treatment of nerve defects. To evaluate the efficacy of decellularized allogeneic nerve, compared with oriented chitosan mesh tube, and an autologous nerve. Sciatic nerves harvested from Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were decellularized in combination with Sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100. A graft into the sciatic nerve in Wistar rats was performed with the decellularized SD rat sciatic nerves or oriented chitosan nonwoven nanofiber mesh tubes (15 mm in length, N=5 in each group). A portion of sciatic nerve of Wistar rat was cut, reversed and re-sutured in-situ as a control. Nerve functional and histological evaluations were performed 25 weeks postoperatively. It was revealed that functional, electrophysiological and histological recoveries in the decellularized nerve group match those in the autograft group. Recovery of sensory function and nerve maturation in the decellularized nerve group were superior to those in the chitosan mesh tube group. Nerve regeneration in the decellularized nerves could match that in the autografts and is somehow superior to artificial chitosan mesh tube. Detergents wash of SDS and Triton X-100 could obtain highly functional nerve grafts from allografts.

  1. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  2. Detergent-free Decellularized Nerve Grafts for Long-gap Peripheral Nerve Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Vasudevan, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: This study describes a detergent-free nerve decellularization technique for reconstruction of long-gap nerve injuries. We compared DFD grafts with an established detergent processing technique and found that DFD nerve grafts are successful in promoting regeneration across long-gap peripheral nerve defects as an alternative to existing strategies.

  3. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    OpenAIRE

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected b...

  4. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  5. Corticosteroids for treating nerve damage in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, Natasja; Nicholls, Peter; Smith, Cairns; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Leprosy causes nerve damage which can result in nerve function impairment and disability. Corticosteroids are commonly used for treating nerve damage, although the long-term effect is uncertain. Objectives: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nerve damage in leprosy. Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 4), MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1...

  6. Behavioral models of pain states evoked by physical injury to the peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Linda S; Yaksh, Tony L

    2009-10-01

    Physical injury or compression of the root, dorsal root ganglion, or peripheral sensory axon leads to well-defined changes in biology and function. Behaviorally, humans report ongoing painful dysesthesias and aberrations in function, such that an otherwise innocuous stimulus will yield a pain report. These behavioral reports are believed to reflect the underlying changes in nerve function after injury, wherein increased spontaneous activity arises from the neuroma and dorsal root ganglion and spinal changes increase the response of spinal projection neurons. These pain states are distinct from those associated with tissue injury and pose particular problems in management. To provide for developing an understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these pain states and to promote development of therapeutic agents, preclinical models involving section, compression, and constriction of the peripheral nerve or compression of the dorsal root ganglion have been developed. These models give rise to behaviors, which parallel those observed in the human after nerve injury. The present review considers these models and their application.

  7. Sixth Nerve Palsy in Paediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Julia E; Reem, Rachel E; Aylward, Shawn C; Rogers, David L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the incidence and describe the characteristics of sixth cranial nerve (CN VI) palsy in paediatric patients with intracranial hypertension (IH). A retrospective chart review of central Ohio children diagnosed with IH over the 3-year period from 2010 to 2013 was conducted. IH without identifiable cause was defined as idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), whereas IH with identifiable pathologic aetiology was deemed secondary intracranial hypertension (SIH). A subset of patients with CN VI palsy was identified. Data collected included patient age, gender, past medical history, aetiology of SIH, ophthalmic examination, lumbar puncture results, neuroimaging results, and response to treatment. Seventy-eight children with intracranial hypertension were included in the study. Nine (11.5%) children (four males, five females; median age 14, range: 3-18) were found to have a unilateral ( n = 2) or bilateral ( n = 7) CN VI palsy. Five children had IIH; the remaining four had SIH from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis ( n = 2) and infection ( n = 2). The mean lumbar puncture opening pressure for the nine patients with CN VI palsy was 40 cm H 2 O (range: 21-65 cm H 2 O). Papilloedema was present in 8/9 (89%) patients. One patient required a lumboperitoneal shunt, and two others required optic nerve sheath fenestrations in addition to medical management. All cases of CN VI palsy resolved with treatment. In our primary service area, the incidence of CN VI palsy is approximately 12% among paediatric IH patients. The majority of cases with CN VI palsy presented with papilloedema and all cases resolved with treatment of intracranial hypertension.

  8. Some Aspects of Facial Nerve Paralysis*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1872 Duchenne described the technique of nerve ex- citability testing for facial paralysis. According to the severity of the condition, peripheral nerve lesions can be classified on the bases of electrical tests, as: (a) neurapraxia; (b) axonotmesis; and (c) neurot- mesis. This classification for peripheral nerve lesions was intro-.

  9. Peripheral nerve lesions in Zimbabwe: a retrospective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tests of nerve function carried out in this laboratory include sensory and motor nerve conduction measurements, electromyography and somatosensory evoked potentials. Their application has been reviewed previously1. Peripheral nerves are common sites of injury. The consequences can be debilitating to the individual.

  10. a technique to repair peripheral nerve injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End-to-side nerve suture (ETSNS) has until recently been extensively researched in the laboratory animal (rat and baboon). Lateral sprouting from an intact nerve into an attached nerve does occur, and functional recovery (sensory and motor) has been demonstrated. We have demonstrated conclusively that ETSNS in the ...

  11. Evaluation of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness profile in thyroid ophthalmopathy without optic nerve dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Mugdha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL thickness profile in patients of thyroid ophthalmopathy with no clinical signs of optic nerve dysfunction. METHODS: A prospective, case-control, observational study conducted at a tertiary care centre. Inclusion criteria consisted of patients with eyelid retraction in association with any one of: biochemical thyroid dysfunction, exophthalmos, or extraocular muscle involvement; or thyroid dysfunction in association with either exophthalmos or extra-ocular muscle involvement; or a clinical activity score (CAS>3/7. Two measurements of RNFL thickness were done for each eye, by Cirrus HD-optical coherence tomography 6mo apart. RESULTS: Mean age of the sample was 38.75y (range 13-70y with 18 males and 22 females. Average RNFL thickness at first visit was 92.06±12.44 µm, significantly lower than control group (101.28±6.64 µm (P=0.0001. Thickness of inferior quadrant decreased from 118.2±21.27 µm to 115.0±22.27 µm after 6mo (P=0.02. There was no correlation between the change in CAS and RNFL thickness. CONCLUSION: Decreased RNFL thickness is an important feature of thyroid orbitopathy, which is an inherent outcome of compressive optic neuropathy of any etiology. Subclinical RNFL damage continues in the absence of clinical activity of the disease. RNFL evaluation is essential in Grave’s disease and active intervention may be warranted in the presence of significant damage.

  12. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swallowing, the gag reflex, and speech Control of muscle in some internal organs and the heart rate This function is not tested as part of the cranial nerve examination. 11th Accessory Neck turning and shoulder shrugging The person is asked to turn the ...

  13. Neuromodulation of the Suprascapular Nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurt, E.; Eijk, T. van; Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Arnts, I.; Steegers, M.A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intractable shoulder pain (CISP) is defined as shoulder pain which is present for longer than 6 months and does not respond to standard treatments like medication, physical therapy, rehabilitation, selective nerve blocks and local infiltrations, or orthopedic procedures. The etiology of CISP

  14. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  15. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Divakar Gosavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  16. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape

  17. Enhancing Peripheral Nerve Regeneration with a Novel Drug-Delivering Nerve Conduit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve rate of nerve regeneration. We have successfully...deliver nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for at least 30 days to improve the nerve regeneration. The...regeneration, nerve conduits, autograft, drug delivery device, nerve growth factor, glial cell line-derived neutrophic factor, polytetrafluoroethylene

  18. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypog...

  19. Let-7 microRNAs Regenerate Peripheral Nerve Regeneration by Targeting Nerve Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shiying; Wang, Xinghui; Gu, Yun; Chen, Chu; Wang, Yaxian; Liu, Jie; Hu, Wen; Yu, Bin; Wang, Yongjun; Ding, Fei; Liu, Yan; Gu, Xiaosong

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common clinical problem. Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes peripheral nerve regeneration, but its clinical applications are limited by several constraints. In this study, we found that the time-dependent expression profiles of eight let-7 family members in the injured nerve after sciatic nerve injury were roughly similar to each other. Let-7 microRNAs (miRNAs) significantly reduced cell proliferation and migration of primary Schwann cells (SCs) by directly target...

  20. Transfer of pectoral nerves to suprascapular and axillary nerves: an anatomic feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sylvain; Balaguer, Thierry; Baque, Patrick; Lebreton, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    We conducted an anatomic study to provide detailed information on the pectoral nerves and anatomic data on the transfer of the pectoral nerves to the axillary nerve. Moreover, we experimentally determined the feasibility of transferring the pectoral nerves to the suprascapular nerve in upper brachial plexus injury. We dissected 26 brachial plexus from 15 fresh cadavers. The origin, location, course, and branching of the pectoral nerves were recorded. The length and the diameter of the pectoral nerves were measured. The diameter of the suprascapular and axillary nerves was recorded. In all dissections, we assessed the feasibility of directly transferring the pectoral nerves to the suprascapular and axillary nerves. We found 3 constant branches of pectoral nerves arising from 3 distinct origins in 20 cases, and 3 constant branches arising from 2 distinct origins in 6 cases. The C7 sent nerve fibers to all 3 branches. The average length and diameter of the superior, middle, and inferior branches of the pectoral nerves were 65 mm, 110 mm, and 105 mm, and 2.0 mm, 2.3 mm, ad 2.4 mm, respectively. The average diameter of the suprascapular and axillary were 2.8 mm and 3.6 mm, respectively. The superior branch reached the suprascapular and axillary nerves in 17 and 8 cases. The middle and inferior branches reached the suprascapular and axillary nerve in all dissections. With an adequate length, diameter, and nerve composition, the middle and inferior branches of the pectoral nerves are suitable donor nerves to the axillary nerve and a potential source of reinnervation of the suprascapular nerve in upper brachial plexus injury. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Advanced and standardized evaluation of neurovascular compression syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastreiter, Peter; Vega Higuera, Fernando; Tomandl, Bernd; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Naraghi, Ramin

    2004-05-01

    Caused by a contact between vascular structures and the root entry or exit zone of cranial nerves neurovascular compression syndromes are combined with different neurological diseases (trigeminal neurolagia, hemifacial spasm, vertigo, glossopharyngeal neuralgia) and show a relation with essential arterial hypertension. As presented previously, the semi-automatic segmentation and 3D visualization of strongly T2 weighted MR volumes has proven to be an effective strategy for a better spatial understanding prior to operative microvascular decompression. After explicit segmentation of coarse structures, the tiny target nerves and vessels contained in the area of cerebrospinal fluid are segmented implicitly using direct volume rendering. However, based on this strategy the delineation of vessels in the vicinity of the brainstem and those at the border of the segmented CSF subvolume are critical. Therefore, we suggest registration with MR angiography and introduce consecutive fusion after semi-automatic labeling of the vascular information. Additionally, we present an approach of automatic 3D visualization and video generation based on predefined flight paths. Thereby, a standardized evaluation of the fused image data is supported and the visualization results are optimally prepared for intraoperative application. Overall, our new strategy contributes to a significantly improved 3D representation and evaluation of vascular compression syndromes. Its value for diagnosis and surgery is demonstrated with various clinical examples.

  2. Adrenaline with lidocaine for digital nerve blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Rath, Santosh; Kalaivani, Mani; Bhanderi, Neel

    2015-03-19

    Surgery on fingers is a common procedure in emergency and day care surgery. Adrenaline combined with lidocaine can prolong digital nerve block and provide a bloodless operating field. Extended postoperative pain relief can reduce the need for analgesics and can facilitate hand rehabilitation. Conventionally, adrenaline is avoided at anatomical sites with end arteries such as digits, penis and pinna because of concerns about arterial spasm, ischaemia and gangrene distal to the site of drug infiltration. To assess the safety and efficacy of use of adrenaline (any dilution) combined with lidocaine (any dilution) for digital nerve blocks (fingers and toes). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2014), MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1966 to 18 November 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid SP (1980 to 18 November 2014). We also searched specific websites, such as www.indmed.nic.in; www.cochrane-sadcct.org; and www.Clinicaltrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the use of adrenaline with lidocaine and plain lidocaine in patients undergoing surgery on digits (fingers and toes). Our primary outcomes were duration of anaesthesia, adverse outcomes such as ischaemia distal to the injection site and cost analysis. Our secondary outcomes were duration of postoperative pain relief and reduced bleeding during surgery. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors independently extracted details of trial methodology and outcome data from reports of all trials considered eligible for inclusion. We performed all analyses on an intention-to-treat basis. We used a fixed-effect model when no evidence of significant heterogeneity between studies was found and a random-effects model when heterogeneity was likely. We included four RCTs with 167 participants. Risk of bias of the included studies was high, as none of them reported method of randomization, allocation concealment

  3. TPC data compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Jens; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Lindenstruth, Volker; Plamper, Patrick; Roehrich, Dieter; Schaefer, Erich; W. Schulz, Markus; M. Steinbeck, Timm; Stock, Reinhard; Sulimma, Kolja; Vestboe, Anders; Wiebalck, Arne E-mail: wiebalck@kip.uni-heidelberg.de

    2002-08-21

    In the collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions in fixed-target and collider experiments, multiplicities of several ten thousand charged particles are generated. The main devices for tracking and particle identification are large-volume tracking detectors (TPCs) producing raw event sizes in excess of 100 Mbytes per event. With increasing data rates, storage becomes the main limiting factor in such experiments and, therefore, it is essential to represent the data in a way that is as concise as possible. In this paper, we present several compression schemes, such as entropy encoding, modified vector quantization, and data modeling techniques applied on real data from the CERN SPS experiment NA49 and on simulated data from the future CERN LHC experiment ALICE.

  4. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  5. Anterior deltopectoral approach for axillary nerve neurotisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, J Terrence Jose

    2012-04-01

    To report outcome of axillary nerve neurotisation for brachial plexus injury through the anterior deltopectoral approach. Nine men aged 20 to 52 (mean, 27.8) years with brachial plexus injury underwent axillary nerve neurotisation through the anterior deltopectoral approach. Three of the patients had complete avulsion of C5-T1 nerve roots. The remaining 6 patients had brachial plexus injury of C5-C6 nerve roots, with associated subluxation of the glenohumeral joint, atrophy of the supraspinatus, deltoid and elbow flexors. They had no active shoulder abduction, external rotation, and elbow flexion. The pectoralis major and minor were cut and/or retracted to expose the underlying infraclavicular plexus. The axillary nerve was identified with respect to the available donor nerves (long head of triceps branch, thoracodorsal nerve, and medial pectoral nerve). In addition to the axillary nerve neurotisation, each patient had a spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve for better shoulder animation. Patients were followed up for 24 to 30 (mean, 26) months. In the 3 patients with C5-T1 nerve root injuries, the mean active abduction and external rotation were 63 and 20 degrees, respectively, whereas the mean abduction strength was M3 (motion against gravity). In the 6 patients with C5-C6 nerve root injuries, the mean active abduction and external rotation were 133 and 65 degrees, respectively, whereas the strength of the deltoids and triceps was M5 (normal) in all. In 4 patients with the pectoralis major cut and repaired, the muscle regained normal strength. The anterior deltopectoral approach enabled easy access to all available donor nerves for axillary nerve neurotisation and achieved good outcomes.

  6. Tight bounds for top tree compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Fernstrøm, Finn; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We consider compressing labeled, ordered and rooted trees using DAG compression and top tree compression. We show that there exists a family of trees such that the size of the DAG compression is always a logarithmic factor smaller than the size of the top tree compression (even for an alphabet...

  7. Complete 3rd cranial nerve dysfunction postdeflation/ excision of an encasing pituitary macroadenoma intrasellular cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng C. S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system injury in particular cranial nerve palsy has been reported to be as high as 2%. Such prevalence of palsy generally attributed to surgical manipulation at the cavernous sinus, especially incurring the abducens nerve. We report the first case of acute oculomotor nerve sequel to the release of cystic fluid wrapping the nerve following a transsphenoidal excision of pituitary macroadenoma in a 57-year-old woman. She attended with the presentation of acute excruciating headache associated with partial drooping of right eye. The computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were consistent with pituitary apoplexy of an underlying pituitary macroadenoma. Urgent transsphenoidal hypophysectomy was done. Intra-operatively, cystic fluid was aspirated during pituitary tumour dissection. At the same time, curettage was employed to removal residual tumour after the tumour biopsy. Immediate post-operative assessment noted complete right eye ptosis, with clinical evidence of complete right third and fourth nerve palsies. MRI was repeated a week later in view of such palsy non-resolution. However, no local compression or edema noted. Observation and monitoring were opted versus surgical revision. Propitiously the aforementioned cranial nerve palsies persist for a month and subsequently subsided. In this case, we highlight the potential deleterious impact of aspirating cystic component and curettaging during pituitary surgery. Likely postulated accounts for such occurrence include sudden release of fluid pressure with resultant cystic traction on its enfolding cranial nerves and subsequent neuropraxia. We aim to invite comments that could enlighten us on this gray area.

  8. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  9. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.

  10. Generalized massive optimal data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsing, Justin; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Data compression has become one of the cornerstones of modern astronomical data analysis, with the vast majority of analyses compressing large raw datasets down to a manageable number of informative summaries. In this paper we provide a general procedure for optimally compressing N data down to n summary statistics, where n is equal to the number of parameters of interest. We show that compression to the score function - the gradient of the log-likelihood with respect to the parameters - yields n compressed statistics that are optimal in the sense that they preserve the Fisher information content of the data. Our method generalizes earlier work on linear Karhunen-Loéve compression for Gaussian data whilst recovering both lossless linear compression and quadratic estimation as special cases when they are optimal. We give a unified treatment that also includes the general non-Gaussian case as long as mild regularity conditions are satisfied, producing optimal non-linear summary statistics when appropriate. As a worked example, we derive explicitly the n optimal compressed statistics for Gaussian data in the general case where both the mean and covariance depend on the parameters.

  11. Compressibility effect in vortex identification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 2 (2009), s. 473-475 ISSN 0001-1452 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200600801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : vortex * vortex identification * compressible flows * compressibility effect Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.990, year: 2009

  12. Compressed sensing for body MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Li; Benkert, Thomas; Block, Kai Tobias; Sodickson, Daniel K; Otazo, Ricardo; Chandarana, Hersh

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of compressed sensing for increasing imaging speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has raised significant interest among researchers and clinicians, and has initiated a large body of research across multiple clinical applications over the last decade. Compressed sensing aims to reconstruct unaliased images from fewer measurements than are traditionally required in MRI by exploiting image compressibility or sparsity. Moreover, appropriate combinations of compressed sensing with previously introduced fast imaging approaches, such as parallel imaging, have demonstrated further improved performance. The advent of compressed sensing marks the prelude to a new era of rapid MRI, where the focus of data acquisition has changed from sampling based on the nominal number of voxels and/or frames to sampling based on the desired information content. This article presents a brief overview of the application of compressed sensing techniques in body MRI, where imaging speed is crucial due to the presence of respiratory motion along with stringent constraints on spatial and temporal resolution. The first section provides an overview of the basic compressed sensing methodology, including the notion of sparsity, incoherence, and nonlinear reconstruction. The second section reviews state-of-the-art compressed sensing techniques that have been demonstrated for various clinical body MRI applications. In the final section, the article discusses current challenges and future opportunities. 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:966-987. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Images compression in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, M.S.; Furuie, S.S.; Moura, L.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of two methods for images compression in nuclear medicine was evaluated. The LZW precise, and Cosine Transformed, approximate, methods were analyzed. The results were obtained, showing that the utilization of approximated method produced images with an agreeable quality for visual analysis and compression rates, considerably high than precise method. (C.G.C.)

  14. Compressive Sensing in Communication Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    . The need for cheaper, smarter and more energy efficient wireless devices is greater now than ever. This thesis addresses this problem and concerns the application of the recently developed sampling theory of compressive sensing in communication systems. Compressive sensing is the merging of signal...... acquisition and compression. It allows for sampling a signal with a rate below the bound dictated by the celebrated Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem. In some communication systems this necessary minimum sample rate, dictated by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem, is so high it is at the limit of what...... with using compressive sensing in communication systems. The main contribution of this thesis is two-fold: 1) a new compressive sensing hardware structure for spread spectrum signals, which is simpler than the current state-of-the-art, and 2) a range of algorithms for parameter estimation for the class...

  15. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... predictors. Thus, nerve gap distance and repair type exert their influence through time to muscle reinnervation. These findings emphasize that factors that control early axonal outgrowth influence the final level of recovery attained years later. They also highlight that a time window exists within which...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  16. Neurological Study of Radial Nerve Conduction During Endoscopic Radial Artery Harvesting:An Intra‐Operative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Bisleri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic radial artery harvesting (ERAH is a feasible and attractive minimally invasive approach for conduit procurement, however there have been concerns about a potential neurological damage occurring at the harvest limb site secondary to injury of the radial nerve during endoscopic harvesting. We present a case of ERAH in which we evaluated intraoperatively the characteristics of radial nerve conduction by means of electroneuromyography (ENM during harvesting. No pathological changes of nerve conduction were detected at the harvest limb site during surgery and postoperatively, thereby supporting the benefits of the endoscopic approach in terms of neurological outcomes following radial artery procurements with a less invasive approach.

  17. Secondary Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    7 October 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cluster of craters in far western Arabia Terra. The crater cluster is oriented along a line that runs nearly east-west (left-right) across the scene. Clusters of craters positioned along a line like this are secondary craters -- that is, they formed as the result of a much larger meteor, asteroid, or cometary impact somewhere else in the region. These craters do not form from the object that impacted Mars to form the larger, primary crater; these are the product of the impact of the rocks and debris thrown out by the larger impact. Location near: 14.9oN, 19.3oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  18. Assessment of neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with a boundary fusion three-dimensional magnetic resonance cisternogram/angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toru; Omi, Megumi; Ohsako, Chika; Onoda, Keisuke; Date, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Precise assessment of the complex nerve-vessel relationship at the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve is useful for the planning of the microvascular decompression (MVD) in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. We have applied a boundary imaging of fusion three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) cisternogram/angiogram. The boundary imaging allows virtual assessment of the spatial relationship of the neurovascular compression at the REZ of the trigeminal nerve. The boundary images depicted complex anatomical relationship of the offending vessels to the trigeminal nerve REZ. The presence of offending vessels, compressive site, and degree of neurovascular compression were assessed from various viewpoints in the cistern and virtually through the brainstem and trigeminal nerve per se. The 3D visualization of the nerve-vessel relationship with fusion images was consistent with the intraoperative findings. The boundary fusion 3D MR cisternogram/angiogram may prove a useful adjunct for the diagnosis and decision-marking process to execute the MVD in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. (author)

  19. Intermuscular aponeuroses between the flexor muscles of the forearm and their relationships with the ulnar nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hyung-Sun; Liu, Hong-Fu; Kim, Jun-Ho; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Chung, In-Hyuk; Kim, In-Beom

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the morphological characteristics of the intermuscular aponeurosis between the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS; IMAS), and that between the FCU and flexor digitorum profundus (FDP; IMAP), and their topographic relationships with the ulnar nerve. Fifty limbs of 38 adult cadavers were studied. The IMAS extended along the deep surface of the FCU adjoining the FDS, having the appearance of a ladder, giving off "steps" that decreased in width from superficial to deep around the middle of the forearm. Its proximal part divided into two bands connected by a thin membrane, and was attached to the medial epicondyle and the tubercle (the most medial prominent part of the coronoid process of the ulna), respectively. The IMAP extended deep between the FCU and FDP from the antebrachial fascia, and its distal end was located on the posterior border of the FCU. The IMAP became broader toward its proximal part, and its proximal end was attached anterior and posterior to the tubercle and the olecranon, respectively. The ulnar nerve passed posterior to the medial epicondyle and then medial to the tubercle, and was crossed by the deep border of the IMAS at 58.3 ± 14.1 mm below the medial epicondyle. The deep border of the IMAS and aberrant tendinous structure passing across the ulnar nerve, or the parts of the IMAS and IMAP passing posterior to the ulnar nerve are potential causes of ulnar nerve compression.

  20. MR imaging of the lumber spine; Visualization capability of the nerve root

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Kazumasa; Hieda, Hiroshi; Goto, Takeshi; Goto, Hiroshi; Koga, Hiromichi; Hiraoka, Kouji (Moji Rousai Hospital, Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-01-01

    We studied visualization capability of the nerve root in mainly coronary section pattern using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI was carried out in 91 patients with lumbago and sciatica. Coronary section was additionally photographed in 58 cases of these patients (32 with intervertebral hernia, 20 with spinal canal stenosis, 2 with spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, 2 with compression fracture and the other 2 patients). The visualization capability of the nerve root was studied with photographing 2 pulse systems of the coronary section by using spin echo and field echo methods. The high signal area of the cerebrospinal fluid and nerve root in the normal lumbar vertebra was noted by field echo method, and pattern that is visualized by myelogram was obtained. The coincidence of the main foci (disturbed lesions of the nerve root) in the intervertebral hernia and coronary section pattern was noted in 21 of 32 cases (64.5%) with considerably high ratio. The condition of the nerve root in the blocked lesion was visualized in the spinal canal stenosis. (author).

  1. Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Takahoko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4 LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60 cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%, and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery.

  2. Manual therapy and neurodynamic mobilization in a patient with peroneal nerve paralysis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Pillastrini, Paolo; Borboni, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe a therapeutic intervention for peroneal nerve paralysis involving the sciatic nerve. A 24-year-old man presented with peroneal nerve paralysis with decreased sensation, severe pain in the popliteal fossa, and steppage gait, which occurred 3 days prior to the consultation. Magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography confirmed lumbar disk herniation with sciatic common peroneal nerve entrapment in the popliteal fossa. A combined treatment protocol of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization including soft tissue work of the psoas and hamstring muscles was performed. Outcome measures were assessed at pretreatment, 1 week posttreatment, and 3-month follow-up and included numeric pain rating scale, range of motion, pressure pain threshold, and manual muscle testing. Treatment interventions were applied for 3 sessions over a period of 1 week. Results showed reduction of the patient's subjective pain and considerable improvement in range of motion, strength, and sensation in his left foot, which was restored to full function. A combined program of spinal and fibular head manipulation and neurodynamic mobilization reduced pain, increased range of motion and strength, and restored full function to the left leg in this patient who had severe functional impairment related to a compressed left common peroneal nerve.

  3. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  4. Therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue using implantable thin-film wireless nerve stimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R; Gamble, Paul; Stephen, Manu; Ray, Wilson Z

    2018-02-09

    OBJECTIVE Electrical stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue has been shown to accelerate axonal regeneration. Yet existing methods of applying electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerves have presented significant barriers to clinical translation. In this study, the authors examined the use of a novel implantable wireless nerve stimulator capable of simultaneously delivering therapeutic electrical stimulation of injured peripheral nerve tissue and providing postoperative serial assessment of functional recovery. METHODS Flexible wireless stimulators were fabricated and implanted into Lewis rats. Thin-film implants were used to deliver brief electrical stimulation (1 hour, 20 Hz) to sciatic nerves after nerve crush or nerve transection-and-repair injuries. RESULTS Electrical stimulation of injured nerves via implanted wireless stimulators significantly improved functional recovery. Brief electrical stimulation was observed to increase the rate of functional recovery after both nerve crush and nerve transection-and-repair injuries. Wireless stimulators successfully facilitated therapeutic stimulation of peripheral nerve tissue and serial assessment of nerve recovery. CONCLUSIONS Implantable wireless stimulators can deliver therapeutic electrical stimulation to injured peripheral nerve tissue. Implantable wireless nerve stimulators might represent a novel means of facilitating therapeutic electrical stimulation in both intraoperative and postoperative settings.

  5. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-yuan Fan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury.

  6. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-long Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery.

  7. Delayed peripheral nerve repair: methods, including surgical ′cross-bridging′ to promote nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the capacity of Schwann cells to support peripheral nerve regeneration, functional recovery after nerve injuries is frequently poor, especially for proximal injuries that require regenerating axons to grow over long distances to reinnervate distal targets. Nerve transfers, where small fascicles from an adjacent intact nerve are coapted to the nerve stump of a nearby denervated muscle, allow for functional return but at the expense of reduced numbers of innervating nerves. A 1-hour period of 20 Hz electrical nerve stimulation via electrodes proximal to an injury site accelerates axon outgrowth to hasten target reinnervation in rats and humans, even after delayed surgery. A novel strategy of enticing donor axons from an otherwise intact nerve to grow through small nerve grafts (cross-bridges into a denervated nerve stump, promotes improved axon regeneration after delayed nerve repair. The efficacy of this technique has been demonstrated in a rat model and is now in clinical use in patients undergoing cross-face nerve grafting for facial paralysis. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation, combined with the surgical technique of promoting the regeneration of some donor axons to ′protect′ chronically denervated Schwann cells, improves nerve regeneration and, in turn, functional outcomes in the management of peripheral nerve injuries.

  8. Evaluation of mammogram compression efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przelaskowski, A.; Surowski, P.; Kukula, A.

    2005-01-01

    Lossy image coding significantly improves performance over lossless methods, but a reliable control of diagnostic accuracy regarding compressed images is necessary. The acceptable range of compression ratios must be safe with respect to as many objective criteria as possible. This study evaluates the compression efficiency of digital mammograms in both numerically lossless (reversible) and lossy (irreversible) manner. Effective compression methods and concepts were examined to increase archiving and telediagnosis performance. Lossless compression as a primary applicable tool for medical applications was verified on a set 131 mammograms. Moreover, nine radiologists participated in the evaluation of lossy compression of mammograms. Subjective rating of diagnostically important features brought a set of mean rates given for each test image. The lesion detection test resulted in binary decision data analyzed statistically. The radiologists rated and interpreted malignant and benign lesions, representative pathology symptoms, and other structures susceptible to compression distortions contained in 22 original and 62 reconstructed mammograms. Test mammograms were collected in two radiology centers for three years and then selected according to diagnostic content suitable for an evaluation of compression effects. Lossless compression efficiency of the tested coders varied, but CALIC, JPEG-LS, and SPIHT performed the best. The evaluation of lossy compression effects affecting detection ability was based on ROC-like analysis. Assuming a two-sided significance level of p=0.05, the null hypothesis that lower bit rate reconstructions are as useful for diagnosis as the originals was false in sensitivity tests with 0.04 bpp mammograms. However, verification of the same hypothesis with 0.1 bpp reconstructions suggested their acceptance. Moreover, the 1 bpp reconstructions were rated very similarly to the original mammograms in the diagnostic quality evaluation test, but the

  9. Future Perspectives in the Management of Nerve Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Susan E

    2018-04-01

     The author presents a solicited "white paper" outlining her perspective on the role of nerve transfers in the management of nerve injuries.  PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were evaluated to compare nerve graft and nerve transfer. An evaluation of the scientific literature by review of index articles was also performed to compare the number of overall clinical publications of nerve repair, nerve graft, and nerve transfer. Finally, a survey regarding the prevalence of nerve transfer surgery was administrated to the World Society of Reconstructive Microsurgery (WSRM) results.  Both nerve graft and transfer can generate functional results and the relative success of graft versus transfer depended on the function to be restored and the specific transfers used. Beginning in the early 1990s, there has been a rapid increase from baseline of nerve transfer publications such that clinical nerve transfer publication now exceeds those of nerve repair or nerve graft. Sixty-two responses were received from WSRM membership. These surgeons reported their frequency of "usually or always using nerve transfers for repairing brachial plexus injuries as 68%, radial nerves as 27%, median as 25%, and ulnar as 33%. They reported using nerve transfers" sometimes for brachial plexus 18%, radial nerve 30%, median nerve 34%, ulnar nerve 35%.  Taken together this evidence suggests that nerve transfers do offer an alternative technique along with tendon transfers, nerve repair, and nerve grafts. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Effect of feedback on delaying deterioration in quality of compressions during 2 minutes of continuous chest compressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias S; Hjortrup, Peter Buhl; Wulff, Nille B

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Good quality basic life support (BLS) improves outcome following cardiac arrest. As BLS performance deteriorates over time we performed a parallel group, superiority study to investigate the effect of feedback on quality of chest compression with the hypothesis that feedback...... delays deterioration of quality of compressions. METHODS: Participants attending a national one-day conference on cardiac arrest and CPR in Denmark were randomized to perform single-rescuer BLS with (n = 26) or without verbal and visual feedback (n = 28) on a manikin using a ZOLL AED plus. Data were...... analyzed using Rescuenet Code Review. Blinding of participants was not possible, but allocation concealment was performed. Primary outcome was the proportion of delivered compressions within target depth compared over a 2-minute period within the groups and between the groups. Secondary outcome...

  11. The Impact of Motor Axon Misdirection and Attrition on Behavioral Deficit Following Experimental Nerve Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alant, Jacob Daniel de Villiers; Senjaya, Ferry; Ivanovic, Aleksandra; Forden, Joanne; Shakhbazau, Antos; Midha, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve transection and neuroma-in-continuity injuries are associated with permanent functional deficits, often despite successful end-organ reinnervation. Axonal misdirection with non-specific reinnervation, frustrated regeneration and axonal attrition are believed to be among the anatomical substrates that underlie the poor functional recovery associated with these devastating injuries. Yet, functional deficits associated with axonal misdirection in experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries have not yet been studied. We hypothesized that experimental neuroma-in-continuity injuries would result in motor axon misdirection and attrition with proportional persistent functional deficits. The femoral nerve misdirection model was exploited to assess major motor pathway misdirection and axonal attrition over a spectrum of experimental nerve injuries, with neuroma-in-continuity injuries simulated by the combination of compression and traction forces in 42 male rats. Sciatic nerve injuries were employed in an additional 42 rats, to evaluate the contribution of axonal misdirection to locomotor deficits by a ladder rung task up to 12 weeks. Retrograde motor neuron labeling techniques were utilized to determine the degree of axonal misdirection and attrition. Characteristic histological neuroma-in-continuity features were demonstrated in the neuroma-in-continuity groups and poor functional recovery was seen despite successful nerve regeneration and muscle reinnervation. Good positive and negative correlations were observed respectively between axonal misdirection (pinjuries of mixed motor nerves that contribute to the long-term functional deficits. Although widely accepted in theory, to our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence to convincingly demonstrate these correlations with data inclusive of the neuroma-in-continuity spectrum. This work emphasizes the need to focus on strategies that promote both robust and accurate nerve regeneration to optimize

  12. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    the nerve supply to intrinsic musculature in the hind foot and may be exacerbated by the lack of physical rehabilitative measures that would...LM, de Crombrugghe B. Some recent advances in the chemistry and biology of trans- forming growth factor-beta. J Cell Biol 1987;105:1039e45. 12. Hao Y...into strips, wrapped around nitrocellulose paper , and placed in a storage solution containing a 1:1 mix of 100% sterile glycerol and Dulbecco’s

  13. Mammography image compression using Wavelet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuhar Ripin; Md Saion Salikin; Wan Hazlinda Ismail; Asmaliza Hashim; Norriza Md Isa

    2004-01-01

    Image compression plays an important role in many applications like medical imaging, televideo conferencing, remote sensing, document and facsimile transmission, which depend on the efficient manipulation, storage, and transmission of binary, gray scale, or color images. In Medical imaging application such Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACs), the image size or image stream size is too large and requires a large amount of storage space or high bandwidth for communication. Image compression techniques are divided into two categories namely lossy and lossless data compression. Wavelet method used in this project is a lossless compression method. In this method, the exact original mammography image data can be recovered. In this project, mammography images are digitized by using Vider Sierra Plus digitizer. The digitized images are compressed by using this wavelet image compression technique. Interactive Data Language (IDLs) numerical and visualization software is used to perform all of the calculations, to generate and display all of the compressed images. Results of this project are presented in this paper. (Author)

  14. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  15. Clinical Evaluation of Decellularized Nerve Allograft with Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cells to Improve Peripheral Nerve Repair and Functional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    followed for 18 months post -surgery. Secondary outcomes will be examined to evaluate the efficacy of the co-treatment for nerve repair compared to...transplantation of in vitro differentiated bone-marrow stromal cells. Eur J Neurosci . 2001 Dec;14(11):1771-6. 20. Djouad F, Jackson WM, Bobick BE, Janjanin S...enrollment. Goals/Milestones Yr 1 Goals  Start Up, Hire PM, Identify Staff, Project Planning, Organization, Doc Prep  SRC/IRB /HRPO (SRC 10/16 IRB

  16. The Dehiscent Facial Nerve Canal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Yetiser

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental injury to the facial nerve where the bony canal defects are present may result with facial nerve dysfunction during otological surgery. Therefore, it is critical to know the incidence and the type of facial nerve dehiscences in the presence of normal development of the facial canal. The aim of this study is to review the site and the type of such bony defects in 144 patients operated for facial paralysis, myringoplasty, stapedotomy, middle ear exploration for sudden hearing loss, and so forth, other than chronic suppurative otitis media with or without cholesteatoma, middle ear tumors, and anomaly. Correlation of intraoperative findings with preoperative computerized tomography was also analyzed in 35 patients. Conclusively, one out of every 10 surgical cases may have dehiscence of the facial canal which has to be always borne in mind during surgical manipulation of the middle ear. Computerized tomography has some limitations to evaluate the dehiscent facial canal due to high false negative and positive rates.

  17. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  18. Axillary nerve injury associated with sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkook; Saetia, Kriangsak; Saha, Suparna; Kline, David G; Kim, Daniel H

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to present and investigate axillary nerve injuries associated with sports. This study retrospectively reviewed 26 axillary nerve injuries associated with sports between the years 1985 and 2010. Preoperative status of the axillary nerve was evaluated by using the Louisiana State University Health Science Center (LSUHSC) grading system published by the senior authors. Intraoperative nerve action potential recordings were performed to check nerve conduction and assess the possibility of resection. Neurolysis, suture, and nerve grafts were used for the surgical repair of the injured nerves. In 9 patients with partial loss of function and 3 with complete loss, neurolysis based on nerve action potential recordings was the primary treatment. Two patients with complete loss of function were treated with resection and suturing and 12 with resection and nerve grafting. The minimum follow-up period was 16 months (mean 20 months). The injuries were associated with the following sports: skiing (12 cases), football (5), rugby (2), baseball (2), ice hockey (2), soccer (1), weightlifting (1), and wrestling (1). Functional recovery was excellent. Neurolysis was performed in 9 cases, resulting in an average functional recovery of LSUHSC Grade 4.2. Recovery with graft repairs averaged LSUHSC Grade 3 or better in 11 of 12 cases Surgical repair can restore useful deltoid function in patients with sports-associated axillary nerve injuries, even in cases of severe stretch-contusion injury.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  20. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  1. Sarcoidosis with Major Airway, Vascular and Nerve Compromise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sekiguchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a 60-year-old Caucasian woman who presented with progressive dyspnea, cough and wheeze. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed innumerable bilateral inflammatory pulmonary nodules with bronchovascular distribution and a mediastinal and hilar infiltrative process with calcified lymphadenopathy leading to narrowing of lobar bronchi and pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram revealed pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed left vocal cord paralysis and significant narrowing of the bilateral bronchi with mucosal thickening and multiple nodules. Transbronchial biopsy was compatible with sarcoidosis. Despite balloon angioplasty of the left lower lobe and pulmonary artery, and medical therapy with oral corticosteroids, her symptoms did not significantly improve. To the authors’ knowledge, the present report describes the first case of pulmonary sarcoidosis resulting in major airway, vascular and nerve compromise due to compressive lymphadenopathy and suspected concurrent granulomatous infiltration. Its presentation mimicked idiopathic mediastinal fibrosis.

  2. Compressive sensing for urban radar

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of compressive sensing and sparse signal reconstruction, approaches to urban radar have shifted toward relaxed constraints on signal sampling schemes in time and space, and to effectively address logistic difficulties in data acquisition. Traditionally, these challenges have hindered high resolution imaging by restricting both bandwidth and aperture, and by imposing uniformity and bounds on sampling rates.Compressive Sensing for Urban Radar is the first book to focus on a hybrid of two key areas: compressive sensing and urban sensing. It explains how reliable imaging, tracki

  3. Anatomical variations of pronator teres muscle: predispositional role for nerve entrapment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edie Benedito Caetano

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the anatomical variations of the pronator teres muscle (PTM and its implication in the compression of the median nerve, which passes through the humeral and ulnar heads of the PTM. METHODS: For the present study, 100 upper limbs from human cadavers from the anatomy laboratory were dissected. Forty-six specimens were male and four, female, whose aged ranged from 28 to 77 years; 27 were white and 23, non-white. A pilot study consisting of six hands from three fresh cadaver dissections was conducted to familiarize the authors with the local anatomy; these were not included in the present study. RESULTS: The humeral and ulnar heads of PTM were present in 86 limbs. In 72 out of the 86 limbs, the median nerve was positioned between the two heads of the PTM; in 11, it passed through the muscle belly of ulnar head of the PTM, and in three, posteriorly to both heads of the PTM. When both heads were present, the median nerve was not observed as passing through the muscle belly of the humeral head of PTM. In 14 out of the 100 dissected limbs, the ulnar head of the PTM was not observed; in this situation, the median nerve was positioned posteriorly to the humeral head in 11 limbs, and passed through the humeral head in three. In 17 limbs, the ulnar head of PTM was little developed, with a fibrous band originating from the ulnar coronoid process, associated with a distal muscle component near the union with the humeral head. In four limbs, the ulnar head of the MPR was represented by a fibrous band. In both limbs of one cadaver, a fibrous band was observed between the supinator muscle and the humeral head of the PTM, passing over median nerve. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that these anatomical variations in relationship median nerve and PTM are potential factors for median nerve compression, as they narrow the space through which the median nerve passes.

  4. Axillary nerve injury in young adults--an overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-09-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (median age at trauma 13 years, range 9-24) with an axillary nerve injury were diagnosed by examination of shoulder function and electromyography (EMG). The patients had either a nerve reconstruction procedure or were treated conservatively and their recovery was monitored. The axillary nerve was explored and reconstructed at a median of 8 months (range 1-22 months) after trauma in 8/10 patients. Two patients were treated non-operatively. In 4/8 cases, a reconstruction with sural nerve graft was performed and in 1/8 case only exploration of the nerve was made (minor neuroma). In 3/8 cases a radial nerve branch transfer to the axillary nerve was chosen as the procedure. The shoulder was mobilised after 3 weeks with physiotherapy and the patients were monitored regularly. Functional recovery was observed in 9/10 cases (median follow up 11 months, range 7-64) with EMG signs of reinnervation in seven patients. Axillary nerve function should not be overlooked in young patients with a minor shoulder trauma. Nerve reconstruction can successfully recreate function.

  5. Axillary nerve injury in young adults-An overlooked diagnosis? Early results of nerve reconstruction and nerve transfers.

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlin, Lars; Cöster, Marcus; Björkman, Anders; Backman, Clas

    2012-01-01

    An injury to the axillary nerve from a shoulder trauma can easily be overlooked. Spontaneous functional recovery may occur, but occasionally reconstructive surgery is required. The time frame for nerve reconstruction procedures is from a neurobiological view crucial for a good functional outcome. This study presents a group of operatively and non-operatively treated young adults with axillary nerve injuries caused by motorcycle accidents, where the diagnosis was set late. Ten young men (media...

  6. A novel concept for continuous peripheral nerve blocks. Presentation of a new ultrasound-guided device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C; Madsen, M H; Lange, K H W

    2015-02-01

    Existing techniques for placing and maintaining the position of peripheral nerve catheters are associated with variable success rates and frequent secondary failures. These factors may affect the clinical efficacy and usefulness of peripheral nerve catheters. We developed a new concept and prototype for ultrasound-guided in-plane positioning and readjustment of peripheral nerve catheters (patent pending). The integrated catheter-needle prototype comprises three parts: a curved needle, a catheter with clear echogenic markings attached to the needle tail and a detachable hub allowing injection of local anesthetic while advancing the needle in the tissue. The system works like a suture and is introduced through the skin, passes in close relation to the nerve and exits through the skin. This allows in-plane ultrasound guidance throughout the procedure both during initial positioning as well as during later in-plane readjustment of the catheter. We tested the system in the popliteal region of two fresh cadavers in a preliminary proof of concept study. Both initial placement and secondary readjustment were precise, judged by the catheter orifices placed close to the sciatic nerve in the popliteal fossa. Circumferential spread of 3-ml isotonic saline around the sciatic nerve was observed on ultrasound images in both conditions. Preliminary proof of concept of this novel method demonstrates that precise in-plane ultrasound-guided initial placement and secondary in-plane readjustment is possible in fresh cadavers. Future studies should address the clinical efficacy and usefulness of this novel concept. © 2014 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Intraoperative Fluoroscopic Imaging for Suprascapular Nerve Localization During Spinal Accessory Nerve to Suprascapular Nerve Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabbad, Nicole C; Nuland, Kyle S; Pothula, Aravind

    2017-08-01

    Distal fiber transfer of the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) has been well described as an effective means to regain shoulder external rotation following upper trunk brachial plexus injuries. Both supine and prone positioning techniques have been described with comparable success. Whereas the posterior technique allows for sufficient distal length on the SAN for effective neurotization of the infraclavicular brachial plexus and SSN both proximal and distal to the suprascapular ligament, localization of the SSN within the suprascapular notch can be challenging and time intensive, especially in the obese patient. The use of intraoperative C-arm fluoroscopy is presented as a viable method for more exact suprascapular notch identification during dissection of the SSN. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Are compression stockings an effective treatment for orthostatic presyncope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Louise Protheroe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Syncope, or fainting, affects approximately 6.2% of the population, and is associated with significant comorbidity. Many syncopal events occur secondary to excessive venous pooling and capillary filtration in the lower limbs when upright. As such, a common approach to the management of syncope is the use of compression stockings. However, research confirming their efficacy is lacking. We aimed to investigate the effect of graded calf compression stockings on orthostatic tolerance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated orthostatic tolerance (OT and haemodynamic control in 15 healthy volunteers wearing graded calf compression stockings compared to two placebo stockings in a randomized, cross-over, double-blind fashion. OT (time to presyncope, min was determined using combined head-upright tilting and lower body negative pressure applied until presyncope. Throughout testing we continuously monitored beat-to-beat blood pressures, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output (finger plethysmography, cerebral and forearm blood flow velocities (Doppler ultrasound and breath-by-breath end tidal gases. There were no significant differences in OT between compression stocking (26.0±2.3 min and calf (29.3±2.4 min or ankle (27.6±3.1 min placebo conditions. Cardiovascular, cerebral and respiratory responses were similar in all conditions. The efficacy of compression stockings was related to anthropometric parameters, and could be predicted by a model based on the subject's calf circumference and shoe size (r = 0.780, p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data question the use of calf compression stockings for orthostatic intolerance and highlight the need for individualised therapy accounting for anthropometric variables when considering treatment with compression stockings.

  9. Morphological differences in skeletal muscle atrophy of rats with motor nerve and/or sensory nerve injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Lei; Lv, Guangming; Jiang, Shengyang; Yan, Zhiqiang; Sun, Junming; Wang, Ling; Jiang, Donglin

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs after denervation. The present study dissected the rat left ventral root and dorsal root at L4-6 or the sciatic nerve to establish a model of simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury. Results showed that with prolonged denervation time, rats with simple motor nerve injury, sensory nerve injury or mixed nerve injury exhibited abnormal behavior, reduced wet weight of the left gastrocnemius muscle, decreased diameter and cross-sectional...

  10. The Neuroprotective Effect of Alcoholic Extract of Cannabis Sativa on Neuronal Density of Spinal Cord Alpha Motoneurons after Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tehranipour

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Injuries of the peripheral nerve system affect the neurons cell body leading to axon injury. Cannabis sativa plant has anti oxidant and anti apoptotic effects. Therefore the aim of present study was to study the neuroprotective effect of alcoholic extract of cannabis sativa leaves on neuronal density of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord after sciatic nerve injury in rats. Methods: In this experimental research, animals were divided into four groups; A: control, B: compression, C: compression+ treatment with 25 mg/kg alcoholic extract, D: compression + treatment with 50 mg/kg extract (n=8. At first, sciatic nerve compression in B, C and D groups was achieved for 60 seconds using locker pincers. Alcoholic extract was injected intra peritoneally in the first and second weeks after compression. Then 28 days after compression, under profusion method, the lumbar spinal cord was sampled and the numerical density in each group was compared with the compression group. The data was analyzed with the use of Minitab 14 software and ANOVA statistical test. Results: Neuronal density showed a meaningful difference in the compression and control groups(P<0.001. Neuronal density in treatment groups(25, 50 mg/kg also had a meaningful increase(P<0.001 as compared to the compression group. Conclusion: Alcoholic extract of cannabis sativa leaves has a neuroprotective effect on spinal cord alpha motoneurons after injury. This could be due to growth and regeneration factors present in the alcoholic extract of cannabis sativa leaves that induce regeneration process in injured neurons or prevent degeneration.

  11. Efficient Lossy Compression for Compressive Sensing Acquisition of Images in Compressive Sensing Imaging Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing Imaging (CSI is a new framework for image acquisition, which enables the simultaneous acquisition and compression of a scene. Since the characteristics of Compressive Sensing (CS acquisition are very different from traditional image acquisition, the general image compression solution may not work well. In this paper, we propose an efficient lossy compression solution for CS acquisition of images by considering the distinctive features of the CSI. First, we design an adaptive compressive sensing acquisition method for images according to the sampling rate, which could achieve better CS reconstruction quality for the acquired image. Second, we develop a universal quantization for the obtained CS measurements from CS acquisition without knowing any a priori information about the captured image. Finally, we apply these two methods in the CSI system for efficient lossy compression of CS acquisition. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed solution improves the rate-distortion performance by 0.4~2 dB comparing with current state-of-the-art, while maintaining a low computational complexity.

  12. Compressed gas fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, John J.; Tiller, Dale B.; Wienhold, Paul D.; Hildebrand, Richard J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas vehicle fuel storage system comprised of a plurality of compressed gas pressure cells supported by shock-absorbing foam positioned within a shape-conforming container. The container is dimensioned relative to the compressed gas pressure cells whereby a radial air gap surrounds each compressed gas pressure cell. The radial air gap allows pressure-induced expansion of the pressure cells without resulting in the application of pressure to adjacent pressure cells or physical pressure to the container. The pressure cells are interconnected by a gas control assembly including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and means for connecting the fuel storage system to a vehicle power source and a refueling adapter. The gas control assembly is enclosed by a protective cover attached to the container. The system is attached to the vehicle with straps to enable the chassis to deform as intended in a high-speed collision.

  13. Compressed sensing for distributed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Coluccia, Giulio; Magli, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the state-of-the art in the exciting and timely topic of compressed sensing for distributed systems. It has to be noted that, while compressed sensing has been studied for some time now, its distributed applications are relatively new. Remarkably, such applications are ideally suited to exploit all the benefits that compressed sensing can provide. The objective of this book is to provide the reader with a comprehensive survey of this topic, from the basic concepts to different classes of centralized and distributed reconstruction algorithms, as well as a comparison of these techniques. This book collects different contributions on these aspects. It presents the underlying theory in a complete and unified way for the first time, presenting various signal models and their use cases. It contains a theoretical part collecting latest results in rate-distortion analysis of distributed compressed sensing, as well as practical implementations of algorithms obtaining performance close to...

  14. Lipofibromatous hamartoma of the superficial peroneal nerve: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Ling Kuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipofibromatous hamartoma, a rarely occurring nerve hamartoma, can present as an acrochordon, cutaneous cyst or other soft tissue tumor and is usually seen within the first three decades of life. The lesion presents as a slowly growing mass that is largely composed of fat and fibrous tissue with epineural and perineural proliferation. Although such tumors are rare, it is important for physicians to be aware of this disorder and recognize its signs because patients may present with what appears to be a benign skin tumor. If left untreated, the lesion may result in nerve compression and eventually lead to the development of peripheral neuropathy. Here, we present two cases of lipofibromatous hamartomas that presented over the ankle and dorsal foot, respectively, that appeared as simple and benign tumors upon initial inspection. Patients were without symptoms or neurological deficits, and diagnosis was not made until histopathological examination of the biopsied specimens. We also discuss the clinical manifestations, histopathological findings, and the management of lipofibromatous hamartomas.

  15. Imaging the Facial Nerve: A Contemporary Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Roehm, P.C.; Mends, F.; Hagiwara, M.; Fatterpekar, G.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging plays a critical role in the evaluation of a number of facial nerve disorders. The facial nerve has a complex anatomical course; thus, a thorough understanding of the course of the facial nerve is essential to localize the sites of pathology. Facial nerve dysfunction can occur from a variety of causes, which can often be identified on imaging. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are helpful for identifying bony facial canal and soft tissue abnormalities, respectively. Ultrasound of the facial nerve has been used to predict functional outcomes in patients with Bell’s palsy. More recently, diffusion tensor tractography has appeared as a new modality which allows three-dimensional display of facial nerve fibers

  16. Factors that influence peripheral nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Archibald, Simon J; Madison, Roger D

    2002-01-01

    Regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is often incomplete though it is uncertain which factors, such as the type and extent of the injury or the method or timing of repair, determine the degree of functional recovery. Serial electrophysiological techniques were used to follow recovery from...... median nerve lesions (n = 46) in nonhuman primates over 3 to 4 years, a time span comparable with such lesions in humans. Nerve gap distances of 5, 20, or 50mm were repaired with nerve grafts or collagen-based nerve guide tubes, and three electrophysiological outcome measures were followed: (1) compound...... muscle action potentials in the abductor pollicis brevis muscle, (2) the number and size of motor units in reinnervated muscle, and (3) compound sensory action potentials from digital nerve. A statistical model was used to assess the influence of three variables (repair type, nerve gap distance, and time...

  17. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the histopathological characteristics associated with the invasion of the optic nerve of uveal melanoma and to evaluate the association between invasion of the optic nerve and survival. In order to achieve this, all uveal melanomas with optic nerve invasion...... in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... invasion. Prelaminar/laminar optic nerve invasion was in multivariate analysis associated with focal retinal invasion, neovascularization of the chamber angle, and scleral invasion. Postlaminar invasion was further associated with non-spindle cell type and rupture of the inner limiting membrane...

  18. The nerve endings of the acetabular labrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y T; Azuma, H

    1995-11-01

    The nerve endings of the human acetabular labrum were investigated. Twenty-three acetabular labra were obtained from 24 fresh human cadavers, stained with Suzuki's silver impregnation and an immunohistochemical technique for neurogenic specific protein S-100, and examined by light and electron microscopy. Ramified free nerve endings were seen in all specimens by silver staining, and also were observed by the immunohistochemical technique for S-100 protein. Sensory nerve end organs, such as a Vater-Pacini corpuscle, Golgi-Mazzoni corpuscle, Ruffini corpuscle, and articular corpuscle (Krause corpuscle), were observed by silver staining. Collagen fibers were scattered sparsely in the superficial layer of the labrum, and nerve endings were observed mostly in this region. Collagen fibers were sparse, and nerve endings also were observed in some regions among the collagen fiber bundles in the inner layer. Innervation of the acetabular labrum was confirmed in this study, suggesting that nerve endings in the labrum may be involved in nociceptive and proprioceptive mechanisms.

  19. Isolated sixth nerve palsy from hemorrhage of a pontine cavernous malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Robert M; Klein, Joshua P; Pless, Misha L

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old woman who developed binocular horizontal diplopia was found to have an isolated fascicular sixth nerve palsy secondary to hemorrhage of a cavernous malformation within the left pontine tegmentum. There was sparing of the paramedian pontine reticular formation and absence of a horizontal gaze palsy. The natural history of cavernous malformations and a mechanism by which hemorrhage of these vascular lesions may produce minimal neurologic signs, including isolated ocular motor cranial nerve palsies, is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that includes susceptibility-weighted sequences leads to their accurate diagnosis.

  20. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p ...% and the amplitudes only to 7 ± 1% (P Touch sensation correlated with SNAP areas (p

  1. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  2. Effect of neurotrophic factor, MDP, on rats’ nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Fornazari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine the immune-modulating effects of the neurotrophic factor N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP on median nerve regeneration in rats. We used male Wistar rats (120-140 days of age, weighing 250-332 g and compared the results of three different techniques of nerve repair: 1 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures alone (group S - 10 rats, 2 epineural neurorrhaphy using sutures plus fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA; group SF - 20 rats, and 3 sutures plus FTA, with MDP added to the FTA (group SFM - 20 rats. Functional assessments using the grasp test were performed weekly for 12 weeks to identify recovery of flexor muscle function in the fingers secondary to median nerve regeneration. Histological analysis was also utilized. The total number and diameter of myelinated fibers were determined in each proximal and distal nerve segment. Two indices, reported as percentage, were calculated from these parameters, namely, the regeneration index and the diameter change index. By the 8th week, superiority of group SFM over group S became apparent in the grasping test (P = 0.005. By the 12th week, rats that had received MDP were superior in the grasping test compared to both group S (P < 0.001 and group SF (P = 0.001. Moreover, group SF was better in the grasping test than group S (P = 0.014. However, no significant differences between groups were identified by histological analysis. In the present study, rats that had received MDP obtained better function, in the absence of any significant histological differences.

  3. Nerve Decompression and Restless Legs Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRestless legs syndrome (RLS is a prevalent sleep disorder affecting quality of life and is often comorbid with other neurological diseases, including peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms related to RLS symptoms remain unclear, and treatment options are often aimed at symptom relief rather than etiology. RLS may present in distinct phenotypes often described as “primary” vs. “secondary” RLS. Secondary RLS is often associated with peripheral neuropathy. Nerve decompression surgery of the common and superficial fibular nerves is used to treat peripheral neuropathy. Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes report improved RLS symptoms following nerve decompression for peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to quantify the change in symptoms commonly associated with RLS using visual analog scales (VAS.MethodsForty-two patients completed VAS scales (0–10 for pain, burning, numbness, tingling, weakness, balance, tightness, aching, pulling, cramping, twitchy/jumpy, uneasy, creepy/crawly, and throbbing, both before and 15 weeks after surgical decompression.ResultsSubjects reported significant improvement among all VAS categories, except for “pulling” (P = 0.14. The change in VAS following surgery was negatively correlated with the pre-surgery VAS for both the summed VAS (r = −0.58, P < 0.001 and the individual VAS scores (all P < 0.01, such that patients who reported the worst symptoms before surgery exhibited relatively greater reductions in symptoms after surgery.ConclusionThis is the first study to suggest improvement in RLS symptoms following surgical decompression of the common and superficial fibular nerves. Further investigation is needed to quantify improvement using RLS-specific metrics and sleep quality assessments.

  4. Geometric Results for Compressible Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Recently, compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) has been elegantly formulated in terms of Lie derivatives. This paper exploits the geometrical properties of the Lie bracket to give new insights into the properties of compressible MHD behaviour, both with and without feedback of the magnetic field on the flow. These results are expected to be useful for the solution of MHD equations in both tokamak fusion experiments and space plasmas.

  5. Compressive spectroscopy by spectral modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    We review two compressive spectroscopy techniques based on modulation in the spectral domain that we have recently proposed. Both techniques achieve a compression ratio of approximately 10:1, however each with a different sensing mechanism. The first technique uses a liquid crystal cell as a tunable filter to modulate the spectral signal, and the second technique uses a Fabry-Perot etalon as a resonator. We overview the specific properties of each of the techniques.

  6. Optic nerve sheath fenestration in cryptococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Tatyana; Mirani, Neena; Turbin, Roger E

    2008-01-01

    A patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) developed crytpococcal meningitis, complicated by papilledema and severe progressive visual loss despite medical therapy. Bilateral optic sheath fenestration resulted in significant improvement in vision and resolution of papilledema. Histopathologic evaluation of the optic nerve sheath demonstrated numerous cryptococci. Optic nerve sheath fenestration may be an effective treatment method when high intracranial pressure is contributing to visual loss, even in the presence of involvement of the optic nerve sheath by the fungus. PMID:19668765

  7. Intermittent third nerve palsy with cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, J R

    1993-06-01

    In the several days before death, two AIDS patients with cryptococcal meningitis and increased intracranial pressure (ICP) experienced episodic unilateral third nerve palsies seemingly related to transient peaks in ICP. While cryptococcal neuritis may have predisposed the nerves to pressure effects, CT scans showed no evidence of tentorial herniation. These cases raise the possibility that severe elevations of ICP can precipitate third nerve paresis on rare occasions.

  8. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to ...... to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing. (C) 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V....

  9. Shrapnel Injury of Isolated Third Cranial Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Ulutaş, Murat; Seçer, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Isolated third nerve palsy develops in numerous intracranial pathologies such as closed head trauma, tumor, and aneurysm. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy caused by shrapnel injury is uncommon. After a penetrating intracranial shrapnel injury, our patient with oculomotor ophthalmoplegia underwent surgery. Microsurgery removed the shrapnel that was applying pressure on the third nerve, resulting in contusion. A partial recovery associated with regeneration was observed at month 9. Extraocular m...

  10. An audit of traumatic nerve injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, G

    2009-07-01

    The impact of trauma in the Irish healthcare setting is considerable. We present the results of a retrospective assessment of referrals to a Neurophysiology department for suspected traumatic nerve injury. A broad range of traumatic neuropathies was demonstrated on testing, from numerous causes. We demonstrate an increased liklihood of traumatic nerve injury after fracture \\/ dislocation (p = 0.007). Our series demonstrates the need for clinicians to be aware of the possibility of nerve injury post trauma, especially after bony injury.

  11. Unilateral Punctate Keratitis Secondary to Wallenberg Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boto, Ana; Del Hierro, Almudena; Capote, Maria; Noval, Susana; Garcia, Amanda; Santiago, Susana

    2014-01-01

    We studied three patients who developed left unilateral punctate keratitis after suffering left-sided Wallenberg Syndrome. A complex evolution occurred in two of them. In all cases, neurophysiological studies showed damage in the trigeminal sensory component at the bulbar level. Corneal involvement secondary to Wallenberg syndrome is a rare cause of unilateral superficial punctate keratitis. The loss of corneal sensitivity caused by trigeminal neuropathy leads to epithelial erosions that are frequently unobserved by the patient, resulting in a high risk of corneal-ulcer development with the possibility of superinfection. Neurophysiological studies can help to locate the anatomical level of damage at the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, confirming the suspected etiology of stroke, and demonstrating that prior vascular involvement coincides with the location of trigeminal nerve damage. In some of these patients, oculofacial pain is a distinctive feature. PMID:24882965

  12. Nerve Biopsy In The Diagnosis Of Leporsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazra B

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin and nerve biopsies were done in 33 cases of different clinical types of leprosy selected from Dermatology OPD of Medical College and Hospitals, Calcutta during 1994-95. Histopathological results were compared with emphasis on the role of nerve biopsies in detection of patients with multibacillary leprosy. The evident possibility of having patients with multibacillary leprosy in peripheral leprosy with multiple drugs. It is found that skin and nerve biopsy are equally informative in borderline and lepromatour leprosy and is the only means to diagnose polyneuritic leprosy. Nerve biopsy appears to be more informative in the diagnosis of all clinical types of leprosy.

  13. Muscle potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, I.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Van Ham, L. M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve and subsequent recording of the muscle-evoked potential (MEP) was performed in eight dogs and three cats with unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction. Localisation of the lesion in the sciatic nerve was based on the history, clinical neurological examination

  14. Genetic modification of human sural nerve segments by a lentiviral vector encoding nerve growth factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autologous nerve grafts are used to treat severe peripheral nerve injury, but recovery of nerve function after grafting is rarely complete. Exogenous application of neurotrophic factors may enhance regeneration, but thus far the application of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by

  15. One-stage human acellular nerve allograft reconstruction for digital nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-yuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human acellular nerve allografts have a wide range of donor origin and can effectively avoid nerve injury in the donor area. Very little is known about one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defects. The present study observed the feasibility and effectiveness of human acellular nerve allograft in the reconstruction of < 5-cm digital nerve defects within 6 hours after injury. A total of 15 cases of nerve injury, combined with nerve defects in 18 digits from the Department of Emergency were enrolled in this study. After debridement, digital nerves were reconstructed using human acellular nerve allografts. The patients were followed up for 6-24 months after reconstruction. Mackinnon-Dellon static two-point discrimination results showed excellent and good rates of 89%. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test demonstrated that light touch was normal, with an obvious improvement rate of 78%. These findings confirmed that human acellular nerve allograft for one-stage reconstruction of digital nerve defect after hand injury is feasible, which provides a novel trend for peripheral nerve reconstruction.

  16. The functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayvada, Haluk; Demirdöver, Cenk; Menderes, Adnan; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Karaca, Can

    2013-03-01

    The sciatic and peroneal nerves are the most frequently injured in lower extremities, followed by tibial and femoral nerves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional results of acute nerve grafting in traumatic sciatic nerve injuries. A total of 9 patients with sciatic nerve defect were treated with primary nerve grafting. The mean age was 31.7 years. The etiologic factors were gunshot wounds, traffic accident, and penetrating trauma. All of the patients had sciatic nerve defects ranging from 3.4 to 13.6 cm. The follow-up period ranged between 25 and 84 months. The tibial nerve motor function was "good" or "very good" (M3-M4) in 5 patients (55.6%). The plantar flexion was not sufficient for the rest of the patients. The peroneal nerve motor function was also "good" and "very good" in 3 patients (33.3%). The functional results of the acute nerve grafting of the sciatic nerve within the first week after the injury are poorer than reported in the related literature. This protocol should only be applied to select patients who have adequate soft tissue coverage and healthy nerve endings.

  17. A prospective clinical evaluation of biodegradable neurolac nerve guides for sensory nerve repair in the hand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertleff, MJOE; Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA

    Purpose: Our purpose was to study the recovery of sensory nerve function, after treatment of traumatic peripheral nerve lesions with a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-ε-caprolactone) Neurolac nerve guide (Polyganics B.V., Groningen, the Netherlands) versus the current standard reconstruction

  18. Biodegradable p(DLLA-epsilon-CL) nerve guides versus autologous nerve grafts : Electromyographic and video analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Nicolai, JPA; Gramsbergen, A; van der Werf, J.F.A.

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional effects of bridging a gap in the sciatic nerve of the rat with either a biodegradable copolymer of (DL)-lactide and epsilon -caprolactone [p(DLLA-epsilon -CL)] nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. Electromyograms (EMGs) of the gastrocnemius

  19. Electro-mechanical response of a 3D nerve bundle model to mechanical loads leading to axonal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, I; Destrade, M; Duffy, M; McHugh, P

    2018-03-01

    Traumatic brain injuries and damage are major causes of death and disability. We propose a 3D fully coupled electro-mechanical model of a nerve bundle to investigate the electrophysiological impairments due to trauma at the cellular level. The coupling is based on a thermal analogy of the neural electrical activity by using the finite element software Abaqus CAE 6.13-3. The model includes a real-time coupling, modulated threshold for spiking activation, and independent alteration of the electrical properties for each 3-layer fibre within a nerve bundle as a function of strain. Results of the coupled electro-mechanical model are validated with previously published experimental results of damaged axons. Here, the cases of compression and tension are simulated to induce (mild, moderate, and severe) damage at the nerve membrane of a nerve bundle, made of 4 fibres. Changes in strain, stress distribution, and neural activity are investigated for myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, by considering the cases of an intact and of a traumatised nerve membrane. A fully coupled electro-mechanical modelling approach is established to provide insights into crucial aspects of neural activity at the cellular level due to traumatic brain injury. One of the key findings is the 3D distribution of residual stresses and strains at the membrane of each fibre due to mechanically induced electrophysiological impairments, and its impact on signal transmission. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Double-compression method for biomedical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yevhenii A.; Mustetsov, Timofey N.; Hamdi, Rami R.; Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Orshubekov, Nurbek; DzierŻak, RóŻa; Uvaysova, Svetlana

    2017-08-01

    This paper describes a double compression method (DCM) of biomedical images. A comparison of image compression factors in size JPEG, PNG and developed DCM was carried out. The main purpose of the DCM - compression of medical images while maintaining the key points that carry diagnostic information. To estimate the minimum compression factor an analysis of the coding of random noise image is presented.