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Sample records for neonatal respiratory care

  1. Year in Review 2015: Neonatal Respiratory Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Sherry E

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal respiratory care practices have changed with breathtaking speed in the past few years. It is critical for the respiratory therapist and others caring for neonates to be up to date with current recommendations and evolving care practices. The purpose of this article is to review papers of particular note that were published in 2015 and address important aspects of newborn respiratory care. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Respiratory care practitioners as primary providers of neonatal intubation in a community hospital: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblett, K E; Meibalane, R

    1995-10-01

    Respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) serve as the primary providers of neonatal endotracheal intubation (ETI) in our institution. ETIs are performed by registered respiratory therapists who have completed Pediatric Advanced Life Support and Neonatal Advanced Life Support training and have successfully completed 3 intubations under the direct supervision of a senior therapist. The purpose of this study was to (1) ascertain whether RCPs can successfully provide this type of service with acceptable complications rates and (2) survey the economic impact of this practice on patient charges in our hospital. An analysis of each intubation event in which an RCP participated was collected and compiled over a 5-month period (9-94 to 2-95). Calculations were made of the success rate and complications. A total of 38 ETIs were performed by the RCPs. Of these, 37 (97.4%) were performed with neonatal ETI at a Level-II nursery in a community hospital, and this practice may result in a cost reduction.

  3. [Respiratory syncytial virus outbreak in a tertiary hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Parejo, Carlos; Morillo García, Aurea; Lozano Domínguez, Carmen; Carreño Ochoa, Concepción; Aznar Martín, Javier; Conde Herrera, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Investigation and control of a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) outbreak that affected the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of a university hospital from October to December 2012. Cohort study of children admitted to the NICU. The infection attack rate was calculated. A descriptive analysis of the cases and a multivariate analysis was performed using the variables that were shown to be risk factors for RSV infection. Preventive measures taken were: contact isolation; hand hygiene training and observation; exclusivity of a health team of nurses and physicians for positive cases, restrictions on visitor numbers; surveillance RSV testing, and palivizumab prophylaxis. The outbreak had three epidemic waves and 20 positive cases out of a total of 48 children admitted. The overall attack rate was 42%. Half of positive cases were children, with a median age of 36 days (p25=22, p75=58). The independent risk factors for RSV infection were birth weight below 1000 grams (OR=23.5; P=.002) and to have another nosocomial infection the week before the diagnosis of RSV infection (OR=19.98; P=.016). It was an outbreak with a high number of cases, due to the delay in notification, prolonged RSV carrier status, and low adherence to hand hygiene practice, which favoured the cross-transmission of infection. The most effective preventive measures were direct observation of hand hygiene and supervision of isolation measures. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. State of the art. Neonatal respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L A

    1999-12-01

    Advances in ventilatory management of respiratory distress in the newborn have made dramatic strides during the last decade. Innovative treatments such as PTV, HFV, liquid ventilation, and NO therapy are just beginning to have an impact on the care of neonates in the NICU. These treatment modalities should continue to have an effect on the care of the newborn infant well into the future.

  5. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Workshop Report: Evaluation of Respiratory Mechanics and Function in the Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peterson-Carmichael, Stacey; Seddon, Paul C.; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Frerichs, Inéz; Hall, Graham L.; Hammer, Jürg; Hantos, Zoltán; van Kaam, Anton H.; McEvoy, Cindy T.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Pillow, J. Jane; Rafferty, Gerrard F.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Stocks, Janet; Ranganathan, Sarath C.

    2016-01-01

    Ready access to physiologic measures, including respiratory mechanics, lung volumes, and ventilation/perfusion inhomogeneity, could optimize the clinical management of the critically ill pediatric or neonatal patient and minimize lung injury. There are many techniques for measuring respiratory

  6. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs ...

  7. Respiratory Home Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us Home > Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources ... Teenagers Living With Lung Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at ...

  8. Auditing of Monitoring and Respiratory Support Equipment in a Level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bergon-Sendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Random safety audits (RSAs are a safety tool but have not been widely used in hospitals. Objectives. To determine the frequency of proper use of equipment safety mechanisms in relation to monitoring and mechanical ventilation by performing RSAs. The study also determined whether factors related to the patient, time period, or characteristics of the area of admission influenced how the device safety systems were used. Methods. A prospective observational study was conducted in a level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU during 2012. 87 days were randomly selected. Appropriate overall use was defined when all evaluated variables were correctly programmed in the audited device. Results. A total of 383 monitor and ventilator audits were performed. The Kappa coefficient of interobserver agreement was 0.93. The rate of appropriate overall use of the monitors and respiratory support equipment was 33.68%. Significant differences were found with improved usage during weekends, OR 1.85 (1.12–3.06, p=0.01, and during the late shift (3 pm to 10 pm, OR 1.59 (1.03–2.4, p=0.03. Conclusions. Equipment safety systems of monitors and ventilators are not properly used. To improve patient safety, we should identify which alarms are really needed and where the difficulties lie for the correct alarm programming.

  9. Intensive care of the neonatal foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterba, A M; Drummond, W H; Kosch, P

    1985-04-01

    The basic concepts of diagnosis and treatment in the abnormal neonatal foal are presented. Methods of restraint, sedation, and general nursing care are discussed, as well as more specific techniques of respiratory and circulatory system support.

  10. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chen-Yiu; Hu, Han-Chung; Chiu, Li-Chung; Chang, Chih-Hao; Li, Li-Fu; Huang, Chung-Chi; Kao, Chuan-Chi; Cheng, Po-Jen; Kao, Kuo-Chin

    2018-05-01

    Obstetric patients comprise a limited portion of intensive care unit patients, but they often present with unfamiliar conditions and exhibit the potential for catastrophic deterioration. This study evaluated the maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy. Information on 71 patients at >25 weeks gestation in the ICU with respiratory failure was recorded between 2009 and 2013. The characteristics and outcomes of mothers and fetuses were determined through a retrospective chart review and evaluated using Student's t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test. The leading causes of respiratory failure were postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia in the obstetric causes group and pneumonia in the nonobstetric causes group during pregnancy and the peripartum period. The non-obstetric causes group exhibited a higher incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and renal replacement therapy as well as requiring more ventilator days. The patients in the obstetric causes group showed significant improvement after delivery in the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen and peak inspiratory pressure decrease. Both groups exhibited high incidences of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Neonatal complications resulting from meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and sepsis were more common in the non-obstetric causes group; however, neurological development impairment was more common in the obstetric causes group. Obstetric cause was associated with longer ventilator free days and fewer episodes of ARDS after delivery. Neonatal complications resulting from different etiologies of respiratory failure were found to differ. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Yiu Hung

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstetric patients comprise a limited portion of intensive care unit patients, but they often present with unfamiliar conditions and exhibit the potential for catastrophic deterioration. This study evaluated the maternal and neonatal outcomes of respiratory failure during pregnancy. Methods: Information on 71 patients at >25 weeks gestation in the ICU with respiratory failure was recorded between 2009 and 2013. The characteristics and outcomes of mothers and fetuses were determined through a retrospective chart review and evaluated using Student's t test, chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test. Results: The leading causes of respiratory failure were postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia in the obstetric causes group and pneumonia in the nonobstetric causes group during pregnancy and the peripartum period. The non-obstetric causes group exhibited a higher incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome and renal replacement therapy as well as requiring more ventilator days. The patients in the obstetric causes group showed significant improvement after delivery in the partial pressure of arterial oxygen to the fraction of inspired oxygen and peak inspiratory pressure decrease. Both groups exhibited high incidences of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Neonatal complications resulting from meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS and sepsis were more common in the non-obstetric causes group; however, neurological development impairment was more common in the obstetric causes group. Conclusion: Obstetric cause was associated with longer ventilator free days and fewer episodes of ARDS after delivery. Neonatal complications resulting from different etiologies of respiratory failure were found to differ. Keywords: Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Neonatal, Obstetric, Outcome, Respiratory failure

  12. Tei index in neonatal respiratory distress and perinatal asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Anwer Attia Khattab

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular compromise is a common complication of neonatal respiratory distress and perinatal asphyxia. Tei index is a Doppler-derived index for the assessment of overall left ventricular function that combines systolic and diastolic time intervals. Aim: Assess the role of MPI versus cardiac troponin I as early indicator of hypoxic cardiac damage in neonates with respiratory distress or perinatal asphyxia. The present work was conducted on forty neonates, 15 with neonatal respiratory distress (group I, 15 with perinatal asphyxia (group II, and 10 apparently healthy neonates as a control (group III. All have: Detailed history-thorough clinical examination-Plain X-ray-ECG-Two dimensional, M-mode and Doppler echocardiographic examination with the measurement of both myocardial performance index (MPI of the right and left ventricle-Serum cardiac troponin I. Results: There was statistically significant increase in serum cardiac troponin I in groups I and II than group III. Left and right ventricular myocardial performance index (MPI were increased in group I and II than the control group. No correlation between Tei index and each of postnatal age, apgar score at 5-min, heart rate, serum cardiac troponin I, ejection fraction and fractional shortening, but there was direct relationship between MPI and LVEDD and inverse relationship between MPI and each of EF% and FS%. But there was significant correlation between L.V. MPI and gestational age. Conclusion: Tei index was higher in neonates with respiratory distress and neonates with perinatal asphyxia than in normal neonates despite normal or even increased ejection fraction which indicates that these patients may have subclinical ventricular dysfunction which should be followed up carefully.

  13. Neonatal respiratory depression associated with epidural analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Gálvez Toro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural analgesia is the most effective analgesics used during childbirth but is not without its problems.In the Hospital San Juan de la Cruz of Ubeda from November 2011 we have detected 3 cases of newborn infants with signs of respiratory depression. Appeared in them: normal cardiotocographic records during childbirth, use of epidural associated with fentanyl, termination by vacuum and elevated temperature in one case.ObjectivesKnow if the neonatal adaptation to extrauterine life may be influenced by the use of epidural analgesia in childbirth. Review what role can have the rise in maternal temperature and the use of epidural fentanyl with the appearance of newborn respiratory distress.MethodsLiterature Review conducted in February of 2012 in Pubmed and the Cochrane Library, using the key words: childbirth, epidural analgesia, neonatal respiratory depression.ResultsOn the respiratory depression associated with fentanyl, a Cochrane review found indicating that newborns of mothers with an epidural, had a lower pH and were less need for administration of naloxone.On PubMed we find a review study that indicates that the respiratory depression caused by the administration of opioids via neuroaxial is rare, placing it below 1 per 1000, and a clinical case that concluded that doses of fentanyl exceeding 300 µg (approx. 5 µg/kg for 4 hours previous to childbirth, have a high risk of neonatal respiratory depression at birth.The same Cochrane review indicates that the women with epidural analgesia had increased risk of maternal fever of at least 38 ° C and a recent cohort study relates this increase in temperature with a greater likelihood of neonatal adverse events (from 37.5 ° C.ConclusionsThe studies found considered safe epidurals to the neonate and the mother, except when certain conditions are met. The literature and our clinical experience have been reports linking neonatal respiratory depression with increasing temperature (37

  14. Tei index in neonatal respiratory distress and perinatal asphyxia

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Anwer Attia Khattab

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular compromise is a common complication of neonatal respiratory distress and perinatal asphyxia. Tei index is a Doppler-derived index for the assessment of overall left ventricular function that combines systolic and diastolic time intervals. Aim: Assess the role of MPI versus cardiac troponin I as early indicator of hypoxic cardiac damage in neonates with respiratory distress or perinatal asphyxia. The present work was conducted on forty neonates, 15 with neonatal respiratory dist...

  15. Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available to improve treatment results in premature infants with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS, by establishing developmental mechanisms and elaborating methods for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Material and methods. The paper analyzes the results of a clinical observation and laboratory, instrumental, immunological, morphological, and radiological studies of 320 premature neonates at 26—35 weeks gestational age. The following groups of neonates were identified: 1 40 premature neonatal infants without NRDS and with the physiological course of an early neonatal period (a comparison group; 2 190 premature neonates with severe NRDS in whom the efficiency of therapy with exogenous surfactants, such as surfactant BL versus curosurf, was evaluated; 3 90 premature newborn infants who had died from NRDS at its different stages. Results. The poor maternal somatic, obstetric, and gynecological histories in the early periods of the current pregnancy create prerequisites for its termination, favor the development of severe acute gestosis, and cause abnormal placental changes. Each gestational age is marked by certain placental changes that promote impaired uterineplacentalfetal blood flow and premature birth. Alveolar and bronchial epithelial damages, including those ante and intranatally, microcircula tory disorders play a leading role in the tanatogenesis of NRDS. Intranatal hypoxia and amniotic fluid aspiration are one of the important factors contributing to alveolar epithelial damage and NRDS in premature neonates. Exogenous surfactants prevent the development of hyaline membranes and are useful in the normalization of ventilation-perfusion relationships and lung biomechanical properties. Conclusion. This study could improve the diagnosis and treatment of NRDS, which assisted in reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation from 130±7.6 to 65±11.6 hours, the number of complications (the incidence of intragastric

  16. Respiratory care manpower issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Paul; Drumheller, Lois; Carlow, John J

    2006-03-01

    Although respiratory care is a relatively new profession, its practitioners are deeply involved in providing patient care in the critical care. In preparation for writing this article, we sought to explore the respiratory therapy manpower needs and activities designed to fulfill those needs in critical care practice. We began by delineating the historical development of respiratory care as a profession, the development of its education, and the professional credentialing system. We then conducted several literature reviews with few articles generated. We requested and received data from the American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC), The National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC), and the Committee on Accreditation of Respiratory Care education (CoARC) relative to their membership, number of credentialed individuals, and educational program student and graduate data for 2000 through 2004. We then conducted two electronic surveys. Survey 1 was a six-item survey that examined the use of mandatory overtime in respiratory care departments. We used a convenience sample of 30 hospitals stratified by size (or=500 beds). Survey 2 was a five-item instrument distributed by blast E-mail to the Society of Critical Care Medicine's Respiratory Care Section members and members of the RC_World list serve. This survey elicited 51 usable and non-duplicative responses from geographically and size-varied institutions. We analyzed these data in several ways from distribution analysis to one-way analysis of variance procedure and appropriate post hoc analysis techniques. Where appropriate, a matched-pairs analysis was performed and these were compared across the variables intensive care unit (ICU) beds per actual number of respiratory care practitioners (RCPs) and ICU beds per preferred number of RCPs. The data gathered from the professional organizations indicated a relatively stable attrition rate (35.2%+/-1.7-3.1%), even in the face of varying enrollments (6,231 in 2004 vs. 4

  17. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care......BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...... visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. OBJECTIVE: To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. METHODS: The study used...

  18. Neonatal respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) referrals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    El-Khuffash, A

    2011-03-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a complex technique for providing life support in neonatal respiratory failure. T UK Collaborative ECMO trial demonstrated cost-effectiveness and substantial improvements in neurological morbidity and mortality. Currently, infants requiring ECMO in Ireland are referred to one of various centres in the UK and Scandinavia. We aimed to review the number of infants referred from Ireland for respiratory ECMO. All infants with a non-cardiac condition referred from Ireland for ECMO were reviewed for diagnosis and outcomes. Eleven infants required ECMO between June 2006 and January 2009 and were referred to the Scandinavian team for ECMO transport although one infant improved and did not require ECMO following the arrival of the team. Four infants died: one infant died prior to arrival of the ECMO team, 3 infants had fatal diagnoses and one infant with congenital diaphragmatic hernia received pre-op ECMO. The median (inter-quartile range) gestational age was 39.7 (38.3-40.7) weeks and birth weight of 3.7 (3.2-4.0) kg. The median age at the decision to transfer for ECMO was 13h (4-123) and the team arrived at 23 h (12-132). All infants had a normal cranial ultrasound and echo prior to ECMO and 2 infants had an abnormal MRI post-ECMO. The time on ECMO was 9 days (3-17) and total length of hospital stay was 32 d (23-36). There were no pre-ECMO clinical or biochemical

  19. Use of palivizumab and infection control measures to control an outbreak of respiratory syncytial virus in a neonatal intensive care unit confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connell, K

    2011-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a potentially life-threatening infection in premature infants. We report an outbreak involving four infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of our hospital that occurred in February 2010. RSV A infection was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Palivizumab was administered to all infants in the NICU. There were no additional symptomatic cases and repeat RSV surveillance confirmed that there was no further cross-transmission within the unit. The outbreak highlighted the infection control challenge of very high bed occupancy in the unit and the usefulness of molecular methods in facilitating detection and management.

  20. Developments in neonatal care and nursing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Patricia; Fallon, Anne

    This article reviews the origins and evolution of neonatology and considers the role of the neonatal nurse within this specialty. Neonatal nurses are a vital part of the neonatal team that provides care for sick babies. The nursing care required by sick babies and their families on a neonatal unit can be variable and complex. The past century has seen significant changes in the role of the neonatal nurse. This has come about through dramatic technological developments on neonatal units, an increased understanding of neonatal physiology and pathology, changes in the education of neonatal nurses, and active and ongoing clinical research within the specialty. The resulting significant advances in neonatal care, including that provided by neonatal nurses, have made a crucial and steadfast contribution to marked improvements in neonatal outcomes.

  1. Epidural analgesia in labour and neonatal respiratory distress: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Chandra, Sue; Ijaz, Zainab; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan

    2014-03-01

    Epidural analgesia is the commonest mode for providing pain relief in labour, with a combination of bupivacaine and fentanyl most often used in practice. To test whether late-preterm and term neonates exposed to opioids in epidural analgesia in labour are more likely to develop respiratory distress in the immediate neonatal period. A case-control study was conducted of singleton infants born during January 2006 to December 2010. Cases were neonates ≥34 weeks gestation, who developed respiratory distress within 24 h of life requiring supplemental oxygen ≥2 h and/or positive pressure ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Controls were gestation and site-matched neonates who did not develop any respiratory distress within the same period. The information on exposure to epidural analgesia and on potential confounding variables was obtained from the standardised delivery record, routinely filled out on all women admitted to the labour wards. In our study, 206 cases and 206 matched controls were enrolled. Exposure to epidural analgesia was present in 146 (70.9%) cases as compared with 131 (63.6%) of the controls. The association between exposure to epidural analgesia and respiratory distress in neonates was statistically significant upon adjustment for all potential confounders (adjusted OR: 1.75, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.99; p = 0.04). When data was separately analysed for term and late-preterm infants, the results were consistent across these subpopulations, showing no interaction effect. Late-preterm and term infants exposed to maternal epidural analgesia in labour are more likely to develop respiratory distress in the immediate neonatal period.

  2. Respiratory care management information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Richard M

    2004-04-01

    Hospital-wide computerized information systems evolved from the need to capture patient information and perform billing and other financial functions. These systems, however, have fallen short of meeting the needs of respiratory care departments regarding work load assessment, productivity management, and the level of outcome reporting required to support programs such as patient-driven protocols. The respiratory care management information systems (RCMIS) of today offer many advantages over paper-based systems and hospital-wide computer systems. RCMIS are designed to facilitate functions specific to respiratory care, including assessing work demand, assigning and tracking resources, charting, billing, and reporting results. RCMIS incorporate mobile, point-of-care charting and are highly configurable to meet the specific needs of individual respiratory care departments. Important and substantial benefits can be realized with an RCMIS and mobile, wireless charting devices. The initial and ongoing costs of an RCMIS are justified by increased charge capture and reduced costs, by way of improved productivity and efficiency. It is not unusual to recover the total cost of an RCMIS within the first year of its operation. In addition, such systems can facilitate and monitor patient-care protocols and help to efficiently manage the vast amounts of information encountered during the practitioner's workday. Respiratory care departments that invest in RCMIS have an advantage in the provision of quality care and in reducing expenses. A centralized respiratory therapy department with an RCMIS is the most efficient and cost-effective way to monitor work demand and manage the hospital-wide allocation of respiratory care services.

  3. Advancing Neurologic Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with a Neonatal Neurologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkey, Sarah B.; Swearingen, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal neurology is a growing sub-specialty area. Given the considerable amount of neurologic problems present in the neonatal intensive care unit, a neurologist with expertise in neonates is becoming more important. We sought to evaluate the change in neurologic care in the neonatal intensive care unit at our tertiary care hospital by having a dedicated neonatal neurologist. The period post-neonatal neurologist showed a greater number of neurology consultations (Pneurology encounters per patient (Pneurology became part of the multi-disciplinary team providing focused neurologic care to newborns. PMID:23271754

  4. Neonatal Informatics: Transforming Neonatal Care Through Translational Bioinformatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Jonathan P.; Benitz, William E.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Butte, Atul J.; Longhurst, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    The future of neonatal informatics will be driven by the availability of increasingly vast amounts of clinical and genetic data. The field of translational bioinformatics is concerned with linking and learning from these data and applying new findings to clinical care to transform the data into proactive, predictive, preventive, and participatory health. As a result of advances in translational informatics, the care of neonates will become more data driven, evidence based, and personalized. PMID:22924023

  5. Influence of mode of delivery at term on the neonatal respiratory morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehdashtian, M.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory morbidity is an important complication of elective cesarean section. Our objective was to find out the incidence of respiratory distress in term neonates delivered by elective cesarean section and compare it with neonates delivered vaginally. We evaluated one thousands infants delivered by elective cesarean section and normal vaginal delivery for respiratory distress. Among 500 cesarean done, 27 (5.4%) neonates had respiratory distress and among 500 vaginal delivery infants, 8(1.6%) developed respiratory Distress (P<0.001). The odd ratio for neonatal respiratory distress was 3.38, almost threefold higher in cesarean section group than those delivered vaginally. (author)

  6. Neonatal respiratory distress secondary to nasal fibrous histiocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, C F; Nagle, R B; Crone, R

    1987-08-01

    A full term one-day-old neonate developed respiratory distress secondary to a right intranasal mass. After exploratory craniotomy revealed no intracranial lesions, the child was observed for 6 months. At that time he experienced severe apnea with cyanosis necessitating removal of the mass, which was diagnosed histologically as a fibrous histiocytoma. Seven year follow-up reveals no further problems. A discussion of fibrous histiocytoma of the nose and paranasal sinuses is briefly given.

  7. Teamwork in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Vanessa Maziero

    2013-01-01

    Medical and technological advances in neonatology have prompted the initiation and expansion of developmentally supportive services for newborns and have incorporated rehabilitation professionals into the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) multidisciplinary team. Availability of therapists specialized in the care of neonates, the roles of…

  8. Efficacy of a low-cost bubble CPAP system in treatment of respiratory distress in a neonatal ward in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondwani Kawaza

    Full Text Available Respiratory failure is a leading cause of neonatal mortality in the developing world. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP is a safe, effective intervention for infants with respiratory distress and is widely used in developed countries. Because of its high cost, bCPAP is not widely utilized in low-resource settings. We evaluated the performance of a new bCPAP system to treat severe respiratory distress in a low resource setting, comparing it to nasal oxygen therapy, the current standard of care.We conducted a non-randomized convenience sample study to test the efficacy of a low-cost bCPAP system treating newborns with severe respiratory distress in the neonatal ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, in Blantyre, Malawi. Neonates weighing >1,000 g and presenting with severe respiratory distress who fulfilled inclusion criteria received nasal bCPAP if a device was available; if not, they received standard care. Clinical assessments were made during treatment and outcomes compared for the two groups.87 neonates (62 bCPAP, 25 controls were recruited. Survival rate for neonates receiving bCPAP was 71.0% (44/62 compared with 44.0% (11/25 for controls. 65.5% (19/29 of very low birth weight neonates receiving bCPAP survived to discharge compared to 15.4% (1/13 of controls. 64.6% (31/48 of neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS receiving bCPAP survived to discharge, compared to 23.5% (4/17 of controls. 61.5% (16/26 of neonates with sepsis receiving bCPAP survived to discharge, while none of the seven neonates with sepsis in the control group survived.Use of a low-cost bCPAP system to treat neonatal respiratory distress resulted in 27% absolute improvement in survival. The beneficial effect was greater for neonates with very low birth weight, RDS, or sepsis. Implementing appropriate bCPAP devices could reduce neonatal mortality in developing countries.

  9. Efficacy of a low-cost bubble CPAP system in treatment of respiratory distress in a neonatal ward in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaza, Kondwani; Machen, Heather E; Brown, Jocelyn; Mwanza, Zondiwe; Iniguez, Suzanne; Gest, Al; Smith, E O'Brian; Oden, Maria; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory failure is a leading cause of neonatal mortality in the developing world. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) is a safe, effective intervention for infants with respiratory distress and is widely used in developed countries. Because of its high cost, bCPAP is not widely utilized in low-resource settings. We evaluated the performance of a new bCPAP system to treat severe respiratory distress in a low resource setting, comparing it to nasal oxygen therapy, the current standard of care. We conducted a non-randomized convenience sample study to test the efficacy of a low-cost bCPAP system treating newborns with severe respiratory distress in the neonatal ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, in Blantyre, Malawi. Neonates weighing >1,000 g and presenting with severe respiratory distress who fulfilled inclusion criteria received nasal bCPAP if a device was available; if not, they received standard care. Clinical assessments were made during treatment and outcomes compared for the two groups. 87 neonates (62 bCPAP, 25 controls) were recruited. Survival rate for neonates receiving bCPAP was 71.0% (44/62) compared with 44.0% (11/25) for controls. 65.5% (19/29) of very low birth weight neonates receiving bCPAP survived to discharge compared to 15.4% (1/13) of controls. 64.6% (31/48) of neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving bCPAP survived to discharge, compared to 23.5% (4/17) of controls. 61.5% (16/26) of neonates with sepsis receiving bCPAP survived to discharge, while none of the seven neonates with sepsis in the control group survived. Use of a low-cost bCPAP system to treat neonatal respiratory distress resulted in 27% absolute improvement in survival. The beneficial effect was greater for neonates with very low birth weight, RDS, or sepsis. Implementing appropriate bCPAP devices could reduce neonatal mortality in developing countries.

  10. Specialist teams for neonatal transport to neonatal intensive care units for prevention of morbidity and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Alvin S M; Berry, Andrew; Jones, Lisa J; Sivasangari, Subramaniam

    2015-10-28

    Maternal antenatal transfers provide better neonatal outcomes. However, there will inevitably be some infants who require acute transport to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Because of this, many institutions develop services to provide neonatal transport by specially trained health personnel. However, few studies report on relevant clinical outcomes in infants requiring transport to NICU. To determine the effects of specialist transport teams compared with non-specialist transport teams on the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity among high-risk newborn infants requiring transport to neonatal intensive care. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2015, Issue 7), MEDLINE (1966 to 31 July 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 31 July 2015), CINAHL (1982 to 31 July 2015), conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. randomised, quasi-randomised or cluster randomised controlled trials. neonates requiring transport to a neonatal intensive care unit. transport by a specialist team compared to a non-specialist team. any of the following outcomes - death; adverse events during transport leading to respiratory compromise; and condition on admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. The methodological quality of the trials was assessed using the information provided in the studies and by personal communication with the author. Data on relevant outcomes were extracted and the effect size estimated and reported as risk ratio (RR), risk difference (RD), number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) or number needed to treat for an additional harmful outcome (NNTH) and mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes. Data from cluster randomised trials were not combined for analysis. One trial met the inclusion criteria of this review but was considered ineligible owing to

  11. Respiratory Support for Pharmacologically Induced Hypoxia in Neonatal Calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Donnelly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Practical methods to provide respiratory support to bovine neonates in a field setting are poorly characterised. This study evaluated the response of healthy neonatal calves with pharmacologically induced respiratory suppression to nasal oxygen insufflation and to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP delivered via an off-the-shelf device. Ten calves were randomised to receive either nasal oxygen insufflation (Group 1, n=5 or CPAP (Group 2, n=5 as a first treatment after induction of respiratory depression by intravenous administration of xylazine, fentanyl, and diazepam. Calves received the alternate treatment after 10 minutes of breathing ambient air. Arterial blood gas samples were obtained prior to sedation, following sedation, following the first and second treatment, and after breathing ambient air before and after the second treatment. Oxygen insufflation significantly increased arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2 but was also associated with significant hypercapnia. When used as the first treatment, CPAP was associated with significantly decreased arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide but did not increase PaO2. These results suggest that the use of CPAP may represent a practical method for correction of hypercapnia associated with inadequate ventilation in a field setting, and further research is required to characterise the use of CPAP with increased inspired oxygen concentrations.

  12. Spectrum of neonatal diseases requiring respiratory support in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-08

    Aug 8, 2016 ... prematurity, infection and tetanus.4 Globally, three of these are also ..... of neonatal mortality and to a large extent similar to the global causes of ... care health work force as this is highly relevant to intro- duction of high level ...

  13. Neonatal Bacterial Colonization Predispose to Lower Respiratory Infections in Early Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa

    2014-01-01

    , and high sensitivity to respiratory, infectious and skin related illness. In particular, sensitivity on LRI was 96%. There was no evidence of bias from concurrent asthmatic disease or socioeconomic status. In conclusion, the study confirmed that COPSAC data is a valid source for investigating childhood......Lower respiratory infections (LRI) in childhood are common and account for considerable morbidity and health care utilization. The frequency of LRI varies significantly between otherwise healthy children, but extrinsic and intrinsic triggers of such variation are poorly understood. Traditionally...... neonatal airway colonization and risk of the LRI in a validated study cohort, and whether a possible association could be reflected in the early immune response to airway pathogens. In study I we aimed to ascertain the quality of information on child’s health, including asthma, allergy, eczema, respiratory...

  14. A rare cause of respiratory distress and edema in neonate: Panhypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Fatma; Kirmizibekmez, Heves; Metin, Fazilet

    2017-01-01

    Clinical presentation of hypopituitarism may be variable in the neonate. Symptoms are generally nonspecific, ranging from absent to severe, and even life-threatening, due to adrenocorticotrophic hormone deficiency. Presently described is a case of unexplained respiratory distress and edema in a neonate. Initial screening revealed panhypopituitarism. Respiratory distress improved after replacement treatment with hydrocortisone and thyroxine.

  15. The Role of Heated Humidified High-flow Nasal Cannula as Noninvasive Respiratory Support in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Yun Chao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC has been introduced and applied as a noninvasive respiratory support in neonates. Although HHHFNC is widely used in neonates presenting with respiratory distress, the efficiency and safety when compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation are still controversial. This review aims to evaluate the performance and applications of HHHFNC in neonates.

  16. European consensus guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants - 2010 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the perinatal management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), controversies still exist. We report the updated recommendations of a European panel of expert neonatologists who had developed consensus guidelines after critical examination of the most up-to-date....... For babies with RDS to have best outcomes, it is essential that they have optimal supportive care, including maintenance of a normal body temperature, proper fluid management, good nutritional support, management of the ductus arteriosus and support of the circulation to maintain adequate tissue perfusion....

  17. Outcome of neonates with idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome; where do we go wrong?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MBKC Dayasiri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background This study focuses on assessing the modifiable risk factors, which are aetiologic in IRDS and the outcome of children who were treated with surfactant therapy. Methods All neonates received by the neonatal intensive care of Anuradhapura teaching hospital with early onset respiratory distress leading to surfactant therapy and among whom chest roentgenograms were supportive of a diagnosis of IRDS, were recruited to study. Appropriate information regarding antenatal and perinatal care, NICU management, complications, and outcomes were collected using a structured questionnaire by the investigators prospectively for one year from January 2012 and retrospectively for the calendar year 2011. Results Seventy one neonates were treated for two year study period and 45(63.4% were males. Antenatal problems included poor antenatal follow up 5(7% and bad obstetric history 3(4.2% with only 52 (73.2% mothers receiving antenatal steroids. Perinatal problems included eclampsia 8 (11.3%, abruption 5(7% and fetal distress 2(2.8% with 23(32.4% children needing resuscitation at birth. The proportion of pulmonary haemorrhage following surfactant was 14/71(19.7%. Twenty three children (32.4% were discharged lively and successfully, while 48 children (67.6% succumbed secondary to extreme prematurity (maturity < 28 weeks and IRDS 34(70.8%, pulmonary haemorrage 8(17%, septicaemia 8(17%, and severe birth asphyxia 2(4.1%. Conclusion Antenatal glucocorticoids to preterm deliveries, management of maternal medical problems, and control of sepsis in NICU need further improvement to optimize care and to bring down neonatal mortality following IRDS. As pulmonary heamorrhage following surfactant therapy remains a significant factor in increasing neonatal mortality and reducing the weight of the recognized beneficial effects of surfactant, effectiveness of these low cost interventions should be further evaluated.

  18. Perinatal/Neonatal case presentation: pulmonary artery sling associated with respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, David; Ron, Nitin; Hromada, Andrew; Chhabra, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary artery sling is a very rare cause of pediatric respiratory distress. The estimated prevalence of the disease was first determined by Yu et al. in 2008 as 59 per million school-aged children. Associated symptoms are cough, wheezing, and feeding difficulty, all of which are common in routine outpatient pediatric clinical encounters. We report a case of a premature male neonate twin who was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit with respiratory distress and pneumothorax. His presentation, as well as the etiology of his pulmonary disease, was felt to be consistent with those of numerous other premature infants. Akin to this was his delayed discharge on account of his slow progress with oral feeding. Parents gave a history of tachypnea and feeding difficulty to his doctors. He presented twice to the emergency room in respiratory distress. At 4 months of age, while in hospital for a pulmonary infection, he had an echocardiogram that revealed a pulmonary artery sling. We review the literature on this vascular anomaly, discuss its diagnosis and management, and critique the clinical thinking that determined this child's course from the perspective of availability heuristics.

  19. MEchatronic REspiratory System SImulator for Neonatal Applications (MERESSINA) project: a novel bioengineering goal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzo, Rosa T; Ciantelli, Massimiliano; Baldoli, Ilaria; Bellanti, Lisa; Gentile, Marzia; Cecchi, Francesca; Sigali, Emilio; Tognarelli, Selene; Ghirri, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Menciassi, Arianna; Cuttano, Armando; Boldrini, Antonio; Laschi, Cecilia; Dario, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory function is mandatory for extrauterine life, but is sometimes impaired in newborns due to prematurity, congenital malformations, or acquired pathologies. Mechanical ventilation is standard care, but long-term complications, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, are still largely reported. Therefore, continuous medical education is mandatory to correctly manage devices for assistance. Commercially available breathing function simulators are rarely suitable for the anatomical and physiological realities. The aim of this study is to develop a high-fidelity mechatronic simulator of neonatal airways and lungs for staff training and mechanical ventilator testing. The project is divided into three different phases: (1) a review study on respiratory physiology and pathophysiology and on already available single and multi-compartment models; (2) the prototyping phase; and (3) the on-field system validation. PMID:23966804

  20. Respiratory and metabolic acidosis differentially affect the respiratory neuronal network in the ventral medulla of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yasumasa; Masumiya, Haruko; Tamura, Yoshiyasu; Oku, Yoshitaka

    2007-11-01

    Two respiratory-related areas, the para-facial respiratory group/retrotrapezoid nucleus (pFRG/RTN) and the pre-Bötzinger complex/ventral respiratory group (preBötC/VRG), are thought to play key roles in respiratory rhythm. Because respiratory output patterns in response to respiratory and metabolic acidosis differ, we hypothesized that the responses of the medullary respiratory neuronal network to respiratory and metabolic acidosis are different. To test these hypotheses, we analysed respiratory-related activity in the pFRG/RTN and preBötC/VRG of the neonatal rat brainstem-spinal cord in vitro by optical imaging using a voltage-sensitive dye, and compared the effects of respiratory and metabolic acidosis on these two populations. We found that the spatiotemporal responses of respiratory-related regional activities to respiratory and metabolic acidosis are fundamentally different, although both acidosis similarly augmented respiratory output by increasing respiratory frequency. PreBötC/VRG activity, which is mainly inspiratory, was augmented by respiratory acidosis. Respiratory-modulated pixels increased in the preBötC/VRG area in response to respiratory acidosis. Metabolic acidosis shifted the respiratory phase in the pFRG/RTN; the pre-inspiratory dominant pattern shifted to inspiratory dominant. The responses of the pFRG/RTN activity to respiratory and metabolic acidosis are complex, and involve either augmentation or reduction in the size of respiratory-related areas. Furthermore, the activation pattern in the pFRG/RTN switched bi-directionally between pre-inspiratory/inspiratory and post-inspiratory. Electrophysiological study supported the results of our optical imaging study. We conclude that respiratory and metabolic acidosis differentially affect activities of the pFRG/RTN and preBötC/VRG, inducing switching and shifts of the respiratory phase. We suggest that they differently influence the coupling states between the pFRG/RTN and preBötC/VRG.

  1. Parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit: a phenomenological hermeneutical interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellenmark-Blom, Michaela; Wigert, Helena

    2014-03-01

    A descriptive study of parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit. As survival rates improve among premature and critically ill infants with an increased risk of morbidity, parents' responsibilities for neonatal care grow in scope and degree under the banner of family-centred care. Concurrent with medical advances, new questions arise about the role of parents and the experience of being provided neonatal care at home. An interview study with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Parents from a Swedish neonatal (n = 22) home care setting were extensively interviewed within one year of discharge. Data were collected during 2011-2012. The main theme of the findings is that parents experience neonatal home care as an inner emotional journey, from having a child to being a parent. This finding derives from three themes: the parents' experience of leaving the hospital milieu in favour of establishing independent parenthood, maturing as a parent and processing experiences during the period of neonatal intensive care. This study suggests that neonatal home care is experienced as a care structure adjusted to incorporate parents' needs following discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal home care appears to bridge the gap between hospital and home, supporting the family's adaptation to life in the home setting. Parents become empowered to be primary caregivers, having nurse consultants serving the needs of the whole family. Neonatal home care may therefore be understood as the implementation of family-centred care during the transition from NICU to home. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Computed radiography in neonatal intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, L.; Bighi, S.; Cervi, P.M.; Lupi, L.

    1991-01-01

    The Authors report their experience in the employment of a computerized digital radiographic system in Neonatal Intensive Care. The analog screen-film system is replaced by photosensitive imaging plates, scanned after X-ray exposure by a laser that releases the digital image, which can then be manipulated on computer work-stations. In a period of twelve months about 200 chest-abdomen X-ray examinations in Neonatal Intensive Care have been performed using this method with good technical and diagnostic results. The use of digital radiography in the neonatal area is of high interest: this system produces good quality images, there is a reduction in radiation dose and 'retakes', the system allows selective enhancement of different structures and their magnification. (orig.)

  3. Factors associated with mortality in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emília Cavalcante Valença Fernandes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To describe the factors associated with mortality of newborns hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in the period from 2012 to 2015. Methods: This was a descriptive, quantitative study of secondary data, correlated with the causes of death and hospitalization according to classification by ICD-10.  The categorical variables were presented in absolute and relative frequencies, with measurements of central tendency and dispersion. Evaluation of the factors associated with neonatal death was made by the logit model of analysis with correction of robust errors by the statistical program Stata 12.0, considering values of p<0.05 and interval of confidence of 95%.  Results: Of the 563 newborns, 58.6% were of the male sex; 89.0% were early newborns, 73.0% were premature. 181 newborns died (32.3%. The main causes of hospitalization were: difficulties during birth, conditions of birth and immaturity (45.0%, pathologies associated with the respiratory system (21.1%, congenital malformations (9.7%. The main causes of death were: septicemia of the NB (40.4%, respiratory discomfort of the NB (22.4%. The significant associations for mortality were the use of ventilatory supports: Mechanical Ventilation (p=0.001, Hallo (p=0.000, CPAP (p=0.000, VNI (p=0.005. Conclusions: The major risk factors for neonatal mortality were associated with septicemia and use of mechanical ventilation.

  4. Exposure assessment of neonates in israel to x-ray radiation during hospitalization at neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datz, H.

    2005-03-01

    Nowadays nearly 10% of all births in western countries are premature. In the last decade, there has been an increase of 45% in the number of neonates that were born in Israel. At the same time, the survival of neonates, especially those with very low birth weight, VLBW, (less than 1,500 gr), has increased dramatically. Diagnostic radiology plays an important role in the assessment and treatment of neonates requiring intensive care. During their prolonged and complex hospitalization, these infants are exposed to multiple radiographic examinations involving X-ray radiation. The extent of the examinations that the infant undergoes depends on its birth weight, gestational age and its medical problems, where most of the treatment effort is focused especially on VLBW neonates. Most of the diagnostic X-ray examinations taken during the hospitalization of neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) consist of imaging of the respiratory and gastrointestinal systems, namely, the chest and abdomen. The imaging process is done using mobile X-ray units located at the NICUs. Due to their long hospitalization periods and complex medical condition, all neonates, and neonates with VLBW in particular, are exposed to a much higher level of diagnostic radiation, compared to normal newborns. The goal of this research was to assess the extent of the exposure of neonates in Israel to X-ray radiation during their hospitalization at the neonatal intensive care unit. Five NICUs, located at different geographical zones in Israel and treating 20% of all newborns in Israel every year, participated in this research. The research was conducted in three phases: Phase I: Collection of information on radiographic techniques and exposure parameters (e.g. kV, mAs, focus to skin distance (FSD), examination borders). 499 X-ray examinations (from 157 neonates) were evaluated for necessary and unnecessary exposure of the neonate's organs to X-ray radiation during these examinations. Phase II

  5. Partnering for optimal respiratory home care: physicians working with respiratory therapists to optimally meet respiratory home care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, G; Petty, T L

    2001-05-01

    The need for respiratory care services continues to increase, reimbursement for those services has decreased, and cost-containment measures have increased the frequency of home health care. Respiratory therapists are well qualified to provide home respiratory care, reduce misallocation of respiratory services, assess patient respiratory status, identify problems and needs, evaluate the effect of the home setting, educate the patient on proper equipment use, monitor patient response to and complications of therapy, monitor equipment functioning, monitor for appropriate infection control procedures, make recommendations for changes to therapy regimen, and adjust therapy under the direction of the physician. Teamwork benefits all parties and offers cost and time savings, improved data collection and communication, higher job satisfaction, and better patient monitoring, education, and quality of life. Respiratory therapists are positioned to optimize treatment efficacy, maximize patient compliance, and minimize hospitalizations among patients receiving respiratory home care.

  6. Comparison of the Therapeutic Effects of Bubble CPAP and Ventilator CPAP on Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Premature Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Noori Shadkam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory distress syndrome is one of the main complications associated with low birth weight, and a main cause of mortality in premature neonates. The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of ventilator continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP and bubble CPAP in the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS in premature neonates. Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 119 neonates diagnosed with RDS, with the gestational age of 28-34 weeks and birth weight of 1000-2200 grams, who were admitted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Infants were allocated to two groups of ventilator CPAP (VCPAP and bubble CPAP (BCPAP therapy. Results: Mean weight, gestational age, and one-minute Apgar score were not significantly different between the two groups. However, duration of treatment with mechanical ventilation in the BCPAP group was significantly lower compared to the VCPAP group. In addition, frequency of complications had no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion: In the treatment of RDS, duration of mechanical ventilation was lower in the BCPAP group compared to the VCPAP group in premature neonates

  7. Prevalence of streptococcus group B in tracheal tube secretions of neonates with respiratory distress: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi N

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with group B streptococcus (GBS can present with respiratory distress, Pneumonia, meningitis and Osteomyelitis in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of GBS colonization in trachea of intubated neonates.Methods: This observational analytic study was performed upon 33 intubated neonates due to respiratory distress in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU Rasoul Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2010-2012. Tracheal secretions cultured upon TODD-HEWITT BROTH and sheep blood agar 5%., chi-square test was used for compare the qualitative variables. P<0.05 was considered meaningful.Results: Three cases had positive streptococcal culture (9.1% and four cases had posi-tive culture for non-streptococcal organisms. no meaningful relation observed between positive GBS culture and neonatal gender, kind of delivery, PROM.Conclusion: Prevalence of GBS positive results (9% in present study is very close to GBS colonization in pregnant women; although the higher colonization rate of pregnant women are expected.

  8. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Reducing nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eileen; Alderdice, Fiona; McCall, Emma; Jenkins, John; Craig, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    Nosocomial infection is a common problem in neonatal intensive care. A pilot quality improvement initiative focussing on hand hygiene and aimed at reducing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants was introduced in five Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Line associated laboratory confirmed bloodstream infection (LCBSI) and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) were chosen as main outcome measures. In VLBW infants, the rate of line associated LCBSI per 1000 central venous catheter days fell by 24%. The rate of VAP per 1000 ventilator days in VLBW infants fell by 38%. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires showed a statistically significant increase in use of alcohol-based gels and increased knowledge of hand hygiene.

  10. Diagnostic Imaging of the Lower Respiratory Tract in Neonatal Foals: Radiography and Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Kara M; Joslyn, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays an essential role in the diagnosis and monitoring of lower respiratory disease in neonatal foals. Radiography is most widely available to equine practitioners and is the primary modality that has been used for the characterization of respiratory disease in foals. Computed tomography imaging, although still limited in availability to the general practitioner, offers advantages over radiography and has been used diagnostically in neonatal foals with respiratory disease. Recognition of appropriate imaging protocols and patient-associated artifacts is critical for accurate image interpretation regardless of the modality used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Incidence of respiratory disorders in neonates born between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation following exposure to antenatal corticosteroids between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventolini, Gary; Neiger, Ran; Mathews, Lindsey; Adragna, Norma; Belcastro, Marc

    2008-02-01

    We studied the effect of antenatal corticosteroids on the incidence of respiratory disorders in singleton neonates born between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation. Retrospective analysis was conducted of the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and other respiratory disorders (need for mechanical ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure, and prolonged oxygen therapy) among singleton neonates delivered between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation who were exposed to antenatal corticosteroids, compared with neonates who were not exposed. Statistical analyses included two-tailed T tests, two-way analysis of variance for continuous data, and chi-square analysis for ratios. A probability of 0.05 was considered significant. Between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2004, 1078 neonates were born between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation. Information regarding antenatal corticosteroids was available in 1044: 574 neonates (53.2%) were exposed to antenatal corticosteroids and 470 (43.6%) were not. One thousand and eighteen neonates were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Respiratory disorders were diagnosed in 140 of those exposed to antenatal steroids (24.4%) and in 382 of the nonexposed (81.3%) ( P < 0.0001). Two hundred and ten neonates (20.6%) developed RDS: Of those, 43 were exposed to antenatal corticosteroids and 167 were not (incidence of RDS was 7.5% and 35.5%, respectively; P = 0.0001). The beneficial effects of corticosteroids were similar in both genders. It appears that the exposure of singleton pregnancies to antenatal corticosteroids between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation is associated with a significantly lower incidence of respiratory disorders among neonates born at 34 to 36 weeks of gestation. Further studies are needed to determine whether administering antenatal steroids to women experiencing preterm labor after 34 weeks of gestation would be associated with a similar beneficial effect.

  12. MEchatronic REspiratory System SImulator for Neonatal Applications (MERESSINA project: a novel bioengineering goal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scaramuzzo RT

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa T Scaramuzzo,1,2 Massimiliano Ciantelli,1 Ilaria Baldoli,3 Lisa Bellanti,3 Marzia Gentile,1 Francesca Cecchi,3 Emilio Sigali,1 Selene Tognarelli,3 Paolo Ghirri,1–4 Stefano Mazzoleni,3 Arianna Menciassi,3 Armando Cuttano,1 Antonio Boldrini,1–4 Cecilia Laschi,3 Paolo Dario3 1Centro di Formazione e Simulazione Neonatale "NINA," UO Neonatologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Pisa, Italy; 2Istituto di Scienze della Vita, 3The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa, Italy; 4Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Respiratory function is mandatory for extrauterine life, but is sometimes impaired in newborns due to prematurity, congenital malformations, or acquired pathologies. Mechanical ventilation is standard care, but long-term complications, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, are still largely reported. Therefore, continuous medical education is mandatory to correctly manage devices for assistance. Commercially available breathing function simulators are rarely suitable for the anatomical and physiological realities. The aim of this study is to develop a high-fidelity mechatronic simulator of neonatal airways and lungs for staff training and mechanical ventilator testing. The project is divided into three different phases: (1 a review study on respiratory physiology and pathophysiology and on already available single and multi-compartment models; (2 the prototyping phase; and (3 the on-field system validation. Keywords: simulation, lung, newborn, continuous medical education, respiratory system

  13. Management of neonatal jaundice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Wan Seng Lian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Practice Guidelines on Management of Neonatal Jaundice 2003 was updated by a multidisciplinary development group and approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia in 2014. A systematic review of 13 clinical questions was conducted using evidence retrieved mainly from Medline and Cochrane databases. Critical appraisal was done using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Recommendations were formulated based on the accepted 103 evidences and tailored to local setting as stated below. Neonatal jaundice (NNJ is a common condition seen in primary care. Multiple risk factors contribute to severe NNJ, which if untreated can lead to adverse neurological outcomes. Visual assessment, transcutaneous bilirubinometer (TcB and total serum bilirubin (TSB are the methods used for the detection of NNJ. Phototherapy remains the mainstay of the treatment. Babies with severe NNJ should be followed-up to detect and manage sequelae. Strategies to prevent severe NNJ include health education, identification of risk factors, proper assessment and early referral.

  14. [Neonatal palliative care and culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bétrémieux, P; Mannoni, C

    2013-09-01

    The period of palliative care is a difficult time for parents and caregivers because they are all weakened by the proximity of death. First of all, because of religious and cultural differences, parents and families cannot easily express their beliefs or the rituals they are required to develop; second, this impossibility results in conflicts between the caregiver team and the family with consequences for both. Caregivers are concerned to allow the expression of religious beliefs and cultural demands because it is assumed that they may promote the work of mourning by relating the dead child to its family and roots. However, caregivers' fear not knowing the cultural context to which the family belongs and having inappropriate words or gestures, as sometimes families dare not, cannot, or do not wish to describe their cultural background. We attempt to differentiate what relates to culture and to religion and attempt to identify areas of potential disagreement between doctors, staff, and family. Everyone has to work with the parents to open a space of freedom that is not limited by cultural and religious assumptions. The appropriation of medical anthropology concepts allows caregivers to understand simply the obligations imposed on parents by their culture and/or their religion and open access to their wishes. Sometimes help from interpreters, mediators, ethnopsychologists, and religious representatives is needed to understand this reality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care: Prevalence, Prevention and Antibiotic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogen, A.

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal infections are an important cause of morbidity in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Prematurity or very low birth weight is an important predisposing factor for neonatal infection. In addition, preterm infants have a compromized immune system and they often require invasive procedures

  16. Challenges and opportunities for neonatal respiratory support in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neonatal health appears not to have received the deserved attention in the context of the Child Survival Strategies and this must have contributed to the non-attainment of the MDG-4 in Nigeria. Neonatal mortality contributes 40% or more to the current rate of child deaths globally, with birth asphyxia, prematurity ...

  17. [Recommendations for analgesia and sedation in neonatal intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawicz, Marcin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to present recommendations, relevant to the management of neonates and infants aged 0-1 years, treated in intensive care settings. They include general principles and recommendations for pain and sedation assessment, sedation and pain management and advice on the use of pharmacological strategies. The bolus (on demand) administration of sedative agents should be avoided because of increased risk of cardiovascular depression and/or neurological complications. Midazolam administration time should be limited to 72 hours because of tachyphylaxis, and the possibility of development of a withdrawal syndrome and neurological complications (grade A, LOE 1b). The level of sedation and pain should be regularly assessed and documented, using presented scales; the COMFORT scale is preferred. Opioids, given in continuous infusion, are the drugs of choice for neonatal sedation. To avoid withdrawal syndrome, the total doses and time of administration of sedative agents should be limited. Methadone is a drug of choice in the treatment of a withdrawal (Grade B, LOE 2). Intravenous ketamine is recommended, when short-term sedation/anaesthesia is required (Grade C, LOE 3) for painful and/or stressful intensive care procedures. (Grade C, LOE 2). Muscle relaxants should be used for endotracheal intubation and in the situations when mechanical ventilation is not possible due to maximal respiratory effort of the patient.

  18. Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    mortality and they have been the reasons for the wide variation in mortality rates among the health facilities reporting. Objective: ... A study in Indonesia about determinants of neonatal ..... antenatal visit, frequency of visits and administration of.

  19. Surfactant Apoprotein D in Preterm Neonates with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the production of surfactant apoprotein D in preterm neonates with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS during artificial ventilation (AV. Subjects and methods. The paper presents the results of studying the production of surfactant protein D (SP-D in various biological fluids in 44 preterm neonates. Two groups of newborn infants were identified according to the clinical manifestations of ARDS. The study group comprised 25 infants with the severe course of the disease, in this connection the preventive administration of the exogenous surfactant Curosurf and AV were made in all the neonates at birth. The control group included 19 preterm babies without signs of ARDS. Results. The study has demonstrated that in parturients and preterm neonatal infants, surfactant apoprotein D is detectable in various biological fluids: amniotic fluid, the gastric aspirate obtained just after birth, residual umbilical cord blood, serum following 8 hours of birth, and bronchoalveolar fluid. Despite the low gestational age of the neonates, the lung surfactant system is able to produce SP-D, as evidenced by its high content in the amniotic fluid and residual umbilical cord blood of preterm neonates. The production of apoprotein D in preterm neonates considerably reduces in the next few hours after birth. Conclusion. The findings suggest that fetal tissues generate SP-D, which improves pulmonary gas exchange in preterm neonates in the first hours after birth and that alveolar-capillary membrane dysfunctions are transient in the neonates on AV. Key words: preterm neonates, acute respiratory distress syndrome, surfactant, surfactant apoprotein D.

  20. Neonatal respiratory syncytial virus infection: role of transplacentally and breast milk-acquired antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, D T; Ogra, P L

    1986-01-01

    The effect of transplacentally and breast milk-acquired antibodies on respiratory syncytial virus infection was studied in neonatal and 2-month-old cotton rats. Adult female rats infected intranasally with live virus regularly produced virus-specific antibodies in the serum, colostrum, and breast milk. By using foster feeding techniques, we showed that both transplacentally and breast milk-acquired antibodies were effective in reducing the replication of respiratory syncytial virus in the lun...

  1. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Samiee-Zafarghandy; S.R. Raman (Sudha R.); J.N. van den Anker (John); K. McHutchison (Kerstin); C.P. Hornik; R.H. Clark; P.B. Smith; D.K. Benjamin (Daniel K.); K. Berezny (Katherine); J. Barrett (Jeffrey); E.V. Capparelli (Edmund); M. Cohen-Wolkowiez (Michael); G.L. Kearns (Greg); M. Laughon (Matthew); A. Muelenaer (Andre); T. Michael O'Shea; I.M. Paul (Ian M.); K. Wade (Kelly); T.J. Walsh (Thomas J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10. years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: We conducted a

  2. Empowerment of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents of infants who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to be empowered to improve bonding, attachment and care-giving skills. Neonatal nurses play a critical role in the empowerment of such parents, but often find it difficult due to a lack of clarity on how it has to be done. A qualitative contextual ...

  3. Job satisfaction of neonatal intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katie; Rubarth, Lori Baas; Miers, Linda J

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the job satisfaction of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses in the Midwestern United States. The factors explored in job satisfaction were monetary compensation (pay), job stress, caring for patients in stressful situations, level of autonomy, organizational support, level of knowledge of the specialty, work environment, staffing levels, communication with physicians, communication with neonatal nurse practitioners, interdisciplinary communication, team spirit, and the amount of required "floating" to other nursing units. Participants were 109 NICU nurses working as either staff nurses (n = 72) or advanced practice nurses (n = 37). Of the participants, 96% worked in a level 3 NICU. A descriptive, correlational design was used to study job satisfaction among NICU nurses. Nurses were recruited at 2 regional NICU conferences in 2009 and 2010. The questionnaire was a researcher-developed survey consisting of 14 questions in a Likert-type response rating 1 to 5, with an area for comments. Descriptive statistics and correlations were used to analyze the resulting data. The majority of participants were moderately satisfied overall in their current position and workplace (mean ranking = 4.07 out of 5.0). Kendall's Tau b (TB) revealed that the strongest positive correlations were between organizational support and team spirit with overall job satisfaction (TB = 0.53). : The individual factors with the highest mean scores were caring for patients in a stressful situation, level of autonomy, and communication between nurses and neonatal nurse practitioners. This indicates that our population of NICU nurses feels most satisfied caring for patients in stressful situations (m = 4.48), are satisfied with their level of autonomy (M = 4.17), and are satisfied with the interdisciplinary communication in their units (m = 4.13). Nurses in the NICU are relatively satisfied with their jobs. The small sample size (n = 109) of Midwest NICU

  4. Fluoxetine treatment abolishes the in vitro respiratory response to acidosis in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voituron, Nicolas; Shvarev, Yuri; Menuet, Clément; Bevengut, Michelle; Fasano, Caroline; Vigneault, Erika; El Mestikawy, Salah; Hilaire, Gérard

    2010-10-26

    To secure pH homeostasis, the central respiratory network must permanently adapt its rhythmic motor drive to environment and behaviour. In neonates, it is commonly admitted that the retrotrapezoid/parafacial respiratory group of neurons of the ventral medulla plays the primary role in the respiratory response to acidosis, although the serotonergic system may also contribute to this response. Using en bloc medullary preparations from neonatal mice, we have shown for the first time that the respiratory response to acidosis is abolished after pre-treatment with the serotonin-transporter blocker fluoxetine (25-50 µM, 20 min), a commonly used antidepressant. Using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunohistology, we have also shown the expression of the serotonin transporter mRNA and serotonin-containing neurons in the vicinity of the RTN/pFRG of neonatal mice. These results reveal that the serotonergic system plays a pivotal role in pH homeostasis. Although obtained in vitro in neonatal mice, they suggest that drugs targeting the serotonergic system should be used with caution in infants, pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers.

  5. Challenges and opportunities for neonatal respiratory support in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-07

    Dec 7, 2015 ... This population of babies is predis- posed to Respiratory Distress ... Given the state of the economy in the low- and middle- income countries, Nigeria, like .... tation, general increase in birth rates, urbanisation, increase health ...

  6. Birth Tourism and Neonatal Intensive Care: A Children's Hospital Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhael, Michel; Cleary, John P; Dhar, Vijay; Chen, Yanjun; Nguyen, Danh V; Chang, Anthony C

    2016-12-01

    Objective  The aim of this article is to examine characteristics of birth tourism (BT) neonates admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods  This was a retrospective review over 3 years; BT cases were identified, and relevant perinatal, medical, social, and financial data were collected and compared with 100 randomly selected non-birth tourism neonates. Results  A total of 46 BT neonates were identified. They were more likely to be born to older women (34 vs. 29 years; p  impacts on families, health care system, and society. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Role of transabdominal ultrasound of lung bases and follow-up in premature neonates with respiratory distress soon after birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahuja, Chirag Kamal; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Sodhi, Kushaljeet Singh; Kumar, Praveen; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2012-01-01

    Chest radiography has been the traditional method of diagnostic evaluation of patients of hyaline membrane disease (HMD). Lung sonography (USG) has been lately explored as an alternative modality. To explore the application of transabdominal USG of lung bases (TASL) in the evaluation of HMD in premature neonates with respiratory distress soon after birth. Tertiary care institutional setup. Study duration–18 months. Follow-up–variable, up to 1 month. Prospective descriptive study. Eighty-eight consecutive patients admitted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with gestational age <32 weeks having respiratory distress within 6 h of birth were enrolled. The diagnosis of HMD was made if the patient had negative gastric shake test and/or suggestive chest radiograph. TASL was performed in all patients within the first 24 h of life and biweekly subsequently. USG was interpreted as normal, HMD pattern, or broncho-pulmonary dysplasia (BPD) pattern. Biweekly follow-up was done for patients showing HMD till normalization of the sonographic HMD pattern, development of the sonographic BPD pattern, or death/discharge of the neonate from the hospital. TASL showed 85.7% sensitivity, 75% specificity, 88.88% positive predictive value, and 69.2% negative predictive value for the diagnosis of HMD. The abnormal sonographic findings on day 14 had 94.1% accuracy for prediction of eventual occurrence of clinical BPD. TASL is complementary to chest radiograph in the diagnosis of HMD. It is also useful for the early prediction of BPD with the potential of reducing the cumulative radiation dose to these neonates

  8. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Sah Ipek

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common micr...

  9. Noise in contemporary neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amber L; van Drongelen, Wim; Lasky, Robert E

    2007-05-01

    Weekly sound surveys (n = 63) were collected, using 5 s sampling intervals, for two modern neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Median weekly equivalent sound pressure levels (LEQ) for NICU A ranged from 61 to 63 dB (A weighted), depending on the level of care. NICU B L(EQ) measurements ranged from 55 to 60 dB (A weighted). NICU B was recently built with a focus on sound abatement, explaining much of the difference between the two NICUs. Sound levels exceeded 45 dB (A weighted), recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, more than 70% of the time for all levels of care. Hourly L(EQ)s below 50 dB (A weighted) and hourly L10s below 55 dB (A weighted), recommended by the Sound Study Group (SSG) of the National Resource Center, were also exceeded in more than 70% of recorded samples. A third SSG recommendation, that the 1 s L(MAX), should not exceed 70 dB (A weighted), was exceeded relatively infrequently (< 11% of the time). Peak impulse measurements exceeded 90 dB for 6.3% of 5 s samples recorded from NICU A and 2.8% of NICU B samples. Twenty-four h periodicities in sound levels as a function of regular staff activities were apparent, but short-term variability was considerable.

  10. Prenatal and neonatal adaptations with a focus on the respiratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, C I; Silva, L C G; Lúcio, C F; Regazzi, F M; Veiga, G A L; Angrimani, D S

    2012-12-01

    Among the modifications that occur during the neonatal period, pulmonary development is the most critical. The neonate's lungs must be able to perform adequate gas exchange, which was previously accomplished by the placenta. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome is defined as insufficient surfactant production or pulmonary structural immaturity and is specifically relevant to preterm newborns. Prenatal maternal betamethasone treatment of bitches at 55 days of gestation leads to structural changes in the neonatal lung parenchyma and consequently an improvement in the preterm neonatal respiratory condition, but not to an increase in pulmonary surfactant production. Parturition represents an important challenge to neonatal adaptation, as the uterine and abdominal contractions during labour provoke intermittent hypoxia. Immediately after birth, puppies present venous mixed acidosis (low blood pH and high dioxide carbon saturation) and low but satisfactory Apgar scores. Thus, the combination of physiological hypoxia during birth and the initial effort of filling the pulmonary alveoli with oxygen results in anaerobiosis. As a neonatal adaptation follow-up, the Apgar analysis indicates a tachypnoea response after 1 h of life, which leads to a shift in the blood acid-base status to metabolic acidosis. One hour is sufficient for canine neonates to achieve an ideal Apgar score; however, a haemogasometric imbalance persists. Dystocia promotes a long-lasting bradycardia effect, slows down Apgar score progression and aggravates metabolic acidosis and stress. The latest data reinforce the need to accurately intervene during canine parturition and offer adequate medical treatment to puppies that underwent a pathological labour. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. Bubble CPAP versus ventilator CPAP in preterm neonates with early onset respiratory distress--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagare, Amit; Kadam, Sandeep; Vaidya, Umesh; Pandit, Anand; Patole, Sanjay

    2013-04-01

    Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) is a low cost nasal CPAP delivery system with potential benefits to developing nations. To compare the efficacy and safety of BCPAP with ventilator-derived CPAP (VCPAP) in preterm neonates with respiratory distress. In a randomized controlled trial, preterm neonates with Silverman-Anderson score ≥ 4 and oxygen requirement >30% within first 6 h of life were randomly allocated to BCPAP or VCPAP. Proportion of neonates with success or failure was compared. In all, 47 of 57 (82.5%) neonates from BCPAP group and 36 of 57 (63.2%) neonates from the VCPAP group completed CPAP successfully (p = 0.03). Neonates who failed CPAP had higher Silverman-Anderson score (p neonates with early onset respiratory distress, with comparable safety.

  12. Radiation doses to neonates requiring intensive care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.; Dellagrammaticas, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    Radiological investigations have become accepted as an important part of the range of facilities required to support severely ill newborn babies. Since the infants are so small, many of the examinations are virtually ''whole-body'' irradiations and it was thought that the total doses received might be appreciable. A group of such babies admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Sheffield over a six-month period have been studied. X-ray exposure factors used for each examination have been noted and total skin, gonad and bone marrow doses calculated, supplemented by measurements on phantoms. It is concluded that in most cases doses received are of the same order as those received over the same period from natural background radiation and probably less than those received from prenatal obstetric radiography, so that the additional risks from the diagnostic exposure are small. The highest doses are received in CT scans and barium examinations and it is recommended that the need for these should be carefully considered. (author)

  13. Epidural analgesia, neonatal care and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Alighieri, Giovanni; Riccardi, Riccardo; Cavani, Maria; Iafisco, Alma; Cota, Francesco; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2014-11-29

    The objective of our study is to evaluate the correlation between epidural analgesia during labor, start of breastfeeding and type of maternal-neonatal care.Two different assistance models were considered: Partial and Full Rooming-in.In this cohort study, 2480 healthy infants were enrolled, 1519 in the Partial Rooming-in group and 1321 in the Full Rooming-in group; 1223 were born to women subjected to epidural analgesia in labor.In case of Partial Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is significant more frequent in newborns born to mothers who didn't receive analgesia. Instead, in case of Full Rooming-in the rate of exclusive or prevailing breastfeeding is almost the same and there's no correlation between the use or not of epidural analgesia.The good start of lactation and the success of breastfeeding seems to be guaranteed by the type of care offered to the couple mother-infant, that reverses any possible adverse effects of the use of epidural analgesia in labor.

  14. A low cost, simplified, and scaleable pneumotachograph and face mask for neonatal mouse respiratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jenny J; Nanu, Roshan; Ray, Russell S

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal respiratory disorders are a leading cause of perinatal mortality due to complications resulting from premature births and prenatal exposure to drugs of abuse, but optimal treatments for these symptoms are still unclear due to a variety of confounds and risk factors. Mouse models present an opportunity to study the underlying mechanisms and efficacy of potential treatments of these conditions with controlled variables. However, measuring respiration in newborn mice is difficult and commercial components are expensive and often require modification, creating a barrier and limiting our understanding of the short and long-term effects of birth complications on respiratory function. Here, we present an inexpensive and simple flow through pneumotachograph and face mask design that can be easily scaled for parallel, high-throughput assays measuring respiration in neonatal mouse pups. The final apparatus consists of three main parts: a water-jacketed chamber, an integrated support tray for the pup, and a pneumotachograph consisting of a two side-arm air channel that is attached to a pressure transducer. The pneumotach showed a linear response and clean, steady respiratory traces in which apneas and sighs were clearly visible. Administration of caffeine in P0.5 CD1 wildtype neonates resulted in an increase in tidal volume, minute ventilation, and minute ventilation normalized to oxygen consumption as well as a decrease in periodic instability. The described methods offer a relatively simple and inexpensive approach to constructing a pneumotachograph for non-invasive measurements of neonatal mouse respiration, enhancing accessibility and enabling the high-throughput and parallel characterizations of neonatal respiratory disorders and potential pharmacological therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. EFFECT OF KANGAROO MOTHER CARE ON OUTCOME IN PRETERM AND LOW BIRTH WEIGHT NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Sekhar Kondapalli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to study the effect of kangaroo mother care(KMC on preterm and LBW neonates’ vital parameters like temperature, respiratory rate, heart rate and oxygen saturation, establishment of breastfeeding and weight gain, morbidity and mortality, outcome in intramural and extramural neonates. MATERIALS AND METHODS Hospital-based prospective study, Katuri Medical College and Hospital, 300 newborns shifted to KMC ward. In our study group, female newborns were more than male newborns. Inborn were more than outborn, late preterm more than early preterm and term neonates. A significant increase in axillary temperature, increase in respiratory rate, decrease in heart rate and increase in oxygen saturation was seen in neonates. Higher proportion of neonates achieved transition from predominant expressed breast milk consumption to predominant direct breastfeeding during hospital stay. RESULTS The study showed significantly mean weight gain per day during in hospital KMC of 20 g/kg/day. Mean age when neonates started to gain weight was 8.5 days. Neonates were discharged early as they met our discharge criteria with mean age being 11.6 days. Morbidity of neonates requiring NICU admissions apart from LBW in our study were hyperbilirubinaemia (49.9%, sepsis (19.4%, respiratory illness (7.8% and hypothermia (6.4%. During KMC stay, sepsis and NEC seen in 2 each, apnoea, PDA, jaundice in one each and maternal acceptance of KMC was good. During follow up, it was observed that all neonates were exclusively breastfed and the rate of weight gain (148 g/week was satisfactory with an exception that only 8 requiring hospitalisation and only 1 death due to severe infection. The response of the family and/or the father was supportive. CONCLUSION KMC sustains improvement in LBW neonates’ physiological parameters and accelerates growth pattern. Practice of KMC promote breastfeeding, shorten hospital stay without compromising survival, growth

  16. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  17. Neonatal doses from X ray examinations by birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, K.; Akahane, K.; Aota, T.; Hada, M.; Takano, Y.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency and type of X ray examinations performed on neonates classified according to their birth weight in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). In this study, the radiology records of 2408 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Oita Prefectural Hospital between January 1994 and September 1999 were investigated. This study revealed that the neonates with earlier gestational ages and lower birth weights required longer NICU stays and more frequent X ray examinations made using a mobile X ray unit. The average number of X ray examinations performed on neonates of less than 750 g birth weight was 26 films per neonate. In regard to computed tomography and fluoroscopy, no significant relationship was found between the birth weight and number of X rays. This study revealed that the entrance-surface dose per neonate was dependent upon the birth weight, while the maximum dose was not dependent upon the birth weight. The average neonatal dose in the NICU was predominantly from computed tomography and fluoroscopy. The individual dose varied widely among neonates. (author)

  18. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.L. van Staa; O.K. Helder; J.C.M. Verweij

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five

  19. Membrane humidification--a new method for humidification of respiratory gases in ventilator treatment of neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssler, L; Tennhoff, W; Roll, C

    1992-01-01

    A humidifier system for neonatology that functions according to the 'membrane humidification' principle was subjected to a performance test in our laboratory. Humidification and heating of the respiratory gases took place in a module consisting of a net of hollow fibres placed inside the incubator. In 18 measurement combinations flow, respiratory gas temperature, and incubator temperature were varied. At respiratory gas temperatures within the range of 33-37 degrees C the minimum international standard for the absolute air humidity in the respiratory gas was achieved or exceeded in all measurements. No controlled clinical tests regarding the importance and long term effects of different temperatures and different humidity levels in the inspiratory air are yet available for the ventilation treatment of neonates. PMID:1444554

  20. Two Mutations in Surfactant Protein C Gene Associated with Neonatal Respiratory Distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tarocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mutations of surfactant genes causing surfactant dysfunction have been described. Surfactant protein C (SP-C deficiency is associated with variable clinical manifestations ranging from neonatal respiratory distress syndrome to lethal lung disease. We present an extremely low birth weight male infant with an unusual course of respiratory distress syndrome associated with two mutations in the SFTPC gene: C43-7G>A and 12T>A. He required mechanical ventilation for 26 days and was treated with 5 subsequent doses of surfactant with temporary and short-term efficacy. He was discharged at 37 weeks of postconceptional age without any respiratory support. During the first 16 months of life he developed five respiratory infections that did not require hospitalization. Conclusion. This mild course in our patient with two mutations is peculiar because the outcome in patients with a single SFTPC mutation is usually poor.

  1. Profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Camila Lima de Souza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit, characterizing the study population according to their neonatal variables and risk factors indicative for the early stimulation treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional and analytical study, held in a reference hospital of Fortaleza, in the period from February to March 2011, with sample consisting of 116 medical records of newborns indicated for the early stimulation treatment. The following variables were analyzed: weight, sex, gestational age, Apgar score, diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Intracranial Hemorrhage, use of mechanical ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. The variables were analyzed using Microsoft Excel™ 2007 software to obtain mean and mode. Results: Among the studied variables, there was a prevalence of low birth weight, prematurity and male newborns. According to the Apgar score, scores of 1st and 5th minutes showed increasing values. Regarding the studied pathologies, the Respiratory Distress Syndrome stands out as the most prevalent, followed by Intracranial Hemorrhage. Concerning the use of mechanical ventilation, CPAP was the most frequently indicated modality, followed by mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: The profile of newborns investigated in this study, which underwent early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care, is represented by male, premature, low weight and high rate of Apgar score at 1st and 5th minutes, with prevalence of respiratory distressand increased use of CPAP. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p523

  2. The changing face of neonatal intensive care in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-22

    Aug 22, 2007 ... of neonatal intensive care facilities for public sector patients ... The main differences between the survivors and non-survivors were in their birth weight and ..... private hospital: comparison of individual physicians' rates, risk.

  3. Radiation doses and risks to neonates undergoing common radiographic examinations in the neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McParland, B.J.; Lee, R.

    1996-01-01

    Neonates in the-Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) can receive large numbers of radiographs owing to the clinical conditions they may present. More neonatal radiation dosimetry data are required for three fundamental reasons: (1.) to aid in the establishment of reference dose levels for interinstitutional comparisons; (2.) to improve childhood cancer risk estimates following neonatal exposure; and (3.) to indicate appropriate directions for dose reduction. This paper describes an investigation of two different NICU radiological techniques with significantly different neonate doses. While patient-matched images taken with both techniques were assessed in a blind review, this component of the study is beyond the scope of this paper and is not discussed here. (author)

  4. European Consensus Guidelines on the Management of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Infants - 2013 Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the perinatal management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), controversies still exist. We report updated recommendations of a European Panel of expert neonatologists who developed consensus guidelines after critical examination of the most up-to-date evide...... maintenance of normal body temperature, proper fluid management, good nutritional support, appropriate management of the ductus arteriosus and support of the circulation to maintain adequate tissue perfusion....

  5. Causes of Neonatal Mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Taleghani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hossein Zeinalzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal survival is one of the most important challenges today. Over 99% of neonatal mortalities occur in the developing countries, and epidemiologic studies emphasize on this issue in the developed countries, as well. In this study, we attempted to investigate the causes of neonatal mortality in Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we studied causes of neonatal mortality in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014. Data collection was performed by the head nurse and treating physician using a pre-designed questionnaire. Most of the data were extracted from the neonatal records. Information regarding maternal underlying diseases and health care during pregnancy was extracted from mothers' records.Results: A total of 891 neonates were admitted to NICU of Taleghani Hospital of Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014, 68 (7.5% of whom died. Among these cases, 37 (%54.4 were male, 29 (29.4% were extremely low birth weight, and 16 (23.5% weighed more than 2.5 kg. The main causes of mortality were congenital anomalies (35.3%, prematurity (26.5%, and sepsis (10.3%, respectively.Conclusion: Congenital anomaly is the most common cause of mortality, and the pattern of death is changing from preventable diseases to unavoidable mortalities

  6. A multicenter, randomized trial comparing synthetic surfactant with modified bovine surfactant extract in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, E; Vollman, J; Giebner, D; Maurer, M; Dreyer, G; Bailey, L; Anderson, M; Mefford, L; Beaumont, E; Sutton, D; Puppala, B; Mangurten, HH; Secrest, J; Lewis, WJ; Carteaux, P; Bednarek, F; Welsberger, S; Gosselin, R; Pantoja, AF; Belenky, A; Campbell, P; Patole, S; Duenas, M; Kelly, M; Alejo, W; Lewallen, P; DeanLieber, S; Hanft, M; Ferlauto, J; Newell, RW; Bagwell, J; Levine, D; Lipp, RW; Harkavy, K; Vasa, R; Birenbaum, H; Broderick, KA; Santos, AQ; Long, BA; Gulrajani, M; Stern, M; Hopgood, G; Hegyi, T; Alba, J; Christmas, L; McQueen, M; Nichols, N; Brown, M; Quissell, BJ; Rusk, C; Marks, K; Gifford, K; Hoehn, G; Pathak, A; Marino, B; Hunt, P; Fox, [No Value; Sharpstein, C; Feldman, B; Johnson, N; Beecham, J; Balcom, R; Helmuth, W; Boylan, D; Frakes, C; Magoon, M; Reese, K; Schwersenski, J; Schutzman, D; Soll, R; Horbar, JD; Leahy, K; Troyer, W; Juzwicki, C; Anderson, P; Dworsky, M; Reynolds, L; Urrutia, J; Gupta, U; Adray, C

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of a synthetic surfactant (Exosurf Neonatal, Burroughs-Wellcome Co) and a modified bovine surfactant extract (Survanta, Ross Laboratories) in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design. Multicenter, randomized trial. Setting. Thirty-eight

  7. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: an e-Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielenga, Joke M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Latour, Jos M; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and research statements were generated to be ranged on importance on a scale of 1-6 (not important to most important). Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in 17 European countries. NICU clinical nurses, managers, educators and researchers (n=75). None. A list of 43 research statements in eight domains. The six highest ranking statements (≥5.0 mean score) were related to prevention and reduction of pain (mean 5.49; SD 1.07), medication errors (mean 5.20; SD 1.13), end-of-life care (mean 5.05; SD 1.18), needs of parents and family (mean 5.04; SD 1.23), implementing evidence into nursing practice (mean 5.02; SD 1.03), and pain assessment (mean 5.02; SD 1.11). The research domains were prioritised and ranked: (1) pain and stress; (2) family centred care; (3) clinical nursing care practices; (4) quality and safety; (5) ethics; (6) respiratory and ventilation; (7) infection and inflammation; and (8) professional issues in neonatal intensive care nursing. The results of this study might support developing a nursing research strategy for the nursing section of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care. In addition, this may promote more European researcher collaboratives for neonatal nursing research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Exposure of neonates to Respiratory Syncytial Virus is critical in determining subsequent airway response in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Melissa

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of acute bronchiolitis in infants and the elderly. Furthermore, epidemiological data suggest that RSV infection during infancy is a potent trigger of subsequent wheeze and asthma development. However, the mechanism by which RSV contributes to asthma is complex and remains largely unknown. A recent study indicates that the age of initial RSV infection is a key factor in determining airway response to RSV rechallenge. We hypothesized that severe RSV infection during neonatal development significantly alters lung structure and the pulmonary immune micro-environment; and thus, neonatal RSV infection is crucial in the development of or predisposition to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Methods To investigate this hypothesis the present study was conducted in a neonatal mouse model of RSV-induced pulmonary inflammation and airway dysfunction. Seven-day-old mice were infected with RSV (2 × 105 TCID50/g body weight and allowed to mature to adulthood. To determine if neonatal RSV infection predisposed adult animals to enhanced pathophysiological responses to allergens, these mice were then sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Various endpoints including lung function, histopathology, cytokine production, and cellularity in bronchoalveolar lavage were examined. Results RSV infection in neonates alone led to inflammatory airway disease characterized by airway hyperreactivity, peribronchial and perivascular inflammation, and subepithelial fibrosis in adults. If early RSV infection was followed by allergen exposure, this pulmonary phenotype was exacerbated. The initial response to neonatal RSV infection resulted in increased TNF-α levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. Interestingly, increased levels of IL-13 and mucus hyperproduction were observed almost three months after the initial infection with RSV. Conclusion Neonatal RSV exposure results in long term

  9. Association between lamellar body count and respiratory distress in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahasadri, Shoreh; Changizi, Nasrin

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of fetal lung maturity by a simple and rapid test has a pivotal role in obstetric managements. Lack of modern laboratory techniques in our country made US investigate whether lamellar body count (Lb) can be applied efficiently in the evaluation of fetal lung maturity. Lamellar body count was assessed in 104 un spun amniotic fluid samples taken from pregnant women admitted at A kbar Aba di Hospital, Tehran, Iran between May 2003 and November 2003 whose fetuses were at risk for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Cut-off points for LBC were determined to evaluate the risk of RDS. Standard clinical and radiographic criteria were used to diagnose RDS. An LBC of less than 10,000 was 99.1% specific for lung immaturity (positive predictive value = 99.1%, negative predictive value = 83.5%). The LBCs of greater than 45,000 eliminates RDS (negative predictive value = 98.9%). Lamellar body count is an easy, rapid and cost-effective test to assess fetal lung maturity in high-risk fetuses. Using the cut-off points of 10,000 and 45,000, LBC can serve as the first screening test of fetal lung maturity. (author)

  10. Frequency and Intensive Care Related Risk Factors of Pneumothorax in Ventilated Neonates

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    Ramesh Bhat Yellanthoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Relationships of mechanical ventilation to pneumothorax in neonates and care procedures in particular are rarely studied. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of selected ventilator variables and risk events to pneumothorax. Methods. Pneumothorax was defined as accumulation of air in pleural cavity as confirmed by chest radiograph. Relationship of ventilator mode, selected settings, and risk procedures prior to detection of pneumothorax was studied using matched controls. Results. Of 540 neonates receiving mechanical ventilation, 10 (1.85% were found to have pneumothorax. Respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and pneumonia were the underlying lung pathology. Pneumothorax mostly (80% occurred within 48 hours of life. Among ventilated neonates, significantly higher percentage with pneumothorax received mandatory ventilation than controls (70% versus 20%; P20 cm H2O and overventilation were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. More cases than controls underwent care procedures in the preceding 3 hours of pneumothorax event. Mean airway pressure change (P=0.052 and endotracheal suctioning (P=0.05 were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. Reintubation (P=0.003, and bagging (P=0.015 were significantly associated with pneumothorax. Conclusion. Pneumothorax among ventilated neonates occurred at low frequency. Mandatory ventilation and selected care procedures in the preceding 3 hours had significant association.

  11. Frequency and Intensive Care Related Risk Factors of Pneumothorax in Ventilated Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat Yellanthoor, Ramesh; Ramdas, Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Relationships of mechanical ventilation to pneumothorax in neonates and care procedures in particular are rarely studied. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of selected ventilator variables and risk events to pneumothorax. Methods. Pneumothorax was defined as accumulation of air in pleural cavity as confirmed by chest radiograph. Relationship of ventilator mode, selected settings, and risk procedures prior to detection of pneumothorax was studied using matched controls. Results. Of 540 neonates receiving mechanical ventilation, 10 (1.85%) were found to have pneumothorax. Respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and pneumonia were the underlying lung pathology. Pneumothorax mostly (80%) occurred within 48 hours of life. Among ventilated neonates, significantly higher percentage with pneumothorax received mandatory ventilation than controls (70% versus 20%; P 20 cm H2O and overventilation were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. More cases than controls underwent care procedures in the preceding 3 hours of pneumothorax event. Mean airway pressure change (P = 0.052) and endotracheal suctioning (P = 0.05) were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. Reintubation (P = 0.003), and bagging (P = 0.015) were significantly associated with pneumothorax. Conclusion. Pneumothorax among ventilated neonates occurred at low frequency. Mandatory ventilation and selected care procedures in the preceding 3 hours had significant association. PMID:24876958

  12. The effect of high risk pregnancy on duration of neonatal stay in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrasiabi, Narges; Mohagheghi, Parisa; Kalani, Majid; Mohades, Gholam; Farahani, Zahra

    2014-08-01

    High risk pregnancies increase the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity. In order to identify the influence of pregnancy complications on the period of neonatal stay in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs), an analysis has been carried out in our center. In a cross-sectional-descriptive analytical study, the data including NICU length of stay was gathered from 526 medical records of neonates. We also assessed their maternal complications such as premature rapture of membranes (PROM), urinary tract infection (UTI), preeclampsia, oligohydramnios, and twin/triplet pregnancy. Finally we analyzed the relation between variables by SPSS statistics software version 19. The level of significance was considered PUTI (P=0.02), multiple gestation (P=0.03), and oligohydramnios (P=0.003). We found a positive correlation between numbers of gestation and length of NICU stay (P=0.03). A positive correlation existed between neonatal complication and length of NICU stay (P<0.001). By increasing maternal health level and prenatal care services, neonatal outcome can be improved and length of stay in NICUs decreased.

  13. Prediction of extubation failure for neonates with respiratory distress syndrome using the MIMIC-II Clinical Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhno, A.; Ennett, C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Extubation failure (EF) is an ongoing problem in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Nearly 25% of neonates fail their first extubation attempt, requiring re-intubations that are associated with riskfactors and financial costs. We identified 179 mechanically ventilated neonatal patients that

  14. Fellowship Training in the Emerging Fields of Fetal-Neonatal Neurology and Neonatal Neurocritical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyser, Christopher D; Tam, Emily W Y; Chang, Taeun; Soul, Janet S; Miller, Steven P; Glass, Hannah C

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal neurocritical care is a growing and rapidly evolving medical subspecialty, with increasing numbers of dedicated multidisciplinary clinical, educational, and research programs established at academic institutions. The growth of these programs has provided trainees in neurology, neonatology, and pediatrics with increased exposure to the field, sparking interest in dedicated fellowship training in fetal-neonatal neurology. To meet this rising demand, increasing numbers of training programs are being established to provide trainees with the requisite knowledge and skills to independently deliver care for infants with neurological injury or impairment from the fetal care center and neonatal intensive care unit to the outpatient clinic. This article provides an initial framework for standardization of training across these programs. Recommendations include goals and objectives for training in the field; core areas where clinical competency must be demonstrated; training activities and neuroimaging and neurodiagnostic modalities which require proficiency; and programmatic requirements necessary to support a comprehensive and well-rounded training program. With consistent implementation, the proposed model has the potential to establish recognized standards of professional excellence for training in the field, provide a pathway toward Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education certification for program graduates, and lead to continued improvements in medical and neurological care provided to patients in the neonatal intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/or analgesia were, to have required invasive ventilation (P3 (P=.023; OR=2.26), the existence of pain evaluation guides in the unit (Pneonates admitted to intensive care units receive sedatives or analgesics. There is significant variation between Spanish neonatal units as regards sedation and analgesia prescribing. Our results provide evidence on the "state of the art", and could serve as the basis of preparing clinical practice guidelines at a national level. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Development and validation of a simple algorithm for initiation of CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundalani, Shilpa G; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Oden, Maria; Kawaza, Kondwani; Gest, Alfred; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Low-cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) systems have been shown to improve survival in neonates with respiratory distress, in developing countries including Malawi. District hospitals in Malawi implementing CPAP requested simple and reliable guidelines to enable healthcare workers with basic skills and minimal training to determine when treatment with CPAP is necessary. We developed and validated TRY (T: Tone is good, R: Respiratory Distress and Y=Yes) CPAP, a simple algorithm to identify neonates with respiratory distress who would benefit from CPAP. To validate the TRY CPAP algorithm for neonates with respiratory distress in a low-resource setting. We constructed an algorithm using a combination of vital signs, tone and birth weight to determine the need for CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress. Neonates admitted to the neonatal ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, in Blantyre, Malawi, were assessed in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Nurses and paediatricians-in-training assessed neonates to determine whether they required CPAP using the TRY CPAP algorithm. To establish the accuracy of the TRY CPAP algorithm in evaluating the need for CPAP, their assessment was compared with the decision of a neonatologist blinded to the TRY CPAP algorithm findings. 325 neonates were evaluated over a 2-month period; 13% were deemed to require CPAP by the neonatologist. The inter-rater reliability with the algorithm was 0.90 for nurses and 0.97 for paediatricians-in-training using the neonatologist's assessment as the reference standard. The TRY CPAP algorithm has the potential to be a simple and reliable tool to assist nurses and clinicians in identifying neonates who require treatment with CPAP in low-resource settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Antenatal treatment with corticosteroids for preterm neonates: impact on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality

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    Joice Fabíola Meneguel

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Although the benefits of antenatal corticosteroids have been widely demonstrated in other countries, there are few studies among Brazilian newborn infants. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of antenatal corticosteroids on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality among neonates with a gestational age of less than 34 weeks. TYPE OF STUDY: Cross-sectional. SETTING: A tertiary-care hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Neonates exposed to any dose of antenatal corticosteroids for fetal maturation up to 7 days before delivery, and newborns paired by sex, birth weight, gestational age and time of birth that were not exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. The sample obtained consisted of 205 exposed newborns, 205 non-exposed and 39 newborns exposed to antenatal corticosteroids for whom it was not possible to find an unexposed pair. PROCEDURES: Analysis of maternal and newborn records. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: The primary clinical outcomes for the two groups were compared: the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and intra-hospital mortality; as well as secondary outcomes related to neonatal morbidity. RESULTS: Antenatal corticosteroids reduced the occurrence of respiratory distress syndrome (OR: 0.33; 95% CI: 0.21-0.51 and the protective effect persisted when adjusted for weight, gestational age and the presence of asphyxia (adjusted OR: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.17-0.43. The protective effect could also be detected through the reduction in the need for and number of doses of exogenous surfactant utilized and the number of days of mechanical ventilation needed for the newborns exposed to antenatal corticosteroids. Their use also reduced the occurrence of intra-hospital deaths (OR: 0.51: 95% CI: 0.38-0.82. However, when adjusted for weight, gestational age, presence of prenatal asphyxia, respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis and use of mechanical ventilation, the antenatal corticosteroids did not maintain the

  18. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  19. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  20. Surfactant therapy for maternal blood aspiration: an unusual cause of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Istemi Han; Demirel, Gamze; Canpolat, Fuat Emre; Erdeve, Omer; Dilmen, Ugur

    2012-10-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is the main treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, surfactant therapy has been shown to be effective in the treatment of other diseases causing neonatal respiratory diseases such as pulmonary hemorrhage, meconium aspiration syndrome, pneumonia/sepsis, pulmonary edema or acute lung injury resulting a secondary surfactant deficiency (SSD). Rarely, as like as in the present patient, exogenous blood aspiration such as breast milk or formula aspiration may lead to SSD. Blood in alveolus leads to a significant biochemical and functional disturbance of the surfactant system and inhibits surfactant production. Here, the authors report a preterm infant of 33 wk gestational age with secondary surfactant deficiency due to maternal blood aspiration because of abruptio placentae. She was received two courses of beractant, a natural bovine surfactant, therapy in 24 h. She was extubated on second day and did not require oxygen on 4(th) day. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of SSD due to maternal blood aspiration treated with surfactant. In conditions such as abruptio placentae, infant should be protected from blood aspiration and if respiratory distress occurs, surfactant inhibition and need for surfactant administration should be considered.

  1. Oral sucrose for heel lance enhances adenosine triphosphate use in preterm neonates with respiratory distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Asmerom, Yayesh; Boskovic, Danilo S; Slater, Laurel; Bacot-Carter, Sharon; Bahjri, Khaled; Mukasa, Joseph; Holden, Megan; Fayard, Elba

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effects of oral sucrose on procedural pain, and on biochemical markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization and oxidative stress in preterm neonates with mild to moderate respiratory distress. Preterm neonates with a clinically required heel lance that met study criteria (n = 49) were randomized into three groups: (1) control (n = 24), (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (n = 15) and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (n = 10). Plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, chi-square and one-way analysis of variance. We found that in preterm neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2, a single dose of oral sucrose given before a heel lance significantly increased markers of adenosine triphosphate use. We found that oral sucrose enhanced adenosine triphosphate use in neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2. Although oral sucrose decreased pain scores, our data suggest that it also increased energy use as evidenced by increased plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization. These effects of sucrose, specifically the fructose component, on adenosine triphosphate metabolism warrant further investigation.

  2. The Effect of the Treatment with Heated Humidified High-Flow Nasal Cannula on Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in China: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Zheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Noninvasive respiratory support is considered the optimal method of providing assistance to preterm babies with breathing problems, including nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP and humidified high flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC. The evidence of the efficacy and safety of HHHFNC used as the primary respiratory support for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is insufficient in low- and middle-income countries. Objective. To investigate the effect of heated humidified high flow nasal cannula on neonatal respiratory distress syndrome compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was performed at a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in suburban Wenzhou, China, in the period between January 2014 and December 2015. Results. A total of 128 infants were enrolled in the study: 65 in the HHHFNC group and 63 in the NCPAP group. The respiratory support with HHHFNC was similar to that with NCPAP with regard to the primary outcome. There is no significant difference between two groups in secondary outcomes. Comparing with NCPAP group, the incidence of nasal damage was lower in HHHFNC group. Conclusions. HHHFNC is an effective and well-tolerated strategy as the primary treatment of mild to moderate RDS in preterm infants older than 28 weeks of GA.

  3. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Abril, A [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Terron, A; Boschi, C [National Technological University, Regional Bioengineering Institute, Mendoza (Argentina); Gomez, M [National Technological University, La Rioja (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed.

  4. Review of noise in neonatal intensive care units - regional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Abril, A; Terron, A; Boschi, C; Gomez, M

    2007-01-01

    This work is about the problem of noise in neonatal incubators and in the environment in the neonatal intensive care units. Its main objective is to analyse the impact of noise in hospitals of Mendoza and La Rioja. Methodology: The measures were taken in different moments in front of higher or lower severity level in the working environment. It is shown that noise produces severe damages and changes in the behaviour and the psychological status of the new born babies. Results: The noise recorded inside the incubators and the neonatal intensive care units together have many components but the noise of motors, opening and closing of access gates have been considered the most important ones. Values above 60 db and and up to 120 db in some cases were recorded, so the need to train the health staff in order to manage the new born babies, the equipment and the instruments associated with them very carefully is revealed

  5. Use of the ketogenic diet in the neonatal intensive care unit-Safety and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lindsey; Fecske, Erin; Salim, Mohammad; Hall, Ara

    2017-02-01

    Drug-resistant epilepsy poses a challenge in neonatal patients, especially those in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), who have various secondary comorbidities. We present results of four children with a history of drug-resistant epilepsy for whom a ketogenic diet was initiated and used in the NICU. A nonfasting induction into ketosis over 1-2 weeks was utilized, with gradual increases in the ketogenic ratio every 2-3 days. Data were collected retrospectively from a database, which included medical history, daily progress notes, relevant laboratory data, and imaging and diagnostic information. The ketogenic diet was well tolerated in all cases. The most common side effects observed were constipation, hypoglycemia, and weight loss. Serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels demonstrated improved reliability as a marker of ketosis when compared to urine ketones in this population. Perceived benefits to the infants included improved seizure control, increased alertness, and decreased need for invasive respiratory support. These cases demonstrate that the use of the ketogenic diet for treatment of neonatal encephalopathy and refractory epilepsy can be undertaken safely in the NICU and is well tolerated by carefully screened neonates and infants. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of amikacin in neonatal intensive care unit patients

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    Paulo Caceres Guido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Amikacin treatment requires close monitoring of blood concentrations to increase the probability that levels achieved are both effective and safe. Aims We described population pharmacokinetics parameters of amikacin in newborns from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with suspected or documented sepsis. Methods A nonlinear mixed-effect model approach was used to analyse the data. Results Twenty seven neonates were enrolled. Final parameter estimates were: Ke(h-1=0.232x(CR Exp-0.85; V(mL/kg=497. Conclusion Weight and serum creatinine are associated with neonatal amikacin volume of distribution and elimination constant rate, respectively. The presence of sepsis may decrease amikacin elimination, although this observation should be further explored. These results could help to individualize amikacin dosage for neonates.

  7. Outbreak of Bacillus cereus infections in a neonatal intensive care unit traced to balloons used in manual ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Zwet, W C; Parlevliet, G A; Savelkoul, P H; Stoof, J; Kaiser, A M; Van Furth, A M; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M

    2000-11-01

    In 1998, an outbreak of systemic infections caused by Bacillus cereus occurred in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Three neonates developed sepsis with positive blood cultures. One neonate died, and the other two neonates recovered. An environmental survey, a prospective surveillance study of neonates, and a case control study were performed, in combination with molecular typing, in order to identify potential sources and transmission routes of infection. Genotypic fingerprinting by amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) showed that the three infections were caused by a single clonal type of B. cereus. The same strain was found in trachea aspirate specimens of 35 other neonates. The case control study showed mechanical ventilation with a Sensormedics ventilation machine to be a risk factor for colonization and/or infection (odds ratio, 9.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 88.2). Prospective surveillance showed that colonization with B. cereus occurred exclusively in the respiratory tract of mechanically ventilated neonates. The epidemic strain of B. cereus was found on the hands of nursing staff and in balloons used for manual ventilation. Sterilization of these balloons ended the outbreak. We conclude that B. cereus can cause outbreaks of severe opportunistic infection in neonates. Typing by AFLP proved very useful in the identification of the outbreak and in the analysis of strains recovered from the environment to trace the cause of the epidemic.

  8. Incidence of congenital heart disease among neonates in a neonatal unit of a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Sabir, M.U.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence and pattern of various congenital heart disease in a neonatal unit of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The prospective study was carried out in the neonatal unit of Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from September 2008 to August 2011. All 5800 neonates admitted with gestational age of >28 weeks irrespective of birthweight were included in the study. Neonatologist/Paediatrician carried out the neonatal examination during the first 12 hours of life. Neonates suspected of having congenital heart disease were further evaluated by pulse oxymetry, X-ray chest and echocardiography to ascertain final diagnosis and type of lesion. Data was collected on a predesigned proforma containing information regarding gender, mode of delivery, gestational age, weight at birth, family history, and associated malformations. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 5800 neonates, 87 (1.5%) were found to have congenital heart disease with an incidence of 15/1000. There was a male preponderance. Most common lesion was ventricular septal defect 27(31.3%), followed by atrial septal defect 20 (22.9%), patent ductus arteriosus 13 (14.94%), tetralogy of fallot 06 (6.89%), transposition of great arteries 04 (4.59%), Pulmonary stenosis 05 (5.79%) and 03(3.44%) had atrioventricular canal defects. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease is a common congenital anomaly. Its incidence varies from centre to centre due to different factors like nature of the sample, method of detection and early examination by a neonatologist/paediatrician. In this study a higher incidence is reported because it was carried out in a tertiary care unit, which is a referral hospital and all the neonates admitted in the unit were included in the study. (author)

  9. Neonatal non-contact respiratory monitoring based on real-time infrared thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Abbas K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monitoring of vital parameters is an important topic in neonatal daily care. Progress in computational intelligence and medical sensors has facilitated the development of smart bedside monitors that can integrate multiple parameters into a single monitoring system. This paper describes non-contact monitoring of neonatal vital signals based on infrared thermography as a new biomedical engineering application. One signal of clinical interest is the spontaneous respiration rate of the neonate. It will be shown that the respiration rate of neonates can be monitored based on analysis of the anterior naris (nostrils temperature profile associated with the inspiration and expiration phases successively. Objective The aim of this study is to develop and investigate a new non-contact respiration monitoring modality for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU using infrared thermography imaging. This development includes subsequent image processing (region of interest (ROI detection and optimization. Moreover, it includes further optimization of this non-contact respiration monitoring to be considered as physiological measurement inside NICU wards. Results Continuous wavelet transformation based on Debauches wavelet function was applied to detect the breathing signal within an image stream. Respiration was successfully monitored based on a 0.3°C to 0.5°C temperature difference between the inspiration and expiration phases. Conclusions Although this method has been applied to adults before, this is the first time it was used in a newborn infant population inside the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. The promising results suggest to include this technology into advanced NICU monitors.

  10. Respiratory Acid-Base Disorders in the Critical Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of respiratory acid-base abnormalities in the critical care unit (CCU) is unknown, although respiratory alkalosis is suspected to be common in this population. Abnormal carbon dioxide tension can have many physiologic effects, and changes in Pco 2 may have a significant impact on outcome. Monitoring Pco 2 in CCU patients is an important aspect of critical patient assessment, and identification of respiratory acid-base abnormalities can be valuable as a diagnostic tool. Treatment of respiratory acid-base disorders is largely focused on resolution of the primary disease, although mechanical ventilation may be indicated in cases with severe respiratory acidosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Placental Inflammatory Changes and Bacterial Infection in Premature Neonates with Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal a relationship of placental inflammatory changes to bacterial infection in premature neonates with respiratory failure. Material and methods. Bronchoalveolar aspirate was bacteriologically studied in 157 premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS; the total and differential leukocyte counts were measured in their peripheral blood. The levels of the cytokines IL-1^3, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-a were studied in different biological fluids of mothers and their babies; the placentas were also morphologically examined. Results. An analysis of bacterial cultures from the tracheobronchial tree revealed no growth of bacterial microflora in 61.8% of cases, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were isolated in 6.4 and 8.3% of the infants, respectively; Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus capitis, Enterobacter agglomerans, and hemolytic group A Streptococcus were seen in 1.9% each; moreover, 1.3% of the newborn infants were found to have Bacillus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp., and Serratia marcescens. Other microorganisms and a microbial association were encountered in 8.9% of cases. Placental morphological examination revealed different inflammatory changes concurrent with chronic and acute placental insufficiency. The investigation demonstrated that the maternal peripheral plasma levels of IL-1^, IL-4, IL-6, and TNF-a were within the physiological range at the end of the first period of delivery. The amniotic fluid displayed elevated IL-6 and TNF-a concentrations and normal IL-4 and IL-1e levels, suggesting that there was an intrauterine inflammatory process. Conclusion. Premature birth is associated with various placental inflammatory changes, which causes intrauterine stimulation of macrophages in the chorionic villi. Specific immune defense mechanisms that prevent the development of a fetal infectious process, i.e. the maternal infectious process, may induce

  12. iNICU - Integrated Neonatal Care Unit: Capturing Neonatal Journey in an Intelligent Data Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpreet; Yadav, Gautam; Mallaiah, Raghuram; Joshi, Preetha; Joshi, Vinay; Kaur, Ravneet; Bansal, Suneyna; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2017-08-01

    Neonatal period represents first 28 days of life, which is the most vulnerable time for a child's survival especially for the preterm babies. High neonatal mortality is a prominent and persistent problem across the globe. Non-availability of trained staff and infrastructure are the major recognized hurdles in the quality care of these neonates. Hourly progress growth charts and reports are still maintained manually by nurses along with continuous calculation of drug dosage and nutrition as per the changing weight of the baby. iNICU (integrated Neonatology Intensive Care Unit) leverages Beaglebone and Intel Edison based IoT integration with biomedical devices in NICU i.e. monitor, ventilator and blood gas machine. iNICU is hosted on IBM Softlayer based cloud computing infrastructure and map NICU workflow in Java based responsive web application to provide translational research informatics support to the clinicians. iNICU captures real time vital parameters i.e. respiration rate, heart rate, lab data and PACS amounting for millions of data points per day per child. Stream of data is sent to Apache Kafka layer which stores the same in Apache Cassandra NoSQL. iNICU also captures clinical data like feed intake, urine output, and daily assessment of child in PostgreSQL database. It acts as first Big Data hub (of both structured and unstructured data) of neonates across India offering temporal (longitudinal) data of their stay in NICU and allow clinicians in evaluating efficacy of their interventions. iNICU leverages drools based clinical rule based engine and deep learning based big data analytical model coded in R and PMML. iNICU solution aims to improve care time, fills skill gap, enable remote monitoring of neonates in rural regions, assists in identifying the early onset of disease, and reduction in neonatal mortality.

  13. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  14. Perinatal transport: problems in neonatal intensive care capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, A B; Bottomley, L; Chatfield, S; Wood, C

    2004-05-01

    To assess the quantity and nature of transfers within the Yorkshire perinatal service, with the aim of identifying suitable outcome measures for the assessment of future service improvements. Collection of data on perinatal transfers from all neonatal and maternity units located in the Yorkshire region of the United Kingdom from May to November 2000. Expectant mothers (in utero transfers) and neonates (ex utero transfers). None Quantification of in utero and ex utero transfers; the reasons for and resources required to support transfers; the nature of each transfer (acute, specialist, non-acute, into or out of region). In the period studied, there were 800 transfers (337 in utero; 463 ex utero); 306 transfers were "acute" (80% of transfers in utero), 214 because of specialist need, and 280 "non-acute". Some 37% of capacity transfers occurred from the two level 3 units in the region. Of 254 transfers out of the 14 neonatal units for intensive care, 44 (17.3%) were transferred to hospitals outside the normal neonatal commissioning boundaries. The study highlights a continuing apparent lack of capacity within the neonatal service in the Yorkshire region, resulting in considerable numbers of neonatal and maternal transfers.

  15. Surgical procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit on critically ill neonates: feasibility and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, M.S.; Jado, A.M.; Al-Bassam, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Transferring unstable, ill neonates to and from the operating rooms carries significant risks and can lead to morbidity. We report on our experience in performing certain procedures in critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We examined the feasibility and safety for such an approach. All surgical procedures performed in the NICU between January 1999 and December 2005 were analyzed in terms of demographic data, diagnosis, preoperative stability of the patient, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Operations were performed at beside in the NICU in critically ill, unstable neonates who needed emergency surgery, in neonates of low birth weight (<1000 gm) and in neonates on special equipments like higher frequency ventilators and nitrous oxide. Thirty-seven surgical procedures were performed including 12 laparotomies, bowel resection and stomies, 7 repairs of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, 4 ligations of patent ductus arteriosus and various others. Birth weights ranged between 850 gm and 3500 gm (mean 2000 gm). Gestational age ranged between 25 to 42 weeks (mean, 33 weeks). Age at surgery was between 1 to 30 days (mean, 30 days). Preoperatively, 19 patients (51.3%) were on inotropic support and all were intubated and mechanically ventilated. There was no mortality related to surgical procedures. Postoperatively, one patient developed wound infection and disruption. Performing major surgical procedures in the NICU is both feasible and safe. It is useful in very low birth weight, critically ill neonates who have definite risk attached to transfer to the operating room. No special area is needed in the NICU to perform complication-free surgery, but designing an operating room within the NICU will be ideal. (author)

  16. Safety of milrinone use in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; Raman, Sudha R; van den Anker, John N; McHutchison, Kerstin; Hornik, Christoph P; Clark, Reese H; Brian Smith, P

    2015-01-01

    Milrinone use in the neonatal intensive care unit has increased over the last 10 years despite a paucity of published safety data in infants. We sought to determine the safety of milrinone therapy among infants in the neonatal intensive care unit. We conducted a retrospective data analysis, identifying all infants who were exposed to milrinone and discharged from 322 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group from 1997-2010. We identified adverse events (AEs) during milrinone exposure. The unit of observation for clinical AEs was the first course of milrinone and for laboratory AEs it was an infant-day of exposure to milrinone. Overall, 1446 of 716,821 (0.2%) infants received milrinone for a total of 6894 infant-days. The proportion of infants exposed to milrinone increased from 0 in 1997 to 4/1000 infant cases in 2010. Persistent pulmonary hypertension (40%) was the most commonly reported diagnosis at the start of milrinone administration. Overall, 606/1446 (42%) of infants had at least 1 clinical AE recorded during milrinone therapy. Hypotension requiring pressors and thrombocytopenia (milrinone therapy. Among infants hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit, there was an increase in the use of milrinone over the past 13 years. The safety, dosing, and efficacy of milrinone in infants should be determined in prospective clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Economic implications of neonatal intensive care unit collaborative quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogowski, JA; Horbar, JD; Plsek, PE; Baker, LS; Deterding, J; Edwards, WH; Hocker, J; Kantak, AD; Lewallen, P; Lewis, W; Lewit, E; McCarroll, CJ; Mujsce, D; Payne, NR; Shiono, P; Soll, RF; Leahy, K

    Objective. To make measurable improvements in the quality and cost of neonatal intensive care using a multidisciplinary collaborative quality improvement model. Design. Interventional study. Data on treatment costs were collected for infants with birth weight 501 to 1500 g for the period of January

  18. Analysis of a dielectric EAP as smart component for a neonatal respiratory simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognarelli, S; Deri, L; Cecchi, F; Scaramuzzo, R; Cuttano, A; Laschi, C; Menciassi, A; Dario, P

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, respiratory syndrome represents the most common neonatal pathology. Nevertheless, being respiratory assistance in newborns a great challenge for neonatologists and nurses, use of simulation-based training is quickly becoming a valid meaning of clinical education for an optimal therapy outcome. Commercially available simulators, are, however, not able to represent complex breathing patterns and to evaluate specific alterations. The purpose of this work has been to develop a smart, lightweight, compliant system with variable rigidity able to replicate the anatomical behavior of the neonatal lung, with the final aim to integrate such system into an innovative mechatronic simulator device. A smart material based-system has been proposed and validated: Dielectric Electro Active Polymers (DEAP), coupled to a purposely shaped silicone camera, has been investigated as active element for a compliance change simulator able to replicate both physiological and pathological lung properties. Two different tests have been performed by using a bi-components camera (silicone shape coupled to PolyPower film) both as an isolated system and connected to an infant ventilator. By means of a pressure sensor held on the silicon structure, pressure values have been collected and compared for active and passive PolyPower working configuration. The obtained results confirm a slight pressure decrease in active configuration, that is in agreement with the film stiffness reduction under activation and demonstrates the real potentiality of DEAP for active volume changing of the proposed system.

  19. Radiation dose to neonates undergoing X-ray imaging in special care baby units in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, R.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Sina, S.; Alizadeh, F. N.; Zeinali, B.; Kamyab, G. R.; Aghevlian, S.; Khorramdel, H.; Namazi, I.; Heirani, M.; Moshkriz, M.; Mahani, H.; Sharifzadeh, M.

    2012-01-01

    Radiographic imaging has a significant role in the timely diagnosis of the diseases of neonates in intensive care units. The estimation of the dose received by the infants undergoing radiographic examination is of great importance, due to greater more radiosensitivity and longer life expectancy of the neonates and premature babies. In this study, the values of entrance skin dose (ESD), dose area products (DAPs), energy imparted (EI), whole-body dose, effective dose and risk of childhood cancer were estimated using three methods including direct method [using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) chips], indirect method (using tube output) and Monte Carlo (MC) method (using MCNP4C code). In the first step, the ESD of the neonates was directly measured using TLD-100 chips. Fifty neonates, mostly premature, with different weights and gestational ages in five hospitals mostly suffering from respiratory distress syndrome and pneumonia were involved in this study. In the second step, the values of ESD to neonates were indirectly obtained from the tube output in different imaging techniques. The imaging room, incubator, neonates and other components were then simulated in order to obtain the ESD values using the MCNP4C code. Finally, the values of ESD assessed by the three methods were used for calculation of DAP, EI, whole-body dose, effective dose and risk of childhood cancer. The results indicate that the mean ESD per radiograph estimated by the direct, indirect and MC methods are 56.6±4.1, 50.1±3.1 and 54.5±3.3 μGy, respectively. The mean risk of childhood cancer estimated in this study varied between 4.21x10 -7 and 2.72x10 -6 . (authors)

  20. Incidence of acute kidney injury in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Doaa; Abd-Elrahman, Hadeel; Shehab, Mohamed M; Abd-Elrheem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a six-month period from September 2011 to March 2012. This prospective study was performed on 250 neonates admitted to the NICU at the Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University. All neonates were subjected to detailed history taking, including pre-natal, natal and post-natal history, with stress on symptoms suggestive of AKI. All neonates were examined thoroughly and the following investigations were performed: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, arterial blood gases, urine sodium and urine creatinine. AKI was diagnosed in 27 cases (10.8%), including 12 females and 15 males. 40.7% of the AKI cases were born after full-term pregnancy while 59.3% were pre-term babies. 29.6% of the AKI cases had oliguria, and there was male sex predominance, with a male-female ratio of 1.3:1. The cause of AKI was pre-renal in 96.3% and intrinsic renal in 3.7% of the cases. The predisposing factors for AKI were sepsis in 63% of the cases, respiratory distress syndrome in 55.6%, mechanical ventilation in 51.9%, peri-natal asphyxia in 18.5%, dehydration in 14.8%, surgical operation in 11.1%, congenital heart disease in 7.4%, sub-galeal hematoma in 3.7%, polycythemia in 3.7% and intra-ventricular hemorrhage in 3.7% of the cases. Our data suggest that pre-renal failure was the most common form of AKI in our patients. Early recognition of risk factors such as sepsis, peri-natal asphyxia or peri-operative problems and rapid effective treatment of contributing conditions will reduce the incidence of AKI in the neonatal period.

  1. Plasma Endothelin-1 Levels in Preterm Neonatal Infants with Acute Respiratory Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Dmitriyev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased pulmonary vascular resistance in preterm infants is associated with acute respiratory failure (ARF and at the same time endothelin-1 (E-1 plays an important role in neonatal pulmonary vascular responsiveness. Methods. Endothelin-1 levels were measured in two blood samples in 12 preterm infants with ARF and in 12 controls (at 32.2±1.3 and 29.8±1.2 weeks of gestation, respectively by enzyme immunoassay. For this, the first and second blood samples were taken at 18 to 40 hours after birth. Results. The plasma level of E-1 in the first sample did not differ between the neonates of both groups. In the second sample, significantly higher E-1 concentrations were observed in the newborns with ARF than in the controls. In the first sample, E-1 concentration were higher than in the second one in both groups (p<0.001. There was a significant positive correlation between the second E-1 sample and the SNAPPE 2 scale rating (r=0.38; p=0.02. The plasma level of E-1 in the first sample did not differ in both groups (11.9 and 12.2 pg/ml, respectively. Conclusion. Neonates with and without ARF had the similar plasma E-1 levels in the first sample, by taking into account the fact that the E-1 levels were higher in ARF than in the controls at 18 to 40 hour after birth. Increased vascular resistance in ARF may be associated with the high level of E-1. Key words: endothe-lin-1, acute respiratory failure.

  2. Electrical Impedance Tomography: a new study method for neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziioannidis, I; Samaras, T; Nikolaidis, N

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of cardiorespiratory system diseases is a procedure that usually demands data collection on terms of the anatomy and the operation of the organs that are under study. Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) is an alternative approach, in comparison to existing techniques. With EIT electrodes are placed in the perimeter of the human body and images of the estimated organ are reconstructed, using the measurement of its impendence (or resistance) distribution and determining its alteration through time, while at the same time the patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation. Its clinical use presupposes the correct placement of the electrodes over the perimeter of the human body, the rapid data collection and electrical safety. It is a low cost technique and it is implemented near the patient. It is able to determine the distribution of ventilation, blood supply, diffused or localized lung defects, but it can also estimate therapeutic interventions or alteration to assisted ventilation of the neonate. EIT was developed at the beginning of the 1980s, but it has only recently begun to be implemented on neonates, and especially in the study of their respiratory system function. The low rate of image analysis is considered to be a drawback, but it is offset by the potential offered for the estimation of lungs' function (both under normal and pathological conditions), since ventilation and resistance are two quite similar concepts. In this review the most important studies about EIT are mentioned as a method of estimating respiratory distress syndrome in neonates. In terms of the above mentioned development, it is supposed that this technique will offer a great amount of help to the doctor in his / her estimations of the cardiorespiratory system and to his / her selection of the best intervening strategies. PMID:22435017

  3. Development and validation of a simple algorithm for initiation of CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Hundalani, Shilpa G; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Oden, Maria; Kawaza, Kondwani; Gest, Alfred; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) systems have been shown to improve survival in neonates with respiratory distress, in developing countries including Malawi. District hospitals in Malawi implementing CPAP requested simple and reliable guidelines to enable healthcare workers with basic skills and minimal training to determine when treatment with CPAP is necessary. We developed and validated TRY (T: Tone is good, R: Respiratory Distress and Y=Yes) CPAP, a s...

  4. Nurses' work environments, care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care on neonatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, Christian M; Clarke, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the relationship between work environment characteristics and neonatal intensive care unit nurses' perceptions of care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care. International evidence suggests that attention to work environments might improve nurse recruitment and retention, and the quality of care. However, comparatively little attention has been given to neonatal care, a specialty where patient and nurse outcomes are potentially quite sensitive to problems with staffing and work environments. Over a 6-month period in 2007-2008, a questionnaire containing measures of work environment characteristics, nursing care rationing, job satisfaction, burnout and quality of care was distributed to 553 nurses in all neonatal intensive care units in the province of Quebec (Canada). A total of 339 nurses (61.3%) completed questionnaires. Overall, 18.6% were dissatisfied with their job, 35.7% showed high emotional exhaustion, and 19.2% rated the quality of care on their unit as fair or poor. Care activities most frequently rationed because of insufficient time were discharge planning, parental support and teaching, and comfort care. In multivariate analyses, higher work environment ratings were related to lower likelihood of reporting rationing and burnout, and better ratings of quality of care and job satisfaction. Additional research on the determinants of nurse outcomes, the quality of patient care, and the impact of rationing of nursing care on patient outcomes in neonatal intensive care units is required. The Neonatal Extent of Work Rationing Instrument appears to be a useful tool for monitoring the extent of rationing of nursing care in neonatal units. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. An agent based architecture for high-risk neonate management at neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Jaleh Shoshtarian; Safdari, Reza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Nayeri, Fatemeh Sadat; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Farajollah, Seide Sedighe Seied

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the use of new tools and technologies has decreased the neonatal mortality rate. Despite the positive effect of using these technologies, the decisions are complex and uncertain in critical conditions when the neonate is preterm or has a low birth weight or malformations. There is a need to automate the high-risk neonate management process by creating real-time and more precise decision support tools. To create a collaborative and real-time environment to manage neonates with critical conditions at the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) and to overcome high-risk neonate management weaknesses by applying a multi agent based analysis and design methodology as a new solution for NICU management. This study was a basic research for medical informatics method development that was carried out in 2017. The requirement analysis was done by reviewing articles on NICU Decision Support Systems. PubMed, Science Direct, and IEEE databases were searched. Only English articles published after 1990 were included; also, a needs assessment was done by reviewing the extracted features and current processes at the NICU environment where the research was conducted. We analyzed the requirements and identified the main system roles (agents) and interactions by a comparative study of existing NICU decision support systems. The Universal Multi Agent Platform (UMAP) was applied to implement a prototype of our multi agent based high-risk neonate management architecture. Local environment agents interacted inside a container and each container interacted with external resources, including other NICU systems and consultation centers. In the NICU container, the main identified agents were reception, monitoring, NICU registry, and outcome prediction, which interacted with human agents including nurses and physicians. Managing patients at the NICU units requires online data collection, real-time collaboration, and management of many components. Multi agent systems are applied as

  6. Clinical profile of newborns undergoing physical therapy in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Ferreira Biazus

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: In neonatal therapy units, physical therapy is directed toward integral baby care. Objective: To describe the profile of newborns (NBs hospitalized in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Methods: Retrospective documentary study with data collection from medical records from July 2011 to July 2013. The sample consisted of NBs who performed motor and respiratory therapy. Data were grouped into five categories according to birth weight (≤ 1000g, 1001-1500g, 1501-2000g, 2001-2500g, ≥ 2501g. Results: total of 1,884 newborns were admitted to the NICU within the stipulated period, 168 (13.9% underwent physical therapy. Of the 168 NBs who underwent physical therapy, 137 were born in the hospital (81.5% and 31 were transferred there (18.5%; 17 of these babies died during the neonatal hospital stay (10.1%. All newborns of the extremely low birth weight group (≤ 1000g required mechanical ventilation, 72.7% non-invasive ventilation and 16.6% high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. The occurrence of pneumothorax in the extremely low birth weight group was 13.8% and 16% in the group with birth weight 1001-1500g. Conclusion: Infants with low birth weight (<2500g constituted the profile of NBs who underwent physical therapy, which was directly related to higher incidence of death and pneumothorax, as well as increased use of mechanical and non-invasive ventilation.

  7. Nanostructure of Red Blood Cell Membranes in Premature Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the nanostructure of red blood cell membranes in premature babies with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS, by applying atomic force microscopy. Subjects and methods. The investigation included 27 newborn infants, of them 13 premature babies with NRDS formed a study group. The mean gestational age was 33.1±2.3 weeks; their birth weight was 1800±299.3 g. A comparison group consisted of 14 full-term babies with favorable pregnancy and term labor. The mean gestational age of the babies was 39.4±0.5 weeks; their birth weight was 3131.7±588.8 g; the infants had a one minute Apgar score of 8±0.4. Their red blood cells were examined using an atomic force microscope. The objects to be examined were residual umbilical cord blood (RUCB from the premature infants; central venous blood after 7 hours of birth and neonatal venous blood taken on day 7 of life. Results. RUCB from full-term babies contained planocytes that were a major morphological type of red blood cells. In physiological pregnancy and acute fetal hypoxia, the morphological composition of red blood cells in premature neonates with NRDS was close to that in full-term babies. The planocytes are also a major morphological type of red blood cells in the premature infants; the frequency of their occurrence varies. Stomatocytes are typical of all the neonates in the NRDS group; their frequency levels vary greatly: from 8 to 65% of the total number of erythrocytes. The examination revealed that the premature infants of 31—36 weeks gestation were characterized by abnormal erythrocyte shapes that showed a high variability. At birth, the premature babies were found to have changes in the nanostructure of red blood cell membranes, which were influenced by intrauterine hypoxia. The first-order value reflecting flickering in the red blood cell membrane varies to the most extent. Conclusion. Atomic force microscopy showed that the greatest changes in the structure of red

  8. Respiratory virology and microbiology in intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østby, Anne-Cathrine; Gubbels, Sophie; Baake, Gerben

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the frequency of 12 common respiratory viruses in patients admitted to intensive care units with respiratory symptoms, evaluate the clinical characteristics and to compare the results to routine microbiological diagnostics. Throat swabs from 122 intensive care-patients >18...... years with acute respiratory symptoms were collected upon admission and analysed with multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction, for 12 community respiratory viruses. Blood and respiratory tract specimens were analysed for bacteria and fungi upon clinicians' request. Clinical and paraclinical data...... were collected. Viruses were detected in 19 (16%) of the 122 study patients. Five virus-positive patients (26%) had possible clinically relevant bacteria or fungi co-detected. Patients with exacerbation in COPD were associated with a viral infection (p = 0.02). Other comorbidities, clinical...

  9. Neonatal Outcomes of Rh-Negative Pregnancies in a Tertiary Level Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chacham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rhesus incompatibility is a preventable cause for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hydrops fetalis and still births. The prevalence of the Rh-negative blood group among Indian woman varies from 2% - 10%. Despite declining the incidence of Rhesus incompatibility, due to availability of anti-D immunoglobulin, and improved antenatal care of the Rh-negative pregnant woman, it still accounts for a significant proportion of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and neuro-morbidity. The prevalence of Rh-negative women having Rh-positive neonates is 60%. Objectives This study aimed to estimate the incidence of Rh iso-immunization and evaluate the outcomes of Rh iso-immunized neonates. Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit, Princess Esra hospital, Deccan college of medical sciences, Hyderabad, Telangana, India. Consecutive intramural and extramural neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care unit with the Rh-negative mother’s blood group and hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled. Neonates born to Rh+ve mothers were excluded. Neonatal gestational age, birth weight, age at admission, duration of phototherapy, duration of hospitalization, neonatal examination and investigations were recorded in a predesigned, pretested performa. Results A total of 90 neonates were born to Rh-negative mothers, of which 70% (63 had the Rh-positive blood group and 30% had the Rh-negative blood group. Of these 63 neonates, 48 (76.2% had hyperbilirubinemia and 43 neonates (68.3% had significant hyperbilirubinemia (total serum bilirubin > 15mg/dL. Among them, 2%, 75% and 23% were born to primi, multi and grandmutli, respectively. Also, 14.5% of the neonates were large for dates (LFD, 75% appropriate for dates (AFD and 10.5% were small for dates (SFD. Premature and SFD neonates had higher incidence of hyperbilirubinemia. Significantly higher incidence of jaundice occurred within 72 hours of life. The mean

  10. Determination of Noise Level and Its Sources in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Neonatal Ward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jahangir Blourchian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Neonatal intensive care units (NICU different sound intensities and frequencies are produced from different sources, which may exert undesirable physiological effects on the infants. The aim of this study was to determine the noise level and its sources in the NICU and neonatal ward of Al-Zahra Hospital of Rasht, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the intensity of the sounds generated by the internal and external sources in the NICU and neonatal ward was measured using a sound level meter device. The sound produced by each of the sources was individually calculated. Data were analyzed performing descriptive and analytical statistics, using SPSS version 19. Results: The mean noise levels in six rooms and a hallway during morning, afternoon and night shifts with the electromechanical devices turned on were 61.67±4.5, 61.32±4.32 and 60.71±4.56 dB, respectively. Moreover, with the devices tuned off the mean noise levels during morning, afternoon and evening shifts were 64.97±2.6, 60.6±1.29 and 57.91±4.73 dB, respectively. The differences between the mean noise levels in the neonatal wards (standard noise level=45 dB during each shift with the electromechanical devices turned on and off were statistically significant (P=0.002 and P

  11. [Risk factors for neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage in the neonatal intensive care unit of a municipal hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jie; Hei, Ming-Yan; Huang, Xi-Lin; Li, Xiao-Ping

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the risk factors for neonatal pulmonary hemorrhage (NPH) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a municipal hospital, and to provide a basis for the early identification and treatment of NPH. A total of 112 neonates who were admitted to the NICU of Shaoyang Central Hospital of Hunan Province and diagnosed with NPH were enrolled as the case group. A nested case-control method was used to select, as a control group (n=224), the neonates who underwent the treatment with an assisted mechanical ventilator and did not experience pulmonary hemorrhage. Univariate analysis and unconditional logistic regression analysis were used to identify the high risk factors for NPH. The univariate analysis showed that compared with the control group, the case group had significantly higher incidence rates of gestational diabetes and cholestasis in mothers, cesarean delivery, gestational age <34 weeks, 5-minute Apgar score ≤5, birth weight <2 500 g, heart failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) before the development of NPH, partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (oxygenation index, OI) ≤100, and a reduction in mean platelet volume. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that DIC, heart failure, and OI ≤100 were independent risk factors for NPH (OR=33.975, 3.975, 1.818 respectively; P<0.05). Heart failure, OI ≤100, and DIC are risk factors for the development of NPH in the NICU of the municipal hospital.

  12. Sedation and analgesia practices in neonatal intensive care units (EUROPAIN): results from a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Eriksson, Mats; Courtois, Emilie; Boyle, Elaine; Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Andersen, Randi Dovland; Sarafidis, Kosmas; Polkki, Tarja; Matos, Cristina; Lago, Paola; Papadouri, Thalia; Montalto, Simon Attard; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Simons, Sinno; Tameliene, Rasa; van Overmeire, Bart; Berger, Angelika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Schroth, Michael; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, Ursula; Trinkl, Anna; Deindl, Philipp; Wald, Martin; Rigo, Vincent; Dussart, Anneliese; Dierckx, Elke; Coppens, Sophie; Kiilsapaa, Birgit; Metsvaht, Tuuli; Metsäranta, Marjo; Nikolajev, Kari; Saarela, Timo; Peltoniemi, Outi; Tammela, Outi; Lehtonen, Liisa; Savagner, Christophe; Sevestre, Anna; Alexandre, Cénéric; Bouchon-Guedj, Nathalie; Saumureau, Simone; Grosse, Camille; Jouvencel, Philippe; Ramful, Duksha; Clamadieu, Catherine; Mourdie, Julien; Montcho, Yannis; Cambonie, Gilles; Di Maio, Massimo; Patural, Hugues; Asrtuc, Dominique; Norbert, Karine; Bouchera, Kassis; Lang, Mathieu; Galene Gromez, Sophie; Hamon, Isabelle; Nolent, Paul; Ntwari, René-Christian; Lallemant, Carine; Chary Tardy, Anne Cécile; Pelluau, Sonia; Roue, Jean Michel; Picaud, Jean Charles; Camelio, Aurélie; Tourneux, Pierre; Saint-Faust, Marie; Morville, Patrice; David, Alexandra; Theret, Bernard; Frédérique, Martin; Topf, Georg; Menendez-Castro, Ricardo; Fujiwara-Pichler, Erhard; Deeg, Karl Heinz; Anatolitou, Fani; Baroutis, George; Papazafeiratou, Chrissoulan; Giannakopoulou, Christine; Baltogianni, Maria; Delivoria, Varvara; Sterpi, Magdalena; Saklamaki-Kontou, Melpomeni; Dimitriou, Gabriel; Charitou, Antonia; Thomaidou, Agathi; Chatziioannidis, Ilias; Salvanos, Iraklis; Pirelli, Anna; Poggiani, Carlo; Fasolato, Valeria; Cristofori, Gloria; Gomirato, Serena; Allegro, Antonella; Alfiero, Michela; Biban, Paolo; Bertolini, Alessandra; Golin, Rosanna; Franco, Elena; Molinaro, Grazia; Federica, Visintini; Rossini, Roberto; Garetti, Elisabetta; Faraoni, Maddalena; Dani, Carlo; Germini, Cristina; Braguglia, Annabella; Benigni, Gina; Azzali, Adriano; Santa, Barresi; Romoli, Raffaella; Carrera, Giuseppe; Miria, Natile; Savant, Patrizia; Cossu, Maria Antonia; Giancarlo, Gargano; Cassar, Robert; Bos, Annelis; van Kaam, Anton; Brouwer, Mieke; van Lingen, Richard; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; Sivertsen, Wiebke; Nakstad, Britt; Solhjell, Kari; Flagstad, Gro; Salvesen, Bodil; Nessestrand, Ingunn A. M.; Nordhov, Marianne; Anderssen, Sven-Harald; Wasland, Kristin; Danielsen, Kåre; Kristoffersen, Laila Marie; Ytterdahl Bergland, Unni; Borghild Stornes, Randi; Andresen, Jannicke; Solberg, Rønnaug; Hochnowski, Kristoffer; Terpinska, Ewa; Kociszewska-Najman, Bozena; Melka, Andrzej; Głuszczak, Ewa; Niezgoda, Anna; Borszewska-Kornacka, Maria Katarzyna; Witwicki, Jacek M.; Korbal, Piotr; Ramos, Helena; Garcia, Pedro; Machado, Cidália; Clemente, Fátima; Costa, Miguel; Trindade, Cristina; Salazar, Anabela; Martins Barroso, Laura; Resende, Cristine; Afonso, Maria Eulàlia; Torres, Jacinto; Maciel, Paula; Nunes, José Luis; Neve Dos Santos, Vera Alexandra; Melgar Bonis, Ana; Euba Lopez, Aintzane; Tapia Collados, Caridad; Jesus Ripalda, María; Solis Sanchez, Gonzalo; Martin Parra, Belén; Botet, Francesc; Fernandez Trisac, Jose Luis; Elorza Fernandez, María Dolores; Arriaga Redondo, María; Bargallo Ailagas, Eva; Saenz, Pilar; Lopez Ortego, Paloma; Ventura, Purificación; Galve, Zenaida; Perez Ocon, Amaya; Crespo Suarez, Pilar; Dianez Vega, Gloria; San Feliciano, Laura; Herranz Carillo, Gloria; Esteban Diez, Inés; Reyné, Mar; Garcia Borau, María José; de Las Cuevas, Isabel; Couce, María L.; González Carrasco, Ersilia; Montoro Exposito, Aurora; Concheiro Guisan, Ana; Luna Lagares, Salud; Sanchez Redondo, Maria Dolores; Hellström Westas, Lena; Moren, Stefan; Norman, Elisabeth; Olsson, Emma; Åberg, Emma; Printz, Gordana; Turner, Mark; McBride, Tim; Bomont, Robert; Webb, Delyth; Saladi, Murthy; Thirumurugan, Arumugavelu; Brooke, Nigel; Skene, Caryl; Bilolikar, Harsha; Noble, Vibert; Vora, Amish; Thompson, Fiona; Deorukhkar, Anjum; El-Refee, Sherif; McIntyre, John; Millman, Guy; Reed, Joanne; Babirecki, Matthew; Kumar, Dev; Yadav, Mahesh; O'Brien, Margaret; Gasiorowski, Edward Robert; Rawlingson, Chris; Shastri, Aravind; Tibby, Shane; Walsh, Sandra; Azzopardi, Denis; Soe, Aung; MaCrae, Duncan; Eyre, Elizabeth; Menon, Gopi; Gupta, Samir; James, Anitha; Surana, Pinki; Adams, Eleri; Wolf, Andrew; Maxwell, Nicola; Wagstaff, Miles; Mann, Rebecca; Kumar, Yadlapalli; Quinn, Michael; Jones Dyson, Steve; Mannix, Paul; Morris, Kevin; Ewer, Andrew; Gurusamy, Kalyana; Deshpande, Sanjeev; Alexander, John; Blake, Kathryn; Kumar, Siva; Oddie, Sam; Ohadike, Pamela; McKechnie, Liz; Gibson, David; Shirsalkar, Anand; Suryanarayanan, Balaji; Hubbard, Marie; Lal, Mithilesh; Ali, Imdad; Shah, Divyen; Sketchley, Suzanne; Gupta, Richa; Schofield, Joanne; Ezzat, Medhat; Mupanemunda, Richard; Gallagher, Andrew; Kronsberg, Shari

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonates who are in pain or are stressed during care in the intensive care unit (ICU) are often given sedation or analgesia. We investigated the current use of sedation or analgesia in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in European countries. Methods EUROPAIN (EUROpean Pain Audit In Neonates) was a

  13. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders...... and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. RESULTS: Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context...

  14. Evaluating a nurse-led model for providing neonatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The paper presents an overview of a multi-dimensional, prospective, comparative 5-year audit of the quality of the neonatal care provided by a maternity unit in the UK delivering 2000 babies a year, where all neonatal care after 1995 was provided by advanced neonatal nurse practitioners, in relation to that provided by a range of other medically staffed comparator units. The audit includes 11 separate comparative studies supervised by a panel of independent external advisors. Data on intrapartum and neonatal mortality is reported. A review of resuscitation at birth, and a two-tier confidential inquiry into sentinel events in six units were carried out. The reliability of the routine predischarge neonatal examination was studied and, in particular, the recognition of congenital heart disease. A review of the quality of postdischarge letters was undertaken alongside an interview survey to elicit parental views on care provision. An audit of all hospital readmissions within 28 days of birth is reported. Other areas of study include management of staff stress, perceived adequacy of the training of nurse practitioners coming into post, and an assessment of unit costs. Intrapartum and neonatal death among women with a singleton pregnancy originally booked for delivery in Ashington fell 39% between 1991-1995 and 1996-2000 (5.12 vs. 3.11 deaths per 1000 births); the decline for the whole region was 27% (4.10 vs. 2.99). By all other indicators the quality of care in the nurse-managed unit was as good as, or better than, that in the medically staffed comparator units. An appropriately trained, stable team with a store of experience can deliver cot-side care of a higher quality than staff rostered to this task for a few months to gain experience, and this is probably more important than their medical or nursing background. Factors limiting the on-site availability of medical staff with paediatric expertise do not need to dictate the future disposition of maternity services.

  15. [Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleker, O.P.; Meijden, W.I. van der; Wittenberg, J.; Bergen, J.E. van; Boeke, A.J.; Doornum, G.J.J. van; Henquet, C.J.; Galama, J.M.D.; Postma, M.J.; Prins, J.M.; Voorst Vader, P.C. van

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes' summarises the current scientific position on the diagnosis and treatment of a great number of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and neonatal herpes. Symptomatic treatment of

  16. Research gaps in neonatal HIV-related care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Davies

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The South African prevention of mother to child transmission programme has made excellentprogress in reducing vertical HIV transmission, and paediatric antiretroviral therapyprogrammes have demonstrated good outcomes with increasing treatment initiation inyounger children and infants. However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African,lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup,and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART before diseaseprogression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine, experts provide valuable recommendations for addressingthese gaps. The present article highlights a number of areas where evidence is lacking toinform guidelines and programme development for optimal neonatal HIV-related care.

  17. Fathers' Stress in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Betty; Ammentorp, Jette; Garne, Ester

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) tend to focus attention on the mothers and the newborn infants. Thus, fathers may find it difficult to establish an optimal father-child relationship and their stress may increase and persist during hospitalization...... and expect fathers to be involved, and support them to establish a father-child relationship, although they might become more stressed. IMPLICATIONS FOR RESEARCH: More adequate outcome measures are needed to determine the effect of interventions on paternal stress.This is an open-access article distributed....... PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of a more father-friendly NICU on paternal stress and their participation in childcare. METHODS: A quasiexperimental design was conducted on Danish-speaking fathers of newborn infants 28 or more weeks' gestational age. The Parental Stressor Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care...

  18. ISO 9001 in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitner, Gad; Nadir, Erez; Feldman, Michael; Yurman, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the process for approving and certifying a neonatal intensive care unit to ISO 9001 standards. The process started with the department head's decision to improve services quality before deciding to achieve ISO 9001 certification. Department processes were mapped and quality management mechanisms were developed. Process control and performance measurements were defined and implemented to monitor the daily work. A service satisfaction review was conducted to get feedback from families. In total, 28 processes and related work instructions were defined. Process yields showed service improvements. Family satisfaction improved. The paper is based on preparing only one neonatal intensive care unit to the ISO 9001 standard. The case study should act as an incentive for hospital managers aiming to improve service quality based on the ISO 9001 standard. ISO 9001 is becoming a recommended tool to improve clinical service quality.

  19. [Congenital cytomegalovirus infection manifesting as neonatal respiratory distress in an HIV-exposed uninfected newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, A; El Mjati, H; Nathan, N; Kieffer, F; Mitanchez, D

    2017-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most common intrauterine infections, affecting approximately 1% of all live births. There are few reports on congenital CMV infections manifesting as isolated pneumonitis. We report a case of congenital CMV with neonatal respiratory distress affecting an HIV-exposed uninfected infant. This infant required noninvasive ventilation beginning within the first 15min of life. The initial chest X-ray showed diffuse bilateral ground-glass opacifications. Bacterial infection, meconium aspiration and hyaline membrane disease were excluded. Salivary quantitative CMV PCR was positive (2,342,261IU/mL) and serum viral load for CMV was low (476IU/mL). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) performed on day 12 for quantitative CMV PCR was significantly positive (1,045,942IU/mL). Intravenous ganciclovir treatment was started on day 14 (7.5mg/kg/12h) for 2 weeks and oral valganciclovir (15mg/kg/12h) was given for 4 weeks afterwards. Ventilatory support was stopped on day 18. HIV serum viral load was negative on day 30. Congenital CMV infection can present as isolated pneumonitis with persistent neonatal respiratory symptoms, emphysematous lung disease, or persistent pulmonary hypertension. If this diagnosis is suspected, and even if CMV viremia remains low, BAL with quantitative CMV PCR must be performed to ascertain the diagnosis and indicate antiviral treatment. HIV-exposed uninfected infants have higher rates of congenital CMV infection when the mother's CD4 rate isCMV transmission in HIV-exposed uninfected infants have occurred by maternal endogenous reactivation or reinfection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel preterm respiratory mechanics active simulator to test the performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, Paolo; Sciuto, Salvatore Andrea; Silvestri, Sergio

    2002-06-01

    A patient active simulator is proposed which is capable of reproducing values of the parameters of pulmonary mechanics of healthy newborns and preterm pathological infants. The implemented prototype is able to: (a) let the operator choose the respiratory pattern, times of apnea, episodes of cough, sobs, etc., (b) continuously regulate and control the parameters characterizing the pulmonary system; and, finally, (c) reproduce the attempt of breathing of a preterm infant. Taking into account both the limitation due to the chosen application field and the preliminary autocalibration phase automatically carried out by the proposed device, accuracy and reliability on the order of 1% is estimated. The previously indicated value has to be considered satisfactory in light of the field of application and the small values of the simulated parameters. Finally, the achieved metrological characteristics allow the described neonatal simulator to be adopted as a reference device to test performances of neonatal ventilators and, more specifically, to measure the time elapsed between the occurrence of a potentially dangerous condition to the patient and the activation of the corresponding alarm of the tested ventilator.

  1. Staff and parents are discriminators for outcomes in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, Verena; Halstenberg, Katrin; Demel, Anja; Kirchberger, Valerie; Riedel, Rainer; Schlößer, Rolf; Wollny, Caroline; Woopen, Christiane; Kuntz, Ludwig; Roth, Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the associations between staff work characteristics, parents' experiences and a number of medical outcome measures. This explorative multicentre study took place in the neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) of five German university hospitals between 2009 and 2011. We assessed staff work characteristics by surveying 126 NICU nurses and 57 physicians and asked 214 parents about their relationships with staff. The outcome variables of 230 premature infants with birth weights of less than 1500 g were collected over a period of 18 months. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression analyses for statistical purposes. We found differences in outcome measures between the NICUs, particularly parameters of respiratory support, weight gain and length of stay. When we controlled for the NICUs' baseline factors, perceptions of the relationship between staff and parents (empathy, p staff work characteristics (workload, p Staff and parents were discriminators for neonatal outcomes through perceptions of work characteristics and the relationship between staff and parents, respectively. Respiratory support and nutrition measures were particularly sensitive. This research has prompted a nationwide, multicentre study of 66 NICUs. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Reducing neonatal mortality in India: critical role of access to emergency obstetric care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Rammohan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal mortality currently accounts for 41% of all global deaths among children below five years. Despite recording a 33% decline in neonatal deaths between 2000 and 2009, about 900,000 neonates died in India in 2009. The decline in neonatal mortality is slower than in the post-neonatal period, and neonatal mortality rates have increased as a proportion of under-five mortality rates. Neonatal mortality rates are higher among rural dwellers of India, who make up at least two-thirds of India's population. Identifying the factors influencing neonatal mortality will significantly improve child survival outcomes in India. METHODS: Our analysis is based on household data from the nationally representative 2008 Indian District Level Household Survey (DLHS-3. We use probit regression techniques to analyse the links between neonatal mortality at the household level and households' access to health facilities. The probability of the child dying in the first month of birth is our dependent variable. RESULTS: We found that 80% of neonatal deaths occurred within the first week of birth, and that the probability of neonatal mortality is significantly lower when the child's village is closer to the district hospital (DH, suggesting the critical importance of specialist hospital care in the prevention of newborn deaths. Neonatal deaths were lower in regions where emergency obstetric care was available at the District Hospitals. We also found that parental schooling and household wealth status improved neonatal survival outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Addressing the main causes of neonatal deaths in India--preterm deliveries, asphyxia, and sepsis--requires adequacy of specialised workforce and facilities for delivery and neonatal intensive care and easy access by mothers and neonates. The slow decline in neonatal death rates reflects a limited attention to factors which contribute to neonatal deaths. The suboptimal quality and coverage of Emergency

  3. A Randomized Trial Comparing Efficacy of Bubble and Ventilator Derived Nasal CPAP in Very Low Birth Weight Neonates with Respiratory Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sheetal; Maria, Arti; Roy, Mahesh K; Verma, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) has an established role in the care of Very Low Birth Weight (VLBW) babies with respiratory distress. Bubble CPAP (BCPAP) is a cheap alternative for countries where resources are limited. However, data comparing efficacy of BCPAP with conventional ventilator derived (VCPAP) is limited. To compare CPAP failure rates between BCPAP and VCPAP among VLBW, with moderate respiratory distress. Secondary objectives were to compare the rates of Intraventricular Haemorrhage (IVH), pulmonary air leaks and deaths between the two groups and determine the predictors of CPAP failure. VLBW babies with moderate respiratory distress (Silverman Anderson score 4-7), born or admitted in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) within 28 days of life were randomized to receive either BCPAP (n=34) or VCPAP (n=34). CPAP failure rate in both the groups was compared. The baseline characteristics were similar in both the groups. Five out of 34 (14.70%) babies in BCPAP group and 11 out of 34 (32.35%) in VCPAP failed CPAP (p=0.08). IVH (BCPAP group 24% and VCPAP group 9%, p= 0.10) and mortality (BCPAP group 6% and VCPAP group 9%, p=0.642) were comparable in both the groups. Factors such as gestational age CPAP failure in our study. The CPAP failure rates in VLBW babies with moderate respiratory distress were found to be similar whether bubble CPAP or ventilator CPAP was used. There was no difference in complication rates of IVH or mortality with either method of CPAP.

  4. Radiation doses to neonates and issues of radiation protection in a special care baby unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C.I.; Fife, I.A.J.; Croasdale, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiographs are most commonly taken in the neonatal period to assist in the diagnosis and management of respiratory difficulties. Frequent accurate radiographic assessment is required and a knowledge of the radiation dose is necessary to make the justification of such exposures. A survey of radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic X-ray examinations (chest and abdomen) has been carried out in the special care baby unit (SCBU) of the Royal Free Hospital. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was calculated from Quality Control measurements on the X-ray set itself. Direct measurement of radiation doses was also performed using highly sensitive thermoluminescence dosimeters (LiF:Mg,Cu,P), calibrated and tested for consistency in sensitivity. The mean ESD per radiograph was calculated to be 36μGy (with a standard deviation of 6μGy), averaged over 95 X-ray examinations. The ESD's as derived from the TLD crystals, ranged from 18μGy to 60μGy. The mean energy imparted (EI) and the mean whole body dose per radiograph were estimated to be 14μJ and 10μGy respectively. Assuming that neonates and foetuses are equally susceptible to carcinogenic effects of radiation (it involves an overestimation of risk), the radiation risk of childhood cancer from a single radiograph was estimated to be of the order (0.3-1.3)x10 -6 . Radiation doses compared favourably with the reference value of 80μGy ESD published by CEC in 1996. (author)

  5. Palliative care in the neonatal unit: neonatal nursing staff perceptions of facilitators and barriers in a regional tertiary nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcullen, Meegan; Ireland, Susan

    2017-05-11

    Neonatology has made significant advances in the last 30 years. Despite the advances in treatments, not all neonates survive and a palliative care model is required within the neonatal context. Previous research has focused on the barriers of palliative care provision. A holistic approach to enhancing palliative care provision should include identifying both facilitators and barriers. A strengths-based approach would allow barriers to be addressed while also enhancing facilitators. The current study qualitatively explored perceptions of neonatal nurses about facilitators and barriers to delivery of palliative care and also the impact of the regional location of the unit. The study was conducted at the Townsville Hospital, which is the only regional tertiary neonatal unit in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of eight neonatal nurses. Thematic analysis of the data was conducted within a phenomenological framework. Six themes emerged regarding family support and staff factors that were perceived to support the provision of palliative care of a high quality. Staff factors included leadership, clinical knowledge, and morals, values, and beliefs. Family support factors included emotional support, communication, and practices within the unit. Five themes emerged from the data that were perceived to be barriers to providing quality palliative care. Staff perceived education, lack of privacy, isolation, staff characteristics and systemic (policy, and procedure) factors to impact upon palliative care provision. The regional location of the unit also presented unique facilitators and barriers to care. This study identified and explored facilitators and barriers in the delivery of quality palliative care for neonates in a regional tertiary setting. Themes identified suggested that a strengths-approach, which engages and amplifies facilitating factors while identified barriers are addressed or minimized, would be successful in

  6. Participatory Action Research in the Field of Neonatal Intensive Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Betty; Johannessen, Helle; Fenger-Grøn, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    : This PAR process was carried out from August 2011 to July 2013 and included participant observations, semi-structured interviews, multi sequential interviews, workshops, focus groups, group discussion, and a seminar. The theoretical framework of validity described by Herr and Anderson's three criteria......BACKGROUND: In neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) health care professionals typically give most of their attention to the infants and the mothers while many fathers feel uncertain and have an unmet need for support and guidance. This paper describes and discusses participatory action research...

  7. When and Why Do Neonatal and Pediatric Critical Care Physicians Consult Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Claire A; Starks, Helene; O'Connor, M Rebecca; Bourget, Erica; Lindhorst, Taryn; Hays, Ross; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2018-06-01

    Parents of children admitted to neonatal and pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) are at increased risk of experiencing acute and post-traumatic stress disorder. The integration of palliative care may improve child and family outcomes, yet there remains a lack of information about indicators for specialty-level palliative care involvement in this setting. To describe neonatal and pediatric critical care physician perspectives on indicators for when and why to involve palliative care consultants. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 attending physicians from neonatal, pediatric, and cardiothoracic ICUs in a single quaternary care pediatric hospital. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using content and thematic analyses. We identified 2 themes related to the indicators for involving palliative care consultants: (1) palliative care expertise including support and bridging communication and (2) organizational factors influencing communication including competing priorities and fragmentation of care. Palliative care was most beneficial for families at risk of experiencing communication problems that resulted from organizational factors, including those with long lengths of stay and medical complexity. The ability of palliative care consultants to bridge communication was limited by some of these same organizational factors. Physicians valued the involvement of palliative care consultants when they improved efficiency and promoted harmony. Given the increasing number of children with complex chronic conditions, it is important to support the capacity of ICU clinical teams to provide primary palliative care. We suggest comprehensive system changes and critical care physician training to include topics related to chronic illness and disability.

  8. Understanding the use of continuous oscillating positive airway pressure (bubble CPAP) to treat neonatal respiratory disease: an engineering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manilal-Reddy, P I; Al-Jumaily, A M

    2009-01-01

    A continuous oscillatory positive airway pressure with pressure oscillations incidental to the mean airway pressure (bubble CPAP) is defined as a modified form of traditional continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivery where pressure oscillations in addition to CPAP are administered to neonates with lung diseases. The mechanical effect of the pressure oscillations on lung performance is investigated by formulating mathematical models of a typical bubble CPAP device and a simple representation of a neonatal respiratory system. Preliminary results of the respiratory system's mechanical response suggest that bubble CPAP may improve lung performance by minimizing the respiratory system impedance and that the resonant frequency of the respiratory system may be a controlling factor. Additional steps in terms of clinical trials and a more complex respiratory system model are required to gain a deeper insight into the mechanical receptiveness of the respiratory system to pressure oscillations. However, the current results are promising in that they offer a deeper insight into the trends of variations that can be expected in future extended models as well as the model philosophies that need to be adopted to produce results that are compatible with experimental verification.

  9. Radiation Dose to Newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreyni Toossi, M. T.; Malekzadeh, M.

    2012-01-01

    With the increase of X-ray use for medical diagnostic purposes, knowing the given doses is necessary in patients for comparison with reference levels. The concept of reference doses or diagnostic reference levels has been developed as a practical aid in the optimization of patient protection in diagnostic radiology. To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography (chest and abdomen). This study has been carried out in the neonatal intensive care unit of a province in Iran. Entrance surface dose was measured directly with thermoluminescent dosimeters. The population included 195 neonates admitted for a diagnostic radiography, in eight NICUs of different hospital types. The mean entrance surface dose for chest and abdomen examinations were 76.3 μGy and 61.5 μGy, respectively. Diagnostic reference levels for neonate in NICUs of the province were 88 μGy for chest and 98 μGy for abdomen examinations that were slightly higher than other studies. Risk of death due to radiation cancer incidence of abdomens examination was equal to 1.88 × 10 -6 for male and 4.43 × 10 -6 for female. For chest X-ray, it was equal to 2.54 × 10 -6 for male and 1.17 × 10 -5 for female patients. Diagnostic reference levels for neonates in our province were slightly higher than values reported by other studies such as European national diagnostic reference levels and the NRPB reference dose. The main reason was related to using a high mAs and a low kVp applied in most departments and also a low focus film distance. Probably lack of collimation also affected some exams in the NICUs.

  10. Telemedicine Versus Face-to-Face Evaluations by Respiratory Therapists of Mechanically Ventilated Neonates and Children: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rebecca C; Yager, Phoebe H; Clark, Maureen E; Roumiantsev, Serguei; Venancio, Heather L; Chipman, Daniel W; Kacmarek, Robert M; Noviski, Natan N

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation is one of the most important therapeutic interventions in neonatal and pediatric ICUs. Telemedicine has been shown to reliably extend pediatric intensivist expertise to facilities where expertise is limited. If reliable, telemedicine may extend the reach of pediatric respiratory therapists (RTs) to facilities where expertise does not exist or free up existing RT resources for important face-to-face activities in facilities where expertise is limited. The aim of this study was to determine how well respiratory assessments for ventilated neonates and children correlated when performed simultaneously by 2 RTs face-to-face and via telemedicine. We conducted a pilot study including 40 assessments by 16 RTs on 11 subjects (5 neonatal ICU; 6 pediatric ICU). Anonymously completed intake forms by 2 different RTs concurrently assessing 14 ventilator-derived and patient-based respiratory variables were used to determine correlations. Forty paired assessments were performed. Median telemedicine assessment time was 8 min. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to determine agreement between continuous data, and the Cohen kappa statistics were used for binary variables. Pressure control, PEEP, breathing frequency, and FIO2 perfectly correlated (r = 1, all P Telemedicine technology was acceptable to RTs. Telemedicine evaluations highly correlated with face-to-face for 10 of 14 aspects of standard bedside respiratory assessment. Poor correlation was noted for more complex, patient-generated parameters, highlighting the importance of further investigation incorporating a virtual stethoscope. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Prescribing errors in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Cezar Machado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric patients, especially those admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (ICU, are highly vulnerable to medication errors. This study aimed to measure the prescription error rate in a university hospital neonatal ICU and to identify susceptible patients, types of errors, and the medicines involved. The variables related to medicines prescribed were compared to the Neofax prescription protocol. The study enrolled 150 newborns and analyzed 489 prescription order forms, with 1,491 medication items, corresponding to 46 drugs. Prescription error rate was 43.5%. Errors were found in dosage, intervals, diluents, and infusion time, distributed across 7 therapeutic classes. Errors were more frequent in preterm newborns. Diluent and dosing were the most frequent sources of errors. The therapeutic classes most involved in errors were antimicrobial agents and drugs that act on the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  12. Modes of death in neonatal intensive care units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Finan, E

    2006-04-01

    With the ever-increasing availability of aggressive medical treatment and technical support, neonatologists are offered an increasing ability to prolong life. While "end-of-life" decisions within NICUs have been studied internationally, there is limited data available for Ireland. Through the auspices of the Irish Faculty of Paediatrics 2002 Neonatal Mortality Ouestionnaire, decisions made around the time of death in Irish Neonatal Intensive Care Units were examined. The overall response rate to the questionnaire was 96% (n=25). One hundred and eighty seven deaths were reported for 2002. Information pertaining to the mode of death was available in 53% of cases. Seventy seven percent of those paediatricians who answered this question, reported either withdrawing or withholding treatment in babies thought to have a hopeless outcome, with the greatest proportion of these deaths occurring in premature infants (n=30) and babies with congenital defects (n=40).

  13. Burnout in the neonatal intensive care unit and its relation to healthcare-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, D S; Sexton, J B; Kan, P; Sharek, P J; Nisbet, C C; Rigdon, J; Lee, H C; Profit, J

    2017-03-01

    To examine burnout prevalence among California neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and to test the relation between burnout and healthcare-associated infection (HAI) rates in very low birth weight (VLBW) neonates. Retrospective observational study of provider perceptions of burnout from 2073 nurse practitioners, physicians, registered nurses and respiratory therapists, using a validated four-item questionnaire based on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. The relation between burnout and HAI rates among VLBW (<1500 g) neonates from each NICU was evaluated using multi-level logistic regression analysis with patient-level factors as fixed effects. We found variable prevalence of burnout across the NICUs surveyed (mean 25.2±10.1%). Healthcare-associated infection rates were 8.3±5.1% during the study period. Highest burnout prevalence was found among nurses, nurse practitioners and respiratory therapists (non-physicians, 28±11% vs 17±19% physicians), day shift workers (30±3% vs 25±4% night shift) and workers with 5 or more years of service (29±2% vs 16±6% in fewer than 3 years group). Overall burnout rates showed no correlation with risk-adjusted rates of HAIs (r=-0.133). Item-level analysis showed positive association between HAIs and perceptions of working too hard (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.28). Sensitivity analysis of high-volume NICUs suggested a moderate correlation between burnout prevalence and HAIs (r=0.34). Burnout is most prevalent among non-physicians, daytime workers and experienced workers. Perceptions of working too hard associate with increased HAIs in this cohort of VLBW infants, but overall burnout prevalence is not predictive.

  14. Is there a Role of Palliative Care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in India?

    OpenAIRE

    Dighe, Manjiri P; Muckaden, Maryann A; Manerkar, Swati A; Duraisamy, Balaji P

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. P...

  15. Impact of hypothermia on implementation of CPAP for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in a low-resource setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carns, Jennifer; Kawaza, Kondwani; Quinn, M K; Miao, Yinsen; Guerra, Rudy; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Oden, Maria; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is widely associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, but remains a pervasive global problem. No studies have examined the impact of hypothermia on outcomes for preterm infants treated with CPAP for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This retrospective analysis assessed the impact of hypothermia on outcomes of 65 neonates diagnosed with RDS and treated with either nasal oxygen (N = 17) or CPAP (N = 48) in a low-resource setting. A classification tree approach was used to develop a model predicting survival for subjects diagnosed with RDS. Survival to discharge was accurately predicted based on three variables: mean temperature, treatment modality, and mean respiratory rate. None of the 23 neonates with a mean temperature during treatment below 35.8°C survived to discharge, regardless of treatment modality. Among neonates with a mean temperature exceeding 35.8°C, the survival rate was 100% for the 31 neonates treated with CPAP and 36.4% for the 11 neonates treated with nasal oxygen (pCPAP, outcomes were poor if more than 50% of measured temperatures indicated hypothermia (5.6% survival). In contrast, all 30 neonates treated with CPAP and with more than 50% of temperature measurements above 35.8°C survived to discharge, regardless of initial temperature. The results of our study suggest that successful implementation of CPAP to treat RDS in low-resource settings will require aggressive action to prevent persistent hypothermia. However, our results show that even babies who are initially cold can do well on CPAP with proper management of hypothermia.

  16. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice

    2012-01-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out....

  17. Efficacy and safety of bubble CPAP in neonatal care in low and middle income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Simone; Duke, Trevor; Davis, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Forty per cent of global child deaths occur in the neonatal period. Low and middle income countries need effective and simple methods to improve hospital-based neonatal care. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) may have a role in improving the quality of respiratory support in hospitals in low and middle income countries. To examine the evidence for the efficacy and safety of bubble CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress in low and middle income settings. A systematic search (1946-March 2014) was performed of Pubmed, Ovid MEDLINE, Web of Science, Google Scholar and the references of relevant articles. Articles meeting inclusion criteria (CPAP for respiratory distress in infants CPAP compared with oxygen therapy, followed by mechanical ventilation if required, reduced the need for mechanical ventilation by 30%-50%. In another three trials comparing bubble CPAP with ventilator CPAP, mortality and complication rates were similar, while meta-analysis of CPAP failure in these same trials showed a lower failure rate in the bubble CPAP groups (p CPAP is safe and reduces the need for mechanical ventilation. Further research into the efficacy of bubble CPAP in low-income and middle-income countries is needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Layout and Nurses' Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doede, Megan; Trinkoff, Alison M; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) remain one of the few areas in hospitals that still use an open bay (OPBY) design for patient stays greater than 24 hr, housing multiple infants, staff, and families in one large room. This creates high noise levels, contributes to the spread of infection, and affords families little privacy. These problems have given rise to the single-family room NICU. This represents a significant change in the care environment for nurses. This literature review answers the question: When compared to OPBY layout, how does a single family room layout impact neonatal nurses' work? Thirteen studies published between 2006 and 2015 were located. Many studies reported both positive and negative effects on nurses' work and were therefore sorted by their cited advantages and disadvantages. Advantages included improved quality of the physical environment; improved quality of patient care; improved parent interaction; and improvements in nurse job satisfaction, stress, and burnout. Disadvantages included decreased interaction among the NICU patient care team, increased nurse workload, decreased visibility on the unit, and difficult interactions with family. This review suggests that single-family room NICUs introduce a complex situation in which trade-offs occur for nurses, most prominently the trade-off between visibility and privacy. Additionally, the literature is clear on what elements of nurses' work are impacted, but how the built environment influences these elements, and how these elements interact during nurses' work, is not as well understood. The current level of research and directions for future research are also discussed.

  19. The scientific basis for postoperative respiratory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common and expensive. Costs, morbidity, and mortality are higher with PPCs than with cardiac or thromboembolic complications. Preventing and treating PPCs is a major focus of respiratory therapists, using a wide variety of techniques and devices, including incentive spirometry, CPAP, positive expiratory pressure, intrapulmonary percussive ventilation, and chest physical therapy. The scientific evidence for these techniques is lacking. CPAP has some evidence of benefit in high risk patients with hypoxemia. Incentive spirometry is used frequently, but the evidence suggests that incentive spirometry alone has no impact on PPC. Chest physical therapy, which includes mechanical clapping and postural drainage, appears to worsen atelectasis secondary to pain and splinting. As with many past respiratory therapy techniques, the profession needs to take a hard look at these techniques and work to provide only practices based on good evidence. The idea of a PPC bundle has merit and should be studied in larger, multicenter trials. Additionally, intraoperative ventilation may play a key role in the development of PPCs and should receive greater attention.

  20. Assessment of surfactant use in preterm infants as a marker of neonatal intensive care unit quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorch Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proposed neonatal quality measures have included structural measures such as average daily census, and outcome measures such as mortality and rates of complications of prematurity. However, process measures have remained largely unexamined. The objective of this research was to examine variation in surfactant use as a possible process measure of neonatal quality. Methods We obtained data on infants 30 to 34 weeks gestation admitted with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS within 48 hours of birth to 16 hospitals participating in the Pediatric Health Information Systems database from 2001-2006. Models were developed to describe hospital variation in surfactant use and identify patient and hospital predictors of use. Another cohort of all infants admitted within 24 hours of birth was used to obtain adjusted neonatal intensive care unit (NICU mortality rates. To assess the construct validity of surfactant use as a quality metric, adjusted hospital rates of mortality and surfactant use were compared using Kendall's tau. Results Of 3,633 infants, 46% received surfactant. For individual hospitals, the adjusted odds of surfactant use varied from 2.2 times greater to 5.9 times less than the hospital with the median adjusted odds of surfactant use. Increased annual admissions of extremely low birth weight infants to the NICU were associated with greater surfactant use (OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.02-3.19. The correlation between adjusted hospital rates of surfactant use and in-hospital mortality was 0.37 (Kendall's tau p = 0.051. Conclusions Though results were encouraging, efforts to examine surfactant use in infants with RDS as a process measure reflecting quality of care revealed significant challenges. Difficulties related to adequate measurement including defining RDS using administrative data, accounting for care received prior to transfer, and adjusting for severity of illness will need to be addressed to improve the utility of this

  1. Ambient Noise Levels in Acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia R. B D'Souza; Leslie Edward Lewis; Vijay Kumar; Ramesh Bhat Y; Jayashree Purkayastha; Hari Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Background: Advances in neonatal care have resulted in improved survival of neonates admitted to the intensive care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). However, the NCU may be an inappropriate milieu, with presence of overwhelming stimuli, most potent being the continuous presence of noise in the ambience of the NICU. Aim and Objectives: To determine and describe the ambient noise levels in the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Material and Methods...

  2. Serum cystatin C as an earlier predictor of acute kidney injury than serum creatinine in preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Ahmed Abdelaal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to evaluate serum cystatin C (sCysC as an early predictor of acute kidney injury (AKI in preterm neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. Sixty preterm neonates diagnosed with RDS and 40 healthy controls (28–36 weeks admitted to the neonatal Intensive Care Unit were investigated. AKI was defined on the 3rd day of life (DOL-3 as an increase in serum creatinine (sCr of >0.3 mg/dL from baseline (the lowest previous sCr. sCysC levels were measured on DOL-1, -3 and -7. Of the 60 neonates with RDS, 24 (40% developed AKI. Five patients (79.17% were classified as AKI Network (AKIN-1 and 19 patients (20.83%, as AKIN-2. At DOL-3, the mean sCysC values were significantly higher among neonates with RDS and AKI (1.68 ± 0.37 compared with controls (0.79 ± 0.83 and those with RDS and no AKI (0.85 ± 0.20 (P <0.001. sCysC levels significantly increased among neonates with AKI from DOL-3 to DOL-7 (P = 0.002. The sCr values showed no significant difference between those with RDS with AKI, RDS, and no AKI or control groups at DOL-1 and -3. Only as late as DOL-7, the mean values of sCr were higher among neonates with AKI compared with no AKI and controls (P <0.001. The receiver operating characteristic curves area under the curve was 0.97 for predicting the development of AKI within 72 h (P = 0.001. With the best cutoff value of ≥1.28 mg/L, the sensitivity and specificity of sCysC for detecting AKI within 72 h were 100 and 83.3%, respectively. In conclusion, sCysC is an early marker for AKI in neonates with RDS.

  3. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives.

  4. Afferent Neural Feedback Overrides the Modulating Effects of Arousal, Hypercapnia and Hypoxemia on Neonatal Cardio-respiratory Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Kathleen J; Schneider, Jennifer M; Ibrahim, Thowfique; Rigaux, Anita; Hasan, Shabih U

    2018-04-20

    Evidence at whole animal, organ-system, and cellular and molecular levels suggests that afferent volume feedback is critical for establishment of adequate ventilation at birth. Due to the irreversible nature of vagal ablation studies to date, it was difficult to quantify the roles of afferent volume input, arousal and changes in blood gas tensions on neonatal respiratory control. During reversible perineural vagal block, profound apneas, and hypoxemia and hypercarbia were observed necessitating termination of perineural blockade. Respiratory depression and apneas were independent of the sleep states. We demonstrate that profound apneas and life-threatening respiratory failure in vagally denervated animals do not result from lack of arousal or hypoxemia. Change in sleep state and concomitant respiratory depression result from lack of afferent volume feedback, which appears to be critical for the maintenance of normal breathing patterns and adequate gas exchange during the early postnatal period. Afferent volume feedback plays a vital role in neonatal respiratory control. Mechanisms for the profound respiratory depression and life-threatening apneas observed in vagally denervated neonatal animals remain unclear. We investigated the roles of sleep states, hypoxic-hypercapnia and afferent volume feedback on respiratory depression using reversible perineural vagal block during early postnatal period. Seven lambs were instrumented during the first 48h of life to record/analyze sleep states, diaphragmatic electromyograph, arterial blood gas tensions, systemic arterial blood pressure and rectal temperature. Perineural cuffs were placed around the vagi to attain reversible blockade. Post-operatively, during the awake state, both vagi were blocked using 2% xylocaine for up to 30 minutes. Compared with baseline values, pHa, PaO 2 and SaO 2 decreased and PaCO 2 increased during perineural blockade (P Respiratory depression and apneas were independent of sleep states. This

  5. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  6. Radiation dose to neonates on a Special Care Baby Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Barry, J.L.; Smalley, P.

    1989-01-01

    The skin entrance dose to neonates on a special care baby unit was estimated from a knowledge of the technique factors, X-ray tube output and backscatter factors. Normalized organ dose data were employed to estimate radiation dose to a number of critical organs. Methods of reducing radiation dose to neonates were investigated. Initially, this involved changing the radiographic technique factors and introducing a lead rubber adjustable collimator, placed on top of the incubator, in addition to light beam diaphragms on the X-ray tube. These modifications to the examination technique appeared to reduce average entrance dose per radiograph from 92 μGy, to 58 μGy, a reduction of 37%. Later, a rare-earth film-screen combination was introduced to replace existing fast calcium tungstate screens. This enabled average entrance dose per radiograph to be reduced to 39 μGy, a further reduction of 33%. The mean radiation dose to a neonate is mainly determined by the number of radiographs. (author)

  7. Radiation dose to neonates on a Special Care Baby Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulkner, K.; Barry, J.L.; Smalley, P.

    1989-03-01

    The skin entrance dose to neonates on a special care baby unit was estimated from a knowledge of the technique factors, X-ray tube output and backscatter factors. Normalized organ dose data were employed to estimate radiation dose to a number of critical organs. Methods of reducing radiation dose to neonates were investigated. Initially, this involved changing the radiographic technique factors and introducing a lead rubber adjustable collimator, placed on top of the incubator, in addition to light beam diaphragms on the X-ray tube. These modifications to the examination technique appeared to reduce average entrance dose per radiograph from 92 ..mu..Gy, to 58 ..mu..Gy, a reduction of 37%. Later, a rare-earth film-screen combination was introduced to replace existing fast calcium tungstate screens. This enabled average entrance dose per radiograph to be reduced to 39 ..mu..Gy, a further reduction of 33%. The mean radiation dose to a neonate is mainly determined by the number of radiographs.

  8. [Stress in parents of hospitalized newborns in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma I, Elisa; Von Wussow K, Fernanda; Morales B, Ignacia; Cifuentes R, Javier; Ambiado T, Sergio

    2017-06-01

    The birth of a child that requires hospitalization in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) can be very stressful for parents. To determine the stress level of parents of newborns (NB) hospitalized in a level III NICU in Santiago, and its association with clinical and sociodemographic variables. Descriptive cross-sectional study. 373 admissions were evaluated. The sampling was non-probabilistic and included parents of RN admitted to the UPCN between 7 and 21 days of hospitalization. Only parents which have visited the RN at least three times were included. i) Questionnaire to obtain data which could not be obtained from the medical record; ii) Parental Stress Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (PSS:NICU) which measures the perception of parents about stressors from the physical and psychological environment of the UPCN. 100 parents of 59 hospitalized NB participated in the study. The average parental stress was 2.87±0.69. The subscale scores got higher was “Relationship with the baby and parental role”. Complications in pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis or prenatal hospitalization, did not affect the stress level or the presence of prematurity, respiratory diseases, congenital malformations, genopathies or requirement of mechanical ventilation. Stress levels presented in parents are unrelated to gender and to the studied clinical variables.

  9. Atypical social development in neonatal intensive care unit survivors at 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasumasa; Yoshida, Futoshi; Hemmi, Hayato; Ito, Miharu; Kakita, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Toru; Hishida, Manabu; Iguchi, Toshiyuki; Seo, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Keiko

    2011-12-01

    Owing to advances in neonatal intensive care, many infants who are hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) can survive and grow, and are referred to as NICU survivors. However, social development in NICU survivors has not been fully explored. To examine the social development of NICU survivors, a questionnaire consisting of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT) was used. The M-CHAT was completed by the parents of either NICU survivors (n= 117) or normally delivered children (control group, n= 112) during their regular medical checkups at a corrected age of 12 months. Ninety percent of NICU survivors and 63% of control children did not pass the M-CHAT screen. As it was originally designed for children aged 18-30 months, failed M-CHAT items could have been due to developmental issues and not due to autistic spectrum disorders. However, there was a significant difference in the total number of items failed between the two groups. In particular, many NICU survivors did not pass on M-CHAT items, such as oversensitivity to noise, unusual finger movements, and attempts to attract attention. Concerning perinatal complications, infants with low birthweight and/or the need for respiratory support tended to have a higher number of failures on all M-CHAT items. NICU survivors may have distinct developmental patterns of social communication, and should be followed up for assessment of social skills and neurological development. © 2011 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2011 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    --- Various Authors

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017; Venice (Italy; October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR, European Society for Neonatology (ESN, Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS, European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNIORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann (President of ESPR, Morten Breindahl (President of ESN, Manuel Sánchez Luna (President of UENPS, Silke Mader (Chairwoman of the Executive Board and Co-Founder of EFCNISCIENTIFIC COMMITTEEVirgilio P. Carnielli (Congress President Chair, Pierre Gressens (Past Scientific President, Umberto Simeoni, Manon Benders, Neil Marlow, Ola D. Saugstad, Petra Hüppi, Agnes van den HoogenSession "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"ABS 1. HOW SAFE IS NASAL CANNULAE OXYGEN THERAPY DURING NEONATAL TRANSPORT? • A. Brunton, J. O’Shea, A. JacksonABS 2. WEANING PREMATURE INFANTS FROM NASAL CONTINUOUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE – CURRENT PRACTICE IN GERMANY • A. Kidszun, C. Arnold, J. Winter, C. Whybra-Trümpler, E. MildenbergerABS 3. TIMING OF KEY EVENTS IN NEONATAL RE­SUSCITATION • A. Heathcote, J. Jones, P. ClarkeABS 4. COMPARING NON-INVASIVE VENTILATION METHODS IN RESPIRATORY SUPPORT OF PRETERM NEONATES WITH RESPIRATORY DISEASES • A.S. Farhat, A. Mohammadzadeh, G.A. Mamuri, R. Saeidi, S. NoorizadehABS 5. PREDICTORS AND OUTCOMES OF CONTINU­OUS POSITIVE AIRWAY PRESSURE AND NA­SAL HIGH-FLOW TREATMENT FAILURE IN PRE­TERM INFANTS: A SECONDARY ANALYSIS OF A RANDOMIZED TRIAL • B. Manley, C. Roberts, D. Frøisland, L. Doyle, P. Davis, L. OwenABS 6. NEONATAL NON-INVASIVE RESPIRATORY SUPPORT APPROACH: A TWO COUNTRIES COMPARISON • I. Bresesti, S. Zivanovic, G. Lista, C. RoehrABS 7. PREDICTORS OF EARLY CPAP FAILURE IN VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PRETERM

  11. Quality improvement in radiography in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loovere, L.; Boyle, E.M.; Blatz, S.; Bowslaugh, M.; Kereliuk, M.; Paes, B.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to ensure that X-rays performed consistently adhere to established technological quality standards and are achieved without compromising patient care while minimizing exposure risks. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether educational sessions targeting areas deemed suboptimal would facilitate improvement. A retrospective, 1-week review of all neonatal X-rays and documentation of clinical information on X-ray requisitions (n = 132) was completed in a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), by a single observer. Standards for X-ray evaluation were defined a priori based on radiographic principles and essential documented medical information for correct interpretation. Targeted areas for improvement were identified and addressed through brief educational sessions and printed pamphlets. The review was repeated after recommendations were implemented. 1 month (n = 93) and 1 year (n = 76) later. Improvements were evident in both the completion of X-ray requisitions and image quality. In particular, there was a statistically significant improvement in requisition legibility (P = 0.019), completeness of the medical history (P < 0.001), reduction in X-ray rotation (P < 0.001), collimation to the specific area of interest (P <0.001), gonadal shielding (P < 0.001), and decrease in monitor leads or artifacts obscuring views (P < 0.001). These improvements were sustained both 1 month and 1 year following the educational sessions. A neonatal X-ray audit is a simple, effective way to evaluate radiographic technique and encourage provision of basic clinical information for diagnostic interpretation by radiologists and neonatologists. As well, structured, collaborative educational sessions between radiology and neonatology staff appear to be a successful and sustainable method to effect overall improvement. (author)

  12. Surfactant protein B deficiency and gene mutations for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in China Han ethnic population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiaojuan; Meng, Fanping; wang, Yan; Xie, Lu; Kong, Xiangyong; Feng, Zhichun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the SP-B deficiency and gene mutations in exon 4 is associated with neonatal RDS in China Han ethnic population. Methods: The study population consisted of 40 neonates with RDS and 40 neonates with other diseases as control in China Han ethnic population. We Compared SP-B expression in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with immunoblotting, and analyzed mutations in the SP-B gene with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene sequencing. Results: In RDS group, low mature Surfactant protein B was found in both lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in 8 neonates. In control group, only 4 neonates with low mature Surfactant protein B in both lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In RDS group, 20 neonates were found to have mutations in exon 4, 12 homozygous mutations with C/C genotype and 8 heterozygous mutations with C/T genotype in surfactant protein B gene+1580 polymorphism. There were 8 cases mutations in control group, 1 in C/C and 7 in C/T genotype. The frequency of homozygotes with C/C genotype was 0.3 and frequency of heterozygotes with C/T genotype was 0.02 in RDS group. In control group, frequency of homozygotes with C/C genotype was 0.025 and frequency of heterozygote with C/T genotype was 0.175. Conclusion: Low mature Surfactant protein B is associated with the pathogenesis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in China Han ethnic population. Mutations in exon 4 of the surfactant protein B gene demonstrate an association between homozygous mutations with C/C genotype in SP-B gene and neonatal RDS. PMID:23330012

  13. Variation in rates of severe retinopathy of prematurity among neonatal intensive care units in the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network

    OpenAIRE

    Darlow, B A; Hutchinson, J L; Simpson, J M; Henderson-Smart, D J; Donoghue, D A; Evans, N J

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To analyse variations in rates of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network (ANZNN), adjusting for sampling variability and for case mix.

  14. Analysis of In-hospital Neonatal Death in the Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in China: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Hong Wang; Li-Zhong Du; Xiao-Lu Ma; Li-Ping Shi; Xiao-Mei Tong; Hong Liu; Guo-Fang Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background:Globally,the proportion of child deaths that occur in the neonatal period remains a high level of 37-41%.Differences of cause in neonate death exist in different regions as well as in different economic development countries.The specific aim of this study was to investigate the causes,characteristics,and differences of death in neonates during hospitalization in the tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of China.Methods:All the dead neonates admitted to 26 NICUs were included between January 1,2011,and December 31,2011.All the data were collected retrospectively from clinical records by a designed questionnaire.Data collected from each NICU were delivered to the leading institution where the results were analyzed.Results:A total of 744 newborns died during the l-year survey,accounting for 1.2% of all the neonates admitted to 26 NICUs and 37.6% of all the deaths in children under 5 years of age in these hospitals.Preterm neonate death accounted for 59.3% of all the death.The leading causes of death in preterm and term infants were pulmonary disease and infection,respectively.In early neonate period,pulmonary diseases (56.5%) occupied the largest proportion ofpreterm deaths while infection (27%) and neurologic diseases (22%) were the two main causes of term deaths.In late neonate period,infection was the leading cause of both preterm and term neonate deaths.About two-thirds of neonate death occurred after medical care withdrawal.Of the cases who might survive if receiving continuing treatment,parents' concern about the long-term outcomes was the main reason of medical care withdrawal.Conclusions:Neonate death still accounts for a high proportion of all the deaths in children under 5 years of age.Our study showed the majority of neonate death occurred in preterm infants.Cause of death varied with the age of death and gestational age.Accurate and prompt evaluation of the long-term outcomes should be carried out to guide the critical

  15. [Family participation in premature care in neonatal ICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaíva, Maria Aparecida Munhoz; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the family participation in the premature assistance in a university hospital neonatal ICU. Data were collected from the participant observation. Results showed that despite of the mother's presence in the daily life of their premature children placed in a hospital, family isn't inserted in the work process and mothers are the only ones who take part of the cares. This participation basically happens in the execution of maternity care, especially at the medium risk unity, the mother and premature family are less welcomed and there isn't any partnership between the care team and the family, there aren't team interventions in order to turn premature family in autonomous subject to promote health and life quality to baby's life.

  16. Magnetic fields in a neonatal intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aasen, S.E.; Johansson, A.; Cristensen, T.

    1995-06-01

    In this study the magnetic flux density in and around the infant incubators of a neonatal intensive care unit were registered and mapped. The mean 50 Hz magnetic flux densities in an incubator was typically in the region 0.2 - l μT, with maximum values around 1.5μT. The field levels are quite varying dependent on type of incubator, position in the incubator, position of the electronic surveillance and treatment equipment and the position of the 220 V main plugs. 8 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Geographical Accessibility to Obstetric and Neonatal Care and its Effect on Early Neonatal Mortality in Colombia, 2012-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Rojas Gualdrón

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The distribution of health resources influences early neonatal mortality, granting access to obstetric care which is a major public health problem. However, the geographical dimension of this influence has not been studied in Colombia. Objective: To describe the geographical accessibility to obstetric and neonatal care beds and its association with early neonatal mortality in Colombia and its municipalities. Method:An ecological study at municipal level was carried out. Ordinary least squares (OLS regression and a geographically weighted regression (GWR were used to explore statistical and spatial associations. Results: The municipalities in Colombia with Higher mortality tend to have lower geographical accessibility to obstetric and neonatal beds after controlling the fertility and economic characteristics of these municipalities. This association is significant only in municipalities of the west coast. The strength of this association decreases in inner municipalities. Discussion: The centralization of obstetric and neonatal beds in major municipalities around the central region leaves municipalities with high risk of mortality underserved. The decentralization of obstetric and neonatal healthcare resources is a mandatory issue in order to reduce geographical disparities in mortality and to improve neonatal survival, and a healthy beginning of life.

  18. Hematopoietic growth factors in neonatal medicine: the use of enterally administered hematopoietic growth factors in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Christensen, Robert D

    2004-03-01

    The practice of complete bowel rest in prematurely delivered neonates and those who have undergone surgery for congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is common in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). However, increased recognition of the critical role of growth factors in GI development suggests that this practice might be modified to include the administration of synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions designed to bridge the neonate between their intra-uterine environment and that of the NICU. This article reviews advances in administering synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions in the NICU.

  19. Incidence of acute kidney injury in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Doaa Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI in neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU over a six-month period from September 2011 to March 2012. This prospective study was performed on 250 neonates admitted to the NICU at the Children′s Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University. All neonates were subjected to detailed history taking, including pre-natal, natal and post-natal history, with stress on symptoms suggestive of AKI. All neonates were examined thoroughly and the following investigations were performed: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine, sodium, potassium, calcium, complete blood count, C-reactive protein, arterial blood gases, urine sodium and urine creatinine. AKI was diagnosed in 27 cases (10.8%, including 12 females and 15 males. 40.7% of the AKI cases were born after full-term pregnancy while 59.3% were pre-term babies. 29.6% of the AKI cases had oliguria, and there was male sex predominance, with a male-female ratio of 1.3:1. The cause of AKI was pre-renal in 96.3% and intrinsic renal in 3.7% of the cases. The predisposing factors for AKI were sepsis in 63% of the cases, respiratory distress syndrome in 55.6%, mechanical ventilation in 51.9%, peri-natal asphyxia in 18.5%, dehydration in 14.8%, surgical operation in 11.1%, congenital heart disease in 7.4%, sub-galeal hematoma in 3.7%, polycythemia in 3.7% and intra-ventricular hemorrhage in 3.7% of the cases. Our data suggest that pre-renal failure was the most common form of AKI in our patients. Early recognition of risk factors such as sepsis, peri-natal asphyxia or peri-operative problems and rapid effective treatment of contributing conditions will reduce the incidence of AKI in the neonatal period.

  20. Patterns of admission and factors associated with neonatal mortality among neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demisse AG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abayneh Girma Demisse, Fentahun Alemu, Mahlet Abayneh Gizaw, Zemene Tigabu School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Introduction: The neonatal period is a highly vulnerable time for an infant completing many of the physiologic adjustments required for life outside the uterus. As a result, there are high rates of morbidity and mortality. The three major causes of mortality in developing countries include prematurity, infection, and perinatal asphyxia. The aim of this study was to identify the patterns of neonatal admission and factors associated with mortality among neonates admitted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of University of Gondar Hospital.Materials and methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted among all admitted neonates in the NICU of University of Gondar referral hospital from December 1, 2015 to August 31, 2016. Information was extracted retrospectively during admission from patient records and death certificates, using a pretested questionnaire. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20, and p-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: A total of 769 neonates was included in the study. There were 448 (58.3% male neonates, and 398 (51.8% neonates were rural residents. More than two-thirds of the 587 deliveries (76.3% were performed in tertiary hospitals. Neonatal morbidity included hypothermia 546 (71%, sepsis 522 (67.9%, prematurity 250 (34.9%, polycythemia 242 (31.5%, hypoglycemia 142 (18.5, meconium aspiration syndrome 113 (14.7%, and perinatal asphyxia 96 (12.5%. The overall mortality was 110 (14.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.9–16.9 of which 69 (62.7% deaths occurred in the first 24 hours of age. In the multivariate analysis, mortality was associated with perinatal asphyxia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 5.97; 95% CI: 3.06–11.64, instrumental delivery (AOR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.08–8.31, and early onset

  1. Long-term effects of recurrent intermittent hypoxia and hyperoxia on respiratory system mechanics in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylag, Andrew M; Mayer, Catherine A; Raffay, Thomas M; Martin, Richard J; Jafri, Anjum; MacFarlane, Peter M

    2017-04-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk for wheezing disorders. Clinically, these neonates experience recurrent episodes of apnea and desaturation often treated by increasing the fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO 2 ). We developed a novel paradigm of neonatal intermittent hypoxia with subsequent hyperoxia overshoots (CIH O/E ) and hypothesized that CIH O/E elicits long-term changes on pulmonary mechanics in mice. Neonatal C57BL/6 mice received CIH O/E , which consisted of 10% O2 (1 min) followed by a transient exposure to 50% FIO 2 , on 10-min repeating cycles 24 h/d from birth to P7. Baseline respiratory mechanics, methacholine challenge, RT-PCR for pro and antioxidants, radial alveolar counts, and airway smooth muscle actin were assessed at P21 after 2-wk room air recovery. Control groups were mice exposed to normoxia, chronic intermittent hyperoxia (CIH E ), and chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH O ). CIH O/E and CIH E increased airway resistance at higher doses of methacholine and decreased baseline compliance compared with normoxia mice. Lung mRNA for NOX2 was increased by CIH O/E . Radial alveolar counts and airway smooth muscle actin was not different between groups. Neonatal intermittent hypoxia/hyperoxia exposure results in long-term changes in respiratory mechanics. We speculate that recurrent desaturation with hyperoxia overshoot may increase oxidative stress and contribute to wheezing in former preterm infants.

  2. Is there a role of palliative care in the neonatal intensive care unit in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiri P Dighe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in medical care have improved the survival of newborn babies born with various problems. Despite this death in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an inevitable reality. For babies who are not going to "get better," the health care team still has a duty to alleviate the physical suffering of the baby and to support the family. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to relieve the physical, psycho social, and spiritual suffering of patients and their families. Palliative care provision in the Indian NICU settings is almost nonexistent at present. In this paper we attempt to "build a case" for palliative care in the Indian NICU setting.

  3. Analysis of neonatal sepsis in one neonatal intensive care unit for 6 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Chun

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the newborn, particularly in preterm. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence rate, causative pathogens and clinical features of neonatal sepsis in one neonatal intensive care unit (NICU for 6 years. Methods : This study was retrospectively performed to review the clinical and laboratory characteristics including sex, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, length of hospitalization, length of total parenteral nutrition, presence of central venous catheter, underlying diseases, laboratory findings, microorganisms isolated from blood culture, complications and mortality in 175 patients between January 2003 and December 2008. Results : 1 Sepsis was present in 175 of 3,747 infants for 6 years. There were more gram-positive organisms. 2 The gram-negatives were more prevalent in preterm. There were no significant differences of other clinical features between two groups. 3 Underlying diseases were found in 73.7%, and the most common disease was cardiovascular disease. The most common organisms of gram-positives and gram-negatives were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Serratia marcescens. 4 There was statistically significant difference on platelet counts between two groups (P&lt;0.05. 5 Complications were found in 18.3% and septic shock was the most common. MRSA was the most common pathogen in sepsis with complication. 6 The mortality rate was 7.4%. 7 There were differences in monthly blood stream infection/ 1,000 patient-days. Conclusion : The studies about the factors that can influence neonatal sepsis will contribute to decrease the infection rates in NICUs.

  4. Neonatal pleural effusions in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions are rare in the newborn. Still, being familiar with this condition is relevant given its association with a wide range of disorders. Only two large series of cases on this matter have been published, with no solid conclusions established. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology, management and prognosis of pleural effusions in a population of high-risk neonates.The authors performed a retrospective study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of "Hospital de São João", Porto (Portugal, between 1997 and 2014, of all newborns with the diagnosis of pleural effusion, chylothorax, hemothorax, empyema, fetal hydrops or leakage of total parenteral nutrition (TPN.Eighty-two newborns were included, 48 males and 34 females. Pleural effusions were congenital in 19 (23.2% newborns and acquired in 63 (76.8%. Fetal hydrops was the most frequent cause (15 cases, 78.9% of congenital effusions while postoperative after intrathoracic surgery was the most common cause (39 cases, 61.9% of acquired effusions, followed by leakage of TPN (13 cases, 20.6%. Chylothorax was the most common type of effusion (41.5% of cases. Pleural effusions after intrathoracic surgery were mainly (64.1% chylothoraces. Regarding use of octreotide for treatment of acquired chylous effusions, the comparative analysis showed no statistical differences between the group of alive newborns who received octreotide and the group who did not. Twenty-seven (32.9% newborns died; the causes of death were related to underlying diseases and not to the pleural effusion. Clinical outcome is generally good, except in hydropic neonates. Blood albumin level appears to be predictive of prognosis and further investigation on its clinical significance should be encouraged.

  5. Respiratory syncytial virus increases lung cellular bioenergetics in neonatal C57BL/6 mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsuwaidi, Ahmed R.; Albawardi, Alia; Almarzooqi, Saeeda; Benedict, Sheela; Othman, Aws R.; Hartwig, Stacey M.; Varga, Steven M.; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that lung cellular bioenergetics (cellular respiration and ATP) increased in 4–10 week-old BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study examined the kinetics and changes in cellular bioenergetics in ≤2-week-old C57BL/6 mice following RSV infection. Mice (5–14 days old) were inoculated intranasally with RSV and the lungs were examined on days 1–10 post-infection. Histopathology and electron microscopy revealed preserved pneumocyte architectures and organelles. Increased lung cellular bioenergetics was noted from days 1–10 post-infection. Cellular GSH remained unchanged. These results indicate that the increased lung cellular respiration (measured by mitochondrial O 2 consumption) and ATP following RSV infection is independent of either age or genetic background of the host. - Highlights: • RSV infection increases lung cellular respiration and ATP in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. • Increased lung cellular bioenergetics is a biomarker of RSV infection. • Lung cellular glutathione remains unchanged in RSV infection

  6. Respiratory syncytial virus increases lung cellular bioenergetics in neonatal C57BL/6 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsuwaidi, Ahmed R., E-mail: alsuwaidia@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Albawardi, Alia, E-mail: alia.albawardi@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Almarzooqi, Saeeda, E-mail: saeeda.almarzooqi@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pathology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Benedict, Sheela, E-mail: sheela.benedict@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Othman, Aws R., E-mail: aws.rashad@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates); Hartwig, Stacey M., E-mail: stacey-hartwig@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Varga, Steven M., E-mail: steven-varga@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, Department of Pathology and Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Souid, Abdul-Kader, E-mail: asouid@uaeu.ac.ae [Departments of Pediatrics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, P.O. Box 17666, Al Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-04-15

    We have previously reported that lung cellular bioenergetics (cellular respiration and ATP) increased in 4–10 week-old BALB/c mice infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study examined the kinetics and changes in cellular bioenergetics in ≤2-week-old C57BL/6 mice following RSV infection. Mice (5–14 days old) were inoculated intranasally with RSV and the lungs were examined on days 1–10 post-infection. Histopathology and electron microscopy revealed preserved pneumocyte architectures and organelles. Increased lung cellular bioenergetics was noted from days 1–10 post-infection. Cellular GSH remained unchanged. These results indicate that the increased lung cellular respiration (measured by mitochondrial O{sub 2} consumption) and ATP following RSV infection is independent of either age or genetic background of the host. - Highlights: • RSV infection increases lung cellular respiration and ATP in neonatal C57BL/6 mice. • Increased lung cellular bioenergetics is a biomarker of RSV infection. • Lung cellular glutathione remains unchanged in RSV infection.

  7. Racial differences in parental satisfaction with neonatal intensive care unit nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A E; D'Agostino, J A; Passarella, M; Lorch, S A

    2016-11-01

    Nurses provide parental support and education in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but it is unknown if satisfaction and expectations about nursing care differ between racial groups. A prospective cohort was constructed of families with a premature infant presenting to primary care between 1 January 2010 and 1 January 2013 (N=249, 52% white, 42% black). Responses to questions about satisfaction with the NICU were analyzed in ATLAS.ti using the standard qualitative methodology. One hundred and twenty (48%) parents commented on nursing. Fifty-seven percent of the comments were positive, with black parents more negative (58%) compared with white parents (33%). Black parents were most dissatisfied with how nurses supported them, wanting compassionate and respectful communication. White parents were most dissatisfied with inconsistent nursing care and lack of education about their child. Racial differences were found in satisfaction and expectations with neonatal nursing care. Accounting for these differences will improve parental engagement during the NICU stay.

  8. Radiofrequency exposure in the Neonatal Medium Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvente, I; Vázquez-Pérez, A; Fernández, M F; Núñez, M I; Múñoz-Hoyos, A

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize electromagnetic fields of radiofrequency (RF-EMF) levels generated in a Neonatal Medium Care Unit and to analyze RF-EMF levels inside unit's incubators. Spot and long-term measurements were made with a dosimeter. The spot measurement mean was 1.51±0.48V/m. Higher values were found in the proximity to the window and to the incubator evaluated. Mean field strength for the entire period of 17h was 0.81 (±0.07)V/m and the maximum value was 1.58V/m for long-term RF-EMF measurements in the incubator. Values found during the night period were higher than those found during the day period. It is important to consider RF-EMF exposure levels in neonatal care units, due to some evidence of adverse health effects found in children and adults. Characterization of RF-EMF exposure may be important to further investigate the mechanisms and underlying effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on infant health. A prudent avoidance strategy should be adopted because newborns are at a vulnerable stage of development and the actual impact of EMF on premature infants is unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Health care-associated infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael T

    2005-06-01

    Neonates represent a unique and highly vulnerable patient population. Advances in medical technology that have occurred over the last few decades have improved the survival and quality of life for neonates, particularly those infants born with extreme prematurity or with congenital defects. Although immunologic immaturity and altered cutaneous barriers play some role in the vulnerability of neonates to nosocomial infections, clearly, therapeutic interventions that have proven to be lifesaving for these fragile infants also appear to be associated with the majority of infectious complications resulting in neonatal morbidity and mortality. Rates of infections in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have varied from 6% to 40% of neonatal patients, with the highest rates in those facilities having larger proportions of very low-birth-weight infants (birthweight NICU infants include the following: (1) optimal infection control practices, especially good hand hygiene and good nursery design; (2) prudent use of invasive interventions with particular attention to early removal of invasive devices after they are no longer essential; and (3) judicious use of antimicrobial agents, with an emphasis on targeted (narrow spectrum) rather than broad-spectrum antibiotics and appropriate indications (proven or suspected bacterial infections).

  10. Medical staffing in Ontario neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, B; Mitchell, A; Hunsberger, M; Blatz, S; Watts, J; Dent, P; Sinclair, J; Southwell, D

    1989-06-01

    Advances in technology have improved the survival rates of infants of low birth weight. Increasing service commitments together with cutbacks in Canadian training positions have caused concerns about medical staffing in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Ontario. To determine whether an imbalance exists between the supply of medical personnel and the demand for health care services, in July 1985 we surveyed the medical directors, head nurses and staff physicians of nine tertiary level NICUs and the directors of five postgraduate pediatric residency programs. On the basis of current guidelines recommending an ideal neonatologist:patient ratio of 1:6 (assuming an adequate number of support personnel) most of the NICUs were understaffed. Concern about the heavy work pattern and resulting lifestyle implications has made Canadian graduates reluctant to enter this subspecialty. We propose strategies to correct staffing shortages in the context of rapidly increasing workloads resulting from a continuing cutback of pediatric residency positions and restrictions on immigration of foreign trainees.

  11. Breastfeeding Support in Neonatal Intensive Care: A National Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Bojesen, Susanne Nordby; Kronborg, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of breastfeeding of preterm infants is affected by the support provided at the hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). However, policies and guidelines promoting breastfeeding vary both nationally and internationally. Objectives: The aim of this survey...... was to describe breastfeeding support in Danish NICUs, where approximately 98% of mothers initiate lactation. Methods: A national survey of all 19 Danish NICUs was conducted in 2009. Four NICUs were at designated Baby-Friendly hospitals, and 5 had a lactation consultant. In all NICUs, it was possible for some...... parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk...

  12. Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 2017; Session "Neonatal Pulmonology, Neonatal Respiratory Support, Resuscitation"

    OpenAIRE

    --- Various Authors

    2017-01-01

    Selected Abstracts of the 2nd Congress of joint European Neonatal Societies (jENS 2017); Venice (Italy); October 31-November 4, 201758th ESPR Annual Meeting, 7th International Congress of UENPS, 3rd International Congress of EFCNIORGANIZING INSTITUTIONSEuropean Society for Paediatric Research (ESPR), European Society for Neonatology (ESN), Union of European Neonatal & Perinatal Societies (UENPS), European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI)ORGANIZING COMMITTEELuc Zimmermann...

  13. The importance of parents in the neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercília Guimarães

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The premature birth and the hospitalization in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU are potential risk factors for the development and behavior of the newborn, as has been shown in recent studies. Premature birth of an infant is a distressing event for the family. Several feelings are experienced by parents during hospitalization of their baby in the NICU. Feelings of guilt, rejection, stress and anxiety are common. Also the attachment processes have the potential to be disrupted or delayed as a result of the initial separation of the premature newborn and the mother after the admission to the NICU. Added to these difficulties, there is the distortion of infant’s “ideal image”, created by the family, in contrast with the real image of the preterm. This relationship-based family-centered approach, the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP, promotes the idea that infants and their families are collaborators in developing an individualized program to maximize physical, mental, and emotional growth and health and to improve long-term outcomes for the high risk newborns. The presence of parents in NICUs and their involvement caring their babies, in a family centered care philosophy, is vital to improve the outcome of their infants and the relationships within each family. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  14. Neonatal bacteriemia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit (NICU at Beasat Hospital, Sanandaj, Iran.

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    Parvin Mohammadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia continues to result in significant morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates. There is scarce data on neonatal bacteremia in among Iranian neonates. In this study, we determined neonatal bacteremia isolates and their antibiotic resistance pattern in neonatal insensitive care unit at Beasat hospital, Sanandaj, Iran. During one year, all neonates admitted to the NICU were evaluated. Staphylococcal isolates were subjected to determine the prevalence of MRS and mecA gene. A total of 355 blood cultures from suspected cases of sepsis were processed, of which 27 (7.6% were positive for bacterial growth. Of the 27 isolates, 20 (74% were Staphylococcus spp as the leading cause of bacteremia. The incidence of Gram negative bacteria was 04 (14.8%. The isolated bacteria were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Maximum resistance among Staphylococcus spp was against Penicillin, and Ampicillin. In our study, the isolated bacteria were 7.5 % Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin sensitive. Oxacillin disk diffusion and PCR screened 35% and 30% mec a positive Staphylococcus spp. The spectrum of neonatal bacteremia as seen in NICU at Beasat hospital confirmed the importance of pathogens such as Staphylococcus spp. Penicillin, Ampicillin and Cotrimoxazol resistance was high in theses isolates with high mecA gene carriage, probably due to antibiotic selection.

  15. Cross-National Systematic Review of Neonatal Mortality and Postnatal Newborn Care: Special Focus on Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Ahmed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The latest nationwide survey of Pakistan showed that considerable progress has been made toward reducing all child mortality indicators except neonatal mortality. The aim of this study is to compare Pakistan’s under-five mortality, neonatal mortality, and postnatal newborn care rates with those of other countries. Neonatal mortality rates and postnatal newborn care rates from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHSs of nine low- and middle-income countries (LMIC from Asia and Africa were analyzed. Pakistan’s maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH policies and programs, which have been implemented in the country since 1990, were also analyzed. The results highlighted that postnatal newborn care in Pakistan was higher compared with the rest of countries, yet its neonatal mortality remained the worst. In Zimbabwe, both mortality rates have been increasing, whereas the neonatal mortality rates in Nepal and Afghanistan remained unchanged. An analysis of Pakistan’s MNCH programs showed that there is no nationwide policy on neonatal health. There were only a few programs concerning the health of newborns, and those were limited in scale. Pakistan’s example shows that increased coverage of neonatal care without ensuring quality is unlikely to improve neonatal survival rates. It is suggested that Pakistan needs a comprehensive policy on neonatal health similar to other countries, and its effective programs need to be scaled up, in order to obtain better neonatal health outcomes.

  16. Cross-National Systematic Review of Neonatal Mortality and Postnatal Newborn Care: Special Focus on Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mansoor; Won, Youngjoon

    2017-11-23

    The latest nationwide survey of Pakistan showed that considerable progress has been made toward reducing all child mortality indicators except neonatal mortality. The aim of this study is to compare Pakistan's under-five mortality, neonatal mortality, and postnatal newborn care rates with those of other countries. Neonatal mortality rates and postnatal newborn care rates from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHSs) of nine low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) from Asia and Africa were analyzed. Pakistan's maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) policies and programs, which have been implemented in the country since 1990, were also analyzed. The results highlighted that postnatal newborn care in Pakistan was higher compared with the rest of countries, yet its neonatal mortality remained the worst. In Zimbabwe, both mortality rates have been increasing, whereas the neonatal mortality rates in Nepal and Afghanistan remained unchanged. An analysis of Pakistan's MNCH programs showed that there is no nationwide policy on neonatal health. There were only a few programs concerning the health of newborns, and those were limited in scale. Pakistan's example shows that increased coverage of neonatal care without ensuring quality is unlikely to improve neonatal survival rates. It is suggested that Pakistan needs a comprehensive policy on neonatal health similar to other countries, and its effective programs need to be scaled up, in order to obtain better neonatal health outcomes.

  17. Perceptions of parents, nurses, and physicians on neonatal intensive care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2010-01-01

    To identify satisfaction with neonatal intensive care as viewed by parents and healthcare professionals and to explore similarities and differences between parents and healthcare professionals. A 3-round Delphi method to identify neonatal care issues (round 1) and to determine the importance of

  18. The effects of non-invasive respiratory support on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity: a neonatal manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Calum T; Kortekaas, Rebecca; Dawson, Jennifer A; Manley, Brett J; Owen, Louise S; Davis, Peter G

    2016-05-01

    Heating and humidification of inspired gases is routine during neonatal non-invasive respiratory support. However, little is known about the temperature and humidity delivered to the upper airway. The International Standards Organization (ISO) specifies that for all patients with an artificial airway humidifiers should deliver ≥33 g/m(3) absolute humidity (AH). We assessed the oropharyngeal temperature and humidity during different non-invasive support modes in a neonatal manikin study. Six different modes of non-invasive respiratory support were applied at clinically relevant settings to a neonatal manikin, placed in a warmed and humidified neonatal incubator. Oropharyngeal temperature and relative humidity (RH) were assessed using a thermohygrometer. AH was subsequently calculated. Measured temperature and RH varied between devices. Bubble and ventilator continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) produced temperatures >34°C and AH >38 g/m(3). Variable flow CPAP resulted in lower levels of AH than bubble or ventilator CPAP, and AH decreased with higher gas flow. High-flow (HF) therapy delivered by Optiflow Junior produced higher AH with higher gas flow, whereas with Vapotherm HF the converse was true. Different non-invasive devices deliver inspiratory gases of variable temperature and humidity. Most AH levels were above the ISO recommendation; however, with some HF and variable flow CPAP devices at higher gas flow this was not achieved. Clinicians should be aware of differences in the efficacy of heating and humidification when choosing modes of non-invasive respiratory support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Inhaled PGE1 in neonates with hypoxemic respiratory failure: two pilot feasibility randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Beena G; Keszler, Martin; Garg, Meena; Klein, Jonathan M; Ohls, Robin; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Cotten, C Michael; Malian, Monica; Sanchez, Pablo J; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Nelin, Leif D; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Bara, Rebecca; Saha, Shampa; Das, Abhik; Wallace, Dennis; Higgins, Rosemary D; Shankaran, Seetha

    2014-12-12

    Inhaled nitric oxide (INO), a selective pulmonary vasodilator, has revolutionized the treatment of neonatal hypoxemic respiratory failure (NHRF). However, there is lack of sustained improvement in 30 to 46% of infants. Aerosolized prostaglandins I2 (PGI2) and E1 (PGE1) have been reported to be effective selective pulmonary vasodilators. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of inhaled PGE1 (IPGE1) in NHRF. Two pilot multicenter phase II RCTs are included in this report. In the first pilot, late preterm and term neonates with NHRF, who had an oxygenation index (OI) of ≥15 and <25 on two arterial blood gases and had not previously received INO, were randomly assigned to receive two doses of IPGE1 (300 and 150 ng/kg/min) or placebo. The primary outcome was the enrollment of 50 infants in six to nine months at 10 sites. The first pilot was halted after four months for failure to enroll a single infant. The most common cause for non-enrollment was prior initiation of INO. In a re-designed second pilot, co-administration of IPGE1 and INO was permitted. Infants with suboptimal response to INO received either aerosolized saline or IPGE1 at a low (150 ng/kg/min) or high dose (300 ng/kg/min) for a maximum duration of 72 hours. The primary outcome was the recruitment of an adequate number of patients (n = 50) in a nine-month-period, with fewer than 20% protocol violations. No infants were enrolled in the first pilot. Seven patients were enrolled in the second pilot; three in the control, two in the low-dose IPGE1, and two in the high-dose IPGE1 groups. The study was halted for recruitment futility after approximately six months as enrollment targets were not met. No serious adverse events, one minor protocol deviation and one pharmacy protocol violation were reported. These two pilot RCTs failed to recruit adequate eligible newborns with NHRF. Complex management RCTs of novel therapies for persistent pulmonary

  20. Nursing care of the newborn in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Costa da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the main measures of care for the newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit. Method: This is an integrative review, in which, it is possible to identify, analyze and synthesize research results with the inclusion of experimental and non-experimental studies. A total of 133 articles were collected. After reading titles, exclusion criteria and reading resumes, 10 were left, in which the sample was composed. Results: The selected publications were placed in 3 thematic categories: The importance of knowledge in nursing care, to the internal NB in ​​NICU; Nursing evaluation and care used for pain relief in NB; Main factors and adverse events that may lead to the hospitalization of the newborn and the increase of morbidity and mortality in an NICU. Conclusion: The analysis of the aforementioned study exposes the importance and main nursing care that can be administered in newborns in a NICU, so that the reduction of neonatal mortality can be provided. Descriptors: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Nursing care; Newborn.

  1. Predictors of respiratory instability in neonates undergoing patient ductus arteriosus ligation after the introduction of targeted milrinone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Joseph Y; Resende, Maura; More, Kiran; Nicholls, Donna; Weisz, Dany E; El-Khuffash, Afif; Jain, Amish; McNamara, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    The postoperative course of preterm babies undergoing surgical closure of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is often complicated by postligation cardiac syndrome (PLCS). Despite targeted milrinone prophylaxis, some infants continue to experience postoperative respiratory deterioration. Our objective is to describe the immediate postoperative course and identify risk factors for respiratory instability when preterm infants undergoing PDA ligation are managed with targeted milrinone treatment. A retrospective review of a cohort of infants undergoing PDA ligation between January, 2010 and August, 2013 was conducted. All infants had a targeted neonatal echocardiogram performed 1 hour after surgery. Infants received prophylactic milrinone treatment if the left ventricular output was <200 mL/kg/min. The primary outcome measure was the development of respiratory instability within 24 hours of surgery. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify predictors of respiratory instability. Eighty-six infants with a median gestational age of 25 weeks (interquartile range [IQR], 24-26) and a birth weight of 740 g (IQR, 640-853) were included in this study. Forty-nine (57.0%) received milrinone prophylaxis. There were 44 (51.2%) infants who developed oxygenation or ventilation failure, and 7 (8.1%) neonates developed PLCS. Infants with longer isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT ≥30 milliseconds) were more likely to develop either oxygenation or ventilation failure. Although the incidence of PLCS has declined after the introduction of targeted milrinone prophylaxis, many preterm infants continue to develop respiratory instability after surgical ligation. In this population, diastolic dysfunction manifested by prolonged IVRT could be associated with an adverse postoperative respiratory course. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insufficiency of Medical Care for Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

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    A. V. Dats

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research: to analyze insufficiency of medical care for patients with acute respiratory failure in the ICU.Materials and methods. It was a retrospective study of 160 patients' medical records (age from 15 to 84 years with acute respiratory failure (ARF hospitalized in the ICUs of 24 regional and municipal hospitals of the Irkutsk Oblast. Medical records were provided by the Territorial Fund of Compulsory Medical Insurance of citizens of Irkutsk region.The results. The basic defects in conducting mechanical ventilation were associated with improper lung function evaluation, microbiological tests of sputum and radiology. ARF was not diagnosed in 32 of 160 ICU patients (20%. In 23% of cases the causes of ARF were not diagnosed. The greatest part of the defects in the treatment of patients with acute respiratory failure was found during the treatment of hypoxemia: no recovery of the respiratory tract patency, no prescription of oxygen for hypoxemia, no mechanical ventilation for persistent hypoxemia on the background of maximum oxygen supply and late switching to mechanical ventilation at the stage of hypoxic cardiac arrest.Conclusions. The use of pulse oximetry alone in the absence of arterial blood gas analysis in 98% of patients with acute respiratory failure and failure to perform the lung X-ray and/or MSCT imaging in 21% of patients were accompanied by a high level of undiagnosed acute respiratory distress syndrome (78%, lung contusion (60%, pulmonary embolism (40%, cardiogenic pulmonary edema (33%, and nosocomial pneumonia (28%. Defects of treatment of patients with ARF in 46% of cases were caused by inadequate management of hypoxemia associated with the recovery of the respiratory tract patency, prescription of oxygen, and mechanical ventilation. 

  3. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garne, Kristina; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-07-08

    For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a "bell cord" to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using telemedicine.

  4. Neurally adjusted ventilatory assist compared to other forms of triggered ventilation for neonatal respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossor, Thomas E; Hunt, Katie A; Shetty, Sandeep; Greenough, Anne

    2017-10-27

    Effective synchronisation of infant respiratory effort with mechanical ventilation may allow adequate gas exchange to occur at lower peak airway pressures, potentially reducing barotrauma and volutrauma and development of air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. During neurally adjusted ventilatory assist ventilation (NAVA), respiratory support is initiated upon detection of an electrical signal from the diaphragm muscle, and pressure is provided in proportion to and synchronous with electrical activity of the diaphragm (EADi). Compared to other modes of triggered ventilation, this may provide advantages in improving synchrony. Primary• To determine whether NAVA, when used as a primary or rescue mode of ventilation, results in reduced rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or death among term and preterm newborn infants compared to other forms of triggered ventilation• To assess the safety of NAVA by determining whether it leads to greater risk of intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), periventricular leukomalacia, or air leaks when compared to other forms of triggered ventilation Secondary• To determine whether benefits of NAVA differ by gestational age (term or preterm)• To determine whether outcomes of cross-over trials performed during the first two weeks of life include peak pressure requirements, episodes of hypocarbia or hypercarbia, oxygenation index, and the work of breathing SEARCH METHODS: We performed searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cohrane Library; MEDLINE via Ovid SP (January 1966 to March 2017); Embase via Ovid SP (January 1980 to March 2017); the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) via EBSCO host (1982 to March 2017); and the Web of Science (1985 to 2017). We searched abstracts from annual meetings of the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) (2000 to 2016); meetings of the European Society of Pediatric Research (published in Pediatric Research); and meetings of the

  5. [Bioethics, deontology, and law in neonatal intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, G

    2002-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care has greatly improved the survival chances but, at the same time, it has also given rise to serious ethical problems. Different contexts influence both physicians attitude and end-of-life practices in neonatology. The clinicians can not ever follow the principles of bioethics, as they are sometimes in conflict. Also, the strategies or guidelines proposed as approaches to neonatal decision-making are difficult to practise. Probably a neonatologist makes his decision even on the basis of his interior conviction and it is well known that in Italy the debate on bioethics is the subject of confrontation between Roman Catholic and secular viewpoint, expressing two positions: the so-called sanctity and the quality of life. However, a clinician has also an obligation to follow the Code of Professional Medical Ethics which cautions against therapeutic aggressiveness; but this document has not legal status. In addition, Italian law is strongly protective of infant life and any discrimination on the basis of malformation or poor prognosis violates constitutional law; moreover, the resuscitation of a preterm infant is mandatory even when the birth is the result of induced late abortion. The author concludes emphasizing the importance, in decision making, of accepting difference as opposed to the logic of the absoluteness of normality, because many handicaps may be accepted and a society expresses its moral richness also by the solidarity reserved to its weakest sons.

  6. Outbreak of Acinetobacter baumannii in a neonatal intensive care unit: antimicrobial susceptibility and genotyping analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Arabella; Achour, Wafa; Cherif, Ahmed; Hmida, Hayet Ben; Afif, Firas Bou; Jabnoun, Sami; Khrouf, Naima; Hassen, Assia Ben

    2009-06-01

    We describe an outbreak of nosocomial respiratory infection caused by multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Tunis and our investigation to determine the source. Between May 2006 and February 2007, 31 infants hospitalized in the NICU of the Centre of Maternity and Neonatology of La Rabta in Tunis developed A. baumannii pneumonia. A case (infected infant) was defined as any patient hospitalized in the NICU during the outbreak period, with clinical signs of pneumonia and isolation of A. baumannii from tracheal aspirate. Ten rectal swabs and 98 environmental specimens were collected for the epidemiological investigation. Thirty-nine A. baumannii isolates were collected: 31 clinical strains from tracheal aspirates (>10(3) colony-forming units [CFU]/mL), 3 environmental strains from incubators, and 5 from rectal swab. For the genotyping method, we used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis using ApaI restriction endonuclease. Thirty-one neonates developed multiple drug-resistant A. baumannii-associated pneumonia with 10 deaths due to A. baumannii infection, 48.4% had very low birth weight (neonates were premature. The mean age at the beginning of symptoms was 6.9 days. A. baumannii isolates were resistant to all beta-lactams. Resistance rates to other antibiotics were, respectively, 94.9% for gentamicin, 87.2% for cotrimoxazole, 41% for netilmicin, and 5.1% for tobramycin. All the isolates were susceptible to colistin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis of outbreak-isolates indicated the presence of only one clone (A) containing nine subtypes genetically related to the outbreak strain. The clonal diffusion of A. baumannii strains in an NICU was confirmed by molecular method. Control measures were reinforced to contain the outbreak.

  7. Social justice considerations in neonatal care for nurse managers and executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Linda; Walden, Marlene; Verklan, M Terese

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the struggle between social justice and market justice within the current health care system, specifically issues affecting neonatal care. Community benefit is described and discussed as an aspect of social justice demonstrated by hospitals. The federal and state Children's Health Insurance Program also is discussed in relation to social justice and health care costs. Implications for managers and executives overseeing neonatal care are presented in relation to the economic and social issues.

  8. Association of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with central respiratory control in isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation of neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EIKI HATORI

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotine exposure is a risk factor in several breathing disorders Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs exist in the ventrolateral medulla, an important site for respiratory control. We examined the effects of nicotinic acetylcholine neurotransmission on central respiratory control by addition of a nAChR agonist or one of various antagonists into superfusion medium in the isolated brainstem-spinal cord from neonatal rats. Ventral C4 neuronal activity was monitored as central respiratory output, and activities of respiratory neurons in the ventrolateral medulla were recorded in whole-cell configuration. RJR-2403 (0.1-10mM, alpha4beta2 nAChR agonist induced dose-dependent increases in respiratory frequency. Non-selective nAChR antagonist mecamylamine (0.1-100mM, alpha4beta2 antagonist dihydro-beta-erythroidine (0.1-100mM, alpha7 antagonist methyllycaconitine (0.1-100mM, and a-bungarotoxin (0.01-10mM all induced dose-dependent reductions in C4 respiratory rate. We next examined effects of 20mM dihydro-beta-erythroidine and 20mM methyllycaconitine on respiratory neurons. Dihydro-beta-erythroidine induces hyperpolarization and decreases intraburst firing frequency of inspiratory and preinspiratory neurons. In contrast, methyllycaconitine has no effect on the membrane potential of inspiratory neurons, but does decrease their intraburst firing frequency while inducing hyperpolarization and decreasing intraburst firing frequency in preinspiratory neurons. These findings indicate that alpha4beta2 nAChR is involved in both inspiratory and preinspiratory neurons, whereas alpha7 nAChR functions only in preinspiratory neurons to modulate C4 respiratory rate

  9. The first occurrence of a CTX-M ESBL-producing Escherichia coli outbreak mediated by mother to neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Ciara

    2017-01-05

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) comprise part of the normal vaginal microflora. Transfer from mother to neonate can occur during delivery resulting, sometimes, in neonatal bacterial disease. Here, we aim to report the first outbreak of CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli with evidence of mother-to-neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) followed by patient-to-patient transmission.

  10. The effect of inhaled budesonide on the prevention of chronic lung disease in premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Sadeghnia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Considering all the latest achievements in neonatal respiratory care, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD is still among the most prevalent morbidity causes in premature infants. Involvement in this process results in longer period of hospitalization for the newborn and in the long run makes the living conditions more difficult. Taking the multifactorial pathogenesis into account, approaches to tackle chronic lung disease (CLD are mainly focused on interventions and prevention procedures. This study tries to investigate the potential capability of inhaled budesonide in the prevention of BPD in newborns with gestational age of <28 weeks with the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. Methods: This study was a randomized clinical trial done on seventy newborns with gestational ages of 23–28 weeks with RDS in Isfahan Shahid Beheshti Educational Hospital from June 2014 to April 2016. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups of intervention with budesonide and control. There were 35 newborns in each group. Upon recording demographic characteristics, the newborns in two groups were compared based on the length of noninvasive ventilation, the need for invasive mechanical ventilation, the number of surfactant administrations, pneumothorax, intraventricular hemorrhage, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA, CLD, and death. Results: The length of the need for nasal continuous positive airway pressure showed no statistically significant difference between the groups (P = 0.54. The number of newborns who needed invasive mechanical ventilation also revealed no meaningful difference (P = 0.14. Similarly, the number of newborns who were characterized as affected by CLD also showed no significant difference between the groups (P = 0.053. Moreover, the number of newborns who experienced pneumothorax was not significantly different for the groups (P = 0.057. The number of newborns who received three administrations of surfactant had also no statistically

  11. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  12. Radiofrequency exposure in the Neonatal Medium Care Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvente, I.; Vázquez-Pérez, A.; Fernández, M.F.; Núñez, M.I.; Múñoz-Hoyos, A.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize electromagnetic fields of radiofrequency (RF-EMF) levels generated in a Neonatal Medium Care Unit and to analyze RF-EMF levels inside unit’s incubators. Spot and long-term measurements were made with a dosimeter. The spot measurement mean was 1.51±0.48 V/m. Higher values were found in the proximity to the window and to the incubator evaluated. Mean field strength for the entire period of 17 h was 0.81 (±0.07) V/m and the maximum value was 1.58 V/m for long-term RF-EMF measurements in the incubator. Values found during the night period were higher than those found during the day period. It is important to consider RF-EMF exposure levels in neonatal care units, due to some evidence of adverse health effects found in children and adults. Characterization of RF-EMF exposure may be important to further investigate the mechanisms and underlying effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on infant health. A prudent avoidance strategy should be adopted because newborns are at a vulnerable stage of development and the actual impact of EMF on premature infants is unknown. - Highlights: • The increasing use of RF-EMF suggests an urgent need for more research in this field. • Health consequences of RF-EMF exposure on infants are not well known. • Description of RF-EMF exposure is vital in further study mechanisms on infant health. • Considering newborns vulnerability, it is wise to adopt a prudent avoidance strategy.

  13. Radiofrequency exposure in the Neonatal Medium Care Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvente, I. [Unit Research Support of the San Cecilio University Hospital, Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University Hospitals of Granada/University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Av. de la Investigación, 11, torre A, planta 11, 18016 Granada (Spain); Vázquez-Pérez, A. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Granada (Spain); Fernández, M.F. [Unit Research Support of the San Cecilio University Hospital, Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University Hospitals of Granada/University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Av. de la Investigación, 11, torre A, planta 11, 18016 Granada (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Núñez, M.I., E-mail: isabeln@ugr.es [Unit Research Support of the San Cecilio University Hospital, Biosanitary Institute of Granada (ibs.GRANADA), University Hospitals of Granada/University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Department of Radiology and Physical Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Av. de la Investigación, 11, torre A, planta 11, 18016 Granada (Spain); Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine Institute (IBIMER), University of Granada (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) (Spain); Múñoz-Hoyos, A. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Granada (Spain)

    2017-01-15

    The aims of this study were to characterize electromagnetic fields of radiofrequency (RF-EMF) levels generated in a Neonatal Medium Care Unit and to analyze RF-EMF levels inside unit’s incubators. Spot and long-term measurements were made with a dosimeter. The spot measurement mean was 1.51±0.48 V/m. Higher values were found in the proximity to the window and to the incubator evaluated. Mean field strength for the entire period of 17 h was 0.81 (±0.07) V/m and the maximum value was 1.58 V/m for long-term RF-EMF measurements in the incubator. Values found during the night period were higher than those found during the day period. It is important to consider RF-EMF exposure levels in neonatal care units, due to some evidence of adverse health effects found in children and adults. Characterization of RF-EMF exposure may be important to further investigate the mechanisms and underlying effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on infant health. A prudent avoidance strategy should be adopted because newborns are at a vulnerable stage of development and the actual impact of EMF on premature infants is unknown. - Highlights: • The increasing use of RF-EMF suggests an urgent need for more research in this field. • Health consequences of RF-EMF exposure on infants are not well known. • Description of RF-EMF exposure is vital in further study mechanisms on infant health. • Considering newborns vulnerability, it is wise to adopt a prudent avoidance strategy.

  14. Rehabilitation of patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, S

    1998-07-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation has been shown to be of benefit to clinically stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study examined the effect of pulmonary rehabilitation on some physiologic variables in COPD patients recovering from an episode of acute respiratory failure. A prospective, randomized study. A respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). Eighty COPD patients recovering from an episode of acute respiratory failure were randomized in a 3:1 fashion to receive stepwise pulmonary rehabilitation (group A, n=60 patients) or standard medical therapy (group B, n=20 patients). Improvements in exercise tolerance, sense of breathlessness, respiratory muscle function, and pulmonary function test values were measured, respectively, by exercise capacity (6-minute walking distance [6MWD]), dyspnea score (Visual Analog Scale [VAS]), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC). Group A received pulmonary rehabilitation that consisted of passive mobilization (step I), early deambulation (step II), respiratory and lower skeletal muscle training (step III), and if the patients were able, complete lower extremity training on a treadmill (step IV). Group B received standard medical therapy plus a basic deambulation program. Sixty-one of 80 patients were mechanically ventilated at admission to the unit and most of them were bedridden. Twelve of the 60 group A patients and 4 of the 20 group B patients died during their RICU stay, and 9 patients required invasive mechanical ventilation at home after their discharge. The total length of RICU stay was 38+/-14 days for patients in group A versus 33.2+/-11 days for those in group B. Most patients from both groups regained the ability to walk, either unaided or aided. At discharge, 6 MWD results were significantly improved (p respiratory failure and who, in most cases, required mechanical ventilation benefited from comprehensive early

  15. Comparison of Risk Factors in Necrotizing Enterocolitis among Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferda Ozlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Necrotizing enterocolitis is one of the important problems of premature infants. The incidence is about 1-5% in infants followed in neonatal care units and inversely related to gestational age and birth weight. Materials and Methods: In this study, 31 infants with necrotizing enterocolitis and 31 infants with similar gestational age and birth weight as control group hospitalized in Cukurova University Neonatal Care Unit between 1 January 2001-31 January 2004 were evaluated. Results: The incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis in this period was 1.4 (31/2214 admission. Mean gestational age was 30.5  3.2 weeks (25-36, mean birth weight was 1331  384 (730-2150 grams while 71% was younger than 32 gestational weeks and 67.7% was under 1500 grams. The signs of NEC were detected at a mean of 11.2  10. (2-38 days. Twenty-six (83.9% were being fed at the time of the necrotizing enterocolitis signs appeared. According to the Walsh and Kliegman classification, 19 (61.3% infants were in stage 1 (17 were 1a, 2 were 1b; 3 (9.6% infants were in stage 2a, 9 (%29.1 infants were in stage 3 (7 were in 3b. Blood culture was positive in 7 (%22.6 infants with predominance of gram negative microorganisms (5 infants. Eleven (%35.5 infants were exitus, 12 were discharged. Hypoxia, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage and umbilical catheterization were significant risk factors in necrotizing enterocolitis . Thrombocytopenia, leucopenia and high C-reactive protein levels were significantly high in necrotizing enterocolitis group. Breast feeding is significantly high in control group. Conclusion: Necrotizing enterocolitis, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. Early breast feeding with small amounts, increasing amount of milk slowly, antenatal steroids, caring hygiene rules can prevent the development of it. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 642-647

  16. Family-Centered Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units: Combining Intensive Care and Family Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Shunsuke; Saito, Tomoko; Ichikawa, Saori; Saito, Kaori; Takada, Tsuzumi; Noguchi, Satoko; Yamada, Miki; Nakagawa, Fumi

    Advances in treatment in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for preterm and sick newborns have improved the mortality rate of patients, but admission to the NICU may disrupt parent-infant interaction, with adverse consequences for infants and their families because of physical, psychological, and emotional separation. The concept of family centered care (FCC), in which family members are part of the care team and infants are close to the family, is important and has become popular in NICU. In 2013, we created a team called "Kodomo-Kazoku Mannaka" to promote FCC in Japan, and visited the NICU at Uppsala University Hospital in Sweden, which is internationally famous for FCC. Since this fruitful visit, we have been promoting FCC in Japan by exhibitions and presentations of the FCC ideas at academic conferences and using internet services. A questionnaire survey conducted in 2015 revealed that the importance and the benefits of FCC in NICU are recognized, although there are some barriers to FCC in each facility. It is hard to change facilities and social systems right away, but it is easier and more important to change people's minds. Our role is to spread the concept of FCC and to help each facility find its own way to adopt it. We will continue to make efforts encourage to promote FCC in Japan.

  17. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Ana Paula de Souza; Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa da; Souza, Nilba Lima de; Mota, Gabriela Miranda; França, Débora Feitosa de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers.METHOD: a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Associati...

  18. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Environmental Stressors and Supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristen G; Patel, Kayla T; Stausmire, Julie M; Bridges, Christy; Mathis, Mary W; Barkin, Jennifer L

    2018-01-03

    The relationship between maternal mental health and infant development has been established in the literature. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a particularly challenging environment for new mothers as several natural processes are disrupted. The objective of this study is to elucidate protective factors and environmental deficits associated with the NICU. The experiences of forty-six ( n = 46) mothers of infants admitted to a Level III NICU in the Midwestern United States, who responded to a related open-ended question, were analyzed thematically. Five themes related to the NICU environment emerged as being either stressful or helpful: (1) amount and quality of communication with medical staff, (2) bedside manner of medical staff, (3) feeling alienated from infant's care, (4) support from other NICU mothers and families, and (5) NICU Physical Environment and Regulations. There is a need for medical staff training on awareness, communication, empathy, and other behaviors that might improve maternal (and parental) experiences in the NICU. The physical environment, including rules and regulations of the NICU, should be reexamined with family comfort in mind in addition to the clinical care of the infant.

  19. [Developmental centered care. Situation in Spanish neonatal units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Maestro, M; Melgar Bonis, A; de la Cruz-Bertolo, J; Perapoch López, J; Mosqueda Peña, R; Pallás Alonso, C

    2014-10-01

    Developmental centered care (DC) is focused on sensorineural and emotional development of the newborns. In Spain we have had information on the application of DC since 1999, but the extent of actual implementation is unknown. To determine the level of implementation of DC in Spanish neonatal units where more than 50 infants weighing under 1500g were cared for in 2012. A comparison was made with previous data published in 2006. A descriptive observational cross-sectional study was performed using a survey with seven questions as in the 2006 questionnaire. The survey was sent to 27 units. The response rate was 81% in 2012 versus 96% in 2006. Noise control measures were introduced in 73% of units in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). The use of saccharose was 50% in 2012 versus 46% in 2006 (P=.6). Parents free entry was 82% in 2012 versus 11% in 2006 (P<.01). Kangaroo care was used without restriction by 82% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2006 (P<.01). The implementation of the DC in Spain has improved. There is still room for improvement in areas, such as the use of saccharose or noise control. However, it is important to highlight the positive change that has occurred in relation to unrestricted parental visits. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Surveillance of infection events in neonatal intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decembrino, L; Perrini, S; Stronati, M

    2010-06-01

    Nosocomial infections are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the newborn intensive care unit (NICU). They result in prolonged hospital stays and increased hospital costs. Neonates are susceptible hosts because of prematurity of organ systems, immaturity of immune system, low birth weight and the use of invasive devices. Most infections are endemic others can occur during outbreaks. As advances in medical technology improve mortality in the tiniest of infants, it is imperative that health care providers identify effective interventions to minimize the risks of nosocomial infections in the NICU. Recommended infection control and prevention strategies are: hand washing promotion, decreased use of invasive procedures, limited antitibiotic exposure, environmental hygiene. In this context infection surveillance is the first step to recognize and analyze problems, to effectively target infection control measures and feedback. Any suspicion of an outbreak should lead to a review of general infection control procedures to prevent the spread of the pathogens as quickly as possible. A multidisciplinary approach can be an effective means of developing a plan of action to apply prolonged and strict adherence to isolation precautions', to detect potential reservoirs or source of infections, to educate every member of the patient care team and to review NICU protocols.

  1. Coordinated Care Organizations: Neonatal and Infant Outcomes in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, S Marie; Oakley, Lisa P; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff

    2017-11-01

    In 2012, Oregon's Medicaid program implemented a comprehensive accountable care model delivered through coordinated care organizations (CCOs). Because CCOs are expected to improve utilization of services and health outcomes, neonatal and infant outcomes may be important indicators of their impact. Estimating difference-in-differences models, we compared prepost CCO changes in outcomes (e.g., low birth weight, abnormal conditions, 5-minute Apgar score, congenital anomalies, and infant mortality) between Medicaid and non-Medicaid births among 99,924 infants born in Oregon during 2011 and 2013. We further examined differences in the impact of CCOs by ethnicity and rurality. Following CCO implementation the likelihood of low birth weight and abnormal conditions decreased by 0.95% and 1.08%, a reduction of 13.4% and 10.4% compared with the pre-CCO level for Medicaid enrollees, respectively. These reductions could be predictive of lifelong health benefits for infants and lower costs for acute care and are, therefore, important markers of success for the CCO model.

  2. Postnatal follow-up of the oxygenation index, arterial to alveolar oxygen tension ratio and alveolar arterial oxygen tension difference values in neonates with the respiratory distress syndrome treated with conventional ventilatory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, A; Despotova-Toleva, L

    1997-01-01

    Recent development of sophisticated intensive care technique for use in newborn infants with the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) has resulted in changes in the therapeutic strategies and moved the problem of neonatal survival into the realm of new therapeutic realities. At present, the mechanical ventilation methods form an integral part of the intensive care strategy of infants with RDS. They have come to the forefront of infant care because of their successful use in ventilatory support and children survival where other therapeutic modalities have failed. The present prospective observational longitudinal study was designed to assess the real-time convenience, reliability and accuracy of the changes in the oxygenation index (OI), arterial-to-alveolar oxygen tension ratio (a/A PO2) and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (A-a)DO2 in ventilator-dependent neonates with RDS, to analyze their feasibility and potential information yield in oxygen inhalation therapy as well as their prognostic implications and predictive value. Twenty neonates with RDS, heralded by respiratory failure which necessitated the initiation of oxygen inhalation therapy and ventilatory support within 24 hours of birth, were enrolled in the study. Ten of the infants survived and the remaining ten died. OI, (a/A PO2) and (A-a)DO2 were followed up sequentially and thoroughly analyzed as the primary outcome measures of the study. The indices were calculated on the basis of the complete monitoring of the ventilatory equipment parameters and acid-base status carried out on an hourly basis. Our results show that: 1. The combination of three indexes (OI, (a/A)PO2 and (A-a)DO2 we propose is a useful discriminating predictor of neonatal lung maturity reflecting arterial blood gas status in ventilator-dependent neonates with RDS. 2. The indices detect the efficacy of the modern conventional ventilatory support with real-time convenience and reliable accuracy forming the cornerstone of clinical decision

  3. Is facility based neonatal care in low resource setting keeping pace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To identify reasons for neonatal admission and death with the aim of determining areas needing improvement. Method: A retrospective chart review was conducted on records for neonates admitted to Mulago National Referral Hospital Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) from 1st November 2013 to 31st January ...

  4. Should euthanasia be legal? An international survey of neonatal intensive care units staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuttini, M.; Casotto, V.; Kaminski, M.; Beaufort, I.D. de; Berbik, I.; Hansen, G.; Kollee, L.A.A.; Kucinskas, A.; Lenoir, S.; Levin, A.V.; Orzalesi, M.; Persson, J.; Rebagliato, M.; Reid, M.; Saracci, R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the views of a representative sample of neonatal doctors and nurses in 10 European countries on the moral acceptability of active euthanasia and its legal regulation. DESIGN: A total of 142 neonatal intensive care units were recruited by census (in the Netherlands, Sweden,

  5. Neonatal Caffeine Treatment and Respiratory Function at 11 Years in Children under 1,251 g at Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lex W; Ranganathan, Sarath; Cheong, Jeanie L Y

    2017-11-15

    Caffeine in the newborn period shortens the duration of assisted ventilation and reduces the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, but its effects on respiratory function in later childhood are unknown. To determine if children born with birth weight less than 1,251 g who were treated with neonatal caffeine had improved respiratory function at 11 years of age compared with children treated with placebo. Children enrolled in the CAP (Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity) randomized controlled trial and assessed at the Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne at 11 years of age had expiratory flow rates measured according to the standards of the American Thoracic Society. Values were converted to z-scores predicted for age, height, ethnicity, and sex. Parents completed questionnaires related to their child's respiratory health. A total of 142 children had expiratory flows measured. Expiratory flows were better in the caffeine group, by approximately 0.5 SD for most variables (e.g., FEV 1 ; mean z-score, -1.00 vs. -1.53; mean difference, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.94; P = 0.008). Fewer children in the caffeine group had values for FVC below the fifth centile (11% vs. 28%; odds ratio, 0.31; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.77; P = 0.012). When adjusted for bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the difference in flow rates between groups diminished. Caffeine treatment in the newborn period improves expiratory flow rates in midchildhood, which seems to be achieved by improving respiratory health in the newborn period. Follow-up lung function testing in adulthood is vital for these individuals. Future placebo-controlled randomized trials of neonatal caffeine are unlikely. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00182312).

  6. Neonatal intensive care in a Karen refugee camp: a 4 year descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Turner

    Full Text Available A third of all deaths in children aged <5 years occur in the neonatal period. Neonatal intensive care is often considered too complex and expensive to be implemented in resource poor settings. Consequently the reductions that have been made in infant mortality in the poorest countries have not been made in the neonatal period. This manuscript describes the activities surrounding the introduction of special care baby unit (SCBU in a refugee setting and the resulting population impact.A SCBU was developed in Maela refugee camp on the Thailand-Myanmar border. This unit comprised of a dedicated area, basic equipment, drugs and staff training. Training was built around neonatal guidelines, comprising six clinical steps: recognition, resuscitation, examination, supportive medical care, specialised medical care, and counselling of parents with sick newborns.From January 2008 until December 2011, 952 infants were admitted to SCBU. The main admission diagnoses were early onset neonatal sepsis, jaundice and prematurity. Early prematurity (<34 weeks carried the highest risk of mortality (OR 9.5, 95% CI 5.4-16.5, p<0.001. There was a significant decrease in mortality from 19.3% (2008 to 4.8% (2011 among the infants admitted for prematurity (p=0.03. The neonatal mortality in Maela camp as a whole declined by 51% from 21.8 to 10.7 deaths per 1000 live births over the corresponding period (p=0.04. Staff expressed more confidence in their ability to take care of neonates and there was a more positive attitude towards premature infants.Neonatal mortality can be reduced in a resource poor setting by introduction of a simple low cost unit specialising in care of sick neonates and run by local health workers following adequate training. Training in recognition and provision of simple interventions at a high standard can increase staff confidence and reduce fatalistic attitudes towards premature neonates.

  7. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  8. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  9. Outbreak of Bacillus cereus Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Traced to Balloons Used in Manual Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Zwet, Wil C.; Parlevliet, Gerard A.; Savelkoul, Paul H.; Stoof, Jeroen; Kaiser, Annie M.; Van Furth, A. Marceline; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, an outbreak of systemic infections caused by Bacillus cereus occurred in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the University Hospital Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Three neonates developed sepsis with positive blood cultures. One neonate died, and the other two neonates recovered. An environmental survey, a prospective surveillance study of neonates, and a case control study were performed, in combination with molecular typing, in order to identify potential sources ...

  10. The Effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on Neonatal Outcomes in Iranian Hospitals: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Sarparast

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC is a supportive technique that beings at the neonatal period and is one of the skin-to-skin contact methods of holding neonate by mother. This method has an important role in exclusive breastfeeding and thermal care of neonates. This study aimed to investigate the application of KMC and evaluate the effect of this technique in different neonatal outcomes, particularly in Iranian neonates. Moreover, this review can be a tool for formative evaluation for this newly introduced treatment intervention in Iran. Evidence Acquisition: This review was conducted in national and international databases concerning experience with KMC on term and preterm neonates admitted in Iranian hospitals from 2006 to 2014. The measured outcomes included physiologic, psychologic, and clinical effects of this practice on newborn infants. Results: In this study, 42 Persian and English language papers were reviewed and finally 26 articles were selected. Various effects of KMC on different factors such as analgesia; physiological effects, breastfeeding, icterus, length of hospitalization, infection, psychologic effects, and weight gain were found. Conclusions: The results showed that as a simple and suitable strategy for increasing the health status of the mothers and newborns, KMC had an important role in improvement of neonatal outcomes in neonatal wards of Iranian hospitals in recent ten years. Therefore, promoting this technique in all neonatal wards of the country can promote health status of this population.

  11. Rehabilitation of sucking and swallowing alterations in premature newborn at the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Vázquez, Edda; Pérez-Padilla, M Lucía; Martín-López, M de Lourdes; Romero-Hernández, Adriana Abigail

    2018-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, 640 premature newborns with alterations in suction-deglution have been taken care of in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, using techniques for patients with immaturity, and neurological, gastrointestinal, cardiologic and respiratory pathologies. This descriptive study includes the treatment employed mainly in premature newborns during this period. Suction, swallowing and breathing coordination are some of the most complex abilities that premature newborns face, due to their anatomofunctional immaturity and improper sensoriomotor integration for the high energy requirements they must meet. Sucking and swallowing are voluntary and involuntary processes that guarantee the safe passage of food from mouth to stomach, and require the coordination of the cranial nerves, the brain stem and cerebral cortex and muscles of the mouth, pharynx and esophagus. The rehabilitation treatment consists in the positioning of the newborn and caretaker, adaptation of teat, regulation of muscle tone and progressive intake of milk. The feeding processing was reduced to 1.5 weeks in newborns submitted to treatment, whereas in those who did not receive the treatment, the proccess took up to 3 weeks. Copyright: © 2018 Permanyer.

  12. Ambroxol for women at risk of preterm birth for preventing neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Garay, Alejandro G; Reveiz, Ludovic; Velasco Hidalgo, Liliana; Solis Galicia, Cecilia

    2014-10-31

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is caused by a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant (an active agent that keeps pulmonary alveoli open and facilitates the entry of air to the lungs, thus improving the oxygenation of the newborn).A number of interventions such as pulmonary surfactant and prenatal corticosteroids are used to prevent RDS. Ambroxol has been studied as a potential agent to prevent RDS, but effectiveness and safety has yet to be evaluated. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of giving ambroxol to pregnant women who are at risk of preterm birth, for preventing neonatal RDS. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (29 November 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 11),Embase (1988 to November 2013), MEDLINE (PubMed 1970 to November 2013), LILACS (1982 to November 2013), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (November 2013) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the administration of ambroxol given to pregnant women at risk of preterm birth versus placebo, antenatal corticosteroids (betamethasone or dexamethasone), or no treatment.We did not identify any trials comparing ambroxol with dexamethasone (corticosteroid) in this review. Nor did we identify any trials comparing ambroxol combined with corticosteroid versus corticosteroid alone, or placebo/no treatment. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and trial quality. Two review authors independently extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. We included 14 studies (in 18 trial reports), involving 1047 pregnant women at risk of preterm birth with 1077 newborns. However, three of the included studies did not report on this review's outcomes of interest. We carried out two main comparisons: ambroxol versus antenatal corticosteroids (betamethasone); and ambroxol versus placebo or no treatment. Seven RCTs provided data for our comparison of ambroxol versus

  13. Core measures for developmentally supportive care in neonatal intensive care units: theory, precedence and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Mary; Gibbins, Sharyn; Hoath, Steven

    2009-10-01

    This paper is a discussion of evidence-based core measures for developmental care in neonatal intensive care units. Inconsistent definition, application and evaluation of developmental care have resulted in criticism of its scientific merit. The key concept guiding data organization in this paper is the United States of America's Joint Commission's concept of 'core measures' for evaluating and accrediting healthcare organizations. This concept is applied to five disease- and procedure-independent measures based on the Universe of Developmental Care model. Electronically accessible, peer reviewed studies on developmental care published in English were culled for data supporting the selected objective core measures between 1978 and 2008. The quality of evidence was based on a structured predetermined format that included three independent reviewers. Systematic reviews and randomized control trials were considered the strongest level of evidence. When unavailable, cohort, case control, consensus statements and qualitative methods were considered the strongest level of evidence for a particular clinical issue. Five core measure sets for evidence-based developmental care were evaluated: (1) protected sleep, (2) pain and stress assessment and management, (3) developmental activities of daily living, (4) family-centred care, and (5) the healing environment. These five categories reflect recurring themes that emerged from the literature review regarding developmentally supportive care and quality caring practices in neonatal populations. This practice model provides clear metrics for nursing actions having an impact on the hospital experience of infant-family dyads. Standardized disease-independent core measures for developmental care establish minimum evidence-based practice expectations and offer an objective basis for cross-institutional comparison of developmental care programmes.

  14. Assessment of Physical Environment of Iran’s Neonatal Tertiary Care Centers from the Perspective of the Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostajab Razavi Nejad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Globally,it is estimated that approximately 13 million neonates are born prematurely each year. The development of the central nervous system in premature neonates continues outside of the uterus and in the environment of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This study aimed to evaluate the physical environment of hospital and nursery in Iran’s tertiary care centers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 23 NICUs of nine Universities of Medical Sciences, where students are trained in the neonatal fellowship course, from seven provinces of Iran, 20th July to 21th September 2015. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software, version 16, and descriptive statistics. Results: In this study, four dimensions of physical environment of hospitals and NICUs including the accessibility of NICU, the physical environment of NICU, infants’ bed space, and the sensory elements of bed spaces were evaluated. The obtained scores for each item was 41.17, 39.95, 38.83, and 39.28 out of 100, respectively. The highest mean score was 71.30 that was related to NICU temperature and ventilation considerations. The lowest mean score was 20, which was related to controlling over the movements around the infants’ beds. The total mean score of the physical environment of hospital and NICU was 39.77. Conclusion: According to the results, it is recommended to take appropriate action to develop physical space and infrastructures for neonatal care regarding developmental care along with other dimensions.

  15. The impact of architectural design upon the environmental sound and light exposure of neonates who require intensive care: an evaluation of the Boekelheide Neonatal Intensive Care Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, D C; Akram Khan, M; Munson, D P; Reid, E J; Helseth, C C; Buggy, J

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the differences in environmental sound, illumination and physiological parameters in the Boekelheide Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (BNICU), which was designed to comply with current recommendations and standards, as compared with a conventional neonatal intensive care unit (CNICU). Prospectively designed observational study. Median sound levels in the unoccupied BNICU (37.6 dBA) were lower than the CNICU (42.1 dBA, P<0.001). Median levels of minimum (6.4 vs 48.4 lux, P<0.05) and maximum illumination (357 vs 402 lux, P<0.05) were lower in the BNICU. A group of six neonates delivered at 32 weeks gestation showed significantly less periodic breathing (14 vs 21%) and awake time (17.6 vs 29.3%) in the BNICU as compared to the CNICU. Light and sound were both significantly reduced in the BNICU. Care in the BNICU was associated with improved physiological parameters.

  16. The Probability of Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome as a Function of Gestational Age and Lecithin/Sphingomyelin Ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Caryn; Norwitz, Errol R.; Woensdregt, Karlijn; Cackovic, Michael; Shaw, Julia A.; Malkus, Herbert; Ehrenkranz, Richard A.; Illuzzi, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    We sought to define the risk of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) as a function of both lecithin/sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio and gestational age. Amniotic fluid L/S ratio data were collected from consecutive women undergoing amniocentesis for fetal lung maturity at Yale-New Haven Hospital from January 1998 to December 2004. Women were included in the study if they delivered a live-born, singleton, nonanomalous infant within 72 hours of amniocentesis. The probability of RDS was modeled using multivariate logistic regression with L/S ratio and gestational age as predictors. A total of 210 mother-neonate pairs (8 RDS, 202 non-RDS) met criteria for analysis. Both gestational age and L/S ratio were independent predictors of RDS. A probability of RDS of 3% or less was noted at an L/S ratio cutoff of ≥3.4 at 34 weeks, ≥2.6 at 36 weeks, ≥1.6 at 38 weeks, and ≥1.2 at term. Under 34 weeks of gestation, the prevalence of RDS was so high that a probability of 3% or less was not observed by this model. These data describe a means of stratifying the probability of neonatal RDS using both gestational age and the L/S ratio and may aid in clinical decision making concerning the timing of delivery. PMID:18773379

  17. Mothers’ perceptions of family centred care in neonatal intensive care units

    OpenAIRE

    Finlayson, Kenneth William; Dixon, Annie; Smith, Chris; Dykes, Fiona Clare; Flacking, Renee

    2014-01-01

    Objective\\ud \\ud To explore mothers’ perceptions of family centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in England.\\ud Design\\ud \\ud The qualitative experiences of 12 mothers from three NICUs in the UK were elicited using individual interviews. A thematic network analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews\\ud Main outcome measures\\ud \\ud A central global theme supported by a number of organizing themes were developed reflecting the views of the mothers and their experi...

  18. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  19. Clinical Competence and Its Related Factors of Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Mirlashari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical competence of nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units together with advancements in medical science and technology increased the survival rate of newborns that need specialized care. To ensure the quality of care and provide the safety of patients, evaluating the clinical competence of nurses seems necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical competence of nurses in the neonatal intensive care units. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 117 nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected by census method. The research tool was Development of Competency Inventory for Registered Nurses questionnaire which completed by self-assessment. The mean clinical competence scores of participants categorized into 3 levels: weak: 273. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using the Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The highest levels of competence were related to critical thinking and research attitude and interpersonal relationships, and the lowest level was related to training and mentoring. There was a direct statistically significant relationship between marital status, employment status, level of interest in working in the neonatal intensive-care units and the clinical competence of nurses. Conclusion: Since the clinical competence of nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units is vital, some variables such as interest in the nursing profession, employment status, the neonatal intensive theoretical and practical training courses and the amount of overtime working hours should be taken into consideration.

  20. Views of parents and health-care providers regarding parental presence at bedside rounds in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyb, M J; Coo, H; Rühland, L; Dow, K

    2014-02-01

    To examine the views of parents and health-care providers regarding parental presence during neonatal intensive care rounds. Cross-sectional survey of parents whose children were admitted to a tertiary-care neonatal intensive care unit (n=81). Medical trainees (n=67) and nurses (n=28) were also surveyed. The majority of parents reported that attending rounds reduced their anxiety and increased their confidence in the health-care team. Nurses were more likely than medical trainees to support parental presence at rounds (P=0.02). About three-quarters of medical trainees and nurses thought discussion is inhibited and 69% of trainees felt teaching is decreased when parents attend rounds. Most parents who attended rounds found the experience beneficial, but medical trainees' views were mixed. The positive impact on parents, and the learning opportunities created in family-centered care and communication when parents are present on rounds, should be highlighted for trainees and other neonatal intensive care personnel.

  1. Breaking down barriers: enabling care-by-parent in neonatal intensive care units in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Shoo; Yu, Hua-Feng; Ye, Xiang Y; Warre, Ruth; Liu, Xiang-Hong; Liu, Jian-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Denying parents access to their infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a standard practice in most hospitals across China. Visitation is not usually permitted or may be strictly limited, and NICU care for most neonates is provided by health-care professionals with little participation of the parents. An exception to this rule is the level 2 "Room-In" ward in Qilu Children's Hospital, Shandong University, where parents have 24-hour access to their infants and participate in providing care. This retrospective cohort study compared the outcomes of infants who were admitted to the NICU and remained there throughout their stay (NICU-NICU group, n=428), admitted to the NICU and then transferred to the Room-In ward (NICU-RIn group, n=1018), or admitted straight to the Room-In ward (RIn only group, n=629). There were no significant differences in the rates of nosocomial infection, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, intraventricular hemorrhage, and retinopathy of prematurity between the NICU-NICU and NICU-RIn groups. The rate of necrotizing enterocolitis was significantly lower in the NICU-RIn group (P=0.04), while weight gain and duration of hospital stay were significantly higher (both Pneonatal care in China.

  2. Breaking down barriers: enabling care-by-parent in neonatal intensive care units in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ying Li; Shoo Lee; Hua-Feng Yu; Xiang Y Ye; Ruth Warre; Xiang-Hong Liu; Jian-Hong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Background:Denying parents access to their infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is a standard practice in most hospitals across China.Visitation is not usually permitted or may be strictly limited,and NICU care for most neonates is provided by health-care professionals with little participation of the parents.An exception to this rule is the level 2 "Room-In" ward in Qilu Children's Hospital,Shandong University,where parents have 24-hour access to their infants and participate in providing care.Methods:This retrospective cohort study compared the outcomes of infants who were admitted to the NICU and remained there throughout their stay (NICU-NICU group,n=428),admitted to the NICU and then transferred to the Room-In ward (NICU-RIn group,n=1018),or admitted straight to the Room-In ward (RIn only group,n=629).Results:There were no significant differences in the rates of nosocomial infection,bronchopulmonary dysplasia,intraventricular hemorrhage,and retinopathy of prematurity between the NICU-NICU and NICURIn groups.The rate of necrotizing enterocolitis was significantly lower in the NICU-RIn group (P=0.04),while weight gain and duration of hospital stay were significantly higher (both P<0.001).Rates of adverse outcomes were lower in RIn-only infants due to their low severity of illness on admission.Conclusions:Allowing parents access to their infant in the NICU is feasible and safe in China,and may result in improvements in infant outcomes.Further studies are required to generate stronger evidence that can inform changes to neonatal care in China.

  3. Involvement of parents in care. Telemedicin neonatal homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, K. G.; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Neonatal homecare (NH) is an alternative to hospitalization for healthy preterm infants dependent only on tube feeding. NH implies parents managing tube feeding while establishing breastfeeding at home with support from neonatal nurses offering home visits regularly, until breastfeed......INTRODUCTION Neonatal homecare (NH) is an alternative to hospitalization for healthy preterm infants dependent only on tube feeding. NH implies parents managing tube feeding while establishing breastfeeding at home with support from neonatal nurses offering home visits regularly, until...... breastfeeding is established. Home visits are time consuming and challenging for neonatal units covering big geographical areas and therefore replacements for home visits should be considered. The aim of this study is to identify parent’s needs when receiving NH and thereby identify requirements...

  4. Parental Decision-Making Preferences in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Elliott Mark; Barg, Frances K; Cook, Noah; Black, Emily; Joffe, Steven

    2016-12-01

    To explore how characteristics of medical decisions influence parents' preferences for control over decisions for their seriously ill infants. In qualitative interviews, parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) were asked to consider all medical decisions they could recall, and were prompted with decisions commonly encountered in the NICU. For each decision, parents were asked detailed questions about who made each decision, whom they would have preferred to make the decision, and why. Using standard qualitative methods, responses were coded and organized such that decision-level characteristics could be analyzed according to preferred decision-making role. Parents identified 2 factors that were associated with a preference to delegate decisions to the medical team (high degree of urgency, high level of required medical expertise) and 4 factors associated with a preference to retain parental control (high perceived risk, high personal experience with the decision, involvement of foreign bodily fluids, and similarity to decisions that they perceived as part of the normal parental role). Characteristics of decisions influence preferences for control over medical decisions among parents of patients in the NICU. These insights may guide improvements in physician-parent communication and consent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Caffeine use in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shaweesh, Jalal M; Martin, Richard J

    2017-10-01

    Caffeine is the most frequently used medication in the neonatal intensive care unit. It is used for the prevention and treatment of apnea, although this has been associated with lower incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and patent ductus arteriosus as well as intact survival at 18-21 months of life. Although neurodevelopmental advantage was no longer statistically significant at age 5 years, caffeine was associated with sustained improvement in co-ordination and less gross motor impairment than placebo. The mechanism of action of caffeine on prevention of apnea and activation of breathing seems to be through central inhibition of adenosine receptors. However, its impact on BPD and neurodevelopmental outcomes might be induced through its effects as anti-inflammatory mediator, protection of white matter, and induction of surfactant protein B. Whereas long-term studies have documented the safety of caffeine as used in current practice, further studies are clearly needed to identify optimum dosing, and time of starting and discontinuing caffeine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  7. Atropine use may lead to post-operative respiratory acidosis in neonates receiving ductal ligation: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Szu-Ling; Lin, Wen-Li; Weng, Chien-Hsiang; Wu, Shye-Jao; Tsai, Hsin-Jung; Wang, Shwu-Meei; Peng, Chun-Chih; Chang, Jui-Hsing

    2018-04-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is one of the most common cardiac conditions in preterm infants. Closure of the PDA in symptomatic patients can be achieved medically or surgically. Atropine is commonly administered in general anesthesia as a premedication in this age group but with limited evidence addressing the effect of its use. Our study examined the association of the use of atropine as a premedication in PDA ligation and the risk of post-operative respiratory complications. This retrospective cohort study included 150 newborns who have failed medical treatment for PDA and received PDA ligation during 2008-2012 in a single tertiary medical center. Ninety-two of them (61.3%) received atropine as premedication for general anesthesia while 58 (38.7%) did not. Post-operative respiratory condition, the need of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the presence of bradycardia were measured. Patients with atropine use were associated with increased odds of respiratory acidosis in both univariate analysis (22.9% vs 7.3%; OR = 3.785, 95% CI = 1.211-11.826, p = 0.022) and multivariate analysis (OR = 4.030, 95% CI = 1.230-13.202, p = 0.021), with an even higher odds of respiratory acidosis in patients receiving both atropine and ketamine. The use of atropine as premedication in general anesthesia for neonatal PDA ligation is associated with higher risk of respiratory acidosis, which worsens with the combined use of ketamine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Breastfeeding support in neonatal intensive care: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maastrup, Ragnhild; Bojesen, Susanne Norby; Kronborg, Hanne; Hallström, Inger

    2012-08-01

    The incidence of breastfeeding of preterm infants is affected by the support provided at the hospital and in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). However, policies and guidelines promoting breastfeeding vary both nationally and internationally. The aim of this survey was to describe breastfeeding support in Danish NICUs, where approximately 98% of mothers initiate lactation. A national survey of all 19 Danish NICUs was conducted in 2009. Four NICUs were at designated Baby-Friendly hospitals, and 5 had a lactation consultant. In all NICUs, it was possible for some parents to stay overnight; 2 units had short restrictions on parents' presence. Five NICUs had integrated postpartum care for mothers. Breastfeeding policies, written guidelines, and systematic breastfeeding training for the staff were common in most NICUs. Seventeen NICUs recommended starting breast milk expression within 6 hours after birth, and mothers were encouraged to double pump. Most NICUs aimed to initiate skin-to-skin contact the first time the parents were in the NICU, and daily skin-to-skin contact was estimated to last for 2-4 hours in 63% and 4-8 hours in 37% of the units. The use of bottle-feeding was restricted. The Danish NICUs described the support of breastfeeding as a high priority, which was reflected in the recommended policies for breast milk pumping, skin-to-skin contact, and the parents' presence in the NICU, as well as in the restricted use of bottle-feeding. However, support varied between units, and not all units supported optimal breastfeeding.

  9. Respiratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The words "respiratory" and "respiration" refer to the lungs and breathing. ... Boron WF. Organization of the respiratory system. In: Boron WF, Boulpaep EL, eds. Medical Physiology . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 26.

  10. The innate immune response to lower respiratory tract E. Coli infection and the role of the CCL2-CCR2 axis in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A; Ndeh, Roland; Collaco, Joseph M; Poupore, Amy K; Dikeman, Dustin; Zhong, Qiong; Singer, Benjamin D; D'Alessio, Franco; Scott, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Neonates have greater morbidity/mortality from lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) compared to older children. Lack of conditioning of the pulmonary immune system due to limited environmental exposures and/or infectious challenges likely contributes to the increase susceptibility in the neonate. In this study, we sought to gain insights into the nature and dynamics of the neonatal pulmonary immune response to LRTI using a murine model. Wildtype (WT) and Ccr2 -/- C57BL/6 neonatal and juvenile mice received E. coli or PBS by direct pharyngeal aspiration. Flow cytometry was used to measure immune cell dynamics and identify cytokine-producing cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure cytokine/chemokine expression. Innate immune cell recruitment in response to E. coli-induced LRTI was delayed in the neonatal lung compared to juvenile lung. Lung clearance of bacteria was also significantly delayed in the neonate. Ccr2 -/- neonates, which lack an intact CCL2-CCR2 axis, had higher mortality after E. coli challenged than Ccr2 +/+ neonates. A greater percentage of CD8 + T cells and monocytes from WT neonates challenged with E. coli produced TNF compared to controls. The pulmonary immune response to E. coli-induced LRTI differed significantly between neonatal and juvenile mice. Neonates were more susceptible to increasing doses of E. coli and exhibited greater mortality than juveniles. In the absence of an intact CCL2-CCR2 axis, susceptibility to LRTI-induced mortality was further increased in neonatal mice. Taken together these findings underscore the importance of age-related differences in the innate immune response to LRTI during early stages of postnatal life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiation dose in the neonatal intensive care unit of Antoine Beclere Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebreton, C.; Rehel, J. L.; Aubert, B.; Musset, D.

    2006-01-01

    As part of a program aiming a better knowledge of the medical exposure of the french population and in the frame of the principle of optimisation, a study of radiation doses to neonates was carried out in neonatal intensive care unit of Antoine Beclere hospital. From March to August 2005, entrance surface dose (ESD) received by 63 neonates classified according the their weight (184 X-ray examinations) was measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) during examination. The mean ESD ESD per exposure was found between 20 and 37 μGy according to the weight of neonates. The newborn of less than 1000 g at birth have a mean of 20 X-ray examinations. Above 1000 g the number of X-ray examinations was between 5 and 8.5. During their stay in neonatal intensive care unit, the total ESD of neonates was from 500 μGy for the smallest Neonates (<1000 g) and the other respectively. Results indicate that neonate exposition, is very small compared with french and international data. ESD was significantly lower than the french reference level of 80 μGy. (Author)

  12. The BRACELET Study: surveys of mortality in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Platt Martin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The subject of death and bereavement in the context of randomised controlled trials in neonatal or paediatric intensive care is under-researched. The objectives of this phase of the Bereavement and RAndomised ControlLEd Trials (BRACELET Study were to determine trial activity in UK neonatal and paediatric intensive care (2002-06; numbers of deaths before hospital discharge; and variation in mortality across intensive care units and trials and to determine whether bereavement support policies were available within trials. These are essential prerequisites to considering the implications of future policies and practice subsequent to bereavement following a child's enrolment in a trial. Methods The units survey involved neonatal units providing level 2 or 3 care, and paediatric units providing level II care or above; the trials survey involved trials where allocation was randomized and interventions were delivered to intensive care patients, or to parents but designed to affect patient outcomes. Results Information was available from 191/220 (87% neonatal units (149 level 2 or 3 care; and 28/32 (88% paediatric units. 90/177 (51% eligible responding units participated in one or more trial (76 neonatal, 14 paediatric and 54 neonatal units and 6 paediatric units witnessed at least one death. 50 trials were identified (36 neonatal, 14 paediatric. 3,137 babies were enrolled in neonatal trials, 210 children in paediatric trials. Deaths ranged 0-278 (median [IQR interquartile range] 2 [1, 14.5] per neonatal trial, 0-4 (median [IQR] 1 [0, 2.5] per paediatric trial. 534 (16% participants died post-enrolment: 522 (17% in neonatal trials, 12 (6% in paediatric trials. Trial participants ranged 1-236 (median [IQR] 21.5 [8, 39.8] per neonatal unit, 1-53 (median [IQR] 11.5 [2.3, 33.8] per paediatric unit. Deaths ranged 0-37 (median [IQR] 3.5 [0.3, 8.8] per neonatal unit, 0-7 (median [IQR] 0.5 [0, 1.8] per paediatric unit. Three trials had a

  13. Post-neonatal Tetanus in a PICU of a Developing Economy: Intensive Care Needs, Outcome and Predictors of Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angurana, Suresh Kumar; Jayashree, Muralidharan; Bansal, Arun; Singhi, Sunit; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) needs, outcome and predictors of mortality in post-neonatal tetanus. Review of 30 consecutive post-neonatal tetanus cases aged 1 months to 12 years admitted to a PICU in north India over a period of 10 years (January 2006 to December 2015). Chronic suppurative otitis media was the commonest portal of entry. All received tetanus toxoid, human tetanus immunoglobulin (HTIG) and appropriate antibiotics; 7 (23.3%) received intrathecal HTIG. Common complications were respiratory failure, rhabdomyolysis, autonomic dysfunction, acute kidney injury and healthcare-associated infections. PICU needs were as follows: ventilation; benzodiazepine, morphine and magnesium sulfate infusion; neuromuscular blockers, inotropes, tracheostomy and renal replacement therapy. Mortality rate was 40%; severity Grade IIIb, autonomic dysfunction, use of vasoactive drugs and those who did not receive intrathecal HTIG were significantly associated with mortality. Post-neonatal tetanus is associated with high mortality, and PICU needs include management of spasms, autonomic dysfunction and complications and cardiorespiratory support. © The Author [2017]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. [Analgesia and sedation in neonatal-pediatric intensive care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünder, C; Houben, F; Hartwig, S; Theisohn, M; Roth, B

    1991-01-01

    In pediatric intensive care, analgesia and sedation has become increasingly important for newborns as well as prematures in recent years. However, its importance is frequently not well recognized and sedation is confounded with analgesia. In our intensive-care unit (ICU), fentanyl and midazolam have proved to be useful. In newborn and premature infants, fentanyl alone has been sufficient because of its analgesic and sedative action. In a study on 20 newborns and prematures suffering from severe respiratory problems as compared with a historical group that did not receive fentanyl, we could show that in subjects receiving fentanyl, considerably less treatment with sedatives and other analgesics was necessary. Cardiopulmonary tolerance was satisfactory. The highest bilirubin values were reached about 1 day earlier and were slightly higher than those measured in the control group, but oral nutrition could be initiated sooner. In small infants, additional midazolam was given after cardiac surgery. During the first 72 h, we found a correlation between serum levels of midazolam and the depth of sedation; however, after 72 h of medication, the dose had to be raised because of an increase in metabolic clearance. During the concomitant administration of midazolam and fentanyl, significantly less midazolam was needed to achieve appropriate analog-sedation. Prior to the administration of analgesics and sedatives, care should be taken to ensure that circulatory conditions are stable and that there is no hypovolemia, and the drugs must be given slowly during several minutes. Especially in a pediatric ICU, light and noise should be diminished and contact between the parents and the child should be encouraged, even when the child is undergoing mechanical ventilation.

  15. Correlation of neonatal intensive care unit performance across multiple measures of quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, Jochen; Zupancic, John A F; Gould, Jeffrey B; Pietz, Kenneth; Kowalkowski, Marc A; Draper, David; Hysong, Sylvia J; Petersen, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether high performance on one measure of quality is associated with high performance on others and to develop a data-driven explanatory model of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) performance. We conducted a cross-sectional data analysis of a statewide perinatal care database. Risk-adjusted NICU ranks were computed for each of 8 measures of quality selected based on expert input. Correlations across measures were tested using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine whether underlying factors were driving the correlations. Twenty-two regional NICUs in California. In total, 5445 very low-birth-weight infants cared for between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007. Pneumothorax, growth velocity, health care-associated infection, antenatal corticosteroid use, hypothermia during the first hour of life, chronic lung disease, mortality in the NICU, and discharge on any human breast milk. The NICUs varied substantially in their clinical performance across measures of quality. Of 28 unit-level correlations, 6 were significant (ρ < .05). Correlations between pairs of measures of quality of care were strong (ρ ≥ .5) for 1 pair, moderate (range, ρ ≥ .3 to ρ < .5) for 8 pairs, weak (range, ρ ≥ .1 to ρ < .3) for 5 pairs, and negligible (ρ < .1) for 14 pairs. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 underlying factors of quality in this sample. Pneumothorax, mortality in the NICU, and antenatal corticosteroid use loaded on factor 1; growth velocity and health care-associated infection loaded on factor 2; chronic lung disease loaded on factor 3; and discharge on any human breast milk loaded on factor 4. In this sample, the ability of individual measures of quality to explain overall quality of neonatal intensive care was modest.

  16. Sustained Reduction in Bloodstream Infections in Infants at a Large Tertiary Care Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sara; Haithcock, Sarah; Smith, P. Brian; Goldberg, Ronald; Bidegain, Margarita; Tanaka, David; Carriker, Charlene; Ericson, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reduction of bloodstream infections (BSI) has emerged as an important patient safety goal. Implementation of central line insertion bundles, standardized line care protocols, and health care provider education programs have reduced BSI in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) around the country. The ability of large tertiary care centers to decrease nosocomial infections, including BSI, has been demonstrated. However, long-term BSI reductions in infants are not well documented. We sought to demonstrate that a low incidence of BSI can be maintained over time in a tertiary care NICU. Subjects 6,790 infants admitted to a large, tertiary care NICU between 2005 and 2013. Design Retrospective intervention study. Methods A staged, multifaceted infection prevention plan was implemented beginning in October 2007 under nursing leadership. The incidence of BSI was determined annually for 2005-2013. Results Baseline BSI incidence for infants admitted to the NICU was 5.15 and 6.08 episodes per 1,000 infant-days in 2005 and 2006, respectively. After protocol implementation, the incidence of BSI decreased to 2.14/1,000 infant-days and 2.44/1,000 infant-days in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Yearly incidence remained low over the next 4 years and decreased even further to 0.20-0.45 infections/1,000 infant days. This represents a 92% decrease in BSI over a period of >5 years. Conclusions Implementation of a nursing-led comprehensive infection control initiative can effectively produce and maintain a reduction in the incidence of BSI in infants at a large tertiary care NICU. What this study adds Long term reductions in neonatal BSI are possible with implementation of a multidisciplinary team approach and strong nursing leadership. PMID:25915573

  17. Skin-to-skin care for procedural pain in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Celeste; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Disher, Timothy; Benoit, Britney; Fernandes, Ananda; Streiner, David; Inglis, Darlene; Zee, Rebekah

    2017-02-16

    Skin-to-skin care (SSC), often referred to as 'kangaroo care' (KC) due to its similarity with marsupial behaviour of ventral maternal-infant contact, is one non-pharmacological intervention for pain control in infants. The primary objectives were to determine the effect of SSC alone on pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonates compared to no intervention, sucrose or other analgesics, or additions to simple SSC such as rocking; and to determine the effects of the amount of SSC (duration in minutes), method of administration (e.g. who provided the SSC) of SSC in reducing pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonatesThe secondary objectives were to determine the safety of SSC care for relieving procedural pain in infants; and to compare the SSC effect in different postmenstrual age subgroups of infants. For this update, we used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 1); MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 25 February 2016); Embase (1980 to 25 February 2016); and CINAHL (1982 to 25 February 2016). We also searched clinical trials' databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials. Studies with randomisation or quasi-randomisation, double- or single-blinded, involving term infants (≥ 37 completed weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA) to a maximum of 44 weeks' PMA and preterm infants (care, and duration of SSC. Twenty-five studies (n = 2001 infants) were included. Nineteen studies (n = 1065) used heel lance as the painful procedure, one study combined venepuncture and heel stick (n = 50), three used intramuscular injection (n = 776), one used 'vaccination' (n = 60), and one used tape removal (n = 50). The studies were generally strong and had low or uncertain risk of bias. Blinding of the intervention was not possible, making them subject to high risk, depending on the

  18. Neonatal palliative care: developing consensus among neonatologists using the Delphi technique in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Joana C C; Justo da Silva, Lincoln

    2013-12-01

    Pediatric palliative care in Portugal is improving, but there is still additional work to do concerning programs or guidelines for this subject. In Portugal, physicians are the stakeholders in the decision-making process with reference to the transition to palliative care in the neonatal intensive care unit, and it was considered very important to raise their awareness and motivation about neonatal palliative care. Our research was based on Catlin and Carter's protocol from 2002 and the main goal was to assess neonatologists' willingness to build a palliative care and end-of-life protocol that could be acceptable nationwide. The survey used the Delphi technique and was developed in 3 rounds. The expert panel was composed of 57 participants who represented 41% of the Portuguese neonatologists. The study was conducted via the Internet, based in a researcher-created private Web site, and e-mail was used for data collection and feedback. Neonatologists agreed on 7 areas: (1) planning (medical education, resources, and local), (2) prenatal palliative care, (3) neonatal palliative care criteria, (4) the parents (presenting neonatal palliative care to parents, including then in the daily care of newborns and in family-centered care), (5) physicians' needs, (6) pain and symptom management, and (7) end-of-life care (withholding/withdrawing ventilation and hydration/nutrition).

  19. Automatic generation of natural language nursing shift summaries in neonatal intensive care: BT-Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, James; Freer, Yvonne; Gatt, Albert; Reiter, Ehud; Sripada, Somayajulu; Sykes, Cindy

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to determine whether and how a computer system could automatically generate helpful natural language nursing shift summaries solely from an electronic patient record system, in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A system was developed which automatically generates partial NICU shift summaries (for the respiratory and cardiovascular systems), using data-to-text technology. It was evaluated for 2 months in the NICU at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, under supervision. In an on-ward evaluation, a substantial majority of the summaries was found by outgoing and incoming nurses to be understandable (90%), and a majority was found to be accurate (70%), and helpful (59%). The evaluation also served to identify some outstanding issues, especially with regard to extra content the nurses wanted to see in the computer-generated summaries. It is technically possible automatically to generate limited natural language NICU shift summaries from an electronic patient record. However, it proved difficult to handle electronic data that was intended primarily for display to the medical staff, and considerable engineering effort would be required to create a deployable system from our proof-of-concept software. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Capacity building of nurses providing neonatal care in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: methods for the POINTS of care project to enhance nursing education and reduce adverse neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlow Brian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased survival of preterm infants in developing countries has often been accompanied by increased morbidity. A previous study found rates of severe retinopathy of prematurity varied widely between different neonatal units in Rio de Janeiro. Nurses have a key role in the care of high-risk infants but often do not have access to ongoing education programmes. We set out to design a quality improvement project that would provide nurses with the training and tools to decrease neonatal mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and make the teaching package (POINTS of care--six modules addressing Pain control; optimal Oxygenation; Infection control; Nutrition interventions; Temperature control; Supportive care available to others. Methods/Design Six neonatal units, caring for 40% of preterm infants in Rio de Janeiro were invited to participate. In Phase 1 of the study multidisciplinary workshops were held in each neonatal unit to identify the neonatal morbidities of interest and to plan for data collection. In Phase 2 the teaching package was developed and tested. Phase 3 consisted of 12 months data collection utilizing a simple tick-sheet for recording. In Phase 4 (the Intervention all nurses were asked to complete all six modules of the POINTS of care package, which was supplemented by practical demonstrations. Phase 5 consisted of a further 12 months data collection. In Phase 1 it was agreed to include inborn infants with birthweight ≤ 1500 g or gestational age of ≤ 34 weeks. The primary outcome was death before discharge and secondary outcomes included retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Assuming 400-450 infants in both pre- and post-intervention periods the study had 80% power at p = Discussion The results of the POINTS of Care intervention will be presented in a separate publication. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN83110114

  1. RANDOMIZED EUROPEAN MULTICENTER TRIAL OF SURFACTANT REPLACEMENT THERAPY FOR SEVERE NEONATAL RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME - SINGLE VERSUS MULTIPLE DOSES OF CUROSURF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SPEER, CP; ROBERTSON, B; CURSTEDT, T; HALLIDAY, HL; COMPAGNONE, D; GEFELLER, O; HARMS, K; HERTING, E; MCCLURE, G; REID, M; TUBMAN, R; HERIN, P; NOACK, G; KOK, J; KOPPE, J; VANSONDEREN, L; LAUFKOTTER, E; KOHLER, W; BOENISCH, H; ALBRECHT, K; HANSSLER, L; HAIM, M; OETOMO, SB; Okken, Albert; ALTFELD, PC; GRONECK, P; KACHEL, W; RELIER, JP; WALTI, H

    There is now convincing evidence that the severity of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome can be reduced by surfactant replacement therapy; however, the optimal therapeutic regimen has not been defined. This randomized European multicenter trial was designed to determine whether the beneficial

  2. Intramuscular adrenaline does not reduce the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in neonates delivered by elective caesarean section at term

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Avlund, O L; Pedersen, B L

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test whether intramuscular injection of 30 microg adrenaline decreased the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in term infants delivered by elective caesarean section before active labour. METHOD: The study was randomised and double-blinded. A total of 270 neonates were...

  3. A gap between need and reality: neonatal nursing staff requirements on a German intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Patry

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive days once a day in a combined pediatric and neonatal ICU of a metropolitan academic medical center in south-west Germany. Each day, 18.9±0.98 patients (mean±standard deviation were assessed (14.26±1.21 neonatal, 4.65±0.98 pediatric. Among neonates, 9.94±2.56 received intensive therapy, 3.77±1.85 intensive surveillance, and 0.65±0.71 special care. Average nursing staff requirement was 12.10±1.81 full time equivalents (FTE per shift. Considering additional pediatric patients in the ICU and actual nursing staff availability (8.97±0.87 FTE per shift, this ICU seems understaffed.

  4. Erros medicamentosos em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal Medication errors in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Bandeira de Melo Escovedo Lerner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a incidência e o tipo de erros médicos em uma unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal e a relação entre o erro e o estado clínico do paciente. MÉTODOS: Revisamos os prontuários médicos, durante os primeiros 7 dias de hospitalização, de todos os recém-nascidos de alto risco admitidos por um período de 3 meses. RESULTADOS: Setenta e três pacientes foram admitidos durante o período de estudo. A média de peso de nascimento foi de 2.140 g (640-5.020 g, e a idade gestacional média foi de 34 semanas (25-40 semanas. Dos 73 prontuários analisados, 40 (55% apresentaram um ou mais erros. Um total de 365 dias de hospitalização foi analisado, e 95 erros médicos foram detectados (um erro por 3,9 dias de hospitalização. O erro mais freqüente esteve associado com uso de medicamentos (84,2%. Uso de procedimentos terapêuticos (medicamentos, fototerapia, etc. sem prescrição adequada no prontuário do paciente (erro de comissão representou 7,4% dos erros, e a incidência de erros de omissão foi de 8,4%. A incidência de erros médicos foi significativamente maior em recém-nascidos com idade gestacional menor. CONCLUSÕES: A incidência de erros no cuidado de recém-nascidos de alto risco é elevada. Deve-se incentivar estratégias para melhorar a educação de profissionais da saúde envolvidos no cuidado e o desenvolvimento da cultura local, divulgando algoritmos claros e acessíveis para orientar o comportamento quando há ocorrência de erros.OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and type of medical errors in a newborn intensive care unit and the relationship between the error and the patient's clinical status. METHODS: We reviewed the medical charts, during the first 7 days of hospitalization, of all high-risk newborn infants admitted for a period of 3 months. RESULTS: Seventy-three patients were admitted during the study period. Their mean birth weight was 2,140 g (640-5,020 g and mean gestational age was 34

  5. Effect of endotoxin and allergens on neonatal lung function and infancy respiratory symptoms and eczema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbing-Karahagopian, V.; Gugten, A.C. van der; Ent, C.K. van der; Uiterwaal, C.; Jongh, M. de; Oldenwening, M.; Brunekreef, B.; Gehring, U.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Exposure to endotoxin and allergens in house dust has been found to be associated with childhood wheeze and asthma. Neonatal lung function is rarely examined in relation to this exposure. OBJECTIVES To assess the association between exposure to endotoxin, house dust mite and cat

  6. Bacterial diversity in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krissi M Hewitt

    Full Text Available Infants in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs are particularly susceptible to opportunistic infection. Infected infants have high mortality rates, and survivors often suffer life-long neurological disorders. The causes of many NICU infections go undiagnosed, and there is debate as to the importance of inanimate hospital environments (IHEs in the spread of infections. We used culture-independent next-generation sequencing to survey bacterial diversity in two San Diego NICUs and to track the sources of microbes in these environments. Thirty IHE samples were collected from two Level-Three NICU facilities. We extracted DNA from these samples and amplified the bacterial small subunit (16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence using 'universal' barcoded primers. The purified PCR products were pooled into a single reaction for pyrosequencing, and the data were analyzed using QIIME. On average, we detected 93+/-39 (mean +/- standard deviation bacterial genera per sample in NICU IHEs. Many of the bacterial genera included known opportunistic pathogens, and many were skin-associated (e.g., Propionibacterium. In one NICU, we also detected fecal coliform bacteria (Enterobacteriales in a high proportion of the surface samples. Comparison of these NICU-derived sequences to previously published high-throughput 16S rRNA amplicon studies of other indoor environments (offices, restrooms and healthcare facilities, as well as human- and soil-associated environments, found the majority of the NICU samples to be similar to typical building surface and air samples, with the notable exception of the IHEs which were dominated by Enterobacteriaceae. Our findings provide evidence that NICU IHEs harbor a high diversity of human-associated bacteria and demonstrate the potential utility of molecular methods for identifying and tracking bacterial diversity in NICUs.

  7. Educational technology integration and distance learning in respiratory care: practices and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Keith B; Johns, Carol L

    2007-11-01

    Educational technologies have had an important role in respiratory care. Distance learning via postal correspondence has been used extensively in respiratory care, and Internet-based distance learning is now used in the training of respiratory therapists (RTs), clinical continuing education, and in baccalaureate degree and higher programs for RTs and educators. To describe the current scope of respiratory care educational technology integration, including distance learning. To investigate online research potential in respiratory care. A probabilistic online survey of United States respiratory care program directors was conducted on educational technology practices and attitudes, including distance learning. A parallel exploratory study of United States respiratory care managers was conducted. One-hundred seventy-seven (53%) program directors participated. One-hundred twenty-eight respiratory care managers participated. For instructional purposes, the respiratory care programs heavily use office-productivity software, the Internet, e-mail, and commercial respiratory care content-based computer-based instruction. The programs use, or would use, online resources provided by text publishers, but there is a paucity. Many program directors reported that their faculty use personal digital assistants (PDAs), often in instructional roles. 74.6% of the programs offer no fully online courses, but 61.0% reported at least one course delivered partially online. The managers considered continuing education via online technologies appropriate, but one third reported that they have not/will not hire RTs trained via distance learning. Neither group considered fully online courses a good match for RT training, nor did they consider training via distance learning of comparable quality to on-campus programs. Both groups rated baccalaureate and higher degrees via distance learning higher if the program included face-to-face instruction. Online distance-learning participatory experience

  8. Digital scrapbooking as a standard of care in neonatal intensive care units: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Muhammad T; Kanwal, Ifrah

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we describe a digital photo scrapbooking project as a standard of care for the parents of infants admitted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Photographs were taken from birth until discharge or expiry at special moments during the infant's hospitalization and used to create a digital scrapbook with daily notes by the parents. The scrapbook and original photos were provided on a CD at discharge or at expiry. Parents and their families unanimously appreciated the photos and the opportunity to record their thoughts, and considered the CDs as a lifetime treasure. Digital photo journaling could be implemented as a standard of care at other institutions with a commitment from the nursing and ancillary staff of the NICU and labor and delivery department, with possible support from volunteers.

  9. Radiation dose reduction in a neonatal intensive care unit in computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frayre, A.S.; Torres, P.; Gaona, E.; Rivera, T.; Franco, J.; Molina, N.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by chest x-rays in neonatal care with thermoluminescent dosimetry and to determine the level of exposure where the quantum noise level does not affect the diagnostic image quality in order to reduce the dose to neonates. In pediatric radiology, especially the prematurely born children are highly sensitive to the radiation because of the highly mitotic state of their cells; in general, the sensitivity of a tissue to radiation is directly proportional to its rate of proliferation. The sample consisted of 208 neonatal chest x-rays of 12 neonates admitted and treated in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). All the neonates were preterm in the range of 28–34 weeks, with a mean of 30.8 weeks. Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) values for chest x-rays are higher than the DRL of 50 μGy proposed by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In order to reduce the dose to neonates, the optimum image quality was achieved by determining the level of ESD where level noise does not affect the diagnostic image quality. The optimum ESD was estimated for additional 20 chest x-rays increasing kVp and reducing mAs until quantum noise affects image quality. - Highlights: ► Entrance surface doses (ESD) in neonates were measured. ► Doses measured in neonates examinations were higher than those reported by literature. ► Reference levels in neonatal studies are required. ► Radiation protection optimization was proposed.

  10. Current issues in the respiratory care of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orsini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive neuromuscular disease, resulting in respiratory muscle weakness, reduced pulmonary volumes, ineffective cough, secretion retention, and respiratory failure. Measures as vital capacity, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, sniff nasal inspiratory pressure, cough peak flow and pulse oximetry are recommended to monitor the respiratory function. The patients should be followed up by a multidisciplinary team, focused in improving the quality of life and deal with the respiratory symptoms. The respiratory care approach includes airway clearance techniques, mechanically assisted cough and noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Vaccination and respiratory pharmacological support are also recommended. To date, there is no enough evidence supporting the inspiratory muscle training and diaphragmatic pacing.

  11. Is more neonatal intensive care always better? Insights from a cross-national comparison of reproductive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Goodman, David C; Little, George A

    2002-06-01

    Despite high per capita health care expenditure, the United States has crude infant survival rates that are lower than similarly developed nations. Although differences in vital recording and socioeconomic risk have been studied, a systematic, cross-national comparison of perinatal health care systems is lacking. To characterize systems of reproductive care for the United States, Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom, including a detailed analysis of neonatal intensive care and mortality. Comparison of selected indicators of reproductive care and mortality from 1993-2000 through a systematic review of journal and government publications and structured interviews of leaders in perinatal and neonatal care. Compared with the other 3 countries, the United States has more neonatal intensive care resources yet provides proportionately less support for preconception and prenatal care. Unlike the United States, the other countries provided free family planning services and prenatal and perinatal physician care, and the United Kingdom and Australia paid for all contraception. The United States has high neonatal intensive care capacity, with 6.1 neonatologists per 10 000 live births; Australia, 3.7; Canada, 3.3; and the United Kingdom, 2.7. For intensive care beds, the United States has 3.3 per 10 000 live births; Australia and Canada, 2.6; and the United Kingdom, 0.67. Greater neonatal intensive care resources were not consistently associated with lower birth weight-specific mortality. The relative risk (United States as reference) of neonatal mortality for infants birth weight rates were notably higher in the United States, partially explaining the high crude mortality rates. The United States has significantly greater neonatal intensive care resources per capita, compared with 3 other developed countries, without having consistently better birth weight-specific mortality. Despite low birth weight rates that exceed other countries, the United States has proportionately

  12. Spectrum of neonatal admissions and their outcome in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasmeen, S.; Waheed, K.A.I.; Gul, R.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the spectrum of neonatal admissions and their outcome in a tertiary care hospital. Study Design: A descriptive observational study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted in Neonatal Unit of The Children's Hospital and Institute of Child Health, Lahore for a period of one year from 1st Jan 2015 to 31st Dec 2015. Material and Methods: Data of all admitted patients during the study period were reviewed and analysed in terms of gender, gestational age, age at presentation, weight, cause of admission and their outcome. Neonates with incomplete data were excluded subsequently. Diagnosis were made on clinical examination, radiological findings and laboratory investigations. Data were analysed using SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 11427 neonates admitted during the study period, 397 were excluded because of deficient record. Of the 11030 neonates males were 7673 (69.6%) and females were 3353 (30.4%). Full-term neonates were 8123 (73.64%) while preterm were 2907 (26.35%). Low birth weight (LBW) babies were 5636 (51.1%). Newborns presented within first 24 hours of life were 1478 (13.4%). Birth asphyxia 3518 (31.89%) was the most common cause of hospital admissions followed by prematurity 2907 (26.36%) and neonatal sepsis 1865 (16.91%). Out of 11030 babies, 7055 (64%) were discharged, 2805 (25.4%) left against medical advice and 1170 (10.6%) neonates expired. Highest number of deaths was because of prematurity 469 (39.32%) followed by asphyxia neonatorum 359 (30.68%) and neonatal sepsis 180 (15.38%). Conclusion: Birth asphyxia, prematurity and sepsis constitute three fourths of hospital admissions in our neonatal unit. Most common cause of mortality was prematurity followed by birth asphyxia and neonatal sepsis. (author)

  13. Sex-Specific Consequences of Neonatal Stress on Cardio-Respiratory Inhibition Following Laryngeal Stimulation in Rat Pups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldy, Cécile; Chamberland, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The presence of liquid near the larynx of immature mammals triggers prolonged apneas with significant O2 desaturations and bradycardias. When excessive, this reflex (the laryngeal chemoreflex; LCR) can be fatal. Our understanding of the origins of abnormal LCR are limited; however, perinatal stress and male sex are risk factors for cardio-respiratory failure in infants. Because exposure to stress during early life has deleterious and sex-specific consequences on brain development it is plausible that respiratory reflexes are vulnerable to neuroendocrine dysfunction. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that neonatal maternal separation (NMS) is sufficient to exacerbate LCR-induced cardio-respiratory inhibition in anesthetized rat pups. Stressed pups were separated from their mother 3 h/d from postnatal days 3 to 12. At P14–P15, pups were instrumented to monitor breathing, O2 saturation (Spo2), and heart rate. The LCR was activated by water injections near the larynx (10 µl). LCR-induced apneas were longer in stressed pups than controls; O2 desaturations and bradycardias were more profound, especially in males. NMS increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMNV) of males but not females. The positive relationship between corticosterone and testosterone observed in stressed pups (males only) suggests that disruption of neuroendocrine function by stress is key to sex-based differences in abnormal LCR. Because testosterone application onto medullary slices augments EPSC amplitude only in males, we propose that testosterone-mediated enhancement of synaptic connectivity within the DMNV contributes to the male bias in cardio-respiratory inhibition following LCR activation in stressed pups. PMID:29308430

  14. Economic evaluation of neonatal care packages in a cluster-randomized controlled trial in Sylhet, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFevre, Amnesty E; Shillcutt, Samuel D; Waters, Hugh R; Haider, Sabbir; El Arifeen, Shams; Mannan, Ishtiaq; Seraji, Habibur R; Shah, Rasheduzzaman; Darmstadt, Gary L; Wall, Steve N; Williams, Emma K; Black, Robert E; Santosham, Mathuram; Baqui, Abdullah H

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate and compare the cost-effectiveness of two strategies for neonatal care in Sylhet division, Bangladesh. In a cluster-randomized controlled trial, two strategies for neonatal care--known as home care and community care--were compared with existing services. For each study arm, economic costs were estimated from a societal perspective, inclusive of programme costs, provider costs and household out-of-pocket payments on care-seeking. Neonatal mortality in each study arm was determined through household surveys. The incremental cost-effectiveness of each strategy--compared with that of the pre-existing levels of maternal and neonatal care--was then estimated. The levels of uncertainty in our estimates were quantified through probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The incremental programme costs of implementing the home-care package were 2939 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1833-7616) United States dollars (US$) per neonatal death averted and US$ 103.49 (95% CI: 64.72-265.93) per disability-adjusted life year (DALY) averted. The corresponding total societal costs were US$ 2971 (95% CI: 1844-7628) and US$ 104.62 (95% CI: 65.15-266.60), respectively. The home-care package was cost-effective--with 95% certainty--if healthy life years were valued above US$ 214 per DALY averted. In contrast, implementation of the community-care strategy led to no reduction in neonatal mortality and did not appear to be cost-effective. The home-care package represents a highly cost-effective intervention strategy that should be considered for replication and scale-up in Bangladesh and similar settings elsewhere.

  15. A study of neonatal outcome associated with preterm birth in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, I.; Azhar, I.A.

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most significant problem in current obstetric practice and according to WHO is the direct cause accounting for 24% of neonatal deaths. Objective: To assess frequency and neonatal outcome in patients with preterm birth. Methodology: A prospective descriptive study was conducted at Gynae Unit III Jinnah Hospital Lahore over a period of one year (from 1st July 2011 to 30th June included in the study. For data collection two groups were made depending upon duration of pregnancy. Group l was allotted to women who were pregnant 2012) in collaboration with Paediatrics department. All labouring women who presented after 28 weeks and before 37 completed weeks of gestation were less ( ) than 32 weeks of gestation. Data was collected and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Results: During the study period total 5171 deliveries took place. Out of 5171 neonates born, 460 were preterm making the frequency of 8.86%. Majority 62.82% were > 32 weeks of gestation, 67.39% were male, 57.60% were > 1.5 kg by weight, 57.17% delivered vaginally and 80.86% were born alive. Neonatal morbidity was more common in neonates less than 32 weeks of gestation. Perinatal mortality was 10.48% in this study. Conclusion: Neonatal morbidity and mortality is more common in neonates less than 32 weeks of gestation, this can be improved by improving prenatal health services and advanced neonatal care. (author)

  16. Systematic review of qualitative studies exploring parental experiences in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Maghaireh, Dua'a Fayiz; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Chan, Chong Mei; Piaw, Chua Yan; Al Kawafha, Mariam Mofleh

    2016-10-01

    To determine the feasibility and utility of a thematic analysis approach to synthesising qualitative evidence about parental experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit. Admission of infants to the neonatal intensive care unit is usually an unexpected event for parents who can cause them to experience psychosocial difficulties. A qualitative systematic review is the best method for exploring these parents' experiences regarding this type of admission. Systematic review. Qualitative studies in peer-reviewed journals aimed at understanding parental experiences regarding infant neonatal intensive care unit admission were identified in six electronic databases. Three reviewers selected relevant articles and assessed the quality of the methodological studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A thematic analysis approach was used to identify the most common themes in the studies describing parental experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit. A total of eighty articles were identified; nine studies were included in this review. Four studies used semistructured interviews, three used interviews, one used self-reporting and one used both focus group and interview methodologies. Common themes across parents' experiences were the stress of hospitalisation, alteration in parenting roles and the impact of infant hospitalisation on psychological health. Having an infant hospitalised in the neonatal intensive care unit is a stressful experience for parents. This experience is the result of exposure to different stressors related to the infant's condition, an alteration in parenting roles or the neonatal intensive care unit environment and staffing. These parents suffered negative psychological effects, experienced an interrupted development of a healthy parent-infant attachment and/or felt parental role alteration. The study's findings are crucial for neonatal intensive care unit nurses to develop intervention strategies and programmes that help parents to

  17. Radiation dose reduction in a neonatal intensive care unit in computed radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayre, A S; Torres, P; Gaona, E; Rivera, T; Franco, J; Molina, N

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dose received by chest x-rays in neonatal care with thermoluminescent dosimetry and to determine the level of exposure where the quantum noise level does not affect the diagnostic image quality in order to reduce the dose to neonates. In pediatric radiology, especially the prematurely born children are highly sensitive to the radiation because of the highly mitotic state of their cells; in general, the sensitivity of a tissue to radiation is directly proportional to its rate of proliferation. The sample consisted of 208 neonatal chest x-rays of 12 neonates admitted and treated in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). All the neonates were preterm in the range of 28-34 weeks, with a mean of 30.8 weeks. Entrance Surface Doses (ESD) values for chest x-rays are higher than the DRL of 50 μGy proposed by the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB). In order to reduce the dose to neonates, the optimum image quality was achieved by determining the level of ESD where level noise does not affect the diagnostic image quality. The optimum ESD was estimated for additional 20 chest x-rays increasing kVp and reducing mAs until quantum noise affects image quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Skin-to-skin care for procedural pain in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Celeste; Campbell-Yeo, Marsha; Fernandes, Ananda; Inglis, Darlene; Streiner, David; Zee, Rebekah

    2014-01-23

    Skin-to-skin care (SSC), otherwise known as Kangaroo Care (KC) due to its similarity with marsupial behaviour of ventral maternal-infant contact, is one non-pharmacological intervention for pain control in infants. The primary objectives were to determine the effect of SSC alone on pain from medical or nursing procedures in neonates undergoing painful procedures compared to no intervention, sucrose or other analgesics, or additions to simple SSC such as rocking; and the effects of the amount of SSC (duration in minutes) and the method of administration (who provided the SSC, positioning of caregiver and neonate pair).The secondary objectives were to determine the incidence of untoward effects of SSC and to compare the SSC effect in different postmenstrual age subgroups of infants. The standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Collaborative Review Group were used. Databases searched in August 2011: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library); Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews; MEDLINE (1950 onwards); PubMed (1975 onwards); EMBASE (1974 onwards); CINAHL (1982 onwards); Web of Science (1980 onwards); LILACS database (1982 onwards); SCIELO database (1982 onwards); PsycInfo (1980 onwards); AMED (1985 onwards); Dissertation-Abstracts International (1980 onwards). Searches were conducted throughout September 2012. Studies with randomisation or quasi-randomisation, double or single-blinded, involving term infants (> 37 completed weeks postmenstrual age (PMA)) to a maximum of 44 weeks PMA and preterm infants (lance as the painful procedure, one study combined venepuncture and heel stick (n = 50), two used intramuscular injection, and one used 'vaccination' (n = 80). The studies that were included were generally strong and free from bias.Eleven studies (n = 1363) compared SSC alone to a no-treatment control. Although 11 studies measured heart rate during painful procedures, data from only four studies (n = 121) could be combined to give a

  19. [Variables determining the amount of care for very preterm neonates: the concept of medical stance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguet, A; Menget, A; Chary-Tardy, A-C; Savajols, E; Abed, N; Thiriez, G

    2014-02-01

    To compare the amount of medical interventions on very preterm neonates (24-31 weeks of gestation) in two French university tertiary care centers, one of which is involved in a Neonatal Developmental Care program. A secondary objective is to assess whether this difference in medical interventions can be linked to a difference in mortality and morbidity rates. We prospectively included all very preterm neonates free from lethal malformation born live in these two centers between 2006 and 2010. These inclusion criteria were met by 1286 patients, for whom we compared the rate of five selected medical interventions: birth by caesarean section, chest intubation in the delivery room, surfactant therapy, pharmacological treatment of patent ductus arteriosus, and red blood cell transfusion. The rates of the five medical interventions were systematically lower in the center that is involved in Neonatal Developmental Care. There was no significant difference in survival at discharge with no severe cerebral ultrasound scan abnormalities between the two centers. There were, however, significantly higher rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and nosocomial sepsis and longer hospital stays when the patients were not involved in a Neonatal Developmental Care program. This benchmarking study shows that in France, in the first decade of the 21st century, there are as many ways to handle very preterm neonates as there are centers in which they are born. This brings to light the concept of medical stance, which is the general care approach prior to the treatment itself. This medical stance creates the overall framework for the staff's decision-making regarding neonate care. The different parameters structuring medical stance are discussed. Moreover, this study raises the problematic issue of the aftermath of benchmarking studies when the conclusion is an increase of morbidity in cases where procedure leads to more interventions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  20. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J; Kinney, James; Puntel, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  1. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military of Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J

    2006-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland, will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision, perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  2. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J; Kinney, James; Puntel, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  3. Sedation and analgesia practices in neonatal intensive care units (EUROPAIN): results from a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajal, Ricardo; Eriksson, Mats; Courtois, Emilie; Boyle, Elaine; Avila-Alvarez, Alejandro; Andersen, Randi Dovland; Sarafidis, Kosmas; Polkki, Tarja; Matos, Cristina; Lago, Paola; Papadouri, Thalia; Montalto, Simon Attard; Ilmoja, Mari-Liis; Simons, Sinno; Tameliene, Rasa; van Overmeire, Bart; Berger, Angelika; Dobrzanska, Anna; Schroth, Michael; Bergqvist, Lena; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S

    2015-10-01

    Neonates who are in pain or are stressed during care in the intensive care unit (ICU) are often given sedation or analgesia. We investigated the current use of sedation or analgesia in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in European countries. EUROPAIN (EUROpean Pain Audit In Neonates) was a prospective cohort study of the management of sedation and analgesia in patients in NICUs. All neonates admitted to NICUs during 1 month were included in this study. Data on demographics, methods of respiration, use of continuous or intermittent sedation, analgesia, or neuromuscular blockers, pain assessments, and drug withdrawal syndromes were gathered during the first 28 days of admission to NICUs. Multivariable linear regression models and propensity scores were used to assess the association between duration of tracheal ventilation (TV) and exposure to opioids, sedatives-hypnotics, or general anaesthetics in neonates (O-SH-GA). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01694745. From Oct 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, 6680 neonates were enrolled in 243 NICUs in 18 European countries. Mean gestational age of these neonates was 35.0 weeks (SD 4.6) and birthweight was 2384 g (1007). 2142 (32%) neonates were given TV, 1496 (22%) non-invasive ventilation (NIV), and 3042 (46%) were kept on spontaneous ventilation (SV). 1746 (82%), 266 (18%), and 282 (9%) neonates in the TV, NIV, and SV groups, respectively, were given sedation or analgesia as a continuous infusion, intermittent doses, or both (panalgesia was 89.3% (70.0-100) for neonates in the TV group. Opioids were given to 1764 (26%) of 6680 neonates and to 1589 (74%) of 2142 neonates in the TV group. Midazolam was given to 576 (9%) of 6680 neonates and 536 (25%) neonates of 2142 neonates in the TV group. 542 (25%) neonates in the TV group were given neuromuscular blockers, which were administered as continuous infusions to 146 (7%) of these neonates. Pain assessments were recorded in 1250 (58%) of 2138, 672 (45%) of 1493, and

  4. A Framework of Complex Adaptive Systems: Parents As Partners in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DʼAgata, Amy L; McGrath, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neonatal care are allowing for increased infant survival; however, neurodevelopmental complications continue. Using a complex adaptive system framework, a broad analysis of the network of agents most influential to vulnerable infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is presented: parent, nurse, and organization. By exploring these interconnected relationships and the emergent behaviors, a model of care that increases parental caregiving in the NICU is proposed. Supportive parent caregiving early in an infant's NICU stay has the potential for more sensitive caregiving and enhanced opportunities for attachment, perhaps positively impacting neurodevelopment.

  5. MRI of ventilated neonates and infants: respiratory pressure as trigger signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, J.; Reiffen, H.P.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: motivated by the difficulties often encountered in the setup of respiratory trigger in MR imaging of mechanical ventilated pediatric patients, a simplified approach in terms of time and reliability was sought. Method: with the help of a male-to-male Luer-Lock adapter in combination with a 3-way adapter the tube of the respiratory compensation bellow was fixed to the output channel for capnography of the airway filter. Ten patients (age 4 months to 6 years) were tested with spin echo imaging and either respiration compensation (T1-weighted imaging) or respiratory triggered (T2-weighted imaging). Results: a clear trigger signal was achieved in all cases. No negative influence on the quality or security of the mechanical ventilation of the patients was observed. Summary: the proposed adapter is safe, efficient and fast to install in patients undergoing MR imaging in general anaesthesia. (orig.) [de

  6. A systematic review of instruments for assessing parent satisfaction with family-centred care in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Oglio, Immacolata; Mascolo, Rachele; Gawronski, Orsola; Tiozzo, Emanuela; Portanova, Anna; Ragni, Angela; Alvaro, Rosaria; Rocco, Gennaro; Latour, Jos M

    2018-03-01

    This systematic review synthesised and described instruments measuring parent satisfaction with the increasing standard practice of family-centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units. We evaluated 11 studies published from January 2006 to March 2016: two studies validated a parent satisfaction questionnaire, and nine developed or modified previous questionnaires to use as outcome measures in their local settings. Most instruments were not tested on reliability and validity. Only two validated instruments included all six of the FCC principles and could assess parent satisfaction with FCC in neonatal intensive care units and be considered as outcome indicators for further research. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Early neonatal special care units and their scientific achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of sick neonates originated in maternity and foundling hospitals in the 19th century. Nosocomial infections and difficult logistics of wet-nursing prevented admission of neonates in most children's hospitals well into the 20th century. In this article, 31 hospitals are described, all located in large cities, in which preterm and sick neonates were treated before the Great Depression. Even though mostly initiated by private charity, these institutions performed research right from the start. Topics included warming and feeding preterm infants, collecting and distributing human milk, developing and storing breast milk substitutes, prevention of rickets and nosocomial infections, maternal and public education regarding infection control, pathoanatomic characterisation of diseases and malformations and epidemiologic studies of infant mortality. These pioneering hospitals, their founding dates, researchers and classic publications are presented in a table. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Elective caesarean section and respiratory morbidity in the term and near-term neonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Kirkeby; Wisborg, Kirsten; Uldbjerg, Niels

    2007-01-01

    in English on elective caesarean section and respiratory morbidity in the newborn. We included studies that compared elective caesarean section to vaginal or intended vaginal delivery, with clear definition of outcome measures and information about gestational age. RESULTS: Nine eligible studies were......-analysis with a pooled risk estimate because of a variety of methodological differences between the studies. The overall risk for respiratory morbidity, however, seemed to increase about 2 to 3 times, though some studies presented much higher risk estimates. A decreasing risk with increasing gestational age was shown...

  9. Respiratory Care year in review 2013: airway management, noninvasive monitoring, and invasive mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Charles G; Blanch, Lluís; Fan, Eddy; Hess, Dean R

    2014-04-01

    Fundamental to respiratory care practice are airway management, noninvasive monitoring, and invasive mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent literature related to these topics in a manner that is most likely to have interest to the readers of Respiratory Care.

  10. Correlation of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Performance Across Multiple Measures of Quality of Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profit, J; Zupancic, JAF; Gould, JB; Pietz, K; Kowalkowski, MA; Draper, D; Hysong, SJ; Petersen, LA

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether high performance on one measure of quality is associated with high performance on others and to develop a data-driven explanatory model of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) performance. Design We conducted a cross-sectional data analysis of a statewide perinatal care database. Risk-adjusted NICU ranks were computed for each of 8 measures of quality selected based on expert input. Correlations across measures were tested using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine whether underlying factors were driving the correlations. Setting Twenty-two regional NICUs in California. Patients In total, 5445 very low-birth-weight infants cared for between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2007. Main Outcomes Measures Pneumothorax, growth velocity, health care–associated infection, antenatal corticosteroid use, hypothermia during the first hour of life, chronic lung disease, mortality in the NICU, and discharge on any human breast milk. Results The NICUs varied substantially in their clinical performance across measures of quality. Of 28 unit-level correlations only 6 were significant (P quality measures were strong (ρ > .5) for 1 pair, moderate (.3 quality in this sample. Pneumothorax, mortality in the NICU, and antenatal corticosteroid use loaded on factor 1; growth velocity and health care–associated infection loaded on factor 2; chronic lung disease loaded on factor 3; and discharge on any human breast milk loaded on factor 4. Conclusion In this sample, the ability of individual measures of quality to explain overall quality of neonatal intensive care was modest. PMID:23403539

  11. Causes of early neonatal respiratory distress in the former Venda - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    respiratory distress in the newborn in Western Europe ... cell count. Positive clinical findings are an enlarged liver or spleen, skin petechiae or blisters, or a positive rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test. A positive maternal history features intrapartum fever above ..... Stem H. Elhs U. The low birth weight Af"can baby. Arch Dts Child ...

  12. Early increased levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in neonates recovering from respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, Willem A.; van Kaam, Anton H. L. C.; Dekker, Tamara; Naber, Brigitta A. E.; Janssen, Daphne J.; Kroon, A. A.; Zimmermann, Luc J. I.; Versnel, Marjan A.; Lutter, René

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an eminent role in airway injury and remodelling. We explored the hypothesis that pulmonary MMP levels would differ early after birth (2-4 days) between infants with resolving respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and infants developing chronic lung disease

  13. Expansion of the ten steps to successful breastfeeding into neonatal intensive care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg; Häggkvist, Anna-Pia; Hansen, Mette Ness

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative: Revised, Updated, and Expanded for Integrated Care (2009) identifies the need for expanding the guidelines originally developed for maternity units to include neonatal intensive care. For this purpose...... and infants: 1. The staff attitude to the mother must focus on the individual mother and her situation. 2. The facility must provide family-centered care, supported by the environment. 3. The health care system must ensure continuity of care, that is, continuity of pre-, peri-, and postnatal care and post......; and for external assessment to decide whether neonatal intensive/intermediate care units meet the conditions required to be designated as Baby-Friendly. The documents will be finalized after consultation with the World Health Organization/United Nations Children's Fund, and the goal is to offer these documents...

  14. Identifying medication errors in the neonatal intensive care unit and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Paediatric patients are particularly prone to medication errors as they are classified as the most fragile population in a hospital setting. Paediatric medication errors in the South African healthcare setting are comparatively understudied. Objectives. To determine the incidence of medication errors in neonatal ...

  15. Importance of physiotherapy/nursing multidisciplinary integration about update newborn position in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa da Silva Neves Moreira Arakaki

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The high-risk newborns may require long periods of hospitalization until they reach clinical stability for hospital discharge. Avoiding babies to be in only one body position may be an effective way to cause respiratory and neuro-psycho-motor benefits, comfort and preventing pressure ulcers.Objectives This study investigated the impact of physiotherapy/nursing integration in update on body positioning of the newborn in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.Methods A questionnaire was administered to nurses and nursing technicians of the neonatal unit of Maternity School of UFRJ and nurses of the Advanced Course in Neonatal Nursing from the same institution. Two classes were taught by the physical therapist of the sector and the questions answered before and after these lessons. It was also a brief characterization of professional participants of the study. We used the Student's t test to compare the correct answers before (PRE and after (POST the classes, considering p < 0.05.Results There was a significant increase in the degree of knowledge of nurses and nursing technicians when compared the responses before (nurses: 68.8%; technicians: 70.1% and after classes (nurses: 78.4 %; technicians: 88.9%. The nurses were less than five years of graduated (45% and little time of professional experience in neonatology (60%. Forty-seven percent of technicians had less than five years of training and 82% had less than 10 years of experience.Conclusion The use of training by the nursing staff was significant, showing the importance of multidisciplinary approach and the integration of knowledge in the search for a humanized and effective care.

  16. Commonly Employed African Neonatal Skin Care Products Compromise Epidermal Function in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Mao-Qiang; Sun, Richard; Man, George; Lee, Dale; Hill, Zelee; Elias, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal mortality is much higher in the developing world than in developed countries. Infections are a major cause of neonatal death, particularly in preterm infants, in whom defective epidermal permeability barrier function facilitates transcutaneous pathogen invasion. The objective was to determine whether neonatal skin care products commonly used in Africa benefit or compromise epidermal functions in murine skin. After twice-daily treatment of 6- to 8-week-old hairless mice with each skin care product for 3 days, epidermal permeability barrier function, skin surface pH, stratum corneum hydration, and barrier recovery were measured using a multiprobe adapter system physiology monitor. For products showing some benefits in these initial tests, the epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis was assessed 1 and 5 hours after a single application to acutely disrupted skin. All of the skin care products compromised basal permeability barrier function and barrier repair kinetics. Moreover, after 3 days of treatment, most of the products also reduced stratum corneum hydration while elevating skin surface pH to abnormal levels. Some neonatal skin care products that are widely used in Africa perturb important epidermal functions, including permeability barrier homeostasis in mice. Should these products have similar effects on newborn human skin, they could cause a defective epidermal permeability barrier, which can increase body fluid loss, impair thermoregulation, and contribute to the high rates of neonatal morbidity and mortality seen in Africa. Accordingly, alternative products that enhance permeability barrier function should be identified, particularly for use in preterm infants. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%).

  18. Pay for performance in neonatal-perinatal medicine--will the quality of health care improve in the neonatal intensive care unit? A business model for improving outcomes in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Alan R

    2010-03-01

    Because neonatal medicine is such an expensive contributor to health care in the United States--with a small population of infants accounting for very high health care costs--there has been a fair amount of attention given to this group of patients. An idea that has received increasing attention in this discussion is pay for performance. This article discusses the concept of pay for performance, examines what potential benefits and risks exist in this model, and investigates how it might achieve the desired goals if implemented in a thoughtful way. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Infection control in neonatal intensive care unit : from a certified nurse in infection control's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    坂木, 晴世

    2007-01-01

    Neonates, especially those in neonatal intensive care units (NICU), are at high risk for infection. And nosocomial infections are responsible for almost 50% of the deaths that occur beyond 2 weeks of age. Advances in neonatal intensive care have resulted in survival of more low birth weight and sick infants. On the other hand, infection control measures in NICU are hard to say that we established. Therefore it is often that infection control measure in NICU of our country is taken in original...

  20. Anaesthetic management of emergency pacemaker implantation in a case of neonatal lupus erythematosus with complete congenital heart block & severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Kiran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An 8-week old 3-kilogram male baby was brought to this tertiary care hospital with respiratory distress, marked tracheal tug, poor feeding and a heart rate of 46/minute. The child had been referred from a peripheral hospital as a case of neonatal lupus with complete congenital heart block. The mother was seropositive for systemic lupus erythematosus with a history of two abortions. Evaluation on admission revealed a heart rate between 40-60/ minute, respiratory rate 40-50/ minute, inspiratory stridor, bilateral crepitations, chest retrac-tion and a marked tracheal tug that improved with prone positioning. Electrocardiography and echocardiography confirmed complete congenital heart block with cardiomegaly and mild left ventricular dysfunction. Keeping in view the impending congestive heart failure, possible early cardiomyopathy and the bad obstetric history ur-gent pacemaker implantation was planned to allow early recovery of the child. The anaesthetic risk was high due to the heart block, ventricular dysfunction, laryngomalacia, severe tracheal tug and anticipated difficult weaning from controlled ventilation. General anaesthesia was administered with endotracheal tube and con-trolled ventilation using ketamine, rocuronium and sufentanil. For patient safety invasive monitoring was pro-vided and external pacing was kept standby. Epicardial pacemaker leads were implanted onto the left ventricu-lar wall through a left anterior 6th intercostal space thoracotomy. The child was electively ventilated for two post operative days. The tracheal tug and secretions gradually subsided over 2 weeks with oxygen, antibiotics, steroids, bronchodilators and physiotherapy. At the time of discharge from hospital 2 weeks after the implant the child was feeding well, tracheal tug was minimal and the lungs were clear.

  1. Incidence of Candida species colonization in neonatal intensive care unit at Riyadh Hospital, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Alhussaini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida species are important hospital-acquired pathogens in infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This study was performed in the NICU of Saudi Arabian Hospital, Riyadh region, KSA to analyze patterns of neonatal Candida colonization as well as to determine the potential risk factors.Methods: Weekly surveillance fungal cultures of anal area, oral cavity, umbilicus and ear canal of neonates were performed from birth until their discharge from the hospital. Colonization was analyzed for timing, site, species, birth weight and gestational age. Potential environmental reservoirs and hands of health care workers (HCWs were also cultured monthly for fungi. Antifungal susceptibility of the identified isolates was also determined.Results: One hundred subjects have been recruited in this study. The overall colonization rate was 51%. Early colonization was found in 27 (27% neonates whereas 24 (24% neonates were lately colonized during their stay in NICU. Colonization was more in preterm neonates than in full and post term. Perianal area and oral cavity were the most frequent colonized sites. C. albicans was the main spp. (58.8% isolated from the neonates followed by C. tropicalis (17.6%, C. glabrata (15.6%, and C. krusei (2%. Of the 51 isolated Candida spp., 68.6% were sensitive to fluconazole, 80% to itraconazole and 64.7% to ketoconazole, while only 33% were sensitive to amphotericin B.Conclusion: Candida has emerged as a common cause of infections in infants admitted to NICU, and C. albicans is the most commonly isolated candidal species. Neonatal infections caused by non- albicans species occur at a later age during their stay in NICU.

  2. Infección neonatal: comportamiento en una unidad de cuidados intensivos Neonatal infection: behavior in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmany Franco Argote

    2010-12-01

    presenting with sepsis seen in the neonatal intensive services of the "America Arias" Gynecology and Obstetrics Hospital for 2 years. METHODS. A quantitative, observational, descriptive and retrospective research was carried out. Universe included 214 neonates. Study variables were: neonatal conditions, clinical sepsis manifestations, severity, humoral alterations and a history of intervention procedures. Some variables were combined founding the p-value to comparison in neonates with non-severe or with severe sepsis. RESULTS. In study group the prematurity, low birth weight and retarded intrauterine growth achieved a 49.1%, 42,1% and 18,7%, respectively. The 72.9% of patients had severe sepsis. The commonest clinical manifestations were the tachypnea (69.2% and a slow capillary filling (57.9%. The more frequent humoral alteration was the metabolic acidosis (63.6% and the umbilical catheterization was the commonest intervention procedure (21.5%, metabolic acidosis and neutrophilia and respiratory assistance with umbilical catheterization (21 % or epicutaneous (20.6%. The p-value was of 0.001 among patients with non-severe sepsis and the patients with severe sepsis in all combinations of intervention and non-significant in the combination of low birth weight-retarded intrauterine growth (IURG. CONCLUSIONS. There was predominance of prematurity, severe sepsis, tachypnea, umbilical catheterization and metabolic acidosis. The differences among the patients with non-severe sepsis and those with severe sepsis were significant in all the intervention combinations and of neonatal condition, but not in the combination of low birth weight-IURG.

  3. Urinary density measurement and analysis methods in neonatal unit care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to assess urine collection methods through cotton in contact with genitalia and urinary collector to measure urinary density in newborns. This is a quantitative intervention study carried out in a neonatal unit of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil, in 2010. The sample consisted of 61 newborns randomly chosen to compose the study group. Most neonates were full term (31/50.8% males (33/54%. Data on urinary density measurement through the methods of cotton and collector presented statistically significant differences (p<0.05. The analysis of interquartile ranges between subgroups resulted in statistical differences between urinary collector/reagent strip (1005 and cotton/reagent strip (1010, however there was no difference between urinary collector/ refractometer (1008 and cotton/ refractometer. Therefore, further research should be conducted with larger sampling using methods investigated in this study and whenever possible, comparing urine density values to laboratory tests.

  4. Neonatal Listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Western developed countries, Listeria monocytogenes is not an uncommon pathogen in neonates. However, neonatal listeriosis has rarely been reported in Taiwan. We describe two cases collected from a single medical institute between 1990 and 2005. Case 1 was a male premature baby weighing 1558 g with a gestational age of 31 weeks whose mother had fever with chills 3 days prior to delivery. Generalized maculopapular rash was found after delivery and subtle seizure developed. Both blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture collected on the 1st day yielded L. monocytogenes. In addition, he had ventriculitis complicated with hydrocephalus. Neurologic development was normal over 1 year of follow-up after ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. Case 2 was a 28-weeks' gestation male premature baby weighing 1180 g. Endotracheal intubation and ventilator support were provided after delivery due to respiratory distress. Blood culture yielded L. monocyto-genes. Cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis but the culture was negative. Brain ultrasonography showed ventriculitis. Sudden deterioration with cyanosis and bradycardia developed on the 8th day and he died on the same day. Neonatal listeriosis is uncommon in Taiwan, but has significant mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis of perinatal infection relies on high index of suspicion in perinatal health care professionals. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:161-164

  5. Evaluation of Risk Factors Related with Neonatal Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Hospitalized Neonates of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Saeidi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patent ductus arteriosus or patent arterial duct (PDA is a condition in which a structure called the ductus arteriosus, normal in fetal life, remains into infancy and onwards, when it should have disappeared. Thus, in this study we want to discuss about frequency of its symptoms and risk factors. Materials and Methods: It is a descriptive study which has been done among 100 newborns registered in Ghaem Hospital of Mashhad. Sampling was gathered easily.Results: The most prevalent symptom among newborn babies was systolic heart murmur (89%. According to the obtained risk factors, hypoxia (71% and acidosis (70% are followed by prematurity (41%. Out of all registered newborn babies 68% were suffering from associated disorders.Conclusion: For achieving an on-time diagnosis of PDA, clinical examination of heart and respiratory symptoms must be examined very precisely. Newborn babies must be examined in terms of two risk factors: prematurity and light weight.

  6. The history of ethical decision making in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placencia, Frank X; McCullough, Laurence B

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal ethics has focused on 2 questions: is withholding potentially live-saving treatment from neonates ethically justified? and if so, who has the authority to decide? This article details how these questions developed and provides a description of the possible answers. In the first section, we review a selection of seminal articles by noted authors in the fields of ethics, medicine, and law. The second section provides a detailed account of the development of the Baby Doe Regulations and the impact they had on neonatal ethics, with particular attention to the emergence of the Best Interest Standard as a guideline for decision making. In the last section, we review the landmark position statements by the American Academy of Pediatric (AAP), and the focus on evidence-based decision making. We conclude that forgoing life-saving treatment is ethically justified. However, this requires a rigorous evidence-based process and is limited by the Best Interest Standard. The second question is more difficult to answer, but we feel that in light of legal limitations, physicians acting as both the infant advocate and a proxy for the state, decide what falls in the range of acceptable treatment options, with the parents free to choose within that range.

  7. The Implications of Parental Consanguinity on the Care of Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 6% of births worldwide, 7.9 million children, are born with a serious genetic congenital abnormality each year. A factor thought to increase the prevalence of birth defects is parental consanguinity, which is a social custom practiced in at least 20% of the world's population. The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between consanguinity and congenital defects. This article also aims to enhance neonatal healthcare practitioners' comprehension of its implications for practice and research. A review of literature was compiled from a search of the online databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), PubMed, EBSCO MegaFILE, and Google Scholar. Literature pertinent to this topic primarily consists of research studies that examine the inbreeding depression phenomenon through comparison of the prevalence of birth defects among the offspring of consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples. Current studies indicate that the progeny of consanguineous couples are at an increased risk of congenital defects compared with those of nonconsanguineous couples. Consanguinity is one risk factor among many that can lead to a major birth defect. Relationships between consanguineous populations and neonatal healthcare practitioners such as registered nurses, advanced practice nurses, and physicians could significantly alter neonatal health outcomes. Specific recommendations such as genetic counseling and therapeutic communication are discussed. Further studies need to investigate the connection between consanguinity and birth defects while controlling for nongenetic variables. Moreover, a focus on consanguineous communities in the United States would prove beneficial.

  8. Stress in parents of very low birth weight preterm infants hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units. A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormald, Francisca; Tapia, José L; Torres, Gabriela; Cánepa, Paula; González, María Aurelia; Rodríguez, Diana; Escobar, Marisol; Reyes, Bernardita; Capelli, Carola; Menéndez, Laura; Delgado, Patricia; Treuer, Sergio; Ramírez, Rodrigo; Borja, Norma; Domínguez, Angélica

    2015-08-01

    The birth of a premature baby is a stressful event for parents. The objective of this study was to determine early stress in parents of very low birth weight infants (VLBWIs) hospitalized in 12 neonatal intensive care units from a South American Neonatal Network, to identify associated factors, and to compare the level of parental stress in public versus private healthcare facilities. Cross-sectional study in mothers/fathers of VLBWIs (500 to 1500 g). Early parental stress was measured using the Parental Stressor Scale, with a score from 1 (low stress) to 5 (high stress). The sociodemographic characteristics of parents and newborn infants were collected and associated with levels of parental stress. The study included 273 fathers/mothers of a total of 218 VLBW preterm infants. The survey was administered at 5.9 ± 2.0 days of life. The average total parental stress was 3.1 ± 0.8, and the highest score was obtained for the parental role subscale (3.6). A lower education level, unemployment, not having held the newborn infant, and respiratory support requirement were associated with higher parental stress levels. Stress was higher among mothers than fathers, and at public facilities versus private ones. Among parents of VLBWIs, a moderate early parental stress was observed. Parental role alteration was the most relevant factor. Parental stress was higher among mothers and at public healthcare facilities. A greater sensitization, further research and interventions in this area are required.

  9. Implementing Family Meetings Into a Respiratory Care Unit: A Care and Communication Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeslie, Vicki; Abcejo, Ma Sunnimpha; Anderson, Claudia; Leibenguth, Emily; Mielke, Cathy; Rabatin, Jeffrey

    Substantial evidence in critical care literature identifies a lack of quality and quantity of communication between patients, families, and clinicians while in the intensive care unit. Barriers include time, multiple caregivers, communication skills, culture, language, stress, and optimal meeting space. For patients who are chronically critically ill, the need for a structured method of communication is paramount for discussion of goals of care. The objective of this quality improvement project was to identify barriers to communication, then develop, implement, and evaluate a process for semistructured family meetings in a 9-bed respiratory care unit. Using set dates and times, family meetings were offered to patients and families admitted to the respiratory care unit. Multiple avenues of communication were utilized to facilitate attendance. Utilizing evidence-based family meeting literature, a guide for family meetings was developed. Templates were developed for documentation of the family meeting in the electronic medical record. Multiple communication barriers were identified. Frequency of family meeting occurrence rose from 31% to 88%. Staff satisfaction with meeting frequency, meeting length, and discussion of congruent goals of care between patient/family and health care providers improved. Patient/family satisfaction with consistency of message between team members; understanding of medications, tests, and dismissal plan; and efficacy to address their concerns with the medical team improved. This quality improvement project was implemented to address the communication gap in the care of complex patients who require prolonged hospitalizations. By identifying this need, engaging stakeholders, and developing a family meeting plan to meet to address these needs, communication between all members of the patient's care team has improved.

  10. Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy: Risk Factor for Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, T; Berenguer, A; Fontes, D; Scortenschi, E; Santos, I; Matos, C; Tomé, T

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: A colestase intra-hepática da gravidez está associada a complicações fetais e neonatais graves, incluindo síndrome de dificuldade respiratória. Tem sido recomendada terapêutica materna com ácido ursodesoxicólico e antecipação do parto para reduzir o risco de complicações. Os objetivos foram determinar a associação entre colestase intra-hepática da gravidez e síndrome de dificuldade respiratória neonatal e avaliar a relação com níveis maternos de ácidos biliares e procediment...

  11. Quality Improvement of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Chou, An-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Lien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2017-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is widely used in neonates, but the clinical practice varies. However, nursing practice differs among individuals, and an inappropriate application method may delay the respiratory therapy, influence the beneficial effect of NCPAP, and increase complications. We introduced a quality improvement project to expedite the application of NCPAP therapy and decrease the incidence of nasal trauma. A new strategy of mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits and a written protocol was implemented from April 2006. All medical staff answered a questionnaire to assess their basic knowledge before and after intensive training. The records of the patients who were treated with NCPAP from October 2005 to November 2006 were reviewed. Fifty-nine medical staff were involved in the project, and their mean score for the questionnaire improved from 69.2 points to 98.3 points after training. From October 2005 to November 2006, 113 infants were recruited in total and 82 of them were admitted after the protocol was implemented. The NCPAP cart dramatically shortened the preparation time (from 520 seconds to 72 seconds) and the application time (from 468 seconds to 200 seconds). The use of the nursing protocol significantly decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in the study population (45.2% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.006), but not in infants with a birth weight of < 1000 g. Risk factors for nasal skin trauma included lower gestational age and birth weight, longer duration of NCPAP use, and lack of standardized nursing care. The mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits is a practical way of expediting the initiation of NCPAP therapy. The written nursing protocol decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in infants, except for those with an extremely low birth weight. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Primary care for women. Management of common respiratory problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, M; Leiner, S

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical management of common respiratory illness that primary care providers encounter in an outpatient setting. The latest recommendations from the American Thoracic Society, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are summarized. The article discusses the causative organisms and antibiotics of choice for community-acquired pneumonia, and how to determine which patients require hospitalization. The appropriate use of asthma medications is described in detail, along with strategies for reducing aeroallergen exposure and for educating patients. An extensive section covers the interpretation of tuberculin skin tests and use of prophylactic isoniazid for prevention therapy of latent tuberculous infection, as well as the treatment of active tuberculosis. Controversies regarding antibiotics for both acute and chronic bronchitis are discussed along with other treatment options including over-the-counter medications, bronchodilators, and non-pharmacologic interventions. Finally, a strategy for dealing with the complaint of chronic cough is outlined. Although many of these conditions require active comanagement by collaborating physicians, the nurse-midwife will be better able to communicate with an advocate for her clients if she possesses expanded and current knowledge of treatment strategies.

  13. Clinical benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Profit

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal intensive care improves survival, but is associated with high costs and disability amongst survivors. Recent health reform in Mexico launched a new subsidized insurance program, necessitating informed choices on the different interventions that might be covered by the program, including neonatal intensive care. The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical outcomes, costs, and cost-effectiveness of neonatal intensive care in Mexico.A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using a decision analytic model of health and economic outcomes following preterm birth. Model parameters governing health outcomes were estimated from Mexican vital registration and hospital discharge databases, supplemented with meta-analyses and systematic reviews from the published literature. Costs were estimated on the basis of data provided by the Ministry of Health in Mexico and World Health Organization price lists, supplemented with published studies from other countries as needed. The model estimated changes in clinical outcomes, life expectancy, disability-free life expectancy, lifetime costs, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs for neonatal intensive care compared to no intensive care. Uncertainty around the results was characterized using one-way sensitivity analyses and a multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis. In the base-case analysis, neonatal intensive care for infants born at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks gestational age prolonged life expectancy by 28, 43, and 34 years and averted 9, 15, and 12 DALYs, at incremental costs per infant of US$11,400, US$9,500, and US$3,000, respectively, compared to an alternative of no intensive care. The ICERs of neonatal intensive care at 24-26, 27-29, and 30-33 weeks were US$1,200, US$650, and US$240, per DALY averted, respectively. The findings were robust to variation in parameter values over wide ranges in sensitivity analyses

  14. A short form of the neonatal intensive care unit family needs inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabete Alves

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The identification of parental needs in Neonatal Intensive Care Units is essential to design and implement family-centered care. This article aims to validate the Neonatal Intensive Care Units Family Needs Inventory for the Portuguese population, and to propose a Short Form. METHODS: A linguistic adaptation of the Neonatal Intensive Care Units Family Needs Inventory, a self-report scale with 56-items, was performed. The instrument was administered to 211 parents of infants hospitalized in all level III Neonatal Intensive Care Units in the North of Portugal, 15-22 days after admission (July of 2013-June of 2014. The number of items needed to achieve reliability close to 0.8 was calculated using by the Spearman-Brown formula. The global goodness of fit of the scale was evaluated using the comparative fit index. Construct validity was assessed through association of each dimension score with socio-demographic and obstetric characteristics. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis revealed two dimensions, one focused on parents' needs and another on the infant's needs. To compose the Short Form Inventory, items with ceiling effect were eliminated and 22 items were submitted to confirmatory analysis, which supported the existence of two dimensions (CFI = 0.925. The Short Form showed a high degree of reliability (alpha ≥ 0.76. Less educated and older parents more frequently attributed a significantly higher importance to parent-centered needs, while parents of multiples revealed a tendency to value infant-centered needs. CONCLUSIONS: The Short Form of the Neonatal Intensive Care Units Family Needs Inventory is a brief, simple, and valid instrument with a high degree of reliability. Further studies are needed to explore associations with practices of family-centered care.

  15. Development of a digital storytelling resource to support children's nursing students in neonatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia; Treves, Richard

    2017-03-06

    A digital storytelling resource focusing on the experience of nursing in neonatal care was developed using the narratives of six undergraduate children's nursing students who had undergone a practice placement on a neonatal unit. An evaluation of the resource in relation to its contribution to learning for students in a new, specialised area of practice revealed that storytelling based on peers' experiences is a valuable and insightful approach to learning. This is particularly important in a specialty such as neonatal care where the unfamiliarity of the environment and patient group can cause anxiety and uncertainty among students. Overall, the resource was seen to be useful to children's nursing students who are preparing for a practice placement in an unfamiliar clinical area.

  16. Intramuscular adrenaline does not reduce the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in neonates delivered by elective caesarean section at term

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille; Avlund, O L; Pedersen, B L

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To test whether intramuscular injection of 30 microg adrenaline decreased the incidence of respiratory distress and hypoglycaemia in term infants delivered by elective caesarean section before active labour. METHOD: The study was randomised and double-blinded. A total of 270 neonates were...... assigned to intramuscular treatment with saline (0.30 ml) or 30 microg adrenaline (0.30 ml) immediately after birth. The primary endpoint was referral to the neonatal ward because of respiratory distress or a blood glucose level ... with pulse oximetry to disclose potential side effects. RESULTS: Pulse-oximetry recordings revealed a modest systemic effect by intramuscular adrenaline as the heart rate and the haemoglobin oxygen saturation were significantly higher in infants who received adrenaline. In contrast, the incidence...

  17. Neonatal pain and preventive strategies: an experience in a tertiary care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, S.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about neonatal pain in Pakistan. So, to know about neonatal pain, its scoring and the effectiveness of oral dextrose in neonatal pain management we carried this study in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of military hospital (MH) Rawalpindi. Methods: This randomized control trial was carried out in NICU of MH, Rawalpindi from to Jan 2013 to Dec 2013. Total of 252 babies were enrolled in the study. We assessed neonatal pain by using Modified Behavioural Pain Scale (MBPS). Babies were given 10% dextrose and sterile water two minutes before a painful procedure and pain assessment was done after the procedure. The different painful procedures included, heel prick, nasogastric (NG) tube insertion, cannulation, catheterization and venepuncture for blood sampling. Results: A total of 252 babies were enrolled in the study. Of these 139(55%) were male and 113(45%) were female babies. Painful procedures included heel lancing 120(48%), I/V cannulations 60(24%), venepuncture 40 (16%), NG insertion 26 (10%) and Foley catheterization 6 (2%). Mean MBPS score with 10% dextrose and sterile water were 4.31 and 6.26 respectively and the difference between two was significant statically. Conclusion: Oral dextrose is a cheap and easily available solution and can be used in neonatal pain management during various painful procedures. (author)

  18. Surveillance and Isolation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newnam, Katherine M

    2016-08-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes 1.4 million (36%) neonatal deaths annually. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a common skin pathogen, remains the second leading cause of late-onset sepsis in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a resistant strain of SA, has created a significant global communicable health risk, especially in the NICU. To examine evidence related to NICU infection control practices surrounding MRSA surveillance, identification, and isolation in response to the clinical question, "What strategies should be universally implemented in the NICU to identify and prevent the spread of MRSA?" Databases were examined for articles on the topical area of MRSA in the neonate. Key terms were used to streamline the search, resulting in 20 primary works and 3 guideline/consensus statements considered imperative in response to the clinical questions. Hand hygiene remains the cornerstone to sound infection control practice. Colonization often leads to systemic infection, with smaller neonates at greatest risk. Hospital infection control compliance has improved outcomes. MRSA surveillance has reduced horizontal spread. No universal, specific recommendations exist to guide surveillance and management of MRSA in the NICU. Standardized guidelines with procedures for hand hygiene, patient surveillance and isolation, and patient cohorting with recommended staffing patterns should guide practice in the NICU. Both MRSA culture and polymerase chain reaction effectively identify positive patients. Decolonization practices are not yet clear. Evaluation of standard isolation practices versus outbreak response and approaches to neonatal decolonization should be evaluated for efficacy, safety, and resistance.

  19. Family support and family-centered care in the neonatal intensive care unit: origins, advances, impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Judith S; Cooper, Liza G; Blaine, Arianna I; Franck, Linda S; Howse, Jennifer L; Berns, Scott D

    2011-02-01

    Family-centered care (FCC) has been increasingly emphasized as an important and necessary element of neonatal intensive care. FCC is conceptualized as a philosophy with a set of guiding principles, as well as a cohort of programs, services, and practices that many hospitals have embraced. Several factors drive the pressing need for family-centered care and support of families of infants in NICUs, including the increase in the number of infants in NICUs; growth in diversity of the population and their concurrent needs; identification of parental and familial stress and lack of parenting confidence; and gaps in support for families, as identified by parents and NICU staff. We explore the origins of and advances in FCC in the NICU and identify various delivery methods and aspects of FCC and family support in the NICU. We examine the research and available evidence supporting FCC in the NICU and offer recommendations for increased dissemination and for future study. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Mohammed Kishk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3% developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001. The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8% followed by Pseudomonas (21.6% and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%. Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%.

  1. First Outbreak with MRSA in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Risk Factors and Control Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsing, Benedicte Grenness Utke; Arpi, Magnus; Andersen, Erik Arthur; Knabe, Niels; Mogensen, Dorthe; Buhl, Dorte; Westh, Henrik; Østergaard, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Denmark June 25th–August 8th 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA transmission. Methods Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and the Danish Neobase database. All MRSA isolates obtained from neonates, relatives and NICU health care workers (HCW) as well as environmental cultures were typed. Results During the 46 day outbreak period, 102 neonates were admitted to the two neonatal wards. Ninety-nine neonates were subsequently sampled, and 32 neonates (32%) from 25 families were colonized with MRSA (spa-type t127, SCCmec V, PVL negative). Thirteen family members from 11 of those families (44%) and two of 161 HCWs (1%) were colonized with the same MRSA. No one was infected. Five environmental cultures were MRSA positive. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (nCPAP) treatment (p = 0.006) and Caesarean section (p = 0.016) were independent risk factors for MRSA acquisition, whereas days of exposure to MRSA was a risk factors in the unadjusted analysis (p = 0.04). Conclusions MRSA transmission occurs with high frequency in the NICU during hospitalization with unidentified MRSA neonates. Caesarean section and nCPAP treatment were identified as risk factors for MRSA colonization. The MRSA outbreak was controlled through infection control procedures. PMID:23825581

  2. First outbreak with MRSA in a Danish neonatal intensive care unit: risk factors and control procedures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicte Grenness Utke Ramsing

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU in Denmark June 25(th-August 8(th 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA transmission. METHODS: Data were collected retrospectively from medical records and the Danish Neobase database. All MRSA isolates obtained from neonates, relatives and NICU health care workers (HCW as well as environmental cultures were typed. RESULTS: During the 46 day outbreak period, 102 neonates were admitted to the two neonatal wards. Ninety-nine neonates were subsequently sampled, and 32 neonates (32% from 25 families were colonized with MRSA (spa-type t127, SCCmec V, PVL negative. Thirteen family members from 11 of those families (44% and two of 161 HCWs (1% were colonized with the same MRSA. No one was infected. Five environmental cultures were MRSA positive. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (nCPAP treatment (p = 0.006 and Caesarean section (p = 0.016 were independent risk factors for MRSA acquisition, whereas days of exposure to MRSA was a risk factors in the unadjusted analysis (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: MRSA transmission occurs with high frequency in the NICU during hospitalization with unidentified MRSA neonates. Caesarean section and nCPAP treatment were identified as risk factors for MRSA colonization. The MRSA outbreak was controlled through infection control procedures.

  3. Parent experiences of communication with healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Lundqvist, Pia

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this review are to explore parents' experiences of communication with healthcare professionals and to identify the meaningfulness of communication to parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).More specifically, the objectives are to identify....

  4. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: An e-delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Wielenga (Joke); L.N. Tume (Lyvonne); J.M. Latour (Jos); A. van den Hoogen (Agnes)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique.Design An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis

  5. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities : an e-Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Latour, Jos M; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. DESIGN: An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and

  6. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: an e-Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M.; Tume, Lyvonne N.; Latour, Jos M.; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and research statements

  7. Challenges in reusing transactional data for daily documentation in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G R; Lawson, E E; Lehmann, C U

    2008-11-06

    The reuse of transactional data for clinical documentation requires navigation of computational, institutional and adaptive barriers. We describe organizational and technical issues in developing and deploying a daily progress note tool in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit that reuses and aggregates data from a commercial integrated clinical information system.

  8. Frontline health worker motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda

    2016-01-01

    The health of mothers and neonates is a concern for many countries, because they form the future of every society. In Ghana efforts have been made to address quality health care in order to accelerate progress in maternal and child health and reduce maternal and

  9. Wireless transmission design for health monitoring at neonatal intensive care units

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.; Nguyen, S.T.; Bambang Oetomo, S.; Feijs, L.M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Health monitoring is crucial for the survival of the ill and fragile infants admitted at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a hospital. However, the adhesive electrodes and wires cause discomfort to the patients and hamper the parent-child interaction. In this paper, we propose the

  10. First outbreak with MRSA in a danish neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Benedicte Grenness Utke; Arpi, Magnus; Andersen, Erik Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe demographic and clinical characteristics and outbreak handling of a large methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Denmark June 25(th)-August 8(th) 2008, and to identify risk factors for MRSA t...

  11. Noise levels in a neonatal intensive care unit in the Cape metropole ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Continuous noise exposure is potentially harmful to infants\\' auditory systems and wellbeing. Although the effects of noise on infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) have been well researched overseas, limited studies have been conducted in South Africa. Aim. To conduct a detailed noise assessment ...

  12. The perception of partnership between parents of premature infants and nurses in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Larsen, Palle; Weis, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify how parents of premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and nurses perceive their partnership.The review questions are: how do parents of premature infants and nurses perceive their partnership during...

  13. Brief Report: Incidence of and Risk Factors for Autistic Disorder in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Yamashita, Yushiro; Ohtani, Yasuyo; Ornitz, Edward; Kuriya, Norikazu; Murakami, Yoshihiko; Fukuda, Seiichi; Hashimoto, Takeo; Yamashita, Fumio

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the incidence of autistic disorder (AD) among 5,271 children in a neonatal intensive care unit in Japan found that 18 children were later diagnosed with AD, an incidence more than twice as high as previously reported. Children with AD had a significantly higher history of the meconium aspiration syndrome than the controls. (Author/DB)

  14. Review of supplemental oxygen and respiratory support for paediatric emergency care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hansmann

    Full Text Available Introduction: In African countries, respiratory infections and severe sepsis are common causes of respiratory failure and mortality in children under five years of age. Mortality and morbidity in these children could be reduced with adequate respiratory support in the emergency care setting. The purpose of this review is to describe management priorities in the emergency care of critically ill children presenting with respiratory problems. Basic and advanced respiratory support measures are described for implementation according to available resources, work load and skill-levels. Methods: We did a focused search of respiratory support for critically ill children in resource-limited settings over the past ten years, using the search tools PubMed and Google Scholar, the latest WHO guidelines, international ‘Advanced Paediatric Life Support’ guidelines and paediatric critical care textbooks. Results: The implementation of triage and rapid recognition of respiratory distress and hypoxia with pulse oximetry is important to correctly identify critically ill children with increased risk of mortality in all health facilities in resource constrained settings. Basic, effective airway management and respiratory support are essential elements of emergency care. Correct provision of supplemental oxygen is safe and its application alone can significantly improve the outcome of critically ill children. Non-invasive ventilatory support is cost-effective and feasible, with the potential to improve emergency care packages for children with respiratory failure and other organ dysfunctions. Non-invasive ventilation is particularly important in severely under-resourced regions unable to provide intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation support. Malnutrition and HIV-infection are important co-morbid conditions, associated with increased mortality in children with respiratory dysfunction. Discussion: A multi-disciplinary approach is required to optimise

  15. Family-Centred Care in Paediatric and Neonatal Nursing- A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.K. Irlam

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A literature review of family-centred care in paediatric and neonatal nursing was undertaken as part of a research project. This research intended to ascertain the knowledge and attitudes of paediatric and neonatal qualified nurses and nurse educators towards family-centred care as it pertains to infants and children in hospitals in the Gauteng Province. A definition of family-centred care is difficult to formulate mainly due to the lack of consensus about its meaning. Additionally, the diverse societal contexts within which family-centred care is applied further complicate its definition. Internationally in developed countries, family-centred care is viewed as care, which is parent-led in consultation with the nurse practitioner. A family-centred care model for the South African context needs to be developed with the focus on parent participation, a precursor of family-centred care. This article traces the early developments in parental care for hospitalised children with specific reference to the USA, the UK and South Africa. Precursor concepts in family-centred care are described followed by a cursory overview of the reality of family-centred care, its cultural dimensions and matters of family strengths and choices in family-centred care.

  16. Even mild respiratory distress alters tissue oxygenation significantly in preterm infants during neonatal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaberger, Bernhard; Pichler, Gerhard; Binder, Corinna; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Urlesberger, Berndt; Avian, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) enables continuous non-invasive measurements of regional oxygen saturation (rSO 2 ). The aim was to evaluate the dynamics of rSO 2 of the brain, preductal and postductal tissues during postnatal transition in preterm infants with and without respiratory support (RS). This single-centre study was designed as an exploratory prospective observational study. Fifty one preterm infants (≥ 30 + 0 and < 37 + 0 weeks) delivered by caesarean section were included. RS using a T-Piece-Resuscitator and supplemental oxygen were given according to guidelines. NIRS measurements were carried out by using Invos Monitor (Covidien; USA) for the first 15 min of life. Three NIRS transducers were attached on the forehead (rSO 2 brain), the right forearm (rSO 2 arm) and the left lower leg (rSO 2 leg). Two groups were compared based on need for RS: normal transition (NT) and RS group. Results: In NT group rSO 2 brain increased over time and was significantly higher than rSO 2 arm, whereas in RS group rSO 2 brain and rSO 2 arm increased without significant differences. Courses of rSO 2 arm and rSO 2 leg increased over time and showed a converging pattern with initially lower values of rSO 2 leg in NT group and a diverging pattern with lower levels of rSO 2 leg in RS group. Overall, rSO 2 levels were higher in NT compared to RS group. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the decreased rSO 2 levels in RS group compared to NT group are not only caused by lower arterial oxygen saturation levels, but also by a compromised perfusion even in infants with only mild respiratory distress. (paper)

  17. Titrated flow versus fixed flow Bubble Nasal CPAP for respiratory distress in preterm neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas eMurki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical effects of a pre-fixed flow of air-oxygen versus a flow titrated according to visible bubbling are not well understood.Objective: To compare the effects of a fixed flow (5 L/min and titrated flow ( flow just enough to ensure bubbling at different set pressures on delivered intra-prong pressure, gas exchange and clinical parameters in preterm infants on bubble CPAP for respiratory distress.Methods: Preterm infants less than 35 weeks gestation on bubble CPAP and less than 96 h of age, were enrolled in this cross over study. They were subjected to 30 minute periods of titrated flow and fixed flow. At the end of both epochs, gas flow rate, set pressure, FiO2, SpO2, Silverman retraction score, respiratory rate , abdominal girth, and blood gases were recorded. The delivered intra-prong pressure was measured by an electronic manometer. Results: Sixty nine recordings were made in 54 infants. For each of the set CPAP pressures (4, 5 and 6 cm H2O, the mean delivered pressure with a fixed flow of 5 L/min was higher than that delivered by the titrated flow. During the fixed flow epoch, the delivered pressure was closer to and higher than the set pressure resulting in higher PaO2 and lower PaCO2 as compared to titrated flow epoch. In the titrated flow period, the delivered pressure was consistently lower than the set pressure. Conclusion: In preterm infants on bubble CPAP with set pressures of 4 to 6 cm H2O, a fixed flow of 5 L/min is more effective than a flow titrated to ensure adequate visible bubbling. It achieves higher delivered pressures, better oxygenation and ventilation.

  18. The preBötzinger complex as a hub for network activity along the ventral respiratory column in the neonate rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourévitch, Boris; Mellen, Nicholas

    2014-09-01

    In vertebrates, respiratory control is ascribed to heterogeneous respiration-modulated neurons along the Ventral Respiratory Column (VRC) in medulla, which includes the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC), the putative respiratory rhythm generator. Here, the functional anatomy of the VRC was characterized via optical recordings in the sagittaly sectioned neonate rat hindbrain, at sampling rates permitting coupling estimation between neuron pairs, so that each neuron was described using unitary, neuron-system, and coupling attributes. Structured coupling relations in local networks, significantly oriented coupling in the peri-inspiratory interval detected in pooled data, and significant correlations between firing rate and expiratory duration in subsets of neurons revealed network regulation at multiple timescales. Spatially averaged neuronal attributes, including coupling vectors, revealed a sharp boundary at the rostral margin of the preBötC, as well as other functional anatomical features congruent with identified structures, including the parafacial respiratory group and the nucleus ambiguus. Cluster analysis of attributes identified two spatially compact, homogenous groups: the first overlapped with the preBötC, and was characterized by strong respiratory modulation and dense bidirectional coupling with itself and other groups, consistent with a central role for the preBötC in respiratory control; the second lay between preBötC and the facial nucleus, and was characterized by weak respiratory modulation and weak coupling with other respiratory neurons, which is congruent with cardiovascular regulatory networks that are found in this region. Other groups identified using cluster analysis suggested that networks along VRC regulated expiratory duration, and the transition to and from inspiration, but these groups were heterogeneous and anatomically dispersed. Thus, by recording local networks in parallel, this study found evidence for respiratory regulation at

  19. Skin care product evaluation in a group of critically ill, premature neonates: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel L; Chakravarthy, Debashish; Drower, Edward; Reyna, Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Cleansing, moisturizing, and protecting neonatal skin is important, but literature evaluating specific product lines is limited. The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of a skin care product line on overall skin condition, perineal erythema, and pain when applied to neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This was an open label, descriptive study. Comparisons were made between measurements taken at the beginning of the study to those at the end, on the same subjects. The study was conducted in a 41-bed NICU at Driscoll Children's Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, that serves 31 counties in the region. This NICU treats children needing level 2 and 3 care, with a 1:1 or 2:1 nurse staffing ratio. This is not a birthing center; patients come from other community hospitals. Twenty-nine neonates participated in the study; their average body weight was 1.39 kg (3.06 lb) and their average gestation was 31.7 weeks. A skin care product line was introduced into a neonatal intensive care unit for 14 days. The products included 2 cleansers, 2 moisturizers, and a skin protectant with zinc oxide. Three outcome measures were tracked: Neonatal Skin Condition Score (NSCS), Skin Erythema Scale (SES), and pain. Nurses were also given a product evaluation survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report percentages and trends. Paired t tests were used to compare the mean NSCS, SES, and pain scores from the first 2 days a subject was in the study to the mean of the scores from the last 2 days they were in the study. Subjects experienced approximately 1774 exposures to individual products during data collection. No differences were found in pain scores (P = .132), SES score (P = .059), or NSCS (P = .603) when mean values were compared at the beginning and end of the study. Analysis of the product evaluation survey for questions on cleaning, moisturizing, and reducing discomfort found that more than 90% of nurses ranked the new products as better than or

  20. Antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates in neonatal care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shrestha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Bacterial infections account for a huge proportion of neonatal deaths worldwide. The problem of antibiotic resistance among common bacterial pathogens mainly the gram negative bacteria is emerging globally which is of more serious concern in developing countries like Nepal. METHODS: A one year retrospective hospital based study was carried out to analyze the results of neonatal blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, stool and surface cultures and to look into the sensitivity pattern of the commonly used antibiotics. RESULTS: The positive yield of blood, urine, eye swab and CSF cultures were 19.56%, 38.5%, 60% and 0.36% respectively. The most common isolates in the blood culture were coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter and non-haemolytic Streptococcus. A significant percent of the isolates were resistant to the first line antibiotics. Among the gram negative isolates more than 30% are resistant to cefotaxime and more than 50% are resistant to gentamicin. During the one year period we had Nursery outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella infections. With the help of environmental cultures we were able to trace the source and intervene appropriately. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility, rational use of antibiotics and the strategy of antibiotic cycling can provide some answers to the emerging problem of antibiotic resistance.

  1. Antibiotic resistance pattern of bacterial isolates in neonatal care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, S; Adhikari, N; Rai, B K; Shreepaili, A

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial infections account for a huge proportion of neonatal deaths worldwide. The problem of antibiotic resistance among common bacterial pathogens mainly the gram negative bacteria is emerging globally which is of more serious concern in developing countries like Nepal. A one year retrospective hospital based study was carried out to analyze the results of neonatal blood, cerebrospinal fluid, urine, stool and surface cultures and to look into the sensitivity pattern of the commonly used antibiotics. The positive yield of blood, urine, eye swab and CSF cultures were 19.56%, 38.5%, 60% and 0.36% respectively. The most common isolates in the blood culture were coagulase negative Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter and non-haemolytic Streptococcus. A significant percent of the isolates were resistant to the first line antibiotics. Among the gram negative isolates more than 30% are resistant to cefotaxime and more than 50% are resistant to gentamicin. During the one year period we had Nursery outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella infections. With the help of environmental cultures we were able to trace the source and intervene appropriately. Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility, rational use of antibiotics and the strategy of antibiotic cycling can provide some answers to the emerging problem of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Retinopathy of prematurity: results from 10 years in a single neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Coutinho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is a vasoproliferative disorder of the retina of preterm newborns and is an important and preventable cause of visual impairment in childhood. This study aimed to assess the incidence and main risk factors associated with the development of ROP in the last 10 years at Hospital Prof. Doutor Fernando Fonseca in Lisbon, Portugal.Methods: Observational and retrospective study conducted between 2005 and 2014 at Hospital Prof. Doctor Fernando Fonseca. The study included newborns of gestational age < 32 weeks. We analyzed maternal, prenatal and neonatal factors associated with the development of ROP. Statistical analysis were performed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS® software. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed and a multiple logistic regression model was carried out with a significance level α = 0.05.Results: 527 premature infants with a gestational age < 32 weeks were studied, of which 165 developed ROP. 60 of these patients needed treatment. In the univariate analysis, the risk factors for the development of ROP were maternal infection in pregnancy, low birth weight, low gestational age, low Apgar score at 5 minutes, need for oxygen therapy until the 28th day of life, a high score on the CRIB and SNAPPE2 scales, use of surfactant, respiratory distress syndrome, persistence of patent ductus arteriosus, peri-intraventricular hemorrhage and neonatal sepsis. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, risk factors for ROP were the presence of neonatal sepsis, respiratory distress syndrome, persistence of patent ductus arteriosus and a high score on the neonatal SNAPPE2 scale.Conclusions: We found a ROP incidence rate of 31.3%, with risk factors similar to those observed in other studies.

  3. Respiratory problems in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, J

    1985-04-01

    Despite major advances in our knowledge and ability to treat respiratory diseases in neonatal foals, neonatal respiratory medicine is still in its infancy. It is hoped that this article may serve as a guideline for diagnosis and treatment. Specific antibiotic regimens and emergency procedures are covered in other articles in this symposium. Because management factors play a critical role in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, education of clients as to their importance would help both prophylactically and therapeutically. The necessity of very careful monitoring of neonates, which is critical to early detection of disease, should be stressed. As respiratory diseases can be fulminant and rapidly fatal, it is imperative not to delay diagnosis and therapy. Thorough examination and implementation of appropriate diagnostic techniques, as well as prompt early referral to a more sophisticated facility when indicated, would prevent many deaths. Although sophisticated support systems are vital for survival of some of these foals, good basic intensive nursing care combined with selection of appropriate drug therapy very early in the course of the disease is all that many foals require and can significantly improve survival rates.

  4. Incidence and nature of medication errors in neonatal intensive care with strategies to improve safety - A review of the current literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chedoe, Indra; Molendijk, Harry A.; Dittrich, Suzanne T. A. M.; Jansman, Frank G. A.; Harting, Johannes W.; Brouwers, Jacobus R. B. J.; Taxis, Katja

    2007-01-01

    Neonates are highly vulnerable to medication errors because of their extensive exposure to medications in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the general lack of evidence on pharmacotherapeutic interventions in neonates and the lack of neonate-specific formulations. We searched PubMed and

  5. Epidemiology, Patterns of Care, and Mortality for Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Intensive Care Units in 50 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellani, Giacomo; Laffey, John G.; Pham, Tài; Fan, Eddy; Brochard, Laurent; Esteban, Andres; Gattinoni, Luciano; van Haren, Frank; Larsson, Anders; McAuley, Daniel F.; Ranieri, Marco; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Thompson, B. Taylor; Wrigge, Hermann; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Pesenti, Antonio; Francois, Guy M.; Rabboni, Francesca; Madotto, Fabiana; Conti, Sara; Sula, Hektor; Nunci, Lordian; Cani, Alma; Zazu, Alan; Dellera, Christian; Insaurralde, Carolina S.; Alejandro, Risso V.; Daldin, Julio; Vinzio, Mauricio; Fernandez, Ruben O.; Cardonnet, Luis P.; Bettini, Lisandro R.; Bisso, Mariano Carboni; Osman, Emilio M.; Setten, Mariano G.; Lovazzano, Pablo; Alvarez, Javier; Villar, Veronica; Pozo, Norberto C.; Grubissich, Nicolas; Plotnikow, Gustavo A.; Vasquez, Daniela N.; Ilutovich, Santiago; Tiribelli, Norberto; Chena, Ariel; Pellegrini, Carlos A.; Saenz, María G.; Estenssoro, Elisa; Simonis, Fabienne D.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Limited information exists about the epidemiology, recognition, management, and outcomes of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). OBJECTIVES To evaluate intensive care unit (ICU) incidence and outcome of ARDS and to assess clinician recognition, ventilation

  6. Identifying medication errors in the neonatal intensive care unit and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the health care professional, patient, or consumer. ... Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Health Care Sciences, ..... patient safety. ... Clifton-Koeppel R. What nurses can do right now to reduce medication errors.

  7. Adverse respiratory events in a post-anesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Adverse respiratory events (ARE) are a leading causes of postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the incidence and determinants of postoperative ARE. This observational prospective study was conducted in a post anesthesia care unit (PACU). A total of 340 adult subjects were admitted consecutively, and AREs were measured after elective surgery. Population demographics, perioperative parameters, ARE occurrence, and length of stay in the postoperative PACU and in hospital were recorded. Data were analyzed descriptively using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Multivariate analyses were carried outusing logistic binary regression, and the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Postoperative AREs occurred in 67 subjects (19.7%). AREs were more frequent after high-risk procedures (42% vs 24%; P=.003), in patients undergoing major surgery (37% vs 25%; P=.041), those receiving general anesthesia (85% vs 67%; P=.004), and in patients administered intraoperative muscle relaxants (79% vs 55%; P<.001) and neostigmine (69% vs 49%; P=.002). Hypoactive emergence (13% vs 5%; P=.015) and residual neuromuscular blockade (46% versus 11%; P<.001) were more frequent in subjects with postoperative ARE. On multivariate analyses, residual neuromuscular blockade was an independent risk factor for ARE in the PACU (OR 6.4; CI 3.0-13.4; P<.001). ARE is an important and common postoperative complication. Residual neuromuscular blockade was an independent risk factor for ARE in the PACU. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla; Angelhoff, Charlotte; Johnsson, Ewa; Karlsson, Jenny; Mörelius, Evalotte

    2015-03-01

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep. Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis. A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography. Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness. Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation. Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Regional Variation in Neonatal Intensive Care Admissions and the Relationship to Bed Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Wade N; Wasserman, Jared R; Goodman, David C

    2018-01-01

    To characterize geographic variation in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission rates across the entire birth cohort and evaluate the relationship between regional bed supply and NICU admission rates. This was a population-based, cross-sectional study. 2013 US birth certificate and 2012 American Hospital Association data were used to assign newborns and NICU beds to neonatal intensive care regions. Descriptive statistics of admission rates were calculated across neonatal intensive care regions. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between bed supply and individual odds of admission, with adjustment for maternal and newborn characteristics. Among 3 304 364 study newborns, the NICU admission rate was 7.2 per 100 births and varied across regions for all birth weight categories. IQRs in admission rates were 84.5-93.2 per 100 births for 500-1499 g, 35.3-46.1 for 1500-2499 g, and 3.5-5.5 for ≥2500 g. Adjusted odds of admission for newborns of very low birth weight were unrelated to regional bed supply; however, newborns ≥2500 g in regions with the highest NICU bed supply were significantly more likely to be admitted to a NICU than those in regions with the lowest (aOR 1.20 [1.03-1.40]). There is persistent underuse of NICU care for newborns of very low birth weight that is not associated with regional bed supply. Among larger newborns, we find evidence of supply-sensitive care, raising concerns about the potential overuse of expensive and unnecessary care. Rather than improving access to needed care, NICU expansion may instead further deregionalize neonatal care, exacerbating underuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improving the quality of maternal and neonatal care: the role of standard based participatory assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Tamburlini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gaps in quality of care are seriously affecting maternal and neonatal health globally but reports of successful quality improvement cycles implemented at large scale are scanty. We report the results of a nation-wide program to improve quality of maternal and neonatal hospital care in a lower-middle income country focusing on the role played by standard-based participatory assessments. METHODS: Improvements in the quality of maternal and neonatal care following an action-oriented participatory assessment of 19 areas covering the whole continuum from admission to discharge were measured after an average period of 10 months in four busy referral maternity hospitals in Uzbekistan. Information was collected by a multidisciplinary national team with international supervision through visit to hospital services, examination of medical records, direct observation of cases and interviews with staff and mothers. Scores (range 0 to 3 attributed to over 400 items and combined in average scores for each area were compared with the baseline assessment. RESULTS: Between the first and the second assessment, all four hospitals improved their overall score by an average 0.7 points out of 3 (range 0.4 to 1, i.e. by 22%. The improvements occurred in all main areas of care and were greater in the care of normal labor and delivery (+0.9, monitoring, infection control and mother and baby friendly care (+0.8 the role of the participatory action-oriented approach in determining the observed changes was estimated crucial in 6 out of 19 areas and contributory in other 8. Ongoing implementation of referral system and new classification of neonatal deaths impede the improved process of care to be reflected in current statistics. CONCLUSIONS: Important improvements in the quality of hospital care provided to mothers and newborn babies can be achieved through a standard-based action-oriented and participatory assessment and reassessment process.

  11. ABO blood group is associated with response to inhaled nitric oxide in neonates with respiratory failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George T El-Ferzli

    Full Text Available Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO reduces death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO in infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN. However, the response to iNO is variable and only 50-60% of infants demonstrate a response to iNO. It is not known why only some infants respond to iNO. Adults and children with blood groups B or AB do not respond as well to iNO as those with blood groups O/A.To determine if blood group was associated with iNO response in newborn infants, a retrospective medical record review was done of infants admitted to a regional NICU from 2002-9 with a diagnosis of PPHN. Data were collected during the first twelve hours post-initiation of treatment. Of 86 infants diagnosed with PPHN, 23 infants had blood group A [18 received iNO], 21 had group B [18 with iNO], 40 had group O [36 with iNO], and 2 had group AB [both received iNO]. Change in PaO(2/FiO(2 was less in infants with blood group A, of whom less than half were responders (ΔPaO(2/FiO(2>20% at 12 h versus 90% of infants with either O or B. Race, sex, birth weight, gestational age, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, and baseline PaO(2/FiO(2 were similar among groups. Outcomes including need for ECMO, death, length of ventilatory support, length of iNO use, and hospital stay were statistically not different by blood groups.Our results indicate that blood group influences iNO response in neonates. We hypothesize that either there is genetic linkage of the ABO gene locus with vasoregulatory genes, or that blood group antigens directly affect vascular reactivity.

  12. The quality of clinical maternal and neonatal healthcare - a strategy for identifying 'routine care signal functions'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Brenner

    Full Text Available A variety of clinical process indicators exists to measure the quality of care provided by maternal and neonatal health (MNH programs. To allow comparison across MNH programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs, a core set of essential process indicators is needed. Although such a core set is available for emergency obstetric care (EmOC, the 'EmOC signal functions', a similar approach is currently missing for MNH routine care evaluation. We describe a strategy for identifying core process indicators for routine care and illustrate their usefulness in a field example.We first developed an indicator selection strategy by combining epidemiological and programmatic aspects relevant to MNH in LMICs. We then identified routine care process indicators meeting our selection criteria by reviewing existing quality of care assessment protocols. We grouped these indicators into three categories based on their main function in addressing risk factors of maternal or neonatal complications. We then tested this indicator set in a study assessing MNH quality of clinical care in 33 health facilities in Malawi.Our strategy identified 51 routine care processes: 23 related to initial patient risk assessment, 17 to risk monitoring, 11 to risk prevention. During the clinical performance assessment a total of 82 cases were observed. Birth attendants' adherence to clinical standards was lowest in relation to risk monitoring processes. In relation to major complications, routine care processes addressing fetal and newborn distress were performed relatively consistently, but there were major gaps in the performance of routine care processes addressing bleeding, infection, and pre-eclampsia risks.The identified set of process indicators could identify major gaps in the quality of obstetric and neonatal care provided during the intra- and immediate postpartum period. We hope our suggested indicators for essential routine care processes will contribute to streamlining

  13. The quality of clinical maternal and neonatal healthcare - a strategy for identifying 'routine care signal functions'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Stephan; De Allegri, Manuela; Gabrysch, Sabine; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Sarker, Malabika; Muula, Adamson S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of clinical process indicators exists to measure the quality of care provided by maternal and neonatal health (MNH) programs. To allow comparison across MNH programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), a core set of essential process indicators is needed. Although such a core set is available for emergency obstetric care (EmOC), the 'EmOC signal functions', a similar approach is currently missing for MNH routine care evaluation. We describe a strategy for identifying core process indicators for routine care and illustrate their usefulness in a field example. We first developed an indicator selection strategy by combining epidemiological and programmatic aspects relevant to MNH in LMICs. We then identified routine care process indicators meeting our selection criteria by reviewing existing quality of care assessment protocols. We grouped these indicators into three categories based on their main function in addressing risk factors of maternal or neonatal complications. We then tested this indicator set in a study assessing MNH quality of clinical care in 33 health facilities in Malawi. Our strategy identified 51 routine care processes: 23 related to initial patient risk assessment, 17 to risk monitoring, 11 to risk prevention. During the clinical performance assessment a total of 82 cases were observed. Birth attendants' adherence to clinical standards was lowest in relation to risk monitoring processes. In relation to major complications, routine care processes addressing fetal and newborn distress were performed relatively consistently, but there were major gaps in the performance of routine care processes addressing bleeding, infection, and pre-eclampsia risks. The identified set of process indicators could identify major gaps in the quality of obstetric and neonatal care provided during the intra- and immediate postpartum period. We hope our suggested indicators for essential routine care processes will contribute to streamlining MNH program

  14. Primary care management of respiratory tract infections in Dutch preschool children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Angelique G S C; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Schilder, Anne G M; Hoes, Arno W; de Jong, Vanya F G M; Hak, Eelko

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine age-specific antibiotic prescription and referral rates in preschool children diagnosed with acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) in primary care. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Research database of the Netherlands University Medical Center Utrecht Primary

  15. Cerebral oxygenation as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy in neonatal intensive care: correlation with arterial oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Carol Lu; Oei, Ju Lee; Lui, Kei; Schindler, Timothy

    2017-07-01

    To assess correlation between cerebral oxygenation (rScO 2 ), as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and arterial oxygenation (PaO 2 ), as measured by arterial blood gases, in preterm neonates. Preterm neonates interpretation of NIRS values in neonatal intensive care, and further evaluation is needed to determine the applicability of NIRS to management of preterm infants. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Nursing In Front Of Technology As A Care Fundament On UTI Obstetric/Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Caxias de Souza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an article about the historical evolution of nursing, emphasizing conceptual and reflexive aspects about the impact of technology on the care process in Obstetrical/Neonatal ICU. Although the technology has contributed to the survival pregnant / premature infants extremes and very low weight in recent years, reveals at times a mechanical and impersonal service, a counterpoint to ethical and human issues. A critical-reflexive discussion is proposed under the use of technology in obstetric and neonatal intensive care, highlighting their implications and adaptations to maternal and child needs. It was concluded that what determines whether a technology is good or bad, if it dehumanises, depersonalises or objectifies care is the way in which it is used, making it necessary to improve and update health professionals. In this reflexive exercise, new ways of caring will be rethought, using art, sensitivity and creativity in the appropriation and humanization of technologies.   Descriptors: Nursing Informatics. Information Technology. Nursing Care. Maternal Health. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal.

  17. Cost analysis of Healthcare in a Private sector Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karambelkar, Geeta; Malwade, Sudhir; Karambelkar, Rajendra

    2016-09-08

    To study the actual cost of care per patient in private-sector level IIIa Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Prospective cost-analysis study. Cost incurred by the family on the treatment of baby, separately for every newborn for entire length of hospitalization, was calculated. 126 newborns were enrolled; High level of intervention was needed for 25.4% babies. The mean cost of care was US $ 90.7 per patient per day. Bulk of the cost of care was the hospital bill.

  18. Fatal neonatal-onset mitochondrial respiratory chain disease with T cell immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Janine; Schubert, Ralf; Horvàth, Rita; Petersen, Jens; Fütterer, Nancy; Malle, Elisabeth; Stumpf, Andreas; Gebhardt, Boris R; Koehl, Ulrike; Schraven, Burkhart; Zielen, Stefan

    2006-09-01

    We present the clinical and laboratory features of a boy with a new syndrome of mitochondrial depletion syndrome and T cell immunodeficiency. The child suffered from severe recurrent infectious diseases, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Clinically, he presented with severe psychomotor retardation, axial hypotonia, and a disturbed pain perception leading to debilitating biting of the thumb, lower lip, and tongue. Brain imaging showed hypoplasia of corpus callosum and an impaired myelinization of the temporo-occipital region with consecutive supratentorial hydrocephalus. Histologic examination of a skeletal muscle biopsy was normal. Biochemical investigation showed combined deficiency of respiratory chain complexes II+III and IV. MtDNA depletion was found by real-time PCR. No pathogenic mutations were identified in the TK2, SUCLA2, DGUOK, and ECGF1 genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found in POLG1. The pathogenic relevance of this mutation is unclear. Interestingly, a lack of CD8(+) T lymphocytes as well as NK cells was also observed. The percentage of CD45RO-expressing cells was decreased in activated CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Activation of T lymphocytes via IL-2 was diminished. The occurrence of the immunologic deficiency in our patient with mtDNA depletion is a rare finding, implying that cells of the immune system might also be affected by mitochondrial disease.

  19. Vagal afferents modulate cytokine-mediated respiratory control at the neonatal medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Kannan V; Kc, Prabha; Hoxha, Zana; Mayer, Catherine A; Wilson, Christopher G; Martin, Richard J

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal sepsis and inflammation trigger lung and brain injury in preterm infants, and associated apnea of prematurity. We hypothesized that endotoxin exposure in the immature lung would upregulate proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression in the medulla oblongata and be associated with impaired respiratory control. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg) or saline was administered intratracheally to rat pups and medulla oblongatas were harvested for quantifying expression of mRNA for proinflammatory cytokines. LPS-exposure significantly increased medullary mRNA for IL-1β and IL-6, and vagotomy blunted this increase in IL-1β, but not IL-6. Whole-body flow plethysmography revealed that LPS-exposed pups had an attenuated ventilatory response to hypoxia both before and after carotid sinus nerve transection. Immunochemical expression of IL-1β within the nucleus of the solitary tract and area postrema was increased after LPS-exposure. In summary, intratracheal endotoxin-exposure in rat pups is associated with upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines in the medulla oblongata that is vagally mediated for IL-1β and associated with an impaired hypoxic ventilatory response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasminogen activator inhibitor I 4G/5G polymorphism in neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armangil, Didem; Yurdakök, Murat; Okur, Hamza; Gürgey, Aytemiz

    2011-08-01

    Fibrin monomers inhibit surfactant function. 4G/5G insertion/deletion polymorphism plays an important role in the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) gene expression. To examine the genotype distribution of PAI-1 polymorphism in 60 infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and 53 controls, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used. The proportion of 4G/4G, 4G/5G, and 5G/5G genotypes did not differ statistically between the RDS and control groups (P > .05). Having PAI-1 4G/4G genotype polymorphism appears to increase the risk of RDS (odds ratio [OR] =1.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-4.3), although it was not statistically significant. No relation was found between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphisms and RDS, but there was an increased risk associated with the 4G variant of the PAI-1 gene. We believe that our findings of increased 4G allele of the PAI-1 gene in infants with RDS would also help to clarify the pathogenesis of RDS.

  1. PROFILE OF NEONATES WITH RESPIRATORY DISTRESS HOSPITALIZED IN A PUBLIC HOSPITAL OF THE INTERIOR OF BAHIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venício Almeida Barbosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to draw the profile of newborns with respiratory distress, assessing geographical origin, sex, maternal gestational and obstetric profile. Methods: This was a descriptive crosssectional study with a quantitative approach. Data collection was performed by medical research and through an interview with themothers. Results: The study population was composed by 72 individuals with 37 females and 45 from other cities. The maternal gestational profile: 58.3% were between 20 and 34 years, 52.8% were multiparous, 44.4% had incomes below the minimum wage, the same value was also found for those who studied between the 5th and 8th grade of elementary school, 90.3% had just one pregnancy, 20.9% had risk factors and 76.6% had less than seven prenatal consultations. The obstetric profile: 55.6% had cesarean delivery, 58.3% were preterm, 43.1% underweight, 35% had some complications during delivery and 36.1% some change in another system. Conclusion: We concluded that most of the study Perfil dos neonatos com desconforto respiratório population has some characteristics that make a high-risk pregnancy and newborn female, born by cesarean section, premature and with low birth weight.

  2. Bacteriological profile of neonatal sepsis in a secondary care hospital in rural Tamil Nadu, Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doniparthi Venkata Pavan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the world. The objective of the current study was to detect the common causative microorganisms of neonatal sepsis and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in a rural secondary hospital in Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: Neonates (0–28 days admitted to this newborn care unit from October 2013 to September 2015, with a diagnosis of probable sepsis were studied. All the enrolled babies had blood cultures taken and were followed up till final outcome, which was discharge or death, irrespective of culture result. Univariate analysis was performed for factors associated with culture positivity, generating odds ratios, and confidence intervals. Results: Among the 107 babies with a diagnosis of probable sepsis, 28 (26.2% had shown bacteria in culture. The majority (94.4% were of early-onset sepsis. The predominant organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (10/28 and Klebsiella (6/28. 100% of Gram-negative bacilli and 90% of Staphylococcus were resistant to Ampicillin. Gentamicin resistance among Gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus was 52.9% and 20%, respectively, while third-generation cephalosporin resistance was 31.2% and 20%, respectively. Among the neonates diagnosed as probable sepsis, idiopathic prematurity (P = 0.007 was found to have a statistically significant association with culture-positive sepsis. Conclusion: The culture positivity rate among the neonates with probable sepsis in the current study was 26%. An alarmingly high degree of antibiotic resistance observed calls for robust infection control practices and an urgent evaluation and development of individual and national antibiotic policies for neonatal sepsis.

  3. Bacteriological profile of neonatal sepsis in a secondary care hospital in rural Tamil Nadu, Southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, Doniparthi Venkata; Mohan, Jesinth; Rakesh, P S; Prasad, Jasmine; Joseph, Lenikumar

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is a leading cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the world. The objective of the current study was to detect the common causative microorganisms of neonatal sepsis and their antimicrobial resistance patterns in a rural secondary hospital in Tamil Nadu, India. Neonates (0-28 days) admitted to this newborn care unit from October 2013 to September 2015, with a diagnosis of probable sepsis were studied. All the enrolled babies had blood cultures taken and were followed up till final outcome, which was discharge or death, irrespective of culture result. Univariate analysis was performed for factors associated with culture positivity, generating odds ratios, and confidence intervals. Among the 107 babies with a diagnosis of probable sepsis, 28 (26.2%) had shown bacteria in culture. The majority (94.4%) were of early-onset sepsis. The predominant organisms were Staphylococcus aureus (10/28) and Klebsiella (6/28). 100% of Gram-negative bacilli and 90% of Staphylococcus were resistant to Ampicillin. Gentamicin resistance among Gram-negative bacilli and Staphylococcus was 52.9% and 20%, respectively, while third-generation cephalosporin resistance was 31.2% and 20%, respectively. Among the neonates diagnosed as probable sepsis, idiopathic prematurity ( P = 0.007) was found to have a statistically significant association with culture-positive sepsis. The culture positivity rate among the neonates with probable sepsis in the current study was 26%. An alarmingly high degree of antibiotic resistance observed calls for robust infection control practices and an urgent evaluation and development of individual and national antibiotic policies for neonatal sepsis.

  4. Is Less Noise, Light and Parental/Caregiver Stress in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Better for Neonates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Rohini; Kamaluddeen, Majeeda; Amin, Harish; Lodha, Abhay

    2018-01-15

    In utero sensory stimuli and interaction with the environment strongly influence early phases of fetal and infant development. Extremely premature infants are subjected to noxious procedures and routine monitoring, in addition to exposure to excessive light and noise, which disturb the natural sleep cycle and induce stress. Non-invasive ventilation, measures to prevent sepsis, and human milk feeding improve short-term and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes in premature infants. To preserve brain function, and to improve quality of life and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes, the focus now is on the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment and its impact on the infant during hospital stay. The objectives of this write-up are to understand the effects of environmental factors, including lighting and noise in the NICU, on sensory development of the infant, the need to decrease parental and caregiver stress, and to review existing literature, local policies and recommendations.

  5. Three-year experience with neonatal ventilation from a tertiary care hospital in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M; Deorari, A K; Paul, V K; Mittal, M; Shanker, S; Munshi, U; Jain, Y

    1993-06-01

    Ninety neonates were ventilated over a period of 33 months of whom 50 (55.5%) survived. Fifty seven babies received IPPV while 33 CPAP. IPPV mode was being used more frequently recently and survival rates have steadily improved over past 3 years. Survival was cent per cent in babies above 1.5 kg on CPAP mode while 16/26 (57.7%) survived on IPPV mode. Of 22 extremely VLBW (air leaks developed in 12 babies of which 6 died. Two babies developed BPD and one ROP. Neonatal ventilation should be ventured in centres where basic facilities for level II care already exist. It may not be cost effective to ventilate extremely low birth weight neonates.

  6. Energy imparted to neonates during X-ray examinations in a special care baby unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapple, C.-L.; Faulkner, K.

    1994-01-01

    Neonates in a special care baby unit may receive a large number of X-rays and their dosimetry is of particular importance. A method of calculating energy imparted to neonates has been developed and a survey carried out in one unit, over a period of 18 months. Entrance dose was calculated from the technique factors used and measurement of tube output. Technique factors were recorded by the radiographer for each exposure taken, and output was measured both with and without an incubator present. Field size was determined by measurements made retrospectively from the radiograph, and a Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine factors for conversion to imparted energy. 119 neonates were included in the survey, and the mean total energy imparted was found to be 0.09 mJ. The maximum value was a factor of nine greater than this. The study also highlighted the potential for dose reduction with regard to better collimation and shielding. (author)

  7. Energy imparted to neonates during X-ray examinations in a special care baby unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapple, C.-L.; Faulkner, K. (Newcastle General Hospital (United Kingdom). Regional Medical Physics Dept.); Hunter, E.W. (Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom))

    1994-04-01

    Neonates in a special care baby unit may receive a large number of X-rays and their dosimetry is of particular importance. A method of calculating energy imparted to neonates has been developed and a survey carried out in one unit, over a period of 18 months. Entrance dose was calculated from the technique factors used and measurement of tube output. Technique factors were recorded by the radiographer for each exposure taken, and output was measured both with and without an incubator present. Field size was determined by measurements made retrospectively from the radiograph, and a Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine factors for conversion to imparted energy. 119 neonates were included in the survey, and the mean total energy imparted was found to be 0.09 mJ. The maximum value was a factor of nine greater than this. The study also highlighted the potential for dose reduction with regard to better collimation and shielding. (author).

  8. European consensus guidelines on the management of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants - 2010 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweet, David G; Carnielli, Virgilio; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    . For babies with RDS to have best outcomes, it is essential that they have optimal supportive care, including maintenance of a normal body temperature, proper fluid management, good nutritional support, management of the ductus arteriosus and support of the circulation to maintain adequate tissue perfusion....

  9. Anatomical architecture and responses to acidosis of a novel respiratory neuron group in the high cervical spinal cord (HCRG) of the neonatal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Y; Yokota, S; Shinozaki, Y; Aoyama, R; Yasui, Y; Ishiguro, M; Oku, Y

    2009-01-01

    It has been postulated that there exists a neuronal mechanism that generates respiratory rhythm and modulates respiratory output pattern in the high cervical spinal cord. Recently, we have found a novel respiratory neuron group in the ventral portion of the high cervical spinal cord, and named it the high cervical spinal cord respiratory group (HCRG). In the present study, we analyzed the detailed anatomical architecture of the HCRG region by double immunostaining of the region using a neuron-specific marker (NeuN) and a marker for motoneurons (ChAT) in the neonatal rat. We found a large number of small NeuN-positive cells without ChAT-immunoreactivity, which were considered interneurons. We also found two and three clusters of motoneurons in the ventral portion of the ventral horn at C1 and C2 levels, respectively. Next, we examined responses of HCRG neurons to respiratory and metabolic acidosis in vitro by voltage-imaging together with cross correlation techniques, i.e., by correlation coefficient imaging, in order to understand the functional role of HCRG neurons. Both respiratory and metabolic acidosis caused the same pattern of changes in their spatiotemporal activation profiles, and the respiratory-related area was enlarged in the HCRG region. After acidosis was introduced, preinspiratory phase-dominant activity was recruited in a number of pixels, and more remarkably inspiratory phase-dominant activity was recruited in a large number of pixels. We suggest that the HCRG composes a local respiratory neuronal network consisting of interneurons and motoneurons and plays an important role in respiratory augmentation in response to acidosis.

  10. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals.

  11. "Social marketing" for early neonatal care: saving newborn lives in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejaz, Iram; Shaikh, Babar Tasneem

    2010-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, developing countries carry a large share of neonatal mortality in the world. According to UNICEF, almost 450 newborn children die every hour, mostly from preventable causes. Restricted access to quality and hygienic delivery services and limited knowledge about handling the newborn aggravate the situation. South Asia, and Pakistan in particular, have reduced their child and infant mortality during the last decade; however, neonatal mortality still remains unacceptably high. There are multiple reasons, mainly related to practices and behaviours of communities and traditional birth attendants. Rural and poor populations suffer most in Pakistan, where three out of five deliveries still occur at home. Traditional community practices and conservative norms drastically affect neonatal health outcomes. Preventing sepsis at the umbilical cord, keeping the baby at the correct temperature after birth and early initiation of exclusive breastfeeding are three simple strategies or messages that need to be disseminated widely to prevent many neonatal mortalities and morbidities. Since inappropriate practices in handling newborns are directly linked with persistent and unremitting behaviours among health providers and the community at large, we suggest doing robust "social marketing" for saving newborn lives. The objective of the paper is to present a social-marketing strategy and a marketing mix that will help address and surmount actual barriers and promote alternative behaviours in early neonatal care.

  12. Bacteriological profile of neonatal septicemia in a tertiary care hospital from Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vrishali Avinash Muley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal septicemia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The present study was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of prevalent pathogens isolated from the blood of septicemic neonates from Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. A total of 180 blood samples of septicemic neonates were studied bacteriologically. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by the Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method in accordance to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institutes (CLSI guidelines. 26.6% (48 out of 180 cases of septicemia could be confirmed by blood culture. Of these, 66.7% cases were of early onset septicemia (EOS and 33.3% were of late onset septicemia (LOS. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant pathogen (35.4% among the Gram-negative pathogens and Staphylococcus aureus (22.9% was the predominant Gram-positive pathogen. 28% of K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates were extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producers. 18.1% of the Staphylococcus isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Multi-drug-resistance pattern was observed with all the isolates. Ciprofloxacin and aminoglycosides were the most effective drugs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates. This study highlights the predominance of Gram-negative organisms in causing neonatal sepsis and emergence of multi-drug-resistant strains in our set up.

  13. [Palliative care after neonatal intensive care: Contributions of Leonetti Law and remaining challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, P; Dillenseger, L; Cojean, N; Escande, B; Zores, C; Astruc, D

    2017-02-01

    The 2005 enactment of the "Patients' rights and end-of-life care" act, known as the Leonetti law, has been accompanied by practical changes in the processes of withdrawal and withholding of active life-sustaining treatments. This law has also promoted the implementation of palliative care in perinatal medicine to avoid unreasonable therapeutic interventions and to preserve the dying patient's quality of life and human dignity. Recently, a new law has been voted by the French National Assembly and new reflections on the ethical aspects of the end of life in neonatal medicine should resume again within the French Society of Neonatology in the working group on ethical issues in neonatology. This is why it appears important to discuss the perceived benefits and the persistent difficulties related to the implementation of the Leonetti law in neonatology. Collegiality in the decision-making processes as well as withdrawal and withholding of life-sustaining treatments that were already present in the practices of many centers has been stipulated within a legal framework and promoted in clinical practice. It has brought serenity within perinatal nursing and medical teams. It has helped them face the always-difficult end-of-life situations with parents and deal with decision-making processes in an intense emotional climate. However, new questions inherent to the law have appeared. The most important ones concern the withholding of artificial nutrition and hydration, the time pressure in the management of the decision-making process, and the management of the duration of palliative care. Challenges remain in addressing various persistent ethical dilemmas such as the possible survival of newborns with significant brain lesions detected after the period of life-sustaining treatments that have allowed their survival. The new law carried by Mr. Clayes and Mr. Léonetti should provide answers to some of these ethical issues, but it would probably not solve all of them. Copyright

  14. Evaluation of Nutritional Status in a Teaching Hospital Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Rafati

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extrauterine growth restriction remains a common and serious problem in newborns especially who are small, immature, and critically ill. Very low birth weight infants (VLBW had 97% and 40% growth failure at 36 weeks and 18-22 months post-conceptual age respectively. The postnatal development of premature infants is critically dependent on an adequate nutritional intake that mimics a similar gestational stage. Deficient protein or amino acid administration over an extended period may cause significant growth delay or morbidity in VLBW infants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate current nutritional status in the neonatal intensive care unit in a teaching hospital. Methods: During this prospective observational study, the nutritional status of 100 consecutive critically ill neonates were evaluated by anthropometric and biochemical parameters in a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit. Their demographic characteristics (weight, height and head circumference, energy source (dextrose and lipid and protein were recorded in the first, 5th, 10th, 15th and 20th days of admission and blood samples were obtained to measure serum albumin and prealbumin. The amount of calorie and protein were calculated for all of preterm and term neonates and compared to standard means separately. Results: The calorie and amino acids did not meet in the majority of the preterm and term neonates and mean daily parenteral calorie intake was 30% or lower than daily requirements based on neonates’ weight. Mortality rate was significantly higher in neonates with lower serum albumin and severity of malnutrition but not with serum prealbumin concentration. Conclusion: Infants were studied did not receive their whole of daily calorie and protein requirements and it is recommended early and enough administration of calorie source (dextrose, lipids and amino acids. Prealbumin was a more benefit biochemical parameter than albumin to evaluate short term nutrition

  15. Mannose-binding lectin codon 54 gene polymorphism in relation to risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Cumhur; Onay, Huseyin; Oguz, Serife Suna; Ozdemir, Taha Resid; Erdeve, Omer; Ozkinay, Ferda; Dilmen, Ugur

    2011-09-01

    Preterm neonates are susceptible to infection due to a combination of sub-optimal immunity and increased exposure to invasive organisms. Invasive fungal infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among preterm infants cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system, which may be especially important in the neonatal setting. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of any association between MBL gene polymorphism and nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates. Codon 54 (B allele) polymorphism in exon 1 of the MBL gene was investigated in 31 patients diagnosed as nosocomial invasive fungal infection and 30 control preterm neonates. AB genotype was determined in 26% and 30% of patient and control groups, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. AA genotype was determined in 74% of the patient group and in 67% of the control group, and the difference was not statistically significant. B allele frequency was not different significantly in the patient group (13%) compared to the control group (18%). In our study, no relationship was found between MBL codon 54 gene polymorphism and the risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates in NICU.

  16. Loss of Hif-2α Rescues the Hif-1α Deletion Phenotype of Neonatal Respiratory Distress In Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Saini

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a state of decreased oxygen reaching the tissues of the body. During prenatal development, the fetus experiences localized occurrences of hypoxia that are essential for proper organogenesis and survival. The response to decreased oxygen availability is primarily regulated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs, a family of transcription factors that modulate the expression of key genes involved in glycolysis, angiogenesis, and erythropoiesis. HIF-1α and HIF-2α, two key isoforms, are important in embryonic development, and likely are involved in lung morphogenesis. We have recently shown that the inducible loss of Hif-1α in lung epithelium starting at E4.5 leads to death within an hour of parturition, with symptoms similar to neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. In addition to Hif-1α, Hif-2α is also expressed in the developing lung, although the overlapping roles of Hif-1α and Hif-2α in this context are not fully understood. To further investigate the independent role of Hif-2α in lung epithelium and its ability to alter Hif-1α-mediated lung maturation, we generated two additional lung-specific inducible Hif-α knockout models (Hif-2α and Hif-1α+Hif-2α. The intrauterine loss of Hif-2α in the lungs does not lead to decreased viability or observable phenotypic changes in the lung. More interestingly, survivability observed after the loss of both Hif-1α and Hif-2α suggests that the loss of Hif-2α is capable of rescuing the neonatal RDS phenotype seen in Hif-1α-deficient pups. Microarray analyses of lung tissue from these three genotypes identified several factors, such as Scd1, Retlnγ, and Il-1r2, which are differentially regulated by the two HIF-α isoforms. Moreover, network analysis suggests that modulation of hormone-mediated, NF-κB, C/EBPα, and c-MYC signaling are central to HIF-mediated changes in lung development.

  17. [Equivalent continuous noise level in neonatal intensive care unit associated to burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido Galindo, A P; Camargo Caicedo, Y; Vélez-Pereira, A M

    2015-01-01

    Noise levels in neonatal intensive care units allow the appearance of symptoms associated with burnout such as stress, irritability, fatigue and emotional instability on health care personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the equivalent continuous noise levels in the neonatal intensive care unit and compare the results with noise levels associated with the occurrence of burnout syndrome on the care team. Continuous sampling was conducted for 20 days using a type I sound level meter on the unit. The maximum, the ninetieth percentile and the equivalent continuous noise level (Leq) values were recorded. Noise level is reported in the range of 51.4-77.6 decibels A (dBA) with an average of 64 dBA, 100.6 dBA maximum, and average background noise from 57.9 dBA. Noise levels exceed the standards suggested for neonatal intensive care units, are close to maximum values referred for noise exposure in the occupational standards and to noise levels associated with the onset of burnout; thus allowing to infer the probability of occurrence of high levels of noise present in the unit on the development of burnout in caregivers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  18. Physicians Perceptions of Shared Decision-Making in Neonatal and Pediatric Critical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Claire A; Starks, Helene; O'Connor, M Rebecca; Bourget, Erica; Hays, Ross M; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2018-04-01

    Most children die in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units after decisions are made to withhold or withdraw life-sustaining treatments. These decisions can be challenging when there are different views about the child's best interest and when there is a lack of clarity about how best to also consider the interests of the family. To understand how neonatal and pediatric critical care physicians balance and integrate the interests of the child and family in decisions about life-sustaining treatments. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 22 physicians from neonatal, pediatric, and cardiothoracic intensive care units in a single quaternary care pediatric hospital. Transcribed interviews were analyzed using content and thematic analysis. We identified 3 main themes: (1) beliefs about child and family interests; (2) disagreement about the child's best interest; and (3) decision-making strategies, including limiting options, being directive, staying neutral, and allowing parents to come to their own conclusions. Physicians described challenges to implementing shared decision-making including unequal power and authority, clinical uncertainty, and complexity of balancing child and family interests. They acknowledged determining the level of engagement in shared decision-making with parents (vs routine engagement) based on their perceptions of the best interests of the child and parent. Due to power imbalances, families' values and preferences may not be integrated in decisions or families may be excluded from discussions about goals of care. We suggest that a systematic approach to identify parental preferences and needs for decisional roles and information may reduce variability in parental involvement.

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial on Effect of Intermittent Early Versus Late Kangaroo Mother Care on Human Milk Feeding in Low-Birth-Weight Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Dhaarani; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Bhalla, Anil Kumar; Dhaliwal, Lakhbir Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Breastfeeding at discharge among sick low-birth-weight (LBW) infants is low despite counseling and intervention like kangaroo mother care (KMC). Research aim: The aim was to study the effects of early initiation of KMC on exclusive human milk feeding, growth, mortality, and morbidities in LBW neonates compared with late initiation of KMC during the hospital stay and postdischarge. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in level 2 and 3 areas of a tertiary care neonatal unit over 15 months. Inborn neonates weighing 1 to 1.8 kg and hemodynamically stable were randomized to receive either early KMC, initiated within the first 4 days of life, or late KMC (off respiratory support and intravenous fluids). Follow-up was until 1 month postdischarge. Outcomes were proportion of infants achieving exclusive human milk feeding and direct breastfeeding, growth, mortality and morbidities during hospital stay, and postdischarge feeding and KMC practices until 1 month. The early KMC group ( n = 80) achieved significantly higher exclusive human milk feeding (86% vs. 45%, p milk feeding (73% vs. 36%, p milk feeding and direct breastfeeding in LBW infants.

  20. Design of an integrated sensor platform for vital sign monitoring of newborn infants at neonatal intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.; Bambang Oetomo, S.; Feijs, L.M.G.; Bouwstra, S.; Ayoola, Idowu; Dols, S.A.E.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous health status monitoring and advances in medical treatments have resulted in a significant increase of survival rate in critically ill infants admitted into Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs). The quality of life and long-term health prospects of the neonates depend increasingly on the

  1. Point-of-care estimation of haemoglobin concentration in neonates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The HemoCue is a point-of-care analytical system for haemoglobin concentration (Hb) measurement. Point-of-care testing has been validated in hospitals and outpatient departments to assist with urgent patient management by providing rapid laboratory test results. Method. In this prospective study we compared ...

  2. Impact of the design of neonatal intensive care units on neonates, staff, and families: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahheidari, Marzieh; Homer, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Newborn intensive care is for critically ill newborns requiring constant and continuous care and supervision. The survival rates of critically ill infants and hospitalization in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have improved over the past 2 decades because of technological advances in neonatology. The design of NICUs may also have implications for the health of babies, parents, and staff. It is important therefore to articulate the design features of NICU that are associated with improved outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the main features of the NICU design and to determine the advantages and limitations of the designs in terms of outcomes for babies, parents, and staff, predominately nurses. A systematic review of English-language, peer-reviewed articles was conducted for a period of 10 years, up to January 2011. Four online library databases and a number of relevant professional Web sites were searched using key words. There were 2 main designs of NICUs: open bay and single-family room. The open-bay environment develops communication and interaction with medical staff and nurses and has the ability to monitor multiple infants simultaneously. The single-family rooms were deemed superior for patient care and parent satisfaction. Key factors associated with improved outcomes included increased privacy, increased parental involvement in patient care, assistance with infection control, noise control, improved sleep, decreased length of hospital stay, and reduced rehospitalization. The design of NICUs has implications for babies, parents, and staff. An understanding of the positive design features needs to be considered by health service planners, managers, and those who design such specialized units.

  3. Acute respiratory distress syndrome: an audit of incidence and outcome in Scottish intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, M; MacKirdy, F N; Ross, J; Norrie, J; Grant, I S

    2003-09-01

    This prospective audit of incidence and outcome of the acute respiratory distress syndrome was conducted as part of the national audit of intensive care practice in Scotland. All patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome in 23 adult intensive care units were identified using the diagnostic criteria defined by the American-European Consensus Conference. Daily data collection was continued until death or intensive care unit discharge. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients were diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome over the 8-month study period. The frequency of acute respiratory distress syndrome in the intensive care unit population was 8.1%; the incidence in the Scottish population was estimated at 16.0 cases.100,000(-1).year(-1). Intensive care unit mortality for acute respiratory distress syndrome was 53.1%, with a hospital mortality of 60.9%. In our national unselected population of critically ill patients, the overall outcome is comparable with published series (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II standardised mortality ratio = 0.99). However, mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome in Scotland is substantially higher than in recent other series suggesting an improvement in outcome in this condition.

  4. A comparison of Wisconsin neonatal intensive care units with national data on outcomes and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Erika W; Sadek-Badawi, Mona; Albanese, Aggie; Palta, Mari

    2008-11-01

    Improvements in neonatal care over the past 3 decades have increased survival of infants at lower birthweights and gestational ages. However, outcomes and practices vary considerably between hospitals. To describe maternal and infant characteristics, neonatal intensive care units (NICU) practices, morbidity, and mortality in Wisconsin NICUs, and to compare outcomes in Wisconsin to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development network of large academic medical center NICUs. The Newborn Lung Project Statewide Cohort is a prospective observational study of all very low birthweight (< or =1500 grams) infants admitted during 2003 and 2004 to the 16 level III NICUs in Wisconsin. Anonymous data were collected for all admitted infants (N=1463). Major neonatal morbidities, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) were evaluated. The overall incidence of BPD was 24% (8%-56% between NICUs); IVH incidence was 23% (9%-41%); the incidence of NEC was 7% (0%-21%); and the incidence of grade III or higher ROP was 10% (0%-35%). The incidence rates of major neonatal morbidities in Wisconsin were similar to those of a national network of academic NICUs.

  5. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  6. The Lived Experience of Jordanian Parents in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuidhail, Jamila; Al-Motlaq, Mohammad; Mrayan, Lina; Salameh, Taghreed

    2017-04-01

    Many international studies in the field of neonatal nursing have identified parental stress, coping difficulties, support issues, and various other experiences that are related to the birth of a preterm infant. However, no studies have assessed the interrelated issues of parental stress, social support, satisfaction, and nursing support in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Jordan. This study describes the lived experiences, needs in relation to care, and support systems of parents whose neonates were admitted to the NICU. A qualitative design using a phenomenological approach was used to explore the experiences of Jordanian parents who gave birth to neonates in the NICU setting. Participants were recruited from the NICUs of government, teaching, and private hospitals. Data were collected using semistructured interviews that were conducted with parents in a suitable place. Ten participants were interviewed: eight mothers and two fathers. After interviews were transcribed, the methodology suggested by van Manen (1990) was used to analyze the data. The shock, worry, and anxiety experienced by parents; the influences of NICU admission on the experiences of parents and families; the information and assistance required and received by parents from healthcare professionals; and the emotions and satisfaction of parents were the main themes that emerged from the study to reflect the lived experience of parents of neonates in the NICU. The parents in this study were satisfied with the healthcare process in the NICUs, even when this care did not fulfill their expectations or needs for their infants. Nurses in the NICUs must develop interventions and strategies that minimize the stress experienced by parents and that support the emotional capacity of parents to deal with this stressful situation.

  7. Assessment of educational curriculum of neonatal subspecialty in the field of challenges in neurodevelopment care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farin Soleimani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In fact, there is no doubt that medical education should be to prepare students for those clinical problems that they may encounter in their future performance. But according to the findings of previous studies in this area, one of the important priority and basic needs in education is training health workers, including physicians. Methods: In this qualitative study focuses on the content analysis of typical (conventional content analysis was performed. The aim of this study was to determine the needs and skills required to train neonatal subspecialists in the ability to manage vulnerable neonates problems and their families specialized in the field of comprehensive health care have driven. Based on purposive sampling, the research participants, staff and alumni of the second year and above the five-year sub-specialty in neonatology, formed by the association of neonatal diseases were chosen. Saturation as a termination criterion was applied to the collected data. Method of data collection was semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions. Reliability means the adequacy and accuracy that was measured by four methodological criteria: credibility, confirmability, transferability and dependability. All phases of study were recorded elaborately and the researchers reported all findings in the same speech research participants. Results: Respondents consider themselves some week points in neonatal medicine education; they expressed their opinions in three categories with four subcategories as follow: "competent person knowledgeable", "weakness of the curriculum", "educational challenges", "need to review the curriculum", "the need to reform medical education system in the country", and "effective strategies for teaching". Conclusion: Editing curriculum to teach coherent and comprehensive clinical skills in one hand, social support and health care for vulnerable children and families in other hand will improve care for vulnerable

  8. Does smoking in pregnancy modify the impact of antenatal steroids on neonatal respiratory distress syndrome? Results of the Epipage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguet, A; Kaminski, M; Truffert, P; Menget, A; Marpeau, L; Voyer, M; Roze, J C; Escande, B; Cambonie, G; Hascoet, J M; Grandjean, H; Breart, G; Larroque, B

    2005-01-01

    To assess the relation between cigarette smoking during pregnancy and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in very preterm birth, and to analyse the differential effect of antenatal steroids on RDS among smokers and non-smokers. A population based cohort study (the French Epipage study). Regionally defined births in France. A total of 858 very preterm liveborn singletons (27-32 completed weeks of gestation) of the French Epipage study were included in this analysis. The odds ratio for RDS in relation to smoking in pregnancy was estimated using a logistic regression to control for gestational age. The odds ratio for RDS in relation to antenatal steroids was estimated taking into account an interaction between antenatal steroids and cigarette smoking, using multiple logistic regression to control for gestational age, birthweight ratio, main causes of preterm birth, mode of delivery, and sex. The odds ratio for RDS in relation to smoking in pregnancy adjusted for gestational age (aOR) was 0.59 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44 to 0.79). The aOR for RDS in relation to antenatal steroids was 0.31 (95% CI 0.19 to 0.49) in babies born to non-smokers and 0.63 (95% CI 0.38 to 1.05) in those born to smokers; the difference was significant (p = 0.04). Cigarette smoking during pregnancy is associated with a decrease in the risk of RDS in very preterm babies. Although antenatal steroids reduce the risk of RDS in babies born to both smokers and non-smokers, the reduction is smaller in those born to smokers.

  9. Parent Perspectives of Neonatal Intensive Care at the End-of-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Erin R; Christian, Becky J; Hinds, Pamela S; Perna, Samuel J; Robinson, Cheryl; Day, Sara; Meneses, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive qualitative study explored parent experiences related to their infant's neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, end-of-life care, and palliative care consultation. "Life and death in the NICU environment" emerged as the primary theme with the following categories: ups and downs of parenting in the NICU, decision-making challenges in the NICU, and parent support. Parents encountered challenges with areas for improvement for end-of-life and palliative care in the NICU. Further research is necessary to understand barriers with integrating palliative care and curative care in the NICU, and how NICU care affects bereavement and coping outcomes after infant death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transfer of newborns to neonatal care unit: a registry based study in Northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibiki Gibson S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction in neonatal mortality has been slower than anticipated in many low income countries including Tanzania. Adequate neonatal care may contribute to reduced mortality. We studied factors associated with transfer of babies to a neonatal care unit (NCU in data from a birth registry at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC in Tanzania. Methods A total of 21 206 singleton live births registered from 2000 to 2008 were included. Multivariable analysis was carried out to study neonatal transfer to NCU by socio-demographic factors, pregnancy complications and measures of the condition of the newborn. Results A total of 3190 (15% newborn singletons were transferred to the NCU. As expected, neonatal transfer was strongly associated with specific conditions of the baby including birth weight above 4000 g (relative risk (RR = 7.2; 95% confidence interval (CI 6.5-8.0 or below 1500 g (RR = 3.0; 95% CI: 2.3-4.0, five minutes Apgar score less than 7 (RR = 4.0; 95% CI: 3.4-4.6, and preterm birth before 34 weeks of gestation (RR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.5-2.1. However, pregnancy- and delivery-related conditions like premature rupture of membrane (RR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.9-2.7, preeclampsia (RR = 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1-1.5, other vaginal delivery (RR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.7-2.9 and caesarean section (RR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.8-2.1 were also significantly associated with transfer. Birth to a first born child was associated with increased likelihood of transfer (relative risk (RR 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.5, while the likelihood was reduced (RR = 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 when the father had no education. Conclusions In addition to strong associations between neonatal transfer and classical neonatal risk factors for morbidity and mortality, some pregnancy-related and demographic factors were predictors of neonatal transfer. Overall, transfer was more likely for babies with signs of poor health status or a complicated pregnancy. Except for a possibly reduced use of transfer

  11. Impact of improved neonatal care on the profile of retinopathy of prematurity in rural neonatal centers in India over a 4-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinekar, Anand; Jayadev, Chaitra; Kumar, Siddesh; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Dogra, Mangat Ram; Bauer, Noel J; Shetty, Bhujang

    2016-01-01

    To report the reduction in the incidence and severity of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in rural India over a 4-year period following the introduction of improved neonatal care practices. The Karnataka Internet Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity program (KIDROP), is a tele-medicine network that screens for ROP in different zones of Karnataka state in rural India. North Karnataka is the most underdeveloped and remote zone of this program and did not have any ROP screening programs before the intervention of the KIDROP in 2011. Six government and eleven private neonatal centers in this zone were screened weekly. Specific neonatal guidelines for ROP were developed and introduced in these centers. They included awareness about risk factors, oxygen regulation protocols, use of pulse oxymetry, monitoring postnatal weight gain, nutritional best practices, and management of sepsis. The incidence and severity of ROP were compared before the guidelines were introduced (Jan 2011 to Dec 2012) and after the guidelines were introduced (July 2013 to June 2015). During this 4-year period, 4,167 infants were screened over 11,390 imaging sessions. The number of enrolled infants increased from 1,825 to 2,342 between the two periods ( P large, unscreened burden of ROP. Improving neonatal care in these centers can positively impact the incidence and severity of ROP even in a relatively short period. A combined approach of a robust ROP screening program and improved neonatal care practices is required to address the challenge.

  12. Scope of neonatal care services in major Nigerian hospitals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-12

    Oct 12, 2015 ... Quality of newborn care by level of services offered is a critical determinant of ... natal unit capacity, personnel, trainings in newborn cardio-pulmonary ... The availability of surfactant replacement service was also solicited.

  13. The continuous glucose monitoring sensor in neonatal intensive care

    OpenAIRE

    Beardsall, K; Ogilvy-Stuart, A; Ahluwalia, J; Thompson, M; Dunger, D

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of continuous glucose monitoring in the very low birthweight baby requiring intensive care, as these infants are known to be at high risk of abnormalities of glucose control.

  14. Neonatal Early Warning Tools for recognising and responding to clinical deterioration in neonates cared for in the maternity setting: A retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwoda, Michelle; New, Karen; Bogossian, Fiona

    2016-09-01

    All newborns are at risk of deterioration as a result of failing to make the transition to extra uterine life. Signs of deterioration can be subtle and easily missed. It has been postulated that the use of an Early Warning Tool may assist clinicians in recognising and responding to signs of deterioration earlier in neonates, thereby preventing a serious adverse event. To examine whether observations from a Standard Observation Tool, applied to three neonatal Early Warning Tools, would hypothetically trigger an escalation of care more frequently than actual escalation of care using the Standard Observation Tool. A retrospective case-control study. A maternity unit in a tertiary public hospital in Australia. Neonates born in 2013 of greater than or equal to 34(+0) weeks gestation, admitted directly to the maternity ward from their birthing location and whose subsequent deterioration required admission to the neonatal unit, were identified as cases from databases of the study hospital. Each case was matched with three controls, inborn during the same period and who did not experience deterioration and neonatal unit admission. Clinical and physiological data recorded on a Standard Observation Tool, from time of admission to the maternity ward, for cases and controls were charted onto each of three Early Warning Tools. The primary outcome was whether the tool 'triggered an escalation of care'. Descriptive statistics (n, %, Mean and SD) were employed. Cases (n=26) comprised late preterm, early term and post-term neonates and matched by gestational age group with 3 controls (n=78). Overall, the Standard Observation Tool triggered an escalation of care for 92.3% of cases compared to the Early Warning Tools; New South Wales Health 80.8%, United Kingdom Newborn Early Warning Chart 57.7% and The Australian Capital Territory Neonatal Early Warning Score 11.5%. Subgroup analysis by gestational age found differences between the tools in hypothetically triggering an escalation of

  15. On ethical (in)decisions experienced by parents of infants in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    This study was a phenomenological investigation of ethical decisions experienced by parents of newborns in neonatal intensive care. I explore the lived meanings of thematic events that speak to the variable ways that ethical situations may be experienced: a decision that was never a choice; a decision as looking for a way out; a decision as thinking and feeling oneself through the consequences; a decision as indecision; and a decision as something that one falls into. The concluding recommendations spell out the need for understanding the experiences of parents whose children require medical care and underscore the tactful sensitivities required of the health care team during moral-ethical decision making.

  16. Bonding with books: the parent-infant connection in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Lynne J

    2013-01-01

    Parents of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) experience one of the most stressful events of their lives. At times, they are unable to participate fully, if at all, in the care of their infant. Parents in the NICU have a need to participate in the care of their infant to attain the parental role. Parental reading to infants in the NICU is an intervention that can connect the parent and infant and offers a way for parents to participate in caregiving. This intervention may have many benefits and may positively affect the parent-infant relationship.

  17. Fathers' Needs and Masculinity Dilemmas in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noergaard, Betty; Ammentorp, Jette; Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Johannessen, Helle; Thibeau, Shelley

    2017-08-01

    Most healthcare professionals in neonatal intensive care units typically focus on the infants and mothers; fathers often feel powerless and find it difficult to establish a father-child relationship. In family-centered healthcare settings, exploring fathers' experiences and needs is important because men's roles in society, especially as fathers, are changing. To describe fathers' needs when their infants are admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit and to discuss these needs within a theoretical framework of masculinity to advance understanding and generate meaningful knowledge for clinical practices. This qualitative study used participant observation, interviews, multiple sequential interviews, and a focus group discussion. Data were analyzed using grounded theory principles. Analysis of the fathers' needs generated 2 primary themes: (1) Fathers as caregivers and breadwinners and (2) fathers and emotions. Fathers wished to be involved and to take care of their infants but have to balance cultural and social norms and expectations of being breadwinners with their wishes to be equal coparents. Health professionals in neonatal intensive care units must be aware of fathers' need and desire to be equal coparents. Nurses should play a key role by, for example, showing that fathers are as important to their infants as are the mothers, helping them become involved in childcare, and ensuring that they are directly informed about their children's progress. Further research in other cultural settings would contribute to knowledge regarding fatherhood and the role of fathers in childcare.

  18. Barriers and facilitators to implementing the Baby-Friendly hospital initiative in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Britney; Semenic, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    To explore manager, educator, and clinical leader perceptions of barriers and facilitators to implementing Baby-Friendly practice in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Qualitative, descriptive design. Two university-affiliated level-III NICUs in Canada. A purposive sample of 10 medical and nursing managers, nurse educators, lactation consultants, and neonatal nurse practitioners. In-depth, semistructured interviews transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Participants valued breastfeeding and family-centered care yet identified numerous contextual barriers to Baby-Friendly care including infant health status, parent/infant separation, staff workloads and work patterns, gaps in staff knowledge and skills, and lack of continuity of breastfeeding support. Facilitators included breastfeeding education, breastfeeding champions, and interprofessional collaboration. Despite identifying numerous barriers, participants recognized the potential value of expanding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) to the NICU setting. Recommendations include promoting BFHI as a facilitator of family-centered care, interdisciplinary staff education, increasing access to lactation consultants, and establishing a group of NICU champions dedicated to BFHI implementation. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. A RESEARCH ON ACCIDENTS RISKS AND CAUSES IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Tanrıverdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate the relationship between the qualifications of neonatal intensive care units of hospitals (physical conditions, standard applications, employee qualifications and use of personal protective equipment and work related causes and risks, employee related causes and risks when occupational accidents occur. Accordingly, a survey was prepared and was made among 105 nurses working in 3 public and 3 private hospital's neonatal intensive care units, in the January of 2010. The survey consists of questions about the qualifications of neonatal intensive care units, work related causes and risks, and employee related causes and risks. From the regression analysis conducted, it has been found that confirmed hypotheses in several studies in the literature were not significant in this study. The sub-dimensions in which relationships has been found show that the improvement of the physical environment in workplace, the improvement of the employee qualifications and standard applications can reduce the rate of occupational accidents. According to the results of this study management should take care of the organizational factors besides to improvement of the physical environment in workplace, the improvement of the employee qualifications and standard applications.

  20. Effect of Kangaroo care combined with music on the mother–premature neonate attachment: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Vahdati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premature birth may complicate the development and quality of the mother–infant attachment relationship. Music and kangaroo care are two common complementary cares performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. The present study investigated the effect of kangaroo care combined with music on the mother–premature neonate attachment. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 64 mothers with premature neonates were selected and assigned to the control and study groups through random allocation. In the control group, kangaroo care, and in the study group, kangaroo care combined with music was adopted. The level of mother–premature neonate attachment was measured and compared before and after the intervention in both the groups using Avant's Maternal Attachment Assessment Scale. Results: There was a significant increase in the mean overall score of attachment in the kangaroo care combined with music group (70.72 (11.46 after the intervention compared to the kangaroo care without music group (53.61 (9.76. Conclusions: The mean overall score of mother–neonate attachment in the kangaroo care combined with music group was higher than the kangaroo care group. This difference can be related to the effectiveness of music combined with kangaroo care.

  1. Translating Neurodevelopmental Care Policies Into Practice: The Experience of Neonatal ICUs in France-The EPIPAGE-2 Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrat, Veronique; Coquelin, Anaëlle; Cuttini, Marina; Khoshnood, Babak; Glorieux, Isabelle; Claris, Olivier; Durox, Mélanie; Kaminski, Monique; Ancel, Pierre-Yves; Arnaud, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    To describe the implementation of neurodevelopmental care for newborn preterm infants in neonatal ICUs in France in 2011, analyze changes since 2004, and investigate factors associated with practice. Prospective national cohort study of all births before 32 weeks of gestation. Twenty-five French regions. All neonatal ICUs (n = 66); neonates surviving at discharge (n = 3,005). None. Neurodevelopmental care policies and practices were assessed by structured questionnaires. Proportions of neonates initiating kangaroo care during the first week of life and those whose mothers expressed breast milk were measured as neurodevelopmental care practices. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to investigate relationships between kangaroo care or breast-feeding practices and unit policies, taking into account potential confounders. Free visiting policies, bed availability for parents, and kangaroo care encouragement significantly improved between 2004 and 2011 but with large variabilities between units. Kangaroo care initiation varied from 39% for neonates in the most restrictive units to 68% in less restrictive ones (p neurodevelopmental care significantly influenced kangaroo care initiation (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.8-7.0 for Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program implementation compared with no training). Breast milk expression by mothers was greater in units with full-time availability professionals trained for breast-feeding support (60% vs 73%; p neurodevelopmental practices occurred between 2004 and 2011, but large variabilities between units persist. Practices increased in units with supportive policies. Specific neurodevelopmental care training with multifaceted interventions strengthened the implementation of policies.

  2. Hazards of pentazocine for neonatal analgesia: a single-centre experience over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, O D; Aghahowa, S E

    2008-09-01

    In developing countries, neonatal analgesia for surgical procedures is a major challenge where postoperative care is inadequate. To report experience of pentazocine for neonatal surgery in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. A retrospective study of surgical neonates who received pentazocine at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital in Benin City between January 1998 and December 2007. During the period, 2590 paediatric operations were performed including 368 (14.2%) neonates, 49 (13.3%) of whom had pentazocine. The other neonates received a variety of analgesics. Of 56 neonates who developed respiratory depression, 40 (71.4%) had pentazocine (pneonates aged between 9 hours and 28 days [mean (SD) 12 (1.2) days] died between 1 and 36 hours following 8-hourly administration of 0.5 mg/kg pentazocine. In older children who had pentazocine, over-sedation was also a problem but there were no deaths. Deaths in neonates were mainly owing to persistent respiratory depression which was compounded by the unavailability of a paediatric ventilator. However, many neonates responded to naloxone. All neonates who died had an autopsy and no lesion was found which could have compromised respiratory function. The use of pentazocine in neonates was associated with high morbidity and mortality. Caution is required when using pentazocine for neonatal analgesia where post-operative respiratory support is insufficient.

  3. Nursing & parental perceptions of neonatal care in Central Vietnam: a longitudinal qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Katie; Partridge, Colin; Tran, Hoang T; Lubran, Suzanna; Macrae, Duncan

    2017-07-11

    Neonatal mortality accounts for nearly three quarters of all infant deaths in Vietnam. The nursing team are the largest professional group working with newborns, however do not routinely receive neonatal training and there is a lack of research into the impact of educational provision. This study explored changes in nursing perceptions towards their role following a neonatal educational intervention. Parents perceptions of nursing care were explored to determine any changes as nurses gained more experience. Semi-Structured qualitative interviews were conducted every 6 months over an 18 month period with 16 nurses. At each time point, parents whose infant was resident on the neonatal unit were invited to participate in an interview to explore their experiences of nursing care. A total of 67 parents participated over 18 months. Interviews were conducted and transcribed in Vietnamese before translation into English for manifest content analysis facilitated by NVivo V14. Analysis of nursing transcripts identified 14 basic categories which could be grouped (23) into 3 themes: (1) perceptions of the role of the neonatal nurse, (2) perception of the parental role and (3) professional recollections. Analysis of parent transcripts identified 14 basic categories which could be grouped into 3 themes: (1) information sharing, (2) participation in care, and (3) personal experience. Qualitative interviews highlighted the short term effect that the introduction of an educational intervention can have on both nursing attitudes towards and parental experience of care in one neonatal unit in central Vietnam. Nurses shared a growing awareness of their role along with its ethical issues and challenges, whilst parents discussed their overall desire for more participation in their infants care. Further research is required to determine the long term impact of the intervention, the ability of nurses to translate knowledge into clinical practice through assessment of nursing knowledge

  4. Radiation doses and risks to neonates undergoing radiographic examinations in intensive care units in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Bouaoun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic radiography in order to derive the local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs for optimisation purposes.Methods: This study was carried out in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU of  two hospitals in Tunis. 134 babies, with weights ranging from 635 g to 6680 g, performed chest-abdomen X-ray examinations. Neonates were categorized into groups of birth weight. For each X-ray examination, patient data and exposure parameters were recorded. Dose area product (DAP was measured and entrance surface dose (ESD was estimated. Effective dose was calculated from the Monte Carlo simulation software PCXMC.Results: DAP values increased with neonatal weight and demonstrated a wide variation (5.0 - 43.0 mGy.cm2, mean 23.4 mGy.cm2 for patient weight from 600 g to 4000 g. A wide variation was also observed for ESD (14 - 93 μGy, mean 55.2 μGy. The LDRLs expressed in term of DAP were estimated to be 17.6 mGy.cm2 and 29.1 mGy.cm2 for the first and the second NICU, respectively. In terms of effective dose, the average value was about 31.6 μSv per single radiological examination. The results show the necessity to use a standardized protocol with high voltage technique combined to lower current time product (mAs values and an adapted collimation which could lead to further reductions in the neonatal doses. Conclusion: This study presents the LDRLs and the effective doses for neonates in two NICUs and demonstrates the necessity to optimize patient protection for this category of patient.

  5. Attrition in Respiratory Care: Stress versus Intrinsic/Extrinsic Rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Timothy D.

    A recent study (Mathews, Lira, and Neis, 1984) indicated that the reason that respiratory therapists leave or intend to leave their profession is the desire for jobs which offer more job satisfaction, better salary, opportunity for advancement, more status or recognition, better work schedules, and better benefits. Although the lack of these…

  6. Long-term Effects of Recurrent Intermittent Hypoxia and Hyperoxia on Respiratory System Mechanics in Neonatal Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dylag, Andrew M.; Mayer, Catherine A.; Raffay, Thomas M.; Martin, Richard J.; Jafri, Anjum; MacFarlane, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Premature infants are at increased risk for wheezing disorders. Clinically, these neonates experience recurrent episodes of apnea and desaturation often treated by increasing the fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2). We developed a novel paradigm of neonatal intermittent hypoxia with subsequent hyperoxia overshoots (CIHO/E) and hypothesized that CIHO/E elicits long-term changes on pulmonary mechanics in mice. Methods Neonatal C57BL/6 mice received CIHO/E, which consisted of 10% O2 (1...

  7. Thomas L Petty's lessons for the respiratory care clinician of today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, David J

    2014-08-01

    Because of the importance of his original contributions and their practical relevance today, Thomas L Petty (1932-2009) was arguably the most important physician in the history of respiratory care. As much as any single individual, he was responsible for the concept of intensive and multidisciplinary respiratory care. In the 1960s and 1970s, he made key observations and introduced pioneering therapies in the ICU and in the home. He was the first to describe and name ARDS and to show how to use PEEP to treat life-threatening hypoxemia. He was one of the first anywhere to organize a pulmonary rehabilitation program and to show the beneficial effects of long-term oxygen therapy in COPD. Dr Petty emphasized the importance of practical, hands-on respiratory care education for both physicians and non-physicians using a collaborative team approach. He targeted educational activities and practical resources specifically to patients, and he showed how researchers and clinicians could interact responsibly with innovators in industry to the benefit of both. His life and career provide 6 important lessons for respiratory clinicians today and in the future: (1) whatever their roles, RTs and other clinicians in this field need to be experts in its core areas, such as mechanical ventilation, ARDS, and COPD; (2) respiratory care is a team activity: every member is important, and all the members need to communicate well and work together; (3) education needs to be targeted to those in the best position to benefit the patient, including primary care providers and family members; (4) everyone in the field needs to understand the important role of the respiratory care industry and to deal with it responsibly; (5) it must never be forgotten that it is all about the patient; and (6) respiratory care should be exciting and fun. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Causes of death in very preterm infants cared for in neonatal intensive care units: a population-based retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Tim; Koller-Smith, Louise; Lui, Kei; Bajuk, Barbara; Bolisetty, Srinivas

    2017-02-21

    While there are good data to describe changing trends in mortality and morbidity rates for preterm populations, there is very little information on the specific causes and pattern of death in terms of age of vulnerability. It is well established that mortality increases with decreasing gestational age but there are limited data on the specific causes that account for this increased mortality. The aim of this study was to establish the common causes of hospital mortality in a regional preterm population admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of the Neonatal Intensive Care Units' (NICUS) Data Collection of all 10 NICUs in the region. Infants cause of death. There were 345 (7.7%) deaths out of 4454 infants. The most common cause of death across all gestational groups was major IVH (cause-specific mortality rate [CMR] 22 per 1000 infants), followed by acute respiratory illnesses [ARI] (CMR 21 per 1000 infants) and sepsis (CMR 12 per 1000 infants). The most common cause of death was different in each gestational group (22-25 weeks [ARI], 26-28 weeks [IVH] and 29-31 weeks [perinatal asphyxia]). Pregnancy induced hypertension, antenatal steroids and chorioamnionitis were all associated with changes in CMRs. Deaths due to ARI or major IVH were more likely to occur at an earlier age (median [quartiles] 1.4 [0.3-4.4] and 3.6 [1.9-6.6] days respectively) in comparison to NEC and miscellaneous causes (25.2 [15.4-37.3] and 25.8 [3.2-68.9] days respectively). Major IVH and ARI were the most common causes of hospital mortality in this extreme to very preterm population. Perinatal factors have a significant impact on cause-specific mortality. The varying timing of death provides insight into the prolonged vulnerability for diseases such as necrotising enterocolitis in our preterm population.

  9. Evaluating the Effect of Mother – Baby Skin- to- Skin Care on Neonatal Outcomes in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kalhor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Involving the parents in caring of premature newborns is one of the best and effective manners for preventing the hospitalization of premature newborns. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of mother – baby skin- to- skin care on neonatal outcomes in preterm infants, in Kosar hospital. Methods: This was a descriptive comparative study conducted on 400 nulliparous women with premature infants admitted to neonatal intensive care unit of Kosar hospital during April 2012 and March 2015. Sampling was performed via convenience sampling. Sample population divided into two groups, one of them 200, the kangaroo care and non- care groups. The data were obtained by a researcher prepared check list, including mother’s demographic characteristics and neonatal outcomes. Both descriptive and statistical analysis methods were applied. For analyzing the data, chi-square test, t-test, and logistic regression tests was applied (P 0.05. In the intervention group, the relationship between maternal variables and neonatal outcome was significant (P <0.05. Conclusion: Mother – baby skin- to- skin care has a positive effect on neonatal outcomes. Thus, supporting and awareness of premature infants’ mothers in order to implement this type of care can reduce the neonatal complications. Moreover, it is effective in decreasing the treatment costs.

  10. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

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    Carmem Lúcia P. da Silva

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  11. Cluster of Candida parapsilosis primary bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Carmem Lúcia P. da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Candida parapsilosis is an increasingly important bloodstream pathogen in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. We investigated a cluster of bloodstream infections in a NICU to determine whether nosocomial transmission occurred. During a 3-day period, 3 premature infants hospitalized in the same unit presented with sepsis caused by C. parapsilosis. Electrophoretic karyotype of the organisms was performed by using pulsed field gel electrophoresis in a countour-clamped homogeneous electric field system. The isolate from 1 newborn could not be typed, and the isolates from the remaining 2 infants had identical patterns. All 3 cases are described. We conclude that nosocomial transmission of C. parapsilosis occurred and that neonates under intensive care may represent a risk group for this pathogen.

  12. Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: clinical practices in five Portuguese neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, H; Rocha, G; Vasconcellos, G; Proença, E; Carreira, M L; Sossai, M R; Morais, B; Martins, I; Rodrigues, T; Severo, M

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of surfactant, prenatal corticosteroids (PNC) and advances in technology, the survival rate of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants has improved dramatically. Rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) vary widely among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and many studies using multiple interventions have shown some improvement in BPD rates. Implementing potentially better practices to reduce BPD has been an effort made over the last few decades. To compare five Portuguese NICUs in terms of clinical practices in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, in order to develop better practices to prevent BPD. 256 preterm neonates, gestational age (GA) NICU, must be addressed to increase the prescription of PNC, to use a lower FiO2, to be careful with fluid administration in the first weeks of life and to prevent PDA and sepsis. It is necessary to follow guidelines, recommendations or protocols to improve quality in the prevention of BPD.

  13. Maternal care receptivity and its relation to perinatal and neonatal mortality. A rural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, N; Hasan, S B; Zaheer, M

    1995-04-01

    A longitudinal study was conducted on 212 pregnant women from May 1987 to April 1988. Maternal Care Receptivity (MCR) "an innovative approach" was adopted for the assessment of maternal care services provided to pregnant mothers at their door steps. During follow-up, scores were allotted to each of the services rendered and antenatal status of pregnant women. Depending on the score--MCR was classified as high (11 to 8), moderate (7 to 4) or poor (3 to 0). Perinatal and neonatal deaths were recorded and an inverse relationship between MCR and perinatal and mortalities was observed (z = 5.46, p women with high MCR. One of the most important cause of high PNMR and neonatal mortality rate in developing countries is poor MCR, i.e., under utilization of even the existing maternal health services. The main reasons for this under utilization appear to be poverty, illiteracy, ignorance and lack of faith in modern medicine.

  14. The effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on medication preparation and administration errors in neonatal intensive care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chedoe, Indra; Molendijk, Harry; Hospes, Wobbe; Van den Heuvel, Edwin B.; Taxis, Katja

    Objective To examine the effect of a multifaceted educational intervention on the incidence of medication preparation and administration errors in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Design Prospective study with a preintervention and postintervention measurement using direct observation. Setting

  15. Ambient Noise Levels in Acute Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Referral Hospital

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    Sonia R. B D'Souza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Advances in neonatal care have resulted in improved survival of neonates admitted to the intensive care of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. However, the NCU may be an inappropriate milieu, with presence of overwhelming stimuli, most potent being the continuous presence of noise in the ambience of the NICU. Aim and Objectives: To determine and describe the ambient noise levels in the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital. Material and Methods: The ambient noise, in this study was the background sound existing in the environment of the acute NICU of a tertiary referral hospital in South India. The ambient noise levels were analyzed by an audiologist and acoustical engineer using a standardized and calibrated Sound Level Meter (SLM i.e., the Hand Held Analyzer type 2250, Brüel and Kjær, Denmark on a weighted frequency A and reported as dB (A. Results: The ambient noise levels were timed measurements yielded by the SLM in terms of L eq, L as well as L exceeded the standard A 10 Aeqmax levels (Leq< 45 dB, L ≤ 50 dB, and Lmax ≤ 65 10 dB.The L eq ranged from 59.4 to 62.12 dB A. A Ventilators with alarms caused the maximum amount of ambient noise yielding a L Sound Pressure Level AF (SPL of 82.14 dB A. Conclusion: The study has found high levels of ambient noise in the acute NICU. Though there are several measures to reduce the ambient noise levels in the NICU, it is essential to raise awareness among health care personnel regarding the observed ambient noise levels and its effects on neonates admitted to the NICU.

  16. Determinants of stress for staff in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Astbury, J; Yu, V Y

    1982-01-01

    Components of stress for 22 paediatric consultants and 29 nursing sisters working in neonatal intensive care units were studied. Ten situations were rated for their intensity of stress and their frequency of occurrence. For intensity of stress, significantly more paediatric consultants rated the competing demands of personal life versus work as highly stressful, than did nursing sisters. For frequency of stress, significantly more paediatric consultants rated 4 situations as frequently occurr...

  17. Provision of bereavement care in neonatal units in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Meredith J P; Aldridge, Anne; Curley, Anna E

    2011-05-01

    To establish what bereavement care services are available in neonatal units in the United Kingdom and to establish the availability to staff (doctors, nurses, and chaplains) of bereavement education, training, communication, and multicultural support. For families who lose a baby in the neonatal period, the support they receive from hospital staff can be pivotal in their ability to cope with their grief. Hospital staff are not always trained to provide this support. Limited evidence is available regarding hospital-based bereavement care in neonatology or its impact on outcome. Questionnaire survey of selected doctors, nurses, and chaplains in 200 neonatal units in the United Kingdom. We had responses from 100% of neonatal units surveyed. Of 600 individuals, 320 responded; 11% of doctors had never received any formal training in bereavement care, compared with 0.8% of nurses and 1.2% and chaplains. In addition, 31% of respondents thought the training they received was inadequate. Knowledge of grief theorists was poor. Up to 99% of units were helping parents create memories through photographs or handprints. Parents were uniformly given the chance to be with their baby at the time of death (99% overall). Siblings were encouraged to be present 71% of the time; 75% of respondents felt that information about the needs of different faith groups was available. Formal psychological support was offered to 45% of families after bereavement. Studies have shown that parents value clear communication, education about grieving, and demonstrated emotional support by staff. Our study has shown that there are deficiencies in staff training and education in this area. Educators must promote the inclusion of content on bereavement/end-of-life care. Additional education on cultural issues would be helpful. Managing the bereavement process well to minimize morbidity for families and healthcare providers is an important challenge for the future.

  18. Can we Replace Arterial Blood Gas Analysis by Pulse Oximetry in Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome, who are Treated According to INSURE Protocol?

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    Pedram Niknafs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neonates with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, who are treated according to INSURE protocol; require arterial blood gas (ABG analysis to decide on appropriate management. We conducted this study to investigate the validity of pulse oximetry instead of frequent ABG analysis in the evaluation of these patients. From a total of 193 blood samples obtained from 30 neonates <1500 grams with RDS, 7.2% were found to have one or more of the followings: acidosis, hypercapnia, or hypoxemia. We found that pulse oximetry in the detection of hyperoxemia had a good validity to appropriately manage patients without blood gas analysis. However, the validity of pulse oximetry was not good enough to detect acidosis, hypercapnia, and hypoxemia.

  19. Parental perception of neonatal intensive care in public sector ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Little is known about parental experience and decision making with regard to premature infants requiring intensive care in developing countries. We undertook this study to characterise parents' experience of physician counselling and their role in making life-support decisions for very low-birth-weight (VLBW) ...

  20. Characteristics of neonatal units that care for very preterm infants in Europe: results from the MOSAIC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Reempts, Patrick; Gortner, Ludwig; Milligan, David

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We sought to compare guidelines for level III units in 10 European regions and analyze the characteristics of neonatal units that care for very preterm infants. METHODS: The MOSAIC (Models of Organising Access to Intensive Care for Very Preterm Births) project combined a prospective...... cohort study on all births between 22 and 31 completed weeks of gestation in 10 European regions and a survey of neonatal unit characteristics. Units that admitted > or = 5 infants at

  1. Screening for hypoglycemia at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with the Abbott PCx glucose meter

    OpenAIRE

    Balion, Cynthia; Grey, Vijaylaxmi; Ismaila, Afisi; Blatz, Susan; Seidlitz, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Point of care (POC) glucose meters are routinely used as a screening tool for hypoglycemia in a neonatal setting. Glucose meters however, lack the same accuracy as laboratory instruments for glucose measurement. In this study we investigated potential reasons for this inaccuracy and established a cut off value for confirmatory testing. Methods In this prospective study, all patients in the neonatal intensive care unit who had a plasma glucose test ordered were eligible to ...

  2. Neonatal care in rural Karnataka: healthy and harmful practices, the potential for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleland John

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every year four million babies die in the first month of life and a quarter of these take place in India. A package of essential newborn care practices exists, which has a proven impact on reducing mortality, and can be implemented in low resource settings. However, childbirth and the neonatal period are culturally important times, during which there is strong adherence to traditional practices. Successful implementation of the package therefore requires in-depth knowledge of the local context and tailored behaviour change communication. Methods This study was carried out in rural Karnataka, India. It uses quantitative data from a prospective survey following mothers through their experience of pregnancy and the postnatal period; and qualitative data from in depth interviews and focus group discussions conducted with mothers, grandmothers and birth attendants. It explores local newborn care practices and beliefs, analyses their harmful or beneficial characteristics and elucidates areas of potential resistance to behaviour change and implementation of the essential newborn care package. Results Findings show that many potentially harmful newborn care practices are being carried out in the study area, such as unhygienic cord cutting, delayed breastfeeding and early bathing. Some are more amenable to change than others, depending on the strength of the underlying beliefs, and acceptability of alternative care. However, movement away from traditional practices is already taking place, particularly amongst the more educated and better off, and there is a clear opportunity to broaden, direct and accelerate this process. Conclusion Community education should be a focus of the National Rural Health Mission (NRHM and Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI program being implemented in Karnataka. The added capacity of the new Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs could enable more women to be reached. With

  3. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazoni, Andréia; Rocha, Patrícia Kuerten; de Souza, Sabrina; Anders, Jane Cristina; de Malfussi, Hamilton Filipe Correia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units. METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121. RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument. CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:25493670

  5. The role of procalcitonin in neonatal intensive care unit patients with candidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagna, Maria Teresa; Coretti, Caterina; Rella, Antonella; Barbuti, Giovanna; Manca, Fabio; Montagna, Osvaldo; Laforgia, Nicola; Caggiano, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Candidemia is a major infectious complication in neonatal patients. The isolation of yeasts from blood is still the "gold standard" for its diagnosis, but other laboratory markers (i.e., circulating antigens) have been studied with varying specificities and sensitivities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of procalcitonin for the diagnosis of candidemia in neonatal patients at high risk. To verify if the use of different commercial methods can highlight dissimilar results of sensitivity and/or specificity, the determination of procalcitonin serum levels was estimated by two systems. Overall, 90 patients from a Neonatal Intensive Care Units were enrolled, of whom six developed Candida bloodstream infection. Four of six infants with candidemia had slight increase of procalcitonin values (0.5-1 ng/mL). Only one baby showed very high levels but he had fungal and bacterial sepsis at the same time, while no elevation was observed in the sixth patient. No statistically significant difference was observed between two different methods at the time of monitoring (p>0.643). Both methods showed a sensitivity of 83.3 % at diagnosis, while the specificity was 73.8 and 63.1 % by methods A and B, respectively. In the light of the low sensibility and specificity of this assay, we can assume that the determination of procalcitonin would not seem to play a significant role in the diagnosis of fungal infection in neonatal patients.

  6. Discharge against Medical Advice at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devpura, Bhanu; Bhadesia, Pranav; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Desai, Sandeep; Phatak, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Objective . We explored reasons for discharged against medical advice (DAMA) of neonates from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) through in-depth interviews of the parents/guardians. Methods . Of 456 babies admitted to NICU during April 2014 to March 2015, 116 babies were DAMA. Parents of randomly selected 50 babies of these 116, residing within 50 kilometers, were approached for in-depth interviews at their homes. Audio recordings were done and manually transcribed, analyzed in detail to explore common threads leading to DAMA. Basic demographic information of the newborns was retrieved from hospital records. Results . The prevalence of DAMA was 25.4%. Of 50 parents approached, 41 in-depth interviews were completed. Nonaffordability (38.6%), no improvement (14.6%), poor prognosis (12%), and inappropriate behavior of the patient relation office personnel (10.6%) were major factors contributing to DAMA. Parents of 6.6% neonates wanted guarantee of survival and 5.3% parents reported poor behavior of nurses. No gender bias was observed related to DAMA. One-third of neonates (34.1%) were DAMA on first day of admission. Conclusions . The issue of DAMA needs attention. Besides nonaffordability and clinical characteristics of the baby, communication (breaking bad news, counseling, etc.) and lack of adequate infrastructure for relatives emerged as modifiable factors leading to DAMA.

  7. Discharge against Medical Advice at Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Gujarat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Devpura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We explored reasons for discharged against medical advice (DAMA of neonates from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU through in-depth interviews of the parents/guardians. Methods. Of 456 babies admitted to NICU during April 2014 to March 2015, 116 babies were DAMA. Parents of randomly selected 50 babies of these 116, residing within 50 kilometers, were approached for in-depth interviews at their homes. Audio recordings were done and manually transcribed, analyzed in detail to explore common threads leading to DAMA. Basic demographic information of the newborns was retrieved from hospital records. Results. The prevalence of DAMA was 25.4%. Of 50 parents approached, 41 in-depth interviews were completed. Nonaffordability (38.6%, no improvement (14.6%, poor prognosis (12%, and inappropriate behavior of the patient relation office personnel (10.6% were major factors contributing to DAMA. Parents of 6.6% neonates wanted guarantee of survival and 5.3% parents reported poor behavior of nurses. No gender bias was observed related to DAMA. One-third of neonates (34.1% were DAMA on first day of admission. Conclusions. The issue of DAMA needs attention. Besides nonaffordability and clinical characteristics of the baby, communication (breaking bad news, counseling, etc. and lack of adequate infrastructure for relatives emerged as modifiable factors leading to DAMA.

  8. The Intensive Care Lifeboat: a survey of lay attitudes to rationing dilemmas in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, C; Savulescu, J; Maslen, H; Selgelid, M; Wilkinson, D

    2016-11-08

    Resuscitation and treatment of critically ill newborn infants is associated with relatively high mortality, morbidity and cost. Guidelines relating to resuscitation have traditionally focused on the best interests of infants. There are, however, limited resources available in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), meaning that difficult decisions sometimes need to be made. This study explores the intuitions of lay people (non-health professionals) regarding resource allocation decisions in the NICU. The study design was a cross-sectional quantitative survey, consisting of 20 hypothetical rationing scenarios. There were 119 respondents who entered the questionnaire, and 109 who completed it. The respondents were adult US and Indian participants of the online crowdsourcing platform Mechanical Turk. Respondents were asked to decide which of two infants to treat in a situation of scarce resources. Demographic characteristics, personality traits and political views were recorded. Respondents were also asked to respond to a widely cited thought experiment involving rationing. The majority of respondents, in all except one scenario, chose the utilitarian option of directing treatment to the infant with the higher chance of survival, higher life expectancy, less severe disability, and less expensive treatment. As discrepancy between outcomes decreased, however, there was a statistically significant increase in egalitarian responses and decrease in utilitarian responses in scenarios involving chance of survival (P = 0.001), life expectancy (P = 0.0001), and cost of treatment (P = 0.01). In the classic 'lifeboat' scenario, all but two respondents were utilitarian. This survey suggests that in situations of scarcity and equal clinical need, non-health professionals support rationing of life-saving treatment based on probability of survival, duration of survival, cost of treatment or quality of life. However, where the difference in prognosis or cost is very

  9. Ventilator assessment of respiratory mechanics in paediatric intensive care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikumar, Gopinathannair; Greenough, Anne; Rafferty, Gerrard F

    2009-01-01

    Many modern “paediatric” mechanical ventilators have in-built features for estimation of respiratory mechanics which could be useful in the management of ventilated infants and children. The aim of this study was to determine if such measurements were reproducible and accurate. Ventilator (Draeger Evita 4) displayed compliance (Cvent) and resistance (Rvent) values were assessed and compared to the results of respiratory system mechanics (respiratory system compliance (Crs) and resistance (Rrs)) measurements obtained using a single breath occlusion technique. Seventeen children (median age 5.1; range 0.3 to 16 yrs) were studied on 24 occasions. The mean coefficients of variations for the techniques were similar (Cvent 13%; Crs 11%; Rvent 16%; Rrs 14%). The mean (SD) Crs (22.8 (12.3) ml/cmH2O) did not differ significantly from Cvent (22.1 (12.7) ml/cm H2O) but the mean Rrs 21.0 (12.7) cmH2O/l/sec was significantly higher than the mean Rvent 32.0 (32.0) cmH2O/l/sec (p=0.03). Bland and Altman analysis demonstrated a mean difference of −10.94 cmH2O/l/sec (SD 24.1) between Rrs and Rvent; the agreement between Rrs and Rvent decreased as Rrs increased (p=0.008). Conclusions: Ventilator assessment of compliance, but not resistance, using the Evita 4 is reproducible and reliable. PMID:17394017

  10. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  11. Parental involvement and kangaroo care in European neonatal intensive care units: a policy survey in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallás-Alonso, Carmen R; Losacco, Valentina; Maraschini, Alice; Greisen, Gorm; Pierrat, Veronique; Warren, Inga; Haumont, Dominique; Westrup, Björn; Smit, Bert J; Sizun, Jacques; Cuttini, Marina

    2012-09-01

    To compare, in a large representative sample of European neonatal intensive care units, the policies and practices regarding parental involvement and holding babies in the kangaroo care position as well as differences in the tasks mothers and fathers are allowed to carry out. Prospective multicenter survey. Neonatal intensive care units in eight European countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy, The Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom). Patients were not involved in this study. None. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 362 units (response rate 78%); only units with ≥50 very-low-birth-weight annual admissions were considered for this study. Facilities for parents such as reclining chairs near the babies' cots, beds, and a dedicated room were common, but less so in Italy and Spain. All units in Sweden, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Belgium reported encouraging parental participation in the care of the babies, whereas policies were more restrictive in Italy (80% of units), France (73%), and Spain (41%). Holding babies in the kangaroo care position was widespread. However, in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, and Spain, many units applied restrictions regarding its frequency (sometimes or on parents request only, rather than routinely), method (conventional rather than skin-to-skin), and clinical conditions (especially mechanical ventilation and presence of umbilical lines) that would prevent its practice. In these countries, fathers were routinely offered kangaroo care less frequently than mothers (p involvement as well as the role played by mothers and fathers varied within and between countries.

  12. Impact of improved neonatal care on the profile of retinopathy of prematurity in rural neonatal centers in India over a 4-year period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinekar, Anand; Jayadev, Chaitra; Kumar, Siddesh; Mangalesh, Shwetha; Dogra, Mangat Ram; Bauer, Noel J; Shetty, Bhujang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report the reduction in the incidence and severity of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in rural India over a 4-year period following the introduction of improved neonatal care practices. Methods The Karnataka Internet Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity program (KIDROP), is a tele-medicine network that screens for ROP in different zones of Karnataka state in rural India. North Karnataka is the most underdeveloped and remote zone of this program and did not have any ROP screening programs before the intervention of the KIDROP in 2011. Six government and eleven private neonatal centers in this zone were screened weekly. Specific neonatal guidelines for ROP were developed and introduced in these centers. They included awareness about risk factors, oxygen regulation protocols, use of pulse oxymetry, monitoring postnatal weight gain, nutritional best practices, and management of sepsis. The incidence and severity of ROP were compared before the guidelines were introduced (Jan 2011 to Dec 2012) and after the guidelines were introduced (July 2013 to June 2015). Results During this 4-year period, 4,167 infants were screened over 11,390 imaging sessions. The number of enrolled infants increased from 1,825 to 2,342 between the two periods (P<0.001). The overall incidence of any stage ROP reduced significantly from 26.8% to 22.4% (P<0.001). The incidence of treatment-requiring ROP reduced from 20.7% to 16% (P=0.06), and of the treated disease, aggressive posterior ROP reduced from 20.8% to 13.1% (P=0.23) following introduction of the guidelines. Discussion Rural neonatal centers in middle-income countries have a large, unscreened burden of ROP. Improving neonatal care in these centers can positively impact the incidence and severity of ROP even in a relatively short period. A combined approach of a robust ROP screening program and improved neonatal care practices is required to address the challenge. PMID:28539801

  13. Major determinants of survival and length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit of newborns from women with premature preterm rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek Eken, Meryem; Tüten, Abdülhamit; Özkaya, Enis; Karatekin, Güner; Karateke, Ateş

    2017-08-01

    To assess the predictors of outcome in terms of length of stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and survival of neonates from women with preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). A population-based retrospective study including 331 singleton pregnant women with PPROM at 24-34 gestational weeks between January 2013 and December 2015 was conducted. Gestational age at delivery, birth weight, route of delivery, newborn gender, maternal age, oligohydramnios, premature retinopathy (ROP), necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), sepsis, fetal growth retardation (FGR), intracranial hemorrhagia (ICH), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), congenital cardiac disease (CCD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), use of cortisol (betamethasone) and maternal complications including gestational diabetes, preeclampsia and chorioamnionitis were used to predict neonatal outcomes in terms of length of stay in the NICU and survival. In linear regression analyses, birth weight, ROP, CCD, BPD, PDA, NEC and preeclampsia were significant confounders for length of stay in the NICU. Among them, birth weight was the most powerful confounder for prolongation of the NICU stay (t: -6.43; p Prematurity-related complications are the most important problems for which precautions should be taken. Therefore, premature deliveries should be avoided to prevent infection and to prolong the latent period in cases of PPROM in order to decrease prematurity-related outcomes.

  14. Does neonatal pain management in intensive care units differ between night and day? An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Romain; Danan, Claude; Daoud, Patrick; Zupan, Véronique; Renolleau, Sylvain; Zana, Elodie; Aizenfisz, Sophie; Lapillonne, Alexandre; de Saint Blanquat, Laure; Granier, Michèle; Durand, Philippe; Castela, Florence; Coursol, Anne; Hubert, Philippe; Cimerman, Patricia; Anand, K J S; Khoshnood, Babak; Carbajal, Ricardo

    2014-02-20

    To determine whether analgesic use for painful procedures performed in neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) differs during nights and days and during each of the 6 h period of the day. Conducted as part of the prospective observational Epidemiology of Painful Procedures in Neonates study which was designed to collect in real time and around-the-clock bedside data on all painful or stressful procedures. 13 NICUs and paediatric intensive care units in the Paris Region, France. All 430 neonates admitted to the participating units during a 6-week period between September 2005 and January 2006. During the first 14 days of admission, data were collected on all painful procedures and analgesic therapy. The five most frequent procedures representing 38 012 of all 42 413 (90%) painful procedures were analysed. Observational study. We compared the use of specific analgesic for procedures performed during each of the 6 h period of a day: morning (7:00 to 12:59), afternoon, early night and late night and during daytime (morning+afternoon) and night-time (early night+late night). 7724 of 38 012 (20.3%) painful procedures were carried out with a specific analgesic treatment. For morning, afternoon, early night and late night, respectively, the use of analgesic was 25.8%, 18.9%, 18.3% and 18%. The relative reduction of analgesia was 18.3%, pnight-time and 28.8%, pday. Parental presence, nurses on 8 h shifts and written protocols for analgesia were associated with a decrease in this difference. The substantial differences in the use of analgesics around-the-clock may be questioned on quality of care grounds.

  15. Strategies for the prevention of hospital-acquired infections in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, A; Stronati, M

    2008-04-01

    Nosocomial infections are among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Prevention of healthcare-associated infections is based on strategies that aim to limit susceptibility to infections by enhancing host defences, interrupting transmission of organisms by healthcare workers and by promoting the judicious use of antimicrobials. Several strategies are available and include: hand hygiene practices; prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections; judicious use of antimicrobials for therapy and prophylaxis; enhancement of host defences; skin care; and early enteral feeding with human milk.

  16. Viral infection and antiviral therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barford, Galina; Rentz, Alison C; Faix, Roger G

    2004-01-01

    Viral diseases are leading causes of mortality and morbidity among infants requiring care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), with ongoing discoveries of new viral pathology likely to add to the burdens posed. Many viral diseases in NICU infants are undiagnosed or appreciated only late in the course because of subtle or asymptomatic presentation, confusion with bacterial disease, and failure to consider viral disease. We present an overview of viral disease in NICU infants, with emphasis on pharmacologic agents currently employed for prophylaxis and treatment of such diseases. Advances in molecular biology and popular demand to develop antiviral agents for viral diseases (eg, human immunodeficiency virus) offer great promise for the future.

  17. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  18. Surfactant from neonatal to pediatric ICU: bench and bedside evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boet, A; Brat, R; Aguilera, S S; Tissieres, P; De Luca, D

    2014-12-01

    Surfactant is a cornerstone of neonatal critical care for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome of preterm babies. However, other indications have been studied for various clinical conditions both in term neonates and in children beyond neonatal age. A high degree of evidence is not yet available in some cases and this is due to the complex and not yet totally understood physiopathology of the different types of pediatric and neonatal lung injury. We here summarise the state of the art of the bench and bedside knowledge about surfactant use for the respiratory conditions usually cared for in neonatal and pediatric intensive care units. Future research direction will also be presented. On the whole, surfactant is able to improve oxygenation in infection related respiratory failure, pulmonary hemorrhage and meconium aspiration syndrome. Bronchoalveolar lavage with surfactant solution is currently the only means to reduce mortality or need for extracorporeal life support in neonates with meconium aspiration. While surfactant bolus or lavage only improves the oxygenation and ventilatory requirements in other types of postneonatal acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), there seems to be a reduction in the mortality of small infants with RSV-related ARDS.

  19. Skin-to-Skin Care for Term and Preterm Infants in the Neonatal ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baley, Jill

    2015-09-01

    “Kangaroo mother care” was first described as an alternative method of caring for low birth weight infants in resource-limited countries, where neonatal mortality and infection rates are high because of overcrowded nurseries, inadequate staffing, and lack of equipment. Intermittent skin-to-skin care (SSC), a modified version of kangaroo mother care, is now being offered in resource-rich countries to infants needing neonatal intensive care, including those who require ventilator support or are extremely premature. SSC significantly improves milk production by the mother and is associated with a longer duration of breastfeeding. Increased parent satisfaction, better sleep organization, a longer duration of quiet sleep, and decreased pain perception during procedures have also been reported in association with SSC. Despite apparent physiologic stability during SSC, it is prudent that infants in the NICU have continuous cardiovascular monitoring and that care be taken to verify correct head positioning for airway patency as well as the stability of the endotracheal tube, arterial and venous access devices, and other life support equipment.

  20. Moral distress within neonatal and paediatric intensive care units: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Trisha; Janvier, Annie; Gillam, Lynn; Davis, Peter G

    2016-08-01

    To review the literature on moral distress experienced by nursing and medical professionals within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Pubmed, EBSCO (Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and Medline) and Scopus were searched using the terms neonat*, infant*, pediatric*, prematur* or preterm AND (moral distress OR moral responsibility OR moral dilemma OR conscience OR ethical confrontation) AND intensive care. 13 studies on moral distress published between January 1985 and March 2015 met our inclusion criteria. Fewer than half of those studies (6) were multidisciplinary, with a predominance of nursing staff responses across all studies. The most common themes identified were overly 'burdensome' and disproportionate use of technology perceived not to be in a patient's best interest, and powerlessness to act. Concepts of moral distress are expressed differently within nursing and medical literature. In nursing literature, nurses are often portrayed as victims, with physicians seen as the perpetrators instigating 'aggressive care'. Within medical literature moral distress is described in terms of dilemmas or ethical confrontations. Moral distress affects the care of patients in the NICU and PICU. Empirical data on multidisciplinary populations remain sparse, with inconsistent definitions and predominantly small sample sizes limiting generalisability of studies. Longitudinal data reflecting the views of all stakeholders, including parents, are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Towards ethical decision support and knowledge management in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Frize, M; Eng, P; Walker, R; Catley, C

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies in neonatal medicine, clinical nursing, and cognitive psychology have indicated the need to augment current decision-making practice in neonatal intensive care units with computerized, intelligent decision support systems. Rapid progress in artificial intelligence and knowledge management facilitates the design of collaborative ethical decision-support tools that allow clinicians to provide better support for parents facing inherently difficult choices, such as when to withdraw aggressive treatment. The appropriateness of using computers to support ethical decision-making is critically analyzed through research and literature review. In ethical dilemmas, multiple diverse participants need to communicate and function as a team to select the best treatment plan. In order to do this, physicians require reliable estimations of prognosis, while parents need a highly useable tool to help them assimilate complex medical issues and address their own value system. Our goal is to improve and structuralize the ethical decision-making that has become an inevitable part of modern neonatal care units. The paper contributes to clinical decision support by outlining the needs and basis for ethical decision support and justifying the proposed development efforts.

  2. Maternal experiences with premature children in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Colares de Sá

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Understand the maternal experience with premature children in neonatal intensive care unit. Methods: This is a qualitative and descriptive study. A questionnaire was used with semi-structured interview type, analyzed by the technique of content analysis and discussed, using the theoretical framework. The sample consisted of 11 mothers who accompanied their babies every day in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Results: After discourse analysis emerged the following categories: experiencing maternal feelings in relation to the baby at risk; the meaning of the neonatal unit for mothers of premature infants, maternal perceptions about prematurity and experiencing the formation of the maternal-filial bond. Conclusions:The mother of premature experiences difficult times in the face of risk and instability of the baby, causing ambivalent feelings in relation to prematurity. Nevertheless, it was found thatfeelings of happiness, love and desire to see your baby being discharged form hospital and live with his family, were significant in relation to feelings of sadness and fear of losing her child.

  3. Neonatal intensive care practices harmful to the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sudha

    2011-06-01

    There has been a marked increase in the survival of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants, but these babies have a long stay in the NICU. Strategies to decrease their neurodevelopmental impairment become very important. The maximum development of the brain occurs between 29-41 weeks. From the warm, dark, acquatic econiche, where the baby hears pleasant sounds like the mother's heart beat, the baby suddenly finds itself in the dry, cold, excessively bright, noisy, environment of the NICU. Noise, bright light, painful procedures, and ill-timed caregiving activities, adversely affect the infant's development. Excessive radiation from X-rays of babies on the ventilator and CT scans also affect the brain. Medications like steroids for chronic lung disease also cause damage to the brain. Aminoglycides and frusemide are known to cause hearing impairment. Hence a developmentally supportive, humanized care will go a long way in enhancing the developmental outcome of these babies.

  4. [The Need for Psychosocial Support of Parents of Children in Neonatal Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Nicole; Karutz, Harald; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    Background Advances in neonatal care have reduced mortality but increased morbidity in babies born pre-maturely or after high-risk pregnancies. However, this often increases the burden on the family and the parents in particular. A systematic review of the literature was conducted that demonstrated the importance of psychosocial support for parents of children in neonatal care. Methods A systematic search of Pubmed, Psyndex, CINAHI and medpilot was conducted. Reference lists of the included articles were also searched for relevant publications. A free-text search found further publications. Together, 78 publications (from 1975-2015) were included in our review. Results A shift from a biomedical model and child-centred treatment to family-centred care has already taken place in neonatal care. However, there is still a considerable gap between theory and practice. Although there is awareness of the need for psychosocial support of parents, the focus of day-to-day care is still on medical interventions and life-supporting treatment for the child. In particular, while the importance of an assessment of needs as a basis for family-centred psychosocial support appears to be well-known, validated screening instruments are rarely used. In addition, the demand for psychosocial support of parents is not just solely determined by the child's medical risk. Conclusions The results highlight the challenges of delivering individualised psychosocial support to families within a healthcare system of limited resources, with practitioners having to take into account the developing parent-child relationship as well as health economics. In future, psychosocial support should be based on evidence rather than intuition. Attachment theory and research, and health psychology can contribute to this development. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. The virtual neonate in The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: when twin number three adds up to error not imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Amir; Chulsky, Elena; Rubin, Robyn; Zohar, Daniel; Barak, Shay

    2014-09-01

    During the administrative admittance of extreme premature twin neonates to the Hospital Information System (HIS), at an Israeli government general hospital, a third virtual baby was mistakenly admitted in addition to the twins. The third virtual baby's records were in department occupancy and transactions were performed in the HIS, such as "admittance" to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), being appended to a mother as well as clinical orders. Once noticed, the records of the third virtual baby were merged in the system with the second correct twin (Baby II), whose records were also in the department occupancy list. An error occurred in the interface whilst merging the records, and patient demography was not updated for clinical orders for Baby II. As a result, all new clinical orders for Baby II carried the non existing third baby's identity. We emphasize that it is advisable to register all newborns as early on in life whilst still in the delivery room, with a permanent identification number as opposed to a temporary identification number to avoid any mismatching if patients records are to be merged or updated. Furthermore, steps that could help prevent such an event could be additional administrative staff to register newborns. However, we conclude, that it would be most helpful to introduce a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) system based on a permanent identity number. If any discrepancies in patient information are detected, an alarm will be triggered during transfer of the baby from the delivery room to the designated Department. A RFID receptor is located at the exit of the delivery room. While most literature available regarding Hospital Information Technology (HIT) and patient safety, mainly discusses mismatching of patients during medication and laboratory testing not much literature regarding the process of registering newborns as a source of patient mismatching has been found. The authors feel that there is a need to further investigate this

  6. Respiratory Virus Detection and Clinical Diagnosis in Children Attending Day Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Moe

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses often have been studied in children with respiratory tract infection (RTI, but less knowledge exists about viruses in asymptomatic children. We have studied the occurrence of a broad panel of respiratory viruses in apparently healthy children attending day care, taking into account the influence of possible confounding factors, such as age, clinical signs of respiratory tract infection (RTI, location (day-care section and season.We have studied 161 children in two day-care centers, each with separate sections for younger and older children, during four autumn and winter visits over a two-year period. A total of 355 clinical examinations were performed, and 343 nasopharyngeal samples (NPS were analyzed by semi-quantitative, real-time, polymerase chain reaction (PCR tests for 19 respiratory pathogens.Forty-three percent of all NPS were PCR-positive for ≥ 1 of 13 virus species, with high species variation during visits. Rhinovirus 26% (88/343 NPS, enterovirus 12% (40/343 and parechovirus 9% (30/343 were detected in every visit, and the rates varied in relation to age, day-care section and season. Ten other viruses were detected in ≤ 3% of the NPS. Generally, viruses occurred together in the NPS. In 24% (79/331 of the clinical examinations with available NPS, the children had clear signs of RTI, while in 41% (135/331 they had mild signs, and in 35% (117/331 the children had no signs of RTI. Moreover, viruses were found in 70% (55/79 of children with clear signs of RTI, in 41% (55/135 with mild signs and in 30% (35/117 without any signs of RTI (p < 0.001.Positive PCR tests for respiratory viruses, particularly picornaviruses, were frequently detected in apparently healthy children attending day care. Virus detection rates were related to age, presence of clinical signs of RTI, location in day care and season.

  7. Two-year outcome of normal-birth-weight infants admitted to a Singapore neonatal intensive care unit.

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    Lian, W B; Yeo, C L; Ho, L Y

    2002-03-01

    To describe the characteristics, the immediate and short-term outcome and predictors of mortality in normal-birth-weight (NBW) infants admitted to a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in Singapore. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 137 consecutive NBW infants admitted to the NICU of the Singapore General Hospital from January 1991 to December 1992. Data on the diagnoses, clinical presentation of illness, intervention received, complications and outcome as well as follow-up patterns for the first 2 years of life, were collected and analysed. NBW NICU infants comprised 1.8% of births in our hospital and 40.8% of all NICU admissions. The main reasons for NICU admissions were respiratory disorders (61.3%), congenital anomalies (15.3%) and asphyxia neonatorum (11.7%). Respiratory support was necessary in 81.8%. Among those ventilated, the only predictive factor contributing to mortality was the mean inspired oxygen concentration. The mortality rate was 11.7%. Causes of death included congenital anomalies (43.75%), asphyxia neonatorum (31.25%) and pulmonary failure secondary to meconium aspiration syndrome (12.5%). The median hospital stay among survivors (88.3%) was 11.0 (range, 4 to 70) days. Of 42 patients (out of 117 survivors) who received follow-up for at least 6 months, 39 infants did not have evidence of any major neurodevelopmental abnormalities at their last follow-up visit, prior to or at 2 years of age. Despite their short hospital stay (compared to very-low-birth-weight infants), the high volume of NBW admissions make the care of this population an important area for review to enhance advances in and hence, reduce the cost of NICU care. With improved antenatal diagnostic techniques (allowing earlier and more accurate diagnosis of congenital malformations) and better antenatal and perinatal care (allowing better management of at-risk pregnancies), it is anticipated that there should be a reduction in such admissions with better

  8. [Congenital myotonic dystrophy in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Sara; Alves Pereira, Clara; Machado, Angela; Pereira, Sandra; Machado, Leonilde; Fraga, Carla; Oliveira, Abílio; Vale, Isabel; Quelhas, Ilídio

    2014-02-01

    Steinert myotonic dystrophy is a multisystemic disease, autosomal dominant, with a wide spectrum of severity and clinical manifestations. The most severe form is one that manifests in the neonatal period, called congenital myotonic dystrophy. This condition is distinguished by overall hypotonia at birth and respiratory function compromise. Complications are frequent, mainly psychomotor development delay, growth failure, food difficulties and constipation. It is associated with a poor prognosis, with an overall mortality of up to 50% of severely affected children. We present five patients with congenital myotonic dystrophy in order to describe clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Existing data in the literature on psychomotor development, complications and prognosis of survivors with congenital myotonic dystrophy are scarce. In our case studies, we have found significant chronic psychomotor limitations.

  9. Horizontal transmission of group B streptococcus in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinis, Julia; Shah, Jay; Murthy, Prashanth; Fulford, Martha

    2011-06-01

    The incidence of early-onset group B streptococcal (GBS) sepsis in the neonatal population has decreased substantially since the introduction of maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis and routine prenatal screening. However, these strategies have not reduced the incidence of late-onset GBS infections. Additional research pertaining to the transmission of late-onset GBS infections is required to develop effective preventive methods. The present report describes probable horizontal transmission of late-onset GBS infection among three infants in a neonatal intensive care unit. GBS strain confirmation was based on the microbiological picture, antibiogram and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These cases highlight the morbidity associated with late-onset GBS disease and the importance of considering horizontal transmission as an etiological factor in GBS infection in the newborn period. Further studies assessing horizontal transmission in late-onset GBS disease may improve prevention and early intervention.

  10. Sound reduction management in the neonatal intensive care unit for preterm or very low birth weight infants.

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    Almadhoob, Abdulraoof; Ohlsson, Arne

    2015-01-30

    Infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) are subjected to stress, including sound of high intensity. The sound environment in the NICU is louder than most home or office environments and contains disturbing noises of short duration and at irregular intervals. There are competing auditory signals that frequently challenge preterm infants, staff and parents. The sound levels in NICUs often exceed the maximum acceptable level of 45 decibels (dB), recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Hearing impairment is diagnosed in 2% to 10% of preterm infants versus 0.1% of the general paediatric population. Noise may cause apnoea, hypoxaemia, alternation in oxygen saturation, and increased oxygen consumption secondary to elevated heart and respiratory rates and may, therefore, decrease the amount of calories available for growth. Elevated levels of speech are needed to overcome the noisy environment in the NICU, thereby increasing the negative impacts on staff, newborns, and their families. High noise levels are associated with an increased rate of errors and accidents, leading to decreased performance among staff. The aim of interventions included in this review is to reduce sound levels to 45 dB or less. This can be achieved by lowering the sound levels in an entire unit, treating the infant in a section of a NICU, in a 'private' room, or in incubators in which the sound levels are controlled, or reducing the sound levels that reaches the individual infant by using earmuffs or earplugs. By lowering the sound levels that reach the neonate, the resulting stress on the cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, and endocrine systems can be diminished, thereby promoting growth and reducing adverse neonatal outcomes. Primary objectiveTo determine the effects of sound reduction on growth and long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes of neonates. Secondary objectives1. To evaluate the effects of sound reduction on short-term medical outcomes (bronchopulmonary

  11. Neonatal pain and reduced maternal care: Early-life stressors interacting to impact brain and behavioral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney-Leber, Sean M; Brummelte, Susanne

    2017-02-07

    Advances in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have drastically increased the survival chances of preterm infants. However, preterm infants are still exposed to a wide range of stressors during their stay in the NICU, which include painful procedures and reduced maternal contact. The activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, in response to these stressors during this critical period of brain development, has been associated with many acute and long-term adverse biobehavioral outcomes. Recent research has shown that Kangaroo care, a non-pharmacological analgesic based on increased skin-to-skin contact between the neonate and the mother, negates the adverse outcomes associated with neonatal pain and reduced maternal care, however the biological mechanism remains widely unknown. This review summarizes findings from both human and rodent literature investigating neonatal pain and reduced maternal care independently, primarily focusing on the role of the HPA axis and biobehavioral outcomes. The physiological and positive outcomes of Kangaroo care will also be discussed in terms of how dampening of the HPA axis response to neonatal pain and increased maternal care may account for positive outcomes associated with Kangaroo care. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Distance decay in delivery care utilisation associated with neonatal mortality. A case referent study in northern Vietnam

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    Eriksson Leif

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to reduce neonatal mortality are essential if the Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4 is to be met. The impact of spatial dimensions of neonatal survival has not been thoroughly investigated even though access to good quality delivery care is considered to be one of the main priorities when trying to reduce neonatal mortality. This study examined the association between distance from the mother's home to the closest health facility and neonatal mortality, and investigated the influence of distance on patterns of perinatal health care utilisation. Methods A surveillance system of live births and neonatal deaths was set up in eight districts of Quang Ninh province, Vietnam, from July 2008 to December 2009. Case referent design including all neonatal deaths and randomly selected newborn referents from the same population. Interviews were performed with mothers of all subjects and GIS coordinates for mothers' homes and all health facilities in the study area were obtained. Straight-line distances were calculated using ArcGIS software. Results A total of 197 neonatal deaths and 11 708 births were registered and 686 referents selected. Health care utilisation prior to and at delivery varied with distance to the health facility. Mothers living farthest away (4th and 5th quintile, ≥1257 meters from a health facility had an increased risk of neonatal mortality (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.40 - 2.75, adjusted for maternal age at delivery and marital status. When stratified for socio-economic factors there was an increased risk for neonatal mortality for mothers with low education and from poor households who lived farther away from a health facility. Mothers who delivered at home had more than twice as long to a health facility compared to mothers who delivered at a health care facility. There was no difference in age at death when comparing neonates born at home or health facility deliveries (p = 0.56. Conclusion Distance to the

  13. Body care experienced by people hospitalized with severe respiratory disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, Kirsten; Bjoern, Agnes; Dahl, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    of their inability to manage personal body care by themselves have not previously been explored. This study explored patients' experiences of being assisted with personal body care. Methods. A grounded theory methodology was used with a convenience sample of 12 patients. Data were gathered from participant...

  14. Factors influencing a nurse's decision to question medication administration in a neonatal clinical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydon, Laurene; Hauck, Yvonne; Zimmer, Margo; Murdoch, Jamee

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence nurse's decisions to question concerning aspects of medication administration within the context of a neonatal clinical care unit. Medication error in the neonatal setting can be high with this particularly vulnerable population. As the care giver responsible for medication administration, nurses are deemed accountable for most errors. However, they are recognised as the forefront of prevention. Minimal evidence is available around reasoning, decision making and questioning around medication administration. Therefore, this study focuses upon addressing the gap in knowledge around what nurses believe influences their decision to question. A critical incident design was employed where nurses were asked to describe clinical incidents around their decision to question a medication issue. Nurses were recruited from a neonatal clinical care unit and participated in an individual digitally recorded interview. One hundred and three nurses participated between December 2013-August 2014. Use of the constant comparative method revealed commonalities within transcripts. Thirty-six categories were grouped into three major themes: 'Working environment', 'Doing the right thing' and 'Knowledge about medications'. Findings highlight factors that influence nurses' decision to question issues around medication administration. Nurses feel it is their responsibility to do the right thing and speak up for their vulnerable patients to enhance patient safety. Negative dimensions within the themes will inform planning of educational strategies to improve patient safety, whereas positive dimensions must be reinforced within the multidisciplinary team. The working environment must support nurses to question and ultimately provide safe patient care. Clear and up to date policies, formal and informal education, role modelling by senior nurses, effective use of communication skills and a team approach can facilitate nurses to

  15. Quality Metrics in Neonatal and Pediatric Critical Care Transport: A National Delphi Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Hamilton P; Bigham, Michael T; Schoettker, Pamela J; Meyer, Keith; Trautman, Michael S; Insoft, Robert M

    2015-10-01

    The transport of neonatal and pediatric patients to tertiary care facilities for specialized care demands monitoring the quality of care delivered during transport and its impact on patient outcomes. In 2011, pediatric transport teams in Ohio met to identify quality indicators permitting comparisons among programs. However, no set of national consensus quality metrics exists for benchmarking transport teams. The aim of this project was to achieve national consensus on appropriate neonatal and pediatric transport quality metrics. Modified Delphi technique. The first round of consensus determination was via electronic mail survey, followed by rounds of consensus determination in-person at the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Transport Medicine's 2012 Quality Metrics Summit. All attendees of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Transport Medicine Quality Metrics Summit, conducted on October 21-23, 2012, in New Orleans, LA, were eligible to participate. Candidate quality metrics were identified through literature review and those metrics currently tracked by participating programs. Participants were asked in a series of rounds to identify "very important" quality metrics for transport. It was determined a priori that consensus on a metric's importance was achieved when at least 70% of respondents were in agreement. This is consistent with other Delphi studies. Eighty-two candidate metrics were considered initially. Ultimately, 12 metrics achieved consensus as "very important" to transport. These include metrics related to airway management, team mobilization time, patient and crew injuries, and adverse patient care events. Definitions were assigned to the 12 metrics to facilitate uniform data tracking among programs. The authors succeeded in achieving consensus among a diverse group of national transport experts on 12 core neonatal and pediatric transport quality metrics. We propose that transport teams across the country use these metrics to

  16. Parent' s experiences and perceives at premature newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit

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    Klaudia Urbančič

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Text treats parent's experiences and perceives and the significant of their newborn premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit in the Ljubljana maternity hospital. Aim of health promotion, the significance of health education in health education counselling are presented. The purpose of this study was to introduction parent' s experiences and make an implementation in nursing practice. The advantage is represent by performing health education counselling for parents in intensive care unit permanently. Perceives of parents during living their newborn infant in neonatal intensive care unit are present on five concepts: perceive parents themselves, perceive their infant, perceive the staff and the intensive care setting and perceive their home setting. Results are showing statistic important differences between mothers and fathers at the time of deliver and at the time charging infant home. A questionare was used for collecting data. Process of development instrument is represent. Descriptive statistics and T-test was used for quantitative data analysed. Using method of internal consistent Chronbach alpha tested reliability of scales and mean differences in time are graf protrayed by 95% confident intervals. Results show statistical significant differences on all five concepts of parent's experiences. Methodological findings and reseaarch limitations are also present. Authoress positive evaluates the effect of health education counselling program and find out its positive effect on parent's critical thinking and contributes to quality assurance nursing.

  17. Impact of Prophylactic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Transient Tachypnea of the Newborn and Neonatal Intensive Care Admission in Newborns Delivered by Elective Cesarean Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Miray Yilmaz; Alan, Serdar; Kahvecioglu, Dilek; Cakir, Ufuk; Yildiz, Duran; Erdeve, Omer; Arsan, Saadet; Atasay, Begum

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effect of the prophylactic continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) administration in the delivery room to newborns who were delivered by elective cesarean section (CS). Inborn infants with gestational age between 34(0/7) to 38(6/7) and born by elective CS were prospectively randomized to receive either prophylactic CPAP for 20 minutes via face mask or standardized care without CPAP in the delivery room. Primary outcomes were the incidence of transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission due to respiratory distress. A total of 259 infants with a mean gestational age of 37.7 ± 0.8 weeks and birth weight of 3,244 ± 477 g were included. A total of 134 infants received prophylactic CPAP and 125 received control standard care. The rate of NICU admission was significantly lower in prophylactic CPAP group (p = 0.045). Although the rate of TTN was lower in the prophylactic CPAP group, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.059). The rate of NICU admission due to respiratory distress was significantly higher in late-preterm cohort than early-term cohort (p CPAP administration decreases the rate of NICU admission without any side effect in late-preterm and early-term infants delivered by elective CS. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. The Impact of an Educational Program Regarding Total Parenteral Nutrition on Infection Indicators in Neonates Admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marofi, Maryam; Bijani, Nahid; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Barekatain, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    One of the basic care measures for preterm infants is providing nutrition through total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and one of the most important complications of it is infection. Because prevention of nosocomial infections is an important issue for neonate's safety, this study aimed to determine the effects of a continuing medical education (CME) course on TPN for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses on indicators of infection in newborns. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 127 neonates who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They were selected through simple convenience sampling method at two stages of before and after the CME program. The inclusion criteria were prescription of TPN by the physician and lack of clinical evidences for infection in newborns before the beginning of TPN. Death of the infant during each stage of the study was considered as the exclusion criteria. The data gathering tool was a data record sheet including clinical signs of infection in the infants and their demographic characteristics. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and student's t -test in SPSS software. The results showed the frequency of clinical markers for infection in newborns at the pre-intervention stage ( n = 41; 65.10%) was significantly less than at the post-intervention stage ( n = 30; 46.90%) ( p = 0.04). Nursing educational programs on TPN reduce infection rates among neonates in NICUs.

  19. Body dirt or liquid gold? How the 'safety' of donated breastmilk is constructed for use in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Katherine

    2014-06-01

    When mothers of preterm infants are unable to produce sufficient volumes of breastmilk, neonatologists in many Western countries prescribe pasteurized donor breastmilk. Breastmilk has a paradoxical presence in the neonatal intensive care unit while it has therapeutic properties, it also has the potential to transmit disease. National health authorities and local neonatal intensive care unit policies each delimit the safety of donor milk by focusing on the presence or absence of pathogens. It is in this light that breastmilk from the human milk bank is both sought and legitimated to minimize safety concerns. This research uses data arising from an ethnographic study of two human milk banks and two neonatal intensive care units in the United States, and 73 interviews with milk donors, neonatal intensive care unit parents and clinicians. The primary research question framing the study was 'What are the underlying processes and practices that have enabled donor milk to be endorsed as a safe and legitimate feeding option in neonatal intensive care units?' This study is framed using three key principles of Latour's 'new critique', namely, adding to reality rather than debunking it, getting closer to data rather than turning away from fact and creating arenas in which to assemble. As a result, conceptions of donor milk's safety are expanded. This case study of donor milk demonstrates how Latour's new critique can inform science and technology studies approaches to the study of safety in health care.

  20. Kangaroo mother care for clinically unstable neonates weighing ≤2000 g: Is it feasible at a hospital in Uganda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Melissa C; Nambuya, Harriet; Waiswa, Peter; Tann, Cally; Elbourne, Diana; Seeley, Janet; Allen, Elizabeth; Lawn, Joy E

    2018-06-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) for stable neonates ≤2000 g (g) is associated with decreased mortality, sepsis, hypothermia, and length of stay compared to conventional care. The World Health Organization states that KMC "should be initiated… as soon as newborns are clinically stable " [12]. However, the majority of deaths occur in unstable neonates. We aimed to determine the proportion of admitted neonates meeting proposed instability criteria, assess the feasibility of providing KMC to unstable neonates, and evaluate the acceptability of this intervention to parents and providers at Jinja Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda. This was a mixed-methods study. We recorded data including birthweight, chronological age, and treatments administered from medical charts, and calculated the percentage of clinically unstable neonates, defined as the need for ≥2 medical therapies in the first 48 hours of admission. We enrolled a sample of neonates meeting pre-defined instability criteria. Mothers were counselled to provide KMC as close to continuously as possible. We calculated the median duration of KMC per episode and per day. To explore acceptability, we conducted semi-structured interviews with parents and newborn unit care providers, and analysed data using the thematic content approach. We included 254 neonates in the audit, 10 neonates in the feasibility sub-study, and 20 participants in the acceptability sub-study. Instability criteria were easily implementable, identifying 89% of neonates as unstable in the audit. The median duration of individual KMC episodes ranged from 115 to 134 minutes. The median daily duration ranged from 4.5 to 9.7 hours. Seventy-five percent of interviewees felt KMC could be used in neonates concurrently receiving other medical therapies. Barriers included lack of resources (beds/space, monitoring devices), privacy issues, inadequate education, and difficulties motivating mothers to devote time to KMC. Recommendations included staff

  1. Admission clinicopathological data, length of stay, cost and mortality in an equine neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Saulez

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary internists need to prognosticate patients quickly and accurately in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This may depend on laboratory data collected on admission, the cost of hospitalisation, length of stay (LOS and mortality rate experienced in the NICU. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study of 62 equine neonates admitted to a NICU of a private equine referral hospital to determine the prognostic value of venous clinicopathological data collected on admission before therapy, the cost of hospitalisation, LOS and mortality rate. The WBC count, total CO2 (TCO2 and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were significantly higher (P < 0.05 and anion gap lower in survivors compared with nonsurvivors. A logistic regression model that included WBC count, hematocrit, albumin / globulin ratio, ALP, TCO2, potassium, sodium and lactate, was able to correctly predict mortality in 84 % of cases. Only anion gap proved to be an independent predictor of neonatal mortality in this study. In the study population, the overall mortality rate was 34 % with greatest mortality rates reported in the first 48 hours and again on day 6 of hospitalisation. Amongst the various clinical diagnoses, mortality was highest in foals after forced extraction during correction of dystocia. Median cost per day was higher for nonsurvivors while total cost was higher in survivors.

  2. Management of outbreaks of nosocomial pathogens in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ghirardi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of nosocomial pathogens are one of the most relevant problems in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. Many factors contribute to the onset of an epidemic, including virulence of the pathogen and vulnerability of the infants hospitalized in NICU. Outbreaks are often caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs. MDROs are defined as microorganisms, predominantly bacteria, that are resistant to one or more classes of antimicrobial agents. MDROs, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE and certain gram-negative bacilli (GNB, have important infection control implications. Once MDROs are introduced into a healthcare setting, transmission and persistence of the resistant strain is determined by the availability of vulnerable patients, selective pressure exerted by antimicrobial use, increased potential for transmission from larger numbers of infected or colonized patients (“colonization pressure”, and the impact of adherence to prevention efforts. Often, routine infection control measures are not enough to contain outbreaks, and additional control measures are needed, including implementation of hand hygiene, cohorting of infected/colonized infants, neonatal surveillance cultures, screening of healthcare workers and decolonization of neonates and/or healthcare workers in selected cases. In this review, we report the practices we developed in our NICU to contain an epidemic. These recommendations reflect the experience of the group, as well as the findings of the current literature.

  3. [Evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the level of noise in different areas of neonatal care in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Sanjuanero, Adriana; Quero-