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Sample records for nerium oleander rosebay

  1. Some Central Nervous System Activities of Nerium Oleander Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the activity of 50 % hydroalcohol flower extract of Nerium oleander Linn. on the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. Methods: The effect of the 50 % hydroalcohol extract of N. oleander flowers at dosage levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. on the locomotor activity of mice ...

  2. The use of Nerium Oleander as biomonitor for radionuclides and trace elements in atmospheric deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Meslmani, Y.; Kharfan, K.; Alshamali, K.; Khalily, H.

    2007-07-01

    The possibility of using Nerium Oleander as biomonitor for radionuclides and trace elements in air for monitoring air pollution in Syrian cities has been studied. Nerium oleander leaves (old, young and fallen) and flowers in addition to air particulates and surface soil from different locations in Damascus, Aleppo, Tartous, Lattakia and Palmyra have been collected. The samples were collected for four period during 2004 and 2005. The samples were chemically analyzed to determine 1 37C s, 2 10P b and 2 10P o. The results have shown high concentrations of the studied trace elements and radionuclides in old and fallen leaves; the highest concentrations were found to be in those samples collected from sites close to industrial areas. These findings indicate that the leaves of nerium oleander accumulate these elements. In addition, the studied elements concentration and especially Pb increased in nerium oleander leaves with leaves age. Moreover variation observed during the year are due to washing by rain water or resuspension by wind. The results have been statistically analyzed to determine the liner correlation coefficient between the studied element in different samples. A liner relation ship between Pb concentration in air particulates and old and fallen leaves has been observed. However, based on the obtained results, the Nerium Oleander can be used as biomonitors for trace elements and radionuclides.(author)

  3. Exploring a natural MDR reversal agent: potential of medicinal food supplement Nerium oleander leaf distillate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kars, Meltem Demirel; Gündüz, Ufuk; Üney, Kamil; Baş, Ahmet Levent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the molecular effects of Nerium oleander leaf distillate on paclitaxel and vincristine resistant (MCF-7/Pac and MCF-7/Vinc) cells and sensitive (MCF-7/S) cell lines. Methods Nerium oleander (N. oleander) leaf extract was obtained by hydrodistillation method. The toxicological effects of N. oleander distillate, previously suggested as medicinal food supplement, on drug resistant cells were evaluated by XTT tests. MDR modulation potential of the plant material was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Paclitaxel and vincristine were applied to the sublines in combination with N. oleander distillate. Results Fractional inhibitory indices show that N. oleander distillate did not increase the antiproliferative effects of anticancer drugs. N. oleander treatment in to MCF-7/Pac and MCF-7/Vinc did not inhibit P-gp activity and MDR1 gene expression level. Conclusions As a result it may be suggested that although N. oleander distillate has some medicinal effects as food supplement it may not be suitable as an MDR modulator for drug resistant breast cancer cells. PMID:23905023

  4. Application of extracts from the poisonous plant, Nerium Oleander L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-09-05

    Sep 5, 2007 ... It is thought that Oleander may contain many other unknown or un-researched compounds that may have dangerous effects. Oleander bark contains rosage- nin, which is known for its strychnine-like effects. The entire plant including the milky white sap is toxic and any part can cause an adverse reaction.

  5. Phytoremediation of fluoride with garden ornamentals Nerium oleander, Portulaca oleracea, and Pogonatherum crinitum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandare, Rahul V; Desai, Shaileshkumar B; Bhujbal, Sourabh S; Watharkar, Anuprita D; Biradar, Shivtej P; Pawar, Pankaj K; Govindwar, Sanjay P

    2017-03-01

    Nursery grown plants of Nerium oleander, Pogonatherum crinitum, and Portulaca oleracea were observed to remove fluoride up to 92, 80, and 73%, respectively, from NaF solution at the concentration of 10 mg L -1 within 15 days. Concentration range of 10-50 mg L -1 of fluoride revealed a constant decrease of removal from 92 to 51% within 15 days by N. oleander, while the biomass (one to five plants) showed enhancement in removal from 74 to 98% in 10 days. Translocation and bioaccumulation factors calculated after fluoride contents in roots and leaves of N. oleander, P. crinitum, and P. oleracea were 1.85, 1.19, and 1.43, and 9.8, 3.6, and 2.2, respectively. P . oleracea, P. crinitum, and N. oleander showed reductions in chlorophyll contents by 40, 57 and 25 and 8%, carbohydrates by 50, 44, and 16%, and proteins by 38, 53, and 15%, respectively. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the roots of P. oleracea, P. crinitum, and N. oleander were observed to be induced by 400, 383, and 500%; 80, 105, and 424%; and 153, 77, and 71%, respectively, while the leaves showed induction in SOD, CAT, and GPX activities by 550, 315, and 165%; 196, 227, and 243%; and 280, 242, and 184%, respectively. Results endorsed the superiority of N. oleander for fluoride removal over other plant species.

  6. Application of extracts from the poisonous plant, Nerium Oleander L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extracts is of weight loss between 5.54 and 10.98% for P. placenta, and between 5.02 and 28.25% for T. versicolor. The lowest weight loss was found to be for beech wood (5.02%) impregnated with the extract of oleander at a concentration level of 0.25% against T. versicolor. While the highest weight loss was also on the ...

  7. Larvicidal Activity of Nerium oleander against Larvae West Nile Vector Mosquito Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae

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    Fouad El-Akhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Outbreaks of the West Nile virus infection were reported in Morocco in 1996, 2003, and 2010. Culex pipiens was strongly suspected as the vector responsible for transmission. In the North center of Morocco, this species has developed resistance to synthetic insecticides. There is an urgent need to find alternatives to the insecticides as natural biocides. Objective. In this work, the insecticidal activity of the extract of the local plant Nerium oleander, which has never been tested before in the North center of Morocco, was studied on larval stages 3 and 4 of Culex pipiens. Methods. Biological tests were realized according to a methodology inspired from standard World Health Organization protocol. The mortality values were determined after 24 h of exposure and LC50 and LC90 values were calculated. Results. The extract had toxic effects on the larvae of culicid mosquitoes. The ethanolic extract of Nerium oleander applied against the larvae of Culex pipiens has given the lethal concentrations LC50 and LC90 in the order of 57.57 mg/mL and 166.35 mg/mL, respectively. Conclusion. This investigation indicates that N. oleander could serve as a potential larvicidal, effective natural biocide against mosquito larvae, particularly Culex pipiens.

  8. Characterisation and bioactivity of oosporein produced by endophytic fungus Cochliobolus kusanoi isolated from Nerium oleander L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alurappa, Ramesha; Bojegowda, Madhusudhan Reddy Muthukurpalya; Kumar, Vijith; Mallesh, Naveen Kumar; Chowdappa, Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive compounds comprising secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi have wide applications in pharmacology and agriculture. Isolation, characterisation and evaluation of biological activities of secondary metabolites were carried out from Cochliobolus kusanoi an endophytic fungus of Nerium oleander L. The fungus was identified based on 18S rDNA sequence analysis. There are no reports available on the compounds of C.kusanoi hence, antimicrobial metabolite produced by this fungus was extracted and purified by fractionation using hexane, diethyl ether, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol. Out of all the solvent fractions, the methanol fraction exhibited better antimicrobial activity which was further purified and characterised as oosporein. Oosporein from C.kusanoi exhibited broad spectrum in vitro antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The characterisation and antioxidant activity of oosporein from C. kusanoi are reported for the first time.

  9. Determination of trace element levels in leaves of Nerium oleander using X-Ray Fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis A.C.R.A.; Neves, Arthur O.P.; Oliveira, Luis F.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2013-01-01

    The environmental pollution by human activity has been one of the most concerns in the last years, principally due to rapid urban growth in the cities and the industrialization process. The air pollution can be increased due to several different kinds of emissions: urban traffic, industrial activities, burning fuel, civil industry of construction/demolition, fires and natural phenomena. Many of these emissions move from long distances due to convections currents and finally tend to deposit mainly in the plants leaves and in the soil. Thus, the plants leaves works as a natural sampler by the emissions deposit in these ones. In this study Nerium oleander leaves were used to measure the environmental pollutions levels in different sampling urban regions in the city of Rio de Janeiro/RJ: Andarai, Benfica, Bonsucesso, Caju, Engenho de Dentro, Engenho Novo, Estacio, Grajau, Inhauma, Lins, Maracana, Maria da Graca, Meier, Praca da Bandeira, Riachuelo, Rio Comprido, Sao Cristovao, Tijuca, Vila Isabel and city Center. The control samples were collected in Campo Grande near of Parque Nacional da Pedra Branca/RJ (National Park of Pedra Branca/RJ). The leaves were collected from adult plants and after the collection the samples were cleaned and placed in the greenhouse for drying, then were mashed and pressed into tablets forms. The analyses were performed using the energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), developed on the own laboratory and based in a SiPIN detector and a mini X ray tube. It was possible to detect 16 elements in the analyzed samples: K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb. The results shows that, in the studied areas, the analysis of the Nerium oleander plant shows a low-cost option and with a substantial efficiency as an environmental pollution biomonitor. (author)

  10. Determination of trace element levels in leaves of Nerium oleander using X-Ray Fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis A.C.R.A.; Neves, Arthur O.P.; Oliveira, Luis F.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica Armando Dias Tavares. Dept. de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica

    2013-07-01

    The environmental pollution by human activity has been one of the most concerns in the last years, principally due to rapid urban growth in the cities and the industrialization process. The air pollution can be increased due to several different kinds of emissions: urban traffic, industrial activities, burning fuel, civil industry of construction/demolition, fires and natural phenomena. Many of these emissions move from long distances due to convections currents and finally tend to deposit mainly in the plants leaves and in the soil. Thus, the plants leaves works as a natural sampler by the emissions deposit in these ones. In this study Nerium oleander leaves were used to measure the environmental pollutions levels in different sampling urban regions in the city of Rio de Janeiro/RJ: Andarai, Benfica, Bonsucesso, Caju, Engenho de Dentro, Engenho Novo, Estacio, Grajau, Inhauma, Lins, Maracana, Maria da Graca, Meier, Praca da Bandeira, Riachuelo, Rio Comprido, Sao Cristovao, Tijuca, Vila Isabel and city Center. The control samples were collected in Campo Grande near of Parque Nacional da Pedra Branca/RJ (National Park of Pedra Branca/RJ). The leaves were collected from adult plants and after the collection the samples were cleaned and placed in the greenhouse for drying, then were mashed and pressed into tablets forms. The analyses were performed using the energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), developed on the own laboratory and based in a SiPIN detector and a mini X ray tube. It was possible to detect 16 elements in the analyzed samples: K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb. The results shows that, in the studied areas, the analysis of the Nerium oleander plant shows a low-cost option and with a substantial efficiency as an environmental pollution biomonitor. (author)

  11. Multielement analysis of X-Ray fluorescence of Nerium oleander L. Leaves in metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis Anna C.R.A.; Neves, Arthur O.P.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2015-01-01

    Some plants are used in the detection of the air pollutants due to leaves ability to absorb the pollutants through their stomata and the cuticle, thus, the plants leaves work as a natural sample of the air emissions that are deposited in their self. However, the foliar analysis of these vegetal species can be used to environmental monitoring. The Nerium oleander L. is a specie of plant commonly used as an environmental biomonitor. In this study, Nerium oleander L. leaves were used as biomonitors to evaluate the levels of environmental pollutants in a sub-region in the Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro-Brazil through Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique - EDXRF. The EDXRF system was developed in the own laboratory and consist of a portable XRF system formed by a mini X-ray tube of low power (anode of Ag and operated in 15 kV/50 μA and 35 kV/50 μA) and a SiPIN detector. Samples of Nerium oleander L. were collected from adult plants drawn randomly so as not favoring one side of the plant. The samples were collected during the year seasons (summer and winter). It was detected the concentration of 13 elements: S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb, and obtain elemental maps of the regions of study. The study shows that the use of EDXRF technique associated to the Nerium oleander L. leaves used as biomonitor is an efficient, precise, fast and low-cost option for air pollutants analysis. (author)

  12. Multielement analysis of X-Ray fluorescence of Nerium oleander L. Leaves in metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Ramon S.; Sanches, Francis Anna C.R.A.; Neves, Arthur O.P.; Oliveira, Davi F.; Anjos, Marcelino J., E-mail: ramonziosp@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: francissanches@gmail.com, E-mail: arthur.nevess@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: davi.oliveira@uerj.br, E-mail: marcelin@uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Aplicada e Termodinamica

    2015-07-01

    Some plants are used in the detection of the air pollutants due to leaves ability to absorb the pollutants through their stomata and the cuticle, thus, the plants leaves work as a natural sample of the air emissions that are deposited in their self. However, the foliar analysis of these vegetal species can be used to environmental monitoring. The Nerium oleander L. is a specie of plant commonly used as an environmental biomonitor. In this study, Nerium oleander L. leaves were used as biomonitors to evaluate the levels of environmental pollutants in a sub-region in the Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro-Brazil through Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique - EDXRF. The EDXRF system was developed in the own laboratory and consist of a portable XRF system formed by a mini X-ray tube of low power (anode of Ag and operated in 15 kV/50 μA and 35 kV/50 μA) and a SiPIN detector. Samples of Nerium oleander L. were collected from adult plants drawn randomly so as not favoring one side of the plant. The samples were collected during the year seasons (summer and winter). It was detected the concentration of 13 elements: S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Pb, and obtain elemental maps of the regions of study. The study shows that the use of EDXRF technique associated to the Nerium oleander L. leaves used as biomonitor is an efficient, precise, fast and low-cost option for air pollutants analysis. (author)

  13. Effects of salinity and drought on growth, ionic relations, compatible solutes and activation of antioxidant systems in oleander (Nerium oleander L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Al Hassan, Mohamad; Naranjo, Miguel A; Agrawal, Veena; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Nerium oleander is an ornamental species of high aesthetic value, grown in arid and semi-arid regions because of its drought tolerance, which is also considered as relatively resistant to salt; yet the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying oleander's stress tolerance remain largely unknown. To investigate these mechanisms, one-year-old oleander seedlings were exposed to 15 and 30 days of treatment with increasing salt concentrations, up to 800 mM NaCl, and to complete withholding of irrigation; growth parameters and biochemical markers characteristic of conserved stress-response pathways were then determined in stressed and control plants. Strong water deficit and salt stress both caused inhibition of growth, degradation of photosynthetic pigments, a slight (but statistically significant) increase in the leaf levels of specific osmolytes, and induction of oxidative stress-as indicated by the accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), a reliable oxidative stress marker-accompanied by increases in the levels of total phenolic compounds and antioxidant flavonoids and in the specific activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR). High salinity, in addition, induced accumulation of Na+ and Cl- in roots and leaves and the activation of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Apart from anatomical adaptations that protect oleander from leaf dehydration at moderate levels of stress, our results indicate that tolerance of this species to salinity and water deficit is based on the constitutive accumulation in leaves of high concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and, to a lesser extent, of glycine betaine, and in the activation of the aforementioned antioxidant systems. Moreover, regarding specifically salt stress, mechanisms efficiently blocking transport of toxic ions from the roots to the aerial parts of the plant appear to contribute to a large extent to tolerance in Nerium oleander.

  14. Larvicidal activity of Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae flower extracts against Culex quinquefasciatus Say (Diptera: Culicidae

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    R. Raveen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Culex quinquefasciatus is the vector responsible for serious disease filariasis among human beings. Plant derived products have received increased attention from scientists as they serve as a rich source for novel natural substances possessing insecticidal properties which are safe to human and ecosystem. During the last decade, various studies on natural plant products against vector mosquito indicate them as possible alternatives to chemical and synthetic insecticides for mosquito control. In the present study, the crude hexane and aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers were reported for larvicidal activity against the filarial vector, Culex quinquefasciatus. Mortality was observed for 24 and 48 hours. Hexane flower extract exhibited highest larvicidal activity with a LC50 value of 102.54 ppm and 61.11ppm after 24 and 48 hours respectively. Further investigations are needed to elucidate this activity against a wide range of all stages of mosquito species and also the active ingredient(s of the extract responsible for larvicidal activity should be identified.

  15. Metal uptake and distribution in cultured seedlings of Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae) from the Río Tinto (Huelva, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Alejandro; Rufo, Lourdes; Zuluaga, Javier; de la Fuente, Vicenta

    2013-10-01

    Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae) is a micro-nano phanerophyte that grows in the riverbanks of the Río Tinto basin (Southwest Iberian Peninsula). The waters and soils of the Río Tinto area are highly acidic and have high concentrations of heavy metals. In this environment, N. oleander naturally grows in both extreme acidic (EA) and less extreme acidic (LEA) water courses, excluding, and bioindicating certain metals. In this work, we compared and evaluated the accumulation preferences and capacities, the distribution and processes of biomineralization of metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Mg, Ca) in the first stages of growth of EA and LEA oleanders by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer analysis. Seeds from both environments were grown and treated with a self-made solution simulating the most extreme red waters from the Río Tinto. LEA plants drastically reduces the metal uptake at the beginning, but later reactivates the uptake reaching concentration values in the same range as the EA plants. The results showed high Mn, Zn and Mg concentrations, accumulation of Fe and Cu in plants from both environments, differing from the metal concentrations of field-grown oleanders. Iron bioformations with traces of other metals were present inside and over epidermal cells and inside vascular cells of stems and roots. They were absent of leaves. The accumulation properties of N. oleander in its early stages of development make it a species to take in consideration in phytoremediation processes but optimized conditions are needed to ensure enough biomass production.

  16. Water-soluble egg membrane enhances the immunoactivating properties of an Aloe vera-based extract of Nerium oleander leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson KF

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen F Benson,1 Robert A Newman,2,3 Gitte S Jensen1 1NIS Labs, Klamath Falls, OR, 2Department of Experimental Therapeutics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, 3Nerium Biotechnology Inc, San Antonio, TX, USA Objective: To evaluate a blend of two natural ingredients on immune parameters relevant for their current topical use and potential support of microcirculation in skin tissue. Materials and methods: A blend (BL of Aloe vera-based Nerium oleander extract (NAE-8i, oleandrin-free and hydrolyzed water-soluble egg membrane (WSEM was applied to human whole-blood cultures for 24 hours, with each separate ingredient serving as a control. Immune-cell subsets were analyzed for expression levels of the activation markers CD69 and CD25. Culture supernatants were analyzed for cytokines, chemokines, and immunoregulating peptides. Results: BL increased CD69 expression on lymphocytes, monocytes, and CD3–CD56+ natural killer cells, and CD25 expression on natural killer cells. The number of CD69+CD25+ lymphocytes increased in cultures treated with BL and the separate ingredients. BL triggered production of multiple cytokines and chemokines, where CC chemokines MIP1α and MIP3α, as well as cytokines involved in wound healing – Groα, Groβ, ENA78, and fractalkine – reached levels manyfold above treatment with either NAE-8i or WSEM alone. Conclusion: Data on BL showed that WSEM strongly enhanced NAE-8i’s effects on immunoactivation in vitro. This has potential relevance for support of immunity in skin tissue, including antibacterial and antiviral defense mechanisms, wrinkle reduction, and wound care. Keywords: chemokines, cytokines, leukocyte activation

  17. Comparing larvicidal Effect of Methanol Extract of the Aerial Parts of Henbane (Hyoscyamus niger L. and Oleander ( Nerium oleander L. plants on Anopheles spp Larvae (Diptera: Culicidae in Vitro

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    Mahmoodreza Behravan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Malaria is an infectious disease by fever and chills, anemia and splenomegaly genus Plasmodium parasite is the agent it. One of the easiest and least expensive methods to prevent this disease is removing the vector that usually by been done insecticides and chemical pesticides, but nowadays due to the damaging effects of by toxic chemicals is currently trying to organic toxic and plant compounds used to combat the pests. So in this study used from the Hyoscyamus niger L. and Nerium oleander L. to destroy the larvae of this vectors and positive results were compared these two plants together. Methods In this experimental study, H. niger and N. oleander collected and dried to extraction by methanol usingthe Rotary Evaporator. Mosquito larvae collected from stagnant water pits and ponds around the Birjand, Iran and order to apply the relevant identity tests and isolation of Anopheles spp mosquito larvae. Survival measurement were used to estimate LC50 values using Probit analysis in Excel 2010 and SPSS (ver 20 software. Results Both Hyoscyamus niger and Nerium oleander had positive effects on destroying the Anopheles spp larvae and between obtained results, the most effective extract for destroying the mosquitoes Anopheles spp larvae, was the flower extract of henbane (LC50 = 0/26 ppm and the weakest one, was the leaves extract of oleander (LC50 = 4/85 ppm. Conclusions According to the results, the flower extract of henbane is recommended as a toxic, organic and natural compounds to fight Anopheles spp mosquito larvae, which it is stronger and more effective compared to the other parts of these two plants.

  18. Study of Absorption and Distribution of Mercury in Nerium Oleander L. on Banks of the Valdeazogues River (Chillon Station- Ciudad Real)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Tejedor, I.; Sierra, M. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Millan, R.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to determine the absorption and distribution of mercury in oleander (Nerium oleander L.) in the Valdeazogues river, located within the mining regions of Almaden (Ciudad Real). The results show that total mercury concentrations in soil range from 116,7 ±24,3 to 350,9 ± 68,6 mg kg - 1 of Hg, but the readily available fraction (soluble + exchangeable) is very low (from 0,013 to 0,017 ± 0,257 ± 0,000 mg Hg kg - 1: less than 0,16% of the total concentration of mercury measured directly on the soil sample).The distribution of mercury absorbed by N. oleander is not homogeneous throughout the aerial part. In general, the concentration is significantly higher in the leaves followed by stems and fruits. According to the results, although the concentration of mercury in the plant is not very high (Leaves: 0,282 ±0,014-1,022 ± 0,110 mg Kg - 1; Stems: 0,087 ± 0,011-0,354 ± 0,046 mg Kg - 1; Fruits: 0,030 ± 0,003-0,077 ± 0,009 mg Kg - 1), oleander has a number of characteristics (high biomass, toxicity, non-edible) that could turn into a future candidate as phyto extraction of mercury in decontamination processes. (Author) 67 refs.

  19. Comparison of leaves of Nerium oleander collected the monitoring trace elements in environmental pollution in Rio de Janeiro and Campinas Cities using of synchrotron radiation fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simabuco, Silvana M.; Ferreira Pinto, Jefferson; Dos Anjos, Marcelino J.

    1999-01-01

    These works describes the use of synchrotron radiation fluorescence analysis as a technique for monitoring trace elements in bio-indicators for environmental pollution control. The analyses were made on leaves of Nerium oleander collected in streets with different traffic flow in Rio de Janeiro and Campinas Cities, Brazil, with one sample from rural zone. Part of the leaves were cleaned with 0,1% v/v detergent in deionized water and than all were dry at 60o C until constant weight. The leaves were than cut in small pieces and submitted to a nitric digestion in a open system. The liquid residue was pre-concentrated with ammonium pirrrolidine dithiocarbamate and filtrated by vacuum pump in cellulose membrane. The measurement was made with a white beam of synchrotron radiation calibrated with thin film standards. The results indicate that same metals like Ti, V, Fe and Zn have major content in sample that came from places with high traffic flow even in leaves that have been washed. The levels of Mn, Co, Cu and Ni did not show significant difference between the samples. The Pb level also did not vary significantly what was expected because in Brazil the gasoline did not use plumb as a additive from many years. The results seems to indicate that the leaves from Nerium oleander absorb metals from the atmosphere and may be used as one environmental indicator

  20. Study of Absorption and Distribution of Mercury in Nerium Oleander L. on Banks of the Valdeazogues River (Chillon Station- Ciudad Real); Estudio de la Absorcion y Distribucion del Mercurio en Nerium Oleander L. en la Ribera del Rio Valdeazogues (Estacion de Chillon - Almaden)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Tejedor, I.; Sierra, M. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Millan, R.

    2010-11-17

    The main objective of this study is to determine the absorption and distribution of mercury in oleander (Nerium oleander L.) in the Valdeazogues river, located within the mining regions of Almaden (Ciudad Real). The results show that total mercury concentrations in soil range from 116,7 {+-}24,3 to 350,9 {+-} 68,6 mg kg{sup -}1 of Hg, but the readily available fraction (soluble + exchangeable) is very low (from 0,013 to 0,017 {+-} 0,257 {+-} 0,000 mg Hg kg{sup -}1: less than 0,16% of the total concentration of mercury measured directly on the soil sample).The distribution of mercury absorbed by N. oleander is not homogeneous throughout the aerial part. In general, the concentration is significantly higher in the leaves followed by stems and fruits. According to the results, although the concentration of mercury in the plant is not very high (Leaves: 0,282 {+-}0,014-1,022 {+-} 0,110 mg Kg{sup -}1; Stems: 0,087 {+-} 0,011-0,354 {+-} 0,046 mg Kg{sup -}1; Fruits: 0,030 {+-} 0,003-0,077 {+-} 0,009 mg Kg{sup -}1), oleander has a number of characteristics (high biomass, toxicity, non-edible) that could turn into a future candidate as phyto extraction of mercury in decontamination processes. (Author) 67 refs.

  1. Aplicação da fluorescencia de raios X dispersiva em energia para monitoramento ambiental pela analise elementar de folhas de Nerium oleander e Rhododendrom ferrigineum

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson Ferreira Pinto

    1999-01-01

    Resumo: O presente trabalho teve como objetivo realizar um monitoramento da poluição atmosférica na cidade de Campinas (SP), aplicando a técnica analítica da Fluorescência de Raios X Dispersiva em Energia convencional (ED-XRF) e por Reflexão Total (TXRF), com excitação por Tubo de Raios X e por Radiação Síncrotron, para a análise dos elementos V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se e Pb em folhas de Nerium oleander e Rhododendronferrigineum, empregadas aqui como bioindicadoras da poluição ambienta...

  2. Evaluation of the in vitro Anti-inflammatory Activity of Nerium oleander L. Flower Extracts and Activity-Guided Isolation of the Active Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrem Atay Balkan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity profile of the Nerium oleander flower EtOH extract/its subextracts (n-hexane, CH 2Cl 2, EtOAc, remaining H 2O were evaluated on LPS induced Raw 264.7 macrophages. The effects of the crude EtOH extract and its subextracts on nitric oxide (NO production and cell viability were determined. The most active subextract was determined to be the EtOAc subextract without exerting any toxicity towards Raw 264.7 macrophages. This subextract significantly inhibited NO production of Raw 264.7 macrophages after LPS induction (62.56±1.91% at 200 µg/mL concentration. The levels of iNOS were reduced up to 67.50%. Moreover, this subextract slightly reduced the phosphorylation levels of MAP kinases (p-ERK, p-JNK, p-38. The highest inhibition was observed for ERK phosphorylation, which was inhibited by 20.53% at 200 µg/mL concentration. Through activity-guided fractionation procedures, kaempferol, kaempferol 3-O-β-glucopyranoside and chlorogenic acid were isolated as the main active components. The structures of the active compounds were determined by 2D-NMR techniques and HRMS analysis. All compounds significantly inhibited NO productions. Results of the present study supported the traditional use of N. oleander flowers to treat inflammatory complaints.

  3. Zeaxanthin and the Heat Dissipation of Excess Light Energy in Nerium oleander Exposed to a Combination of High Light and Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig, B; Winter, K; Krüger, A; Czygan, F C

    1988-05-01

    Upon termination of watering of plants of Nerium oleander exposed to high light, photochemical efficiency became reduced as leaf water content decreased. Evidence is presented that this type of photoinhibition reflects to a substantial degree radiationless dissipation of excitation energy, probably mediated by the carotenoid zeaxanthin. During the imposition of water stress, the zeaxanthin content of leaves increased at the expense of violaxanthin and beta-carotene as a water deficit developed over a period of several days. The increase in zeaxanthin content was linearly related to an increase in the rate of radiationless energy dissipation in the antenna chlorophyll as calculated from the characteristics of chlorophyll a fluorescence measured with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer at room temperature. The increase in the rate of radiationless dissipation was also linearly related to a decrease in PSII photochemical efficiency as indicated by the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence. Leaves of well-watered shade plants of N. oleander exposed to strong light showed a similar increase in zeaxanthin content as sun leaves of the same species subjected to drought in strong light. Shade leaves possessed the same capacity as sun leaves to form zeaxanthin at the expense of both violaxanthin and beta-carotene. The resistance of this species to the destructive effects of excess light appears to be related to interconversions between beta-carotene and the three carotenoids of the xanthophyll cycle.

  4. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and skin regenerative properties of an Aloe vera-based extract of Nerium oleander leaves (NAE-8®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson KF

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen F Benson,1 Robert A Newman,2,3 Gitte S Jensen1 1NIS Labs, Klamath Falls, Oregon, USA; 2University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 3Nerium Biotechnology, Inc, San Antonio, TX, USA Objective: The goal for this study was to evaluate the effects of an Aloe vera-based Nerium oleander extract (NAE-8®, compared to an extract of A. vera gel alone (ALOE, and to an aqueous extract of N. oleander (AQ-NOE in bioassays pertaining to dermatologic potential with respect to antioxidant protection, anti-inflammatory effects, and cytokine profiles in vitro. Methods: Cellular antioxidant protection was evaluated in three separate bioassays: The cellular antioxidant protection of erythrocytes (CAP-e assay, protection of cellular viability and prevention of apoptosis, and protection of intracellular reduced glutathione levels, where the last two assays were performed using human primary dermal fibroblasts. Reduction of intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS was tested using polymorphonuclear cells in the absence and presence of oxidative stress. Changes to cytokine and chemokine profiles when whole blood cells and human primary dermal fibroblasts were exposed to test products were determined using a 40-plex Luminex array as a method for exploring the potential cross-talk between circulating and skin-resident cells. Results: The NAE-8® provided significantly better antioxidant protection in the CAP-e bioassay than AQ-NOE. NAE-8® and AQ-NOE both protected cellular viability and intracellular reduced glutathione, and reduced the ROS formation significantly when compared to control cells, both under inflamed and neutral culture conditions. ALOE showed minimal effect in these bioassays. In contrast to the NAE-8®, the AQ-NOE showed induction of inflammation in the whole blood cultures, as evidenced by the high induction of CD69 expression and secretion of a number of inflammatory cytokines. The treatment of dermal

  5. PBI-05204, a supercritical CO₂ extract of Nerium oleander, inhibits growth of human pancreatic cancer via targeting the PI3K/mTOR pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yong; Rhea, Patrea; Tan, Lin; Cartwright, Carrie; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Ravoori, Murali K; Addington, Crandell; Gagea, Mihai; Kundra, Vikas; Kim, Sun-Jin; Newman, Robert A; Yang, Peiying

    2015-04-01

    Introduction Oleandrin, a cardiac glycoside, exerts strong anti-proliferative activity against various human malignancies in in vitro cells. Here, we report the antitumor efficacy of PBI-05204, a supercritical C0₂ extract of Nerium oleander containing oleandrin, in a human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 orthotopic model. Results While all the control mice exhibited tumors by the end of treatment, only 2 of 8 mice (25%) treated for 6 weeks with PBI-05204 (40 mg/kg) showed dissectible tumor at the end of the treatment period. The average tumor weight (222.9 ± 116.9 mg) in mice treated with PBI-05204 (20 mg/kg) was significantly reduced from that in controls (920.0 ± 430.0 mg) (p PBI-05204 (40 mg/kg) treated group showed that the pancreatic tissues of 5/6 mice were normal while the remaining mouse had a tumor the largest diameter of which was less than 2.3 mm. In contrast, while gemcitabine alone did not significantly reduce tumor growth, PBI-05204 markedly enhanced the antitumor efficacy of gemcitabine in this particular model. Ki-67 staining was reduced in pancreatic tumors from mice treated with PBI-05204 (20 mg/kg) compared to that of control, suggesting that PBI-05204 inhibited the proliferation of the Panc-1 tumor cells. PBI-05204 suppressed expression of pAkt, pS6, and p4EPB1 in a concentration-dependent manner in both Panc-1 tumor tissues and human pancreatic cancer cell lines, implying that this novel botanical drug exerts its potent antitumor activity, at least in part, through down-regulation of PI3k/Akt and mTOR pathways.

  6. Determination of Physio-Chemical Properties of Oleander Seed Oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need for alternative feedstock for biodiesel production due to the competition in vegetable oil production for human consumption and biodiesel production necessitated a study in the physiochemical properties of Nerium Oleander seed, a non-edible ornamental plant. The objectives were to determine the physical, ...

  7. The effect of oleander glycosides on the germination of pollen grains and the mitosis of the generative nucleus in Tradescantia bracteata Small and Allium cepa L.

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    J. A. Tarkowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water solution of a mixture of glycosides from oleander (Nerium oleander L. on the germination of pollen grains and on the mitosis of the generative nucleus in Tradescantia bracteata Small and Allium cepa L. has been studied. An inhibition of the germination and of the growth of pollen tubes was observed, proportionally to the concentration of glycosides. The pollen grains of A. cepa are more sensitive. The disturbances in mitosis lead to the formation of two or more uneven-sized doughter nuclei, or to the formation of restitution nuclei. These anomalies are more numerous in T. bracteata. From these results d t appears that pollen grains of A. cepa are characterized by a generally high physiological sensitivity and a small mitotic sensitivity, wheras for T. bracteata the opposite is true.

  8. TOXICITY OF NERIUM INDICUM AND EUPHORBIA ROYLEANA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different dilutions of aqueous and methanolic extracts of lattices of Nerium indicum (Apocynaceae) and Euphorbia royleana (Euphorbiaceae) were administered for 24h and 48h to the Culex quinquesfasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae in order to test their lethality. The larvicidal activity of lattices of both plants, were time ...

  9. Oleander toxicity – the clinical spectrum and mortality predictors: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    Oleander poisoning ranks second in the list being ... poisoningand to devise a standard assessment protocol in oleander-poisoned patients. This .... poisoning. Clin. Toxicol. (Phila). 2009;47(3):206-12. 2. Bandara V, Weinstein SA, White J, Eddleston. M. A review of the natural history, toxinology, diagnosis and clinical ...

  10. Evidence for an Invasive Aphid “Superclone”: Extremely Low Genetic Diversity in Oleander Aphid (Aphis nerii) Populations in the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, John Scott; Mondor, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    Background The importance of genetic diversity in successful biological invasions is unclear. In animals, but not necessarily plants, increased genetic diversity is generally associated with successful colonization and establishment of novel habitats. The Oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, though native to the Mediterranean region, is an invasive pest species throughout much of the world. Feeding primarily on Oleander (Nerium oleander) and Milkweed (Asclepias spp.) under natural conditions, these plants are unlikely to support aphid populations year round in the southern US. The objective of this study was to describe the genetic variation within and among US populations of A. nerii, during extinction/recolonization events, to better understand the population ecology of this invasive species. Methodology/Principal Findings We used five microsatellite markers to assess genetic diversity over a two year period within and among three aphid populations separated by small (100 km) and large (3,700 km) geographic distances on two host plant species. Here we provide evidence for A. nerii “superclones”. Genotypic variation was absent in all populations (i.e., each population consisted of a single multilocus genotype (MLG) or “clone”) and the genetic composition of only one population completely changed across years. There was no evidence of sexual reproduction or host races on different plant species. Conclusions/Significance Aphis nerii is a well established invasive species despite having extremely low genetic diversity. As this aphid appears to be obligatorily asexual, it may share more similarities with clonally reproducing invasive plants, than with other animals. Patterns of temporal and geographic genetic variation, viewed in the context of its population dynamics, have important implications for the management of invasive pests and the evolutionary biology of asexual species. PMID:21408073

  11. Evidence for an invasive aphid "superclone": extremely low genetic diversity in Oleander aphid (Aphis nerii populations in the southern United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Scott Harrison

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of genetic diversity in successful biological invasions is unclear. In animals, but not necessarily plants, increased genetic diversity is generally associated with successful colonization and establishment of novel habitats. The Oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, though native to the Mediterranean region, is an invasive pest species throughout much of the world. Feeding primarily on Oleander (Nerium oleander and Milkweed (Asclepias spp. under natural conditions, these plants are unlikely to support aphid populations year round in the southern US. The objective of this study was to describe the genetic variation within and among US populations of A. nerii, during extinction/recolonization events, to better understand the population ecology of this invasive species.We used five microsatellite markers to assess genetic diversity over a two year period within and among three aphid populations separated by small (100 km and large (3,700 km geographic distances on two host plant species. Here we provide evidence for A. nerii "superclones". Genotypic variation was absent in all populations (i.e., each population consisted of a single multilocus genotype (MLG or "clone" and the genetic composition of only one population completely changed across years. There was no evidence of sexual reproduction or host races on different plant species.Aphis nerii is a well established invasive species despite having extremely low genetic diversity. As this aphid appears to be obligatorily asexual, it may share more similarities with clonally reproducing invasive plants, than with other animals. Patterns of temporal and geographic genetic variation, viewed in the context of its population dynamics, have important implications for the management of invasive pests and the evolutionary biology of asexual species.

  12. Oleander toxicity – the clinical spectrum and mortality predictors: an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institutional assessment and treatment protocols based on the infrastructure and expertise available are the need of the hour. Prompt first aid, critical assessment and timely referral for cardiac pacing can cut down mortality to a large extent. Keywords: Oleander poisoning; Cardiac glycoside toxicity; Mortality predictors ...

  13. Oleander intoxication in New World camelids: 12 cases (1995-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozikowski, Tania A; Magdesian, K Gary; Puschner, Birgit

    2009-08-01

    To characterize the clinical and clinicopathologic effects and evaluate outcome associated with oleander toxicosis in New World camelids. Retrospective case series. 11 llamas and 1 alpaca. Medical records from a veterinary medical teaching hospital from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2006, were reviewed. Records of all New World camelids that had detectable amounts of oleandrin in samples of serum, urine, or gastrointestinal fluid were included in the study. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, and outcome of affected camelids. 11 llamas and 1 alpaca met the inclusion criteria of the study. Either oleander plants were present where the camelids resided (n = 7) or oleander plant material was identified in the hay fed to the camelids (5). One llama was dead on arrival at the hospital, and another was euthanized upon admission because of financial concerns. Of the 10 treated camelids, 9 had evidence of acute renal failure, 7 had gastrointestinal signs, and 4 had cardiac dysrhythmias on initial evaluation. The overall mortality rate was 25%, but the mortality rate for the 10 camelids that were medically treated was 10%. In New World camelids, oleander intoxication was associated with a triad of clinical effects (ie, renal, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular dysfunction). Oleander intoxication often represented a herd problem but carried a fair to good prognosis if treated promptly. Oleander toxicosis should be considered a differential diagnosis in sick camelids.

  14. Rapid detection of oleander poisoning using digoxin immunoassays: comparison of five assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Amitava; Datta, Pradip

    2004-12-01

    Oleander is an ornamental shrub that grows in the United States, Australia, India, Sri Lanka, China, and other parts of the world. All parts of the plant are poisonous because the presence of cardiac glycoside oleandrin. Despite its toxicity, oleander extract is used in folk medicines. Because of its structural similarity, oleandrin cross-reacts with the fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for digoxin. We studied the potential of detecting oleandrin in serum using 5 common digoxin immunoassays (FPIA, MEIA, both from Abbott; Beckman digoxin assay on Synchron LX, Chemiluminescent assay, CLIA from Bayer Diagnostics) and a recently FDA-approved turbidimetric assay on the ADVIA 1650 analyzer (Bayer). Aliquots of drug-free and digoxin-like immunoreactive substances (DLIS)-free serum pools were supplemented with ethanol extract of oleander leaves or oleandrin (Sigma Chemicals) in amounts expected in vivo after severe overdose. We observed significant apparent digoxin concentration with FPIA, Beckman, and the new turbidimetric assay (1 mL drug-free serum supplemented with 5.0 microL of oleander extract: apparent digoxin 2.36 ng/mL by the FPIA, 0.32 ng/mL by the MEIA, 0.93 ng/mL by the Beckman, 0.82 ng/mL by the new turbidimetric assay). The CLIA showed no cross-reactivity. Similar observations were made when serum pools were supplemented with oleandrin. Because cross reactivity should be tested in the presence of the primary analyte, we supplemented serum pools prepared from patients receiving digoxin with oleander extract or oleandrin. The measured digoxin concentrations were falsely elevated with the FPIA, Beckman, and turbidimetric assays, the highest false elevation being observed with the FPIA. Surprisingly, apparent digoxin concentrations were falsely lowered when MEIA was used. Digibind neutralizes free apparent digoxin concentration in vitro in serum pools supplemented with oleander extract, and this effect can be measured by the FPIA. We conclude that

  15. Indentification of vincamine indole alkaloids producing endophytic fungi isolated from Nerium indicum, Apocynaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ren; Jiajia, Liu; Dongliang, Yang; Yingzi, Peng; Juan, Hong; Xiong, Liu; Nana, Zhao; Jing, Zhou; Yitian, Luo

    2016-11-01

    Vincamine, a monoterpenoid indole alkaloid which had been marketed as nootropic drugs for the treatment of cerebral insufficiencies, is widely found in plants of the Apocynaceae family. Nerium indicum is a plant belonging to the Apocynaceae family. So, the purpose of this research was designed to investigate the vincamine alkaloids producing endophytic fungi from Nerium indicum, Apocynaceae. 11 strains of endophytic fungi, isolated from the stems and roots of the plant, were grouped into 5 genera on the basis of morphological characteristics. All fungal isolates were fermented and their extracts were preliminary screened by Dragendorff's reagent and thin layer chromatography (TLC). One isolated strain CH1, isolated from the stems of Nerium indicum, had the same Rf value (about 0.56) as authentic vincamine. The extracts of strain CH1 were further analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and the results showed that the strain CH1 could produce vincamine and vincamine analogues. The acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity assays using Ellman's method revealed that the metabolites of strain CH1 had significant AchE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 5.16μg/mL. The isolate CH1 was identified as Geomyces sp. based on morphological and molecular identification, and has been deposited in the China Center for Type Culture Collection (CCTCCM 2014676). This study first reported the natural compounds tabersonine and ethyl-vincamine from endophytic fungi CH1, Geomyces sp. In conclusion, the fungal endophytes from Nerium indicum can be used as alternative source for the production of vincamine and vincamine analogues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. A new p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivative from an endophytic fungus Penicillium sp. of Nerium indicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yang-Min; Qiao, Ke; Kong, Yang; Guo, Lin-Xin; Li, Meng-Yun; Fan, Chao

    2017-12-01

    A new p-hydroxybenzoic acid derivative named 4-(2'R, 4'-dihydroxybutoxy) benzoic acid (1) was isolated from the fermentation of Penicillium sp. R22 in Nerium indicum. The structure was elucidated by means of spectroscopic (HR-ESI-MS, NMR, IR, UV) and X-ray crystallographic methods. The antibacterial and antifungal activity of compound 1 was tested, and the results showed that compound 1 revealed potent antifungal activity against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Alternaria alternata, and Alteranria brassicae with MIC value of 31.2 μg/ml.

  17. First-in-human study of pbi-05204, an oleander-derived inhibitor of akt, fgf-2, nf-κΒ and p70s6k, in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, D S; Henary, H; Falchook, G S; Naing, A; Fu, S; Moulder, S; Wheler, J J; Tsimberidou, A; Durand, J B; Khan, R; Yang, P; Johansen, M; Newman, R A; Kurzrock, R

    2014-12-01

    PBI-05204, a Nerium oleander extract (NOE) containing the cardiac glycoside oleandrin, inhibits the α-3 subunit of Na-K ATPase, as well as FGF-2 export, Akt and p70S6K, hence attenuating mTOR activity. This first-in-human study determined the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of PBI-05204 in patients with advanced cancer. Methods Forty-six patients received PBI-05204 by mouth for 21 of 28 days (3 + 3 trial design). Dose was escalated 100% using an accelerated titration design until grade 2 toxicity was observed. Plasma PK and mTOR effector (p70S6K and pS6) protein expressions were evaluated. Results Dose-limiting toxicities (grade 3 proteinuria, fatigue) were observed at dose level 8 (0.3383 mg/kg/day). Common possible drug-related adverse were fatigue (26 patients, 56.5%), nausea (19 patients, 41.3%) and diarrhea (15 patients, 32.6 %). Electrocardiogram monitoring revealed grade 1 atrioventricular block (N = 10 patients) and grade 2 supraventricular tachycardia (N = 1). The MTD was DL7 (0.2255 mg/kg) where no toxicity of grade ≥ 3 was observed in seven patients treated. Seven patients (15%) had stable disease > 4 months. Mean peak oleandrin concentrations up to 2 ng/mL were achieved, with area under the curves 6.6 to 25.5 μg/L*hr and a half-life range of 5-13 h. There was an average 10% and 35% reduction in the phosphorylation of Akt and pS6 in PBMC samples in 36 and 32 patients, respectively, tested between predose and 21 days of treatment. Conclusions PBI-05204 was well tolerated in heavily pretreated patients with advanced solid tumors. The recommended Phase II dose is 0.2255 mg/kg/day.

  18. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from OLEANDER, YANKEE CLIPPER and Skogafoss in the NW Atlantic from 1993-02-06 to 1993-12-05 (NODC Accession 9400024)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water depth and temperature data was collected in NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from ships SKOGAFOSS, OLEANDER, and YANKEE CLIPPER as part of Ship Of Opportunity...

  19. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from OLEANDER and YANKEE CLIPPER in the NW Atlantic from 1991-01-05 to 1991-12-11 (NODC Accession 9200018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water depth and temperature data was collected in NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from ships OLEANDER and YANKEE CLIPPER as part of Ship Of Opportunity Programme...

  20. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from YANKEE CLIPPER and OLEANDER in the NW Atlantic from 1992-01-11 to 1992-12-20 (NODC Accession 9300034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The water depth and temperature data were collected in NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from ships OLEANDER and YANKEE CLIPPER between January 11, 1992 and December 20, 1992...

  1. A TaqMan-based real time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing bacterial leaf scorch in oleander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Singh, Raghuwinder; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

    2013-02-15

    A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay was developed for specific detection of strains of X. fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The assay uses primers WG-OLS-F1 and WG-OLS-R1 and the fluorescent probe WG-OLS-P1, designed based on unique sequences found only in the genome of oleander strain Ann1. The assay is specific, allowing detection of only oleander-infecting strains, not other strains of X. fastidiosa nor other plant-associated bacteria tested. The assay is also sensitive, with a detection limit of 10.4fg DNA of X. fastidiosa per reaction in vitro and in planta. The assay can also be applied to detect low numbers of X. fastidiosa in insect samples, or further developed into a multiplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and distinguish diverse strains of X. fastidiosa that may occupy the same hosts or insect vectors. Specific and sensitive detection and quantification of oleander strains of X. fastidiosa should be useful for disease diagnosis, epidemiological studies, management of oleander leaf scorch disease, and resistance screening for oleander shrubs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. yellow oleander

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AGROSEARCH UIL

    P2O5 ha-1 because the native nitrogen in the soil was enough for both the growth and yield performance of T. peruviana in the study ... sample for routine soil analysis in the laboratory to determine physico-chemical properties of the experimental site. Sampling ... Physical characteristics %. Clay. 236. 236. Silt. 40. 80. Sand.

  3. Oleander poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson JK. Plant poisons and traditional medicines. In: Farrar J, Hotez PJ, Junghanss T, Kang G, Lalloo D, White NJ, eds. Manson's Tropical Diseases . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 76. Mofenson HC, Caraccio TR, McGuigan ...

  4. A CLINICAL STUDY OF 100 CASES OF ACUTE OLEANDER SEED POISONING IN KANYAKUMARI GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Selvaraj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Yellow oleander (Cascabela thevetia is a poisonous plant that is widely found in India. All parts of the C. thevetia plant are toxic to humans as they contain cardiac glycosides. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients with alleged history of yellow oleander seed poisoning who came to Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital during the period of 2013-16 were enrolled in this study. Patients presenting with multiple poison consumption and those with previous history of heart disease were excluded from the study. A detailed history of the number of seeds consumed, the time of consumption, detailed clinical assessment, routine blood investigations and a 12-lead ECG were recorded. ECG was recorded at the time of admission and every 12th hourly to detect any cardiac arrhythmias. RESULTS Most symptomatic patients had conduction defects affecting the SA node, the AV node or both. Patients showing cardiac arrhythmias had significantly higher mean serum potassium concentrations ranging from 4.5-5.2 mEq/L. Yellow oleander seed poisoning is common among young females (56%. There is a poor correlation between the number of seeds ingested and the severity of cardiotoxicity. Arrhythmias has occurred after ingestion of one or two seeds; some patients are asymptomatic even after consuming five or more seeds without requiring specialised treatments. This could be explained on the basis that crushed seeds are more dangerous than whole seeds. CONCLUSION Most of these young previously healthy patients had conduction defects affecting the SA or AV nodes. Relatively, few had the atrial tachyarrhythmias or ventricular ectopic beats that are typical of digoxin poisoning. Yellow oleander induced arrhythmias were associated with high serum potassium levels when compared to patient without arrhythmias.

  5. Fructose-1, 6-diphosphate (FDP as a novel antidote for yellow oleander-induced cardiac toxicity: A randomized controlled double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawson Andrew H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac toxicity due to ingestion of oleander plant seeds in Sri Lanka and some other South Asian countries is very common. At present symptomatic oleander seed poisoning carries a mortality of 10% in Sri Lanka and treatment of yellow oleander poisoning is limited to gastric decontamination and atropine administration. The only proven effective antidote is digoxin antibodies but these are not available for routine use because of the high cost. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a new and inexpensive antidote for patients with life threatening arrhythmias due oleander poisoning. Method/design We set up a randomised double blind clinical trial to assess the effectiveness of Fructose 1, 6 diphosphate (FDP in acute yellow oleander poisoning patients admitted to the adult medical wards of a tertiary hospital in Sri Lanka. Patients will be initially resuscitated following the national guidelines and eligible patients will be randomised to receive either FDP or an equal amount of normal saline. The primary outcome measure for this study is the sustained reversion to sinus rhythm with a heart rate greater than 50/min within 2 hours of completion of FDP/placebo bolus. Secondary outcomes include death, reversal of hyperkalaemia on the 6, 12, 18 and 24 hour samples and maintenance of sinus rhythm on the holter monitor. Analysis will be on intention-to-treat. Discussion This trial will provide information on the effectiveness of FDP in yellow oleander poisoning. If FDP is effective in cardiac glycoside toxicity, it would provide substantial benefit to the patients in rural Asia. The drug is inexpensive and thus could be made available at primary care hospitals if proven to be effective. Trial Registration Current Controlled trial ISRCTN71018309

  6. Cyto-architectural Alterations in the Corpuscles of Stannius of Stinging Catfish Heteropneustes fossilis after Exposure to a Botanical Pesticide (Nerium indicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ManiRam Prasad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This investigation describes the cyto-architectural alterations observed in the corpuscles of Stannius of stinging catfish Heteropneustes fossilis after treatment with a botanical pesticide Nerium indicum. Methods: Heteropneustes fossilis were subjected to 11.27 and 2.81 mg/L of Nerium indicum leaf extract over short- and long-term exposure periods, respectively. Blood was collected for calcium analysis and corpuscles of Stannius (CS gland were fixed on 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in the short-term experiment and after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in the long-term experiment. Results: Serum calcium levels decreased from 48 h to 96 h. CS remains unaffected till 72 h. After the 96-hour treatment, increased granulation was observed in AF- positive cells. Nuclear volume of these cells exhibited no change throughout the short-term treatment. Slight increases in nuclear volume of AF-negative cells were recorded after 96 h. Nerium indicum caused decreases in serum calcium levels of H. fossilis from day 14 to 28. CS exhibited no alterations up to 14 days of exposure. AF-positive cells of CS depicted increased granulation after 21 days of treatment. Nuclear volume of these cells exhibited a slight decrease from day 21 to 28. Heavy accumulation of AF-positive granules was observed and few degenerating cells were noticed. Nuclear volume of AF-negative cells increased after 21 and 28 days of treatment. Vacuolization and degeneration occurred in certain places. Conclusion: It is inferred from the present study that the botanical pesticide Nerium indicum induced severe changes in the corpuscles of Stannius of catfish.

  7. Effect of various growth hormone concentration and combination on callus induction, nature of callus and callogenic response of Nerium odorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmi, Runa; Trivedi, Maheshwar Prasad

    2014-03-01

    Nerium odorum, Linn. (Apocynaceae) is an important evergreen shrub. It is heat, salinity and drought tolerant. Plants with milky sap have medicinal value, mainly cardenolides, flavonoids and terpenes. It is used for wastewater purification and for restoration of riparian woodlands. In view of these facts, the study was conducted for micropropagation of N. odorum. Murashige and Skoog (MS) media supplemented with different concentrations (0.5-10.0 mg/l) of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and kinetin (Kin) were used singly and in combinations. Among all the growth hormones, 2,4-D was the best for callus induction (75% in stem and 79% in leaf) and in combination 2,4-D and BAP (78% in stem and 81% in leaf). The day of callus induction started from the 19th to the 37th day. This variation is due to the differences in culture conditions and the age of explants. The fresh and dry weight and moisture content showed good growth of callus, which is used in further studies of alkaloid production. Micropropagation of this plant allows the production of clones at a fast rate and in continuous manner. This work can lead to the development of an efficient protocol for callus induction and other issues.

  8. Molluscicidal activity of cardiac glycosides from Nerium indicum against Pomacea canaliculata and its implications for the mechanisms of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lingpeng; Wang, Wanxian; Dong, Xinjiao; Hu, Renyong; Nan, Xuyang

    2011-09-01

    Cardiac glycosides from fresh leaves of Nerium indicum were evaluated for its molluscicidal activity against Pomacea canaliculata (golden apple snail: GAS) under laboratory conditions. The results showed that LC(50) value of cardiac glycosides against GAS was time dependent and the LC(50) value at 96 h was as low as 3.71 mg/L, which was comparable with that of metaldehyde at 72 h (3.88 mg/L). These results indicate that cardiac glycosides could be an effective molluscicide against GAS. The toxicological mechanism of cardiac glucosides on GAS was also evaluated through changes of selected biochemical parameters, including cholinesterase (ChE) and esterase (EST) activities, glycogen and protein contents in hepatopancreas tissues of GAS. Exposure to sublethal concentrations of cardiac glycosides, GAS showed lower activities of EST isozyme in the later stages of the exposure period as well as drastically decreased glycogen content, although total protein content was not affected at the end of 24 and 48 h followed by a significant depletion at the end of 72 and 96 h. The initial increase followed by a decline of ChE activity was also observed during the experiment. These results suggest that cardiac glycosides seriously impair normal physiological metabolism, resulting in fatal alterations in major biochemical constituents of hepatopancreas tissues of P. canaliculata. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multilocus sequence typing of Xylella fastidiosa causing Pierce's disease and oleander leaf scorch in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoli; Morano, Lisa; Bromley, Robin; Spring-Pearson, Senanu; Stouthamer, Richard; Nunney, Leonard

    2010-06-01

    Using a modified multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa based on the same seven housekeeping genes employed in a previously published MLST, we studied the genetic diversity of two subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa and X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi, which cause Pierce's disease and oleander leaf scorch, respectively. Typing of 85 U.S. isolates (plus one from northern Mexico) of X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa from 15 different plant hosts and 21 isolates of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi from 4 different hosts in California and Texas supported their subspecific status. Analysis using the MLST genes plus one cell-surface gene showed no significant genetic differentiation based on geography or host plant within either subspecies. Two cases of homologous recombination (with X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, the third U.S. subspecies) were detected in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. Excluding recombination, MLST site polymorphism in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (0.048%) and X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi (0.000%) was substantially lower than in X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex (0.240%), consistent with the hypothesis that X. fastidiosa subspp. fastidiosa and sandyi were introduced into the United States (probably just prior to 1880 and 1980, respectively). Using whole-genome analysis, we showed that MLST is more effective at genetic discrimination at the specific and subspecific level than other typing methods applied to X. fastidiosa. Moreover, MLST is the only technique effective in detecting recombination.

  10. Yellow Oleander Seed, or "Codo de Fraile" (Thevetia spp.): A Review of Its Potential Toxicity as a Purported Weight-Loss Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Stuart, Armando; Rivera, José O

    2018-05-04

    The Dietary Supplements and Health Education Act (DSHEA), passed by the United States Congress in October of 1994, defines herbal products as nutritional supplements, not medications. This opened the market for diverse products made from plants, including teas, extracts, essential oils, and syrups. Mexico and the United States share an extensive border, where diverse herbal products are available to the public without a medical prescription. Research undertaken in the neighboring cities of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and El Paso, Texas, USA, shows the use of herbs is higher in this border area compared to the rest of the United States. A portion of the population is still under the erroneous impression that "natural" products are completely safe to use and therefore lack side effects. We review the dangers of ingesting the toxic seed of Thevetia spp. (family Apocynaceae), commonly known as "yellow oleander" or "codo de fraile," misleadingly advertised on the Internet as an effective and safe dietary supplement for weight loss. Lack of proper quality control regarding herbs generates a great variability in the quantity and quality of the products' content. Herb-drug interactions occur between some herbal products and certain prescription pharmaceuticals. Certain herbs recently introduced into the U.S. market may not have been previously tested adequately for purity, safety, and efficacy. Due to the lack of reliable clinical data regarding the safe use of various herbal products currently available, the public should be made aware regarding the possible health hazards of using certain herbs for therapeutic purposes. The potentially fatal toxicity of yellow oleander seed is confirmed by cases reported from various countries, while the purported benefits of using it for weight loss have not been evaluated by any known clinical trials. For this reason, the use of yellow oleander seed as a dietary supplement should be avoided.

  11. (Kaner) Flower Extract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the activity of 50 % hydroalcohol flower extract of. Nerium oleander Linn. on the central nervous system (CNS) of mice. Methods: The effect of the 50 % hydroalcohol extract of N. oleander flowers at dosage levels of 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. on the locomotor activity of mice ...

  12. Effect of cardiac glycosides from Nerium indicum on feeding rate, digestive enzymes activity and ultrastructural alterations of hepatopancreas in Pomacea canaliculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lingpeng; Qian, Xiaowei; Nan, Xuyang; Zhang, Yejian

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides from Nerium indicum showed potent molluscicide activity against Pomacea canaliculata (GAS), but the toxicological mechanism is still far less understood. Effects of sublethal treatments of cardiac glycosides on feeding rate, digestive enzymes and ultrastructural alterations of the hepatopancreas in GAS were evaluated in this study. Exposure of GAS to sublethal concentrations of cardiac glycosides resulted in a significant reduction of feeding rate of GAS. The amylase, cellulose and protease activity were increase significantly at the end of 24 h followed by significant inhibition after 48 h of exposure while lipase activity was not affected significantly at the end of 24 h followed by a significant inhibition after 48 h of exposure during experimental period. The main ultrastructural alterations of hepatopancreas observed in snails under cardiac glycosides treatment comprised disruption of nuclear membrane, increased vesiculation and dilatation of endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolization and swelling of mitochondrial compared to the untreated GAS. These results, for the first time, provide systematic evidences showing that cardiac glycosides seriously impairs the hepatopancreas tissues of GAS, resulting in inhibition of digestive enzymes activity and feeding rate and cause GAS death in the end. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of digoxin cross-reacting substances in patients with acute yellow Oleander (Thevetia peruviana) poisoning, including the effect of activated charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Darren M; Southcott, Emma; Potter, Julia M; Roberts, Michael S; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A

    2006-12-01

    Intentional self-poisonings with seeds from the yellow oleander tree (Thevetia peruviana) are widely reported. Activated charcoal has been suggested to benefit patients with yellow oleander poisoning by reducing absorption and/or facilitating elimination. Two recent randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of activated charcoal yielded conflicting outcomes in terms of mortality. The effect of activated charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of Thevetia cardenolides has not been assessed. This information may be useful for determining whether further studies are necessary. Serial blood samples were obtained from patients enrolled in an RCT assessing the relative efficacy of single-dose and multiple-dose activated charcoal (SDAC and MDAC, respectively) compared with no activated charcoal (NoAC). The concentration of Thevetia cardenolides was estimated with a digoxin immunoassay. The effect of activated charcoal on cardenolide pharmacokinetics was compared between treatment groups by determining the area under the curve for each patient in the 24 hours following admission, the 24-hour mean residence time, and regression lines obtained from serial concentration points, adjusted for exposure. Erratic and prolonged absorption patterns were noted in each patient group. The apparent terminal half-life was highly variable, with a median time of 42.9 hours. There was a reduction in 24-hour mean residence time and in the apparent terminal half-life estimated from linear regression in patients administered activated charcoal, versus the control group (NoAC). This effect was approximately equal in patients administered MDAC or SDAC. Activated charcoal appears to favorably influence the pharmacokinetic profile of Thevetia cardenolides in patients with acute self-poisoning and may have clinical benefits. Given the conflicting clinical outcomes noted in previous RCTs, these mechanistic data support the need for further studies to determine whether a particular subgroup

  14. Cardiac Glycoside Plants Self-Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radenkova-Saeva J.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac glycosides are found in a diverse group of plants including Digitalis purpurea and Digitalis lanata (foxgloves, Nerium oleander, Convallaria majalis (lily of the valley, Strophanthus gratus, etc. Nerium Oleander is an indoor and ornamental plant of an evergreen shrub. It’s widespread in countries with a Mediterranean climate. Oleander is one of the most poisonous plants known to humans. All parts of the nerium oleander are poisonous, primarily due to the contained cardiac glycosides - oleandrin, nerin, digitoxigenin, and olinerin of which oleandrin is the principal toxin. The bark contains the toxic substances of rosagenin which causes strychnine-like effects. Signs of poisoning appear a few hours after the adoption of the parts of the plant. Two cases of Nerium Oleander poisoning were presented. Clinical picture included gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and central nervous system effects. The clinical symptoms were characterized by nausea, vomiting, salivation, colic, diarrhoea, ventricular tachycardia, dysrhythmia, heart block, ataxia, drowsiness, muscular tremor. Treatment included administration of activated charcoal, symptomatic and supportive care.

  15. Seasonal variation of isoprene emissions from tropical roadside plant species and their possible role in deteoriating air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Saxena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, two widely adapted common Indian plant species viz. Dalbergia sissoo and Nerium oleander were examined for normalized isoprene emission rate (NIER using dynamic flow through bag enclosure technique. An attempt has also been made to evaluate suitability of these two selected plant species for city plantation programmes. Dalbergia sp. has got high isoprene emission (84.67 ± 3.87 μg/g/h while Nerium sp. has minimum (0.001 ± 0.17 μg/g/h during summer season as compared to monsoon season. Thus, Nerium oleander falls under low isoprene emitting category while Dalbergia sissoo, under high isoprene emitting category. The plants having low emitting isoprene rate due to non-functionalization of this light dependent Isoprene-synthase (IspS. Hence, Nerium oleander should be encouraged for further city plantation at roadsides and Dalbergia sissoo should be done on low scale expecting reduction of other harmful pollutants in air.

  16. Morpho-anatomical characteristics of the raw material of the herbal drug Olivae folium and its counterfeits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakušić Branislava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The olive tree leaf is a very significant plant raw material from the medical and economic points of view (Ph. Eur. 5, PDR. In the region of Southeast Europe, olive leaves are most commonly adulterated with oleander leaves and the leaves of Pittosporum tobira. This paper deals with the morphological and anatomical features of leaves of the following species: Olea europaea, Nerium oleander and Pittosporum tobira. The aim of this research was to define concrete diagnostic parameters permitting detection of adulterants in commercial samples of the herbal drug Olivae folium.

  17. Epidemiology of intoxication of domestic animals by plants in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Cristina; Caloni, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    This review focuses on some of the most important poisonous plants in Europe and provides an overview of the poisoning episodes that have occurred in European countries. Poisoning of livestock and companion animals by plants is a relatively common occurrence. In Europe livestock and horses are commonly poisoned by Datura stramonium (Jimson weed), Senecio spp. (ragworts and groundsels), Quercus spp. (oak), Taxus baccata (European yew), Nerium oleander (oleander), Pteridium aquilinum (bracken fern), Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) and Rhododendron spp. (rhododendrons and azaleas). Poisoning may occur when the fresh plant is ingested in pasture or when it contaminates hay or silage. In pets, the greatest majority of plant poisonings are the result of ingestion of house or garden plants, such as Cycas revoluta (Sago palm), Ricinus communis (castor bean), Allium spp., Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinsettia), Lilium spp., Convallaria majalis (Lily of the valley), Pyracantha spp. (firethorn), Rhododendron spp. (rhododendrons and azaleas), Melia azedarach (Chinaberry tree), Taxus baccata (European yew) and Nerium oleander (oleander). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of heavy metals in selected medicinal plants from Dir, Swat and Peshawar districts of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, I.; Khattak, M.R.; Khan, F.A.; Rehman, I.; Khan, F.U.

    2011-01-01

    Essential and non-essential heavy metals like Manganese, Zinc, Iron, Nickel, Copper, Chromium, Lead and Cadmium were analyzed quantitatively in selected medicinal plants including, Acorus calamus, Artemisia annua, Chenopodium foliosum, Cupressus arizonica, Euphorbia helioscopia L, Lepidium sativum, Nerium oleander, Ranunculus mariculatus , Tecoma stans, Urtica dioica by using atomic absorption spectrometry. The main purpose of this study was to quantify essential and non-essential heavy metals in selected herbs, which are extensively used in the preparation of herbal products and standardized extracts. The high conc. of iron, Mn was found in Nerium oleander 26.52 mg/kg, 94.40 mg/kg. Zn in Lepidium sativum 77.00 mg/kg and high conc. of K 94600 and Na 400 mg/kg was found in Tecoma stans. The concentration of other heavy metals particularly Cu, Ni and Pb were also found in higher conc. in the selected herbs. The main purpose of the present study was to evaluate the contents of toxic metals and their concentration level which may have adverse effect on human health, besides providing a scientific data. (author)

  19. Unripe red fruits may be aposematic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ne'eman, Gidi; Izhaki, Ido

    2009-01-01

    The unripe fruits of certain species are red. Some of these species disperse their seeds by wind (Nerium oleander, Anabasis articulata), others by adhering to animals with their spines (Emex spinosa) or prickles (Hedysarum spinosissimum). Certainly neither type uses red coloration as advertisement to attract the seed dispersing agents. Fleshy-fruited species (Rhamnus alaternus, Rubus sanguineus and Pistacia sp.), which disperse their seeds via frugivores, change fruit color from green to red while still unripe and then to black or dark blue upon ripening. The red color does not seem to function primarily in dispersal (unless red fruits form advertisement flags when there are already black ripe fruits on the plant) because the red unripe fruits of these species are poisonous, spiny, or unpalatable. The unripe red fruits of Nerium oleander are very poisonous, those of Rhamnus alaternus and Anabasis articulata are moderately poisonous, those of Rubus sanguineus are very sour, those of Pistacia sp. contain unpalatable resin and those of Emex spinosa and Hedysarum spinosissimum are prickly. We propose that these unripe red fruits are aposematic, protecting them from herbivory before seed maturation. PMID:19847110

  20. Occurrence, types and distribution of calcium oxalate crystals in leaves and stems of some species of poisonous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tütüncü Konyar, Sevil; Öztürk, Necla; Dane, Feruzan

    2014-12-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals, which are found in many organs of plants, have different morphological forms: as druses, prism, styloids, raphides and crystal sand. In this study, the distribution, type and specific location of calcium oxalate crystals in the leaves and stems of the eight species of poisonous plants and one species of nonpoisonous plant were investigated with light microscopy. During study special attention was given to the possible correlation between the presence and types of calcium oxalate crystals and toxic plant organs. The plants examined in this study were Hedera helix L. (Araliaceae), Aristolochia clematitis L. (Aristolochiaceae), Humulus lupulus L. (Cannabaceae), Saponaria officinalis L. (Caryophyllaceae), Chelidonium majus L. (Papaveraceae), Hypericum perforatum L. (Hypericaceae), Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae), Cynanchum acutum L. (Asclepiadaceae), and Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae). Three types of crystals: druses, prismatic crystals and crystal sands were observed. Druses were identified in the leaves and stems of six species of studied plants. In contrast to druses, crystal sands and prismatic crystals were rare. Prismatic crystals were observed in the leaf mesophlly cells of both Nerium oleander and Cynanchum acutum. However, crystal sands were observed only in the pith tissue of Humulus lupulus. On the other hand, leaves and stems of Chelidonium majus, Aristolochia clematitis and Hypericum perforatum were devoid of crystals. There is no absolute correlation between the presence and type of calcium oxalate crystals and toxic plant organs. However druse crystals may function as main irritant in toxic organs of the plants.

  1. Antiproliferative and phytochemical analyses of leaf extracts of ten Apocynaceae species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Kuin; Lim, Yau Yan; Abdullah, Noor Rain; Nordin, Fariza Juliana

    2011-01-01

    Background: The anticancer properties of Apocynaceae species are well known in barks and roots but less so in leaves. Materials and Methods: In this study, leaf extracts of 10 Apocynaceae species were assessed for antiproliferative (APF) activities using the sulforhodamine B assay. Their extracts were also analyzed for total alkaloid content (TAC), total phenolic content (TPC), and radical scavenging activity (RSA) using the Dragendorff precipitation, Folin–Ciocalteu, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays, respectively. Results: Leaf extracts of Alstonia angustiloba, Calotropis gigantea, Catharanthus roseus, Nerium oleander, Plumeria obtusa, and Vallaris glabra displayed positive APF activities. Extracts of Allamanda cathartica, Cerbera odollam, Dyera costulata, and Kopsia fruticosa did not show any APF activity. Dichloromethane (DCM) extract of C. gigantea, and DCM and DCM:MeOH extracts of V. glabra showed strong APF activities against all six human cancer cell lines. Against breast cancer cells of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, DCM extracts of C. gigantea and N. oleander were stronger than or comparable to standard drugs of xanthorrhizol, curcumin, and tamoxifen. All four extracts of N. oleander were effective against MCF-7 cells. Extracts of Kopsia fruticosa had the highest TAC while those of Dyera costulata had the highest TPC and RSA. Extracts of C. gigantea and V. glabra inhibited the growth of all six cancer cell lines while all extracts of N. oleander were effective against MCF-7 cells. Conclusion: Extracts of C. gigantea, V. glabra, and N. oleander therefore showed great promise as potential candidates for anticancer drugs. The wide-spectrum APF activities of these three species are reported for the first time and their bioactive compounds warrant further investigation. PMID:21772753

  2. The Histological And Histochemical Changes In The Gonads Of The Cotton Leaf Worm SPODOPTERA LITTORALIS (BOISD.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HAZAA, M.A.M.; ALM EL-DIN, M.M.S.; EL-AKHDAR, E.A.H.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of sub-sterilizing dose of gamma radiation (125 Gy) alone or in combination with different concentrations of Tafla leaves extract (Nerium oleander) on the histology and histochemistry of the male and female reproductive systems were studied. The treatment caused histopathological changes in the ovaries including vacuolation, absence of nurse cells, shrinkage of oocyte tissue, clumped of chromatin material and thickness of epithelial cells at some areas. The vacuolation of the testes and absorbation of sperm bundles also represent the damage of germ cells, and disintegration of spermatocytes was most prominent in these organs. Histochemical studies showed clear increment in the protein content of male testes while it showed clear decrement in the female ovaries. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) showed a pronounced increase in both male and female gonads in spite of DNA showed a pronounced decrement.

  3. Les Brulures Chimiques Par Le Laurier Rose

    OpenAIRE

    Bakkali, H.; Ababou, M.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Moussaoui, A.; Ennouhi, A.; Fouadi, F.Z.; Siah, S.; Ihrai, H.

    2010-01-01

    Le laurier rose ou Nerium oleander est un arbuste qui pousse naturellement dans les régions méditerranéennes. Au Maroc on le trouve dans les lieux humides. Il est réputé par ses risques de toxicité systémique en cas d'empoisonnement à cause de la présence de deux alcaloïdes, surtout l'oléandrine. La littérature illustre des cas d'utilisation locale des feuilles de cette plante contre la gale, les hémorroïdes et les furoncles. Nous rapportons deux cas de brûlures chimiques par le laurier rose ...

  4. Caffeoylquinic acids in leaves of selected Apocynaceae species: Their isolation and content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Kuin; Lim, Yau Yan; Ling, Sui Kiong; Chan, Eric Wei Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Three compounds isolated from the methanol (MeOH) leaf extract of Vallaris glabra (Apocynaceae) were those of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs). This prompted a quantitative analysis of their contents in leaves of V. glabra in comparison with those of five other Apocynaceae species (Alstonia angustiloba, Dyera costulata, Kopsia fruticosa, Nerium oleander, and Plumeria obtusa), including flowers of Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle), the commercial source of chlorogenic acid (CGA). Compound were isolated by column chromatography, and identified by NMR and MS analyses. CQA content of leaf extracts was determined using reversed-phase HPLC. From the MeOH leaf extract of V. glabra, 3-CQA, 4-CQA, and 5-CQA or CGA were isolated. Content of 5-CQA of V. glabra was two times higher than flowers of L. japonica, while 3-CQA and 4-CQA content was 16 times higher. With much higher CQA content than the commercial source, leaves of V. glabra can serve as a promising alternative source.

  5. Inquérito epidemiológico sobre plantas tóxicas das mesoregiões Central e Oeste do Rio Grande do Norte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Antonio Geraldo Neto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um estudo para determinar as plantas tóxicas incriminadas como de interesse zootécnico em 35 municípios das mesorregiões Central e Oeste do estado do Rio Grande do Norte (RN. Foram entrevistados 180 produtores, 20 médicos veterinários, 12 técnicos agrícolas e 5 agrônomos. Os dados obtidos nas entrevistas foram compilados e analisados com auxílio do programa Epi Info versão 6.04. As plantas tóxicas relatadas pelos entrevistados como causadoras de diversos surtos foram Ipomoea asarifolia, Aspidosperma pyrifolium, Indigofera suffruticosa, Manihot carthaginensis subsp. glaziovii, Amorimia septentrionalis, Tephrosia cinerea, Anadenanthera colubrina var. cebil, Marsdenia megalantha, Anacardium occidentale, Cnidoscolus quercifolius, Crotalaria retusa, Froelichia humboldtiana, Ipomoea carnea, Leucaena leucocephala, Manihot esculenta, Mimosa tenuiflora, Nerium oleander, Prosopis juliflora, Ricinus communis, Sorghum bicolor, Sorghum halepense e Urochloa (Brachiaria decumbens.

  6. Ensaios preliminares em laboratório para verificar a ação moluscicida de algumas espécies da flora brasileira Preliminary laboratory tests of the molluscicide activity of some species of Brazilian flora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelymar Martineli Mendes

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se em laboratório a atividade moluscicida de 68 extratos de 23 plantas brasileiras. As soluções em água desclorada dos extratos hexânicos e etanólico, nas concentrações de 1, 10 e 100 ppm, foram testadas sobre caramujos adultos e desovas de Biomphalaria glabrata, criados em laboratório. As plantas que demonstraram ação moluscicida na concentração de 100 ppm foram: Arthemisia verlotorum Lamotte, Caesalpinia peltophoroides Benth, Cassia rugosa G.Don., Eclipta alba Hassk, Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd, Euphorbia splendens Bojer, Joannesia princeps Vell, Leonorus sibiricus L.,Macrosiphonia guaranitica Muell,Nerium oleander L., Palicourea nicotianaefolia Cham, e Schlech., Panicum maximum M., Rumex crispus L., Ruta graveolens L., e Stryphnodendron barbatiman M.The molluscicide activity of sixty-eight extracts from twenty-three Brazilian plants was studied in the laboratory. The solutions, in dechlorinated water, of hexanic and ethylic extracts at 1, 10 and 100 ppm concentrations, were tested on adult snails and egg masses of Biomphalaria glabrata, reared in the laboratory. The plants with molluscicide activity on adult snails and/or egg masses at 100 ppm concentration were: Arthemisia verlotorum Lamotte, Caesalpinia peltophoroides Benth, Cassia rugosa G. Don, Eclipta alba Hassk, Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd, Euphorbia splendens Bojer, Joannesia princeps Vell, Leonorus sibiricus L., Macrosiphonia guaranitica Muell, Nerium oleander L., Palicourea nicotianaefolia Cham. and Schlech., Panicum maximum M., Rumex crispus L., Ruta graveolens L. and Stryphnodendron barbatiman M.

  7. Phytobiocidal management of bacterial wilt of tomato caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (Smith) Yabuuchi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, N.; Ahmad, M.; Siddique, M.; Ali, A.; Naz, I.; Ullah, N.; Ahmad, F.

    2016-11-01

    Phytobiocides are a good alternative to chemicals in managing bacterial diseases including bacterial wilt of tomato caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. In the present research study, finely ground dried powders of seven widely available medicinal plants/weeds species viz., Peganum harmala (esfand or wild rue), Calotropis procera (sodom apple), Melia azedarach (white cedar), Allium sativum (garlic), Adhatoda vasica (malabar nut), Tagetes patula (marigold) and Nerium oleander (oleander) were assessed for their anti-microbial activity, both in-vitro (10% w/v) and in-vivo (10, 20, 30, and 40 g/kg of potted soil) against R. solanacearum. Aqueous extracts (prepared as 10% w/v, soaking for 48-72 h and filtering) of C. procera, A. vasica, and T. patula inhibited the in-vitro growth of the bacterial pathogen over 60% of that produced by the standard antibiotic streptomycin. A. sativum, N. oleander and P. harmala aqueous extracts were less effective while M. azedarach showed no effect against R. solanacearum. The higher dose (40 g/kg of soil) of C. procera, A. vasica and T. patula decreased disease severity quite effectively and increased yield and plant growth characters as much as the standard antibiotic did. No phytotoxicity of medicinal plants powder was observed on tomato plants. Alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and terpenoids were detected in the aqueous extracts of T. patula and A. vasica whereas C. procera was found to have only alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins and saponins. Our data suggest that dried powders of T. patula, C. procera and A. vasica (40 g/kg of soil) could be used as an effective component in the integrated disease management programs against bacterial wilt of tomato. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of air pollution tolerance index and anticipated performance index of plants and their application in development of green space along the urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Nagpal, Avinash Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Air pollution due to vehicular emissions has become one of the most serious problems in the whole world and has resulted in huge threat to both the environment and the health of living organisms (plants, humans, animals, microorganisms). Plants growing along the roadsides get affected at the maximum as they are the primary recipients to different air pollutants and show varied levels of tolerance and sensitivity. Taking this into account, the present work was based on assessment of seasonal variation in air pollution tolerance index (APTI) and anticipated performance index (API) of four roadside plants, namely, Alstonia scholaris, Nerium oleander, Tabernaemontana coronaria, and Thevetia peruviana belonging to family Apocynaceae. APTI was calculated by the determination of four important biochemical parameters, viz., pH, relative water content (RWC), total chlorophyll (TChl), and ascorbic acid (AsA) content of leaves. The leaf samples were collected from plants growing at seven different sites of Amritsar (Punjab), India, for pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. Highest APTI (82.14) was reported in N. oleander during the pre-monsoon season while the lowest was recorded in T. coronaria (18.59) in the post-monsoon season. On the basis of API score, A. scholaris was anticipated to be an excellent performer during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons followed by N. oleander, T. coronaria, and T. peruviana. Linear regression analysis and Pearson's correlation coefficient depicted significant positive correlation between APTI and ascorbic acid content during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons.

  9. Phytobiocidal management of bacterial wilt of tomato caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (Smith Yabuuchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseerud Din

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Phytobiocides are a good alternative to chemicals in managing bacterial diseases including bacterial wilt of tomato caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. In the present research study, finely ground dried powders of seven widely available medicinal plants/weeds species viz., Peganum harmala (esfand or wild rue, Calotropis procera (sodom apple, Melia azedarach (white cedar, Allium sativum (garlic, Adhatoda vasica (malabar nut, Tagetes patula (marigold and Nerium oleander (oleander were assessed for their anti-microbial activity, both in-vitro (10% w/v and in-vivo (10, 20, 30, and 40 g/kg of potted soil against R. solanacearum. Aqueous extracts (prepared as 10% w/v, soaking for 48-72 h and filtering of C. procera, A. vasica, and T. patula inhibited the in-vitro growth of the bacterial pathogen over 60% of that produced by the standard antibiotic streptomycin. A. sativum, N. oleander and P. harmala aqueous extracts were less effective while M. azedarach showed no effect against R. solanacearum. The higher dose (40 g/kg of soil of C. procera, A. vasica and T. patula decreased disease severity quite effectively and increased yield and plant growth characters as much as the standard antibiotic did. No phytotoxicity of medicinal plants powder was observed on tomato plants. Alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins and terpenoids were detected in the aqueous extracts of T. patula and A. vasica whereas C. procera was found to have only alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins and saponins. Our data suggest that dried powders of T. patula, C. procera and A. vasica (40 g/kg of soil could be used as an effective component in the integrated disease management programs against bacterial wilt of tomato.

  10. Plant extracts on Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Beauveria bassianaExtratos vegetais sobre Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae e Beauveria bassiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Zorzetti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Looking for alternatives to pesticides for Hypothenemus hampei control, the objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts of Moringa oleifera (Moringa and Tephrosia purpurea (tephrosia (seeds, leaves and roots and Melia azedarach (cinnamon, Nerium oleander (oleander and Azadirachta indica (neem (leaves only, on mortality and repellency of H. hampei and its compatibility with Beauveria bassiana, an important natural enemy of this pest. To assess the mortality, coffee leaves (Coffea arabica L were treated by immersion in a solution of endosulfan and plant extracts at a concentration of 10% and then offered to adults of H. hampei. The repellency was evaluated in multiple-choice tests and in no-choice tests among coffee fruit treated and untreated The compatibility between extracts and Beauveria bassiana (CG 452 was analyzed by quantifying germination, colony forming units, growth and yield / productivity of conidia. The highest mortalities were observed when leaves were treated with ethanolic extract of T. purpurea (leaves which did not differ from endosulfan, and aqueous and ethanolic extracts from M. oleifera seeds . In free-choice tests, all the ethanolic extracts showed repellent action, being higher for M. oleifera (root and T. purpurea (seed. The aqueous extracts of M. oleifera (leaves and seeds and N. oleander (leaves showed the highest repellency. In no-choice tests the highest repellency level was for coffee fruits treated with A. indica (leaves. The ethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves negatively affected B. bassiana germination. These studies showed the potential of these plant extracts for use in the field as an alternative to chemical control, once they are also selective for B. bassiana. Visando alternativas ao uso de agrotóxicos no controle de Hypothenemus hampei, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial de extratos vegetais aquosos e etanólicos de Moringa oleifera

  11. Insecticied effect of silver and zinc nanoparticles against Aphis nerii Boyer of fonscolombe (Hemiptera: Aphididae Efecto insecticida de nanopartículas de plata y zinc contra Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe (Hemiptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rouhani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The oleander aphid, Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe, is one of the common pests of ornamental plants in the families of Apocynaceae and Sclepiadaceae and distributed throughout the world, which has been responsible for the mortality of a large number of oleander (Nerium oleander L. shrubs each year. In this research, the insecticidal activity of Ag nanoparticles against the A. nerii was investigated. Nanoparticles of Ag and Ag-Zn were synthesized through a solvothermal method, and using them, insecticidal solutions of different concentrations were prepared and tested on A. nerii. For comparison purposes, imidacloprid was also used as a conventional insecticide. In the experiments, the LC50 value for imidacloprid, Ag and Ag-Zn nanoparticles were calculated to be 0.13 μL mL-1, 424.67 mg mL-1, and 539.46 mg mL-1, respectively. The result showed that Ag nanoparticles can be used as a valuable tool in pest management programs of A. nerii. Additionally, the study showed that imidacloprid at 1 μL mL-1 and nanoparticles at 700 mg mL-1 had the highest insect mortality effect.El áfido de la adelfa, Aphis nerii Boyer de Fonscolombe, es una de las plagas más comunes de plantas ornamentales en las familias Apocynaceae y Sclepiadaceae y tiene distribución mundial, ha sido responsable de la mortalidad de un gran número de arbustos de adelfa (Nerium oleander L. cada ano. En este estudio se investigó la actividad insecticida de nanopartículas de Ag contra A. nerii. Nanopartículas de Ag y Ag-Zn fueron sintetizadas a través de un método solvotérmico, y con ellas se prepararon soluciones insecticidas de diferentes concentraciones y se probaron contra A. nerii. Con fines de comparación, también se usó imidacloprid como un insecticida convencional. En los experimentos, el valor LC50 para imidacloprid, nanopartículas de Ag y Ag-Zn se calculó como 0.13 μL mL-1, 424.67 mg mL-1, y 539.46 mg mL-1, respectivamente. El resultado mostró que nanopart

  12. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  13. Phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in tropical coastal soils. I. Selection of promising woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenhao H; Lo, Joey B; Robert, Françoise M; Ray, Chittaranjan; Tang, Chung-Shih

    2004-01-01

    This glasshouse study is aimed at evaluating tropical plants for phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated saline sandy subsurface soils. Tropical plants were selected for their ability to tolerate high salinity and remove No. 2 diesel fuel in coastal topsoil prior to further investigation of the phytoremediation feasibility in deep contaminated soils. The residual petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminant at the John Rogers Tank Farm site, a former petroleum storage facility, at Hickam Air Force Base, Honolulu, Hawaii, is located in a coastal area. It lies below a layer of silt in the subsurface, in loamy sand characterized by moderate salinity and high pH. Little is known regarding the ability of tropical plants to remediate petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface soil in Hawaiian and other Pacific Island ecosystems although suitable plants have been identified and utilized for bioremediation in surface soil or marine sediments. The experiments were conducted in long narrow pots under glasshouse conditions in two phases. A preliminary experiment was done with nine tropical plants: kiawe (Prosopis pallida), milo (Thespesia populnea), common ironwood (Casuarina equisetifolia), kou (Cordia subcordata), tropical coral tree (Erythrina variegata), false sandalwood (Myoporum sandwicense), beach naupaka (Scaevola sericea), oleander (Nerium oleander), and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris). These plants were screened for resistance to high salinity treatment (2% NaCl) and two diesel fuel levels (5 and 10 g No. 2 diesel fuel/kg soil) in separate treatments. Plants that showed good tolerance of both factors were further evaluated in a second phase for their efficacy in the phytoremediation of diesel-fuel petroleum hydrocarbons under moderate salinity treatment (1% NaCl). Tropical coral tree and buffelgrass were susceptible to either 2% NaCl or diesel fuel at 10 g/kg soil, but tolerant of diesel fuel at 5 g/kg soil. Kiawe, milo, kou, common ironwood, N. oleander

  14. Applied clinical pharmacology and public health in rural Asia – preventing deaths from organophosphorus pesticide and yellow oleander poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Self-poisoning with pesticides or plants is a major clinical problem in rural Asia, killing several hundred thousand people every year. Over the last 17 years, our clinical toxicology and pharmacology group has carried out clinical studies in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka to improve treatment and reduce deaths. Studies have looked at the effectiveness of anti-digoxin Fab in cardiac glycoside plant poisoning, multiple dose activated charcoal in all poisoning, and pralidoxime in moderate toxicity organophosphorus insecticide poisoning. More recently, using a Haddon matrix as a guide, we have started conducting public health and animal studies to find strategies that may work outside of the hospital. Based on the 2009 GSK Research in Clinical Pharmacology prize lecture, this review shows the evolution of the group's research from a clinical pharmacology approach to one that studies possible interventions at multiple levels, including the patient, the community and government legislation. PMID:22943579

  15. Intoxicações por plantas diagnosticadas em ruminantes e equinos e estimativa das perdas econômicas na Paraíba Plant poisonings diagnosed in ruminants and horses and estimation of the economical losses in Paraíba

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    Tales S. Assis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Foi realizado um levantamento dos surtos de intoxicações por plantas em ruminantes e equinos diagnosticados no Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária (LPV, do Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Campus de Patos, Paraíba, no período de 2000-2007. Em bovinos 7,4% dos diagnósticos realizados pelo LPV foram intoxicações por plantas. Foram diagnosticadas intoxicações por Centhraterum brachylepis (um surto, Brachiaria spp. (um surto, Crotalaria retusa (dois surtos, Ipomoea batatas (um surto, Marsdenia sp. (um surto, gramíneas contendo nitratos e nitritos (um surto por Echinochloa polystachya e dois surtos por Pennisetum purpureum, Palicourea aeneofusca (um surto, Prosopis juliflora (três surtos, Nerium oleander (um surto e Mimosa tenuiflora (sete surtos. Na espécie ovina 13% dos diagnósticos foram intoxicações por plantas. Os surtos foram causados por Ipomoea asarifolia (quatro surtos, Brachiaria spp. (três surtos, Crotalaria retusa (dois surtos, Tephrosia cinerea (dois surtos, Panicum dichotomiflorum (um surto, Mascagnia rigida (um surto e malformações associadas à ingestão de Mimosa tenuiflora (20 surtos. Nos caprinos, 6,4% dos diagnósticos corresponderam à intoxicação por plantas. Sete surtos foram causados por Mimosa tenuiflora, um por Ipomoea asarifolia, um por Ipomoea carnea, um por Ipomoea riedelli, três por Prosopis juliflora, um por Arrabidaea corallina, dois por Aspidosperma pyrifolium, dois por Turbina cordata e um por Opuntia ficus-indica. Na espécie equina 14% das doenças diagnosticadas foram devidas a intoxicações por plantas, sendo 12 surtos por Crotalaria retusa e um por Turbina cordata. As perdas na Paraíba por plantas tóxicas são estimadas em 3.895 bovinos, 8.374 ovinos, 6.390 caprinos e 366 equinos, que representam uma perda econômica anual, por morte de animais, de R$ 2.733.097,00. São relatados alguns aspectos epidemiológicos, sinais clínicos e patologia de surtos de

  16. Caffeoylquinic acids in leaves of selected Apocynaceae species: Their isolation and content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siu Kuin; Lim, Yau Yan; Ling, Sui Kiong; Chan, Eric Wei Chiang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Three compounds isolated from the methanol (MeOH) leaf extract of Vallaris glabra (Apocynaceae) were those of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs). This prompted a quantitative analysis of their contents in leaves of V. glabra in comparison with those of five other Apocynaceae species (Alstonia angustiloba, Dyera costulata, Kopsia fruticosa, Nerium oleander, and Plumeria obtusa), including flowers of Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle), the commercial source of chlorogenic acid (CGA). Materials and Methods: Compound were isolated by column chromatography, and identified by NMR and MS analyses. CQA content of leaf extracts was determined using reversed-phase HPLC. Results: From the MeOH leaf extract of V. glabra, 3-CQA, 4-CQA, and 5-CQA or CGA were isolated. Content of 5-CQA of V. glabra was two times higher than flowers of L. japonica, while 3-CQA and 4-CQA content was 16 times higher. Conclusion: With much higher CQA content than the commercial source, leaves of V. glabra can serve as a promising alternative source. PMID:24497746

  17. Plant poisoning in domestic animals: epidemiological data from an Italian survey (2000-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, F; Cortinovis, C; Rivolta, M; Alonge, S; Davanzo, F

    2013-06-01

    An Italian epidemiological study based on the human Poison Control Centre of Milan (Centro Antiveleni di Milano (CAV)) data related to domestic animal poisoning by exposure to plants, was carried out in collaboration with the Veterinary Toxicology Section of the University of Milan. It encompasses a 12-year period, from the beginning of 2000 to the end of 2011. Calls related to toxic plants accounted for 5.7 per cent of total inquiries (2150) received by CAV. The dog was the most commonly poisoned species (61.8 per cent of calls) followed by the cat (26 per cent). Little information was recorded for other species. Most exposures (73.8 per cent) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in only 53.7 per cent of cases, and fatal poisoning accounted for 10.6 per cent of these cases. Glycoside, alkaloid, oxalate, toxalbumin, saponin, terpene and terpenoid-containing plants were recorded and found to be responsible for intoxication. Cycas revoluta, Euphorbia pulcherrima, Hydrangea macrophylla, Nerium oleander, Rhododendron species and Prunus species were the plants most frequently involved. Epidemiological data from this Italian survey provide useful information on animal exposure to plants and confirm the importance of plants as causative agents of animal poisoning.

  18. AQUEOUS EXTRACTS OF PLANTS IN Colletotrichum gloeosporioides INHIBITION IN VITRO AND IN POSTHARVEST GUAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO HENRIQUE ALVES DA SILVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of plant aqueous extracts in the control of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz. Penz. & Sacc. the causal agent of guava anthracnose in, was evaluated in vitro with 1, 2 and 3% aqueous ex- tracts of Azadirachta indica, Nerium oleander, Ocimum gratissimum, Syzygium aromaticum. The experiment was installed in a complete randomized desing in a 3x4 factorial scheme (doses x extracts. For the evaluation, it was calculated the percentage of fungal inhibition. The experiment in vivo was conducted by applying Syzy- gium aromaticum and Azadirachta indica aqueous extract at 2 and 3%, respectively, in three different storage conditions: refrigerated with and without plastic film (PVC, and at ambient conditions. The experiment was installed in a completely randomized design, in a 2x3 factorial scheme (extracts x storage conditions. We evaluated the external appearance and severity of disease, loss of weight and Brix degrees. Syzygium aromati- cum extract at 2% provided 100% of fungal mycelial growth inhibition, and Azadirachta indica extract at the highest dosage (3% inhibited 20.22%. In fruits, there was not significant statistical difference between the ef- fect of extracts on the external appearance and severity of disease, loss of weight and Brix degrees. In relation to the storage conditions, the ones with plastic film and refrigerated differed from the other conditions obtain- ing better external appearance and less severity of disease, lower loss of weight and higher Brix degrees.

  19. Biosurfactants prevent in vitro Candida albicans biofilm formation on resins and silicon materials for prosthetic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochis, Andrea; Fracchia, Letizia; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Rimondini, Lia

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the preventive antiadhesion activity of biosurfactants against Candida albicans biofilm. Disks of silicon and acrylic resin for denture prostheses were precoated with increasing concentrations of biosurfactants obtained from endophyte biofilms selected from Robinia pseudoacacia and from Nerium oleander, and afterward infected with C. albicans cells. The number of biofilm cells were detected by colony-forming unit (CFU) counting, cell viability was established by the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenyl amino)carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide (XTT) assay, and biosurfactant cytotoxicity was evaluated by the [3-(4,5-dimethyliazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium] (MTT) assay. Chlorhexidine was used as control. Precoating with biosurfactants caused a greater reduction (P biosurfactants was observed at low concentrations (78.12 μg/mL and 156.12 μg/mL) which were noncytotoxic. This study demonstrated the preventive antiadhesion activity of biosurfactants against C. albicans biofilm. These agents are amphiphilic, interfere with microbial adhesion, and demonstrate cycompatibility with epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bottom-up effects on herbivore-induced plant defences: a case study based on compositional patterns of rhizosphere microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Emilio; Paredes, Daniel; Rodríguez, Estefanía; Aldana, Diana; González, Mónica; Nogales, Rogelio; Campos, Mercedes; Moreno, Beatriz

    2017-07-24

    Below-ground soil microorganisms can modulate above-ground plant-insect interactions. It still needs to be determined whether this is a direct effect of single species or an indirect effect of shifts in soil microbial community assemblages. Evaluation of the soil microbiome as a whole is critical for understanding multi-trophic interactions, including those mediated by volatiles involving plants, herbivorous insects, predators/parasitoids and microorganisms. We implemented a regulated system comprising Nerium oleander plants grown in soil initially containing a sterile/non sterile inoculum, herbivore Aphis nerii and predator Chrysoperla carnea. After aphid attack, plants emitted a characteristic blend of volatiles derived from two biosynthetic classes: fatty acid catabolites and aromatic-derived products. Three aliphatic compounds were mainly detected in plants grown in the inoculated microbial soil, a blend which was preferentially chosen by C. carnea adult females. The contrasting effect of the initial inocula was attributed to the different microbial consortia developed in each treatment. We argue that differences in the relative abundance of the active microbial communities in the rhizosphere correlate with those in the emission of selected volatile compounds by attacked plants. The mechanisms involved in how the functional soil microbiome modulates inducible indirect defence of plants are discussed.

  1. Dual activities of the anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204 provide neuroprotection in brain slice models for neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kanegan, Michael J; Dunn, Denise E; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Shah, Bijal; He, Dong Ning; McCoy, Daniel D; Yang, Peiying; Peng, Jiangnan; Shen, Li; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

    2016-05-12

    We previously reported neuroprotective activity of the botanical anti-cancer drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, in brain slice and in vivo models of ischemic stroke. We showed that one component of this neuroprotective activity is mediated through its principal cardiac glycoside constituent, oleandrin, via induction of the potent neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, we also noted that the concentration-relation for PBI-05204 in the brain slice oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model is considerably broader than that for oleandrin as a single agent. We thus surmised that PBI-05204 contains an additional neuroprotective component(s), distinct from oleandrin. We report here that neuroprotective activity is also provided by the triterpenoid constituents of PBI-05204, notably oleanolic acid. We demonstrate that a sub-fraction of PBI-05204 (Fraction 0-4) containing oleanolic and other triterpenoids, but without cardiac glycosides, induces the expression of cellular antioxidant gene transcription programs regulated through antioxidant transcriptional response elements (AREs). Finally, we show that Fraction 0-4 provides broad neuroprotection in organotypic brain slice models for neurodegeneration driven by amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau implicated in Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementias, respectively, in addition to ischemic injury modeled by OGD.

  2. Cytotoxic effects of Oosporein isolated from endophytic fungus Cochliobolus kusanoi

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    Rmaesha eA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, oosporein, a fungal toxic secondary metabolite known to be a toxic agent causing chronic disorders in animals, was isolated from fungus Cochliobolus kusanoi of Nerium oleander L. Toxic effects of oosporein and the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity as well as the role of oxidative stress in cytotoxicity to MDCK kidney cells and RAW 264.7 splene cells were evaluated in-vitro. Also to know the possible in-vivo toxic effects of oosporein on kidney and spleen, Balb/C mouse were treated with different concentrations of oosporein ranging from 20 uM to 200 µM. After 24 hrs of post exposure histopathological observations were made to know the effects of oosporein on target organs. Oosporein induced elevated levels of ROS generation and high levels of MDA, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, induced glutathione hydroxylase production was observed in a dose depended manner. Effects oosporein on chromosomal DNA damage was assessed by Comet assay, and increase in DNA damage were observed in both the studied cell lines by increasing the oosprin concentration. Further, oosporein treatment to studied cell lines indicated significant suppression of oxidative stress related gene (SOD1 and CAT expression, and increased levels of mRNA expression in apoptosis or oxidative stress

  3. Ephedra alte (Joint Pine: An Invasive, Problematic Weedy Species in Forestry and Fruit Tree Orchards in Jordan

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    Jamal R. Qasem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 2008–2010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked.

  4. Phytoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in tropical coastal soils. II. Microbial response to plant roots and contaminant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ryan K; Sun, Wenhao H; Tang, Chung-Shih; Robert, Françoise M

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study was to understand the interaction between plants and microorganisms during petroleum-hydrocarbon bioremediation in Pacific Islands coastal soils. Total bacteria and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms population dyanamics were examined in the rhizospheres of tropical trees and shrubs, which were evaluated for their phytoremediation potential in a greenhouse experiment. The respective and combined effects of plant roots and diesel contaminant on the microbial populations were determined in relation to diesel fuel depletion. An increase in the grading populations size of the hydrocarbon-degrading populations of microbes, elicited by rhizodeposition, is generally regarded as conducive to an enhanced degradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants in vegetated soil. The soil was a coastal sandy loam (pH 7.8) which was artificially contaminated with 10 g of No. 2 diesel fuel/kg soil or left uncontaminated. The pots were irrigated with fertilizer and 1% NaCl. The enumerations were carried out in the contaminated and uncontaminated rhizospheres of three trees, kiawe (Prosopis pallida), milo (Thespesia populnea), and kou (Cordia subcordata) and three shrubs, beach naupaka (Scaevola sericea), false sandalwood (Myoporum sandwicense), and oleander (Nerium oleander). Unplanted control soils were included in the experiment. Total bacteria and phenanthrene-degrading bacteria were enumerated on plates. Diesel- and pristane-degrading microorganisms were enumerated by the most-probable-number technique in tissue-culture plates. All four types of microorganisms responded to the rhizosphere of the 6 plants in uncontaminated soil and to the diesel contaminant in unplanted soil. In contaminated rhizospheres, no effect of the plant on the hydrocarbon-degrader numbers was visible. Total bacteria responded more to the plant roots than to the contaminant. The phenanthrene-degrading bacteria and pristane-degrading microorganisms were more influenced by the

  5. Poisonous plants in New Zealand: a review of those that are most commonly enquired about to the National Poisons Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, Robin J; Beasley, D Michael G; Lambie, Bruce S; Wilkins, Gerard T; Schep, Leo J

    2012-12-14

    New Zealand has a number of plants, both native and introduced, contact with which can lead to poisoning. The New Zealand National Poisons Centre (NZNPC) frequently receives enquiries regarding exposures to poisonous plants. Poisonous plants can cause harm following inadvertent ingestion, via skin contact, eye exposures or inhalation of sawdust or smoked plant matter. The purpose of this article is to determine the 15 most common poisonous plant enquiries to the NZNPC and provide a review of current literature, discussing the symptoms that might arise upon exposure to these poisonous plants and the recommended medical management of such poisonings. Call data from the NZNPC telephone collection databases regarding human plant exposures between 2003 and 2010 were analysed retrospectively. The most common plants causing human poisoning were selected as the basis for this review. An extensive literature review was also performed by systematically searching OVID MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar. Further information was obtained from book chapters, relevant news reports and web material. For the years 2003-2010 inclusive, a total of 256,969 enquiries were received by the NZNPC. Of these enquiries, 11,049 involved exposures to plants and fungi. The most common poisonous plant enquiries, in decreasing order of frequency, were: black nightshade (Solanum nigrum), arum lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica), kowhai (Sophora spp.), euphorbia (Euphorbia spp.), peace lily (Spathiphyllum spp.), agapanthus (Agapanthus spp.), stinking iris (Iris foetidissima), rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum), taro (Colocasia esculentum), oleander (Nerium oleander), daffodil (Narcissus spp.), hemlock (Conium maculatum), karaka (Corynocarpus laevigatus), foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) and ongaonga/New Zealand tree nettle (Urtica ferox). The combined total of enquiries for these 15 species was 2754 calls (representing approximately 25% of all enquiries regarding plant exposures). The signs

  6. Ethnopharmacological survey of plants used in the traditional treatment of hypertension and diabetes in south-eastern Morocco (Errachidia province).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahraoui, A; El-Hilaly, J; Israili, Z H; Lyoussi, B

    2007-03-01

    This survey was undertaken in the Errachidia province in south-eastern Morocco in order to inventory the main medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Four hundred individuals who knew about and/or had used the medicinal plants for the indicated diseases, including some herbal healers, were interviewed throughout different regions of the province. The inventory of medicinal plants is summarized in a synoptic table, which contains the scientific, vernacular and common name of the plant, its ecological distribution, the part of the plant and the preparation used and the therapeutic indication. Extensive investigations have brought to light 64 medicinal plants belonging to 33 families; of these, 45 are used for diabetes, 36 for hypertension, and 18 for both diseases. Of these plants, 34% grow in the wild, 44% are cultivated, and 22% are not indigenous to the area and are brought from other parts of Morocco or from outside the country. The survey shows that 78% of the patients regularly use these medicinal plants. In this region, the most frequently used plants to treat diabetes include Ajuga iva, Allium cepa, Artemisia herba-alba, Carum carvi, Lepidium sativum, Nigella sativa, Olea europaea, Peganum harmala, Phoenix dactylifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, and Zygophyllum gaetulum, and those to treat hypertension include Ajuga iva, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Carum carvi, Nigella sativa, Olea europea, Rosmarinus officinalis, Origanum majorana, Peganum harmala, and Phoenix dactylifera. The local people recognize the toxic plants and are very careful in using such plants, which are Citrullus colocynthis, Datura stramonium, Nerium oleander, Nigella sativa, Peganum harmala and Zygophyllum gaetulum. Our survey shows that traditional medicine in the south-eastern Moroccan population has not only survived but has thrived in the transcultural environment and intermixture of many ethnic traditions and

  7. Effect of medicinal and aromatic plants on rumen fermentation, protozoa population and methanogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, R; Baruah, L; Saravanan, M; Suresh, K P; Sampath, K T

    2013-06-01

    The potential of tannins from 21 medicinal and aromatic plant leaves as antimethanogenic additives in ruminant feeds was investigated. The effect of tannin from these leaves on rumen fermentation parameters, protozoa population and methanogenesis was studied by incubating the samples [200 mg dry matter (DM)] without and with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000 (400 mg DM) as a tannin binder during 24-h incubation in the in vitro Hohenheim gas method. Based on the methane percentage estimated in the total gas produced, methane production in millilitre was calculated [methane volume (ml) = methane % × total gas produced (ml) in 24 h]. In the samples, crude protein and neutral detergent fibre (g/kg DM) ranged from 113 to 172 and from 352 to 444 respectively. The total phenol (TP; g/kg DM) content was highest in Terminalia chebula (274) followed by Hemigraphis colorata (71) and Sapindus laurifolia (51) respectively. In the remaining samples, it was 50% in A. indica and C. thevetica. One of the important findings of our study was that of the 21 samples screened, Entodinia population increased in 12 with PEG as compared to 7 where Holotricha increased, indicating higher susceptibility of Entodinia to tannin. There was no increase in the protozoa population with PEG when incubating Cardiospermum halicacabum, Clerodendrum inerme, Dioscorea floribunda, Nerium oleander and Selastras paniculatus, which strongly suggested that methane suppression recorded in these samples was not because of a defaunating effect of their tannins per se. The fermentation pattern reflected increased total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentration from 0 to 28.3% with PEG addition among the leaves. Our results confirmed further observations that methanogenesis in vitro is not essentially related to density of protozoa population. Secondly, medicinal and aromatic plants such as C. inerme, Gymnema sylvestre and Sapindus laurifolia containing tannins appear to have a potential to suppress

  8. Xylella fastidiosa CoDiRO strain associated with the olive quick decline syndrome in southern Italy belongs to a clonal complex of the subspecies pauca that evolved in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelletti, Simone; Scortichini, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited bacterium transmitted by xylem-fluid-feeding Hemiptera insects, causes economic losses of both woody and herbaceous plant species. A Xyl. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain, namely CoDiRO, was recently found to be associated with the 'olive quick decline syndrome' in southern Italy (i.e. Apulia region). Recently, some Xyl. fastidiosa strains intercepted in France from Coffea spp. plant cuttings imported from Central and South America were characterized. The introduction of infected plant material from Central America in Apulia was also postulated even though an ad hoc study to confirm this hypothesis is lacking. In the present study, we assessed the complete and draft genome of 27 Xyl. fastidiosa strains. Through a genome-wide approach, we confirmed the occurrence of three subspecies within Xyl. fastidiosa, namely fastidiosa, multiplex and pauca, and demonstrated the occurrence of a genetic clonal complex of four Xyl. fastidiosa strains belonging to subspecies pauca which evolved in Central America. The CoDiRO strain displayed 13 SNPs when compared with a strain isolated in Costa Rica from Coffea sp. and 32 SNPs when compared with two strains obtained from Nerium oleander in Costa Rica. These results support the close relationships of the two strains. The four strains in the clonal complex contain prophage-like genes in their genomes. This study strongly supports the possibility of the introduction of Xyl. fastidiosa in southern Italy via coffee plants grown in Central America. The data also stress how the current global circulation of agricultural commodities potentially threatens the agrosystems worldwide.

  9. Xylella fastidiosa: an examination of a re-emerging plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette; Ingel, Brian; Blanco-Ulate, Barbara; Cantu, Dario; Roper, Caroline

    2018-04-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative bacterial plant pathogen with an extremely wide host range. This species has recently been resolved into subspecies that correlate with host specificity. This review focuses on the status of X. fastidiosa pathogenic associations in plant hosts in which the bacterium is either endemic or has been recently introduced. Plant diseases associated with X. fastidiosa have been documented for over a century, and much about what is known in the context of host-pathogen interactions is based on these hosts, such as grape and citrus, in which this pathogen has been well described. Recent attention has focused on newly emerging X. fastidiosa diseases, such as in olives. Bacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; family Xanthomonadaceae; genus Xylella; species fastidiosa. Gram-negative rod (0.25-0.35 × 0.9-3.5 μm), non-flagellate, motile via Type IV pili-mediated twitching, fastidious. Xylella fastidiosa has a broad host range that includes ornamental, ecological and agricultural plants belonging to over 300 different species in 63 different families. To date, X. fastidiosa has been found to be pathogenic in over 100 plant species. In addition, it can establish non-symptomatic associations with many plants as a commensal endophyte. Here, we list the four distinct subspecies of X. fastidiosa and some of the agriculturally relevant diseases caused by them: X. fastidiosa ssp. fastidiosa causes Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevine (Vitis vinifera); X. fastidiosa ssp. multiplex causes almond leaf scorch (ALS) and diseases on other nut and shade tree crops; X. fastidiosa ssp. pauca causes citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) (Citrus spp.), coffee leaf scorch and olive quick decline syndrome (OQDS) (Olea europaea); X. fastidiosa ssp. sandyi causes oleander leaf scorch (OLS) (Nerium oleander). Significant host specificity seemingly exists for some of the subspecies, although this could be a result of technical biases based on the limited number of

  10. Potent α-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Shobha Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic α-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for α-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic α-amylase. Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L. Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L. Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd. Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc. for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting≥ 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry. Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5% while 4 extracts showed low inhibition ( 50% was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 μgml-1, leaves of Morus alba (1440 μgml-1 and Ocimum tenuiflorum (8.9 μgml-1. Acarbose as the

  11. The influence of physicochemical characteristics of a non-edible oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, oil was extracted from yellow oleander (YO) seed and the yield was found to be 64.7% . The physico-chemical parameters of the yellow oleander seed oil (YO) were assessed following the ASTM standard methods, and found to have iodine value of 75.82 and calorific value of 13.79 MJ/Kg. Other ...

  12. Linking ecosystem services and water resources: landscape-scale hydrology of the Little Karoo

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Maitre, David C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available oleander are generally confined to freshwa- ter reaches, while Tamarix ramosissima and Arundo donax are more salt tolerant (Figure 3). The changes in species composition may have resulted in a substantial increase in transpiration rates from riparian...

  13. Eesti võib saada rahvusvahelise luuleauhinna / Kätlin Kaldmaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldmaa, Kätlin, 1970-

    2007-01-01

    Kristiina esimene ingliskeelne luulekogu "The drums of silence" (Oleander Press, 2007) on jõudnud Suurbritannia maineka luuletõlkepreemia Corneliu M. Popescu tõlkeauhinna (The Corneliu M. Popescu Prize for European Poetry Translation) nominentide hulka

  14. Cascara

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... black hellebore, Canadian hemp roots, digitalis leaf, hedge mustard, figwort, lily of the valley roots, motherwort, oleander leaf, pheasant's eye plant, pleurisy root, squill bulb leaf scales, star of Bethlehem, strophanthus seeds, and uzara. Avoid using cascara with any of ...

  15. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, July - November 2001 (NODC Accession 0000633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected by from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 12 July 2001 to 27 November 2001....

  16. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, November 2000 - October 2001 (NODC Accession 0000596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — emperature profiles were collected by from XBT from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 13 November 2000 to 12 October 2001. Data...

  17. "1001 Winters, Kristiina Ehin's new collection of poetry in English Translation..."

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2013-01-01

    Tutvustus: Ehin, Kristiina. 1001 winters = 1001 talve / translated by Ilmar Lehtpere. S. l. : The Bitter Oleander Press, 2013 ; Best European fiction 2013 / edited by Aleksandar Hemon. S. l. : Dalkey Archive Press, 2012

  18. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by SEAS program participating vessels, November 2001 - January 2002 (NODC Accession 0000661)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 22 November 2001 to 23 January 2002....

  19. Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: some like it knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Cayo; Matas, Isabel M; Bardaji, Leire; Aragón, Isabel M; Murillo, Jesús

    2012-12-01

    . Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi. Kingdom Bacteria; Phylum Proteobacteria; Class Gammaproteobacteria; Family Pseudomonadaceae; Genus Pseudomonas; included in genomospecies 2 together with at least P. amygdali, P. ficuserectae, P. meliae and 16 other pathovars from the P. syringae complex (aesculi, ciccaronei, dendropanacis, eriobotryae, glycinea, hibisci, mellea, mori, myricae, phaseolicola, photiniae, sesami, tabaci, ulmi and certain strains of lachrymans and morsprunorum); when a formal proposal is made for the unification of these bacteria, the species name P. amygdali would take priority over P. savastanoi. Gram-negative rods, 0.4-0.8 × 1.0-3.0 μm, aerobic. Motile by one to four polar flagella, rather slow growing, optimal temperatures for growth of 25-30 °C; oxidase negative, arginine dihydrolase negative; elicits the hypersensitive response on tobacco; most isolates are fluorescent and levan negative, although some isolates are nonfluorescent and levan positive. P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi causes tumours in cultivated and wild olive and ash (Fraxinus excelsior). Although strains from olive have been reported to infect oleander (Nerium oleander), this is generally not the case; however, strains of P. savastanoi pv. nerii can infect olive. Pathovars fraxini and nerii are differentiated from pathovar savastanoi mostly in their host range, and were not formally recognized until 1996. Literature before about 1996 generally names strains of the three pathovars as P. syringae ssp. savastanoi or P. savastanoi ssp. savastanoi, contributing to confusion on the host range and biological properties. Symptoms of infected trees include hyperplastic growths (tumorous galls or knots) on the stems and branches of the host plant and, occasionally, on leaves and fruits. The pathogen can survive and multiply on aerial plant surfaces, as well as in knots, from where it can be dispersed by rain, wind, insects and human activities, entering the plant through

  20. A bittersweet story: the true nature of the laurel of the Oracle of Delphi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harissis, Haralampos V

    2014-01-01

    It is known from ancient sources that "laurel," identified with sweet bay, was used at the ancient Greek oracle of Delphi. The Pythia, the priestess who spoke the prophecies, purportedly used laurel as a means to inspire her divine frenzy. However, the clinical symptoms of the Pythia, as described in ancient sources, cannot be attributed to the use of sweet bay, which is harmless. A review of contemporary toxicological literature indicates that it is oleander that causes symptoms similar to those of the Pythia, while a closer examination of ancient literary texts indicates that oleander was often included under the generic term laurel. It is therefore likely that it was oleander, not sweet bay, that the Pythia used before the oracular procedure. This explanation could also shed light on other ancient accounts regarding the alleged spirit and chasm of Delphi, accounts that have been the subject of intense debate and interdisciplinary research for the last hundred years.

  1. Development and Evaluation of Poly Herbal Molluscicidal Extracts for Control of Apple Snail (Pomacea maculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruswamy Prabhakaran

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Golden Apple Snail (GAS is the most destructive invasive rice pest in Southeast Asia. The cost of synthetic molluscicides, their toxicity to non-target organisms, and their persistence in the environment have propelled the research of plant-derived molluscicides. Most research efforts have focused on individual plant extracts for their molluscicidal potency against GAS and have not been proven to be entirely effective in rice field conditions. Selective combination of synergistically acting molluscicidal compounds from various plant extracts might be an effective alternative. In this direction, ethanolic extracts from six different plants (Neem, Tobacco, Nerium, Pongamia, Zinger, and Piper were evaluated against Pomacea maculata Perry. Of the various combinations studied, a binary extract (1:1 of nerium and tobacco (LC90 177.71 mg/L, 48 h, and two tri-herbal extract formulations (1:1:1 of (nerium + tobacco + piper and (nerium + tobacco + neem were found to be most effective, with LC90 values of 180.35 mg/L and 191.52 mg/L, respectively, in laboratory conditions. The synergistic effect of combined herbal extracts resulted in significant reduction in LC90 values of the individual extracts. The findings of this study demonstrate that the selective combinations of potent molluscicidal herbal extracts are effective for management of P. maculata under laboratory conditions.

  2. Thevetia neriifolia Juss. ex Steud Syn. J. peruviava (Pers.) Schum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thevetia neriifolia Juss. ex Steud Syn. J. peruviava (Pers.) Schum (English: yellow oleander; Hindi: Pili-. Kaner) of Apocynaceae is a small evergreen ornamental tree with strap-like simple leaves and funnel- shaped yellow flowers. Fruit is large with a single hard-shelled seed. Thevetia trees are largely cultivated in gardens ...

  3. Reciprocal interactions between native and introduced populations of common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca, and the specialist aphid, Aphis nerii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukovinszky, T.; Gols, R.; Agrawal, A.A.; Roge, C.; Bezemer, T.M.; Biere, A.; Harvey, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Following its introduction into Europe (EU), the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) has been free of most specialist herbivores that are present in its native North American (NA) range, except for the oleander aphid Aphis nerii. We compared EU and NA populations of A. nerii on EU and NA milkweed

  4. Thevetia neriifolia Juss. ex Steud Syn. J. peruviava (Pers.) Schum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Schum (English: yellow oleander; Hindi: Pili-. Kaner) of Apocynaceae is a small evergreen ornamental tree with strap-like simple leaves and funnel- shaped yellow flowers. Fruit is large with a single hard-shelled seed. ... 'thevetine' of the seed are highly poisonous. The bark is bitter and is used in treating intermittent fevers.

  5. Patterns of resource use by milkweed insects in Sinai Abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Francis

    for example, beak morphology in crossbill birds is under selection from squirrels causing changes in ... aphid and a weevil) and their predators (syrphid larvae, coccinellids and several bird species). The lygaeid ...... Groeters FR (1993) Tests for host-associated fitness trade-offs in the milkweed-oleander aphid. Oecologia 93 ...

  6. Phylogenetic Relationships of Xylella fastidiosa Strains Isolated from Landscape Ornamentals in Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Martinez, Rufina; de la Cerda, Karla A; Costa, Heather S; Cooksey, Donald A; Wong, Francis P

    2007-07-01

    ABSTRACT Xylella fastidiosa is an insect-borne, xylem-limited pathogenic bacterium that has been associated with a rise in incidence of diseased landscape ornamentals in southern California. The objective of this study was to genetically characterize strains isolated from ornamental hosts to understand their distribution and identity. Strains of X. fastidiosa isolated from ornamentals were characterized using a multiprimer polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR, and sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (ISR). Based on RAPD-PCR and 16S-23S rDNA ISR, strains isolated from daylily, jacaranda, and magnolia clustered with members of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi and caused oleander leaf scorch but not Pierce's disease symptoms in glasshouse assays on oleander and grape, respectively. This demonstrated both that our groupings based on genetic characterization were valid and that strains of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi are present in hosts other than oleander. Strains isolated from Spanish broom, cherry, and one strain isolated from western redbud clustered with X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa members. Strains isolated from purple-leafed plum, olive, peach, plum, sweetgum, maidenhair tree, crape myrtle, and another western redbud strain clustered with members of X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex. All strains isolated from mulberry and one from heavenly bamboo formed a separate cluster that has not yet been defined as a subspecies.

  7. Intercomparison of the Gulf Stream in ocean reanalyses: 1993-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Lequan; Wolfe, Christopher L. P.; Hameed, Sultan

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of high-resolution ocean reanalysis products. This paper compares aspects of the Gulf Stream (GS) from the Florida Straits to south of the Grand Banks-particularly Florida Strait transport, separation of the GS near Cape Hatteras, GS properties along the Oleander Line (from New Jersey to Bermuda), GS path, and the GS north wall positions-in 13 widely used global reanalysis products of various resolutions, including two unconstrained products. A large spread across reanalysis products is found. HYCOM and GLORYS2v4 stand out for their superior performance by most metrics. Some common biases are found in all discussed models; for example, the velocity structure of the GS near the Oleander Line is too symmetrical and the maximum velocity is too weak compared with observations. Less than half of the reanalysis products show significant correlations (at the 95% confidence level) with observations for the GS separation latitude at Cape Hatteras, the GS transport, and net transport across Oleander Line. The cross-stream velocity structure is further discussed by a theoretical model idealizing GS as a smoothed PV front.

  8. Toxicity of botanical insecticides on golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruamthum, W; Visetson, S; Milne, J R; Bullangpoti, V

    2010-01-01

    The molluscicidal activity of crude extracts from five highly potential plants, Annona squamosa seed, Nerium indicum Leaves, Stemona tuberose root, Cyperus rotundus corm and Derris elliptica root was assessed to Pomacea canaliculata. D. elliptica root and C. rotundus corm extracts showed the highest toxicity against 3-month old snails which have LC50 as 23.68 +/- 2.96 mg/l and 133.20 +/- 7.94 mg/l, respectively. The C. rotundus corm extracts were chosen for detoxification enzyme in vivo assay which shows esterase and glutathione S-transferase activity in stomach, intestinal tracts and digestive glands of survival treated P. canaliculata were inhibited.

  9. High-Resolution Melting Analysis as a Powerful Tool to Discriminate and Genotype Pseudomonas savastanoi Pathovars and Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Andrea; Cerboneschi, Matteo; Tegli, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi is a serious pathogen of Olive, Oleander, Ash, and several other Oleaceae. Its epiphytic or endophytic presence in asymptomatic plants is crucial for the spread of Olive and Oleander knot disease, as already ascertained for P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv) on Olive and for pv. nerii (Psn) on Oleander, while no information is available for pv. fraxini (Psf) on Ash. Nothing is known yet about the distribution on the different host plants and the real host range of these pathovars in nature, although cross-infections were observed following artificial inoculations. A multiplex Real-Time PCR assay was recently developed to simultaneously and quantitatively discriminate in vitro and in planta these P. savastanoi pathovars, for routine culture confirmation and for epidemiological and diagnostical studies. Here an innovative High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA)-based assay was set up to unequivocally discriminate Psv, Psn and Psf, according to several single nucleotide polymorphisms found in their Type Three Secretion System clusters. The genetic distances among 56 P. savastanoi strains belonging to these pathovars were also evaluated, confirming and refining data previously obtained by fAFLP. To our knowledge, this is the first time that HRMA is applied to a bacterial plant pathogen, and one of the few multiplex HRMA-based assays developed so far. This protocol provides a rapid, sensitive, specific tool to differentiate and detect Psv, Psn and Psf strains, also in vivo and against other related bacteria, with lower costs than conventional multiplex Real-Time PCR. Its application is particularly suitable for sanitary certification programs for P. savastanoi, aimed at avoiding the spreading of this phytopathogen through asymptomatic plants. PMID:22295075

  10. High-resolution melting analysis as a powerful tool to discriminate and genotype Pseudomonas savastanoi pathovars and strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gori

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas savastanoi is a serious pathogen of Olive, Oleander, Ash, and several other Oleaceae. Its epiphytic or endophytic presence in asymptomatic plants is crucial for the spread of Olive and Oleander knot disease, as already ascertained for P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv on Olive and for pv. nerii (Psn on Oleander, while no information is available for pv. fraxini (Psf on Ash. Nothing is known yet about the distribution on the different host plants and the real host range of these pathovars in nature, although cross-infections were observed following artificial inoculations. A multiplex Real-Time PCR assay was recently developed to simultaneously and quantitatively discriminate in vitro and in planta these P. savastanoi pathovars, for routine culture confirmation and for epidemiological and diagnostical studies. Here an innovative High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA-based assay was set up to unequivocally discriminate Psv, Psn and Psf, according to several single nucleotide polymorphisms found in their Type Three Secretion System clusters. The genetic distances among 56 P. savastanoi strains belonging to these pathovars were also evaluated, confirming and refining data previously obtained by fAFLP. To our knowledge, this is the first time that HRMA is applied to a bacterial plant pathogen, and one of the few multiplex HRMA-based assays developed so far. This protocol provides a rapid, sensitive, specific tool to differentiate and detect Psv, Psn and Psf strains, also in vivo and against other related bacteria, with lower costs than conventional multiplex Real-Time PCR. Its application is particularly suitable for sanitary certification programs for P. savastanoi, aimed at avoiding the spreading of this phytopathogen through asymptomatic plants.

  11. Air-borne Contact Dermatitis in Varanasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Singh

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty-six patients suspected to have air borne contact dermatitis were tested with various plant antigens. Thirteen patients turned out to be sensitive to one or more antigens. The plant antigens, used for testing, were Parthenium hysterophorus, Lantana camara, Cynodon dactylon, Bougainvaled spectabills, calotropis procera, Argimone mexicana, Acacia arabica, Azadiracha indica, Eucalyptus rostrata, Saraka indica, triticum vulgare, Triticum aestivum, Dryopteris filix, Nerium indicum, Eclipta alba, Mangifera indica, Trianthema monogyna, Euphorbia hirta, Euphorbia thimifolia, Amaranthus spinosus, Amaranthus viridis, Carissa carands, Salvia plebia, Cyperus rotandus, Cassia occidentalis, Gynandropsis gynandra, Pennisetum typhoides, chenopodium album, Nicotana tobacum, Tagetes sp, Rosa indica, Cestrum nocturnum, Helianthus annus, Jasminum samlae, Thuja orientalis, Cajanus cajan, Hibiscus rosasinensis, Echinochloa cruss-galli, Phaseolus aureus, Ricinus communis and Alternantheria sessilis. The maximum positive reactions were elicited by Parthenium hysterophorus (30.0% followed in the order of frequency by Amarnthus viridis (10.0% Gynandropsis gynandra (10.0% Pennisetum typhoides (10.0%, Nerium indicum (3.9%, Triticum vulgare (2.5% and Dryopteris filix (2.5%. Rest of the plant antigens did not show any reaction. The male to female ratio was 5.5:1.

  12. Photosynthesis of boreal ground vegetation after a forest clear-cut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, L.; Pumpanen, J.; Vesala, T.; Hari, P.

    2009-11-01

    Heather (Calluna vulgaris), rosebay willowherb (Epilobium angustifolium), wavy hair-grass (Deschampsia flexuosa) and raspberry (Rubus idaeus) are typical species at boreal clear-cut sites. In this study, we measured their photosynthesis separately in the growing season of 2005 using a manual chamber. All measured species showed clear and species-specific seasonal cycles of photosynthetic activity (Pmax). The maxima of C. vulgaris and E. angustifolium occurred around June and July, while that of R. idaeus occurred as late as August. A simple model of photosynthetic activity is presented, addressing the photosynthesis of C. vulgaris was mainly explained by temperature history when the soil moisture is high. The activity of deciduous D. flexuosa also followed the temperature history, unlike the activities of E. angustifolium and R. idaeus. During a short drought, some shoots decreased their Pmax levels but none of the species showed similar reactions between individuals. We also observed that the comparison of the whole-plant Pmax or respiration of different-sized individuals were less scattered than the results based on full-grown leaf mass, implying that species-specific rates of photosynthesis at ground level are rather similar regardless of the plant size. Using species composition and continuous temperature and light measurements, we upscaled the species-specific process rates and integrated fixed and respired CO2 of ground vegetation for the entire 2005 growing season. The photosynthetic production per surface area of soil was 760 g C m-2 y-1 at the fertile site and 300 g C m-2 y-1 at the infertile site. During the snow-free period (18 April-21 November), the above ground parts of measured species released 75 g C m-2 y-1 at the infertile site. At the fertile site, E. angustifolium and R. idaeus respired 22 and 12 g C m-2 y-1, respectively.

  13. Diurnal variation in probability of death following self-poisoning in Sri Lanka—evidence for chronotoxicity in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Chris; Gunnell, David; Mohamed, Fahim; Eddleston, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background The absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of medicines are partly controlled by transporters and enzymes with diurnal variation in expression. Dose timing may be important for maximizing therapeutic and minimizing adverse effects. However, outcome data for such an effect in humans are sparse, and chronotherapeutics is consequently less practised. We examined a large prospective Sri Lankan cohort of patients with acute poisoning to seek evidence of diurnal variation in the probability of survival. Methods In all, 14 840 patients admitted to hospital after yellow oleander (Cascabela thevetia) seed or pesticide [organophosphorus (OP), carbamate, paraquat, glyphosate] self-poisoning were investigated for variation in survival according to time of ingestion. Results We found strong evidence that the outcome of oleander poisoning was associated with time of ingestion (P poisoning was over 50% lower following evening ingestion (risk ratio = 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.62). Variation in dose across the day was not responsible. Conclusions We have shown for the first time that timing of poison ingestion affects survival in humans. This evidence for chronotoxicity suggests chronotherapeutics should be given greater attention in drug development and clinical practice. PMID:23179303

  14. Diurnal variation in probability of death following self-poisoning in Sri Lanka--evidence for chronotoxicity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Robert; Metcalfe, Chris; Gunnell, David; Mohamed, Fahim; Eddleston, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of medicines are partly controlled by transporters and enzymes with diurnal variation in expression. Dose timing may be important for maximizing therapeutic and minimizing adverse effects. However, outcome data for such an effect in humans are sparse, and chronotherapeutics is consequently less practised. We examined a large prospective Sri Lankan cohort of patients with acute poisoning to seek evidence of diurnal variation in the probability of survival. In all, 14 840 patients admitted to hospital after yellow oleander (Cascabela thevetia) seed or pesticide [organophosphorus (OP), carbamate, paraquat, glyphosate] self-poisoning were investigated for variation in survival according to time of ingestion. We found strong evidence that the outcome of oleander poisoning was associated with time of ingestion (P poisoning was over 50% lower following evening ingestion (risk ratio = 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.62). Variation in dose across the day was not responsible. We have shown for the first time that timing of poison ingestion affects survival in humans. This evidence for chronotoxicity suggests chronotherapeutics should be given greater attention in drug development and clinical practice.

  15. Effect of single and binary combinations of plant-derived molluscicides on different enzyme activities in the nervous tissue of Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, I G; Singh, Amrita; Singh, V K; Singh, D K

    2003-01-01

    Effect of single and binary treatments of plant-derived molluscicides on different enzymes--acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and acid/alkaline phosphatase (ACP/ALP)--in the nervous tissue of the harmful terrestrial snail Achatina fulica were studied. Sublethal in vivo 24-h exposure to 40% and 80% LC(50) of Azadirachta indica oil, Cedrus deodara oil, Allium sativum bulb powder, Nerium indicum bark powder and binary combinations of A. sativum (AS) + C. deodara (CD) and CD + A. indica (AI) oils significantly altered the activity of these enzymes in the nervous tissue of Achatina fulica. The binary treatment of AS + CD was more effective against AChE, LDH, and ALP than the single ones. However, binary treatment of AI + CD was more effective against ALP. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cardenolides from the Apocynaceae family and their anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Shiyuan; Chen, Yanyan; Lu, Yunfang; Wang, Yuefei; Ding, Liqin; Jiang, Miaomiao

    2016-07-01

    Cardenolides, as a group of natural products that can bind to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with an inhibiting activity, are traditionally used to treat congestive heart failure. Recent studies have demonstrated that the strong tumor cytotoxicities of cardenolides are mainly due to inducing the tumor cells apoptosis through different expression and cellular location of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunits. The leaves, flesh, seeds and juices of numerous plants from the genera of Nerium, Thevetia, Cerbera, Apocynum and Strophanthus in Apocynaceae family, are the major sources of natural cardenolides. So far, 109 cardenolides have been isolated and identified from this family, and about a quarter of them are reported to exhibit the capability to regulate cancer cell survival and death through multiple signaling pathways. In this review, we compile the phytochemical characteristics and anticancer activity of the cardenolides from this family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidemiology of intentional self-poisoning in rural Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Gunnell, David; Karunaratne, Ayanthi; de Silva, Dhammika; Sheriff, M H Rezvi; Buckley, Nick A

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the epidemiology of intentional self-poisoning in rural Sri Lanka by prospectively recording 2189 admissions to two secondary hospitals. Many patients were young (median age 25 years), male (57%) and used pesticides (49%). Of the 198 who died,156 were men (case fatality 12.4%) and 42 were women (4.5%). Over half of female deaths were in those under 25 years old; male deaths were spread more evenly across age groups. Oleander and paraquat caused 74% of deaths in people under 25 years old; thereafter organophosphorous pesticides caused many deaths. Although the age pattern of self-poisoning was similar to that of industrialised countries, case fatality was more than 15 times higher and the pattern of fatal self-poisoning different.

  18. Utilization of γ-irradiation technique on plant mutation breeding and plant growth regulation in Tokyo Metropolitan Isotope Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Hirokatsu

    1997-01-01

    During about 30-years, we have developed γ-irradiation technique and breeding back pruning method for the study of mutation breeding of ornamental plants. As a result, we have made a wide variety of new mutant lines in chrysanthemum, narcissus, begonia rex, begonia iron cross, winter daphne, zelkova, sweet-scented oleander, abelia, kobus, and have obtained 7 plant patents. By the use of γ-irradiation to plant mutation breeding, we often observed that plants irradiated by low dose of γ-rays showed superior or inferior growth than the of non-irradiated plants. Now, we established the irradiation conditions of γ-rays for mutation breeding and growth of regulation in narcissus, tulip, Enkianthus perulatus Schneid., komatsuna, moyashi, african violet. In most cases, irradiation dose rate is suggested to be a more important factor to induce plant growth regulators than irradiation dose. (author)

  19. [Poisonous plants: An ongoing problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Monseny, A; Martínez Sánchez, L; Margarit Soler, A; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, V; Luaces Cubells, C

    2015-05-01

    A medical visit for plant ingestion is rare in the pediatric emergency services but may involve a high toxicity. The botanical toxicology training of health staff is often very limited, and it can be difficult to make a diagnosis or decide on the appropriate treatment. To study the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of poisoning due to plant ingestion in order to increase the knowledge of the health professional. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted on patients seen in a pediatric emergency department after the ingestion of plant substances from January 2008 to December 2012. During the period of study, 18 patients had ingested possible toxic plants. In 14 cases, it was considered to be potentially toxic: broom, oleander, mistletoe, butcher's-broom, and vulgar bean (2), Jerusalem tomato, castor (2), Jimson weed, potus, marijuana, and mushrooms with digestive toxicity (2). Among the potentially toxic cases, the ingestion was accidental in 10 patients, 2 cases were classed as infantile mistreatment, 1 case had recreational intention, and another one suicidal intentions. The ingestion of oleander, castor and Jimson weed had major toxicity. The potential gravity of the ingestion of plant substances and the variety of the exposure mechanism requires the pediatrician to bear in mind this possibility, and to be prepared for its diagnosis and management. Specific preventive information measures need to be designed for the families and for the regulation of toxic plants in playgrounds. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Future species composition will affect forest water use after loss of eastern hemlock from southern Appalachian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Steven; Ford, Chelcy R; Vose, James M

    2013-06-01

    Infestation of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carr.) with hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA, Adelges tsugae) has caused widespread mortality of this key canopy species throughout much of the southern Appalachian Mountains in the past decade. Because eastern hemlock is heavily concentrated in riparian habitats, maintains a dense canopy, and has an evergreen leaf habit, its loss is expected to have a major impact on forest processes, including transpiration (E(t)). Our goal was to estimate changes in stand-level E(t) since HWA infestation, and predict future effects of forest regeneration on forest E(t) in declining eastern hemlock stands where hemlock represented 50-60% of forest basal area. We used a combination of community surveys, sap flux measurements, and empirical models relating sap flux-scaled leaf-level transpiration (E(L)) to climate to estimate the change in E(t) after hemlock mortality and forecast how forest E(t) will change in the future in response to eastern hemlock loss. From 2004 to 2011, eastern hemlock mortality reduced annual forest E(t) by 22% and reduced winter E(t) by 74%. As hemlock mortality increased, growth of deciduous tree species--especially sweet birch (Betula lenta L.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.), and the evergreen understory shrub rosebay rhododendron (Rhododendron maximum L.)--also increased, and these species will probably dominate post-hemlock riparian forests. All of these species have higher daytime E(L) rates than hemlock, and replacement of hemlock with species that have less conservative transpiration rates will result in rapid recovery of annual stand E(t). Further, we predict that annual stand E(t) will eventually surpass E(t) levels observed before hemlock was infested with HWA. This long-term increase in forest E(t) may eventually reduce stream discharge, especially during the growing season. However, the dominance of deciduous species in the canopy will result in a

  1. Phenolic profiling and therapeutic potential of local flora of Azad Kashmir; In vitro enzyme inhibition and antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Muhammad Asam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study supports the phytochemical screening, evaluation of antioxidant and enzyme inhibition potential and correlations between antioxidant activities and phenolics of Rumex dentatus (Family: Polygonaceae, Mentha spicata (Family: Lamiaceae, Withania somnifera (Family: Solanaceae, Nerium indicum (Family: Apocynaceae and Artemisia scoparia (Family: Asteraceae. The herbal materials were extracted in ethanol (90% and partitioned between several solvents based on polarities. Total phenols were determined with FC method and ranged 21.33 ± 1.53 - 355.67 ± 6.03 mg GAE/ mg of the extract. Antioxidant activities (DPPH, total iron reducing capacity, phosphomolybdate assay & FRAP and enzyme inhibition potential (Protease, AChE & BChE were performed by the standard protocols. The results showed that all extracts exhibited significant DPPH activity ranging from 12.67 ± 2.08 - 92.67 ± 1.53%. The extracts that were active in DPPH activity also potrayed marvelous FRAP, total iron reducing and phosphomolybdate values. Correlation studies of antioxidant activities and the content of phenolic compounds in plant materials exhibited positive correlation between them. The outcome of enzyme inhibition activity exhibited that about 80% of the fractions under surveillance plants intimated more than 50% inhibition. Isolation of bioactive compounds from these plants is in progress.

  2. Feeding on different attractive flowering plants affects the energy reserves of Culex pipiens pallens adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bao-Ting; Hu, Yin; Ding, Yan-Mei; Tian, Jia-Xin; Mo, Jian-Chu

    2018-01-01

    Mosquito adults usually need to ingest sugar from nectar host plants to sustain their metabolic needs. Mosquitoes could be differentially attracted by various flowering plant species, and the volatiles were thought to be important factors attributed to the differential attractiveness. However, whether mosquitoes' preference for host plants correlates with their nutritional rewards from sugar sources remains unclear. In the present study, the preference of newly emerged Culex pipiens pallens to three kinds of flowering plants (Ligustrum quihoui, Abelia chinensis, and Nerium indicum) was determined in the olfactometer. Besides, when the newly emerged mosquitoes were provided with these flowering plants as sugar sources, the content of their metabolic reserves (glycogen, lipid, and protein) was determined. The results revealed that Cx. pipiens pallens could be differentially attracted by the odors emitted by the inflorescences of the tested flowering plants, and the nutritional rewards of mosquitoes were significantly affected by feeding on different inflorescences. The present study demonstrated that feeding on nectar host plants with differential attraction could affect the energy reserves of Cx. pipiens pallens.

  3. Improvised Media for In Vitro Pollen Germination of some Species of Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi Chatterjee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pollen germination forms one of the most important stage post pollination prior to fertilization. This is essential for proper seed setting and seed development. In vitro pollen germination test is the most reliable way of assessing the pollen viability. In the present study pollen grains of seven genera under Apocynaceae family namely, Allamanda, Alstonia, Catharanthus, Nerium, Plumeria, Thevetia and Tabernaemontana were tested in some basic cultural media, such as Brewbaker’s media, 6% Glucose solution, 4% Calcium Nitrate solution and 3% Boron solution. Alstonia pollen grains exhibited highest percentage of germination rate in all the cultural media. Glucose and Brewbaker’s media is found to be highly suitable for efficient pollen germination in all the genera. Boron solution is effective for germination of pollen grains of tree species. In vitro pollen germination can be easily carried out in laboratories. These results can be utilised in plant breeding programmes to improve cultivar and varieties. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11074 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 146-153

  4. Effect of single and binary combinations of plant-derived molluscicides on reproduction and survival of the snail Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, I G; Singh, D K

    2000-11-01

    The effects of sublethal treatments (20% and 60% of LC(50)/24 h) with plant-derived molluscicides on the reproduction of the giant African snail Achatina fulica were studied. Azadirachta indica oil, Cedrus deodara oil, Allium sativum bulb powder, and Nerium indicum bark powder singly and binary combinations on reproduction and survival of A. fulica were investigated. Repeated treatment occurred on day 0, day 15, and day 30. These plant-derived molluscicides significantly reduced fecundity, egg viability, and survival of A. fulica within 15 days. Discontinuation of the treatments after day 30 did not lead to a recovery trend in the next 30 days. Day 0 sublethal treatment of all the molluscicides caused a maximum reduction in protein, amino acid, DNA, RNA, and phospholipid levels and simultaneous increase in lipid peroxidation in the ovotestis of treated A. fulica. It is believed that sublethal exposure of these molluscicides on snail reproduction is a complex process, involving more than one factor in reducing the reproductive capacity of A. fulica.

  5. Anti-implantation activity of some indigenous plants in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, A O; Saxena, V; Shukla, S; Tewari, R K; Mathur, S; Gupta, A; Sharma, S; Mathur, R

    1985-01-01

    Various extracts of one hundred and eight medicinal plants were screened for their anti-implantation activity in female albino rats. Out of these, 50% ethanolic extract of Codonospis ovata Benth (PL); 50% ethanolic, acetone and benzene extracts of Puararia tuberosa DC (TUB); aqueous and methanolic extracts of Punica granatum Linn. (PX) and ethanolic and acetone extracts of Rubus ellipiticus Smith (PX) inhibited pregnancy in 70-90% of rats. Similarly ethanolic extract of Adhatoda vasica Nees (LF) and Kigelia pinnata DC (PL); ethanolic and acetone extracts of Acrostichum aureum Linn. (PL), Juniperus communis Linn. (SD), Lepidium capitatum H.f. & T. (PL); ethanolic and benzene extracts of Citrulus colocynthus Schrad (LF) and acetone extract of Codonopsis ovata Benth (PL) showed 60-70% anti-implantation activity. Extracts of a few plants VIZ. Dolichos biflorus Linn. (SD), Ferule orientalis Linn. (PL), Nerium odoratum Lamk (RT), Randia dumetorum Lamk (SD) and Ruta graveolens Linn. (PL) could inhibit pregnancy in 50-60% of rats. The rest of the plants were either inactive or showed insignificant antifertility activity.

  6. Contact Dermatitis Due to Plants in Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Vinod Sharma

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and seven patients (151 males and 56 females were patch tested with a battery of plants, potassium dichromate and formaldehyde. Sensitivity to Parthenium hysterophorus. Nerium indicum, Calotropis procera, Eucalyptus sp and Mangifera indica was found in 60.87, 23.64, 15.46 andl2.08% patients respectively. One hundred and twenty six patients (92 males and 34 females including five teenage girls and one 13 years old child had parthenium dermatitis. Majority (74.60% were between 30 to 59 years of age. Dermatitis involving face especially eyelids, neck, cubital and popliteal fossae was the common (82.54% mode of presentation. Photosensitive pattern was seen in 9.51% and chronic lichenification of extremities in the remaining 7.97% patients Parthenium dermatitis was seen more frequently in city dwellers, while farmers constituted only 20.7% of all cases. There was frequent patch test positivity to potassium dichromate (24.i5% and formaline (28.02% in the present patients.

  7. Laticiferous taxa as a source of energy and hydrocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, S.; Subramanian, R.B.; Kothari, I.L.; Inamdar, J.A. (Sardar Patel Univ., Gujarat (India))

    Twenty-nine laticiferous taxa of Apocynaceae, Asclepiadaceae, and Sapotaceae were screened for suitability as alternative sources of renewable energy, rubber, and phytochemicals and to select the most promising ones for large-scale cultivation. Of these, Allamanda violacea (14.9% protein, 13.8% polyphenol, 8.6% oil, 3.2% hydrocarbon), Catharanthus roseus (15.4% protein, 10.4% polyphenol, 11.5% oil, 1.9% hydrocarbon), and Holarrhena antidysenterica (14.2% protein, 16.4% polyphenol, 5,4% oil, 4.8% hydrocarbon) of Apocynaceae; Asclepias curassavica (19.3% protein, 6.5% polyphenol, 3.9% oil, 2.0% hydrocarbon), Calotropis gigantea (18.5% protein, 6.8% polyphenol, 7.0% oil, 2.8% hydrocarbon) of Asclepiadaceae; Mimusops elengi (11.3% protein, 9.7% polyphenol, 7.2% oil, 4.0% hydrocarbon) of Sapotaceae show promising potential for future petrochemical plantations; of all these taxa, Holarrhena antidysenterica yielded an unusually high percentage (4.8%) of hydrocarbon fraction followed by Mimusops elengi (4.0%). NMR spectra confirmed the presence of cis-polyisoprene in all species studied except Nerium indicum (white-flowered var.). These data indicate that the majority of the species under investigation may be considered for large-scale cultivation as an alternative source of rubber, intermediate energy, and other phytochemicals.

  8. Alone by the Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Ferić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available 1.At first the island is just a sign on a yellow board with a drawing of a vessel and the letters saying “Car Ferry,” then it is a grayish silhouette in the blue of the sea, and then, later still, an acquaintance working on the ferry, who just nods briefly in greeting. Jablanac, ferry port, its pleasant lobby, and then, from the upper deck, a giant rock approaching. That is the object of a year-long desire: the moment of stepping off the boat and smelling the rosemary, diesel and sheep droppings, seeing the sharp rocks looking at the Strait of Senj, coarse limestone in sharp opposition to the signs that say: Benvenuti, Welcome, Willkommen!At home, on the terrace, in the shade of the oleander, there’s no wish to eat. Only swimming trunks are put on and then, barefoot, without a towel or sun-tanning lotion, off to the beach.“Why won’t you eat something?” grandma asks.She knows that there’s an exciting world waiting out there, but she knows nothing of the details. All friends went on a boat trip. And suddenly one step from the shade of a path covered with oleanders and acacias leads into the burning sun of the afternoon. The light screams, just like children in the water, just like white objects that radiate as if there are some powerful light bulbs within. The feeling of freedom of someone who has just arrived in a foreign place and can now do anything. There’s no one familiar on the beach, they all got in the boat and left. The seafront leading to the camp is full of people, naked children with dirty faces licking ice cream, young families pushing strollers, groups of teenagers who have just woken up from their last night’s party. But there’s no one that must be greeted. The feeling of freedom that’s at the same time close to death. Suddenly, all paths are open. That there are no obligations or friends waiting, this afternoon, until they come back, is a complete boon.

  9. Development of a versatile tool for the simultaneous differential detection of Pseudomonas savastanoi pathovars by End Point and Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegli, Stefania; Cerboneschi, Matteo; Libelli, Ilaria Marsili; Santilli, Elena

    2010-05-28

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi is the causal agent of olive knot disease. The strains isolated from oleander and ash belong to the pathovars nerii and fraxini, respectively. When artificially inoculated, pv. savastanoi causes disease also on ash, and pv. nerii attacks also olive and ash. Surprisingly nothing is known yet about their distribution in nature on these hosts and if spontaneous cross-infections occur. On the other hand sanitary certification programs for olive plants, also including P. savastanoi, were launched in many countries. The aim of this work was to develop several PCR-based tools for the rapid, simultaneous, differential and quantitative detection of these P. savastanoi pathovars, in multiplex and in planta. Specific PCR primers and probes for the pathovars savastanoi, nerii and fraxini of P. savastanoi were designed to be used in End Point and Real-Time PCR, both with SYBR Green or TaqMan chemistries. The specificity of all these assays was 100%, as assessed by testing forty-four P. savastanoi strains, belonging to the three pathovars and having different geographical origins. For comparison strains from the pathovars phaseolicola and glycinea of P. savastanoi and bacterial epiphytes from P. savastanoi host plants were also assayed, and all of them tested always negative. The analytical detection limits were about 5 - 0.5 pg of pure genomic DNA and about 102 genome equivalents per reaction. Similar analytical thresholds were achieved in Multiplex Real-Time PCR experiments, even on artificially inoculated olive plants. Here for the first time a complex of PCR-based assays were developed for the simultaneous discrimination and detection of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi, pv. nerii and pv. fraxini. These tests were shown to be highly reliable, pathovar-specific, sensitive, rapid and able to quantify these pathogens, both in multiplex reactions and in vivo. Compared with the other methods already available for P. savastanoi, the identification

  10. Jaan Krossist Kalevputrani

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2012-01-01

    Välismaal ilmunud eesti kirjandusest ja eesti kirjanike tegemistest piiri taga: Eric Dickensi tõlkes ilmus inglise keeles Jaan Krossi romaan "Vastutuulelaev" (Sailing Against the Wind) ja eesti lühiproosa kogumik "The Dedalus Book of Estonian Literature" ; Indias esitleti eesti rahvuseepose "Kalevipoeg" Vishnu Khare tõlget hindi keelde ("Kalevputra") ; USA kirjandusajakiri "The Bitter Oleander" pühendas oma viimase numbri 32 lehekülge Kristiina Ehinile ja tema loomingule ; Piret Raua raamat "Printsess Luluu ja härra Kere" (läti keeles "Princese Skella un Leta kungs") võitis esikoha 2011. aasta Läti Lastežürii 3.-4. klassi vanuserühmas ; Viivi Luige teos "Varjuteater", mis ilmus 2011. aastal soome keeles, tunnistati üheks Helsingi Linnaraamatukogu iga-aastase auhinna "12 osumaa" laureaadiks ; UNESCO ülemaailmse luulepäeva tähistamiseks toimunud rahvusvahelisest luulemaratonist võttis osa ka Jüri Talvet

  11. Prey Acceptability and Preference of Oenopia conglobata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae, a Candidate for Biological Control in Urban Green Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Lumbierres

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oenopia conglobata is one of the most common ladybird species in urban green areas of the Mediterranean region. We have obtained data about its prey acceptability and prey preferences. In a laboratory experiment, we investigated the acceptability of seven aphid and one psyllid species as prey for this coccinellid: the aphids Chaitophorus populeti, Aphis gossypii, Aphis craccivora Monelliopsis caryae, Eucallipterus tiliae, Aphis nerii (on white poplar, pomegranate, false acacia, black walnut, lime, and oleander, respectively, and the psyllid Acizzia jamatonica on Persian silk tree. These species are abundant in urban green areas in the Mediterranean region. In addition, we tested the acceptability of Rhopalosiphum padi on barley, an aphid species easily reared in the laboratory. We also tested preferences of the predator in cafeteria experiments with three aphid species and one aphid and the psyllid. Adults and larvae of the coccinellid accepted all of the preys offered, except A. nerii, with a clear preference for M. caryae. The predator also showed preference for M. caryae when it was offered in a cafeteria experiment with other aphid species or with the psyllid. The aphid R. padi obtained a good acceptability and could be used for rearing O. conglobata in the laboratory.

  12. Plant Poisoning among Children in Rural Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kavinda Chandimal Dayasiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant poisoning is a common presentation in paediatric practice and an important cause of preventable mortality and morbidity in Sri Lanka. The burden of plant poisoning is largely underexplored. The current multicenter study based in rural Sri Lanka assessed clinical profiles, poison related factors, clinical management, complications, outcomes, and risk factors associated with plant poisoning in the paediatric age group. Among 325 children, 57% were male with 64% being below five years of age. 99.4% had ingested the poison. Transfer rate was 66.4%. Most had unintentional poisoning. Commonest poison plant was Jatropha circus and poisoning event happened mostly in home garden. 29% of parents practiced harmful first-aid practices. 32% of children had delayed presentations to which the commonest reason was lack of parental concern regarding urgency of seeking medical care. Presence of poisonous plants in home garden was the strongest risk factor for plant poisoning. Mortality rate was 1.2% and all cases had Oleander poisoning. The study revealed the value of community awareness regarding risk factors and awareness among healthcare workers regarding the mostly benign nature of plant poisoning in children in view of limiting incidence of plant poisoning and reducing expenditure on patient management.

  13. Readability of Healthcare Literature for Gastroparesis and Evaluation of Medical Terminology in Reading Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillier, Andrew; Patel, Shyam

    2017-02-01

    Gastroparesis is a chronic condition that can be further enhanced with patient understanding. Patients' education resources on the Internet have become increasingly important in improving healthcare literacy. We evaluated the readability of online resources for gastroparesis and the influence by medical terminology. Google searches were performed for "gastroparesis", "gastroparesis patient education material" and "gastroparesis patient information". Following, all medical terminology was determined if included on Taber's Medical Dictionary 22nd Edition. The medical terminology was replaced independently with "help" and "helping". Web resources were analyzed with the Readability Studio Professional Edition (Oleander Solutions, Vandalia, OH) using 10 different readability scales. The average of the 26 patient education resources was 12.7 ± 1.8 grade levels. The edited "help" group had 6.6 ± 1.0 and "helping" group had 10.4 ± 2.1 reading levels. In comparing the three groups, the "help" and "helping" groups had significantly lower readability levels (P reading level by the American Medical Association. Medical terminology was shown to be the cause for this elevated readability level with all, but four resources within the recommended grade levels following word replacement.

  14. Detection of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi from Olive and Other Hosts by Polymersae Chain Reaction (PCR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hijazin, R.; Khlaif, H.

    2005-01-01

    Field inspection indicated that olive knot bacteria occur in different olivetrees growing in Jordan including: Amman (Alhashmi Alshamali, Aljubiha, Dahiet Alrashid, Tela' Ali and Wadi Assir), Madaba'a (Alsamik), Alkarak, Faculty of Agriculture, Mou'ta University and Irbid (Aljohfieh). Olive knot bacteria were collected from different locations in Jordan including: Jerash, Wadi Shouiab and Dairalla. One hundred isolates of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi were obtained from natyrally infected olive trees. Another 30 isoltes of the same microorganism were obtained from other host plants from different locations in Jordan. The iaal gene was detected by PCR amplification from 82% of DNA extracts from sap of knots formed on naturally infected olives and 97% from bacterial cultures, respectively. Pathogenic Ps. savastanoi pv. savastanoi was recovered on KB medium from 55% of the collected isolates. Detection of iaal gene of the tested isolsates was found to be more efficient in detection Ps. savastanoi than by isolation on KB medium and the pathogenicity test. Culturing the isolates on KB medium prior to the iaal amplification greatly improved the PCR efficiency. The iaal gene was detected in 80%, 90% of the isolates from naturally infected oleander, jasmine and zizphus, respectively. Moreover, Ps. savastanoi pv. savastanoi was isolated from symptomless olive plants, and iaal gene was detected using PCR amplification. The results indicated that PCR was more efficient in detecting olive knot bacteria by iaal amplification than by isolation on KB medium followed by the pathogenicity test. (Author's) 22 refs., 2 figs

  15. Determination of heavy metal contents by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) in some medicinal plants from Pakistani and Malaysian origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Sobia; Najam, Rahila; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Abbas, Syed Atif

    2015-09-01

    This study depicts a profile of existence of heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, Hg, Mn, Fe, Na, Ca, and Mg) in some important herbal plants like (H. Integrifolia, D. regia, R. communis, C. equisetifolia, N. oleander, T. populnea, M. elengi, H. schizopetalus, P. pterocarpum) from Pakistan and an antidiabetic Malaysian herbal drug product containing (Punica granatum L. (Mast) Hook, Momordica charantia L., Tamarindus indica L., Lawsonia inermis L.) using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Heavy metals in these herbal plants and Malaysian product were in the range of 0.02-0.10 ppm of Cu, 0.00-0.02 ppm of Ni, 0.02-0.29 ppm of Zn, 0.00-0.04 ppm of Cd, 0.00-1.33 ppm of Hg, 0.00-0.54 ppm of Mn, 0.22-3.16 ppm of Fe, 0.00-9.17 ppm of Na, 3.27-15.63 ppm of Ca and 1.85-2.03 ppm of Mg. All the metals under study were within the prescribed limits except mercury. Out of 10 medicinal plants/product under study 07 were beyond the limit of mercury permissible limits. Purpose of this study is to determine heavy metals contents in selected herbal plants and Malaysian product, also to highlight the health concerns related to the presence of toxic levels of heavy metals.

  16. Fatal injury in eastern Sri Lanka, with special reference to cardenolide self-poisoning with Cerbera manghas fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Haggalla, Sapumal

    2008-09-01

    Self-poisoning with plant seeds or fruits is a common method of self-harm in South Asia. While most deaths follow ingestion of Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) seeds, other plants are locally common. During review of fatal injuries seen in a teaching hospital in eastern Sri Lanka, we noted cases of fatal self-poisoning with Cerbera manghas (sea mango, pink eyed cerbera, odollam tree) fruits. We reviewed the post-mortem records of the Batticaloa Teaching Hospital and extracted data on all cases of fatal injury. During 2001 and 2002, 315 post mortems for injury were performed in Batticaloa Teaching Hospital. Intentional self-harm was responsible for 48.6% of cases. While T. peruviana was responsible for 33 deaths, C. manghas self-poisoning caused seven deaths. C. manghas cases had typical features of cardenolide poisoning with cardiac dysrhythmias and hyperkalemia. In the absence of pacing facilities and anti-digoxin Fab, management involved administration of atropine and of insulin and dextrose to lower serum potassium concentrations. C. manghas self-poisoning has only previously been reported from Kerala and Tamil Nadu in south India. While uncommon in other parts of Sri Lanka, it has become a common method of self-harm in one east coast district, accounting for 20% of fatal self-harm with plants in one hospital. Management was inadequate with the available resources, emphasising the need for an affordable antitoxin for plant cardenolide poisoning.

  17. El Dioscórides de Andrés Laguna en los textos de Cervantes: de la materia medicinal al universo literario

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    Francisco López-Muñoz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The literary works of Miguel de Cervantes have been widely studied from numerous points of view, including the medical one. In the present work, we defend the hypothesis that the Andrés Laguna version of Dioscorides was the source used by Cervantes in his literary passages related to therapeutic aspects, especially in relation to plants with medicinal properties. This book, a copy of which was in Cervantes’ private library, is the only medical treatise cited by the novelist in any of his writings (Don Quixote. Apart from the medicinal plants mentioned in his works, of which we have identified chicory, oleander, henbane, opium poppy, rosemary, rhubarb, tobacco, tamarisk, seeds of spurge, and vervain, Cervantes also seemed familiar with the effects of different pharmaceutical preparations produced from plants (white ointment, Aparicio’s Oil, narcotic powders, etc.. Our hypothesis is backed up by Cervantes’ use of descriptions similar to those of Laguna in his Dioscorides (the hallucinogenic effects of witches’ ointments in The Colloquy of the Dogs, the therapeutic properties of rosemary in the treatment of wounds and traumatisms in Don Quixote, the narcotic effects of opium in The Jealous Extremaduran, the psychodysleptic effects of some love potions in The Licentiate of Glass, or the toxic effects of some poisons in The Spanish-English Lady, and even, in some cases, by use of Laguna’s similar quotations (as in his reference to the purging of excessive bile in Don Quixote.

  18. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

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    Leonard Nunney

    Full Text Available The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee defined a new sequence type (ST53 that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  19. Atrial Fibrillation in Eight New World Camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgmanesh, R; Magdesian, K G; Estell, K E; Stern, J A; Swain, E A; Griffiths, L G

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information on the incidence of clinical signs, concurrent illness and treatment options for atrial fibrillation (AF) in New World Camelids (NWC). Describe clinical signs and outcome of AF in NWC. Eight New World Camelids admitted with AF. A retrospective observational study of camelids diagnosed with AF based on characteristic findings on electrocardiogram (ECG). All animals had an irregularly irregular heart rhythm detected on physical examination and 4 cases had obtunded mentation on admission. Three camelids were diagnosed with AF secondary to oleander intoxication, 3 animals had underlying cardiovascular disease, 1 was diagnosed with lone AF and 1 had AF diagnosed on examination for a urethral obstruction. Five of eight animals survived to discharge and nonsurvivors consisted of animals which died or were euthanized as a result of cardiovascular disease (2/8) or extra-cardiac disease unrelated to the AF (1/8). Atrial fibrillation occurs in NWC in association with cardiovascular disease, extra-cardiac disease or as lone AF. Amiodarone and transthoracic cardioversion were attempted in one llama with lone AF, but were unsuccessful. Atrial fibrillation was recorded in 0.1% of admissions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  20. PsasM2I, a type II restriction-modification system in Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: differential distribution of carrier strains in the environment and the evolutionary history of homologous RM systems in the Pseudomonas syringae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Tamara; Moscetti, Ilaria; Marchi, Guido

    2014-11-01

    A type II restriction-modification system was found in a native plasmid of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi MLLI2. Functional analysis of the methyltransferase showed that the enzyme acts by protecting the DNA sequence CTGCAG from cleavage. Restriction endonuclease expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cells resulted in mutations in the REase sequence or transposition of insertion sequence 1A in the coding sequence, preventing lethal gene expression. Population screening detected homologous RM systems in other P. savastanoi strains and in the Pseudomonas syringae complex. An epidemiological survey carried out by sampling olive and oleander knots in two Italian regions showed an uneven diffusion of carrier strains, whose presence could be related to a selective advantage in maintaining the RM system in particular environments or subpopulations. Moreover, carrier strains can coexist in the same orchards, plants, and knot tissues with non-carriers, revealing unexpected genetic variability on a very small spatial scale. Phylogenetic analysis of the RM system and housekeeping gene sequences in the P. syringae complex demonstrated the ancient acquisition of the RM systems. However, the evolutionary history of the gene complex also showed the involvement of horizontal gene transfer between related strains and recombination events.

  1. Prey Acceptability and Preference of Oenopia conglobata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a Candidate for Biological Control in Urban Green Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumbierres, Belén; Madeira, Filipe; Pons, Xavier

    2018-01-12

    Oenopia conglobata is one of the most common ladybird species in urban green areas of the Mediterranean region. We have obtained data about its prey acceptability and prey preferences. In a laboratory experiment, we investigated the acceptability of seven aphid and one psyllid species as prey for this coccinellid: the aphids Chaitophorus populeti, Aphis gossypii , Aphis craccivora Monelliopsis caryae , Eucallipterus tiliae , Aphis nerii (on white poplar, pomegranate, false acacia, black walnut, lime, and oleander, respectively), and the psyllid Acizzia jamatonica on Persian silk tree. These species are abundant in urban green areas in the Mediterranean region. In addition, we tested the acceptability of Rhopalosiphum padi on barley, an aphid species easily reared in the laboratory. We also tested preferences of the predator in cafeteria experiments with three aphid species and one aphid and the psyllid. Adults and larvae of the coccinellid accepted all of the preys offered, except A. nerii , with a clear preference for M. caryae . The predator also showed preference for M. caryae when it was offered in a cafeteria experiment with other aphid species or with the psyllid. The aphid R. padi obtained a good acceptability and could be used for rearing O. conglobata in the laboratory.

  2. The complex biogeography of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: genetic evidence of introductions and Subspecific introgression in Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa.

  3. Accumulation of Cr, Cd, Pb, Cu, and Zn by plants in tanning sludge storage sites: opportunities for contamination bioindication and phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongqiang; Yu, Shen; Bañuelos, G S; He, Yunfeng

    2016-11-01

    Tanning sludge enriched with high concentrations of Cr and other metals has adverse effects on the environment. Plants growing in the metalliferous soils may have the ability to cope with high metal concentrations. This study focuses on potentials of using native plants for bioindication and/or phytoremediation of Cr-contaminated sites. In the study, we characterized plants and soils from six tanning sludge storage sites. Soil in these sites exhibited toxic levels of Cr (averaged 16,492 mg kg -1 ) and other metals (e.g., 48.3 mg Cu kg -1 , 2370 mg Zn kg -1 , 44.9 mg Pb kg -1 , and 0.59 mg Cd kg -1 ). Different metal tolerance and accumulation patterns were observed among the sampled plant species. Phragmites australis, Zephyranthes candida, Cynodon dactylon, and Alternanthera philoxeroides accumulated moderate-high concentrations of Cr and other metals, which could make them good bioindicators of heavy metal pollution. High Cr and other metal concentrations (e.g., Cd and Pb) were found in Chenopodium rubrum (372 mg Cr kg -1 ), Aster subulatus (310 mg Cr kg -1 ), and Brassica chinensis (300 mg Cr kg -1 ), being considered as metal accumulators. In addition, Nerium indicum and Z. candida were able to tolerate high concentrations of Cr and other metals, and they may be used as preferable pioneer species to grow or use for restoration in Cr-contaminated sites. This study can be useful for establishing guidelines to select the most suitable plant species to revegetate and remediate metals in tanning sludge-contaminated fields.

  4. Natural Products based P-glycoprotein Activators for Improved β-amyloid Clearance in Alzheimer's Disease: An in silico Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Pravin; Vidyasagar, Nikhil; Dhulap, Sivakami; Dhulap, Abhijeet; Hirwani, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is an age related disorder and is defined to be progressive, irreversible neurodegenerative disease. The potential targets which are associated with the Alzheimer's disease are cholinesterases, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, Beta secretase 1, Pregnane X receptor (PXR) and P-glycoprotein (Pgp). P-glycoprotein is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, which is an important integral of the blood-brain, blood-cerebrospinal fluid and the blood-testis barrier. Reports from the literature provide evidences that the up-regulation of the efflux pump is liable for a decrease in β -amyloid intracellular accumulation and is an important hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, targeting β-amyloid clearance by stimulating Pgp could be a useful strategy to prevent Alzheimer's advancement. Currently available drugs provide limited effectiveness and do not assure to cure Alzheimer's disease completely. On the other hand, the current research is now directed towards the development of synthetic or natural based therapeutics which can delay the onset or progression of Alzheimer's disease. Since ancient time medicinal plants such as Withania somnifera, Bacopa monieri, Nerium indicum have been used to prevent neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Till today around 125 Indian medicinal plants have been screened on the basis of ethnopharmacology for their activity against neurological disorders. In this paper, we report bioactives from natural sources which show binding affinity towards the Pgp receptor using ligand based pharmacophore development, virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies for the bioactives possessing acceptable ADME properties. These bioactives can thus be useful to treat Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Using pilot test data to refine an alternative cover design in northern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smesrud, Jason K; Benson, Craig H; Albright, William H; Richards, James H; Wright, Shannon; Israel, Tim; Goodrich, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Two instrumented test sections were constructed in summer 1999 at the Kiefer Landfill near Sacramento, California to test the hydraulic performance of two proposed alternative final covers. Both test sections simulated monolithic evapotranspiration (ET) designs that differed primarily in thickness. Both were seeded with a mix of two perennial and one annual grass species. Oleander seedlings were also planted in the thicker test section. Detailed hydrologic performance monitoring of the covers was conducted from 1999 through 2005, The thicker test section met the performance criterion (average percolation of percolation (average of 55 mm/y). Both test sections were decommissioned in summer 2005 to investigate changes in soil hydraulic properties, geomorphology, and vegetation and to collect data to support a revised design. Field data from hydrologic monitoring and the decommissioning study were subsequently included in a hydrologic modeling study to estimate the performance of an optimized cover system for full-scale application. The decommissioning study showed that properties of the soils changed over the monitoring period (saturated hydraulic conductivity and water holding capacity increased, density decreased) and that the perennial grasses and shrubs intended for the cover were out-competed by annual species with shallower roots and lesser capacity for water uptake. Of these changes, reduced ET from the shallow-rooted annual vegetation is believed to be the primary cause for the high percolation rate from the thinner test section. Hydrologic modeling suggests that the target hydraulic performance can be achieved using an ET cover with similar thickness to the thin test section if perennial vegetation species observed in surrounding grasslands can be established. This finding underscores the importance of establishing and maintaining the appropriate vegetation on ET covers in this climate.

  6. Global Analysis of Type Three Secretion System and Quorum Sensing Inhibition of Pseudomonas savastanoi by Polyphenols Extracts from Vegetable Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Biancalani

    Full Text Available Protection of plants against bacterial diseases still mainly relies on the use of chemical pesticides, which in Europe correspond essentially to copper-based compounds. However, recently plant diseases control is oriented towards a rational use of molecules and extracts, generally with natural origin, with lower intrinsic toxicity and a reduced negative environmental impact. In this work, polyphenolic extracts from vegetable no food/feed residues of typical Mediterranean crops, as Olea europaea, Cynara scolymus, and Vitis vinifera were obtained and their inhibitory activity on the Type Three Secretion System (TTSS and the Quorum Sensing (QS of the Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. nerii strain Psn23 was assessed. Extract from green tea (Camellia sinensis was used as a positive control. Collectively, the data obtained through gfp-promoter fusion system and real-time PCR show that all the polyphenolic extracts here studied have a high inhibitory activity on both the TTSS and QS of Psn23, without any depressing effect on bacterial viability. Extracts from green tea and grape seeds were shown to be the most active. Such activity was confirmed in planta by a strong reduction in the ability of Psn23 to develop hyperplastic galls on explants from adult oleander plants, as well as to elicit hypersensitive response on tobacco. By using a newly developed Congo red assay and an ELISA test, we demonstrated that the TTSS-targeted activity of these polyphenolic extracts also affects the TTSS pilus assembly. In consideration of the potential application of polyphenolic extracts in plant protection, the absence of any toxicity of these polyphenolic compounds was also assessed. A widely and evolutionary conserved molecular target such as Ca2+-ATPase, essential for the survival of any living organism, was used for the toxicity assessment.

  7. Mobile applications and patient education: Are currently available GERD mobile apps sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobian, Michael; Kandinov, Aron; El-Kashlan, Nour; Svider, Peter F; Folbe, Adam J; Mayerhoff, Ross; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Raza, S Naweed

    2017-08-01

    Despite the increasing role of mobile applications (apps) in patient education, there has been little inquiry evaluating the quality of these resources. Because poor health literacy has been associated with inferior health outcomes, evaluating the quality of patient education materials takes on great importance. Our objective was to employ validated readability tools for the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) mobile apps. GERD-specific apps found in the Apple App Store (Apple Inc., Cupertino CA) were evaluated using the Readability Studio Professional Version 2015 for Windows (Oleander Software, Ltd, Vandalia, OH). All text was evaluated using nine validated algorithms measuring readability including Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, Simple Measure of Gobbledygook grading, Gunning Fog index, Coleman-Liau, New Fog Count formula, Raygor Readability Estimate, FORCAST, Fry graph, and Flesch Reading Ease score. Average reading grade levels for individual GERD apps ranged from 9.6 to 12.9 (interquartile range 10.3-12). The average reading grade level for all apps analyzed was 11.1 ± 0.2 standard error of the mean (SEM), with an average Flesch Reading Ease score for all mobile apps analyzed of 51 ± 2.05 (SEM), falling into the "fairly difficult" category given by this measure. Raygor Readability estimates that most mobile apps have a reading grade level between 10 and 12, with the majority of this outcome due to long words. This analysis demonstrates the feasibility of assessing readability of mobile health apps. Our findings suggest significant gaps in potential comprehension between the apps analyzed and the average reader, diminishing the utility of these resources. We hope our findings influence future mobile health-related app development and thereby improve patient outcomes in GERD and other chronic diseases. NA. Laryngoscope, 127:1775-1779, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Retrospective study of cattle poisonings in California: recognition, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puschner B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anita Varga,1 Birgit Puschner21William R Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital, Large Animal Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USA; 2Department of Molecular Biosciences and the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: In this retrospective study all suspect bovine intoxications submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011 were reviewed. A total of 1199 cases were submitted, but a diagnosis of intoxication was only established in 13.5% of cases. In these cases, overexposures to minerals, metals, and poisonous plants were determined as the most commonly diagnosed poisonings in cattle in California. Nitrate/nitrite poisoning was the most commonly diagnosed plant-associated intoxication, followed by gossypol and oleander. This study details the diagnostic challenges and treatment options for the most commonly diagnosed intoxications. To ensure proper treatment and prevention of new cases, accurate diagnosis is necessary, and therefore this review provides an essential tool for the food animal practitioner. Available toxicological analyses are offered at select laboratories, which can be time consuming and expensive, yet the potential for residues in consumed animal products and implications for human health necessitate testing and consultation. Any potential exposure to a toxicant in cattle should be reviewed to determine whether a residue hazard exists. Therapy focuses on immediate removal of the toxicant from the environment and from the gastrointestinal tract. With few antidotes available, most are cost prohibitive to treat numerous affected cattle. In addition, most antidotes will require extra-label drug use and establishment of meat and milk withdrawal times.Keywords: toxins, toxicology, poisonous plants, bovine

  9. Formation of Stylet Sheaths in āere (in air from eight species of phytophagous hemipterans from six families (Suborders: Auchenorrhyncha and Sternorrhyncha.

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    J Kent Morgan

    Full Text Available Stylet sheath formation is a common feature among phytophagous hemipterans. These sheaths are considered essential to promote a successful feeding event. Stylet sheath compositions are largely unknown and their mode of solidification remains to be elucidated. This report demonstrates the formation and solidification of in āere (in air produced stylet sheaths by six hemipteran families: Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae, Asian citrus psyllid, Aphis nerii (Aphididae, oleander/milkweed aphid, Toxoptera citricida (Aphididae, brown citrus aphid, Aphis gossypii (Aphididae, cotton melon aphid, Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Aleyrodidae, whitefly, Homalodisca vitripennis (Cicadellidae, glassy-winged sharpshooter, Ferrisia virgata (Pseudococcidae, striped mealybug, and Protopulvinaria pyriformis (Coccidae, pyriform scale. Examination of in āere produced stylet sheaths by confocal and scanning electron microscopy shows a common morphology of an initial flange laid down on the surface of the membrane followed by continuous hollow core structures with sequentially stacked hardened bulbous droplets. Single and multi-branched sheaths were common, whereas mealybug and scale insects typically produced multi-branched sheaths. Micrographs of the in āere formed flanges indicate flange sealing upon stylet bundle extraction in D. citri and the aphids, while the B. tabaci whitefly and H. vitripennis glassy-winged sharpshooter flanges remain unsealed. Structural similarity of in āere sheaths are apparent in stylet sheaths formed in planta, in artificial diets, or in water. The use of 'Solvy', a dissolvable membrane, for intact stylet sheath isolation is reported. These observations illustrate for the first time this mode of stylet sheath synthesis adding to the understanding of stylet sheath formation in phytophagous hemipterans and providing tools for future use in structural and compositional analysis.

  10. Density-dependent reduction and induction of milkweed cardenolides by a sucking insect herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, John W; Malcolm, Stephen B

    2004-03-01

    The effect of aphid population size on host-plant chemical defense expression and the effect of plant defense on aphid population dynamics were investigated in a milkweed-specialist herbivore system. Density effects of the aposematic oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, on cardenolide expression were measured in two milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica and A. incarnata. These plants vary in constitutive chemical investment with high mean cardenolide concentration in A. curassavica and low to zero in A. incarnata. The second objective was to determine whether cardenolide expression in these two host plants impacts mean A. nerii colony biomass (mg) and density. Cardenolide concentration (microgram/g) of A. curassavica in both aphid-treated leaves and opposite, herbivore-free leaves decreased initially in comparison with aphid-free controls, and then increased significantly with A. nerii density. Thus, A. curassavica responds to aphid herbivory initially with density-dependent phytochemical reduction, followed by induction of cardenolides to concentrations above aphid-free controls. In addition, mean cardenolide concentration of aphid-treated leaves was significantly higher than that of opposite, herbivore-free leaves. Therefore, A. curassavica induction is strongest in herbivore-damage tissue. Conversely, A. incarnata exhibited no such chemical response to aphid herbivory. Furthermore, neither host plant responded chemically to herbivore feeding duration time (days) or to the interaction between herbivore initial density and feeding duration time. There were also no significant differences in mean colony biomass or population density of A. nerii reared on high cardenolide (A. curassavica) and low cardenolide (A. incarnata) hosts.

  11. Evaluating the complexity of online patient education materials about brain aneurysms published by major academic institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raghav; Adeeb, Nimer; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Moore, Justin M; Patel, Apar S; Kim, Christopher; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Health care education resources are increasingly available on the Internet. A majority of people reference these resources at one point or another. A threshold literacy level is needed to comprehend the information presented within these materials. A key component of health literacy is the readability of educational resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association have recommended that patient education materials be written between a 4th- and a 6th-grade education level. The authors assessed the readability of online patient education materials about brain aneurysms that have been published by several academic institutions across the US. METHODS Online patient education materials about brain aneurysms were downloaded from the websites of 20 academic institutions. The materials were assessed via 8 readability scales using Readability Studio software (Oleander Software Solutions), and then were statistically analyzed. RESULTS None of the patient education materials were written at or below the NIH's recommended 6th-grade reading level. The average educational level required to comprehend the texts across all institutions, as assessed by 7 of the readability scales, was 12.4 ± 2.5 (mean ± SD). The Flesch Reading Ease Scale classified the materials as "difficult" to understand, correlating with a college-level education or higher. An ANOVA test found that there were no significant differences in readability among the materials from the institutions (p = 0.215). CONCLUSIONS Brain aneurysms affect 3.2% of adults 50 years or older across the world and can cause significant patient anxiety and uncertainty. Current patient education materials are not written at or below the NIH's recommended 4th- to 6th-grade education level.

  12. Differential Life History Trait Associations of Aphids with Nonpersistent Viruses in Cucurbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelella, G M; Egel, D S; Holland, J D; Nemacheck, J A; Williams, C E; Kaplan, I

    2015-06-01

    The diversity of vectors and fleeting nature of virus acquisition and transmission renders nonpersistent viruses a challenge to manage. We assessed the importance of noncolonizing versus colonizing vectors with a 2-yr survey of aphids and nonpersistent viruses on commercial pumpkin farms. We quantified aphid alightment using pan traps, while testing leaf samples with multiplex RT-PCR targeting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Overall, we identified 53 aphid species (3,899 individuals), from which the melon aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, a pumpkin-colonizing species, predominated (76 and 37% of samples in 2010 and 2011, respectively). CMV and ZYMV were not detected, but WMV and PRSV were prevalent, both regionally (WMV: 28/29 fields, PRSV: 21/29 fields) and within fields (infection rates = 69 and 55% for WMV in 2010 and 2011; 28 and 25% for PRSV in 2010 and 2011). However, early-season samples showed extremely low infection levels, suggesting cucurbit viruses are not seed-transmitted and implicating aphid activity as a causal factor driving virus spread. Interestingly, neither noncolonizer and colonizer alightment nor total aphid alightment were good predictors of virus presence, but community analyses revealed species-specific relationships. For example, cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora Koch) and spotted alfalfa aphid (Therioaphis trifolii Monell f. maculata) were associated with PRSV infection, whereas the oleander aphid (Aphis nerii Bover de Fonscolombe) was associated with WMV spread within fields. These outcomes highlight the need for tailored management plans targeting key vectors of nonpersistent viruses in agricultural systems. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Multiple-dose activated charcoal in acute self-poisoning: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Juszczak, Edmund; Buckley, Nick A; Senarathna, Lalith; Mohamed, Fahim; Dissanayake, Wasantha; Hittarage, Ariyasena; Azher, Shifa; Jeganathan, K; Jayamanne, Shaluka; Sheriff, Mh Rezvi; Warrell, David A

    2008-02-16

    The case-fatality for intentional self-poisoning in the rural developing world is 10-50-fold higher than that in industrialised countries, mostly because of the use of highly toxic pesticides and plants. We therefore aimed to assess whether routine treatment with multiple-dose activated charcoal, to interrupt enterovascular or enterohepatic circulations, offers benefit compared with no charcoal in such an environment. We did an open-label, parallel group, randomised, controlled trial of six 50 g doses of activated charcoal at 4-h intervals versus no charcoal versus one 50 g dose of activated charcoal in three Sri Lankan hospitals. 4632 patients were randomised to receive no charcoal (n=1554), one dose of charcoal (n=1545), or six doses of charcoal (n=1533); outcomes were available for 4629 patients. 2338 (51%) individuals had ingested pesticides, whereas 1647 (36%) had ingested yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) seeds. Mortality was the primary outcome measure. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with controlled-trials.com as ISRCTN02920054. Mortality did not differ between the groups. 97 (6.3%) of 1531 participants in the multiple-dose group died, compared with 105 (6.8%) of 1554 in the no charcoal group (adjusted odds ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.70-1.33). No differences were noted for patients who took particular poisons, were severely ill on admission, or who presented early. We cannot recommend the routine use of multiple-dose activated charcoal in rural Asia Pacific; although further studies of early charcoal administration might be useful, effective affordable treatments are urgently needed.

  14. Collective defense of Aphis nerii and Uroleucon hypochoeridis (Homoptera, Aphididae against natural enemies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Hartbauer

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalent way aphids accomplish colony defense against natural enemies is a mutualistic relationship with ants or the occurrence of a specialised soldier caste typical for eusocial aphids, or even both. Despite a group-living life style of those aphid species lacking these defense lines, communal defense against natural predators has not yet been observed there. Individuals of Aphis nerii (Oleander aphid and Uroleucon hypochoeridis, an aphid species feeding on Hypochoeris radicata (hairy cat's ear, show a behavioral response to visual stimulation in the form of spinning or twitching, which is often accompanied by coordinated kicks executed with hind legs. Interestingly, this behaviour is highly synchronized among members of a colony and repetitive visual stimulation caused strong habituation. Observations of natural aphid colonies revealed that a collective twitching and kicking response (CTKR was frequently evoked during oviposition attempts of the parasitoid wasp Aphidius colemani and during attacks of aphidophagous larvae. CTKR effectively interrupted oviposition attempts of this parasitoid wasp and even repelled this parasitoid from colonies after evoking consecutive CTKRs. In contrast, solitary feeding A. nerii individuals were not able to successfully repel this parasitoid wasp. In addition, CTKR was also evoked through gentle substrate vibrations. Laser vibrometry of the substrate revealed twitching-associated vibrations that form a train of sharp acceleration peaks in the course of a CTKR. This suggests that visual signals in combination with twitching-related substrate vibrations may play an important role in synchronising defense among members of a colony. In both aphid species collective defense in encounters with different natural enemies was executed in a stereotypical way and was similar to CTKR evoked through visual stimulation. This cooperative defense behavior provides an example of a surprising sociality that can be found

  15. Knots Untie: Molecular Determinants Involved in Knot Formation Induced by Pseudomonas savastanoi in Woody Hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Caballo-Ponce

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the molecular basis of tree diseases is lately receiving a renewed attention, especially with the emerging perception that pathogens require specific pathogenicity and virulence factors to successfully colonize woody hosts. Pathosystems involving woody plants are notoriously difficult to study, although the use of model bacterial strains together with genetically homogeneous micropropagated plant material is providing a significant impetus to our understanding of the molecular determinants leading to disease. The gammaproteobacterium Pseudomonas savastanoi belongs to the intensively studied Pseudomonas syringae complex, and includes three pathogenic lineages causing tumorous overgrowths (knots in diverse economically relevant trees and shrubs. As it occurs with many other bacteria, pathogenicity of P. savastanoi is dependent on a type III secretion system, which is accompanied by a core set of at least 20 effector genes shared among strains isolated from olive, oleander, and ash. The induction of knots of wild-type size requires that the pathogen maintains adequate levels of diverse metabolites, including the phytohormones indole-3-acetic acid and cytokinins, as well as cyclic-di-GMP, some of which can also regulate the expression of other pathogenicity and virulence genes and participate in bacterial competitiveness. In a remarkable example of social networking, quorum sensing molecules allow for the communication among P. savastanoi and other members of the knot microbiome, while at the same time are essential for tumor formation. Additionally, a distinguishing feature of bacteria from the P. syringae complex isolated from woody organs is the possession of a 15 kb genomic island (WHOP carrying four operons and three other genes involved in degradation of phenolic compounds. Two of these operons mediate the catabolism of anthranilate and catechol and, together with another operon, are required for the induction of full-size tumors

  16. Salinity variability along the eastern continental shelf of Canada and the United States, 1973-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisagni, James J.

    2016-09-01

    residuals (mse) are larger for the Gulf of St. Lawrence (~0.19), Eastern and Western Scotian Shelf (~0.09-0.06), Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank (~0.08-0.06), Middle Atlantic Bight (~0.19), and maximal for the DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf (~0.36), and are also correlated at 0-year lag, but are uncorrelated with the four northern-most sub-regions. Consideration of a simple "flux variation" model that includes along-shelf, altimeter-derived velocity anomalies measured upstream on the Western Scotian Shelf and the positive along-shelf mean salinity gradient between the Eastern Scotian Shelf and the DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf, may explain the synchronous nature of NSS residuals for the southern-most 6 sub-regions. Furthermore, the flux variation model results in calculated NSS residuals that are within a factor of two of observed NSS residuals for the southern-most DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf. Co-varying broad-scale coastal sea level and shelf break front position anomalies also support the flux variation model, as do CMV Oleander temperature anomalies across a limited Middle Atlantic Bight shelf region. Overall, the relationships between along-shelf observations of NSS and other shelf parameters support an existing wind-driven dynamical shelf model. Specifically, a flux variation model is able to describe IAV of NSS along a section of the Canadian and U.S shelf for periods greater than one year. In the future, this model may be able to provide useful indices of regime change as noted within the Northeast Shelf Large Marine Ecosystem by other workers.