WorldWideScience

Sample records for neonatal nursing including

  1. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  2. Developments in neonatal care and nursing responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Patricia; Fallon, Anne

    This article reviews the origins and evolution of neonatology and considers the role of the neonatal nurse within this specialty. Neonatal nurses are a vital part of the neonatal team that provides care for sick babies. The nursing care required by sick babies and their families on a neonatal unit can be variable and complex. The past century has seen significant changes in the role of the neonatal nurse. This has come about through dramatic technological developments on neonatal units, an increased understanding of neonatal physiology and pathology, changes in the education of neonatal nurses, and active and ongoing clinical research within the specialty. The resulting significant advances in neonatal care, including that provided by neonatal nurses, have made a crucial and steadfast contribution to marked improvements in neonatal outcomes.

  3. The History and State of Neonatal Nursing Quality Improvement Practice and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Aniko; Dowling, Donna A; Dolansky, Mary A

    2018-03-01

    Quality improvement has evolved rapidly in neonatal nursing. This review outlines the history and current state of quality improvement practice and education in neonatal nursing. The future of neonatal nursing includes a stronger emphasis on quality improvement in advanced practice education that promotes doctoral projects that result in clinical improvements. A collective focus will ensure that neonatal nurses not only deliver evidence-based care, but also continually improve the care they deliver.

  4. Ethical challenges in neonatal intensive care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandås, Maria; Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D

    2015-12-01

    Neonatal nurses report a great deal of ethical challenges in their everyday work. Seemingly trivial everyday choices nurses make are no more value-neutral than life-and-death choices. Everyday ethical challenges should also be recognized as ethical dilemmas in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to investigate which types of ethical challenges neonatal nurses experience in their day-to-day care for critically ill newborns. Data were collected through semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews. Phenomenological-hermeneutic analysis was applied to interpret the data. Six nurses from neonatal intensive care units at two Norwegian hospitals were interviewed on-site. The study is designed to comply with Ethical Guidelines for Nursing Research in the Nordic Countries and the Helsinki declaration. Findings suggest that nurses experience a diverse range of everyday ethical challenges related to challenging interactions with parents and colleagues, emotional strain, protecting the vulnerable infant, finding the balance between sensitivity and authority, ensuring continuity of treatment, and miscommunication and professional disagreement. A major finding in this study is how different agents involved in caring for the newborn experience their realities differently. When these realities collide, ethical challenges arise. Findings suggest that acting in the best interests of the child becomes more difficult in situations involving many agents with different perceptions of reality. The study presents new aspects which increases knowledge and understanding of the reality of nursing in a neonatal intensive care unit, while also demanding increased research in this field of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Job satisfaction of neonatal intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katie; Rubarth, Lori Baas; Miers, Linda J

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the job satisfaction of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses in the Midwestern United States. The factors explored in job satisfaction were monetary compensation (pay), job stress, caring for patients in stressful situations, level of autonomy, organizational support, level of knowledge of the specialty, work environment, staffing levels, communication with physicians, communication with neonatal nurse practitioners, interdisciplinary communication, team spirit, and the amount of required "floating" to other nursing units. Participants were 109 NICU nurses working as either staff nurses (n = 72) or advanced practice nurses (n = 37). Of the participants, 96% worked in a level 3 NICU. A descriptive, correlational design was used to study job satisfaction among NICU nurses. Nurses were recruited at 2 regional NICU conferences in 2009 and 2010. The questionnaire was a researcher-developed survey consisting of 14 questions in a Likert-type response rating 1 to 5, with an area for comments. Descriptive statistics and correlations were used to analyze the resulting data. The majority of participants were moderately satisfied overall in their current position and workplace (mean ranking = 4.07 out of 5.0). Kendall's Tau b (TB) revealed that the strongest positive correlations were between organizational support and team spirit with overall job satisfaction (TB = 0.53). : The individual factors with the highest mean scores were caring for patients in a stressful situation, level of autonomy, and communication between nurses and neonatal nurse practitioners. This indicates that our population of NICU nurses feels most satisfied caring for patients in stressful situations (m = 4.48), are satisfied with their level of autonomy (M = 4.17), and are satisfied with the interdisciplinary communication in their units (m = 4.13). Nurses in the NICU are relatively satisfied with their jobs. The small sample size (n = 109) of Midwest NICU

  6. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Layout and Nurses' Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doede, Megan; Trinkoff, Alison M; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) remain one of the few areas in hospitals that still use an open bay (OPBY) design for patient stays greater than 24 hr, housing multiple infants, staff, and families in one large room. This creates high noise levels, contributes to the spread of infection, and affords families little privacy. These problems have given rise to the single-family room NICU. This represents a significant change in the care environment for nurses. This literature review answers the question: When compared to OPBY layout, how does a single family room layout impact neonatal nurses' work? Thirteen studies published between 2006 and 2015 were located. Many studies reported both positive and negative effects on nurses' work and were therefore sorted by their cited advantages and disadvantages. Advantages included improved quality of the physical environment; improved quality of patient care; improved parent interaction; and improvements in nurse job satisfaction, stress, and burnout. Disadvantages included decreased interaction among the NICU patient care team, increased nurse workload, decreased visibility on the unit, and difficult interactions with family. This review suggests that single-family room NICUs introduce a complex situation in which trade-offs occur for nurses, most prominently the trade-off between visibility and privacy. Additionally, the literature is clear on what elements of nurses' work are impacted, but how the built environment influences these elements, and how these elements interact during nurses' work, is not as well understood. The current level of research and directions for future research are also discussed.

  7. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses Working in an Open Ward: Stress and Work Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Mélanie; Feeley, Nancy; Lavigne, Geneviève L; Genest, Christine; Robins, Stéphanie; Fréchette, Julie

    2016-01-01

    There is some research on the impact of open-ward unit design on the health of babies and the stress experienced by parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care units. However, few studies have explored the factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in open-ward neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to examine what factors are associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction among nurses practicing in an open-ward neonatal intensive care unit. A cross-sectional correlational design was used in this study. Participants were nurses employed in a 34-bed open-ward neonatal intensive care unit in a major university-affiliated hospital in Montréal, Quebec, Canada. A total of 94 nurses were eligible, and 86 completed questionnaires (91% response rate). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the participants' characteristics. To identify factors associated with nurse stress and work satisfaction, correlational analysis and multiple regression analyses were performed with the Nurse Stress Scale and the Global Work Satisfaction scores as the dependent variables. Different factors predict neonatal intensive care unit nurses' stress and job satisfaction, including support, family-centered care, performance obstacles, work schedule, education, and employment status. In order to provide neonatal intensive care units nurses with a supportive environment, managers can provide direct social support to nurses and influence the culture around teamwork.

  8. High-Fidelity Simulation for Neonatal Nursing Education: An Integrative Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    The lack of safe avenues to develop neonatal nursing competencies using human subjects leads to the notion that simulation education for neonatal nurses might be an ideal form of education. This integrative literature review compares traditional, teacher-centered education with high-fidelity simulation education for neonatal nurses. It examines the theoretical frameworks used in neonatal nursing education and outlines the advantages of this type of training, including improving communication and teamwork; providing an innovative pedagogical approach; and aiding in skill acquisition, confidence, and participant satisfaction. The importance of debriefing is also examined. High-fidelity simulation is not without disadvantages, including its significant cost, the time associated with training, the need for very complex technical equipment, and increased faculty resource requirements. Innovative uses of high-fidelity simulation in neonatal nursing education are suggested. High-fidelity simulation has great potential but requires additional research to fully prove its efficacy.

  9. The neonatal nurses' view of their role in emotional support of parents and its complexities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Melanie; Chur-Hansen, Anna; Winefield, Helen

    2014-11-01

    To explore the nurses' views of their role both in the neonatal intensive care unit and in the provision of interacting with, and emotionally supporting, families. The neonatal intensive care nurse has a large and complex clinical role and also a role of emotional supporter for parents in the neonatal intensive care unit. Identifying components of their role and recognising the elements within the nursery that obstruct or encourage this role can allow for modification of nurse education and peer support. Qualitative study based on semistructured interviews. Nine neonatal nurses from a single neonatal intensive care unit were interviewed and the data analysed thematically using NVIVO version 10. Participants viewed their role as an enjoyable yet difficult one, requiring seniority, training and experience. They provided support to parents by communicating, listening, providing individualised support and by encouraging parental involvement with their baby. Constructive elements that contributed to the provision of support included a positive neonatal intensive care unit environment and providing a parent support group. More obstructive elements were a lack of physical neonatal intensive care unit space, little time available for nurse-to-parent conversation and language and cultural barriers between nurses and parents. The role of the neonatal nurse in providing emotional support is complex and requires a high level of ongoing support and education for staff, and minimisation of physical and staff-related obstructions. The modern neonatal intensive care unit offers complex medical and nursing services and with this care comes higher needs from both babies and their parents. Neonatal intensive care unit nurses should be supported in their roles by having peer support available in the neonatal intensive care unit and education and training in emotional support and counselling skills. The nursing staff also require a comfortable and practical physical working space in

  10. Journey to Becoming a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner: Making the Decision to Enter Graduate School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M Colleen; Cesario, Sandra K; Symes, Lene; Montgomery, Diane

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) play an important role in caring for premature and ill infants. Currently, there is a shortage of NNPs to fill open positions. Understanding how nurses decide to become NNPs will help practicing nurse practitioners, managers, and faculty encourage and support nurses in considering the NNP role as a career choice. To describe how nurses decide to enter graduate school to become nurse practitioners. A qualitative study using semistructured interviews to explore how 11 neonatal intensive care unit nurses decided to enter graduate school to become NNPs. Key elements of specialization, discovery, career decision, and readiness were identified. Conditions leading to choosing the NNP role include working in a neonatal intensive care unit and deciding to stay in the neonatal area, discovering the NNP role, deciding to become an NNP, and readiness to enter graduate school. Important aspects of readiness are developing professional self-confidence and managing home, work, and financial obligations and selecting the NNP program. Neonatal nurse practitioners are both positive role models and mentors to nurses considering the role. Unit managers are obligated to provide nurses with opportunities to obtain leadership skills. Faculty of NNP programs must be aware of the impact NNP students and graduates have on choices of career and schools. Exploring the decision to become an NNP in more geographically diverse populations will enhance understanding how neonatal intensive care unit nurses decide to become NNPs.

  11. The need to nurse the nurse: emotional labor in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cricco-Lizza, Roberta

    2014-05-01

    In this 14-month ethnographic study, I examined the emotional labor and coping strategies of 114, level-4, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses. Emotional labor was an underrecognized component in the care of vulnerable infants and families. The nature of this labor was contextualized within complex personal, professional, and organizational layers of demand on the emotions of NICU nurses. Coping strategies included talking with the sisterhood of nurses, being a super nurse, using social talk and humor, taking breaks, offering flexible aid, withdrawing from emotional pain, transferring out of the NICU, attending memorial services, and reframing loss to find meaning in work. The organization had strong staffing, but emotional labor was not recognized, supported, or rewarded. The findings can contribute to the development of interventions to nurse the nurse, and to ultimately facilitate NICU nurses' nurturance of stressed families. These have implications for staff retention, job satisfaction, and delivery of care.

  12. Professional Burnout and Concurrent Health Complaints in Neonatal Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobogatova, Natalija; Žemaitienė, Nida; Šmigelskas, Kastytis; Tamelienė, Rasa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze nurses' professional burnout and health complaints and the relationship between the two components. The anonymous survey included 94 neonatal intensive care nurses from two centers of perinatology. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) was used to evaluate professional burnout; it consisted of 3 components, Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishments, with 22 items in total. Health complaints were evaluated by 21 items, where nurses were asked to report the occurrence of symptoms within the last year. Scale means were presented with standard deviations (SD). Inferential analysis was conducted with multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for age, residence, and work experience. The mean score of professional burnout on the Emotional Exhaustion subscale was 14.4 (SD=7.91), Depersonalization 3.8 (SD=4.75), and Personal Accomplishment 29.1 (SD=10.12). The health assessment revealed that sleeplessness, lack of rest, nervousness, and tiredness were the most common complaints. The regression analysis revealed that tiredness was independently associated with significantly increased odds of professional burnout (OR=4.1). In our study, more than half of the nurses in neonatal intensive care had moderate or high levels of emotional exhaustion, while levels of depersonalization were significantly lower. In contrast, the level of personal accomplishment was low in more than half of the nurses. The most common health complaints were sleep disturbances, nervousness, and tiredness. Tiredness was most strongly associated with professional burnout.

  13. Evaluating a nurse-led model for providing neonatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The paper presents an overview of a multi-dimensional, prospective, comparative 5-year audit of the quality of the neonatal care provided by a maternity unit in the UK delivering 2000 babies a year, where all neonatal care after 1995 was provided by advanced neonatal nurse practitioners, in relation to that provided by a range of other medically staffed comparator units. The audit includes 11 separate comparative studies supervised by a panel of independent external advisors. Data on intrapartum and neonatal mortality is reported. A review of resuscitation at birth, and a two-tier confidential inquiry into sentinel events in six units were carried out. The reliability of the routine predischarge neonatal examination was studied and, in particular, the recognition of congenital heart disease. A review of the quality of postdischarge letters was undertaken alongside an interview survey to elicit parental views on care provision. An audit of all hospital readmissions within 28 days of birth is reported. Other areas of study include management of staff stress, perceived adequacy of the training of nurse practitioners coming into post, and an assessment of unit costs. Intrapartum and neonatal death among women with a singleton pregnancy originally booked for delivery in Ashington fell 39% between 1991-1995 and 1996-2000 (5.12 vs. 3.11 deaths per 1000 births); the decline for the whole region was 27% (4.10 vs. 2.99). By all other indicators the quality of care in the nurse-managed unit was as good as, or better than, that in the medically staffed comparator units. An appropriately trained, stable team with a store of experience can deliver cot-side care of a higher quality than staff rostered to this task for a few months to gain experience, and this is probably more important than their medical or nursing background. Factors limiting the on-site availability of medical staff with paediatric expertise do not need to dictate the future disposition of maternity services.

  14. Walking the line between the possible and the ideal: lived experiences of neonatal nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Elisabeth O C; Kronborg, Hanne; Aagaard, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the lived experiences of neonatal nurses, that is, what it is like to be a neonatal nurse after developmental care is introduced in the unit.......To investigate the lived experiences of neonatal nurses, that is, what it is like to be a neonatal nurse after developmental care is introduced in the unit....

  15. The attitudes of neonatal nurses towards extremely preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Katie; Marlow, Neil; Edgley, Alison; Porock, Davina

    2012-08-01

    The paper is a report of a study of the attitudes of neonatal nurses towards extremely preterm infants. Alongside advancing survival at extremely preterm gestational ages, ethical debates concerning the provision of invasive care have proliferated in light of the high morbidity. Despite nurses being the healthcare professionals who work closest with the infant and their family, their potential influence is usually ignored when determining how parents come to decisions about future care for their extremely premature infant. A Q methodology was employed to explore the attitudes of neonatal nurses towards caring for extremely preterm infants. Data were collected between 2007 and 2008 and analysed using PQMethod and Card Content Analysis. Thirty-six nurses from six neonatal units in the United Kingdom participated. Although there was consensus around the professional role of the nurse, when faced with the complexities of neonatal nursing three distinguishing factors emerged: the importance of parental choice in decision-making, the belief that technology should be used to assess response to treatment, and the belief that healthcare professionals should undertake difficult decisions. Neonatal nurses report unexpected difficulties in upholding their professionally defined role through highly complex and ever varied decision-making processes. Recognition of individual attitudes to the care of extremely preterm infants and the role of the family in the face of difficult decisions should facilitate more open communication between the nurse and the parents and improve the experience of both the nurse and the family during these emotional situations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Research Priorities in Neonatal and Pediatric Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaíla Corrêa Castral

    2014-03-01

    • Implement the participation of Brazilian scientific societies in establishing health care policies, guidelines and protocols, creating consensus committees. Furthermore, it is important to highlight the ABEn recommendations presented during the 65th Brazilian Nursing Congress, which took place in October of 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, particularly regarding the development of strategies to meet the National Curriculum Guidelines for Nursing Undergraduate Courses, especially concerning the development, participation and application of research and other types of knowledge production that aim at improving the quality of professional practice. Therefore, this number of the Revista Eletrônica de Enfermagem has five original articles that are relevant for Pediatric and Neonatal Nursing. The studies address themes such as nursing diagnosis in children with respiratory infections, child immunization, childhood vulnerability, factors related to peripheral vascular trauma in children, and using case studies to teach diagnostic thinking. The findings are relevant for the implementation of more effective interventions, thus improving the quality of health care delivered to newborns, children and their family.     REFERENCE 1. Carvalho V. Linhas de pesquisa e prioridades de enfermagem: proposta com distinção gnoseológica para o agrupamento da produção científica de pós-graduação em enfermagem. Esc. Anna Nery. 2002;6(1:145-54. 2. Lansky S, França E. Mortalidade infantil neonatal no Brasil: situação, tendências e perspectivas. In: Rede Interagencial de Informações para Saúde. Demografia e Saúde: contribuição para análise de situação e tendências [Internet]. Brasília: OPAS; 2009 [acesso em: 20 mar 2014]. p. 83-112. Disponível em: http://www.ripsa.org.br/local/docsonline/6/7/276-livro_demografia_e_saude_WEB.pdf. 3. Ministério da Saúde. Plano Nacional de Saúde–PNS:2012-2015. Brasília (Brasil: Ministério da Saúde;  2011 [acesso em: 20 mar 2014

  17. Neonatal Resuscitation: Knowledge And Practice Of Nurses In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Appropriate resuscitation techniques are crucial to the survival of newborn infants. Objective. To assess knowledge of nurses in western Nigeria about neonatal resuscitation. Method. A cross-sectional survey of the nurses attached to secondary health facilities in western Nigeria was done using a ...

  18. Neonatal nurses' perceptions of pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collados-Gómez, L; Camacho-Vicente, V; González-Villalba, M; Sanz-Prades, G; Bellón-Vaquerizo, B

    To describe the perceptions of nurses in neonatal units on pain management, meet the educational profile and describe the use of pain assessment tools and non-pharmacological management for treatment. Cross-sectional descriptive multicentre study, developed during the months of February to September 2015, in the neonatology services of three hospitals at the Community of Madrid, Spain. Data collection was performed through an ad hoc questionnaire on paper or electronically using Survey Monkey platform. The sample consisted of 142 professionals, with a response rate of 55%: 47.9% (68) confirmed they had received specific training in pain management; 39.5% (56) stated that pain is regularly assessed in the unit; only 43.6% reported using validated scales, the most used being the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). As for the non-pharmacological management, swaddling and non-nutritive sucking it is the most used, followed by sucrose. Intravenous cannulation was identified as the most painful procedure. Pain management is in the process of improvement, because of training and because there is little pain assessment using validated scales. The improvement in the use of non-pharmacological management for the relief of pain in minor procedures is noteworthy. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Enfermería Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias (SEEIUC). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Palliative care in the neonatal unit: neonatal nursing staff perceptions of facilitators and barriers in a regional tertiary nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcullen, Meegan; Ireland, Susan

    2017-05-11

    Neonatology has made significant advances in the last 30 years. Despite the advances in treatments, not all neonates survive and a palliative care model is required within the neonatal context. Previous research has focused on the barriers of palliative care provision. A holistic approach to enhancing palliative care provision should include identifying both facilitators and barriers. A strengths-based approach would allow barriers to be addressed while also enhancing facilitators. The current study qualitatively explored perceptions of neonatal nurses about facilitators and barriers to delivery of palliative care and also the impact of the regional location of the unit. The study was conducted at the Townsville Hospital, which is the only regional tertiary neonatal unit in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of eight neonatal nurses. Thematic analysis of the data was conducted within a phenomenological framework. Six themes emerged regarding family support and staff factors that were perceived to support the provision of palliative care of a high quality. Staff factors included leadership, clinical knowledge, and morals, values, and beliefs. Family support factors included emotional support, communication, and practices within the unit. Five themes emerged from the data that were perceived to be barriers to providing quality palliative care. Staff perceived education, lack of privacy, isolation, staff characteristics and systemic (policy, and procedure) factors to impact upon palliative care provision. The regional location of the unit also presented unique facilitators and barriers to care. This study identified and explored facilitators and barriers in the delivery of quality palliative care for neonates in a regional tertiary setting. Themes identified suggested that a strengths-approach, which engages and amplifies facilitating factors while identified barriers are addressed or minimized, would be successful in

  20. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders...... and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. RESULTS: Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context...

  1. Neonatal Nurses Experience Unintended Consequences and Risks to Patient Safety With Electronic Health Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudding, Katherine M; Gephart, Sheila M; Carrington, Jane M

    2018-04-01

    In this article, we examine the unintended consequences of nurses' use of electronic health records. We define these as unforeseen events, change in workflow, or an unanticipated result of implementation and use of electronic health records. Unintended consequences experienced by nurses while using electronic health records have been well researched. However, few studies have focused on neonatal nurses, and it is unclear to what extent unintended consequences threaten patient safety. A new instrument called the Carrington-Gephart Unintended Consequences of Electronic Health Record Questionnaire has been validated, and secondary analysis using the tool explored the phenomena among neonatal nurses (N = 40). The purposes of this study were to describe unintended consequences of use of electronic health records for neonatal nurses and to explore relationships between the phenomena and characteristics of the nurse and the electronic health record. The most frequent unintended consequences of electronic health record use were due to interruptions, followed by a heavier workload due to the electronic health record, changes to the workflow, and altered communication patterns. Neonatal nurses used workarounds most often with motivation to better assist patients. Teamwork was moderately related to higher unintended consequences including patient safety risks (r = 0.427, P = .007), system design (r = 0.419, P = .009), and technology barriers (r = 0.431, P = .007). Communication about patients was reduced when patient safety risks were high (r = -0.437, P = .003). By determining the frequency with which neonatal nurses experience unintended consequences of electronic health record use, future research can be targeted to improve electronic health record design through customization, integration, and refinement to support patient safety and better outcomes.

  2. Capacity building of nurses providing neonatal care in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: methods for the POINTS of care project to enhance nursing education and reduce adverse neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlow Brian A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased survival of preterm infants in developing countries has often been accompanied by increased morbidity. A previous study found rates of severe retinopathy of prematurity varied widely between different neonatal units in Rio de Janeiro. Nurses have a key role in the care of high-risk infants but often do not have access to ongoing education programmes. We set out to design a quality improvement project that would provide nurses with the training and tools to decrease neonatal mortality and morbidity. The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and make the teaching package (POINTS of care--six modules addressing Pain control; optimal Oxygenation; Infection control; Nutrition interventions; Temperature control; Supportive care available to others. Methods/Design Six neonatal units, caring for 40% of preterm infants in Rio de Janeiro were invited to participate. In Phase 1 of the study multidisciplinary workshops were held in each neonatal unit to identify the neonatal morbidities of interest and to plan for data collection. In Phase 2 the teaching package was developed and tested. Phase 3 consisted of 12 months data collection utilizing a simple tick-sheet for recording. In Phase 4 (the Intervention all nurses were asked to complete all six modules of the POINTS of care package, which was supplemented by practical demonstrations. Phase 5 consisted of a further 12 months data collection. In Phase 1 it was agreed to include inborn infants with birthweight ≤ 1500 g or gestational age of ≤ 34 weeks. The primary outcome was death before discharge and secondary outcomes included retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Assuming 400-450 infants in both pre- and post-intervention periods the study had 80% power at p = Discussion The results of the POINTS of Care intervention will be presented in a separate publication. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN83110114

  3. Distance education in neonatal nursing scenarios: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Machado Freire

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identify resources that support learning mediated by technology in the field of neonatal nursing. METHOD Systematic review with searches conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO. Titles and abstracts were independently evaluated by two experts. RESULTS Of the 2,051 references, 203 full-text articles were analyzed, resulting in the inclusion of nine studies on semiotics and semiology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, general aspects of neonatal care, diagnostic reasoning and assessment of pain. Only two articles addressed the development of educational strategies and seven papers described the assessment of these strategies by experts and/or users. CONCLUSION Distance education is an important resource for education, and its improvement and updating, and it particularly adds advantages for neonatal nursing by approximating teaching and real-life situations and by minimizing the exposure of newborns for teaching purposes. The lack of educational initiatives mediated by technology suggests the need for the development, evaluation and dissemination of educational resources focused on nursing care of newborns and their families.

  4. [Distance education in neonatal nursing scenarios: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Laís Machado; Paula, Mariane Andreza de; Duarte, Elysangela Dittz; Bueno, Mariana

    2015-06-01

    Identify resources that support learning mediated by technology in the field of neonatal nursing. Systematic review with searches conducted in MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO. Titles and abstracts were independently evaluated by two experts. Of the 2,051 references, 203 full-text articles were analyzed, resulting in the inclusion of nine studies on semiotics and semiology, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, general aspects of neonatal care, diagnostic reasoning and assessment of pain. Only two articles addressed the development of educational strategies and seven papers described the assessment of these strategies by experts and/or users. Distance education is an important resource for education, and its improvement and updating, and it particularly adds advantages for neonatal nursing by approximating teaching and real-life situations and by minimizing the exposure of newborns for teaching purposes. The lack of educational initiatives mediated by technology suggests the need for the development, evaluation and dissemination of educational resources focused on nursing care of newborns and their families.

  5. Challenges in Neonatal Nursing Clinical Teaching to Nurse-Midwife Technicians in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuma-Ngaiyaye, Ellemes Everret; Adejumo, Oluyinka; Dartey, Anita Fafa

    2017-04-01

    Practice-based learning is important in clinical teaching of nursing and midwifery as students develop the necessary competencies and confidence aligned by the outcomes of their learning programs. However, in Malawi, research shows that clinical teaching in neonatal nursing has not been given adequate consideration. This article reports on challenges faced by educators and students in clinical teaching and learning in neonatal nursing for nurse-midwife technicians. An explorative qualitative study was conducted. Data were collected through 23 focus group discussions with 140 students and 31 clinical teachers from eight nursing colleges. Audiorecorded data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Hennink's content analysis stages. Challenges faced by clinical teachers and students were short duration and variation in clinical placements, lack of emphasis in clinical teaching, and lack of skills among clinical staff. Nursing training institutions should maximize student learning opportunities in neonatal nursing practice by creating more practice-based learning opportunities that meet the students' needs. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):215-221.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Nursing diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Ana Paula de Souza; Silva, Maria de Lourdes Costa da; Souza, Nilba Lima de; Mota, Gabriela Miranda; França, Débora Feitosa de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to elaborate the Nursing Diagnoses of newborns with sepsis in a neonatal intensive care unit and characterize the profile of the neonates and their mothers.METHOD: a cross-sectional and quantitative study, with a sample of 41 neonates. A physical examination and consultation of the hospital records were undertaken, using an instrument. The elaboration of the Nursing Diagnoses followed a process of diagnostic inference and was based on the North American Nursing Diagnosis Associati...

  7. Core Values in Nursing Care Based on the Experiences of Nurses Engaged in Neonatal Nursing: A Text-mining Approach for Analyzing Reflection Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiromi; Okuda, Reiko; Hagino, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Background Strong feelings about and enthusiasm for nursing care are reflected in nurses’ thoughts and behaviors in clinical practice and affect their profession. This study was conducted to identify the characteristics of core values in nursing care based on the experiences of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing through a process for recognizing the conceptualization of nursing. Methods We conceptualized nursing care in 43 nurses who were involved in neonatal nursing using a reflection sheet. We classified descriptions on a sheet based on the Three-Staged Recognition scheme and analyzed them using a text-mining approach. Results Nurses involved in neonatal nursing recognized that they must take care of the “child,” “mother,” and “family.” Important elements of nursing in nurses with less than 5 years versus 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience were classified into seven clusters, respectively. These elements were mainly related to family members in both groups. In nurses with less than 5 years of experience, four clusters of one-way communication by nurses were observed in the analysis of the key elements in nursing. On the other hand, five clusters of mutual relationships between patients, their family members, and nurses were observed in nurses with 5 or more years of experience. Conclusion In conclusion, the core value of nurses engaged in neonatal nursing is family-oriented nursing. Nurses with 5 or more years of neonatal nursing experience understand patients and their family members well through establishing relationships and providing comfort and safety while taking care of them. PMID:29599621

  8. Preventing postpartum smoking relapse: an opportunity for neonatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Sharron

    2009-08-01

    Smoking during pregnancy and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke have harmful and sometimes devastating effects on the health of the newborn. Although interventions for smoking cessation during pregnancy demonstrate effectiveness for increasing smoking abstinence, the majority of women relapse in the postpartum period. However, modifying contributing factors for relapse may improve the success of sustained abstinence. Many parents are eager to quit smoking and willing to participate in smoking cessation interventions. Through a population-based approach to healthcare, neonatal nurses are in an ideal position to prevent relapse and to promote smoking abstinence; they can coordinate and lead efforts for establishing smoking cessation strategies that integrate obstetric, newborn, and pediatric services.

  9. Walking the line between the possible and the ideal: lived experiences of neonatal nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Hall, Elisabeth; Ammentorp, Jette

    2010-01-01

    København, EAPS Conference Okt. 2010 Background: Nurses working in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) meet a handful of professional challenges and are nursing ever smaller and more vulnerable infants using technological devices and in addition they have to integrate parents in the care. Design......: A qualitative interview study with a hermeneutic-phenomenological approach. Aims: To investigate the lived experiences of neonatal nurses, that is, what it is like to be a neonatal nurse at the time when developmental care is introduced in the unit. Setting: An 18 bed level II-III neonatal unit at a tertiary...... university hospital in Denmark. Developmental care was recently introduced in the unit, and parents spent many hours a day with their baby and stayed overnight in guestrooms at the hospital. Method: Data were collected from seven neonatal nurses with varied experiences; they were analyzed and thematized...

  10. [Nursing interventions on the physical environment of Neonatal Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel Capó Rn, I

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to analyse nursing interventions regarding noise and lighting that influence neurodevelopment of the preterm infant in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. A review of the literature was performed using the databases: Cuiden Plus, PubMed, IBECS and Cochrane Library Plus. The inclusion and exclusion criteria were established in accordance with the objectives and limits used in each database. Of the 35 articles used, most were descriptive quantitative studies based on the measurement of sound pressure levels and lighting in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The countries included in this study are Brazil and the United States, and the variables analysed were the recording the times of light and noise. Based on the high levels of light and noise recorded in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units, nursing interventions that should be carried out to reduce them are described. The evidence indicates that after the implementation of these interventions, the high levels of both environmental stimuli are reduced significantly. Despite the extensive literature published on this problem, the levels of light and noise continue to exceed the recommended limits. Therefore, nurses need to increase and enhance their efforts in this environment, in order to positively influence neurodevelopment of premature newborn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  11. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  12. Dancing around families: neonatal nurses and their role in child protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltmarsh, Tina; Wilson, Denise

    2017-08-01

    To explore the processes neonatal intensive care nurses used in their child protection role with preterm infants. Neonatal nurses' screening for family violence is important in identifying at-risk preterm infants requiring protection upon discharge from neonatal intensive care settings. We know little about neonatal nurses and their role in child protection. A qualitative research design using Glaserian grounded theory. Ten in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with New Zealand neonatal intensive care nurses. Data were simultaneously analysed using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling to develop a substantive grounded theory. Dancing around families is the substantive grounded theory explaining how neonatal intensive care nurses respond to and manage an infant needing child protection. Knowing at-risk families is the process these nurses used, which draws on their personal and professional knowledge to identify an infant's child welfare requirements. A tension exists for neonatal nurses in shaping and framing the baby's safety and protection needs between their role of nurturing and protecting an at-risk infant and it belonging to the family. Child protection is a source of conflict for neonatal intensive care nurses. A lack of education, dodgy families and lack of confidence in child welfare services all compromise effective child protection. Their reality is tension between wanting the best possible outcomes for the baby, but having little or no control over what happens following its discharge. Neonatal intensive care nurses are ideally positioned to identify and respond to those preterm infants at risk of child maltreatment. They need education in child maltreatment, and protection focused on preterm infants, collegial support and clinical supervision. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Clinical Competence and Its Related Factors of Nurses in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jila Mirlashari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical competence of nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units together with advancements in medical science and technology increased the survival rate of newborns that need specialized care. To ensure the quality of care and provide the safety of patients, evaluating the clinical competence of nurses seems necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical competence of nurses in the neonatal intensive care units. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 117 nurses working in the neonatal intensive care units of the hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected by census method. The research tool was Development of Competency Inventory for Registered Nurses questionnaire which completed by self-assessment. The mean clinical competence scores of participants categorized into 3 levels: weak: 273. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 13 using the Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The highest levels of competence were related to critical thinking and research attitude and interpersonal relationships, and the lowest level was related to training and mentoring. There was a direct statistically significant relationship between marital status, employment status, level of interest in working in the neonatal intensive-care units and the clinical competence of nurses. Conclusion: Since the clinical competence of nurses in the Neonatal Intensive Care Units is vital, some variables such as interest in the nursing profession, employment status, the neonatal intensive theoretical and practical training courses and the amount of overtime working hours should be taken into consideration.

  14. Creating stories for learning about the neonatal care experience through the eyes of student nurses: An interpretive, narrative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia

    2017-01-01

    Storytelling is an increasingly well recognised and valued platform to learn about the human experience within healthcare. Little is known however about how stories can enhance understanding in neonatal care, a specialised field offering rich opportunities for learning. This study focuses on the creation of stories based on the experiences of student nurses to inform teaching and learning strategies in the neonatal field. The study aimed to create stories from the narratives of student nurses working within the neonatal field and identify what key themes for learning emerged in order to develop a storytelling resource to share experiences with their peers. An interpretive, constructivist approach was used to collect, analyse and create stories from student nurse's experiences, in line with narrative inquiry. Six pre-registration children's nursing students were selected by purposive sampling. Interviews were undertaken within six weeks following placement completion in an agreed location. Narratives were obtained by semi-structured interviews. Narrative analysis and core story creation was undertaken to construct stories and key learning themes emerged which provided the pedagogical basis for subsequent digital resource development. Key themes emerged relating to the insight and observances of student nurses and the neonatal journey they had experienced, including the nature of neonatal care, experiences of the neonate and parents, the environment and their own learning transition. Preliminary peer evaluation of the storytelling resource revealed storytelling as an interesting and novel approach to teaching & learning, learning from ones' peers, preparation for practice and a valuable insight into a new specialist area. The study has value to teaching and learning by enabling an appreciation of how narrative can be used to portray the experiences of learners. Findings also support an approach to analysing narrative to create stories for learning and inform

  15. Walking the line between the possible and the ideal: lived experiences of neonatal nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Hall, Elisabeth; Ammentorp, Jette

    2011-01-01

    . London, St. George Hospital Juni 2011 Objective: To investigate the lived experiences of neonatal nurses, that is, what it is like to be a neonatal nurse after developmental care is introduced in the unit. Methods: The study was designed as a qualitative interview study with a hermeneuticphenom....... London, St. George Hospital Juni 2011 Objective: To investigate the lived experiences of neonatal nurses, that is, what it is like to be a neonatal nurse after developmental care is introduced in the unit. Methods: The study was designed as a qualitative interview study...... with a hermeneuticphenomenological approach. Participants were seven neonatal nurses working in an 18-bed level 2 and 3 neonatal unit at a tertiary university hospital in Denmark. Developmental care was recently introduced in the unit, parents spend many hours a day with their baby and stay overnight in guestrooms at the hospital....... Results: The essential theme of the phenomenon being a neonatal nurse is found to be ‘walking the line between the possible and the ideal’. Five themes illuminate this essence. They are: ‘being attentive to the infant and the mother—infant dyad’, ‘the body tells’, ‘time is everything’, ‘working in a quiet...

  16. Neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum challenges based on context, input, process, and product evaluation model: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Ashghali-Farahani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Weakness of curriculum development in nursing education results in lack of professional skills in graduates. This study was done on master's students in nursing to evaluate challenges of neonatal intensive care nursing curriculum based on context, input, process, and product (CIPP evaluation model. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with qualitative approach, which was completed according to the CIPP evaluation model. The study was conducted from May 2014 to April 2015. The research community included neonatal intensive care nursing master's students, the graduates, faculty members, neonatologists, nurses working in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, and mothers of infants who were hospitalized in such wards. Purposeful sampling was applied. Results: The data analysis showed that there were two main categories: “inappropriate infrastructure” and “unknown duties,” which influenced the context formation of NICU master's curriculum. The input was formed by five categories, including “biomedical approach,” “incomprehensive curriculum,” “lack of professional NICU nursing mentors,” “inappropriate admission process of NICU students,” and “lack of NICU skill labs.” Three categories were extracted in the process, including “more emphasize on theoretical education,” “the overlap of credits with each other and the inconsistency among the mentors,” and “ineffective assessment.” Finally, five categories were extracted in the product, including “preferring routine work instead of professional job,” “tendency to leave the job,” “clinical incompetency of graduates,” “the conflict between graduates and nursing staff expectations,” and “dissatisfaction of graduates.” Conclusions: Some changes are needed in NICU master's curriculum by considering the nursing experts' comments and evaluating the consequences of such program by them.

  17. Transition from neonatal intensive care unit to special care nurseries: Experiences of parents and nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. A.L. van Staa; O.K. Helder; J.C.M. Verweij

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' and nurses' experiences with the transition of infants from the neonatal intensive care unit to a special care nursery. Qualitative explorative study in two phases. Level IIID neonatal intensive care unit in a university hospital and special care nurseries (level II) in five

  18. The perception of partnership between parents of premature infants and nurses in neonatal intensive care units

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Larsen, Palle; Weis, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify how parents of premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and nurses perceive their partnership.The review questions are: how do parents of premature infants and nurses perceive their partnership during...

  19. Nurses' work environments, care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care on neonatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochefort, Christian M; Clarke, Sean P

    2010-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study of the relationship between work environment characteristics and neonatal intensive care unit nurses' perceptions of care rationing, job outcomes, and quality of care. International evidence suggests that attention to work environments might improve nurse recruitment and retention, and the quality of care. However, comparatively little attention has been given to neonatal care, a specialty where patient and nurse outcomes are potentially quite sensitive to problems with staffing and work environments. Over a 6-month period in 2007-2008, a questionnaire containing measures of work environment characteristics, nursing care rationing, job satisfaction, burnout and quality of care was distributed to 553 nurses in all neonatal intensive care units in the province of Quebec (Canada). A total of 339 nurses (61.3%) completed questionnaires. Overall, 18.6% were dissatisfied with their job, 35.7% showed high emotional exhaustion, and 19.2% rated the quality of care on their unit as fair or poor. Care activities most frequently rationed because of insufficient time were discharge planning, parental support and teaching, and comfort care. In multivariate analyses, higher work environment ratings were related to lower likelihood of reporting rationing and burnout, and better ratings of quality of care and job satisfaction. Additional research on the determinants of nurse outcomes, the quality of patient care, and the impact of rationing of nursing care on patient outcomes in neonatal intensive care units is required. The Neonatal Extent of Work Rationing Instrument appears to be a useful tool for monitoring the extent of rationing of nursing care in neonatal units. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Coach training can improve the self-efficacy of neonatal nurses. A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we have investigated the impact of coach training offered to neonatal nurses on their assessment of their ability to meet the needs of the mothers and fathers. METHODS: The effect of a 3-day coaching training offered to neonatal nurses was investigated...... significant. CONCLUSION: Coaching can improve nurses' self-efficacy in relation to meet the needs of the mothers and fathers. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Coaching could be a method that can maximize the personal and professional potential of the staff, and prepare them for the mindful being-in-relation approach...

  1. Racial differences in parental satisfaction with neonatal intensive care unit nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A E; D'Agostino, J A; Passarella, M; Lorch, S A

    2016-11-01

    Nurses provide parental support and education in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), but it is unknown if satisfaction and expectations about nursing care differ between racial groups. A prospective cohort was constructed of families with a premature infant presenting to primary care between 1 January 2010 and 1 January 2013 (N=249, 52% white, 42% black). Responses to questions about satisfaction with the NICU were analyzed in ATLAS.ti using the standard qualitative methodology. One hundred and twenty (48%) parents commented on nursing. Fifty-seven percent of the comments were positive, with black parents more negative (58%) compared with white parents (33%). Black parents were most dissatisfied with how nurses supported them, wanting compassionate and respectful communication. White parents were most dissatisfied with inconsistent nursing care and lack of education about their child. Racial differences were found in satisfaction and expectations with neonatal nursing care. Accounting for these differences will improve parental engagement during the NICU stay.

  2. Improved nurse-parent communication in neonatal intensive care unit: evaluation and adjustment of an implementation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate and adjust systematic implementation of guided family-centred care in a neonatal intensive care unit. Family-centred care is valued in neonatal intensive care units internationally, but innovative strategies are needed to realise the principles. Guided family-centred care was developed to facilitate person-centred communication by bridging the gap between theory and practice in family-centred care. Main mechanisms of guided family-centred care are structured dialogue, reflection and person-centred communication. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to monitor participatory implementation of a systematic approach to training and certification of nurses delivering guided family-centred care. Systematic implementation of guided family-centred care included workshops, supervised delivery and certification. Evaluation and adjustment of nurse adherence to guided family-centred care was conducted by monitoring (1) knowledge, (2) delivery, (3) practice uptake and (4) certification. Implementation was improved by the development of a strategic framework and by adjusting the framework according to the real-life context of a busy neonatal care unit. Promoting practice uptake was initially underestimated, but nurse guided family-centred care training was improved by increasing the visibility of the study in the unit, demonstrating intervention progress to the nurses and assuring a sense of ownership among nurse leaders and nonguided-family-centred-care-trained nurses. An adjusted framework for guided family-centred care implementation was successful in overcoming barriers and promoting facilitators. Insights gained from our pioneering work might help nurses in a similar context to reach their goals of improving family-centred care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A gap between need and reality: neonatal nursing staff requirements on a German intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Patry

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new staffing rules for neonatal nurses in intensive care units (ICU were issued in Germany, using categories of care of the British Association of Perinatal Medicine as blueprint. Neonates on intensive care require a nurse-to-patient ratio of 1:1, on intensive surveillance (high dependency care of 1:2. No requirements exist for special care, transitional care, and pediatric ICU patients. Using these rules, nursing staff requirement was calculated over a period of 31 consecutive days once a day in a combined pediatric and neonatal ICU of a metropolitan academic medical center in south-west Germany. Each day, 18.9±0.98 patients (mean±standard deviation were assessed (14.26±1.21 neonatal, 4.65±0.98 pediatric. Among neonates, 9.94±2.56 received intensive therapy, 3.77±1.85 intensive surveillance, and 0.65±0.71 special care. Average nursing staff requirement was 12.10±1.81 full time equivalents (FTE per shift. Considering additional pediatric patients in the ICU and actual nursing staff availability (8.97±0.87 FTE per shift, this ICU seems understaffed.

  4. Nurses' and Parents' Perceptions of Parental Guidance on Using Nonpharmacological Pain-Relieving Methods Among Neonates in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölkki, Tarja; Laukkala, Helena; Korhonen, Anne

    2016-08-01

    Despite growing knowledge of parents' important role in their infants' pain management, the extent to which nurses in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) provide guidance to parents on nonpharmacological methods is unclear. This study aimed to describe and compare the perceptions of parental guidance in using nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods among neonates in NICUs from the viewpoints of nurses and parents, and to examine the participants' demographics related to the guidance. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study using questionnaire surveys was conducted. Eight NICUs of 5 university hospitals in Finland. A total of 427 participants, including 294 nurses and 178 parents. The participants indicated that the methods of touching and holding were the most commonly introduced strategies in infants' pain alleviation, as they were given as an alternative "nearly always/always" (nurses 91%, 87% and parents 61%, 58%, respectively). In contrast, music and breast-feeding were the less commonly introduced nonpharmacological methods (nurses 11%, 6% and parents 1%, 6%, respectively). A significant difference (p methods compared with parents. In addition, many demographic factors of the nurses, the parents, and their infants were related to the parental guidance. Our findings indicate that parental guidance should not be based on nurses' evaluations of their activities without taking into account parents' perspectives. When counseling parents to use nonpharmacological methods, neonatal nurses should actively interact with families and discuss parents' individual needs. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Automatic generation of natural language nursing shift summaries in neonatal intensive care: BT-Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, James; Freer, Yvonne; Gatt, Albert; Reiter, Ehud; Sripada, Somayajulu; Sykes, Cindy

    2012-11-01

    Our objective was to determine whether and how a computer system could automatically generate helpful natural language nursing shift summaries solely from an electronic patient record system, in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A system was developed which automatically generates partial NICU shift summaries (for the respiratory and cardiovascular systems), using data-to-text technology. It was evaluated for 2 months in the NICU at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, under supervision. In an on-ward evaluation, a substantial majority of the summaries was found by outgoing and incoming nurses to be understandable (90%), and a majority was found to be accurate (70%), and helpful (59%). The evaluation also served to identify some outstanding issues, especially with regard to extra content the nurses wanted to see in the computer-generated summaries. It is technically possible automatically to generate limited natural language NICU shift summaries from an electronic patient record. However, it proved difficult to handle electronic data that was intended primarily for display to the medical staff, and considerable engineering effort would be required to create a deployable system from our proof-of-concept software. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Nursing & parental perceptions of neonatal care in Central Vietnam: a longitudinal qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Katie; Partridge, Colin; Tran, Hoang T; Lubran, Suzanna; Macrae, Duncan

    2017-07-11

    Neonatal mortality accounts for nearly three quarters of all infant deaths in Vietnam. The nursing team are the largest professional group working with newborns, however do not routinely receive neonatal training and there is a lack of research into the impact of educational provision. This study explored changes in nursing perceptions towards their role following a neonatal educational intervention. Parents perceptions of nursing care were explored to determine any changes as nurses gained more experience. Semi-Structured qualitative interviews were conducted every 6 months over an 18 month period with 16 nurses. At each time point, parents whose infant was resident on the neonatal unit were invited to participate in an interview to explore their experiences of nursing care. A total of 67 parents participated over 18 months. Interviews were conducted and transcribed in Vietnamese before translation into English for manifest content analysis facilitated by NVivo V14. Analysis of nursing transcripts identified 14 basic categories which could be grouped (23) into 3 themes: (1) perceptions of the role of the neonatal nurse, (2) perception of the parental role and (3) professional recollections. Analysis of parent transcripts identified 14 basic categories which could be grouped into 3 themes: (1) information sharing, (2) participation in care, and (3) personal experience. Qualitative interviews highlighted the short term effect that the introduction of an educational intervention can have on both nursing attitudes towards and parental experience of care in one neonatal unit in central Vietnam. Nurses shared a growing awareness of their role along with its ethical issues and challenges, whilst parents discussed their overall desire for more participation in their infants care. Further research is required to determine the long term impact of the intervention, the ability of nurses to translate knowledge into clinical practice through assessment of nursing knowledge

  7. Knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among nursing staff of pediatric department: an Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Archana S; Dongara, Ashish R; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2014-03-01

    Neonates receiving care in intensive care units are highly likely to experience pain due to investigations and/or treatments carried out by the health care providers. Neonates are a vulnerable population because they are unable to vocalize their pain. Unaddressed and mismanaged pain can not only affect the child's comfort, but also may alter the development and cognitive abilities of the child in a later part of his/her life. Therefore it is entirely the caregiver's responsibility to accurately assess and manage neonatal pain. We assessed and compared the knowledge and attitudes regarding neonatal pain among the nurses posted in the various units of a pediatric department [pediatric ward, pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)]. An appropriately modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain questionnaire was consensually validated, pretested, and then administered to the nursing staff of the pediatric department at a department at a hospital in Gujarat. Data were entered in Epi-Info and analyzed with the use of SPSS 14.0. The questionnaire was administered to 41 nurses working in the Department of Pediatrics, and the response rate was 97.5%. Mean age of the nurses in the study sample was 25.75 years (SD 5.513). The mean total score of the participants was 8.75 out of 17 (SD 2.549), which was unsatisfactory. The mean correct answer rate was 49.67% among the staff of NICU and 48.67% among the pediatric ward and PICU staff. The attitudes among the nurses were assessed. It was concluded that the nurses lack knowledge and that their attitudes also were hindering pain management. One of the barriers identified by the nurses was that physicians do not prescribe analgesics for managing neonatal pain. So not only the nursing staff, but all of the caregivers involved in neonatal care may be lacking in knowledge and hold perceptions and attitudes that hamper neonatal pain management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain

  8. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: an e-Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielenga, Joke M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Latour, Jos M; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and research statements were generated to be ranged on importance on a scale of 1-6 (not important to most important). Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in 17 European countries. NICU clinical nurses, managers, educators and researchers (n=75). None. A list of 43 research statements in eight domains. The six highest ranking statements (≥5.0 mean score) were related to prevention and reduction of pain (mean 5.49; SD 1.07), medication errors (mean 5.20; SD 1.13), end-of-life care (mean 5.05; SD 1.18), needs of parents and family (mean 5.04; SD 1.23), implementing evidence into nursing practice (mean 5.02; SD 1.03), and pain assessment (mean 5.02; SD 1.11). The research domains were prioritised and ranked: (1) pain and stress; (2) family centred care; (3) clinical nursing care practices; (4) quality and safety; (5) ethics; (6) respiratory and ventilation; (7) infection and inflammation; and (8) professional issues in neonatal intensive care nursing. The results of this study might support developing a nursing research strategy for the nursing section of the European Society of Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care. In addition, this may promote more European researcher collaboratives for neonatal nursing research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. The role of the neonatal nurse practitioner in the community hospital level I nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) have played a significant role in providing medical coverage to many of the country's Level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Extensive education and experience are required for a nurse practitioner (NP) to become competent in caring for these critically ill newborns. The NNP can take this competence and experience and expand her role out into the community Level I nurseries. Clinical care of the infants and close communication with parents, pediatricians, and the area tertiary center provide a community service with the goal of keeping parents and babies together in the community hospital without compromising the health of the baby. The NNP service, with 24-hour nursery and delivery coverage, supports an ongoing obstetric service to the community hospital. The NNP's experience enables her to provide a neonatal service that encompasses a multitude of advanced practice nursing roles.

  10. Development of a digital storytelling resource to support children's nursing students in neonatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia; Treves, Richard

    2017-03-06

    A digital storytelling resource focusing on the experience of nursing in neonatal care was developed using the narratives of six undergraduate children's nursing students who had undergone a practice placement on a neonatal unit. An evaluation of the resource in relation to its contribution to learning for students in a new, specialised area of practice revealed that storytelling based on peers' experiences is a valuable and insightful approach to learning. This is particularly important in a specialty such as neonatal care where the unfamiliarity of the environment and patient group can cause anxiety and uncertainty among students. Overall, the resource was seen to be useful to children's nursing students who are preparing for a practice placement in an unfamiliar clinical area.

  11. Factors influencing a nurse's decision to question medication administration in a neonatal clinical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydon, Laurene; Hauck, Yvonne; Zimmer, Margo; Murdoch, Jamee

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors that influence nurse's decisions to question concerning aspects of medication administration within the context of a neonatal clinical care unit. Medication error in the neonatal setting can be high with this particularly vulnerable population. As the care giver responsible for medication administration, nurses are deemed accountable for most errors. However, they are recognised as the forefront of prevention. Minimal evidence is available around reasoning, decision making and questioning around medication administration. Therefore, this study focuses upon addressing the gap in knowledge around what nurses believe influences their decision to question. A critical incident design was employed where nurses were asked to describe clinical incidents around their decision to question a medication issue. Nurses were recruited from a neonatal clinical care unit and participated in an individual digitally recorded interview. One hundred and three nurses participated between December 2013-August 2014. Use of the constant comparative method revealed commonalities within transcripts. Thirty-six categories were grouped into three major themes: 'Working environment', 'Doing the right thing' and 'Knowledge about medications'. Findings highlight factors that influence nurses' decision to question issues around medication administration. Nurses feel it is their responsibility to do the right thing and speak up for their vulnerable patients to enhance patient safety. Negative dimensions within the themes will inform planning of educational strategies to improve patient safety, whereas positive dimensions must be reinforced within the multidisciplinary team. The working environment must support nurses to question and ultimately provide safe patient care. Clear and up to date policies, formal and informal education, role modelling by senior nurses, effective use of communication skills and a team approach can facilitate nurses to

  12. Informing Leadership Models: Nursing and Organizational Characteristics of Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Freestanding Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toole, Cheryl A; DeGrazia, Michele; Connor, Jean Anne; Gauvreau, Kimberlee; Kuzdeba, Hillary Bishop; Hickey, Patricia A

    Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) located in freestanding children's hospitals may exhibit significant variation in nursing and organizational characteristics, which can serve as opportunities for collaboration to understand optimal staffing models and linkages to patient outcomes. Adopting methods used by Hickey et al in pediatric cardiovascular critical care, the purpose of this study was to provide a foundational description of the nursing and organizational characteristics for NICUs located in freestanding children's hospitals in the United States. Clinical nurse leaders in NICUs located in freestanding children's hospitals were invited to participate in an electronic cross-sectional survey. Descriptive analyses were used to summarize nursing and organizational characteristics. The response rate was 30% (13/43), with 69.2% of NICUs classified as level III/IV and 30.8% classified as level II/III. Licensed bed capacity varied significantly (range, 24-167), as did the proportion of full-time equivalent nurses (range, 71.78-252.3). Approximately three-quarters of staff nurses held baccalaureate degrees or higher. A quarter of nurses had 16 or more years (26.3%) of experience, and 36.9% of nurses had 11 or more years of nursing experience. Nearly one-third (29.2%) had 5 or less years of total nursing experience. Few nurses (10.6%) held neonatal specialty certification. All units had nurse educators, national and unit-based quality metrics, and procedural checklists. This study identified (1) variation in staffing models signaling an opportunity for collaboration, (2) the need to establish ongoing processes for sites to participate in future collaborative efforts, and (3) survey modifications necessary to ensure a more comprehensive understanding of nursing and organizational characteristics in freestanding children's hospital NICUs.

  13. Quality versus quantity: The complexities of quality of life determinations for neonatal nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2017-11-01

    The ability to save the life of an extremely premature baby has increased substantially over the last decade. This survival, however, can be associated with unfavourable outcomes for both baby and family. Questions are now being asked about quality of life for survivors of extreme prematurity. Quality of life is rightly deemed to be an important consideration in high technology neonatal care; yet, it is notoriously difficult to determine or predict. How does one define and operationalise what is considered to be in the best interest of a surviving extremely premature baby, especially when the full extent of the outcomes might not be known for several years? The research investigates the caregiving dilemmas often faced by neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies. This article explores the issues arising for neonatal nurses when they considered the philosophical and ethical questions about quality of life in babies ≤24 weeks gestation. Data were collected via a questionnaire to Australian neonatal nurses and semi-structured interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. Ethical considerations: Ethical processes and procedures have been adhered to by the researchers. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'difficult choices' was generated which comprised three sub-themes: 'damaged through survival', 'the importance of the brain' and 'families are important'. The results show that neonatal nurses believed that quality of life was an important consideration; yet they experienced significant inner conflict and uncertainty when asked to define or suggest specific elements of quality of life, or to suggest how it might be determined. It was even more difficult for the nurses to say when an extremely premature baby's life possessed quality. Their previous clinical and personal experiences led the nurses to believe that the quality of the family's life was important, and possibly more so than the quality of life

  14. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: An e-delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Wielenga (Joke); L.N. Tume (Lyvonne); J.M. Latour (Jos); A. van den Hoogen (Agnes)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique.Design An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis

  15. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities : an e-Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M; Tume, Lyvonne N; Latour, Jos M; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. DESIGN: An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and

  16. European neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities: an e-Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M.; Tume, Lyvonne N.; Latour, Jos M.; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and prioritise neonatal intensive care nursing research topics across Europe using an e-Delphi technique. An e-Delphi technique with three questionnaire rounds was performed. Qualitative responses of round one were analysed by content analysis and research statements

  17. Walking the line between the possible and the ideal: Lived experiences of neonatal nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Hall, Elisabeth; Ammentorp, Jette

    2012-01-01

    with a hermeneuticphenomenological approach. Participants were seven neonatal nurses working in an 18-bed level 2 and 3 neonatal unit at a tertiary university hospital in Denmark. Developmental care was recently introduced in the unit, parents spend many hours a day with their baby and stay overnight in guestrooms at the hospital....... Results: The essential theme of the phenomenon being a neonatal nurse is found to be ‘walking the line between the possible and the ideal’. Five themes illuminate this essence. They are: ‘being attentive to the infant and the mother—infant dyad’, ‘the body tells’, ‘time is everything’, ‘working in a quiet...

  18. [Evaluation of digital educational student-technology interaction in neonatal nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Fernanda Salim Ferreira de; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti

    2015-02-01

    To assess the digital educational technology interface Caring for the sensory environment in the neonatal unit: noise, lighting and handling based on ergonomic criteria. Descriptive study, in which we used the guidelines and ergonomic criteria established by ISO 9241-11 and an online Likert scale instrument to identify problems and interface qualities. The instrument was built based on Ergolist, which follows the criteria of ISO 9141-11. There were 58 undergraduate study participants from the School of Nursing of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, who attended the classes about neonatal nursing content. All items were positively evaluated by more than 70% of the sample. Educational technology is appropriate according to the ergonomic criteria and can be made available for teaching nursing students.

  19. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SYSTEMATIZATION OF NURSING ICU - NEONATAL HOSPITAL REGIONAL DE CÁCERES-MT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliene de Souza Porto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the implementation of the Nursing Care System (NCS in the ICU - Neonatal Hospital Regional de Cáceres Dr. Anthony Fontes - HRCAF. This is an exploratory qualitative approach with descriptive profile of the case study. Data were collected through interviews with five nurses from ICU - Neonatal, using as research instrument, a questionnaire containing open and closed questions and analyzing a chart. The results showed that nurses know and realize the importance of NCS as a methodological tool that guides the practice of care and as professional recognition, although not held by all. The analysis of the records showed that there Systematization of Nursing Care at this clinic. Of the 707 days analyzed records there were only 30 (4.25% Nursing Research, none (0.0% record Diagnosis and Planning, 57 (8.26% days with record Deployment, Assessment and 23 record (3.24% in which its registered nursing care, assistance totaling 15.55% recorded in medical records. With the completion of this study, it was noted that the SAE often becomes impossible in practice of nursing because of various difficulties such as lack of time, lack of human resources, work overload, and the generic form organizational structure.

  20. Nursing care of the newborn in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysa Costa da Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the main measures of care for the newborn in the neonatal intensive care unit. Method: This is an integrative review, in which, it is possible to identify, analyze and synthesize research results with the inclusion of experimental and non-experimental studies. A total of 133 articles were collected. After reading titles, exclusion criteria and reading resumes, 10 were left, in which the sample was composed. Results: The selected publications were placed in 3 thematic categories: The importance of knowledge in nursing care, to the internal NB in ​​NICU; Nursing evaluation and care used for pain relief in NB; Main factors and adverse events that may lead to the hospitalization of the newborn and the increase of morbidity and mortality in an NICU. Conclusion: The analysis of the aforementioned study exposes the importance and main nursing care that can be administered in newborns in a NICU, so that the reduction of neonatal mortality can be provided. Descriptors: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit; Nursing care; Newborn.

  1. A burden of knowledge: A qualitative study of experiences of neonatal intensive care nurses' concerns when keeping information from parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-12-01

    Improved life-sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care has resulted in an increased probability of survival for extremely premature babies. In the neonatal intensive care, the condition of a baby can deteriorate rapidly. Nurses and parents are together for long periods at the bedside and so form close and trusting relationships. Neonatal nurses as the constant caregivers may be presented with contradictory demands in attempting to meet the baby's needs and being a patient and family advocate. This article aims to explore the issues arising for neonatal nurses when holding information about changes to a condition of a baby that they are unable to share with parents. Data were collected via interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'keeping secrets' was identified and comprised of three sub-themes 'coping with potentially catastrophic news', 'fear of inadvertent disclosure' and 'a burden that could damage trust'. Keeping secrets and withholding information creates internal conflict in the nurses as they balance the principle of confidentiality with the parent's right to know information. The neonatal nurses experienced guilt and shame when they were felt forced by circumstances to keep secrets or withhold information from the parents of extremely premature babies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. The NNP/DNP shortage: transforming neonatal nurse practitioners into DNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, Jana L; Kenner, Carole A

    2009-01-01

    Neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) represent a high-demand specialty practice that is especially targeted for US secondary and tertiary care neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). NNPs make primary decisions about the caregiving of high-risk newborns at the time of admission, throughout hospitalization, at transfer, and at discharge that require an advanced knowledge base in neonatology as well as NICU clinical experience. NNPs prepared at the master's level are currently in very short supply, with some estimates suggesting that for each NNP who graduates, there are 80 positions open across the country. Even with the present shortage, due to the high cost of NNP education, NNP programs are diminishing and those that are remaining are not graduating a sufficient number of new NNPs each year to keep up with the demand. To add to the basic shortage problem, in 2004 the American Association of Colleges of Nursing decided that by 2015, the terminal degree for all nurse practitioners should move from the master's degree to the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree. That decision added a minimum of 12 months of full-time education to the advanced education requirements for nurse practitioners. What impact will the decision to require a DNP degree have on NNP specialty practice? Will even more NNP programs close because of faculty shortages of NNPs prepared at the DNP level? If a worse shortage occurs in the number of NNPs prepared to practice in NICUs, will physician assistants or other nonphysician clinicians who meet the need for advanced neonatal care providers replace NNPs? What steps, if any, can nursing take to ensure that NNP specialty practice is still needed and survives after supplementing the DNP requirement to NNP education?

  3. Post-oral and perioral stimulations during nursing enhance appetitive olfactory memory in neonatal rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, J; Ferreira, G; Mirabito, L; Lévy, F; Nowak, R

    2009-06-01

    Nursing-suckling interactions facilitate olfactory learning in newborns as long as suckling and the olfactory stimulus temporally overlap. We tested the hypothesis that olfactory preferences would develop even with a long delay between odor presentation and nursing. Thyme was presented to 2-day-old rabbit pups by placing an odorized plate 2 cm above their nest box. Duration and time of nursing were controlled and occurred before, during, or after odor presentation. Controls were not nursed. When exposed to the odor for 15 min, control pups preferred thyme to a novel odor in a 2-choice test immediately after exposure but not 3 and 22 h later. When pups were nursed immediately before thyme exposure or during exposure, they preferred the familiar odorant until 22 h later. Identically, when nursing occurred 30 min before odor exposure, a preference for thyme was maintained up to 22 h. This was not observed when nursing occurred 60 min before odor presentation. We concluded that enhancement of olfactory memory occurs in neonates during nursing but also after post-oral stimulation by postprandial internal state.

  4. Ethical challenges in the neonatal intensive care units: perceptions of physicians and nurses; an Iranian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Maliheh; Mosayebi, Ziba; Asghari, Fariba; Zarrini, Pari

    2015-01-01

    The challenging nature of neonatal medicine today is intensified by modern advances in intensive care and treatment of sicker neonates. These developments have caused numerous ethical issues and conflicts in ethical decision-making. The present study surveyed the challenges and dilemmas from the viewpoint of the neonatal intensive care personnel in the teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in the capital of Iran. In this comparative cross-sectional study conducted between March 2013 and February 2014, the physicians' and nurses' perceptions of the ethical issues in neonatal intensive care units were compared. The physicians and nurses of the study hospitals were requested to complete a 36-item questionnaire after initial accommodations. The study samples consisted of 284 physicians (36%) and nurses (64%). Content validity and internal consistency calculations were used to examine the psychometric properties of the questionnaire. Data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression using SPSS v. 22. Respecting patients' rights and interactions with parents were perceived as the most challenging aspects of neonatal care. There were significant differences between sexes in the domains of the perceived challenges. According to the linear regression model, the perceived score would be reduced 0.33 per each year on the job. The results of our study showed that the most challenging issues were related to patients' rights, interactions with parents, communication and cooperation, and end of life considerations respectively. It can be concluded, therefore, that more attention should be paid to these issues in educational programs and ethics committees of hospitals.

  5. [Planned home births assisted by nurse midwives: maternal and neonatal transfers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koettker, Joyce Green; Brüggemann, Odaléa Maria; Dufloth, Rozany Mucha

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this explorative and descriptive study was to describe the rates and reasons for intrapartum transfers from home to hospital among women assisted by nurse midwives, and the outcomes of those deliveries. The sample consisted of eleven women giving birth and their newborns, from January 2005 to December 2009. Data was collected from the maternal and neonatal records and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The transfer rate was 11%, most of the women were nulliparous (63.6%), and all of them were transferred during the first stage of labor. The most common reasons for transfer were arrested cervical dilation, arrested progress of the fetal head and cephalopelvic disproportion. Apgar scores were >7 for 81.8% of the newborns; and there were no admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit. The results show that planned home births assisted by nurse midwives following a clinical protocol, had good outcomes even when a transfer to the hospital was needed.

  6. Symbolic interactionism and nurse-mother communication in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Lisa Marie

    2009-01-01

    The admission of an infant to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has the potential to cause significant stress for the mothers of these infants. Researchers have found that nurse-mother communication has the potential to either aid or hinder the mother's adaptation to the NICU environment. These communication patterns are relatively complex in nature and therefore warrant further investigation. Symbolic interactionism (SI) is a theoretical framework that offers the potential to direct such an investigation. The purpose of this article is to examine nurse-mother communication patterns in the NICU through the theoretical lens of SI.

  7. Neonatal resuscitation – knowledge and practice of nurses in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... nurses' knowledge about NR at a secondary health care level in western Nigeria. Methods ... section II tested appropriate decisions and actions such as appropriate ... lying-in ward (17; 9.5%) and in other wards and clinics not.

  8. A qualitative descriptive exploration of the educational and career plans of early career neonatal nurses and midwives: An Irish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Linda Martina; Patton, Declan

    2018-01-01

    The scarcity of appropriately qualified nurses and midwives is a major obstacle in achieving an effective health system. Neonatal nurses and midwives require a high level of skill and education to fulfil their role. It is also an area that sees high staff turnover rates. For this study a descriptive qualitative approach was used to ascertain early career neonatal nurses' and midwives' experiences of further education, their future career plans, and their perceived facilitators and barriers to further education and career progression. After receiving ethical approval, twelve nurses and midwives were recruited across three tertiary level neonatal units in Ireland. Semi structured interviews were carried out and interview transcripts were subsequently analysed using Attride-Stirling's (2001) Thematic Networks to deduce themes from the data. Support and involvement, mentoring, and career progression and retention were the three main themes identified upon analysis of the data. The majority of participants identified definitive career plans but some felt their goals were unachievable in their current workplace. Consequently a large number of participants have plans to leave their employment in neonates and pursue a career in other areas of nursing. Staff appraisals and succession planning programmes may assist early career nurses and midwives in focusing on their individual career goals, leading to a greater uptake of further specialised education and improved retention of neonatal nurses and midwives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nursing In Front Of Technology As A Care Fundament On UTI Obstetric/Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Caxias de Souza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is an article about the historical evolution of nursing, emphasizing conceptual and reflexive aspects about the impact of technology on the care process in Obstetrical/Neonatal ICU. Although the technology has contributed to the survival pregnant / premature infants extremes and very low weight in recent years, reveals at times a mechanical and impersonal service, a counterpoint to ethical and human issues. A critical-reflexive discussion is proposed under the use of technology in obstetric and neonatal intensive care, highlighting their implications and adaptations to maternal and child needs. It was concluded that what determines whether a technology is good or bad, if it dehumanises, depersonalises or objectifies care is the way in which it is used, making it necessary to improve and update health professionals. In this reflexive exercise, new ways of caring will be rethought, using art, sensitivity and creativity in the appropriation and humanization of technologies.   Descriptors: Nursing Informatics. Information Technology. Nursing Care. Maternal Health. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal.

  10. How Nurse Work Environments Relate to the Presence of Parents in Neonatal Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallowell, Sunny G; Rogowski, Jeannette A; Lake, Eileen T

    2017-09-25

    Parental presence in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is essential for families to participate in infant care and prepare them to transition from hospital to home. Nurses are the principal caregivers in the NICU. The nurse work environment may influence whether parents spend time with their hospitalized infants. To examine the relationship between the NICU work environment and parental presence in the NICU using a national data set. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study of a national sample of 104 NICUs, where 6060 nurses reported on 15,233 infants cared for. Secondary analysis was used to examine associations between the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) (subscale items and with a composite measure) and the proportion of parents who were present during the nurses' shift. Parents of 60% (SD = 9.7%) of infants were present during the nurses' shift. The PES-NWI composite score and 2 domains-Nurse Participation in Hospital Affairs and Manager Leadership and Support-were significant predictors of parental presence. A 1 SD higher score in the composite or either subscale was associated with 2.5% more parents being present. Parental presence in the NICU is significantly associated with better nurse work environments. NICU practices may be enhanced through enhanced leadership and professional opportunities for nurse managers and staff. Future work may benefit from qualitative work with parents to illuminate their experiences with nursing leaders and nurse-led interventions in the NICU and design and testing of interventions to improve the NICU work environment.

  11. Is there an alternative to continuous opioid infusion for neonatal pain control? A preliminary report of parent/nurse-controlled analgesia in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Michelle L; Hainsworth, Keri; Simpson, Pippa M; Arca, Marjorie J; Uhing, Michael R; Varadarajan, Jaya; Weisman, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    Continuous opioid infusion (COI) remains the mainstay of analgesic therapy in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Parent/nurse-controlled analgesia (PNCA) has been accepted as safe and effective for pediatric patients, but few reports include use in neonates. This study sought to compare outcomes of PNCA and COI in postsurgical neonates and young infants. Twenty infants treated with morphine PNCA were retrospectively compared with 13 infants treated with fentanyl COI in a Midwestern pediatric hospital in the United States. Outcome measures included opioid consumption, pain scores, frequency of adverse events, and subsequent methadone use. The PNCA group (median 6.4 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1) morphine equivalents, range 0.0-31.4) received significantly less opioid (P < 0.001) than the COI group (median 40.0 μg · kg(-1) · h(-1) morphine equivalents; range 20.0-153.3), across postoperative days 0-3. Average daily pain scores (based on 0-10 scale) were low for both groups, but median scores differed nonetheless (0.8 PNCA vs 0.3 COI, P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the frequency of adverse events or methadone use. Results suggest PNCA may be a feasible and effective alternative to COI for pain management in postsurgical infants in the NICU. Results also suggest PNCA may provide more individualized care for this vulnerable population and in doing so, may potentially reduce opioid consumption; however, more studies are needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Family-Centred Care in Paediatric and Neonatal Nursing- A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.K. Irlam

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available A literature review of family-centred care in paediatric and neonatal nursing was undertaken as part of a research project. This research intended to ascertain the knowledge and attitudes of paediatric and neonatal qualified nurses and nurse educators towards family-centred care as it pertains to infants and children in hospitals in the Gauteng Province. A definition of family-centred care is difficult to formulate mainly due to the lack of consensus about its meaning. Additionally, the diverse societal contexts within which family-centred care is applied further complicate its definition. Internationally in developed countries, family-centred care is viewed as care, which is parent-led in consultation with the nurse practitioner. A family-centred care model for the South African context needs to be developed with the focus on parent participation, a precursor of family-centred care. This article traces the early developments in parental care for hospitalised children with specific reference to the USA, the UK and South Africa. Precursor concepts in family-centred care are described followed by a cursory overview of the reality of family-centred care, its cultural dimensions and matters of family strengths and choices in family-centred care.

  13. Including sustainability issues in nurse education: A comparative study of first year student nurses' attitudes in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Janet; Heidenreich, Thomas; Álvarez-Nieto, Carmen; Fasseur, Fabienne; Grose, Jane; Huss, Norma; Huynen, Maud; López-Medina, Isabel M; Schweizer, Angélick

    2016-02-01

    Education in sustainable development is a goal recognised by a large number of countries and a vital concept in healthcare. It is therefore important that nurse education incorporates elements of sustainable development into nursing education curricula. However, there is limited research on student nurses' attitudes towards sustainability and no comparison of attitudes towards sustainability and its inclusion in the nursing curriculum across Europe. This project aims to assess student nurses' attitudes towards sustainability, its relevance to nursing and its inclusion in the nursing curricula. 1. To assess base-line attitudes at the start of nursing and midwifery training; 2. To compare sustainability awareness between students participating in training in a number of European universities. A comparative survey design using the Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) questionnaire. Nursing classes of Universities and Nursing Schools in four European countries were investigated using a questionnaire consisting of five sustainability-related items. 916 nursing students (UK: 450, Germany: 196, Spain: 124, Switzerland: 146). Standard descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to establish psychometric quality (Principal Components Analysis, Cronbach's alpha, Pearson correlations) and compare student nurses from the four countries. The reliability of SANS_2 was good (Cronbach's alpha=.82) and the five items loaded on a single factor which explained 58% of variance. ANOVA of the SANS_2 total score showed significant differences between countries with German nursing students showing more sustainability awareness than students from the UK and Spain. SANS_2 is a reliable instrument to assess nursing students' sustainability awareness; there are significant differences in sustainability awareness of students of different European countries. Limitations of the study include non-random sampling, possible method effects and social desirability effects

  14. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazoni, Andréia; Rocha, Patrícia Kuerten; de Souza, Sabrina; Anders, Jane Cristina; de Malfussi, Hamilton Filipe Correia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units. METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121. RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument. CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:25493670

  15. Imaging the neonate in the incubator: an investigation of the technical, radiological and nursing issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, S J; Wentworth, S D P

    2007-11-01

    Modern neonatal incubators incorporate an X-ray tray device into the mattress support structure to facilitate patient examination with minimal disturbance and distress. However, the usual method of examination is to place the image plate directly underneath the baby. Users often cite radiological reasons for not using X-ray trays but modern quantitative evidence is lacking. This work looks at the technical and clinical aspects of imaging neonates in incubators and the impact that these may have in determining the imaging protocol. A number of hospitals were surveyed to determine their current method of examination and the reasons for their preference. Experimental measurements of the radiological impact of using (or not using) the X-ray tray were performed for a range of neonatal incubators. The average dose to the image plate was 5.9 microGy (range 5.4-6.4 microGy) for the "plate on mattress" method and 3.0 microGy (2.0-3.8 microGy) when using the tray--a 49% reduction owing to the mattress support materials. However, when using a computed radiography (CR) imaging system, the image quality differences were marginal. Survey results indicated that nurses preferred to use the tray but that radiographers were reluctant. We conclude that incubator manufacturers could do much to improve the radiological performance of their equipment and we offer recommendations. We also conclude that, with appropriate nurse and radiographer training and the advent of CR imaging systems, use of X-ray tray facilities may optimize imaging of the neonate in the incubator.

  16. Neonatal health including congenital malformation risk of 1072 children born after vitrified embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belva, F; Bonduelle, M; Roelants, M; Verheyen, G; Van Landuyt, L

    2016-07-01

    Does vitrification of Day 3 and Day 5 embryos adversely affect birth outcomes of singletons and twins in comparison with peers born after fresh embryo transfer? Neonatal health parameters, including the prevalence of congenital malformations, in singletons and twins born after embryo vitrification are similar to or slightly better than after fresh embryo transfer. Although vitrification, rather than slow-freezing, of embryos is routine practice nowadays, convincing evidence regarding the safety for the offspring is sparse. Literature data comprise results from mostly small-sized studies or studies including only Day 3 or only Day 5 vitrified embryo transfers. Overall, better or comparable perinatal outcomes, in terms of higher birthweight and lower risk for small-for-gestational age or for low birthweight, have been reported for singletons born after vitrified embryo transfer compared with fresh embryo transfer. According to the single available study with sufficient sample size, the congenital malformation rate was found to be comparable after vitrified and fresh embryo transfers. Data were collected from 960 cycles after transfer of embryos vitrified on Day 3 (n = 457) or Day 5 (n = 503) and from 1644 cycles after fresh embryo transfer on Day 3 (n = 853) or Day 5 (n = 791), performed between 2008 and 2013 at the Centre for Reproductive Medicine of the university hospital UZ Brussel. Outcome measures were neonatal health in terms of birthweight, small-for-gestational age, prematurity rate, perinatal death and major/minor/total malformation rate. Perinatal health parameters of 11 stillborns and 1061 live borns (827 singletons and 234 twins) in the vitrified group and of 28 stillborns and 1838 live borns (1374 singletons and 464 twins) in the fresh embryo group are reported. Within 3 months after birth, children in the two study groups were assessed clinically with special attention to congenital malformations by a paediatrician blinded to the type of embryo

  17. The five-factor model of personality, work stress and professional quality of life in neonatal intensive care unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The study aim was to determine the direct and indirect relations of the five-factor model of personality traits and work stress with professional quality of life in neonatal nurses. Neonatal intensive care nursing has positive and negative effects on neonatal nurses' psychological well-being. Although individual and situational factors interact to influence professional quality of life, there have been few studies of these relationships in neonatal nurses. A cross-sectional study conducted in 2016. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure professional quality of life (burnout, secondary traumatic stress and compassion satisfaction), five-factor model of personality traits (neuroticism, agreeableness, extraversion, conscientiousness and openness) and work stress (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload). One hundred and forty (34%) of 405 eligible neonatal nurses provided the data. After controlling for work stress, neuroticism and agreeableness were related to burnout, neuroticism was related to secondary traumatic stress, and extraversion was related to compassion satisfaction. Work stress controlled for personality traits was related to burnout and secondary traumatic stress, but not to compassion satisfaction. Neuroticism moderated the effect of work stress on secondary traumatic stress and agreeableness and openness moderated the effect of work stress on compassion satisfaction. Work stress mediated the effect of neuroticism and extraversion on burnout and the effects of extraversion and conscientiousness on compassion satisfaction. Strategies to reduce work stress may not lessen burnout and secondary traumatic stress or increase compassion satisfaction in neonatal nurses who are prone to high neuroticism, low agreeableness and low extraversion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Importance of physiotherapy/nursing multidisciplinary integration about update newborn position in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa da Silva Neves Moreira Arakaki

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The high-risk newborns may require long periods of hospitalization until they reach clinical stability for hospital discharge. Avoiding babies to be in only one body position may be an effective way to cause respiratory and neuro-psycho-motor benefits, comfort and preventing pressure ulcers.Objectives This study investigated the impact of physiotherapy/nursing integration in update on body positioning of the newborn in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.Methods A questionnaire was administered to nurses and nursing technicians of the neonatal unit of Maternity School of UFRJ and nurses of the Advanced Course in Neonatal Nursing from the same institution. Two classes were taught by the physical therapist of the sector and the questions answered before and after these lessons. It was also a brief characterization of professional participants of the study. We used the Student's t test to compare the correct answers before (PRE and after (POST the classes, considering p < 0.05.Results There was a significant increase in the degree of knowledge of nurses and nursing technicians when compared the responses before (nurses: 68.8%; technicians: 70.1% and after classes (nurses: 78.4 %; technicians: 88.9%. The nurses were less than five years of graduated (45% and little time of professional experience in neonatology (60%. Forty-seven percent of technicians had less than five years of training and 82% had less than 10 years of experience.Conclusion The use of training by the nursing staff was significant, showing the importance of multidisciplinary approach and the integration of knowledge in the search for a humanized and effective care.

  19. The effect of coverings, including plastic bags and wraps, on mortality and morbidity in preterm and full-term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatley, H K; Blencowe, H; Lawn, J E

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal hypothermia is an important risk factor for mortality and morbidity, and is common even in temperate climates. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether plastic coverings, used immediately following delivery, were effective in reducing the incidence of mortality, hypothermia and morbidity. A total of 26 studies (2271 preterm and 1003 term neonates) were included. Meta-analyses were conducted as appropriate. Plastic wraps were associated with a reduction in hypothermia in preterm (⩽29 weeks; risk ratio (RR)=0.57; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.71) and term neonates (RR=0.76; 95% CI 0.60 to 0.96). No significant reduction in neonatal mortality or morbidity was found; however, the studies were underpowered for these outcomes. For neonates, especially preterm, plastic wraps combined with other environmental heat sources are effective in reducing hypothermia during stabilization and transfer within hospital. Further research is needed to quantify the effects on mortality or morbidity, and investigate the use of plastic coverings outside hospital settings or without additional heat sources.

  20. Perceived Stress and Professional Quality of Life in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Nurses in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Amee A; Vankar, Jagdish R; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G

    2015-11-01

    To study the levels of perceived stress in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses and its association with professional quality of life domains viz. compassion satisfaction, burnout and secondary trauma. In this multicenter, cross sectional study, data was collected by surveying 129 nurses from nine NICUs across six cities of Gujarat, India using demographic questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale (PSS14) and Professional Quality of Life Scale (ProQOL5) during July to September 2013. Descriptive statistics, correlation coefficient and multiple regression were used for analysis. The mean (SD) age of participants was 28.37 (8.20) y. Most were single, satisfied with salary benefits and reported 'good' to 'excellent' relationships at work. The mean (SD) duration of duty hours was 8.12 (0.76) h and 43.6% were attending to more than 4 patients/shift. The mean (SD) perceived stress level was 22.19 (7.17) [Range: 3 to 39]. High compassion satisfaction, high burnout, and high secondary traumatic stress were reported by 25 (19.4%), 30 (23.3%) and 30 (23.3%) nurses respectively. PSS14 was negatively correlated with compassion satisfaction (r = -0.28) and positively correlated with burnout (r = 0.43) and secondary traumatic stress (r = 0.24). Most of the nurses (91, 70.5%) were identified as perceiving moderate to high stress. Professional quality of life domains correlated with perceived stress. There is further need to study domains influencing NICU nurses' professional QOL. Identifying stress and QOL issues in NICU nurses can help formulate relevant policies.

  1. A Descriptive Study on the Neonatal Morbidity Profile of Autism Spectrum Disorders, Including a Comparison with Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atladóttir, H. Ó.; Schendel, D. E.; Parner, E. T.; Henriksen, T. B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the profile of specific neonatal morbidities in children later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and to compare this profile with the profile of children with hyperkinetic disorder, cerebral palsy, epilepsy or intellectual disability. This is a Danish population based cohort study, including all…

  2. Measurement of transepidermal water loss in Tanzanian cot-nursed neonates and its relation to postnatal weight loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, HFH; Massawe, AW; Okken, A; Coenraads, PJ; Muskiet, FAJ; Huisman, M; Boersma, ER

    In healthy cot-nursed Tanzanian neonates (n = 92, gestation 26-42 weeks) measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and weight change were performed during the first 24 h after birth at an average ambient humidity of 70% and an environmental temperature of 32 degrees C. Urine production on day

  3. 'I used to fight with them but now I have stopped!': conflict and doctor-nurse anaesthetists' motivation in maternal and neonatal care provision in a specialist referral hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aberese-Ako, M.; Agyepong, I.A.; Gerrits, T.; van Dijk, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology: The study used ethnographic methods including participant

  4. Osteogenesis imperfecta types I-XI: implications for the neonatal nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, Jody

    2014-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), also called "brittle bone disease," is a rare heterozygous connective tissue disorder that is caused by mutations of genes that affect collagen. Osteogenesis imperfecta is characterized by decreased bone mass, bone fragility, and skin hyperlaxity. The phenotype present is determined according to the mutation on the affected gene as well as the type and location of the mutation. Osteogenesis imperfecta is neither preventable nor treatable. Osteogenesis imperfecta is classified into 11 types to date, on the basis of their clinical symptoms and genetic components. This article discusses the definition of the disease, the classifications on the basis of its clinical features, incidence, etiology, and pathogenesis. In addition, phenotype, natural history, diagnosis and management of this disease, recurrence risk, and, most importantly, the implications for the neonatal nurse and management for the family are discussed.

  5. The need to include obstetric nurses in prenatal care visits in the public health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Aparecida Lagrosa Garcia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate, with a qualitative approach, the role of Obstetric Nurses at the primary level of care given to women’s health as a vital component of the multidisciplinary team, which today is fundamental for providing care, prevention as well as health education and promotion, especially in programs whose activities are geared towards primary care of pregnant, parturient, and puerpera women. Methods: Brazilian laws and the determinations of Nursing Councils in reference to the activities of the obstetric nurse were researched, including the nurse’s responsibilities and limits. The bibliographic search was conducted in health-related journals, lay publications, and the Internet. Results: The conflicts between professional physicians and nurses were discussed. Conclusions: It was concluded that the activities of the nurse, conducting low-risk prenatal clinical visits in the basic healthcare network, has legal and ethical support and provides true benefit to the clients.

  6. Simulation-based team training improved the self-assessed ability of physicians, nurses and midwives to perform neonatal resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, B; Nohlert, E; Ewald, U; Widarsson, M

    2017-08-01

    The use of simulation-based team training in neonatal resuscitation has increased in Sweden during the last decade, but no formal evaluation of this training method has been performed. This study evaluated the effect of simulation-based team training on the self-assessed ability of personnel to perform neonatal resuscitation. We evaluated a full-day simulation-based team training course in neonatal resuscitation, by administering a questionnaire to 110 physicians, nurses and midwives before and after the training period. The questionnaire focused on four important domains: communication, leadership, confidence and technical skills. The study was carried out in Sweden from 2005 to 2007. The response rate was 84%. Improvements in the participants' self-assessed ability to perform neonatal resuscitation were seen in all four domains after training (p technical skills domain compared to experienced personnel (p = 0.001). No differences were seen between professions or time since training in any of the four domains. Personnel with less previous experience with neonatal resuscitation showed improved confidence (p = 0.007) and technical skills (p = 0.003). A full-day course on simulation-based team training with video-supported debriefing improved the participants' self-assessed ability to perform neonatal resuscitation. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Dutch guideline for clinical foetal-neonatal and paediatric post-mortem radiology, including a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemans, L J P; Vester, M E M; Kolsteren, E E M; Erwich, J J H M; Nikkels, P G J; Kint, P A M; van Rijn, R R; Klein, W M

    2018-06-01

    Clinical post-mortem radiology is a relatively new field of expertise and not common practice in most hospitals yet. With the declining numbers of autopsies and increasing demand for quality control of clinical care, post-mortem radiology can offer a solution, or at least be complementary. A working group consisting of radiologists, pathologists and other clinical medical specialists reviewed and evaluated the literature on the diagnostic value of post-mortem conventional radiography (CR), ultrasonography, computed tomography (PMCT), magnetic resonance imaging (PMMRI), and minimally invasive autopsy (MIA). Evidence tables were built and subsequently a Dutch national evidence-based guideline for post-mortem radiology was developed. We present this evaluation of the radiological modalities in a clinical post-mortem setting, including MIA, as well as the recently published Dutch guidelines for post-mortem radiology in foetuses, neonates, and children. In general, for post-mortem radiology modalities, PMMRI is the modality of choice in foetuses, neonates, and infants, whereas PMCT is advised in older children. There is a limited role for post-mortem CR and ultrasonography. In most cases, conventional autopsy will remain the diagnostic method of choice. Based on a literature review and clinical expertise, an evidence-based guideline was developed for post-mortem radiology of foetal, neonatal, and paediatric patients. What is Known: • Post-mortem investigations serve as a quality check for the provided health care and are important for reliable epidemiological registration. • Post-mortem radiology, sometimes combined with minimally invasive techniques, is considered as an adjunct or alternative to autopsy. What is New: • We present the Dutch guidelines for post-mortem radiology in foetuses, neonates and children. • Autopsy remains the reference standard, however minimal invasive autopsy with a skeletal survey, post-mortem computed tomography, or post

  8. The NASA Task Load Index as a measure of overall workload among neonatal, paediatric and adult intensive care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs-Cooley, Heather L; Mara, Constance A; Carle, Adam C; Gurses, Ayse P

    2018-02-12

    The NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) is a subjective workload assessment scale developed for use in aviation and increasingly applied to healthcare. The scale purports to measure overall workload as a single variable calculated by summing responses to six items. Since no data address the validity of this scoring approach in health care, we evaluated the single factor structure of the NASA-TLX as a measure of overall workload among intenisive care nurses. Confirmatory factor analysis of data from two studies of nurse workload in neonatal, paediatric, and adult intensive care units. Study 1 data were obtained from 136 nurses in one neonatal intensive care unit. Study 2 data were collected from 300 nurses in 17 adult, paediatric and neonatal units. Nurses rated their workload using the NASA-TLX's paper version. A single factor model testing whether all six items measured a single overall workload variable fit least well (RMSEA = 0.14; CFI = 0.91; TLI = 0.85). A second model that specified two items as outcomes of overall workload had acceptable fit (RMSEA = 0.08; CFI = 0.97; TLI = 0.95) while a third model of four items fit best (RMSEA = 0.06; CFI > 0.99; TLI = 0.99). A summed score from four of six NASA-TLX items appears to most reliably measure a single overall workload variable among intensive care nurses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The challenges of neonatal magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Graves, Martin J.; Lomas, David J.; Edwards, Andrea; Austin, Topun

    2012-01-01

    Improved neonatal survival rates and antenatal diagnostic imaging is generating a growing demand for postnatal MRI examinations. Neonatal brain MRI is now becoming standard clinical care in many settings, but with the exception of some research centres, the technique has not been optimised for imaging neonates and small children. Here, we review some of the challenges involved in neonatal MRI, including recent advances in overall MR practicality and nursing practice, to address some of the ways in which the MR experience could be made more neonate-friendly. (orig.)

  10. Behavioral analysis of preterm neonates included in a tactile and kinesthetic stimulation program during hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Andréia M; Bergamasco, Niélsy H P

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of tactile and kinesthetic stimulation on behavioral and clinical development in preterm neonates while still in the hospital. Thirty-two clinically stable preterm infants weighing kinesthetic stimulation (n=16). Data on the infants' clinical progress were collected from medical charts and behavioral evaluations by means of a series of weekly, eight-minute films recorded from the time of inclusion into the study until hospital discharge. There was a trend towards a shorter duration of hospital stay, increased daily weight gain and a predominance of self-regulated behavior (regular breathing, state of alertness, balanced tonus, a range of postures, coordinated movements, hand-to-face movement control, suction, grip, support) in infants in the SG. With respect to motor control, comparative analysis of postconceptional ages according to age-bracket (I - 31-33 weeks 6/7; II - 34-36 weeks 6/7; and III - 37-39 weeks 6/7) revealed balanced tonus and coordinated voluntary movements in all three periods, a longer time spent in a range of postures (age bracket I) or in flexion (age bracket II) and more regular breathing in age bracket I in the SG. In the hospital, tactile and kinesthetic stimulation was shown to have a positive effect, contributing towards adjustment and self-regulation of behavior in the preterm newborn infant. Article registered in the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) under the number ACTRN12610000133033.

  11. Evaluating Neonatal Resuscitation Skills of Nursing and Midwifery Students Using Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Malekzadeh

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: The students’ skills in neonatal resuscitation were lower than expected. As competence in this area is of high significance for the improvement of neonatal outcomes, holding training workshops through applying novel training methods is recommended.

  12. The heuristics of nurse responsiveness to critical patient monitor and ventilator alarms in a private room neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohan; Mortel, Heidi van de; Feijs, Loe; Andriessen, Peter; Pul, Carola van

    2017-01-01

    Alarm fatigue is a well-recognized patient safety concern in intensive care settings. Decreased nurse responsiveness and slow response times to alarms are the potentially dangerous consequences of alarm fatigue. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that modulate nurse responsiveness to critical patient monitor and ventilator alarms in the context of a private room neonatal intensive care setting. The study design comprised of both a questionnaire and video monitoring of nurse-responsiveness to critical alarms. The Likert scale questionnaire, comprising of 50 questions across thematic clusters (critical alarms, yellow alarms, perception, design, nursing action, and context) was administered to 56 nurses (90% response rate). Nearly 6000 critical alarms were recorded from 10 infants in approximately 2400 hours of video monitoring. Logistic regression was used to identify patient and alarm-level factors that modulate nurse-responsiveness to critical alarms, with a response being defined as a nurse entering the patient's room within the 90s of the alarm being generated. Based on the questionnaire, the majority of nurses found critical alarms to be clinically relevant even though the alarms did not always mandate clinical action. Based on video observations, for a median of 34% (IQR, 20-52) of critical alarms, the nurse was already present in the room. For the remaining alarms, the response rate within 90s was 26%. The median response time was 55s (IQR, 37-70s). Desaturation alarms were the most prevalent and accounted for more than 50% of all alarms. The odds of responding to bradycardia alarms, compared to desaturation alarms, were 1.47 (95% CI = 1.21-1.78; heuristics in determining whether or not to respond to the alarm. Amongst other factors, the category and duration of critical alarms along with the clinical status of the patient determine nurse-responsiveness to alarms.

  13. Using a didactic model to improve patient observation skills in neonatal intensive care nurse trainees - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Marianne Trygg; Tandberg, Bente Silnes; Lerdal, Anners

    2012-08-01

    To implement a didactic model for students specialising in intensive care nursing (n=12) and nurses working in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) (n=17). To evaluate nurse self-assessments following observation of children with congenital heart disease (CHD), before and after participation in the programme, as well as the usefulness of the programme. A pilot study with a pre- and post-test design, using self-administered questionnaires. The didactic model increased the number of clinical observations and assessments of physiological factors made by both students and NICU nurses during evaluation of children with suspected CHD. The majority of nurses reported that both participation in the programme and the didactic model were useful and they demonstrated high-level knowledge, according to Bloom's taxonomy for cognitive learning. In particular, subjects found that the literature provided and structured bedside guidance in the clinical setting assisted learning. Intensive care students and NICU nurses performed clinical observations and physical factor assessments more frequently after completing the programme, compared with baseline. We speculate that this didactic model may also be useful in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Using appreciative inquiry to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance family-centred care: A collaborative workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovski, Suza; Schmied, Virginia; Vickers, Margaret; Jackson, Debra

    2015-06-01

    Family-centred care (FCC) has been well recognised, accepted and reported in the literature as an optimised way of caring for hospitalised children. While neonatal units strive to adopt this philosophy, published research suggests there are difficulties implementing FCC principles in daily practice. Appreciative inquiry (AI) is a philosophy and methodology that offers a unique, strength-based approach to promoting organisational learning and positive organisational change. As a participatory approach, AI facilitates change from the ground up and lends itself to building effective partnerships or collaborations. This article reports the findings of a one-day workshop using an AI methodology to bring neonatal nurses and parents together to enhance the FCC within a neonatal intensive care unit in Sydney, Australia. Participants (n = 15) developed collaborative insights of optimal FCC that can be built upon to support neonates and their families in the future. Shared visions were formed, strategies identified and a development plan made for ongoing collaborations and partnerships. AI provides a flexible framework that enables the mandatory collaboration needed to develop action plans that can form the catalyst for organizational change in health-care research and practice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  15. Factors associated with infant feeding of human milk at discharge from neonatal intensive care: Cross-sectional analysis of nurse survey and infant outcomes data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallowell, Sunny G; Rogowski, Jeannette A; Spatz, Diane L; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Kenny, Michael; Lake, Eileen T

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are principal caregivers in the neonatal intensive care unit and support mothers to establish and sustain a supply of human milk for their infants. Whether an infant receives essential nutrition and immunological protection provided in human milk at discharge is an issue of health care quality in this setting. To examine the association of the neonatal intensive care unit work environment, staffing levels, level of nurse education, lactation consultant availability, and nurse-reported breastfeeding support with very low birth weight infant receipt of human milk at discharge. Cross sectional analysis combining nurse survey data with infant discharge data. A national sample of neonatal intensive care units (N=97), nurses (N=5614) and very low birth weight infants (N=6997). Sequential multivariate linear regression models were estimated at the unit level between the dependent variable (rate of very low birth weight infants discharged on "any human milk") and the independent variables (nurse work environment, nurse staffing, nursing staff education and experience, lactation consultant availability, and nurse-reported breastfeeding support). The majority of very low birth weight infants (52%) were discharged on formula only. Fewer infants (42%) received human milk mixed with fortifier or formula. Only 6% of infants were discharged on exclusive human milk. A 1 SD increase (0.25) in the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index composite score was associated with a four percentage point increase in the fraction of infants discharged on human milk (pmilk (pmilk at discharge (p=.056). A 1 SD increase (7%) in the fraction of infants who received breastfeeding support was associated with an eight percentage point increase in the fraction of infants discharged on human milk (pmilk. Investments by nurse administrators to improve work environments and support educational preparation of nursing staff may ensure that the most vulnerable infants have the best

  16. Perceptions of parents, nurses, and physicians on neonatal intensive care practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latour, Jos M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2010-01-01

    To identify satisfaction with neonatal intensive care as viewed by parents and healthcare professionals and to explore similarities and differences between parents and healthcare professionals. A 3-round Delphi method to identify neonatal care issues (round 1) and to determine the importance of

  17. A survey on Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illness implementation by nurses in four districts of West Arsi zone of Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Sheka Shemsi; Sendo, Endalew Gemechu

    2018-01-01

    In Ethiopia, one in 17 children dies before 1 year of age and one in 11 children dies before 5 years. Research that examines the factors influencing the implementation of the Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illnesses (IMNCI) strategy in Ethiopia is limited. This study aimed to identify the factors compelling the execution of IMNCI by nurses in four districts of West Arsi zone of Ethiopia. A mixed-method cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March 2016 in West Arsi zone of Oromia regional state, Ethiopia. A total of 185 Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI)-trained registered nurses working at Under-Five Clinic were purposively chosen for the study among 291 registered nurses based at health centers and hospitals in the Arsi zone. The study was complemented by a qualitative method. More than half (57.8%) of the nurses interviewed had been trained (51.35% of them attended in-service training). The most common issues encountered in the implementation of IMCI were: lack of trained staff (56.2%), lack of essential drugs and supplies (37.3%), and irregular supportive supervision (89.2%). The qualitative data supplemented the factors that influence IMNCI implementation, including drug unavailability, lack of human resources, and lack of effective supportive supervision and follow-up visits. Therefore, interventions aiming at training nurses, with emphasis on performing supportive consistent supervision and supporting the system of health care by enhancing admittance to indispensable drugs and supplies, are recommended to help IMCI implementation.

  18. Use of the ICU Nurse-Physician Questionnaire (ICU N-P-Q): testing reliability and validity in neonatal intensive care units in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hatoko; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Mori, Rintaro; Nishida, Toshihiko; Kusuda, Satoshi; Nakayama, Takeo

    2016-05-09

    Although communication among health providers has become a critical part of improving quality of care, few studies on this topic have been conducted in Japan. This study aimed to examine the reliability and validity of the Intensive Care Unit Nurse-Physician Questionnaire (ICU N-P-Q) for use among nurses and physicians in neonatal ICUs (NICUs) in Japan. A Japanese translation of the ICU N-P-Q was administered to physicians and nurses working at 40 NICUs across Japan, which were participating in the Improvement of NICU Practice and Team Approach Cluster randomized controlled trial (INTACT). We used the principal components analysis to evaluate the factor structure of the instruments. Convergent validity was assessed by examining correlations between the subscales of Communication and Conflict Management of the ICU N-P-Q and the subscales and total score of the Nurse-Physician Collaboration Scale (NPCS). Correlations between the subscales of Communication and Conflict Management by correlation with scales that refer to performance, including Job Satisfaction and Unit Effectiveness, were calculated to test the criterion validity. In total, 2006 questionnaires were completed by 316 physicians and 1690 nurses. The exploratory factor analysis revealed 15 factors in the physicians' questionnaire and 12 in the nurses' questionnaire. Convergent validity was confirmed, except for 'Between-group Accuracy' and 'Cooperativeness' in the physicians' scale, and for 'Between-group Accuracy' and 'Sharing of Patient Information' in the nurses' scale. Correlations between the subscales of communication and outcomes were confirmed in the nurses' questionnaire but were not fully supported in the physicians' questionnaire. Although the psychometric property behaved somewhat differently by occupation, the present findings provide preliminary support for the utility of the common item structure with the original scale, to measure the degree and quality of communication and collaboration

  19. Social justice considerations in neonatal care for nurse managers and executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Linda; Walden, Marlene; Verklan, M Terese

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the struggle between social justice and market justice within the current health care system, specifically issues affecting neonatal care. Community benefit is described and discussed as an aspect of social justice demonstrated by hospitals. The federal and state Children's Health Insurance Program also is discussed in relation to social justice and health care costs. Implications for managers and executives overseeing neonatal care are presented in relation to the economic and social issues.

  20. Computer and laboratory simulation in the teaching of neonatal nursing: innovation and impact on learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti; Aredes, Natália Del' Angelo; Fernandes, Ananda Maria; Batalha, Luís Manuel da Cunha; Apóstolo, Jorge Manuel Amado; Martins, José Carlos Amado; Rodrigues, Manuel Alves

    2016-10-10

    to evaluate the cognitive learning of nursing students in neonatal clinical evaluation from a blended course with the use of computer and laboratory simulation; to compare the cognitive learning of students in a control and experimental group testing the laboratory simulation; and to assess the extracurricular blended course offered on the clinical assessment of preterm infants, according to the students. a quasi-experimental study with 14 Portuguese students, containing pretest, midterm test and post-test. The technologies offered in the course were serious game e-Baby, instructional software of semiology and semiotechnique, and laboratory simulation. Data collection tools developed for this study were used for the course evaluation and characterization of the students. Nonparametric statistics were used: Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon. the use of validated digital technologies and laboratory simulation demonstrated a statistically significant difference (p = 0.001) in the learning of the participants. The course was evaluated as very satisfactory for them. The laboratory simulation alone did not represent a significant difference in the learning. the cognitive learning of participants increased significantly. The use of technology can be partly responsible for the course success, showing it to be an important teaching tool for innovation and motivation of learning in healthcare. avaliar a aprendizagem cognitiva de estudantes de enfermagem na avaliação clínica neonatal a partir de um curso semipresencial com uso de simulação por computador e em laboratório; comparar a aprendizagem cognitiva dos estudantes em grupo controle e experimental ao testar a simulação em laboratório; e avaliar o curso semipresencial extracurricular oferecido sobre avaliação clínica do bebê pré-termo, segundo os estudantes. estudo quase-experimental com 14 estudantes portugueses contendo pré-teste, teste intermediário e pós-teste. As tecnologias oferecidas no curso foram serious

  1. Factors associated with infant feeding of human milk at discharge from neonatal intensive care: Cross-sectional analysis of nurse survey and infant outcomes data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallowell, Sunny G.; Rogowski, Jeannette A.; Spatz, Diane L.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Kenny, Michael; Lake, Eileen T.

    2016-01-01

    Context Nurses are principal caregivers in the neonatal intensive care unit and support mothers to establish and sustain a supply of human milk for their infants. Whether an infant receives essential nutrition and immunological protection provided in human milk at discharge is an issue of health care quality in this setting. Objectives To examine the association of the neonatal intensive care unit work environment, staffing levels, level of nurse education, lactation consultant availability, and nurse-reported breastfeeding support with very low birth weight infant receipt of human milk at discharge. Design and setting Cross sectional analysis combining nurse survey data with infant discharge data. Participants A national sample of neonatal intensive care units (N = 97), nurses (N = 5614) and very low birth weight infants (N = 6997). Methods Sequential multivariate linear regression models were estimated at the unit level between the dependent variable (rate of very low birth weight infants discharged on “any human milk”) and the independent variables (nurse work environment, nurse staffing, nursing staff education and experience, lactation consultant availability, and nurse-reported breastfeeding support). Results The majority of very low birth weight infants (52%) were discharged on formula only. Fewer infants (42%) received human milk mixed with fortifier or formula. Only 6% of infants were discharged on exclusive human milk. A 1 SD increase (0.25) in the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index composite score was associated with a four percentage point increase in the fraction of infants discharged on human milk (p nurses with a bachelor’s degree in nursing was associated with a three percentage point increase in the fraction infants discharged on human milk (p nurses, and more infants who receive breastfeeding support by nurses have higher rates of very low birth weight infants discharged home on human milk. Investments by nurse

  2. Including sustainability issues in nurse education: A comparative study of first year student nurses' attitudes in four European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, Janet; Heidenreich, Thomas; Álvarez-Nieto, Carmen; Fasseur, F; Grose, Jane; Huss, N; Huynen, Maud; López-Medina, IM; A, Schweizer

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Education in sustainable development is a goal recognised by a large number of countries and a vital concept in healthcare. It is therefore important that nurse education incorporates elements of sustainable development into nursing education curricula. However, there is limited

  3. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Attitudes of Nurses and Physicians About Clinical Autopsy in Neonatal and Adult Hospital Care: A Survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjörnheim, Berit; Rosendahl, Anders; Eriksson, Lennart C; Takman, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The rate of autopsies has dropped to low levels in Western countries. The aim of this study was to describe the experiences and attitudes of registered nurses (RNs) and physicians (MD) toward clinical autopsies in neonatal and adult hospital care in Sweden. RNs and MDs in neonatal and adult care specialized clinics at a university-affiliated hospital in Sweden were surveyed. Survey responses were tallied, and free-text comments were assessed with qualitative content analysis. Three hundred thirty-six surveys were distributed; the response rate was 35%. Most RNs and 14% of the MDs had limited or no experience participating in an autopsy. Notably, few RNs and approximately one third of the MDs were familiar with the autopsy processes and the treatment of the deceased person's body after an autopsy. More than one third of RNs had experience with talking to relatives regarding autopsy. Most agreed that an autopsy could be supportive for relatives during the grieving process and beneficial for the quality of healthcare. Most MDs (70%) thought that autopsies should be performed more frequently. Qualitative results emphasized that RNs and MDs thought that autopsy information supported the grieving process of relatives-especially parents who had lost a child. The survey data confirm belief in the value of clinical autopsies in neonatal and adult hospital care. RNs and MDs should receive training about the autopsy process and procedures for obtaining consent for an autopsy. RNs are in a position to support the decision making of relatives about providing consent for autopsy and have an opportunity to take a more active role in the autopsy process.

  5. Innovations in occupational health nursing education, including a distance learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowis, A; Ellington, H

    1991-07-01

    The results of a survey in the United Kingdom in the late 1980s indicated that many occupational health nurses were not being sent for formal training because of the length of time nurses needed to be away from their employment and the difficulty employers had in finding nurse replacements during training. To meet the needs of occupational health nurses and their employers, the Robert Gordon Institute of Technology (RGIT) instituted a modular training course that offers full time attendance or distance learning options. RGIT's course consists of six modules over a 1 to 3 year period, which students can take in any order after completing a short Return to Study course. Using the innovative distance learning option, occupational health nurses can earn a Diploma in Occupational Health Nursing while completing most of their courses at the workplace, thus avoiding conflicts between training and work schedules.

  6. Promoção de vínculo afetivo na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal: um desafio para as enfermeiras Promoción de vínculo afectivo en la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal: un desafío para las enfermeras Promoting affective attachment at the neonatal intensive care unit: a challenge for nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudete Aparecida Conz

    2009-12-01

    las enfermeras se perciben como un elemento de aproximación entre hijos y padres y creen que ejercen un papel importante en la formación de un vínculo afectivo entre ellos.The study was motivated by observations of the routine at neonatal intensive care units (NICU, thoughts about the dichotomy between theory, discourse, and the practice of many nurses towards the newborns' parents. The objectives were to learn about nurses' experiences regarding neonatal care to newborns and their parents, and to understand how nurses experience the process of affective attachment between newborns hospitalized at NICUs and their parents. This study was developed according to the social phenomenology approach of Alfred Schütz. Study subjects were eight practical nurses who had worked at NICU of public and private hospitals. Categories of experience emerged from the discourses, including Human Contact. The analysis revealed that nurses see themselves as the connection between parents and children, and believe they play an important role in creating the affective attachment between parent and child.

  7. Taking care of the newborn dying and their families: Nurses' experiences of neonatal intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane de Amorim Almeida

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the experiences of nurses when caring for dying newborns and their families in the NICU; and redeem their perceptions about acting before the death and grieving process. Method A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed with nine nurses at the ICU of a hospital in São Paulo (SP, Brazil. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD. Results Caring for newborns who are dying and their families is very difficult for nurses, due to the intense involvement. They seek strategies to deal with the situation and, before the newborn’s death, despite the suffering, express the feeling of accomplishment. Conclusions Facing death and grief triggers mechanisms that emerge life references, coming across painful issues. Learning to deal with these questions is a daily challenge for nurses of the NICU.

  8. Effects of a 12-hour shift on mood states and sleepiness of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeu Sartini Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of a 12-hour shift on mood states and sleepiness at the beginning and end of the shift. METHOD Quantitative, cross-sectional and descriptive study.It was conducted with 70 neonatal intensive care unit nurses. The Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS, Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS, and a socio-demographic profile questionnaire were administered. RESULTS When the KSS and BRUMS scores were compared at the beginning of the shift associations were found with previous sleep quality (p ≤ 0.01, and quality of life (p ≤ 0.05. Statistical significant effects on BRUMS scores were also associated with previous sleep quality, quality of life, liquid ingestion, healthy diet, marital status, and shift work stress. When the beginning and end of the shift were compared, different KSS scores were seen in the group of all nurses and in the night shift one. Significant vigor and fatigue scores were observed within shift groups. CONCLUSION A good night’s sleep has positive effects on the individual`s mood states both at the beginning and the end of the shift. The self-perception of a good quality of life also positively influenced KSS and BRUMS scores at the beginning and end of the shift. Proper liquid ingestion led to better KSS and BRUMS scores.

  9. HOSPITAL INFECTIONS IN THE SETTING OF NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE: A CONTRIBUTION TO NURSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Bertolossi Marta de Araújo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: refletir sobre a infecção hospitalar nas utins a partir da análise da produção científica da enfermagem nacional e internacional acerca desta temática. Método: abordagem qualitativa a partir da revisão bibliográfica em base de dados. Resultados: Os dados analisados foram publicações dos últimos dez anos, em revistas indexadas nas bases de dados: Medline, Lilacs, Bdenf e Scielo. Após a busca com os descritores: “infecção hospitalar”; “neonatal”. em inglês: “infection”, “hospitalar” e “neonatologic foram encontradas 134 publicações das quais 28 se enquadravam no objetivo da pesquisa. Para análise das produções foi adotada a análise de conteúdo na modalidade temática, originando 3 categorias: a Fatores de risco para disseminação da infecção hospitalar; b Infecções comuns no cenário neonatal; c Assistência de enfermagem na prevenção da infecção hospitalar neonatal. Conclusão: Trata-se de uma temática fundamental na Assistência de enfermagem ao neonato nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, contudo pouco explorada por enfermeiros. Descritores: Infecção hospitalar; Neonatal; Cuidado de enfermagem.

  10. O envolvimento do enfermeiro no processo de morrer de bebês internados em Unidade Neonatal El involucramiento del enfermero en el proceso de morir de niños hospitalizados en una unidad de neonatología Nurses experiences with death in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Rocha Aguiar

    2006-06-01

    úsqueda del equilibrio entre el cuidar del otro y de sí mismo.ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: to understand Neonatal Intensive Care nurses experiences caring for dying neonates. METHODS: this was an qualitative exploratory study. Ten Neonatal Intensive Care Unit nurses from a school-affiliated hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará participated in this study. Data were collected during May and June, 2003. RESULTS: the following categories emerged from the analysis: feelings in the presence of death; interacting with the family in the process of dying; and, educational inadequacies coping with a terminally ill neonate. The feelings expressed by the nurses included loss, sadness, misery, weakness, and detachment. The nurses also see themselves involved with the grieving family, although the majority of them reported not having enough foundational knowledge with grief and thanatology. CONCLUSION: those nurses who deal with death in the workplace, such as the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, are trying to keep a balance between caring for others and themselves.

  11. Computed tomography diagnosis of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy combined with intracranial hemorrhage and clinical nursing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Zhang, J L; Li, Y

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), one of the common causes of newborn invalidism, is likely to induce nervous system-associated sequelae and even intracranial hemorrhage in severe cases. The incidence rate of HIE has been rising in recent years. In order to study the clinical nursing effect for HIE combined with intracranial hemorrhage, 76 newborns diagnosed with HIE combined with intracranial hemorrhage by spiral computed tomography (CT) from the of Binzhou People’s Hospital, Shandong, China were selected. They were divided into a control group and an intervention group. The control group received routine nursing, while the intervention group received comprehensive nursing intervention. The experimental results suggested that the mental developmental index (MDI) value and the psychomotor developmental index (PDI) value of patients in the intervention group were much higher than those of the control group and the difference was significant (phemorrhage recover more effectively, therefore is worth applying.

  12. Neonatal retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero T Kivelä

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available From 7% to 10% of all retinoblastomas and from 44% to 71% of familial retinoblastomas in developed countries are diagnosed in the neonatal period, usually through pre- or post-natal screening prompted by a positive family history and sometimes serendipitously during screening for retinopathy of prematurity or other reasons. In developing countries, neonatal diagnosis of retinoblastoma has been less common. Neonatal retinoblastoma generally develops from a germline mutation of RB1, the retinoblastoma gene, even when the family history is negative and is thus usually hereditary. At least one-half of infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have unilateral tumors when the diagnosis is made, typically the International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (Murphree Group B or higher, but most germline mutation carriers will progress to bilateral involvement, typically Group A in the fellow eye. Neonatal leukokoria usually leads to the diagnosis in children without a family history of retinoblastoma, and a Group C tumor or higher is typical in the more advanced involved eye. Almost all infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have at least one eye with a tumor in proximity to the foveola, but the macula of the fellow eye is frequently spared. Consequently, loss of reading vision from both eyes is exceptional. A primary ectopic intracranial neuroblastic tumor known as trilateral retinoblastoma is no more common after neonatal than other retinoblastoma. For many reasons, neonatal retinoblastoma may be a challenge to eradicate, and the early age at diagnosis and relatively small tumors do not guarantee the preservation of both eyes of every involved child. Oncology nurses can be instrumental in contributing to better outcomes by ensuring that hereditary retinoblastoma survivors receive genetic counseling, by referring families of survivors to early screening programs when they are planning for a baby, and by providing psychological and practical support

  13. Impact of a standardized nurse observation protocol including MEWS after Intensive Care Unit discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Meester, K; Das, T; Hellemans, K; Verbrugghe, W; Jorens, P G; Verpooten, G A; Van Bogaert, P

    2013-02-01

    Analysis of in-hospital mortality after serious adverse events (SAE's) in our hospital showed the need for more frequent observation in medical and surgical wards. We hypothesized that the incidence of SAE's could be decreased by introducing a standard nurse observation protocol. To investigate the effect of a standard nurse observation protocol implementing the Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS) and a color graphic observation chart. Pre- and post-intervention study by analysis of patients records for a 5-day period after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) discharge to 14 medical and surgical wards before (n=530) and after (n=509) the intervention. For the total study population the mean Patient Observation Frequency Per Nursing Shift (POFPNS) during the 5-day period after ICU discharge increased from .9993 (95% C.I. .9637-1.0350) in the pre-intervention period to 1.0732 (95% C.I. 1.0362-1.1101) (p=.005) in the post-intervention period. There was an increased risk of a SAE in patients with MEWS 4 or higher in the present nursing shift (HR 8.25; 95% C.I. 2.88-23.62) and the previous nursing shift (HR 12.83;95% C.I. 4.45-36.99). There was an absolute risk reduction for SAE's within 120h after ICU discharge of 2.2% (95% C.I. -0.4-4.67%) from 5.7% to 3.5%. The intervention had a positive impact on the observation frequency. MEWS had a predictive value for SAE's in patients after ICU discharge. The drop in SAE's was substantial but did not reach statistical significance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Taking care of the newborn dying and their families: Nurses' experiences of neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fabiane de Amorim; Moraes, Mariana Salim de; Cunha, Mariana Lucas da Rocha

    2016-06-01

    To understand the experiences of nurses when caring for dying newborns and their families in the NICU; and redeem their perceptions about acting before the death and grieving process. A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach, developed with nine nurses at the ICU of a hospital in São Paulo (SP), Brazil. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse (CSD). Caring for newborns who are dying and their families is very difficult for nurses, due to the intense involvement. They seek strategies to deal with the situation and, before the newborn's death, despite the suffering, express the feeling of accomplishment. Facing death and grief triggers mechanisms that emerge life references, coming across painful issues. Learning to deal with these questions is a daily challenge for nurses of the NICU. Compreender as experiências vivenciadas por enfermeiros ao cuidar de neonatos que estão morrendo e seus familiares na UTIN; e resgatar as suas percepções sobre a atuação diante do processo de morte e luto. Estudo descritivo exploratório, de abordagem qualitativa, desenvolvido com nove enfermeiras da UTIN de um hospital de São Paulo (SP), Brasil. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista semi-estruturada e analisados pela técnica do Discurso de Sujeito Coletivo (DSC). Cuidar de neonatos que estão morrendo e suas famílias é muito difícil para as enfermeiras, devido ao intenso envolvimento. Buscam estratégias para lidar com a situação e, diante do óbito do neonato, apesar do sofrimento, manifestam o sentimento de dever cumprido. Enfrentar a morte e o luto aciona mecanismos que afloram referências de vida, deparando-se com questões dolorosas. Aprender a lidar com essas questões é um desafio diário para os enfermeiros de UTIN.

  15. THE IMPORTANCE OF NURSES IN THE HANDLING OF THE PICC IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jecilea Pereira Barbosa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este estudo aborda a manutenção do Cateter Venoso Central de Inserção Periférica, sendo ela um dos episódios mais comuns utilizadas nas Unidades de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, objetivando identificar as dificuldades encontradas pelo enfermeiro na manutenção desse cateter, de modo a contribuir para melhoria da assistência prestada ao recém-nascido. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa exploratória, descritiva, bibliográfica com abordagem qualitativa realizada na Biblioteca Virtual de Saúde (LILACS E BDENF.Após a coleta de dados foi realizada uma leitura exploratória, seletiva,critica e analise temática,emergindo as seguintes categorias:Principais dificuldades encontradas na manutenção do PICC e A importância do papel do enfermeiro na manutenção do PICC.Concluímos então que se faz necessário o conhecimento teórico prático do enfermeiro na implantação, manutenção e remoção do PICC reduzindo a dificuldade de utilização desse cateter para um tratamento de qualidade.

  16. Neonatal Tele-Homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne

    Neonatal homecare (NH) implies that parents manage tube feeding and care of their preterm infant at home supported by home visits from neonatal nurses, to monitor infant growth and the well-being of the family. Home visits are costly and time consuming in rural areas. The overall aim of this study...

  17. Infection control in neonatal intensive care unit : from a certified nurse in infection control's point of view

    OpenAIRE

    坂木, 晴世

    2007-01-01

    Neonates, especially those in neonatal intensive care units (NICU), are at high risk for infection. And nosocomial infections are responsible for almost 50% of the deaths that occur beyond 2 weeks of age. Advances in neonatal intensive care have resulted in survival of more low birth weight and sick infants. On the other hand, infection control measures in NICU are hard to say that we established. Therefore it is often that infection control measure in NICU of our country is taken in original...

  18. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda Aberese-Ako

    Full Text Available This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital.The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings.Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12 and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned.Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients.To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers and health workers on conflict management should be put in

  19. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethics Statement Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Results Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. Conclusion To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers

  20. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers and health workers on conflict management should be put in place

  1. Prenatal cocaine exposure and neonatal/infant outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, Shelly

    2003-01-01

    Illegal drug use throughout the nation is a problem of epidemic proportion. Of particular concern is drug use among pregnant women. In most cases, these women have little hope of achieving a better life for themselves or their children. Illegal drugs, cocaine in particular, can have devastating effects on the neonate. These effects can last well into childhood and can exhibit themselves in academic, social, and family situations. Challenges for the neonatal nurse include early identification of these infants and use of available resources. This article addresses prenatal cocaine use and support services for drug-dependent women, effects of cocaine during the neonatal period, possible neonatal and infant outcomes, and implications for nursing practice.

  2. Effects of a 12-hour shift on mood states and sleepiness of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tadeu Sartini; Moreira, Clarice Zinato; Guo, James; Noce, Franco

    2017-03-09

    To assess the effect of a 12-hour shift on mood states and sleepiness at the beginning and end of the shift. Quantitative, cross-sectional and descriptive study.It was conducted with 70 neonatal intensive care unit nurses. The Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS), Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS), and a socio-demographic profile questionnaire were administered. When the KSS and BRUMS scores were compared at the beginning of the shift associations were found with previous sleep quality (p ≤ 0.01), and quality of life (p ≤ 0.05). Statistical significant effects on BRUMS scores were also associated with previous sleep quality, quality of life, liquid ingestion, healthy diet, marital status, and shift work stress. When the beginning and end of the shift were compared, different KSS scores were seen in the group of all nurses and in the night shift one. Significant vigor and fatigue scores were observed within shift groups. A good night's sleep has positive effects on the individual`s mood states both at the beginning and the end of the shift. The self-perception of a good quality of life also positively influenced KSS and BRUMS scores at the beginning and end of the shift. Proper liquid ingestion led to better KSS and BRUMS scores. Evaluar el efecto de un turno de 12 horas en estados de ánimo y somnolencia al principio y al final del turno. Estudio cuantitativo, transversal y descriptivo.Se realizó con 70 enfermeras de unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatales. Se administró la Escala de Humor Brunel (BRUMS), la Escala de Somnolencia de Karolinska (KSS) y un cuestionario de perfil sociodemográfico. Cuando se compararon las puntuaciones de KSS y BRUMS al comienzo del turno se encontraron asociaciones con calidad de sueño previa (p ≤ 0,01) y calidad de vida (p ≤ 0,05). Los efectos estadísticos significativos en las puntuaciones de BRUMS también se asociaron con la calidad previa del sueño, la calidad de vida, la ingestión de líquidos, la dieta saludable, el

  3. ‘Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment’ – Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Bloomer, MJ; Endacott, R; Copnell, B; O’Connor, M

    2016-01-01

    publisher: Elsevier articletitle: ‘Something normal in a very, very abnormal environment’ – Nursing work to honour the life of dying infants and children in neonatal and paediatric intensive care in Australia journaltitle: Intensive and Critical Care Nursing articlelink: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iccn.2015.09.001 content_type: article copyright: Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal perceptions of family-centred support and their associations with the mother-nurse relationship in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Aya; Mori, Akiko

    2018-04-01

    To evaluate maternal perceptions of family-centred support with hospitalised preterm infants and their relationship between mothers and nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Mothers who gave birth to preterm infants tend to suffer more stress and need individual support based on family-centred care. However, there may be a shortage of support for mothers to obtain parent-crafting skills before bringing their infants home. This cross-sectional study used path analysis and multiple group analysis to evaluate a structural equation model of the relationship between maternal perception based on family-centred support in parent-crafting training and the mothers-nurses collaboration. We analysed data from 98 mothers (valid response proportion, 41.0%) whose infants were hospitalised in the NICU of two types of perinatal centres in Japan. We used three revised standardised questionnaires in Japanese: Measure of Process of Care in the NICU (Neo-MPOC 20), Enabling Practice Scale in the NICU (Neo-EPS) and the author-developed Mother and Infant Questionnaire. Path analysis revealed that the relationship between mothers and nurses was linked to three factors related to the perinatal centres' support: consideration of parents' feelings, ability to deal with specific needs and coordination in dealing with situations that interact with provision of parent-friendly visual information. Separate path analyses for each perinatal centre showed the same pattern, although the standard coefficients were different. Maternal perceptions of family-centred support with hospitalised preterm infants promoted better collaboration between mothers and nurses to obtain parent-crafting skills at two types of perinatal units in Japan. Clear visual information materials might promote better maternal understanding of their infants, help in acquisition of parent-crafting skills and improve mother-nurse collaboration, with the result that mothers are better able to care for their infants

  5. Neonatal Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Complications & Loss > Loss & grief > Neonatal death Neonatal death E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... cope with your baby’s death. What is neonatal death? Neonatal death is when a baby dies in ...

  6. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  7. Healthcare-associated infections in paediatric and neonatal wards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surveillance is seldom conducted in neonates and children in African .... nurses had additional duties including occupational health, quality ... this difference was not statistically significant. .... annual HH audits at Tygerberg Hospital (Sister Marina Aucamp, ... Behaviour modification and education on the importance of.

  8. Neonatal mortality at Leratong Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unit lacked sufficient NICU equipment. The aims of the ... staff on duty, admission room care for all neonates from the Leratong .... home (29%) or from another facility (4%). ..... The work load, coupled with shortage of trained nurses during.

  9. [Improving the provision of nesting and positioning for premature infants by nurses in neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Min; Lin, Kai-Hui; Su, Hsiu-Ya; Lin, Mei-Hsiang; Hsu, Chu-Ling

    2014-04-01

    Nesting and positioning is a common nursing skill used in the developmental care of premature infants. This skill maintains premature infants in a comfortable position, facilitates the monitoring of stable vital signs, and enables spontaneous motor activity for normal neuromuscular and skeletal joint function. This project was designed to improve nursing staff cognition and skills regarding nesting and positioning for premature infants in the NICU. Strategies used in this project were: develop an infant position assessment tool; record a demonstration video about nesting and positioning skills to provide learning efficacy among the nursing staff; and modify an education program for new nurses. After implementation, nurse cognition regarding premature infant nesting and positioning increased from 58.3% to 92.3%. The rate of correct technique use similarly rose from 63.3% to 91.4%. This is a valid intervention for improving the correctness of nesting and positioning in nursing care. This project standardized education in terms of nesting and positioning practice goals and enhanced quality care for premature infants.

  10. Difficulties in the dissemination and implementation of clinical guidelines in government neonatal intensive care units in Brazil: how managers, medical and nursing, position themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magluta, Cynthia; Gomes, Maria A de Sousa Mendes; Wuillaume, Susana M

    2011-08-01

    Clinical guidelines are tools that systematize scientific evidence and help to achieve proper care. Several difficulties are reported regarding the effective use, such as the shortcomings in the level of knowledge and attitudes by the professionals, the service structure and the preferences appointed by patients. An analysis of these difficulties was the objective of this study in the context of government Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) in Brazil. A semi-structured survey was carried out with 53 managers (medical and nursing) of the 15 NICU in a convenient sample of two groups of government units in Brazil. The managers chose their answers from a list of difficulties to implement the guidelines based on the analytical model of Cabana and graded the difficulties found on a 5-point scale with no reference to quality. Respondents have reported several difficulties with the following priority: lack of professionals to provide care, being perceived as more critical within the nursing and physiotherapy crews, minor participation of professionals in the discussion process and inadequate infrastructure. The lack of acquaintance with the guidelines by the professionals has been reported by few of the surveyed. These findings show some common ground to literature pointing the importance of adequate infrastructure. Managers showed a low valuation of both the level of knowledge and the professionals' adhesion to the guidelines. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Tecnologia educacional em saúde: contribuições para a enfermagem pediátrica e neonatal Tecnología educativa en salud: contribuciones para la enfermería pediátrica y neonatal Educational technology in health: contributions for pediatric and neonatal nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Mara Monti Fonseca

    2011-03-01

    pediatric and neonatal nursing teaching and practice, is pointed out. Technological resources in educational materials have been used in a progressively motivating and interactive pedagogical relationship, aiming to offer a more motivating learning for students, nursing teams, children and their families. This report describes the experience of a research and study group in the development of materials targeting permanent training and education in the area of pediatric and neonatal nursing. Health education for children and their relatives on different themes that permeates this care was also targeted. The developed educational materials permit students, health professionals and clients to experience the teaching and learning process in a stimulating way, facilitating the clarification of doubts and transforming learning through attractive, innovative and illustrative situations.

  12. An evaluation of bubble-CPAP in a neonatal unit in a developing country: effective respiratory support that can be applied by nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyamaibole, Lanieta; Kado, Joseph; Qovu, Josaia D; Colquhoun, Samantha; Duke, Trevor

    2006-08-01

    To describe the implementation of bubble-CPAP in a referral hospital in a developing country and to investigate: the feasibility of nurses implementing bubble-CPAP and the impact of bubble-CPAP on need for mechanical ventilation and mortality. Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data from two time periods: 18 months before and 18 months after the introduction of bubble-CPAP. The introduction of bubble-CPAP was associated with a 50 per cent reduction in the need for mechanical ventilation; from 113 of 1,106 (10.2 per cent) prior to bubble-CPAP to 70 of 1,382 (5.1%) after introduction of CPAP (chi2, pCPAP there were 79 deaths (case fatality of 7.1 per cent). In the 18 months after bubble-CPAP there were 74 deaths (CF 5.4 per cent), relative risk: 0.75 (0.55-1.02, chi2, p=0.065). Nurses could safely apply bubble-CPAP after 1-2 months of on-the-job training. Equipment for Bubble-CPAP cost 15 per cent of the cost of the cheapest mechanical ventilator. The introduction of bubble-CPAP substantially reduced the need for mechanical ventilation, with no difference in mortality. In models of neonatal care for resource-limited countries, bubble-CPAP may be the first type of ventilatory support that is recommended. Its low cost and safety when administered by nurses makes it ideal for this purpose. Bubble-CPAP has the potential for being available at even lower cost than the current commercially available bubble systems used in this study.

  13. Neonatal Outcomes in the Birth Center Setting: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippi, Julia C; Danhausen, Kathleen; Alliman, Jill; Phillippi, R David

    2018-01-01

    This systematic review investigates the effect of the birth center setting on neonatal mortality in economically developed countries to aid women and clinicians in decision making. We searched the Google Scholar, CINAHL, and PubMed databases using key terms birth/birthing center or out of hospital with perinatal/neonatal outcomes. Ancestry searches identified additional studies, and an alert was set for new publications. We included primary source studies in English, published after 1980, conducted in a developed country, and researching planned birth in centers with guidelines similar to American Association of Birth Centers standards. After initial review, we conducted a preliminary analysis, assessing which measures of neonatal health, morbidity, and mortality were included across studies. Neonatal mortality was selected as the sole summary measure as other measures were sporadically reported or inconsistently defined. Seventeen studies were included, representing at least 84,500 women admitted to a birth center in labor. There were substantial differences of study design, sampling techniques, and definitions of neonatal outcomes across studies, limiting conclusive statements of the effect of intrapartum care in a birth center. No reviewed study found a statistically increased rate of neonatal mortality in birth centers compared to low-risk women giving birth in hospitals, nor did data suggest a trend toward higher neonatal mortality in birth centers. As in all birth settings, nulliparous women, women aged greater than 35 years, and women with pregnancies of more than 42 weeks' gestation may have an increased risk of neonatal mortality. There are substantial flaws in the literature concerning the effect of birth center care on neonatal outcomes. More research is needed on subgroups at risk of poor outcomes in the birth center environment. To expedite research, consistent use of national and international definitions of perinatal and neonatal mortality within

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Including a Nurse Specialist in the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence in Primary Care in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Holtzer-Goor

    Full Text Available Incontinence is an important health problem. Effectively treating incontinence could lead to important health gains in patients and caregivers. Management of incontinence is currently suboptimal, especially in elderly patients. To optimise the provision of incontinence care a global optimum continence service specification (OCSS was developed. The current study evaluates the costs and effects of implementing this OCSS for community-dwelling patients older than 65 years with four or more chronic diseases in the Netherlands.A decision analytic model was developed comparing the current care pathway for urinary incontinence in the Netherlands with the pathway as described in the OCSS. The new care strategy was operationalised as the appointment of a continence nurse specialist (NS located with the general practitioner (GP. This was assumed to increase case detection and to include initial assessment and treatment by the NS. The analysis used a societal perspective, including medical costs, containment products (out-of-pocket and paid by insurer, home care, informal care, and implementation costs.With the new care strategy a QALY gain of 0.005 per patient is achieved while saving €402 per patient over a 3 year period from a societal perspective. In interpreting these findings it is important to realise that many patients are undetected, even in the new care situation (36%, or receive care for containment only. In both of these groups no health gains were achieved.Implementing the OCSS in the Netherlands by locating a NS in the GP practice is likely to reduce incontinence, improve quality of life, and reduce costs. Furthermore, the study also highlighted that various areas of the continence care process lack data, which would be valuable to collect through the introduction of the NS in a study setting.

  15. [Neonatal cholestasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquete, M L

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To warn pediatricians about the early recognition of cholestasis in newborns and infants. METHODS: A bibliographic research about cholestasis was performed using Medline, and emphasizing the most relevant publications of the last 30 years. RESULTS: The concept of cholestasis and the causes of cholestatic tendency in newborns and infants are described. Several causes of intra and extrahepatic cholestasis are reported as well. In this review, only the diseases with diagnostic, therapeutic or prognostic peculiarities are commented, including extrahepatic biliary atresia, idiopathic neonatal hepatitis, galactosemia, and Alagille s syndrome. Furthermore, several resources are discussed for the diagnosis of cholestasis. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of the diagnosis of cholestasis through the detection of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns who present jaundice after 14 days of life is a goal that could change the prognosis of several diseases responsible for neonatal cholestasis.

  16. Survey of attitudes and practices of Irish nursing students towards hand hygiene, including handrubbing with alcohol-based hand rub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Liz M; O'Connell, Nuala H; Dunne, Colum P

    2017-05-01

    Hand hygiene is widely recognised as the most important measure a healthcare worker can take in preventing the spread of healthcare associated infections. As a member of the healthcare team, nursing students have direct patient contact during clinical practice; hence, good hand hygiene practice among nursing students is essential. Low to moderate levels of hand hygiene knowledge and poor attitudes and practices are reported among nursing students. However, less is known about their attitudes and practices of handrubbing with ABHR, even though handrubbing is the recommended optimum practice in most situations. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes and practices of hand hygiene, in particular handrubbing with alcohol-based hand rub, among nursing students in Ireland. This survey employed a descriptive, self-report design using a questionnaire to gather data. It was administered electronically to all undergraduate nursing students (n=342) in the Department of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Limerick, Ireland in March and April 2015. Response rate was 66%. Attitudes towards hand hygiene were generally positive. Compliance with hand hygiene after contact with body fluid was high (99.5%) and before a clean or aseptic procedure (98.5%). However, suboptimal practices emerged, before touching a patient (85%), after touching a patient (87%) and after touching patients' surroundings (61%), with first year students more compliant than fourth year students. 16% of students were not aware of the clinical contraindications for using alcohol-based hand rub and 9% did not know when to use soap and water and when to use alcohol-based hand rub. Educators and practitioners play an important role in ensuring that nursing students develop appropriate attitudes towards hand hygiene and engage in optimal handrubbing practices. Raising awareness among nursing students of their responsibility in preventing the occurrence and reducing the transmission of HCAI as an on

  17. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care......BACKGROUND: For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home...... visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. OBJECTIVE: To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. METHODS: The study used...

  18. Fatores que tornam estressante o trabalho de médicos e enfermeiros em terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal: estudo de revisão bibliográfica Factors that cause stress in physicians and nurses working in a pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit: bibliographic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Revisão de literatura sobre estresse ocupacional e síndrome de burnout em médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal. MÉTODOS: Os artigos foram identificados a partir das bases de dados MedLine, LILACS e SciElo, usando as palavras-chave estresse, burnout, médicos, enfermagem, unidade de terapia intensiva, unidade de cuidados intensivos pediátricos e unidades de cuidados intensivos neonatais. O período pesquisado foi de 1990 a 2007. RESULTADOS: Médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal são candidatos a apresentarem estresse, alterações psicológicas e síndrome de Burnout. Pesquisas sobre o tema identificaram alterações importantes que acometem médicos e enfermeiros intensivistas: sobrecarga de trabalho, burnout, desejo de abandonar o trabalho e níveis elevados de cortisol entre outros fatores. CONCLUSÕES: Os profissionais que trabalham em unidade de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal , pela especificidade do seu trabalho, estão expostos ao risco do estresse ocupacional e, conseqüentemente ao Burnout. Estes dados sugerem a necessidade de serem feitas pesquisas, com o objetivo de desenvolver medidas preventivas e modelos de intervenção.OBJECTIVES: Bibliographic review on occupational stress and burnout presence in physicians and nurses that work in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units. METHODS: The articles were selected from the MedLine, LILACS and SciElo data base using the key words: stress, burnout, physicians, nursing, intensive care unit, pediatric intensive care unit and neonatal intensive care unit. The studied period ranged from 1990 to 2007. RESULTS: Health professionals who work in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units are strong candidates for developing stress, psychological alterations and burnout syndrome. Researches on this subject identified important alterations suffered by these

  19. MRI of neonatal encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khong, P.L.; Lam, B.C.C.; Tung, H.K.S.; Wong, V.; Chan, F.L.; Ooi, G.C.

    2003-01-01

    We present the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in neonatal encephalopathy, including hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, perinatal/neonatal stroke, metabolic encephalopathy from inborn errors of metabolism, congenital central nervous system infections and birth trauma. The applications of advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are emphasized

  20. Abdominal surgery in neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, James E; Gaughan, Earl M

    2005-08-01

    Abdominal surgery in foals under 30 days old has become more common with improved neonatal care. Early recognition of a foal at risk and better nursing care have increased the survival rates of foals that require neonatal care. The success of improved neonatal care also has increased the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal, umbilical, and bladder disorders in these foals. This chapter focuses on the early and accurate diagnosis of specific disorders that require abdominal exploratory surgery and the specific treatment considerations and prognosis for these disorders.

  1. Relation Between Interleukin-1-β And Interleukin-8 Levels In Breast Milk (Colostrum) And Neonatal Physiological Jaundice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.A.; Moawad, A.T.; Marei, E.S.

    2011-01-01

    The immune system of neonates is influenced by maternal immunity during pregnancy and lactation. Breast-fed neonates have higher incidence of neonatal jaundice and higher level of total serum bilirubin than formula-fed infants. The aim of this study was to find a relationship between neonatal physiological jaundice and interleukin-1-beta (IL-1-β) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the colostrum of nursing mothers. Breast milk (colostrum) was collected from 45 nursing mothers of healthy full term neonates. The sharing mothers and their neonates were divided into two groups according to the presence of neonatal jaundice and the level of total serum bilirubin. All jaundiced neonates had total serum bilirubin level more than 12 mg/dl which appeared on the third postpartum day, all of them were breast-fed only. They were subjected to full history through clinical examination and laboratory investigations including determination of colostral levels of IL-1-β and IL-8, by ELISA, and determination of neonatal total serum bilirubin levels. This study revealed that mothers of neonates with physiological jaundice had higher concentrations of IL-1-β and IL-8 in their colostrums as compared with control group. Moreover, it displayed that total serum bilirubin level of jaundiced neonates was higher than its level in non-jaundiced neonates. There were significant correlations between IL- 1-β and IL-8 with mother's age in all groups, while there were inverse correlations between IL-1-β, IL-8 and gestational age of non- jaundiced neonates. Additionally, there was significant correlation between IL-1-β and IL-8 in the colostrum of all mothers enrolled in this study. On the other hand, no correlation was determined between cytokines IL-1-β, IL-8 and total serum bilirubin in all neonates sharing in this study. This study clearly demonstrated that the levels of immunomodulating agents such as cytokines IL-1-β and IL-8 were elevated in the colostrum of mothers with jaundiced neonates

  2. Intensive care of the neonatal foal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterba, A M; Drummond, W H; Kosch, P

    1985-04-01

    The basic concepts of diagnosis and treatment in the abnormal neonatal foal are presented. Methods of restraint, sedation, and general nursing care are discussed, as well as more specific techniques of respiratory and circulatory system support.

  3. Produção de conhecimento sobre o cuidado ao recém-nascido em UTI Neonatal: contribuição da enfermagem brasileira Generación de conocimientos sobre el cuidado al recién nacido en UTI Neonatal: contribución de la Enfermería brasileña Production of knowledge about the care given to newborns in neonatal IC: contribution of Brazilian nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Costa

    2010-03-01

    Neonatología.The objective of this documentary study was to reflect on the state of the art of nursing in Brazil regarding care given to newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. The data source used was the Brazilian Nursing Association base of theses and dissertations. Eighty-one studies were located. Data analysis was performed in two stages: first, the study's characterization was performed; second, the material was organized according to data evident in the study, resulting in thematic categories: care centered on the newborn's physiological aspects; care provided to the family accompanying their newborn in the NICU; and the health team providing care to the newborn in the NICU. It was found that nursing research seeks new forms of care and brings theory closer to practice, thus guaranteeing its support of the nursing profession and contributing to the production of knowledge in neonatology.

  4. Fatal Neonatal Herpes Simplex Infection Likely from Unrecognized Breast Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Scott S

    2016-02-01

    Type 1 herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is very prevalent yet in rare circumstances can lead to fatal neonatal disease. Genital acquisition of type 2 HSV is the usual mode for neonatal herpes, but HSV-1 transmission by genital or extragenital means may result in greater mortality rates. A very rare scenario is presented in which the mode of transmission was likely through breast lesions. The lesions were seen by nurses as well as the lactation consultant and obstetrician in the hospital after delivery of the affected baby but not recognized as possibly being caused by herpes. The baby died 9 days after birth with hepatic failure and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Peripartum health care workers need to be aware of potential nongenital (including from the breast[s]) neonatal herpes acquisition, which can be lethal. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Early neonatal special care units and their scientific achievements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of sick neonates originated in maternity and foundling hospitals in the 19th century. Nosocomial infections and difficult logistics of wet-nursing prevented admission of neonates in most children's hospitals well into the 20th century. In this article, 31 hospitals are described, all located in large cities, in which preterm and sick neonates were treated before the Great Depression. Even though mostly initiated by private charity, these institutions performed research right from the start. Topics included warming and feeding preterm infants, collecting and distributing human milk, developing and storing breast milk substitutes, prevention of rickets and nosocomial infections, maternal and public education regarding infection control, pathoanatomic characterisation of diseases and malformations and epidemiologic studies of infant mortality. These pioneering hospitals, their founding dates, researchers and classic publications are presented in a table. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Dysphagia associated with presumed pharyngeal dysfunction in 16 neonatal foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, S J; Hurcombe, S D; Barr, B S; Schott, H C

    2012-02-01

    Dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction occurs in human neonates and is associated with prematurity and hypoxic episodes. This syndrome probably occurs in neonatal foals but has not been reported. The objectives of this study were to describe 1) a series of neonatal foals with dysphagia due to pharyngeal dysfunction; 2) the progression, treatment and resolution of the dysphagia; 3) the comorbidities; and 4) the prognosis for life and athleticism for affected foals. Records from 3 referral equine hospitals were reviewed from neonatal foals with dysphagia of pharyngeal origin. Inclusion criteria were a normal to strong suckle, dysphagia evidenced by milk at the nostrils after nursing the dam, and endoscopic examination of the airway. Foals with mechanical reasons for dysphagia, botulism or hyperkalaemic periodic paralysis were not included. Sixteen neonatal foals qualified for the study. Eight (50%) were premature and/or diagnosed with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy. Twelve (75%) had aspiration pneumonia. Fifteen foals were discharged alive from the hospital, nursing the mare with no evidence of dysphagia (n = 14), or mild dysphagia (n = 1), a mean +/- s.d. of 7 +/- 6 days (median = 6.3 days, range 0-22 days) after hospital admission. One foal was subjectedto euthanasia in hospital. Follow-up nformation was available for 14 animals. Thirteen of 16 (81%) were alive and included one yearling and 12 horses >2 years old. Seven of the 14 (50%) were racing, training or in work, and 6 horses were pets, breeding animals or had unknown athletic status. Two had laryngeal deficits. One foal was subjected to euthanasia within weeks of discharge from the hospital due to aspiration pneumonia. Dysphagia related to pharyngeal dysfunction occurs in equine neonates and can resolve, but may require days to weeks of supportive care. Prognosis for life is favourable and for athleticism fair.

  7. Competências, sofrimento e construção de sentido na atividade de auxiliares de enfermagem em Utin Skills, suffering and construction of meaning in the activity of auxiliary nurses in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata das competências requeridas/ desenvolvidas nas atividades de auxiliares de enfermagem de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal (Utin em articulação com a saúde dessas trabalhadoras (o sofrimento→prazer no trabalho. A perspectiva da ergologia orienta o esforço investigativo, incorporando outros referenciais, como os contidos nos estudos de Zarifian e Dejours. No plano metodológico, ainda tendo o ponto de vista da atividade como operador sintético, foram feitos levantamento e análise de documentos e visitas à Utin, operando-se com o dispositivo Encontros sobre o Trabalho, da Comunidade Ampliada de Pesquisa (CAP. Concluiu-se que o coletivo de auxiliares, protagonista do trabalho em análise, construiu um patrimônio de conhecimentos práticos sobre o seu trabalho e uma base minimamente eficaz de transmissão desse patrimônio. Fazendo uso da abordagem 'Psicodinâmica do Trabalho', ressaltou-se o caráter desafiante que o trabalho em UTI Neonatal apresenta, o que envolve saber lidar não só com o sofrimento dos neonatos como também o de mães e familiares, inclusive como forma de defesa contra seu próprio sofrimento, evitando um rumo patogênico. Observou-se, por fim, que é premente a demanda de qualificação formal por parte dessas trabalhadoras, o que propiciaria, dentre outros importantes benefícios, um maior reconhecimento social, com efeitos positivos sobre sua própria saúde.The article deals with vocational training and skills required in the activity of nursing staff in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU in conjunction with the 'body-self' and the health of these workers. It discusses the issue of jurisdiction in synergy with other issues relevant to her, as the ratio of service and suffering→pleasure working. The perspective of Ergology guides the investigative effort, incorporating other materials such as Zarifian and Dejours. At the methodological level, even taking the viewpoint of activity as

  8. Long-term efficacy of an ergonomics program that includes patient-handling devices on reducing musculoskeletal injuries to nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Arun; Kapellusch, Jay M

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term efficacy of an ergonomics program that included patient-handling devices in six long-term care facilities (LTC) and one chronic care hospital (CCH). Patient handling is recognized as a major source of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among nursing personnel, and several studies have demonstrated effectiveness of patient-handling devices in reducing those MSDs. However, most studies have been conducted in a single facility, for a short period, and/or without a comprehensive ergonomics program. Patient-handling devices along with a comprehensive ergonomics program was implemented in six LTC facilities and one CCH. Pre- and postintervention injury data were collected for 38.9 months (range = 29 to 54 months) and 51.2 months (range = 36 to 60 months), respectively. Postintervention patient-handling injuries decreased by 59.8% (rate ratio [RR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.28, 0.49], p nursing staff were fairly low. A vast majority of patients found the devices comfortable and safe. Longer transfer times with the use of devices was not an issue. Implementation of patient-handling devices along with a comprehensive program can be effective in reducing MSDs among nursing personnel. Strategies to expand usage of patient-handling devices in most health care settings should be explored.

  9. The role of the nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit: between the ideal, the real and the possible Actuación de la enfermera en la unidad de terapia intensiva neonatal: entre lo ideal, lo real y lo posible Atuação da enfermeira na unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal: entre o ideal, o real e o possível

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liciane Langona Montanholi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The nurse is one of the professionals responsible for the care directed toward the physical, mental and social development of newborns in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. This study aimed to comprehend the experience of nurses working in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Data collection was performed in 2008, through interviews with 12 nurses working in public and private hospitals of the city of São Paulo. The units of meaning identified were grouped into three categories: Developing actions; Perceiving their actions and Expectations. The analysis was based on social phenomenology. It was concluded that the overload of activities, the reduced number of staff, the lack of materials, equipment and the need for professional improvement are the reality of the work of the nurse in this sector. To supervise the care is the possible; integral care of the newborn, involving the parents, is the ideal desired.El enfermero es uno de los profesionales responsables por el cuidado dirigido al desarrollo físico, psíquico y social del recién nacido en la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal. Este trabajo objetivó comprender la experiencia de enfermeras que actúan en una Unidad de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal. La recolección de datos fue realizada en 2.008, por medio de entrevistas con 12 enfermeras que actuaban en hospitales públicos y privados de la ciudad de Sao Paulo. Las unidades de significado identificadas fueron agrupadas en tres categorías: Desarrollando acciones, Percibiendo sus acciones y Expectativas. El análisis fue fundamentado en la fenomenología social. Se concluye que la sobrecarga de actividades, el reducido número de personal, la falta de materiales, equipamientos y la necesidad de perfeccionamiento profesional son la realidad del trabajo de la enfermera en ese sector. Supervisar los cuidados, es posible; cuidar integralmente del recién nacido, envolviendo sus padres, es el ideal deseado.O enfermeiro é um dos profissionais respons

  10. Development and validation of a simple algorithm for initiation of CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundalani, Shilpa G; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Oden, Maria; Kawaza, Kondwani; Gest, Alfred; Molyneux, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Low-cost bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) systems have been shown to improve survival in neonates with respiratory distress, in developing countries including Malawi. District hospitals in Malawi implementing CPAP requested simple and reliable guidelines to enable healthcare workers with basic skills and minimal training to determine when treatment with CPAP is necessary. We developed and validated TRY (T: Tone is good, R: Respiratory Distress and Y=Yes) CPAP, a simple algorithm to identify neonates with respiratory distress who would benefit from CPAP. To validate the TRY CPAP algorithm for neonates with respiratory distress in a low-resource setting. We constructed an algorithm using a combination of vital signs, tone and birth weight to determine the need for CPAP in neonates with respiratory distress. Neonates admitted to the neonatal ward of Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, in Blantyre, Malawi, were assessed in a prospective, cross-sectional study. Nurses and paediatricians-in-training assessed neonates to determine whether they required CPAP using the TRY CPAP algorithm. To establish the accuracy of the TRY CPAP algorithm in evaluating the need for CPAP, their assessment was compared with the decision of a neonatologist blinded to the TRY CPAP algorithm findings. 325 neonates were evaluated over a 2-month period; 13% were deemed to require CPAP by the neonatologist. The inter-rater reliability with the algorithm was 0.90 for nurses and 0.97 for paediatricians-in-training using the neonatologist's assessment as the reference standard. The TRY CPAP algorithm has the potential to be a simple and reliable tool to assist nurses and clinicians in identifying neonates who require treatment with CPAP in low-resource settings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. An agent based architecture for high-risk neonate management at neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, Jaleh Shoshtarian; Safdari, Reza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Nayeri, Fatemeh Sadat; Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Farajollah, Seide Sedighe Seied

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the use of new tools and technologies has decreased the neonatal mortality rate. Despite the positive effect of using these technologies, the decisions are complex and uncertain in critical conditions when the neonate is preterm or has a low birth weight or malformations. There is a need to automate the high-risk neonate management process by creating real-time and more precise decision support tools. To create a collaborative and real-time environment to manage neonates with critical conditions at the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) and to overcome high-risk neonate management weaknesses by applying a multi agent based analysis and design methodology as a new solution for NICU management. This study was a basic research for medical informatics method development that was carried out in 2017. The requirement analysis was done by reviewing articles on NICU Decision Support Systems. PubMed, Science Direct, and IEEE databases were searched. Only English articles published after 1990 were included; also, a needs assessment was done by reviewing the extracted features and current processes at the NICU environment where the research was conducted. We analyzed the requirements and identified the main system roles (agents) and interactions by a comparative study of existing NICU decision support systems. The Universal Multi Agent Platform (UMAP) was applied to implement a prototype of our multi agent based high-risk neonate management architecture. Local environment agents interacted inside a container and each container interacted with external resources, including other NICU systems and consultation centers. In the NICU container, the main identified agents were reception, monitoring, NICU registry, and outcome prediction, which interacted with human agents including nurses and physicians. Managing patients at the NICU units requires online data collection, real-time collaboration, and management of many components. Multi agent systems are applied as

  12. Tuberculosis neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1986-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPEUTICOS. TUBERCULOSIS NEONATAL 1. CONCEPTO La tuberculosis neonatal es la infección del recién nacido producida por el bacilo de Koch. Es una situación rara pero grave que requiere un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento enérgico..

  13. Assistência de enfermagem em unidade de internação neonatal: medidas para prevenção de infecções hospitalares Asistencia de enfermería en unidades de hospitalización neonatal: medidas para prevención de infecciones hospitalarias Nursing care in neonatal units: measures for the prevention of hospital infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivone Kamada

    1997-01-01

    nursing care in terms of the environment, equipment, personnel and the newborn. In view of the problems related to hospital infection, the objective of the present investigation was lo determine the relationship between prescriptive measures for the Prevention of Infection and activities effectively carried out in a Neonatal Admission Unit. Participant observation and semi structured interviews were the strategies used for the investigation which allowed data collection. With this research we could see that prophylactic measures need to be taken together in a collection of activities based on adequate structure and facilities, performed by a cohesive professional team where everybody work towards the same goal. Measures taken isolated do not contribute to the effective accomplishment of prescriptions.

  14. Risk Factors for Pressure Ulcers Including Suspected Deep Tissue Injury in Nursing Home Facility Residents: Analysis of National Minimum Data Set 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyochol; Cowan, Linda; Garvan, Cynthia; Lyon, Debra; Stechmiller, Joyce

    2016-04-01

    To provide information on risk factors associated with pressure ulcers (PrUs), including suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI), in nursing home residents in the United States. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Examine the literature related to risk factors for the development of PrUs.2. Compare risk factors associated with the prevalence of PrUs and sDTI from the revised Minimum Data Set 3.0 2012 using a modified Defloor's conceptual model of PrUs as a theoretical framework. This study aims to characterize and compare risk factors associated with pressure ulcers (PrUs), including suspected deep tissue injury (sDTI), in nursing home (NH) residents in the United States. Secondary analysis of the 2012 Minimum Data Set (MDS 3.0). Medicare- or Medicaid-certified NHs in the United States. Nursing home residents (n = 2,936,146) 18 years or older with complete PrU data, who received comprehensive assessments from January to December 2012. Pressure ulcer by stage was the outcome variable. Explanatory variables (age, gender, race and ethnicity, body mass index, skin integrity, system failure, disease, infection, mobility, and cognition) from the MDS 3.0 were aligned with the 4 elements of Defloor's conceptual model: compressive forces, shearing forces, tissue tolerance for pressure, and tissue tolerance for oxygen. Of 2,936,146 NH residents who had complete data for PrU, 89.9% had no PrU; 8.4% had a Stage 2, 3, or 4 or unstagable PrU; and 1.7% had an sDTI. The MDS variables corresponding to the 4 elements of Defloor's model were significantly predictive of both PrU and sDTI. Black residents had the highest risk of any-stage PrU, and Hispanic residents had the highest risk of sDTI. Skin integrity, system failure, infection, and disease risk factors had larger effect sizes for sDTI than for other PrU stages

  15. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of neonatal staff concerning neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sizakele L.T. Khoza

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal pain management has received increasing attention over the past four decades. Research into the effects of neonatal pain emphasises the professional, ethical and moral obligations of staff to manage pain for positive patient outcomes. However, evaluation studies continuously report evidence of inadequate neonate pain management and a gap between theory and practice. Objective: This study reviewed current practice in neonatal pain management to describe the knowledge, attitudes and practices of nurses and doctors regarding pain management for neonates in two academic hospitals. Method: A non-experimental, prospective quantitative survey, the modified Infant Pain Questionnaire, was used to collect data from 150 nurses and doctors working in the neonatal wards of two academic hospitals in central Gauteng. Results: The response rate was 35.33% (n = 53, most respondents being professional nurses (88.68%; n = 47 working in neonatal intensive care units (80.77%; n = 42; 24 (45.28% had less than 5 years’ and 29 respondents 6 or more years’ working experience in neonatal care. A review of pain management in the study setting indicated a preference for pharmacological interventions to relieve moderate to severe pain. An association (p < 0.05 was found between pain ratings on 5 procedures and frequency of administration of pharmacological pain management. Two-thirds of respondents (64% reported that there were no pain management guidelines in the neonatal wards in which they worked. Conclusion: The interventions to manage moderate neonatal pain are in line with international guidelines. However, neonatal pain management may not occur systematically based on prior assessment of neonatal pain, choice of most appropriate intervention and evaluation. This study recommends implementation of a guideline to standardise practice and ensure consistent and adequate pain management in neonates.

  16. Neonatal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Shastri, Sweta; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-03-01

    Neonatal hypertension (HT) is a frequently under reported condition and is seen uncommonly in the intensive care unit. Neonatal HT has defined arbitrarily as blood pressure more than 2 standard deviations above the base as per the age or defined as systolic BP more than 95% for infants of similar size, gestational age and postnatal age. It has been diagnosed long back but still is the least studied field in neonatology. There is still lack of universally accepted normotensive data for neonates as per gestational age, weight and post-natal age. Neonatal HT is an important morbidity that needs timely detection and appropriate management, as it can lead to devastating short-term effect on various organs and also poor long-term adverse outcomes. There is no consensus yet about the treatment guidelines and majority of treatment protocols are based on the expert opinion. Neonate with HT should be evaluated in detail starting from antenatal, perinatal, post-natal history, and drug intake by neonate and mother. This review article covers multiple aspects of neonatal hypertension like definition, normotensive data, various etiologies and methods of BP measurement, clinical features, diagnosis and management.

  17. The first official schools for nursing education in Greece: over a century of tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Kousoulis, Antonis A; Karamanou, Marianna; Tsoucalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2011-12-01

    The pressing need for educated nursing staff in Greece was first recognized by Queen Olga and Crown Princess Sofia, at the end of the nineteenth century with significant international aid.As a result, the School of Nursing Sisters of the Sanatorium "Evangelismos" was founded in 1875 and the first Greek "School of Certified Nurses" of the "Saint Sophia" Children's Hospital was established in 1897. This Children's Hospital has provided Greece with excellent trained nurses in Pediatric as well as Neonatal and Infant Nursing ever since. Distinguished nurses from abroad as well as a plethora of professors and physicians have taught at the school which has effectively made a mark in forming a tradition until today. The international concept of the school, including enhancing the young nurses' practice with experience from abroad is one of its most interesting features. The first Greek nursing schools rank among the first in the world.

  18. [Parents and nursing staff's expectations regarding the nurse's work in a NICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Ivone; Rocha, Semíramis Melani Melo

    2006-09-01

    The general purpose of this investigation was to identify parent and nursing staff expectations regarding the nurse's role in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A descriptive study was carried out using a qualitative approach and interviews were conducted at a NICU in the interior of the State of São Paulo. Results showed new expectations on the part of parents and professionals regarding the role of NICU nurses. The knowledge identified as necessary were a family-centered approach, interpersonal relations techniques, and differentiation between technology and scientific knowledge. The conclusion is that NICU nurses need to play a more incisive role in the nursing care process, adjusting the use of technological advances to human knowledge, particularly in the area of interpersonal relationships between family members and staff, which includes activities of continuing education, such as specialization courses.

  19. The influence of nurse home visits, including provision of 3 months of contraceptives and contraceptive counseling, on perceived barriers to contraceptive use and contraceptive use self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnick, Alan L; Rdesinski, Rebecca E; Creach, E Dawn; Choi, Dongseok; Harvey, S Marie

    2008-01-01

    To identify the influence of a community health nurse (CHN) home visit on perceived barriers to contraceptive access and contraceptive use self-efficacy. We enrolled 103 women into two groups in a randomized trial evaluating the influence of contraceptive dispensing and family planning counseling during home visits on perceived barriers to accessing contraceptives and contraceptive use self-efficacy. Both groups received counseling by a CHN about sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy prevention, and a resource card listing phone numbers of family planning clinics. After randomization, the CHN dispensed three months of hormonal contraception to the intensive intervention group and advised the minimal intervention group to schedule an appointment at a family planning clinic. Data collection at baseline and 12 months included demographic, reproductive and other health-related information as well as quantitative assessments of information on perceived barriers to contraceptive access and contraceptive use self-efficacy. The mean age of participants was 24.7 years. Three-fourths had household incomes under $25,000. We found significant reductions in three perceived barriers to contraceptive access for both groups, as well as significant increases in two measures of contraceptive use self-efficacy at twelve months compared to baseline. Nurse home visits involving family planning counseling might be effective in reducing perceived barriers to contraceptive access and increasing contraceptive use self-efficacy.

  20. Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweigart, Erin

    2017-01-01

    NICU nurses have seen a dramatic increase in cases of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). The care needs of infants with NAS are highly demanding and can lead to feelings of frustration and emotional exhaustion among NICU nurses. Although studies have examined the experiences of nurses caring for NAS patients, none have specifically addressed the risk for compassion fatigue and burnout. Nurses need practical strategies to reduce their risk for compassion fatigue and burnout when caring for these patients. Improved education and implementation of self-care measures can help nurses more effectively manage stress and positively impact care of these infants and their families.

  1. Interpreting neonatal nursing care from the parents' experiences viewpoint Interpretación del cuidado de enfermería neonatal desde las experiencias y vivencias de los padres; Interpretação do cuidado da enfermagem neonatal partindo das experiências e vivências dos pais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RUIZ DE CÁRDENAS CARMEN HELENA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is "to interpret the experiences of the new-born's parents about nursing care received by their children in the newborn unit (UCIN of la Samaritana University Hospital (HUS". In a quantitative, descriptive and exploratory study, a semi structured interview was used which served as guide to obtain testimonies of fathers and mothers of hospitalized newborns. From the analysis of the information obtained from each one of the questions substantive codes were identified, which were grouped to form categories. The result was five categories: 1. Difficulties in the performance of the parents' role. 2. Impact due to the newborn hospitalization. 3. Expectations from the parents in relation with the newborn's care. 4. Assertive communication. 5. Parents learn from female/male nurse(s. The testimonies and analysis of each one of these strategies allow an approach to the interpretation of nursing care for parents of hospitalized newborns, based on their experiences. In the authors' opinion, the rise of two categories which are very important for nursing, can be highlighted, these have to continue being explored in other type of research: "parents learn from the nurses" and "assertive communication".El objetivo es "interpretar las experiencias y vivencias de los padres de los neonatos acerca del cuidado de enfermería que reciben sus hijos en la unidad de neonatos (UCIN del Hospital Universitario de la Samaritana (HUS". Es un estudio cualitativo, descriptivo, exploratorio. Se utilizó una entrevista semiestructurada la cual sirvió como guía para obtener los testimonios de los padres y madres de los neonatos hospitalizados. Del análisis de la información obtenida de cada una de las preguntas se identificaron códigos sustantivos, los cuales se agruparon con el fin de formar las categorías. Surgieron cinco categorías: 1. Dificultades en el desempeño del rol de padres. 2. Impacto ante la

  2. Interpretación del cuidado de enfermería neonatal desde las experiencias y vivencias de los padres do cuidado da enfermagem neonatal partindo das experiências e vivências dos pais Interpreting neonatal nursing care from the parents' experiences viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN CLEMENTE GUERRA GUERRA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo es "interpretar las experiencias y vivencias de los padres de los neonatos acerca del cuidado de enfermería que reciben sus hijos en la unidad de neonatos (UCIN del Hospital Universitario de la Samaritana (HUS". Es un estudio cualitativo, descriptivo, exploratorio. Se utilizó una entrevista semiestructurada la cual sirvió como guía para obtener los testimonios de los padres y madres de los neonatos hospitalizados. Del análisis de la información obtenida de cada una de las preguntas se identificaron códigos sustantivos, los cuales se agruparon con el fin de formar las categorías. Surgieron cinco categorías: 1. Dificultades en el desempeño del rol de padres. 2. Impacto ante la hospitalización del neonato. 3. Expectativas de los padres frente al cuidado del neonato. 4. Comunicación asertiva. 5. Los padres aprenden de las(os enfermeras(os. Los testimonios y el análisis de cada una de estas categorías permiten un acercamiento a la interpretación de lo que es el cuidado de enfermería para los padres de los neonatos hospitalizados, a partir de sus experiencias y vivencias. En opinión de los autores, resalta el surgimiento de dos categorías muy importantes para enfermería, que se deben seguir explorando en otro tipo de investigaciones: "los padres aprenden de las enfermeras" y "comunicación asertiva".O objetivo é "interpretar as experiências e vivências dos pais dos neonatos em torno ao cuidado de enfermagem fornecido aos filhos na unidade de cuidado intensivo neonatal (UCIN do Hospital Universitário da Samaritana (HUS". Esse é um levantamento qualitativo, descritivo e experimental. Utilizou-se uma entrevista semi-estruturada que serviu como orientação para obter os testemunhos dos pais e mães dos neonatos hospitalizados. Da análise da informação coletada com base em cada uma das perguntas, identificamos códigos substantivos, que foram compilados objetivando a formação de categorias. Dessa compilação sa

  3. The Influence of Neonatal Nursery Design on Mothers' Interactions in the Nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Liz; Peters, Kathryn; Rowe, Jennifer; Sheeran, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the influence of neonatal nursery design on interactions between nurses and mothers of infants in the nursery. We used a natural quasi-experimental design, using semi-structured interviews and a structured measure of mothers' and nurses' perceptions of nursing care, to compare mothers (n=26 and n=40) and nurses (n=22 and n=29) in an open-bay (OB) nursery and a single family room (SFR) nursery. Thematic analysis was used to generate key themes from the interviews. Mothers and nurses in both nursery designs talked about Valuing interactions; the importance of interactions between mothers and nurses. Mothers and nurses described SFRs as providing a space, My/their room, which enhanced mothers' sense of control and connection with the infant. SFRs were also associated with Changing the norms of interactions with nurses and other mothers, which created challenges in the desired quantity and quality of interactions for mothers and nurses. Nurses in the SFR nursery also reported Enhanced interactions, including improved confidentiality and personalized communication. Mothers in the OB nursery reported more supportive mothering actions from nurses than mothers in the SFR nursery. Both mothers and nurses in the OB nursery also talked about Our nursery community, which captured the value of having other nurses and mothers in the rooms. Mothers and nurses perceived that the SFR nursery enhanced privacy and maternal closeness for mothers compared to the OB nursery. However, the SFR nursery design presented challenges to some interactions of value to nurses and mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to implementing the Baby-Friendly hospital initiative in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Britney; Semenic, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    To explore manager, educator, and clinical leader perceptions of barriers and facilitators to implementing Baby-Friendly practice in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Qualitative, descriptive design. Two university-affiliated level-III NICUs in Canada. A purposive sample of 10 medical and nursing managers, nurse educators, lactation consultants, and neonatal nurse practitioners. In-depth, semistructured interviews transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Participants valued breastfeeding and family-centered care yet identified numerous contextual barriers to Baby-Friendly care including infant health status, parent/infant separation, staff workloads and work patterns, gaps in staff knowledge and skills, and lack of continuity of breastfeeding support. Facilitators included breastfeeding education, breastfeeding champions, and interprofessional collaboration. Despite identifying numerous barriers, participants recognized the potential value of expanding the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) to the NICU setting. Recommendations include promoting BFHI as a facilitator of family-centered care, interdisciplinary staff education, increasing access to lactation consultants, and establishing a group of NICU champions dedicated to BFHI implementation. © 2014 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  5. Volume and leak measurements during neonatal CPAP in neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Hendrik S.

    2011-01-01

    As yet, little is known about the effects of air leakages during CPAP in newborns. The present doctoral dissertation investigates tidal volume and leak measurements during nasal continuous positive airway pressure in neonates using a commercial ventilatory device. Investigations include in vitro studies, modelling and computer simulation as well as a clinical randomized cross-over trial in neonates.

  6. Status of neonatal intensive care units in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal mortality in India accounts for 50% of infant mortality, which has declined to 84/1000 live births. There is no prenatal care for over 50% of pregnant women, and over 80% deliver at home in unsafe and unsanitary conditions. Those women who do deliver in health facilities are unable to receive intensive neonatal care when necessary. Level I and Level II neonatal care is unavailable in most health facilities in India, and in most developing countries. There is a need in India for Level III care units also. The establishment of neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in India and developing countries would require space and location, finances, equipment, staff, protocols of care, and infection control measures. Neonatal mortality could be reduced by initially adding NICUs at a few key hospitals. The recommendation is for 30 NICU beds per million population. Each bed would require 50 square feet per cradle and proper climate control. Funds would have to be diverted from adult care. The largest expenses would be in equipment purchase, maintenance, and repair. Trained technicians would be required to operate and monitor the sophisticated ventilators and incubators. The nurse-patient ratio should be 1:1 and 1:2 for other infants. Training mothers to work in the NICUs would help ease the problems of trained nursing staff shortages. Protocols need not be highly technical; they could include the substitution of radiant warmers and room heaters for expensive incubators, the provision of breast milk, and the reduction of invasive procedures such as venipuncture and intubation. Nocosomial infections should be reduced by vacuum cleaning and wet mopping with a disinfectant twice a day, changing disinfectants periodically, maintaining mops to avoid infection, decontamination of linen, daily changing of tubing, and cleaning and sterilizing oxygen hoods and resuscitation equipment, and maintaining an iatrogenic infection record book, which could be used to

  7. Nurses' perceptions of critical issues requiring consideration in the development of guidelines for professional registered nurse staffing for perinatal units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Wilson, Jane; Ruhl, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    To solicit input from registered nurse members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) on critical considerations for review and revision of existing nurse staffing guidelines. Thematic analysis of responses to a cross-sectional on-line survey question: "Please give the staffing task force your input on what they should consider in the development of recommendations for staffing of perinatal units." Members of AWHONN (N = 884). Descriptions of staffing concerns that should be considered when evaluating and revising existing perinatal nurse staffing guidelines. Consistent themes identified included the need for revision of nurse staffing guidelines due to requirements for safe care, increases in patient acuity and complexity, invisibility of the fetus and newborn as separate and distinct patients, difficulties in providing comprehensive care during labor and for mother-baby couplets under current conditions, challenges in staffing small volume units, and the negative effect of inadequate staffing on nurse satisfaction and retention. Participants overwhelmingly indicated current nurse staffing guidelines were inadequate to meet the needs of contemporary perinatal clinical practice and required revision based on significant changes that had occurred since 1983 when the original staffing guidelines were published. © 2012 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  8. Approach to neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Narayan

    2015-01-01

    The treatment includes supportive care along with administration of appropriate antibiotics. Adjuvant treatment includes IVIG, GCSF, exchange transfusion and pentoxifylline administration. This paper aims to present an algorithmic approach to neonatal sepsis to expedite the diagnosis along with providing appropriate and adequate treatment.

  9. Preventing Workplace Injuries Among Perinatal Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Laura; Hurst, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of perinatal nursing put nurses at risk for injuries, including frequent repetitive bending, lifting of clients, and exposure to potentially large amounts of body fluids such as blood and amniotic fluid. Violence is also a potential risk with stressful family situations that may arise around childbirth. Workplace injuries put a health care facility at risk for staff turnover, decreases in the number of skilled nurses, client dissatisfaction, workers' compensation payouts, and employee lawsuits. Through the use of safety equipment, improved safety and violence training programs, "no manual lift" policies, reinforcement of personal protective equipment usage, and diligent staff training to improve awareness, these risks can be minimized. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  10. Neonatal neurosonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at

    2014-09-15

    Paediatric and particularly neonatal neurosonography still remains a mainstay of imaging the neonatal brain. It can be performed at the bedside without any need for sedation or specific monitoring. There are a number of neurologic conditions that significantly influence morbidity and mortality in neonates and infants related to the brain and the spinal cord; most of them can be addressed by ultrasonography (US). However, with the introduction of first CT and then MRI, neonatal neurosonography is increasingly considered just a basic first line technique that offers only orienting information and does not deliver much relevant information. This is partially caused by inferior US performance – either by restricted availability of modern equipment or by lack of specialized expertise in performing and reading neurosonographic scans. This essay tries to highlight the value and potential of US in the neonatal brain and briefly touching also on the spinal cord imaging. The common pathologies and their US appearance as well as typical indication and applications of neurosonography are listed. The review aims at encouraging paediatric radiologists to reorient there imaging algorithms and skills towards the potential of modern neurosonography, particularly in the view of efficacy, considering growing economic pressure, and the low invasiveness as well as the good availability of US that can easily be repeated any time at the bedside.

  11. Neonatal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Glycerin Suppositories During Phototherapy in Premature Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler-O'Hara, Meggan; Reininger, Ann; Wang, Hongyue; Amin, Sanjiv B; Rodgers, Nathan J; D'Angio, Carl T

    To determine if glycerin suppositories were effective in reducing total duration of phototherapy in premature neonates. We hypothesized that glycerin suppositories would have no effect on phototherapy duration or total serum bilirubin levels. Prospective randomized controlled double-blinded trial. Level IV NICU. Neonates born between 30 weeks, 0 days and 34 weeks, 6 days gestational age who developed physiologic hyperbilirubinemia needing phototherapy. Neonates were randomized to the no-suppository group or to the suppository group. Neonates were randomized to receive glycerin suppositories every 8 hours while under phototherapy or to a sham group. The primary outcome was total hours of phototherapy. Secondary outcomes included peak total serum bilirubin levels, time from start to discontinuation of phototherapy, rate of decline in bilirubin levels, repeat episodes of phototherapy, and number of stools while the neonates received phototherapy. A total of 39 neonates were assigned to the no-suppository group and 40 to the suppository group. Withholding suppositories was not inferior to providing suppositories. The total hours of phototherapy were not longer (i.e., noninferior) among neonates not provided suppositories (61 ± 53 hours) than among those given suppositories (72 ± 49 hours). There were no differences in peak bilirubin levels, rate of bilirubin decline, or repeat episodes of phototherapy. Routine use of glycerin suppositories among preterm neonates who receive phototherapy does not affect bilirubin levels or phototherapy duration. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nurses who work outside nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine; Pallas, Linda O'Brien; Aitken, Leanne M

    2004-09-01

    The desire to care for people, a family history of professional health care work, and security in career choice are documented reasons for entering nursing. Reasons for leaving include workload, unsafe work environments and harassment. The relationship between these factors and the time nurses spend in the profession has not been explored. This paper reports a study with people who have left nursing, to investigate why they became a nurse, how long they stayed in nursing, and their reasons for leaving. A questionnaire was mailed to Registered Nurses currently working outside nursing, seeking respondents' reasons for entering and leaving nursing, and perceptions of the skills gained from nursing and the ease of adjustment to working in a non-nursing environment. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, correlational analysis and linear and multiple regression analysis. A model incorporating the factors 'altruistic reasons', 'default choice' and 'stepping stone' explained 36.2% of the variance in reasons for becoming a nurse. A model incorporating the factors 'legal and employer', 'external values and beliefs about nursing', 'professional practice', 'work life/home life' and 'contract requirements' explained 55.4% of the variance in reasons for leaving nursing. Forty-eight per cent of the variance in tenure in nursing practice was explained through personal characteristics of nurses (36%), reasons for becoming a nurse (7%) and reasons for leaving (6%). The reasons why nurses entered or left the profession were varied and complex. While personal characteristics accounted for a large component of tenure in nursing, those managing the nursing workforce should consider professional practice issues and the balance between work life and home life.

  14. Ictericia Neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco de la Fuente, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    El motivo que ha llevado a la realización de este trabajo fin de grado sobre el tema de la ICTERICIA NEONATAL se debe a la elevada frecuencia de su aparición en la población. Un porcentaje elevado de RN la padecen al nacer siendo, en la mayor parte de los casos, un proceso fisiológico resuelto con facilidad debido a una inmadurez del sistema hepático y a una hiperproducción de bilirrubina. La ictericia neonatal es la pigmentación de color amarillo de la piel y mucosas en ...

  15. Rings in the neonate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hackett, C B

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is an uncommon disease of the neonate. It is believed to be caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies to the ribonucleoproteins (Ro\\/SSA, La\\/SSB or rarely U RNP) as these are almost invariably present in NLE sera. The most common clinical manifestations include cutaneous lupus lesions and congenital complete heart block. Hepatobiliary and haematologic abnormalities are reported less frequently. We describe a patient with cutaneous NLE to illustrate and raise awareness of the characteristic annular eruption of this condition. We also emphasize the need for thorough investigation for concomitant organ involvement and for maternal education regarding risk in future pregnancies.

  16. Maternal periodontal disease, pregnancy, and neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasanayake, Ananda P; Gennaro, Susan; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Chhun, Nok

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the current literature on the association between maternal periodontal disease and poor pregnancy and neonatal outcomes and outline the role nurses can play in improving the oral health of pregnant women. Maternal periodontal disease is linked to preterm birth, low birthweight, and preterm low birthweight, but treatment of periodontal disease during pregnancy has been shown to be safe and effective. Nurses, nurse practitioners, and nurse-midwives are in a position to educate pregnant women on the benefits of good oral health and identify and refer women who are in need of dental care for treatment.

  17. Neonatal Jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Væth, Michael; Schendel, Diana

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that infants transferred to a neonatal ward after delivery had an almost twofold increased risk of being diagnosed with infantile autism later in childhood in spite of extensive controlling of obstetric risk factors. We therefore decided to investigate other reasons ...

  18. The Impact of an Educational Program Regarding Total Parenteral Nutrition on Infection Indicators in Neonates Admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marofi, Maryam; Bijani, Nahid; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Barekatain, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    One of the basic care measures for preterm infants is providing nutrition through total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and one of the most important complications of it is infection. Because prevention of nosocomial infections is an important issue for neonate's safety, this study aimed to determine the effects of a continuing medical education (CME) course on TPN for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses on indicators of infection in newborns. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 127 neonates who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. They were selected through simple convenience sampling method at two stages of before and after the CME program. The inclusion criteria were prescription of TPN by the physician and lack of clinical evidences for infection in newborns before the beginning of TPN. Death of the infant during each stage of the study was considered as the exclusion criteria. The data gathering tool was a data record sheet including clinical signs of infection in the infants and their demographic characteristics. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and student's t -test in SPSS software. The results showed the frequency of clinical markers for infection in newborns at the pre-intervention stage ( n = 41; 65.10%) was significantly less than at the post-intervention stage ( n = 30; 46.90%) ( p = 0.04). Nursing educational programs on TPN reduce infection rates among neonates in NICUs.

  19. Hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada Aggravated neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Campo González

    2010-09-01

    a low birth weight. Most of patients were treated with luminotherapy (90,17%. CONCLUSION. The severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is a health problem. Aggravating factors include the prematurity and the low birth weight. Luminotherapy is an effective therapeutic measure for its treatment.

  20. Parental satisfaction in the traditional system of neonatal intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission is a time of significant stress for the ... depression, both during the neonate's hospitalisation and in the post- ... directly, as the expressed breastmilk is fed to the baby by nursing staff as per its need ...

  1. Empowerment of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parents of infants who are admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) need to be empowered to improve bonding, attachment and care-giving skills. Neonatal nurses play a critical role in the empowerment of such parents, but often find it difficult due to a lack of clarity on how it has to be done. A qualitative contextual ...

  2. Advancing nursing scholarship: the Mozambique model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Judith C; Dippenaar, Joan; Schmollgruber, Shelley; Mphuthi, David D; Huiskamp, Agnes

    2017-01-01

    Despite the importance of Human Resources for Health for the development and functioning of health systems worldwide, many countries continue to be plagued by poor health systems and a lack of adequate health care. Health systems failures may be attributed to both quantitative and qualitative nursing shortages including the lack of advanced skills to lead health initiatives, to conduct research and to educate other nurses. The response by development partners is usually framed around the production of skilled nurses through the processes of up-skilling and scaling-up. The outcome is expanded practice but with scant attention to the professional advancement of nurses. In this paper we present a two-phased capacity development model that adopted professionalization strategies to advance nursing scholarship and consequent postgraduate specialization of the first cohort of nurses in Mozambique. The main objectives were to: develop and implement a clinical course work master's degree in nursing; and ensure sustainability by capacitating the host institution to continue with the master's programme following graduation. Rigorous processes for project discussions, negotiations and monitoring were necessary amid limited resources and a challenging political climate. Forging in-country partnerships, sustaining alliances and government investment are thus key to the success of the Mozambique model. Notwithstanding some difficulties, the process unfolded over a five-year period, graduating the first cohort of 11 senior nurses with a master's degree, specializing either in critical care and trauma nursing, or maternal and neonatal health. Bridging the skills gap between generalist and specialist nurses is essential for them to manage complex and high acuity cases and to reverse associated morbidity and mortality. We conclude that this model serves as a professionalization strategy to advance nurses' scholarship of clinical practice, research and teaching.

  3. Enhancing neonatal wellness with home visitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Carlo; Warmuskerken, Geene; Sinclair, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    We planned and implemented an evidence-based program to screen for jaundice and to try to increase the proportion of women breastfeeding for 6 months. The program involved home visitation by a registered nurse to provide education on and support of breastfeeding, and to perform physical assessment of both mothers and newborns, including screening for neonatal jaundice. Quantitative data showed increased breastfeeding rates at 6 months. In addition, readmission rates for jaundice were higher when compared to regional benchmarks. However, the average length of stay for treatment of jaundice was shorter than regional benchmarks. Qualitative data indicated that the program was effective at achieving its goals and was valued by participants. © 2015 AWHONN.

  4. Neonatal hypocalcemia, neonatal seizures, and intellectual disability in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Evelyn Ning Man; George, Susan R.; Andrade, Danielle M.; Chow, Eva W. C.; Silversides, Candice K.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hypocalcemia is a common endocrinological condition in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Neonatal hypocalcemia may affect neurodevelopment. We hypothesized that neonatal hypocalcemia would be associated with rare, more severe forms of intellectual disability in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Methods We used a logistic regression model to investigate potential predictors of intellectual disability severity, including neonatal hypocalcemia, neonatal seizures, and complex congenital heart disease, e.g., interrupted aortic arch, in 149 adults with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Ten subjects had moderate-to-severe intellectual disability. Results The model was highly significant (P < 0.0001), showing neonatal seizures (P = 0.0018) and neonatal hypocalcemia (P = 0.047) to be significant predictors of a more severe level of intellectual disability. Neonatal seizures were significantly associated with neonatal hypocalcemia in the entire sample (P < 0.0001), regardless of intellectual level. There was no evidence for the association of moderate- to-severe intellectual disability with other factors such as major structural brain malformations in this sample. Conclusion The results suggest that neonatal seizures may increase the risk for more severe intellectual deficits in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, likely mediated by neonatal hypocalcemia. Neonatal hypocalcemia often remains unrecognized until the postseizure period, when damage to neurons may already have occurred. These findings support the importance of early recognition and treatment of neonatal hypocalcemia and potentially neonatal screening for 22q11.2 deletions. PMID:23765047

  5. Neonatal Kraniefraktur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine Marie Harries; Stantchev, Hristo

    2015-01-01

    During the latest decades the incidence of birth traumas has decreased significantly. Even so the traumas still contribute to an increased mortality and morbidity. We present a case of spontaneous neonatal skull fracture following a normal vaginal delivery. Abnormal facial structure was seen, and......, and the fracture was identified with an MRI. The fractures healed without neurosurgical intervention. Case reports show that even in uncomplicated vaginal deliveries skull fractures can be seen and should be suspected in children with facial abnormalities....

  6. Neonatal Listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Western developed countries, Listeria monocytogenes is not an uncommon pathogen in neonates. However, neonatal listeriosis has rarely been reported in Taiwan. We describe two cases collected from a single medical institute between 1990 and 2005. Case 1 was a male premature baby weighing 1558 g with a gestational age of 31 weeks whose mother had fever with chills 3 days prior to delivery. Generalized maculopapular rash was found after delivery and subtle seizure developed. Both blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture collected on the 1st day yielded L. monocytogenes. In addition, he had ventriculitis complicated with hydrocephalus. Neurologic development was normal over 1 year of follow-up after ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. Case 2 was a 28-weeks' gestation male premature baby weighing 1180 g. Endotracheal intubation and ventilator support were provided after delivery due to respiratory distress. Blood culture yielded L. monocyto-genes. Cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis but the culture was negative. Brain ultrasonography showed ventriculitis. Sudden deterioration with cyanosis and bradycardia developed on the 8th day and he died on the same day. Neonatal listeriosis is uncommon in Taiwan, but has significant mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis of perinatal infection relies on high index of suspicion in perinatal health care professionals. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:161-164

  7. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J; Kinney, James; Puntel, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  8. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military of Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J

    2006-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland, will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can, with telemedicine supervision, perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  9. Telemedicine Based Ultrasound for Detecting Neonatal Heart Disease in Babies at Remote Military or Native American Health Care Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sahn, David J; Kinney, James; Puntel, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ... & Science University in Portland will test the hypothesis that trained primary care practitioners or nurses can with telemedicine supervision perform cardiac ultrasound exams on neonates at risk...

  10. Moral distress within neonatal and paediatric intensive care units: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Trisha; Janvier, Annie; Gillam, Lynn; Davis, Peter G

    2016-08-01

    To review the literature on moral distress experienced by nursing and medical professionals within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Pubmed, EBSCO (Academic Search Complete, CINAHL and Medline) and Scopus were searched using the terms neonat*, infant*, pediatric*, prematur* or preterm AND (moral distress OR moral responsibility OR moral dilemma OR conscience OR ethical confrontation) AND intensive care. 13 studies on moral distress published between January 1985 and March 2015 met our inclusion criteria. Fewer than half of those studies (6) were multidisciplinary, with a predominance of nursing staff responses across all studies. The most common themes identified were overly 'burdensome' and disproportionate use of technology perceived not to be in a patient's best interest, and powerlessness to act. Concepts of moral distress are expressed differently within nursing and medical literature. In nursing literature, nurses are often portrayed as victims, with physicians seen as the perpetrators instigating 'aggressive care'. Within medical literature moral distress is described in terms of dilemmas or ethical confrontations. Moral distress affects the care of patients in the NICU and PICU. Empirical data on multidisciplinary populations remain sparse, with inconsistent definitions and predominantly small sample sizes limiting generalisability of studies. Longitudinal data reflecting the views of all stakeholders, including parents, are required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Neonates need tailored drug formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegaert, Karel

    2013-02-08

    Drugs are very strong tools used to improve outcome in neonates. Despite this fact and in contrast to tailored perfusion equipment, incubators or ventilators for neonates, we still commonly use drug formulations initially developed for adults. We would like to make the point that drug formulations given to neonates need to be tailored for this age group. Besides the obvious need to search for active compounds that take the pathophysiology of the newborn into account, this includes the dosage and formulation. The dosage or concentration should facilitate the administration of low amounts and be flexible since clearance is lower in neonates with additional extensive between-individual variability. Formulations need to be tailored for dosage variability in the low ranges and also to the clinical characteristics of neonates. A specific focus of interest during neonatal drug development therefore is a need to quantify and limit excipient exposure based on the available knowledge of their safety or toxicity. Until such tailored vials and formulations become available, compounding practices for drug formulations in neonates should be evaluated to guarantee the correct dosing, product stability and safety.

  12. Skin care product evaluation in a group of critically ill, premature neonates: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Daniel L; Chakravarthy, Debashish; Drower, Edward; Reyna, Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Cleansing, moisturizing, and protecting neonatal skin is important, but literature evaluating specific product lines is limited. The purpose of this study was to measure the influence of a skin care product line on overall skin condition, perineal erythema, and pain when applied to neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). This was an open label, descriptive study. Comparisons were made between measurements taken at the beginning of the study to those at the end, on the same subjects. The study was conducted in a 41-bed NICU at Driscoll Children's Hospital in Corpus Christi, Texas, that serves 31 counties in the region. This NICU treats children needing level 2 and 3 care, with a 1:1 or 2:1 nurse staffing ratio. This is not a birthing center; patients come from other community hospitals. Twenty-nine neonates participated in the study; their average body weight was 1.39 kg (3.06 lb) and their average gestation was 31.7 weeks. A skin care product line was introduced into a neonatal intensive care unit for 14 days. The products included 2 cleansers, 2 moisturizers, and a skin protectant with zinc oxide. Three outcome measures were tracked: Neonatal Skin Condition Score (NSCS), Skin Erythema Scale (SES), and pain. Nurses were also given a product evaluation survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report percentages and trends. Paired t tests were used to compare the mean NSCS, SES, and pain scores from the first 2 days a subject was in the study to the mean of the scores from the last 2 days they were in the study. Subjects experienced approximately 1774 exposures to individual products during data collection. No differences were found in pain scores (P = .132), SES score (P = .059), or NSCS (P = .603) when mean values were compared at the beginning and end of the study. Analysis of the product evaluation survey for questions on cleaning, moisturizing, and reducing discomfort found that more than 90% of nurses ranked the new products as better than or

  13. Essential competencies in nursing education for prevention and care related to unintended pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Caroline; Cappiello, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    To identify the essential competencies for prevention and care related to unintended pregnancy to develop program outcomes for nursing curricula. Modified Delphi study. National. Eighty-five nurse experts, including academic faculty and advanced practice nurses providing sexual and reproductive health care in primary or specialty care settings. Expert panelists completed a three-round Delphi study using an electronic survey. Eighty-five panelists completed the first round survey, and 72 panelists completed all three rounds. Twenty-seven items achieved consensus of at least 75% of the experts by the third round to comprise the educational competencies. Through an iterative process, experts in prevention and care related to unintended pregnancy reached consensus on 27 core educational competencies for nursing education. The competencies provide a framework for curricular development in an important area of nursing education. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  14. [Neonatal tumours and congenital malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbel Tornero, O; Ortega García, J A; Ferrís i Tortajada, J; García Castell, J; Donat i Colomer, J; Soldin, O P; Fuster Soler, J L

    2008-06-01

    The association between pediatric cancer and congenital abnormalities is well known but, there is no exclusive data on the neonatal period and the underlying etiopathogenic mechanisms are unknown. First, to analyze the frequency of neonatal tumours associated with congenital abnormalities; and second, to comment on the likely etiopathogenic hypotheses of a relationship between neonatal tumours and congenital abnormalities. Historical series of neonatal tumours from La Fe University Children's Hospital in Valencia (Spain), from January 1990 to December 1999. Histological varieties of neonatal tumours and associated congenital abnormalities were described. A systematic review of the last 25 years was carried out using Medline, Cancerlit, Index Citation Science and Embase. The search profile used was the combination of "neonatal/congenital-tumors/cancer/neoplasms" and "congenital malformations/birth defects". 72 neonatal tumours were identified (2.8% of all pediatric cancers diagnosed in our hospital) and in 15 cases (20.8%) there was some associated malformation, disease or syndrome. The association between congenital abnormalities and neonatal tumours were: a) angiomas in three patients: two patients with congenital heart disease with a choanal stenosis, laryngomalacia; b) neuroblastomas in two patients: horseshoe kidney with vertebral anomalies and other with congenital heart disease; c) teratomas in two patients: one with cleft palate with vertebral anomalies and other with metatarsal varus; d) one tumour of the central nervous system with Bochdaleck hernia; e) heart tumours in four patients with tuberous sclerosis; f) acute leukaemia in one patient with Down syndrome and congenital heart disease; g) kidney tumour in one case with triventricular hydrocephaly, and h) adrenocortical tumour: hemihypertrophy. The publications included the tumours diagnosed in different pediatric periods and without unified criteria to classify the congenital abnormalities. Little data

  15. Neonatal hypoglycaemia: learning from claims

    OpenAIRE

    Hawdon, Jane M; Beer, Jeanette; Sharp, Deborah; Upton, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal hypoglycaemia is a potential cause of neonatal morbidity, and on rare but tragic occasions causes long-term neurodevelopmental harm with consequent emotional and practical costs for the family. The organisational cost to the NHS includes the cost of successful litigation claims. The purpose of the review was to identify themes that could alert clinicians to common pitfalls and thus improve patient safety. Design The NHS Litigation Authority (NHS LA) Claims Management Syste...

  16. Infant outcomes of certified nurse midwife attended home births: United States 2000 to 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, M H

    2010-09-01

    Home births attended by certified nurse midwives (CNMs) make up an extremely small proportion of births in the United States (home deliveries compared with certified nurse midwife in-hospital deliveries in the United States as measured by the risk of adverse infant outcomes among women with term, singleton, vaginal deliveries. United States linked birth and infant death files for the years 2000 to 2004 were used for the analysis. Adverse neonatal outcomes including death were determined by place of birth and attendant type for in-hospital certified nurse midwife, in-hospital 'other' midwife, home certified nurse midwife, home 'other' midwife, and free-standing birth center certified nurse midwife deliveries. For the 5-year period there were 1 237 129 in-hospital certified nurse midwife attended births; 17 389 in-hospital 'other' midwife attended births; 13 529 home certified nurse midwife attended births; 42 375 home 'other' midwife attended births; and 25 319 birthing center certified nurse midwife attended births. The neonatal mortality rate per 1000 live births for each of these categories was, respectively, 0.5 (deaths=614), 0.4 (deaths=7), 1.0 (deaths=14), 1.8 (deaths=75), and 0.6 (deaths=16). The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for neonatal mortality for home certified nurse midwife attended deliveries vs in-hospital certified nurse midwife attended deliveries was 2.02 (1.18, 3.45). Deliveries at home attended by CNMs and 'other midwives' were associated with higher risks for mortality than deliveries in-hospital by CNMs.

  17. Involvement of parents in care. Telemedicin neonatal homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, K. G.; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Neonatal homecare (NH) is an alternative to hospitalization for healthy preterm infants dependent only on tube feeding. NH implies parents managing tube feeding while establishing breastfeeding at home with support from neonatal nurses offering home visits regularly, until breastfeed......INTRODUCTION Neonatal homecare (NH) is an alternative to hospitalization for healthy preterm infants dependent only on tube feeding. NH implies parents managing tube feeding while establishing breastfeeding at home with support from neonatal nurses offering home visits regularly, until...... breastfeeding is established. Home visits are time consuming and challenging for neonatal units covering big geographical areas and therefore replacements for home visits should be considered. The aim of this study is to identify parent’s needs when receiving NH and thereby identify requirements...

  18. Translating continuing professional development education to nursing practice in Rwanda: Enhancing maternal and newborn health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Kasine

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately 99% of the three million neonatal deaths that occur annually are in developing countries. In Rwanda, neonatal asphyxia is the leading cause of neonatal mortality accounting for 38% of all neonatal deaths. The Helping Babies Breathe (HBB© course was initiated by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP in 2010 to reduce neonatal mortality in resource limited areas. Despite the provision of HBB© courses to practicing nurses in Rwanda, little is known about nurses’ experiences of applying the knowledge and skills acquired from those courses to practice. This study was conducted in 2014 in five district hospitals (Nyamata, Rwamagana, Gahini, Kiziguro, and Kibungo located in the Eastern Province of Rwanda. Purpose: Explore nurses’ experiences of translating continuing professional development (CPD education utilizing the HBB© course to nursing practice in Rwanda. Methods: Qualitative descriptive design. A purposive sample of 10 nurses participated in individual interviews. NVIVO computer software was used to manage qualitative data. Content analysis was used for generating categories from the data. Findings: Three categories emerged from the analysis: 1 application of competencies acquired from education sessions to practice, 2 benefits of CPD, and 3 facilitators and barriers to the application of competencies into practice. Qualitative interviews revealed that Nurses’ perceived confidence in performing newborn resuscitation improved after taking part in HBB© courses. Nonetheless, nurses voiced the existence of conditions in their work environment that hindered their ability to apply the acquired knowledge and skills including insufficient materials, shortages of nurses, and potential inadequate human resource allocation. Recommendations and conclusion: Regular offerings of newborn resuscitation CPD courses to health professionals in developing countries could increase their knowledge and skills, which could

  19. Neonatal hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straussman, Sharon; Levitsky, Lynne L

    2010-02-01

    Hypoglycemia in the newborn may be associated with both acute decompensation and long-term neuronal loss. Studies of the cause of hypoglycemic brain damage and the relationship of hypoglycemia to disorders associated with hyperinsulinism have aided in our understanding of this common clinical finding. A recent consensus workshop concluded that there has been little progress toward a precise numerical definition of neonatal hypoglycemia. Nonetheless, newer brain imaging modalities have provided insight into the relationship between neuronal energy deficiency and central nervous system damage. Laboratory studies have begun to reveal the mechanism of hypoglycemic damage. In addition, there is new information about hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of genetic, environmental, and iatrogenic origin. The quantitative definition of hypoglycemia in the newborn remains elusive because it is a surrogate marker for central nervous system energy deficiency. Nonetheless, the recognition that hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, which produces profound central nervous system energy deficiency, is most likely to lead to long-term central nervous system damage, has altered management of children with hypoglycemia. In addition, imaging studies on neonates and laboratory evaluation in animal models have provided insight into the mechanism of neuronal damage.

  20. Systematic review of qualitative studies exploring parental experiences in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Maghaireh, Dua'a Fayiz; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim; Chan, Chong Mei; Piaw, Chua Yan; Al Kawafha, Mariam Mofleh

    2016-10-01

    To determine the feasibility and utility of a thematic analysis approach to synthesising qualitative evidence about parental experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit. Admission of infants to the neonatal intensive care unit is usually an unexpected event for parents who can cause them to experience psychosocial difficulties. A qualitative systematic review is the best method for exploring these parents' experiences regarding this type of admission. Systematic review. Qualitative studies in peer-reviewed journals aimed at understanding parental experiences regarding infant neonatal intensive care unit admission were identified in six electronic databases. Three reviewers selected relevant articles and assessed the quality of the methodological studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A thematic analysis approach was used to identify the most common themes in the studies describing parental experiences in the neonatal intensive care unit. A total of eighty articles were identified; nine studies were included in this review. Four studies used semistructured interviews, three used interviews, one used self-reporting and one used both focus group and interview methodologies. Common themes across parents' experiences were the stress of hospitalisation, alteration in parenting roles and the impact of infant hospitalisation on psychological health. Having an infant hospitalised in the neonatal intensive care unit is a stressful experience for parents. This experience is the result of exposure to different stressors related to the infant's condition, an alteration in parenting roles or the neonatal intensive care unit environment and staffing. These parents suffered negative psychological effects, experienced an interrupted development of a healthy parent-infant attachment and/or felt parental role alteration. The study's findings are crucial for neonatal intensive care unit nurses to develop intervention strategies and programmes that help parents to

  1. The Effect of Body Position on Pain Due to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP in Premature Neonates: A Cross-Over Clinical Trial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Jabraeili

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The most common cause of admission to neonatal intensive care units (NICU is respiratory distress syndrome. One of the respiratory assistance methods is using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Regarding the importance of pain control which is one of the major priorities in neonatal nursing care, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of body position on pain due to nasal CPAP in premature neonates. Materials and Methods In this cross-over clinical trial, 50 premature neonates who were receiving nasal CPAP admitted to the NICU of Imam Reza Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, were included. The neonates were randomly placed at three body positions (fetal, supine, and prone positions. Pain was measured by Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital Pain Scale Neonates (ALPS-Neo pain assessment scale. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS software (Version 22.0. Results Significant difference existed regarding pain of nasal CPAP among body positions (p< 0.001. Mean (SD pain was 5.15 (0.822 in fetal position, 6.260 (0.747 in prone position and 7.326 (0.792 in supine position. Conclusion Body positioning in premature neonates under nasal CPAP in NICU can be effective as a non-pharmacologic method in alleviating pain due to nasal CPAP. Among the studied positions, the lowest pain score was seen in fetal position.

  2. Succession Planning for Nursing Leaders in a College of Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) challenged nursing to ensure the nursing workforce includes a sufficient number of academic nurse leaders, nurse educators, and doctorally prepared nurses for the future healthcare needs of the people of the United States. National data reveals a fragile supply of academic nurse educators and leaders. This tenuous…

  3. Estudo preliminar sobre a qualidade de vida de médicos e enfermeiros intensivistas pediátricos e neonatais Estudio preliminar sobre la calidad de vida de médicos y enfermeros intensivistas pediátricos y neonatales Preliminary study about qualify of life of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparar a Qualidade de Vida (QV de médicos e enfermeiros que trabalham em UTI Pediátrica (PED e Neonatal (NEO e, também, avaliar se há diferença entre a QV na mesma categoria profissional, mas diferindo de acordo com a unidade de trabalho. Estudo descritivo com 37 médicos e 20 enfermeiros. O WHOQOL-100 foi utilizado. Médicos da PED diferiram estatisticamente no domínio VI (p=0,003, quando comparados com médicos da NEO. Médicos e enfermeiros da PED apresentaram diferença estatística significante no domínio V (p Comparar la Calidad de Vida (QV de médicos y enfermeros que trabajan en UTI Pediátrica (PED y neonatal (NEO y, también evaluar si existe diferencia entre la QV en la misma categoría profesional, aunque variando de acuerdo con la unidad de trabajo. Estudio descriptivo con 37 médicos y 20 enfermeros. Fue utilizado el WHOQOL-100. Los médicos de PED diferían estadísticamente en el dominio VI (p=0,003 en comparación con los médicos de NEO. Médicos y enfermeros de PED presentaron una diferencia estadística significativa en el dominio V (pCompare the Quality of Life (QL of doctors and nurses who work in Pediatric (PED and Neonatal (NEO Intensive Care Units, and to evaluate whether there are differences between the QL in the same job category, but differing according to the work unit. This descriptive study was performed with 37 physicians and 20 nurses. The WHOQOL100 was used. Physicians from the PED differ statistically in the field VI (p=0.003 compared with physicians from the NEO. Physicians and nurses from the PED showed a statistically significant difference in field V (p<0.01, while physicians and nurses from the NEO showed a statistically significant difference in field VI (p=0.05. The QL assessment of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units was below the scores found in scientific literature, compared to studies that evaluated patients with chronic pain and mental health

  4. Neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Dessì

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper on neonatal sepsis, after a short presentation of etiopathogenesis and physiopathology, we will briefly present the clinical picture, the diagnosis and the therapy. Concerning diagnosis, we will focus our attention on procalcitonin (PCT, serum amyloid A (SAA, presepsin (sCD14 and metabolomics. Three practical tables complete the review. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  5. Nursing informatics and nursing ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer

    2013-01-01

    All healthcare visions, including that of The TIGER (Technology-Informatics-Guiding-Educational-Reform) Initiative envisage a crucial role for nursing. However, its 7 descriptive pillars do not address the disconnect between Nursing Informatics and Nursing Ethics and their distinct communities......-of-(care)-decision. Increased pressure for translating 'evidence-based' research findings into 'ethically-sound', 'value-based' and 'patient-centered' practice requires rethinking the model implicit in conventional knowledge translation and informatics practice in all disciplines, including nursing. The aim is to aid 'how...... nurses and other health care scientists more clearly identify clinical and other relevant data that can be captured to inform future comparative effectiveness research. 'A prescriptive, theory-based discipline of '(Nursing) Decisionics' expands the Grid for Volunteer Development of TIGER's newly launched...

  6. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2018-01-01

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reconsidering the concept of nursing as handled by Japanese nursing teachers : The nursing network formed by innovative nursing teachers

    OpenAIRE

    山梨, 八重子; ヤマナシ, ヤエコ; Yamanashi, Yaeko

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the originality of nursing given by nursing teachers. From the results, I concluded that, taking nursing from the viewpoint of Kant education, all teachers including the nursing teachers, and nursing teachers make teachers and others to bring out the important nursing skills in themselves. Further the network formed from these interactions is the origin of the nursing provided by nursing teachers.

  8. What GUIDES Your NURSING PRACTICE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountras, Stacy C

    2015-01-01

    Nurses' personal belief systems or philosophies about nursing and people guides their nursing care, especially in difficult situations. Defining and articulating a personal philosophy helps the nurse better understand the motivation and reasoning behind his or her work. In this article, a nurse shares her philosophy of nursing, underlying beliefs, and discusses how this guides her practice. Questions to help nurses articulate their own personal philosophy of nursing are included.

  9. Etiologies of Prolonged Unconjugated Hyperbilirubinemia in Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem Sabzehei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Jaundice is a common condition among neonates. Prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia occurs when jaundice persists beyond two weeks in term neonates and three weeks in preterm neonates. This study aimed to determine the etiologies of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infants admitted to the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Methods: This study was conducted on all infants diagnosed with prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia during 2007-2012 in the neonatal ward of Besat Hospital in Hamadan, Iran. Demographic characteristics of infants, physical examination and laboratory findings were collected and analyzed to determine the etiologies of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Results: In total, 100 infants diagnosed with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in this study, including 49 male and 51 female neonates with mean age of 20±1 days and mean bilirubin level of 17.5±4.0 mg/dL. Main causes of hyperbilirubinemia were urinary tract infection, ABO incompatibility, hypothyroidism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in 14%, 5%, 6% and 5% of neonates, respectively. Moreover, unknown etiologies, such as breastfeeding, were detected in 70% of the studied infants. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, determining the main causes of prolonged unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia in neonates is of paramount importance. In the majority of cases, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is associated with physiological factors, such as breastfeeding.

  10. Neonatal Vaccination: Challenges and Intervention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Matthew C; Surendran, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    While vaccines have been tremendously successful in reducing the incidence of serious infectious diseases, newborns remain particularly vulnerable in the first few months of their life to life-threatening infections. A number of challenges exist to neonatal vaccination. However, recent advances in the understanding of neonatal immunology offer insights to overcome many of those challenges. This review will present an overview of the features of neonatal immunity which make vaccination difficult, survey the mechanisms of action of available vaccine adjuvants with respect to the unique features of neonatal immunity, and propose a possible mechanism contributing to the inability of neonates to generate protective immune responses to vaccines. We surveyed recent published findings on the challenges to neonatal vaccination and possible intervention strategies including the use of novel vaccine adjuvants to develop efficacious neonatal vaccines. Challenges in the vaccination of neonates include interference from maternal antibody and excessive skewing towards Th2 immunity, which can be counteracted by the use of proper adjuvants. Synergistic stimulation of multiple Toll-like receptors by incorporating well-defined agonist-adjuvant combinations to vaccines is a promising strategy to ensure a protective vaccine response in neonates. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Water immersion in neonatal bereavement photography is a new technique intended to enhance the quality of the photographs provided to families following their loss. Water immersion appears to be most helpful following a second trimester fetal demise. This technique can be used by nurses, professional photographers and others in addition to more traditional neonatal bereavement photography. It does not require special skills or equipment and can be implemented in virtually any perinatal setting. The enhanced quality of photographs produced with this method can potentially provide a source of comfort to grieving families. © 2014 AWHONN.

  12. The relationship between attendance at birth and maternal mortality rates: an exploration of United Nations' data sets including the ratios of physicians and nurses to population, GNP per capita and female literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J J; Wharrad, H

    2001-05-01

    The relationship between attendance at birth and maternal mortality rates: an exploration of United Nations' data sets including the ratios of physicians and nurses to population, GNP per capita and female literacy. This is the third and final paper drawing on data taken from United Nations (UN) data sets. The first paper examined the global distribution of health professionals (as measured by ratios of physicians and nurses to population), and its relationship to gross national product per capita (GNP) (Wharrad & Robinson 1999). The second paper explored the relationships between the global distribution of physicians and nurses, GNP, female literacy and the health outcome indicators of infant and under five mortality rates (IMR and u5MR) (Robinson & Wharrad 2000). In the present paper, the global distribution of health professionals is explored in relation to maternal mortality rates (MMRs). The proportion of births attended by medical and nonmedical staff defined as "attendance at birth by trained personnel" (physicians, nurses, midwives or primary health care workers trained in midwifery skills), is included as an additional independent variable in the regression analyses, together with the ratio of physicians and nurses to population, female literacy and GNP. To extend our earlier analyses by considering the relationships between the global distribution of health professionals (ratios of physicians and nurses to population, and the proportion of births attended by trained health personnel), GNP, female literacy and MMR. countries, regression analyses were performed using numbers of physicians, and numbers of nurses, per 1000 population, the proportion of births attended by trained health personnel, GNP per capita and female literacy as independent variables and MMRs as the dependent variable. Linear regression analyses show positive associations for MMRs and the ratios of physicians to population (73%, n=136), ratios of nurses to population (56%, n=137), and

  13. Impact of violence against women on severe acute maternal morbidity in the intensive care unit, including neonatal outcomes: a case-control study protocol in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Pollock, Wendy E; McDonald, Susan J; Taft, Angela J

    2018-03-14

    Preventing and reducing violence against women (VAW) and maternal mortality are Sustainable Development Goals. Worldwide, the maternal mortality ratio has fallen about 44% in the last 25 years, and for one maternal death there are many women affected by severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU). These women represent the most critically ill obstetric patients of the maternal morbidity spectrum and should be studied to complement the review of maternal mortality. VAW has been associated with all-cause maternal deaths, and since many women (30%) endure violence usually exerted by their intimate partners and this abuse can be severe during pregnancy, it is important to determine whether it impacts SAMM. Thus, this study aims to investigate the impact of VAW on SAMM in the ICU. This will be a prospective case-control study undertaken in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru, with a sample size of 109 cases (obstetric patients admitted to the ICU) and 109 controls (obstetric patients not admitted to the ICU selected by systematic random sampling). Data on social determinants, medical and obstetric characteristics, VAW, pregnancy and neonatal outcome will be collected through interviews and by extracting information from the medical records using a pretested form. Main outcome will be VAW rate and neonatal mortality rate between cases and controls. VAW will be assessed by using the WHO instrument. Binary logistic followed by stepwise multivariate regression and goodness of fit test will assess any association between VAW and SAMM. Ethical approval has been granted by the La Trobe University, Melbourne-Australia and the tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru. This research follows the WHO ethical and safety recommendations for research on VAW. Findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  14. Impact of violence against women on severe acute maternal morbidity in the intensive care unit, including neonatal outcomes: a case–control study protocol in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala Quintanilla, Beatriz Paulina; Pollock, Wendy E; McDonald, Susan J; Taft, Angela J

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Preventing and reducing violence against women (VAW) and maternal mortality are Sustainable Development Goals. Worldwide, the maternal mortality ratio has fallen about 44% in the last 25 years, and for one maternal death there are many women affected by severe acute maternal morbidity (SAMM) requiring management in the intensive care unit (ICU). These women represent the most critically ill obstetric patients of the maternal morbidity spectrum and should be studied to complement the review of maternal mortality. VAW has been associated with all-cause maternal deaths, and since many women (30%) endure violence usually exerted by their intimate partners and this abuse can be severe during pregnancy, it is important to determine whether it impacts SAMM. Thus, this study aims to investigate the impact of VAW on SAMM in the ICU. Methods and analysis This will be a prospective case-control study undertaken in a tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru, with a sample size of 109 cases (obstetric patients admitted to the ICU) and 109 controls (obstetric patients not admitted to the ICU selected by systematic random sampling). Data on social determinants, medical and obstetric characteristics, VAW, pregnancy and neonatal outcome will be collected through interviews and by extracting information from the medical records using a pretested form. Main outcome will be VAW rate and neonatal mortality rate between cases and controls. VAW will be assessed by using the WHO instrument. Binary logistic followed by stepwise multivariate regression and goodness of fit test will assess any association between VAW and SAMM. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the La Trobe University, Melbourne-Australia and the tertiary healthcare facility in Lima-Peru. This research follows the WHO ethical and safety recommendations for research on VAW. Findings will be presented at conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals. PMID:29540421

  15. Neonatal pressure ulcers: prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Molina P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo García-Molina,1,2 Alba Alfaro-López,1 Sara María García-Rodríguez,1 Celia Brotons-Payá,1 Mari Carmen Rodríguez-Dolz,1,2 Evelin Balaguer-López1,2 1Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, 2Research Group of Pediatric Nutrition, INCLIVA Foundation, Valencia, Spain Abstract: Health professionals should be prepared to respond to the needs of hospitalized neonates. The health team must consider multiple situations, where the neonate is at risk of having an adverse effect. One of the main interventions that health professionals must practice when interacting with hospitalized newborns is skin care. Neonates often suffer from diaper rash or intravenous drugs extravasation. Recently, hospitalized neonates and especially those in an unstable clinical situation are also at a risk of developing pressure ulcers. The presence of a pressure ulcer in a neonate can lead to serious problems to survival (eg, sepsis, clinical instability. This is the reason why, with this literature review, we attempt to answer questions from health professionals caring for neonates about the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers. Keywords: infant, pressure ulcer, treatment, prevention, wound, assessment

  16. NEONATAL CONJUNCTIVITIS AND ITS DRUG SENSITIVITY PATTERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Thulukkanam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neonatal conjunctivitis is eye discharge in neonates and it is a common infection in neonates in the first month of life. Worldwide, the incidence of neonatal conjunctivitis varies from 1% to 33% depending on the socioeconomic status of the people in the region. In India, the incidence varies from region to region from 0.9 to 35%. MATERIALS AND METHODS Single center prospective study. All neonates of age 0-30 days delivered and referred from neonatal ward of Chengalpattu Medical College and Hospital with complaints of eye swelling, redness, conjunctival discharge to the eye department for treatment are included in the study. RESULTS In this study, age group from 0-7 days were most commonly affected by neonatal conjunctivitis. Both eyes were commonly affected together. Neonates born by both LSCS and normal vaginal delivery were almost equally affected. The most common organism found in culture and Gram staining was staphylococci. CONCLUSION Neonatal conjunctivitis is more likely to be acquired postnatally. It acquires during the 1 st week and responds well to local application of antibiotics, which covers common causative bacteria.

  17. Neonatal euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    Despite advances in the care of infants, there remain many newborns whose medical conditions are incompatible with sustained life. At times, healthcare providers and parents may agree that prolonging life is not an appropriate goal of care, and they may redirect treatment to alleviate suffering. While pediatric palliative treatment protocols are gaining greater acceptance, there remain some children whose suffering is unrelenting despite maximal efforts. Due to the realization that some infants suffer unbearably (ie, the burdens of suffering outweigh the benefits of life), the Dutch have developed a protocol for euthanizing these newborns. In this review, I examine the ethical aspects of 6 forms of end of life care, explain the ethical arguments in support of euthanasia, review the history and verbiage of the United States regulations governing limiting and withdrawing life-prolonging interventions in infants, describe the 3 categories of neonates for whom the Dutch provide euthanasia, review the published analyses of the Dutch protocol, and finally present some practical considerations should some form of euthanasia ever be deemed appropriate.

  18. Causes of Neonatal Mortality in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Taleghani Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hossein Zeinalzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neonatal survival is one of the most important challenges today. Over 99% of neonatal mortalities occur in the developing countries, and epidemiologic studies emphasize on this issue in the developed countries, as well. In this study, we attempted to investigate the causes of neonatal mortality in Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we studied causes of neonatal mortality in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014. Data collection was performed by the head nurse and treating physician using a pre-designed questionnaire. Most of the data were extracted from the neonatal records. Information regarding maternal underlying diseases and health care during pregnancy was extracted from mothers' records.Results: A total of 891 neonates were admitted to NICU of Taleghani Hospital of Tabriz, Iran, during 2013-2014, 68 (7.5% of whom died. Among these cases, 37 (%54.4 were male, 29 (29.4% were extremely low birth weight, and 16 (23.5% weighed more than 2.5 kg. The main causes of mortality were congenital anomalies (35.3%, prematurity (26.5%, and sepsis (10.3%, respectively.Conclusion: Congenital anomaly is the most common cause of mortality, and the pattern of death is changing from preventable diseases to unavoidable mortalities

  19. Causes and Clinical Outcomes in Neonates with Acute Abdomen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Causes and Clinical Outcomes in Neonates with Acute Abdomen Requiring Surgery at ... Neonatal surgery is challenging, particularly in the emergency setting whereby ... Other causes included peritonitis (6.9%) and abdominal wall defects (4.7%). ... accounting for 13 cases (30.2%) and mortality was 34.9 % ( 15 neonates).

  20. Pediatric and neonatal cardiovascular pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Hoover, Suzan R

    2003-01-01

    Advances in cardiology, surgical techniques, postoperative care, and medications have improved the chances of long-term survival of the neonatal and pediatric patient with complex congenital cardiac anomalies. Rather than undergoing palliative repair, these children are now frequently taken to the operating room for complete repair. As complete repair becomes the norm, collaborative management and a thorough understanding of the pre and postoperative medications used become essential to the care of these patients. The nurse's ability to understand preop, postop, and management medications is enhanced by an understanding of the principles of cardiac anatomy and physiology, as well as developmental changes in cardiac function. All of these are reviewed. In addition, since the safe and effective administration of these drugs depends on the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurse's thorough knowledge of these medications and their effects on the cardiovascular system, a brief review of these medications is presented. While new technology and techniques are improving survival rates for children with congenital heart anomalies, it is the postoperative care that these children receive that enhances the patient's survival even more.

  1. Neonatal hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarici D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Sarici1, S Umit Sarici21Kecioren Research and Education Hospital, Kecioren, Ankara, 2Chief of Division of Neonatology, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: In this article, distribution of potassium (K+ in body fluids, pathophysiology, causes, clinical signs and symptoms, and the evaluation and treatment of neonatal hypokalemia are reviewed. K+ is the most important intracellular cation and normal serum K+ is stabilized between 3.5 and 5.5 mEq/L. Hypokalemia may be caused by increased renal losses, increased extrarenal (gastrointestinal losses, redistribution or prolonged insufficient K+ intake. Clinical signs and symptoms occur as the result of functional changes in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and the heart. Hypokalemia is usually asymptomatic when K+ levels are between 3.0 and 3.5 mEq/L; however, there may sometimes be slight muscle weakness. Moderate hypokalemia is observed when serum K+ is between 2.5 and 3.0 mEq/L. Proximal muscle weakness is observed most commonly in lower extremities; cranial muscles are normal, but constipation and distention are prominent. Severe hypokalemia develops when serum K+ falls below 2.5 mEq/L. Rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, severe muscle weakness, paralysis, respiratory distress, and respiratory arrest are observed. The clinical signs and symptoms may be unremarkable in cases of chronically developing hypokalemia; however, appropriate treatment is essential when serum K+ level falls below 2.5 mEq/L as the most dangerous complication of hypokalemia is fatal cardiac arrythmia, and changes visible with electrocardiography may not always correlate with the level of hypokalemia. Sodium (Na+, K+, chloride (Cl-, bicarbonate, creatinine, blood sugar, magnesium (Mg, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and blood gases should be investigated by laboratory testing. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinine kinase, and

  2. The neonatal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodmark, O.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical examination of the CNS in the neonate is often difficult in cases of complex pathology. Diagnostic imaging of the neonatal brain has become extremely useful and in the last decade has developed in two main directions: CT and US. MR imaging has been used recently with varying success in the diagnosis of pathology in the neonatal brain. Despite technical difficulties, this imaging method is likely to become increasingly important in the neonate. The paper examines the normal neonatal brain anatomy as seen with the different modalities, followed by pathologic conditions. Attention is directed to the common pathology, in asphyxiated newborns, the patholphysiology of intraventicular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia in the preterm neonate, and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the term neonate. Pitfalls, artifacts, and problems in image interpretation are illustrated. Finally, the subsequent appearance of neonatal pathology later in infancy and childhood is discussed

  3. Preliminary study about occupational stress of physicians and nurses in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: the balance between effort and reward Estudio preliminar sobre el estrés ocupacional de médicos y enfermeros en UTI pediátrica y neonatal: el equilibrio entre esfuerzo y recompensa Estudo preliminar sobre o estresse ocupacional de médicos e enfermeiros em UTI pediátrica e neonatal: o equilíbrio entre esforço e recompensa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the balance between effort (E and reward (R among physicians and nurses working in pediatric (PED and neonatal (NEO Intensive Care Units. This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out with 37 physicians and 20 nurses. The Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire was used. Statistically significant differences were not found among physicians (p>0.05 or nurses from PED and NEO in relation to E and R (p>0.05. No statistically significant differences were found between physicians and nurses in PED in the several studied variables. Comparison between the professionals working in NEO revealed that physicians presented more over-commitment than nurses (p=0.01. The organizational setting of NEO proved to be more demanding for physicians, exacting a greater commitment to their work, while demands presented in both units seemed to be the same for nurses.El objetivo del estudio fue comparar el equilibrio entre esfuerzo (E y recompensa (R entre médicos de unidades de terapia intensiva pediátrica (PED y neonatal (NEO y entre enfermeros de las mismas unidades. Este es estudio transversal descriptivo con 37 médicos y 20 enfermeros. El cuestionario Effort-Reward Imbalance fue utilizado. No se encontraron diferencias estadísticas entre médicos de la PED y de la NEO en relación al E y R (p>0,05. De la misma forma, enfermeros de la PED y de la NEO no tuvieron diferencias estadísticas en relación al E y R (p>0,05. Comparando médicos con enfermeros de la PED, no fueron encontradas diferencias entre las variables estudiadas. En relación a la comparación hecha entre profesionales de la NEO, se encontró un mayor súper compromiso de médicos de que de enfermeros (p=0,01. El ambiente organizacional de la NEO se mostró más exigente para los médicos, determinando mayor compromiso con el trabajo, en cuanto que, para los enfermeros de ambas unidades, la demanda pareció ser la misma.O objetivo do estudo foi comparar o equil

  4. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Breast milk banking: current opinion and practice in Australian neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Eva Y; Kecskés, Zsuzsoka; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed E

    2012-09-01

    To find out the knowledge and attitudes of health-care professionals (HCPs) in Australian neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) towards breast milk banking (BMBg) and pasteurised donated breast milk (PDBM). Cross-sectional structured survey of HCPs in all 25 NICUs in Australia. Response rate was 43.4% (n= 358 of 825). Participants included nurses and midwives (291, 81.3%) and the remainder were neonatologists and neonatal trainees (67, 18.7%). A variable number of HCPs agreed that PDBM would decrease the risk of necrotising enterocolitis (81%) and allergies (48.9%), 8.4% thought PDBM will carry risk of infections and 78.8% agreed that PDBM is preferable over formula, but only 67.5% thought that establishing breast milk banks (BMBs) are justifiable. Significant differences were found between doctors and nurses/midwives, with 19.4% of doctors compared with 5.8% of nurses/midwives agreed that PDBM carried an increased risk of infection. Although, over 90% of nurses/midwives and 70% of doctors agreed that the donation of breast milk is important, only 71% of nurses/midwives and 52.2% of doctors thought that setting up a BMB was justifiable. The opinions about BMBg differ widely between HCPs; however, the majority support the practice. HCPs had different knowledge gaps in regard to BMBg. Nurses/midwives positively view the practice of BMBg more strongly compared with neonatologists. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  6. Pelayanan Kesehatan Ibu dan Kematian Neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desy Fitri Yani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia bersama seluruh negara berkembang berupaya mencapai kesepakatan Millenium Development Goals (MDGs dengan salah satu sasaran menurunkan angka kematian neonatal dari 20 per 1.000 kelahiran hidup menjadi 15 per 1.000 kelahiran hidup. Penelitian ini bertujuan mengetahui hubungan pelayanan kesehatan ibu dengan kematian neonatal di Kabupaten Lampung Timur tahun 2011. Penelitian dengan desain studi kasus kontrol ini mengamati kasus ibu yang mengalami kematian neonatal dan kontrol ibu yang tidak mengalami kematian neonatal. Analisis multivariat menemukan pelayanan antenatal dan pertolongan persalinan berhubungan secara signifikan dengan kematian neonatal, setelah mengendalikan variabel umur ibu dan riwayat kehamilan (OR = 16,32; nilai p = 0,000; dan (OR = 18,36; nilai p = 0,31. Bayi yang dilahirkan dari Ibu dengan pelayanan antenatal tidak lengkap berisiko mengalami kematian neonatal 16,32 dan 18,36 kali lebih besar daripada bayi yang dilahirkan. Ibu dengan pelayanan antenatal lengkap dan penolong persalinan profesional. Tidak ada hubungan penolong persalinan dengan kematian neonatal, setelah mengontrol variabel pelayanan antenatal, umur ibu, riwayat kehamilan, riwayat penyakit, dan riwayat persalinan. Disarankan meningkatkan kualitas pelayanan antenatal dengan memerhatikan faktor umur ibu dan riwayat persalinan, mengembangkan kegiatan audit maternal perinatal serta meningkatkan keterampilan petugas penolong persalinan. All developing countries including Indonesia seek to reach agreement the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s. It is objectives include reducing neonatal mortality by 25 percent from 20 per 1,000 live birth to 15 per 1,000 live births. This study aimed to determine the relationship of maternal health services with neonatal mortality in East Lampung District in 2011. This study used case control design to compare between the groups of mother whom have neonatal deaths (cases and neonatal life (control in East Lampung District in

  7. Nursing informatics: the future now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamta

    2014-01-01

    Technological advancements in the health care field have always impacted the health care practices. Nursing practice has also been greatly influenced by the technology. In the recent years, use of information technology including computers, handheld digital devices, internet has advanced the nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as science. In every sphere of nursing practice, nursing research, nursing education and nursing informatics play a very important role. If used properly it is a way to save time, helping to provide quality nursing care and increases the proficiency of nursing personnel.

  8. Two Neonates with Congenital Hydrocolpos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vydehi Murthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neonatal hydrocolpos is a rare condition. Hydrocolpos is cystic dilatation of the vagina with fluid accumulation due to a combination of stimulation of secretary glands of the reproductive tract and vaginal obstruction. The differential for a neonatal presentation of lower abdominal mass includes urogenital anomalies, Hirschsprung’s, disease or sacrococcygeal teratoma. Prenatal diagnosis and early newborn imaging studies leads to early detection and treatment of these cases. Case. We report here two cases of neonatal hydrocolpos with prenatal diagnosis of lower abdominal mass. Postnatally, ultrasound, MRI imaging, and cystoscopy confirmed large cystic mass as hydrocolpos with distal vaginal obstruction. Both patients had enlarged renal system secondary to mass effect. Conclusion. High index of suspicion for hydrocolpos in a newborn presenting with fetal diagnosis of infraumbilical abdominal mass will facilitate timely intervention and prevention of complications.

  9. CT of the neonatal head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S.; Rogan, E.A.; Batty, R.; Raghavan, A.; Whitby, E.H.; Hart, A.R.; Connolly, D.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used less often than other techniques on neonatal units. However, in the acute setting, CT can be invaluable in diagnosing or excluding potentially life-threatening conditions and guiding initial management in neonates. Common indications for scanning include trauma, suspected non-accidental injury, infection, or an acute hypoxic or metabolic event. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the normal neonatal head at CT and compare this to the common pathological abnormalities. Several key features of each condition will be highlighted. It is important to note that some pathological conditions can have overlapping features at CT and, therefore, the clinical history and additional investigations are also of key importance in determining the diagnosis

  10. When nurses compete with parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, B L

    1980-01-01

    Subtle competition flourishes between parents and nurses in neonatal intensive care settings. Because the parents have so little opportunity to contribute to the care of their infants, and because they come to the experience with a broad range of emotional preparation, they often feel displaced by the competent and occassionally overprotective staff nurses. The nurses may not recognize the subtle forms of competition but they do cope with outcomes: hostile or uncooperative parents. This article describes competitive situations, discusses the impact upon the family, and recommends alternatives to competitive nursing care.

  11. Neonatal tetanus associated with skin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, M; Dungwa, N

    2016-08-03

    A 1-week-old infant was brought to a regional hospital with a history of recurrent seizures following lower abdominal septic skin infection. She was found to have neonatal tetanus, and a spatula test was positive. The tetanus infection was associated with a superficial skin infection, common in neonates. Treatment included sedatives (diazepam, chlorpromazine, phenobarbitone and morphine), muscle relaxants, antibiotics and ventilation in the neonatal intensive care unit. Intrathecal and intramuscular immunoglobulin were given, and the wound was treated. The infant recovered, with no seizures by the 16th day from admission, and was off the ventilator by the 18th day. This was shorter than the usual 3 - 4 weeks for neonates with tetanus at the hospital. The question arises whether tetanus immunisation should be considered in infants with skin infections, which frequently occur in the neonatal period.

  12. Practice variation in the transfer of premature infants from incubators to open cots in Australian and New Zealand neonatal nurseries: results of an electronic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Karen; Bogossian, Fiona; East, Christine; Davies, Mark William

    2010-06-01

    The incubator environment is essential for optimal physiological functioning and development of the premature infant but the infant is ultimately required to make a successful transfer from incubator to open cot in order to be discharged from hospital. Criteria for transfer lack a systematic approach because no clear, specific guideline predominates in clinical practice. Practice variation exists between continents, regions and nurseries in the same countries, but there is no recent review of current practices utilised for transferring premature infants from incubators to open cots. To document current practice for transferring premature infants to open cots in neonatal nurseries. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey. Twenty-two neonatal intensive care units and fifty-six high dependency special care baby units located in public hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. A sample of 78 key clinical nursing leaders (nurse unit managers, clinical nurse consultants or clinical nurse specialists) within neonatal nurseries identified through email or telephone contact. Data were collected using a web-based survey on practice, decision-making and strategies utilised for transferring premature infants from incubators to open cots. Descriptive statistics (frequencies and crosstabs) were used to analyse data. Comparisons between groups were tested for statistical significance using Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Significant practice variation between countries was found for only one variable, nursing infants clothed (p=0.011). Processes and practices undertaken similarly in both countries include use of incubator air control mode, current weight criterion, thermal challenging, single-walled incubators and heated mattress systems. Practice variation was significant between neonatal intensive care units and special care baby units for weight range (p=0.005), evidence-based practice (p=0.004), historical nursery practice (p=0.029) and incubator air control mode (p=0

  13. Barriers to Use of Non-pharmacological Pain Management Methods in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Zahedpasha

    2017-09-01

    CONCLUSION: According to the results of this study, inadequate nursing staff and insufficient knowledge about pain complications were the most important causes for lack of application of pain management methods for neonates

  14. Neonatal resuscitation: advances in training and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer T

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Taylor Sawyer, Rachel A Umoren, Megan M Gray Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Neonatal Education and Simulation-based Training (NEST Program, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: Each year in the US, some four hundred thousand newborns need help breathing when they are born. Due to the frequent need for resuscitation at birth, it is vital to have evidence-based care guidelines and to provide effective neonatal resuscitation training. Every five years, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR reviews the science of neonatal resuscitation. In the US, the American Heart Association (AHA develops treatment guidelines based on the ILCOR science review, and the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP translates the AHA guidelines into an educational curriculum. In this report, we review recent advances in neonatal resuscitation training and practice. We begin with a review of the new 7th edition NRP training curriculum. Then, we examine key changes to the 2015 AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines. The four components of the NRP curriculum reviewed here include eSim®, Performance Skills Stations, Integrated Skills Station, and Simulation and Debriefing. The key changes to the AHA neonatal resuscitation guidelines reviewed include initial steps of newborn care, positive-pressure ventilation, endotracheal intubation and use of laryngeal mask, chest compressions, medications, resuscitation of preterm newborns, and ethics and end-of-life care. We hope this report provides a succinct review of recent advances in neonatal resuscitation. Keywords: neonatal resuscitation, Neonatal Resuscitation Program, NRP, simulation, deliberate practice, debriefing, eSIM

  15. Current Trends in Neonatal Tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaiah, Amal; Moyer, Kelly; Pereira, Kevin D

    2016-08-01

    The indications for neonatal tracheostomy may have changed with current noninvasive respiratory therapies compared with previous decades. To study the current trends in neonatal tracheostomy and identify the primary indication for the procedure and risk factors for failed extubation. This retrospective medical record review included 47 neonates who underwent tracheostomy from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2013, at the University of Maryland Children's Hospital. Group 1 included infants undergoing tracheostomy for the primary indication of upper airway obstruction; group 2, infants with primary pulmonary disease. Data on weight, gestational age, comorbid conditions, congenital abnormalities, complications, outcomes, and indications for tracheostomy were compared statistically between groups. Differences in gestational age, birth weight, and age at tracheostomy. Among the 47 infants included in the study (30 boys; 17 girls, mean [SD] age, 113 [73] days), 31 (66%) demonstrated anatomical causes of airway obstruction, and 16 (34%) had significant pulmonary disease. Among infants with anatomical causes, subglottic stenosis represented the largest group (11 of 31 [35%]). The mean age at the time of tracheostomy was significantly lower in the group with airway obstruction (98.9 vs 146.9 days; difference, 48 [95% CI, 4.8-91.2] days; P = .04). No procedure-related morbidity or mortality was encountered. Anatomical upper airway obstruction may be returning as the most common indication for a neonatal tracheostomy, thereby supporting the belief that current respiratory therapies have lowered the burden of chronic lung disease and the need for prolonged ventilatory care.

  16. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  17. Supporting families in neonatal loss: relationship and faith key to comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holston, Jane Treadwell

    2015-01-01

    Around 20,000 neonatal deaths occur each year, many from congenital heart defects such as hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Nurses are on the frontline of caring for families experiencing neonatal loss. Careful spiritual and cultural assessment, attention to beliefs, focusing on relationship, and helping families create legacy can assist with grieving and making meaning out of loss.

  18. Should euthanasia be legal? An international survey of neonatal intensive care units staff.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuttini, M.; Casotto, V.; Kaminski, M.; Beaufort, I.D. de; Berbik, I.; Hansen, G.; Kollee, L.A.A.; Kucinskas, A.; Lenoir, S.; Levin, A.V.; Orzalesi, M.; Persson, J.; Rebagliato, M.; Reid, M.; Saracci, R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present the views of a representative sample of neonatal doctors and nurses in 10 European countries on the moral acceptability of active euthanasia and its legal regulation. DESIGN: A total of 142 neonatal intensive care units were recruited by census (in the Netherlands, Sweden,

  19. Naturalistic nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussey, Trevor

    2011-01-01

    Where nurse education aims to provide an overarching intellectual framework, this paper argues that it should be the framework of naturalism. After an exposition of the chief features of naturalism and its relationship to science and morality, the paper describes naturalistic nursing, contrasting it with some other perspectives. There follows a defence of naturalism and naturalistic nursing against several objections, including those concerning spirituality, religion, meaning, morality, and alternative sources of knowledge. The paper ends with some of the advantages of the naturalistic approach. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Update on neonatal hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozance, Paul J

    2014-02-01

    Neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the most common biochemical abnormalities encountered in the newborn. However, controversy remains surrounding its definition and management especially in asymptomatic patients. New information has been published that describes the incidence and timing of low glucose concentrations in the groups most at risk for asymptomatic neonatal hypoglycemia. Furthermore, one large prospective study failed to find an association between repetitive low glucose concentrations and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants. But hypoglycemia due to hyperinsulinism, especially genetic causes, continued to be associated with brain injury. New advances were made in the diagnosis and management of hyperinsulinism, including acquired hyperinsulinism in small for gestational age infants and others. Continuous glucose monitoring remains an attractive strategy for future research in this area. The fundamental question of how best to manage asymptomatic newborns with low glucose concentrations remains unanswered. Balancing the risks of overtreating newborns with low glucose concentrations who are undergoing a normal transition following birth against the risks of undertreating those in whom low glucose concentrations are pathological, dangerous, and/or a harbinger of serious metabolic disease remains a challenge.

  1. Neonatal sigmoid volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalayleh, Harbi; Koplewitz, Benjamin Z; Kapuller, Vadim; Armon, Yaron; Abu-Leil, Sinan; Arbell, Dan

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal sigmoid volvulus is a rare entity. It is associated with Hirschsprung's disease. Presentation is acute abdominal distention, vomiting and obstipation. Abdominal radiograph will show the "coffee bean" sign, but this is frequently missed and the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Treatment options include contrast enema, colonoscopy or laparotomy, depending on the condition of the baby and local availability. During the last 6years, 6 infants with sigmoid volvulus were treated in our department. Four presented during the first 48h since birth, and 2 presented at the age of 2 and 7weeks of age. One child was operated and 5 had primary contrast enema with radiologic de-volvulus. Rectal biopsy was performed in all cases; three children had Hirschsprung's disease. Those with normal biopsies responded well to rectal washouts. Two patients had early one stage transanal pullthrough and one had 2 further occasions of sigmoid volvulus prior to definitive surgery. All three recovered with an uneventful course. Neonatal sigmoid volvulus requires a high level of suspicion. Contrast enema is efficient for primary de-volvulus. Rectal biopsy should be performed and if positive for Hirschsprung's disease, surgery should be performed sooner rather than later. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development and validation of Neonatal Satisfaction Survey--NSS-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Inger H; Vadset, Tove B; Barstad, Johan; Svindseth, Marit F

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a survey to investigate parents' satisfaction with neonatal wards in a population of parents of children with a gestation age of ≥24 weeks to 3 months after full-term birth. We explored the literature and conducted three focus groups: two with expert health personnel and one with parents. We tested the survey in a parent population (N = 105) and report the different stages in the validation process along with the full survey, the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey - 13 categories (NSS-13). We found 13 subcategories in the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey. The subcategories measure parents' satisfaction with neonatal units based on staff, admission, nurses, anxiety, siblings (parents' perceptions of caring for the siblings of the newborn), information, timeout, doctors, facilities, nutrition, preparation for discharge, trust and visitors. Each subcategory showed acceptable internal consistency. The full version of the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey presents 69 items, and each subcategory contains two to eleven items. The Neonatal Satisfaction Survey seems suitable to measure parents' satisfaction with neonatal units and can be used in full, but it can also measure subcategories. Parents' satisfaction with neonatal units can be used to improve the quality in such wards. We consider this study as the first in a series to validate the NSS-13. The full survey with subcategories is presented in this paper. © 2014 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. The Validity and Reliability of the Turkish Version of the Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Çiğdem; Altay, Naime

    2017-03-01

    The study created a Turkish translation of the Neonatal Skin Risk Assessment Scale (NSRAS) that was developed by Huffines and Longsdon in 1997. Study authors used a cross-sectional survey design in order to determine the validity and reliability of the Turkish translation. The study was conducted at the neonatal intensive care unit of a university hospital in Ankara between March 15 and June 30, 2014. The research sample included 130 neonatal assessments from 17 patients. Data were collected by questionnaire regarding the characteristics of the participating neonates, 7 nurse observers, and the NSRAS and its subarticles. After translation and back-translation were performed to assess language validity of the scale, necessary corrections were made in line with expert suggestions, and content validity was ensured. Internal consistency of the scale was assessed by its homogeneity, Cronbach's α, and subarticle-general scale grade correlation. Cronbach's α for the scale overall was .88, and Cronbach's α values for the subarticles were between .83 and .90. Results showed a positive relationship among all the subarticles and the overall NSRAS scale grade (P Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin analysis was applied for sample sufficiency, and Bartlett test analysis was applied in order to assess the factor analysis of the sample. The Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin coefficient was 0.73, and the χ value found according to the Bartlett test was statistically significant at an advanced level (P < .05). In the 6 subarticles of the scale and in the general scale total grade, a high, positive, and significant relationship among the grades given by the researcher and the nurse observers was found (P < .05). The Turkish NSRAS is reliable and valid.

  4. Imaging findings of neonatal adrenal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bo Kyung; Lee, Min Hee

    1999-01-01

    In newborn infants, normal adrenal glands are characterized by a relatively thin echogenic center surrounded by a thick, hypoechoic cortical rim as seen on ultrasound (US). Various disorders involving the neonatal adrenal gland include adrenal hemorrhage, hyperplasia, cyst, Wolman's disease, and congenital neuroblastoma. Adrenal hemorrhage is the most common cause of an adrenal mass in the neonate, though differentiation between adrenal hemorrhage and neuroblastoma is in many cases difficult. We describe characteristic US, CT and MR imaging findings in neonates with various adrenal disorders

  5. Imaging findings of neonatal adrenal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung; Han, Bo Kyung; Lee, Min Hee [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    In newborn infants, normal adrenal glands are characterized by a relatively thin echogenic center surrounded by a thick, hypoechoic cortical rim as seen on ultrasound (US). Various disorders involving the neonatal adrenal gland include adrenal hemorrhage, hyperplasia, cyst, Wolman's disease, and congenital neuroblastoma. Adrenal hemorrhage is the most common cause of an adrenal mass in the neonate, though differentiation between adrenal hemorrhage and neuroblastoma is in many cases difficult. We describe characteristic US, CT and MR imaging findings in neonates with various adrenal disorders.

  6. Justification of early neurorehabilitation in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Badogina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The problem of disabled children in Ukraine is of special significance as a result of the constant growth of their number among the peadiatric population. Currently, many premature neonates and children with inoperable malformations are nursed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. At the same time, the increase of clinical cases of chronic and associated pathology of the nervous system leads to deepening the process of disability in peadiatric population. Today, the primary need is neurorehabilitation of children, but many questions are still not resolved. When should we begin rehabilitation of a child with one or another pathology? Who should conduct this process? How intensive could it be? What are the goals and objectives in this case? The purpose of the study was to highlight the need for early neurorehabilitation of newborns already in the first days of life, at the stage of the NICU. Also, to evaluate the effectiveness of a set of measures for primary neonatal rehabilitation in the nursing stage according to the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS during the first year of child’s life. Materials and methods. Neurorehabilitation according to the developed method was carried on in neonates with pathology of nervous the nervous system who received treatment in the nursing department of NICU. Rehabilitation activities were conducted with the participation of nurses, neonatologists, physical therapists with the involvement of mothers of sick children. Twenty-five patients who underwent ventricular bypass surgery were monitored. Among them — 12 children with malformations of the spinal cord (spina bifida and 13 — with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus. The examined group included 18 patients who underwent neurorehabilitation according to the developed method. The control group consisted of 7 children treated only with massage. To evaluate the effectiveness of a set of exercises, AIMS was used during the first year of child

  7. Formación de valores en los enfermeros del nuevo modelo pedagógico Formation of values in nursing students who are included in the new pedagogical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caridad Rodríguez Rodríguez

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Por las palabras expresadas por el Comandante en Jefe Fidel Castro: "creando valores, creando capital humano, creando ética y creando principios, la calidad de nuestra educación alcanzará altísimos niveles" y la importancia de formar el modelo de hombre que necesita la sociedad se realizó un estudio observacional, analítico y trasversal del universo de enfermeros del nuevo modelo pedagógico con un total de 200 correspondiente a la Vicedirección de Enfermería del Hospital General Docente "Comandante Pinares" de San Cristóbal, Pinar del Río. Se aplicó una encuesta anónima que se anexará al trabajo donde se hicieron preguntas sobre conceptos importantes dentro de la formación de valores. Se insertaron situaciones problemas para valorar con sus respuestas cómo se encuentran los enfermeros en su formación ética frente al ejercicio de su profesión y determinar cual es la formación de valores de los enfermeros frente a su realidad para llegar a ofrecer servicios de excelencia en salud, y poder concientizar que la enfermera no sólo debe estar bien preparada en sus conocimientos profesionales, sino ser un profesional íntegro moral, cívica y éticamente. Se pudo apreciar que a pesar de la buena preparación que poseen los enfermeros aún podemos continuar trabajando en base a la formación de valores en la ética frente a su profesión, puntualizando en la responsabilidad, la valentía y la audacia, así como la honestidad con que deben enfrentar su trabajo.Because of the importance of forming a new model of men and women that our society needs, an observational, analytical and cross-sectional study was conducted with nursing students who are included in the new pedagogical model. The sample was formed by 200 students belonging to the Vice-direction of Nursing at "Comandante Pinares" General Teaching Hospital in San Cristóbal, Pinar del Río. An anonymous survey was applied (it is attached where questions about the most important

  8. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garne, Kristina; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-07-08

    For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a "bell cord" to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using telemedicine.

  9. Parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit: a phenomenological hermeneutical interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellenmark-Blom, Michaela; Wigert, Helena

    2014-03-01

    A descriptive study of parents' experiences with neonatal home care following initial care in the neonatal intensive care unit. As survival rates improve among premature and critically ill infants with an increased risk of morbidity, parents' responsibilities for neonatal care grow in scope and degree under the banner of family-centred care. Concurrent with medical advances, new questions arise about the role of parents and the experience of being provided neonatal care at home. An interview study with a phenomenological hermeneutic approach. Parents from a Swedish neonatal (n = 22) home care setting were extensively interviewed within one year of discharge. Data were collected during 2011-2012. The main theme of the findings is that parents experience neonatal home care as an inner emotional journey, from having a child to being a parent. This finding derives from three themes: the parents' experience of leaving the hospital milieu in favour of establishing independent parenthood, maturing as a parent and processing experiences during the period of neonatal intensive care. This study suggests that neonatal home care is experienced as a care structure adjusted to incorporate parents' needs following discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit. Neonatal home care appears to bridge the gap between hospital and home, supporting the family's adaptation to life in the home setting. Parents become empowered to be primary caregivers, having nurse consultants serving the needs of the whole family. Neonatal home care may therefore be understood as the implementation of family-centred care during the transition from NICU to home. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dimensions of nursing process: the leadership cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Karin; Snyder, Eugene R

    2011-08-01

    The field of nursing is in a state of crisis. This crisis has a number of causes: a shortage of registered nurses to fill job vacancies, lack of professional growth opportunities, inability to participate in decision making, and lack of orientation and training for newly graduated nurses. Democratic leadership can result in respect and greater levels of trust among staff in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  11. The Frequency and Severity of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Abnormalities in Infants with Mild Neonatal Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian H; Neil, Jeffrey; Morey, JoAnn; Yang, Edward; Silvera, Michelle V; Inder, Terrie E; Ortinau, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    To assess and contrast the incidence and severity of abnormalities on cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia. This retrospective cohort studied infants with mild, moderate, and severe neonatal encephalopathy who received therapeutic hypothermia at a single tertiary neonatal intensive care unit between 2013 and 2015. Two neuroradiologists masked to the clinical condition evaluated brain MRIs for cerebral injury after therapeutic hypothermia using the Barkovich classification system. Additional abnormalities not included in this classification system were also noted. The rate, pattern, and severity of abnormalities/injury were compared across the grades of neonatal encephalopathy. Eighty-nine infants received therapeutic hypothermia and met study criteria, 48 with mild neonatal encephalopathy, 35 with moderate neonatal encephalopathy, and 6 with severe neonatal encephalopathy. Forty-eight infants (54%) had an abnormality on MRI. There was no difference in the rate of overall MRI abnormalities by grade of neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 54%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 54%, and severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P= .89). Basal ganglia/thalamic injury was more common in those with severe neonatal encephalopathy (mild neonatal encephalopathy 4%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 9%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 34%; P = .03). In contrast, watershed injury did not differ between neonatal encephalopathy grades (mild neonatal encephalopathy 36%, moderate neonatal encephalopathy 32%, severe neonatal encephalopathy 50%; P = .3). Mild neonatal encephalopathy is commonly associated with MRI abnormalities after therapeutic hypothermia. The grade of neonatal encephalopathy during the first hours of life may not discriminate adequately between infants with and without cerebral injury noted on MRI after therapeutic hypothermia

  12. [New parenting education in maternal child nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jih-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    Taiwan society is today typified by low birth rates amongst Taiwanese and a rising number of children born to immigrant and trans-cultural marriage families. Unhealthy behavior and anxiety on the part of pregnant women increase postpartum depression and complications and negatively affect neonatal heath. Such may further negatively impact upon romantic feelings between the new parents and the nascent parent-child relationship. New parenting education is a proactive and innovative strategy that may be used to improve maternal and child health. Therefore, it is worthy to explore how best to achieve cost-effective education interventions. First, the importance of new parenting education and its influence factors must be understood. Factors of women's health and nursing responsibilities potentially addressed by new parenting education include pregnancy complications, fetal death and malformation, accidents and traumas during childhood and adolescence, childhood obesity, and pediatric health-care delivery systems. It is the responsibility of nursing professionals to collect and interpret information on health promotion, disease prevention and childcare in cooperation with other disciplines. Nurses are also responsible to participate in family education and services that target new parents. Therefore, nursing professionals participate in planning and intervention actions related to health promotion, develop support group and counseling centers, collect and organize relevant information, and develop family education and health promotion models. Achieving preventive health service goals while maintaining family competencies and empowerment is an essential aspect of the parenthood mission and vision.

  13. The neonate in distress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, T.I. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Respiratory distress is a very common and yet non-specific symptom in neonates and young infants. It may be manifested clinically in many ways, including tachypnea, apnea, periodic respiratory, grunting, retractions, nasal flaring, and cyanosis. In many instances, the chest radiograph is diagnostic or at least suggestive of the diagnosis. This fact is important in determining surgical or medical conditions that require emergency therapy. Even if the chest film is normal, valuable information can be gained. This initial normal radiograph can be used as a baseline film in the face of further developing symptoms which, likewise, may have developing radiographic findings. In any event, the chest radiograph gives the clinician ''direction'' in his or her search for the cause of the patient's respiratory distress

  14. Neonatal Pulmonary Hemosiderosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Limme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage. The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images is strongly suggestive.

  15. Mothers of Pre-Term Infants in Neonate Intensive Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Margaret

    2007-01-01

    In this study, eight mothers of pre-term infants under the care of nursing staff and neonatologists in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Children's Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia, were observed and interviewed about their birth experience and their images of themselves as mothers during their stay. Patterns and themes in the…

  16. The nursing contribution to ethical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dinten-Schmid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the neonatal care units of the University Hospitals of Zurich and Bern, the nurse´s role in ethical decision-making is well established. However, nurses often reported uncertainty with regard to introducing the premature infant’s situation from the nursing perspective in ethics rounds. Aims: To empower neonatal nurses in fulfilling their role in the multiprofessional decision-making process, we performed a practice development project. On the basis of the Iowa model we developed a checklist for presenting the nursing history of premature infants in an ethically competent and responsible way. Conclusions: The ‘checklist for nursing assessment in the context of ethical decision-making’, equips nurses for their professional contribution to ethics rounds, making them better prepared to present the nursing perspective in a structured and thorough manner. Implications for practice: The Iowa model supports practice development even with limited data availability The instrument invigorates the neonatal nurse´s role in the multiprofessional ethical decision-making process It is crucial to involve peers in practice development

  17. Nurse Burnout and Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahey, Doris C.; Aiken, Linda H.; Sloane, Douglas M.; Clarke, Sean P.; Vargas, Delfino

    2010-01-01

    Background Amid a national nurse shortage, there is growing concern that high levels of nurse burnout could adversely affect patient outcomes. Objectives This study examines the effect of the nurse work environment on nurse burnout, and the effects of the nurse work environment and nurse burnout on patients' satisfaction with their nursing care. Research Design/Subjects We conducted cross-sectional surveys of nurses (N = 820) and patients (N = 621) from 40 units in 20 urban hospitals across the United States. Measures Nurse surveys included measures of nurses' practice environments derived from the revised Nursing Work Index (NWI-R) and nurse outcomes measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and intentions to leave. Patients were interviewed about their satisfaction with nursing care using the La Monica-Oberst Patient Satisfaction Scale (LOPSS). Results Patients cared for on units that nurses characterized as having adequate staff, good administrative support for nursing care, and good relations between doctors and nurses were more than twice likely as other patients to report high satisfaction with their care, and their nurses reported significantly lower burnout. The overall level of nurse burnout on hospital units also affected patient satisfaction. Conclusions Improvements in nurses' work environments in hospitals have the potential to simultaneously reduce nurses' high levels of job burnout and risk of turnover and increase patients' satisfaction with their care. PMID:14734943

  18. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome in neonates born to opioid maintained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Nina; Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Baewert, Andjela; Jagsch, Reinhold; Peternell, Alexandra; Thau, Kenneth; Fischer, Gabriele

    2007-03-16

    Neonates born to opioid-maintained mothers are at risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which often requires pharmacological treatment. This study examined the effect of opioid maintenance treatment on the incidence and timing of NAS, and compared two different NAS treatments (phenobarbital versus morphine hydrochloride). Fifty-three neonates born to opioid-maintained mothers were included in this study. The mothers received methadone (n=22), slow-release oral morphine (n=17) or buprenorphine (n=14) throughout pregnancy. Irrespective of maintenance treatment, all neonates showed APGAR scores comparable to infants of non-opioid dependent mothers. No difference was found between the three maintenance groups regarding neonatal weight, length or head circumference. Sixty percent (n=32) of neonates required treatment for NAS [68% in the methadone-maintained group (n=15), 82% in the morphine-maintained group (n=14), and 21% in the buprenorphine-maintained group (n=3)]. The mean duration from birth to requirement of NAS treatment was 33 h for the morphine-maintained group, 34 h for the buprenorphine-maintained group and 58 h for the methadone-maintained group. In neonates requiring NAS treatment, those receiving morphine required a significantly shorter mean duration of treatment (9.9 days) versus those treated with phenobarbital (17.7 days). Results suggest that morphine hydrochloride is preferable for neonates suffering NAS due to opioid withdrawal.

  19. Use of a web-based education program improves nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloian, Barbara J; Lewin, Linda Orkin; O'Connor, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the baseline knowledge and knowledge gained of nurses, nursing students, midwives, and nurse practitioners who completed Breastfeeding Basics, an online educational program. This study reports on an anonymous evaluation of an online breastfeeding education program developed and maintained to promote evidence-based breastfeeding practice. Included in the study were 3736 nurses, 728 nurse practitioners/midwives, and 3106 nursing students from the United States who completed ≥ one pretest or posttest on the Breastfeeding Basics website between April 1999 and December 31, 2011. Baseline scores were analyzed to determine if nurses' baseline knowledge varied by selected demographic variables such as age, gender, professional level, personal or partner breastfeeding experience, and whether they were required to complete the website for a job or school requirement and to determine knowledge gaps. Pretest and posttest scores on all modules and in specific questions with low pretest scores were compared as a measure of knowledge gained. Lower median pretest scores were found in student nurses (71%), males (71%), those required to take the course (75%), and those without personal breastfeeding experience (72%). The modules with the lowest median pretest scores were Anatomy/Physiology (67%), Growth and Development of the Breastfed Infant (67%), the Breastfeeding Couple (73%), and the Term Infant with Problems (60%). Posttest scores in all modules increased significantly (p nurses and nursing students. Gaps exist in nurses' breastfeeding knowledge. Knowledge improved in all areas based on comparison of pretest and posttest scores. © 2015 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  20. Neonate brain disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xydis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Hypoxic-Ischemic insults in the brain of neonates constitute major cause of morbidity and mortality. A wide range of motor, sensory, and cognitive disabilities are observed in this population spanning from slight motor deficits, school difficulties and behavioral problems up to cerebral palsy and mental retardation. Pathologically involved areas characterized by high metabolic demands and therefore with enhanced vulnerability to any reduction or cessation of energy and oxygen supply. Watershed areas of the brain (vascular end zones and vascular border zones) are predominately affected in any adverse event. Radiologic and pathologic appearance of these lesions depends both on the severity of the insult and the maturity of the brain. The dominant pathology observed in preterm neonates is white matter lesions. There are three basic patterns of brain destruction in this population. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL focal fPVL, diffuse dPVL), germinal matrix haemorrhage (GMH) associated with intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH), and parenchymal haemorrhage (PH). fPVL is characterized by focal necrosis of all cellular elements in the periventricular white matter, resulting in the formation of cysts, and dPVL is characterized by diffuse destruction of the premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pre-OLs) the precursors of mature oligodendroglia cells responsible for the formation of myelin in a later stage. GMH is located beneath germinal matrix layer surrounding the lateral ventricles and can extend into the ventricular system resulting thus to IVH. Finally, PH is located within the parenchyma adjacent to the ventricles and is believed to represent haemorrhagic infarcts following venous drainage compromise. In term or near-term neonates, the top-ographic pattern of injuries involves mainly gray matter structures. Most frequent predilection sites include the cerebral cortex (paracentral lobule, Rolandic area, visual cortex and hippocampus), basal ganglia, thalamus, and

  1. Implementation of Bubble CPAP in a Rural Ugandan Neonatal ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ryan M; Hedstrom, Anna B; DiBlasi, Robert M; Mant, Jill E; Nyonyintono, James; Otai, Christine D; Lester, Debbie A; Batra, Maneesh

    2015-03-01

    Respiratory distress is a leading cause of neonatal death in low-income and middle-income countries. CPAP is a simple and effective respiratory support modality used to support neonates with respiratory failure and can be used in low-income and middle-income countries. The goal of this study was to describe implementation of the Silverman-Andersen respiratory severity score (RSS) and bubble CPAP in a rural Ugandan neonatal NICU. We sought to determine whether physicians and nurses in a low-income/middle-income setting would assign similar RSS in neonates after an initial training period and over time. We describe the process of training NICU staff to use the RSS to assist in decision making regarding initiation, titration, and termination of bubble CPAP for neonates with respiratory distress. Characteristics of all neonates with respiratory failure treated with bubble CPAP in a rural Ugandan NICU from January to June 2012 are provided. Nineteen NICU staff members (4 doctors and 15 nurses) received RSS training. After this, the Spearman correlation coefficient for respiratory severity scoring between doctor and nurse was 0.73. Twenty-one infants, all CPAP, with 17 infants starting on the day of birth. The majority of infants (16/21, 76%) were preterm, 10 (48%) were CPAP, 5.2 ± 2.3 after 2-4 h of CPAP, 4.9 ± 2.7 after 12-24 h of CPAP, and 3.5 ± 1.9 before CPAP was discontinued. Duration of treatment with CPAP averaged 79 ± 43 h. Approximately half (11/21, 52%) of infants treated with CPAP survived to discharge. Implementing bubble CPAP in a low-income/middle-income setting is feasible. The RSS may be a simple and useful tool for monitoring a neonate's respiratory status and for guiding CPAP management. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. NEONATAL TOBACCO SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.Kireev

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is to study neonatal adaptation in new-born children from the tobacco abused mothers. A comparative analysis of clinical and neuroendochnal status and lipid metabolism in new-born children from smoking and non-smoking mothers was carried out Neonatal adaptation disorders were revealed in new-born children from the smoking mothers.

  3. Using the Delphi method to develop nursing-sensitive quality indicators for the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Huang, Li-Hua; Xing, Mei-Yuan; Feng, Zhi-Xian; Shao, Le-Wen; Zhang, Mei-Yun; Shao, Rong-Ya

    2017-02-01

    To develop nursing-sensitive quality indicators consistent with current medical practices in Chinese neonatal intensive care units. The development of nursing-sensitive quality indicators has become a top priority in nursing management. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no objective, scientific and sensitive evaluation of the quality of neonatal intensive care unit nursing in China. A modified Delphi technique was used to seek opinions from experts about what should be used and prioritised as indicators of quality care in neonatal intensive care unit nursing. Based on a literature review, we identified 21 indicators of nursing-sensitive quality in the neonatal intensive care unit. Our group of 11 consultants chose 13 indicators to be discussed using the Delphi method. In October and November 2014, 39 neonatal intensive care unit experts in 18 tertiary hospitals spread across six provinces participated in two rounds of Delphi panels. Of the 13 indicators discussed, 11 were identified as indicators of nursing-sensitive quality in the neonatal intensive care unit: rate of nosocomial infections, rate of accidental endotracheal extubation, rate of errors in medication administration, rate of treatment for pain, rate of peripheral venous extravasation, rate of compliance with handwashing techniques, incidence of pressure ulcers, incidence of noise, the bed-to-care ratio, the proportion of nurses with greater than five years neonatal intensive care unit experience and incidence of retinopathy. The 11 neonatal intensive care unit nursing-sensitive indicators identified by the Delphi method integrated with basic Chinese practices provide a basis for nursing management and the monitoring of nursing quality. This study identified nursing-sensitive quality indicators for neonatal intensive care unit care that are suitable for current clinical practice in China. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus epidemic in a neonatal nursery: a strategy of infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertini, Giovanna; Nicoletti, PierLuigi; Scopetti, Franca; Manoocher, Pourshaban; Dani, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella

    2006-08-01

    The risk of nosocomial infection due to Staphylococcus aureus in fullterm newborns is higher under hospital conditions where there are overcrowded nurseries and inadequate infection control techniques. We report on an outbreak of skin infection in a Maternity Nursery (May 21, 2000) and the measures undertaken to bring the epidemic under control. These measures included: separating neonates already present in the nursery on August 23, 2000 from ones newly arriving by creating two different cohorts, one of neonates born before this date and one of neonates born later; restricting healthcare workers caring for S. aureus- infected infants from working with non-infected infants; disallowing carrier healthcare workers from caring for patients; introducing contact and droplet precautions (including the routine use of gowns, gloves, and mask); ensuring appropriate disinfection of potential sources of contamination. A representative number of isolates were typed by genomic DNA restriction length polymorphism analysis by means of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 227 cases of skin lesions, microbiological laboratory analyses confirmed that 175 were staphylococcal infections. The outbreak showed a gradual reduction in magnitude when the overcrowding of the Nursery was reduced by separating the newborns into the two different Nurseries (two cohorts). The genotyping of the strains by PFGE confirmed the nurse-to-newborn transmission of S. aureus. The measures adopted for controlling the S. aureus outbreak can, in retrospect, be assessed to have been very effective.

  5. Maternal Risk Factors for Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Melissa I.; Gupta, Munish; Modest, Anna M.; Wu, Lily; Hacker, Michele R.; Martin, Camilia R.; Rana, Sarosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the relationship between maternal hypertensive disease and other risk factors and the neonatal development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Methods This was a retrospective case control study of infants with NEC from 2008 to 2012. The primary exposure of interest was maternal hypertensive disease, which has been hypothesized to put infants at risk for NEC. Other variables collected included demographics, pregnancy complications, medications, and neonatal hospital course. Data was abstracted from medical records. Results 28 cases of singleton neonates with NEC and 81 matched controls were identified and analyzed. There was no significant difference in the primary outcome. Fetuses with an antenatal diagnosis of growth restriction were more likely to develop NEC (p=0.008). Infants with NEC had lower median birth weight than infants without NEC (p=0.009). Infants with NEC had more late-onset sepsis (p=0.01) and mortality before discharge (p=0.001). Conclusions The factors identified by this case-control study that increased the risk of neonatal NEC included intrauterine growth restriction and lower neonatal birth weight. The primary exposure, hypertensive disease, did not show a significantly increased risk of neonatal NEC, however there was a nearly two-fold difference observed. Our study was underpowered to detect the observed difference. PMID:25162307

  6. Attitudes toward expanding nurses' authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzman, Hana; Van Dijk, Dina; Eizenberg, Limor; Khaikin, Rut; Phridman, Shoshi; Siman-Tov, Maya; Goldberg, Shoshi

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of care procedures previously under the physician's authority have been placed in the hands of registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of nurses towards expanding nurses' authority and the relationships between these attitudes and job satisfaction facets, professional characteristics, and demographics. A cross-sectional study was conducted between 2010 and 2011 in three major medical centers in Israel. Participants included 833 nurses working in 89 departments. Attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority were assessed by self-report questionnaire, as well as job satisfaction facets including perception of professional autonomy, nurse-physician working relations, workload and burnout, perceptions of quality of care, and nursing staff satisfaction at work. Nurses reported positive attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority and moderate attitudes for interpretation of diagnostic tests in selected situations. The results of multivariate regression analyses demonstrate that the nurses' satisfaction from professional autonomy and work relations were the most influential factors in explaining their attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority. In addition, professionally young nurses tend to be more positive regarding changes in nurses' authority. In the Israeli reality of a nurse's shortage, we are witnessing professional transitions toward expansion of the scope of nurses' accountability and decision-making authority. The current research contributes to our understanding of attitudes toward the expansion of nurses' authority among the nursing staffs. The findings indicate the necessity of redefining the scope of nursing practice within the current professional context.

  7. Mapping the nursing competences in neonatology: a qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Emanuela; Alebbi, Alessia; Bedini, M Giovanna; Boni, Laura; Foà, Chiara

    2017-07-18

    There are several studies that support the importance of advanced expertise and specialization of the neonatal pediatric nurse. However, proceeding with a analysis of the scientific literature regarding the nursing advanced competence in neonatology, very few studies specify and define these competences. The aim of the study is investigate and analyze skills, tasks and responsibilities of the neonatal pediatric nurse, to map a "neonatal nurse competence profile", offered from the points of view of the Neonatology Units professionals. 32 professionals (nurses, physicians, psychologists, healthcare assistants) operating in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of two Italian Hospitals were interviewed. The semi-structured interviews have been performed, transcribed and analyzed following the Levati's model (based on Activity, Expectations and Evaluation system). About the nurses activities, the participants underlined the newborn care, the care of the caregiver and the "bureaucratic" activities. About the system of expectations, the participants marked on specific skills but those are described only comprehensively. About the evaluation system there are different perceptions among the professionals, but the nurses themselves feel that they have to answer for their actions primarily to infants and families, indicating a sense of responsibility towards the patients. On the basis of the interviews a profile of a neonatal nurse competences has been drawn up. This consists of 42 competences that future studies can further specify, integrate and expand.

  8. Neonatal appendicitis: a survival case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Linha Secco

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To report a case of neonatal appendicitis in a children’s hospital in southern Brazil, demonstrating the impact on neonatal survival. Method: Case study with data collection from medical records, approved by the Institution and Ethics Committee for Research with Human Beings. Results: The clinical picture is initially characterized by food intolerance, evolving to hypoactivity, alteration of vital signs and septicemia due to intestinal perforation. Management is exclusively surgical, since no case described in the literature was diagnosed preoperatively and the findings usually point to acute abdomen. Conclusion: A focused clinical surveillance should be established when the infant presents peritoneal irritation. Follow-up of the evolution and the worsening of the symptoms by nurses, as part of the care team in partnership with the medical team, enables an early surgical intervention, thereby avoiding complications such as septicemia and death.

  9. Delayed Diagnosis of Iatrogenic Bladder Perforation in a Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinette S. Birs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic bladder injuries have been reported in the neonate during umbilical artery/vein catheterization, voiding cystourethrogram, urinary catheterizations, and overwhelming hypoxic conditions. Patients with iatrogenic bladder perforations can present with acute abdomen indicating urinary peritonitis, septic-uremic shock, or subtle symptoms like abdominal distension, pain, hematuria, uremia, electrolyte imbalances, and/or difficulty urinating. The following neonatal case report of perforated bladder includes a review of the signs, symptoms, diagnostic tools, and management of bladder injury in neonates.

  10. 'There were more wires than him': the potential for wireless patient monitoring in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Oliver; Beardsall, Kathryn; Crilly, Nathan; Lasenby, Joan

    2017-02-01

    The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be one of the most stressful hospital environments. Alongside providing intensive clinical care, it is important that parents have the opportunity for regular physical contact with their babies because the neonatal period is critical for parent-child bonding. At present, monitoring technology in the NICU requires multiple wired sensors to track each baby's vital signs. This study describes the experiences that parents and nurses have with the current monitoring methods, and reports on their responses to the concept of a wireless monitoring system. Semistructured interviews were conducted with six parents, each of whom had babies on the unit, and seven nurses who cared for those babies. The interviews initially focused on the participants' experiences of the current wired system and then on their responses to the concept of a wireless system. The transcripts were analysed using a general inductive approach to identify relevant themes. Participants reported on physical and psychological barriers to parental care, the ways in which the current system obstructed the efficient delivery of clinical care and the perceived benefits and risks of a wireless system. The parents and nurses identified that the wires impeded baby-parent bonding; physically and psychologically. While a wireless system was viewed as potentially enabling greater interaction, staff and parents highlighted potential concerns, including the size, weight and battery life of any new device. The many wires required to safely monitor babies within the NICU creates a negative environment for parents at a critical developmental period, in terms of physical and psychological interactions. Nurses also experience challenges with the existing system, which could negatively impact the clinical care delivery. Developing a wireless system could overcome these barriers, but there remain challenges in designing a device suitable for this unique environment.

  11. Using appreciative inquiry to transform student nurses' image of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauke, Motshedisi E; Van Der Wal, Dirk; Botha, Annalie

    2015-08-19

    Literature provides adequate evidence of a poor perception of nursing within the profession, resulting in high rates of attrition of student nurses and newly qualified nurses. The nursing profession, in particular nurse educators, has an ethical and professional responsibility to find innovative strategies to promote the positive image of nursing amongst student nurses. The purpose of the study was to explore the potential of appreciative inquiry (AI) as an intervention teaching strategy to transform student nurses' image of nursing. A quantitative, quasi-experimental, explorative-descriptive design comprising the pretest, appreciative inquiry as intervention, and the post-test was used. Convenience sampling was used to select third and fourth year college and university student nurses in the Gauteng province of South Africa for the pre- and the post-test respectively. Data were collected by means of a questionnaire and analysed by SPSS version 20.0. The pretest results revealed a mix of positive and negative perceptions of the image of nursing amongst student nurses. The negative perceptions of the image of nursing that needed intervention included the working conditions of nurses, and the perception of nursing as a profession that was not respected and appreciated. The post-test results showed a significant and positive change in the student nurses' perception of the image of nursing as a respected and appreciated profession. Although AI resulted in a negative to positive change in some aspects of student nurses' image of nursing, the negative perceptions of the working conditions of nurses remained and became more negative. The positive image of gender in nursing was enhanced following the implementation of AI. Appreciative inquiry demonstrated potential as a teaching strategy to produce a positive nursing image change and positive orientation towards nursing amongst student nurses.

  12. Neonatal erythroderma – clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boull CL

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Christina L Boull, Kristen P Hook Department of Dermatology, Division of Pediatric Dermatology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: Neonatal erythroderma is rare, but significant as it may be the initial manifestation of an array of infectious, metabolic, and genetic conditions, some of which are life-threatening. Initial management should focus on identifying and treating life threatening etiololgies and complications, including infection, and fluid, electrolyte, and temperature disturbances. Often, the etiology of erythroderma is difficult to quickly identify in the neonate, as there is significant clinical overlap between causative entities. Furthermore, rapid definitive diagnostic tests are lacking. Herein we provide a review of the specific clinical features and diagnostic tests, which can aid in making a correct diagnosis. Skin care for the erythrodermic infant is also discussed. We encourage subspecialist consultation when appropriate to aid in the evaluation, especially when initial testing is nondiagnostic. Keywords: psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, cutaneous candidiasis

  13. Nurses' beliefs about nursing diagnosis: A study with cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Fabio; Pancani, Luca; Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Lumillo-Gutierrez, Iris; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2018-06-01

    To identify clusters of nurses in relation to their beliefs about nursing diagnosis among two populations (Italian and Spanish); to investigate differences among clusters of nurses in each population considering the nurses' socio-demographic data, attitudes towards nursing diagnosis, intentions to make nursing diagnosis and actual behaviours in making nursing diagnosis. Nurses' beliefs concerning nursing diagnosis can influence its use in practice but this is still unclear. A cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of nurses in Italy and Spain was enrolled. Data were collected between 2014-2015 using tools, that is, a socio-demographic questionnaire and behavioural, normative and control beliefs, attitudes, intentions and behaviours scales. The sample included 499 nurses (272 Italians & 227 Spanish). Of these, 66.5% of the Italian and 90.7% of the Spanish sample were female. The mean age was 36.5 and 45.2 years old in the Italian and Spanish sample respectively. Six clusters of nurses were identified in Spain and four in Italy. Three clusters were similar among the two populations. Similar significant associations between age, years of work, attitudes towards nursing diagnosis, intentions to make nursing diagnosis and behaviours in making nursing diagnosis and cluster membership in each population were identified. Belief profiles identified unique subsets of nurses that have distinct characteristics. Categorizing nurses by belief patterns may help administrators and educators to tailor interventions aimed at improving nursing diagnosis use in practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Nurse retention and satisfaction in Ecuador: implications for nursing administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Sheri P

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the characteristics of professional nursing work environments that may affect nursing turnover and satisfaction within a large Ecuadorian hospital. Nursing turnover is a challenge and may compromise patient care. Work dissatisfaction contributes to high turnover. Improving nurse satisfaction can contribute to better patient outcomes. Eighty-eight nurses participated in a quantitative and qualitative survey focusing on nursing satisfaction, turnover and selected organisation characteristics. Issues that may affect nurse satisfaction and turnover were identified using questions from the Nursing Work Index: pay, insufficient number of nurses, undervaluing of nurses by public and the medical team, limited advancement opportunities, lack of autonomy and inflexibility in schedule. Other themes identified from qualitative data are reported. The top factor of decreased satisfaction was low pay as indicated by the Nursing Work Index. The qualitative results showed that low pay was the factor for nurse turnover. Additional factors related to nursing satisfaction can be addressed to improve nurse retention. Along with increasing nursing pay, strategies to consider in decreasing turnover and increasing satisfaction included: providing opportunities for nursing advancement, promoting the value of nursing, creating clinical protocols and enhancing autonomy. This study adds to knowledge about nursing needs and satisfaction in South America. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Neonatal outcome and congenital malformations in children born after ICSI with testicular or epididymal sperm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedder, Jens; Loft, A; Parner, Erik Thorlund

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Does neonatal outcome including congenital malformations in children born after ICSI with epididymal and testicular sperm [testicular sperm extraction (TESE)/percutaneous epididymal sperm aspiration (PESA)/testicular sperm aspiration (TESA) (TPT)] differ from neonatal outcome in c...

  16. Neonatal seizures in a rural Iranian district hospital: etiologies, incidence and predicting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghian, Afsaneh; Damghanian, Maryam; Shariati, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Current study determined the overall incidence, common causes as well as main predictors of this final diagnosis among neonates admitted to a rural district hospital in Iran. This study was conducted on 699 neonates who were candidate for admission to the NICU. Study population was categorized in the case group, including patients exposed to final diagnosis of neonatal seizures and the control group without this diagnosis. Neonatal seizure was reported as final diagnosis in 25 (3.6%) of neonates. The most frequent discharge diagnosis in the seizure group was neonatal sepsis and in the non-seizure group was respiratory problems. No significant difference was found in early fatality rate between neonates with and without seizures (8.0% vs. 10.1%). Only gestational age <38 week had a relationship with the appearance of neonatal seizure. Low gestational age has a crucial role for predicting appearance of seizure in Iranian neonates.

  17. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  18. Bayesian automated cortical segmentation for neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Zane; Paquette, Natacha; Ganesh, Bhavana; Wang, Yalin; Ceschin, Rafael; Nelson, Marvin D.; Macyszyn, Luke; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Panigrahy, Ashok; Lepore, Natasha

    2017-11-01

    Several attempts have been made in the past few years to develop and implement an automated segmentation of neonatal brain structural MRI. However, accurate automated MRI segmentation remains challenging in this population because of the low signal-to-noise ratio, large partial volume effects and inter-individual anatomical variability of the neonatal brain. In this paper, we propose a learning method for segmenting the whole brain cortical grey matter on neonatal T2-weighted images. We trained our algorithm using a neonatal dataset composed of 3 fullterm and 4 preterm infants scanned at term equivalent age. Our segmentation pipeline combines the FAST algorithm from the FSL library software and a Bayesian segmentation approach to create a threshold matrix that minimizes the error of mislabeling brain tissue types. Our method shows promising results with our pilot training set. In both preterm and full-term neonates, automated Bayesian segmentation generates a smoother and more consistent parcellation compared to FAST, while successfully removing the subcortical structure and cleaning the edges of the cortical grey matter. This method show promising refinement of the FAST segmentation by considerably reducing manual input and editing required from the user, and further improving reliability and processing time of neonatal MR images. Further improvement will include a larger dataset of training images acquired from different manufacturers.

  19. [Infection prevention and control in neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Elisiane; Lorenzini, Elisiane; da Costa, Tatiane Costa; da Silva, Eveline Franco

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to identify the knowledge of the nursing team of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) on infection control, identijfying the factors that facilitate or hinder the prevention and control of Healthcare Associated Infections (HICAI). A descriptive study using a qualitative research method conducted with three nurses and 15 nurse technicians, who work in a NICU of a charitable organization, in southern Brazil. It became evident that the nursing staff had great knowledge about the factors that facilitate the prevention and control of HCAI in NICU, the most important factor being proper hand hygiene. Among the factors that hinder infection prevention and control are to overcrowding and excessive workload. The efficient performance of the nursing staff is an important part of the strategy for prevention and control of HCAI.

  20. Towards Chagas disease elimination: Neonatal screening for congenital transmission in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Pamela Marie; Juárez, José Guillermo; Arrivillaga, Margarita Rivera; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra María; Doktor, Katherine; Bryan, Joe P; Escobar, Clara Yaseli; Cordón-Rosales, Celia

    2017-09-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease that continues to affect populations living in extreme poverty in Latin America. After successful vector control programs, congenital transmission remains as a challenge to disease elimination. We used the PRECEDE-PROCEED planning model to develop strategies for neonatal screening of congenital Chagas disease in rural communities of Guatemala. These communities have persistent high triatomine infestations and low access to healthcare. We used mixed methods with multiple stakeholders to identify and address maternal-infant health behaviors through semi-structured interviews, participatory group meetings, archival reviews and a cross-sectional survey in high risk communities. From December 2015 to April 2016, we jointly developed a strategy to illustratively advertise newborn screening at the Health Center. The strategy included socioculturally appropriate promotional and educational material, in collaboration with midwives, nurses and nongovernmental organizations. By March 2016, eight of 228 (3.9%) pregnant women had been diagnosed with T. cruzi at the Health Center. Up to this date, no neonatal screening had been performed. By August 2016, seven of eight newborns born to Chagas seropositive women had been parasitologically screened at the Health Center, according to international standards. Thus, we implemented a successful community-based neonatal screening strategy to promote congenital Chagas disease healthcare in a rural setting. The success of the health promotion strategies developed will depend on local access to maternal-infant services, integration with detection of other congenital diseases and reliance on community participation in problem and solution definition.

  1. Towards Chagas disease elimination: Neonatal screening for congenital transmission in rural communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Marie Pennington

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease that continues to affect populations living in extreme poverty in Latin America. After successful vector control programs, congenital transmission remains as a challenge to disease elimination. We used the PRECEDE-PROCEED planning model to develop strategies for neonatal screening of congenital Chagas disease in rural communities of Guatemala. These communities have persistent high triatomine infestations and low access to healthcare. We used mixed methods with multiple stakeholders to identify and address maternal-infant health behaviors through semi-structured interviews, participatory group meetings, archival reviews and a cross-sectional survey in high risk communities. From December 2015 to April 2016, we jointly developed a strategy to illustratively advertise newborn screening at the Health Center. The strategy included socioculturally appropriate promotional and educational material, in collaboration with midwives, nurses and nongovernmental organizations. By March 2016, eight of 228 (3.9% pregnant women had been diagnosed with T. cruzi at the Health Center. Up to this date, no neonatal screening had been performed. By August 2016, seven of eight newborns born to Chagas seropositive women had been parasitologically screened at the Health Center, according to international standards. Thus, we implemented a successful community-based neonatal screening strategy to promote congenital Chagas disease healthcare in a rural setting. The success of the health promotion strategies developed will depend on local access to maternal-infant services, integration with detection of other congenital diseases and reliance on community participation in problem and solution definition.

  2. Home-based Care Needs of Preterm Infants Discharged Early from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A Descriptive Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Namnabati

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: The enhancement of the nurses' knowledge about the needs of the preterm neonates with early discharge would result in the improvement of their abilities in the relevant domain. Accordingly, these nurses could help the mothers to prevent the incidence of several complications in the neonates, such as readmissions to the NICU. More importantly, these measures could prevent from the consequences of failure to fulfil these needs emerging in the later stages of life.

  3. The sonographic features of neonatal appendicitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Shu-Yu; Guo, Yi-Yi; Mu, Jian-Feng; Yan, Chao-Ying

    2017-11-01

    Neonatal appendicitis is extremely rare, and preoperative diagnosis is challenging. This study aimed to investigate the utility of ultrasound for the diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis. Four cases of neonatal appendicitis were included in this case series. One was a female infant and the other 3 were male infants; they were aged from 10 to 17 days. Neonatal appendicitis. Four newborns in our hospital were diagnosed with neonatal appendicitis by abdominal ultrasound. Their sonographic features were summarized and compared with surgical and pathological findings. In these infants, abdominal ultrasound demonstrated ileocecal bowel dilatation, intestinal and bowel wall thickening, and localized encapsulated effusion in the right lower quadrant and the abscess area, which was assumed to surround the appendix. Ultrasound is helpful for the diagnosis of neonatal appendicitis.

  4. A simple high-dose gentamicin regimen showed no side effects among neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Anne Sofie; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Dalegaard, Mette Correll

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment of infections in neonates with gentamicin is a balance between optimising bactericidal effect and minimising adverse effects. Previously, at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Kolding Hospital, Denmark, neonates suspected of having infections were treated daily...... and 2012 and treated with gentamicin were included retrospectively in the study. Neonates with trough serum (S)-gentamicin level ≥ 2.0 mg/l before the third dose were reviewed in detail. RESULTS: In total, S-gentamicin level was measured in 253 treated neonates of whom 7% displayed elevated trough values....... Neonates elevated S...

  5. Thrombocytopenia in neonates with polycythemia: incidence, risk factors and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlug, Roos D; Lopriore, Enrico; Janssen, Marleen; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Rath, Mirjam E A; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J

    2015-02-01

    Polycythemia occurs in 1 to 5% of neonates and is associated with complications, including an increased risk of thrombocytopenia. To evaluate incidence, risk factors, management and outcome of thrombocytopenia in neonates with polycythemia. All neonates with polycythemia admitted to our neonatal intensive care unit between 2006 and 2013 were included in this retrospective study. We evaluated the incidence of thrombocytopenia (platelet count polycythemia and is independently associated with growth restriction. Increased hematocrit is associated with decreased platelet count.

  6. Special Considerations in Neonatal Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgleish, Stacey; Kostecky, Linda; Charania, Irina

    2016-12-01

    Care of infants supported with mechanical ventilation is complex, time intensive, and requires constant vigilance by an expertly prepared health care team. Current evidence must guide nursing practice regarding ventilated neonates. This article highlights the importance of common language to establish a shared mental model and enhance clear communication among the interprofessional team. Knowledge regarding the underpinnings of an open lung strategy and the interplay between the pathophysiology and individual infant's response to a specific ventilator strategy is most likely to result in a positive clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patterns of admission and factors associated with neonatal mortality among neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of University of Gondar Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demisse AG

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abayneh Girma Demisse, Fentahun Alemu, Mahlet Abayneh Gizaw, Zemene Tigabu School of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Introduction: The neonatal period is a highly vulnerable time for an infant completing many of the physiologic adjustments required for life outside the uterus. As a result, there are high rates of morbidity and mortality. The three major causes of mortality in developing countries include prematurity, infection, and perinatal asphyxia. The aim of this study was to identify the patterns of neonatal admission and factors associated with mortality among neonates admitted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of University of Gondar Hospital.Materials and methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted among all admitted neonates in the NICU of University of Gondar referral hospital from December 1, 2015 to August 31, 2016. Information was extracted retrospectively during admission from patient records and death certificates, using a pretested questionnaire. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 20, and p-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.Results: A total of 769 neonates was included in the study. There were 448 (58.3% male neonates, and 398 (51.8% neonates were rural residents. More than two-thirds of the 587 deliveries (76.3% were performed in tertiary hospitals. Neonatal morbidity included hypothermia 546 (71%, sepsis 522 (67.9%, prematurity 250 (34.9%, polycythemia 242 (31.5%, hypoglycemia 142 (18.5, meconium aspiration syndrome 113 (14.7%, and perinatal asphyxia 96 (12.5%. The overall mortality was 110 (14.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.9–16.9 of which 69 (62.7% deaths occurred in the first 24 hours of age. In the multivariate analysis, mortality was associated with perinatal asphyxia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 5.97; 95% CI: 3.06–11.64, instrumental delivery (AOR: 2.99; 95% CI: 1.08–8.31, and early onset

  8. Nursing Competency: Definition, Structure and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Mika

    2018-01-01

    Nursing competency includes core abilities that are required for fulfilling one’s role as a nurse. Therefore, it is important to clearly define nursing competency to establish a foundation for nursing education curriculum. However, while the concepts surrounding nursing competency are important for improving nursing quality, they are still not yet completely developed. Thus, challenges remain in establishing definitions and structures for nursing competency, competency levels necessary for nursing professionals, training methods and so on. In the present study, we reviewed the research on definitions and attributes of nursing competency in Japan as well as competency structure, its elements and evaluation. Furthermore, we investigated training methods to teach nursing competency. PMID:29599616

  9. Nursing Competency: Definition, Structure and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, Mika

    2018-03-01

    Nursing competency includes core abilities that are required for fulfilling one's role as a nurse. Therefore, it is important to clearly define nursing competency to establish a foundation for nursing education curriculum. However, while the concepts surrounding nursing competency are important for improving nursing quality, they are still not yet completely developed. Thus, challenges remain in establishing definitions and structures for nursing competency, competency levels necessary for nursing professionals, training methods and so on. In the present study, we reviewed the research on definitions and attributes of nursing competency in Japan as well as competency structure, its elements and evaluation. Furthermore, we investigated training methods to teach nursing competency.

  10. Estresse ocupacional e suas repercussões na qualidade de vida de médicos e enfermeiros intensivistas pediátricos e neonatais Occupational stress and repercussions on the quality of life of pediatric and neonatal intensivist physicians and nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa de Cássia Fogaça

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar as relações entre trabalho e qualidade de vida de médicos e enfermeiros em unidades de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 37 médicos e 20 enfermeiros. O Job Content Questionnarie (JCQ, Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI e World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-100 foram utilizados. A correlação foi estimada através do coeficiente de correlação de Spearman. RESULTADOS: O esforço é inversamente correlacionado com os domínios: físico, psicológico, nível de independência, meio ambiente (pOBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between work and quality of life of doctors and nurses in pediatric intensive care units and neonatal. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 37 doctors and 20 nurses. The Job Content Questionnarie (JCQ e Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI, and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-100 were used. The correlation was estimated by Spearman correlation coefficient. RESULTS: The effort is inversely correlated with the areas physical, psychological, level of independence, environment (p<0.01 and social relationship (p<0.05. The reward is inversely correlated with the areas and psychological (p<0.05 level of independence (p<0.01. Control over the work is directly correlated with the physical domain (p<0.05. The psychological demands are inversely correlated with the areas physical (p<0.05, psychological (p<0.01 and level of independence (p<0.01. The physical demand is inversely correlated with physical areas, level of independence, environmental (p<0.01 and psychological (p<0.05. Job insecurity is inversely correlated with the psychological fields, level of independence (p<0.05 and the environment (p<0.01. Support the supervisor is directly correlated with degree of independence (p <0.05. CONCLUSION: Doctors and nurses showed high efforts, demands psychological, physical and job insecurity that impact on quality of life.

  11. Correction of Neonatal Hypovolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moskalev

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of hydroxyethyl starch solution (6% refortane, Berlin-Chemie versus fresh frozen plasma used to correct neonatal hypovolemia.Materials and methods. In 12 neonatal infants with hypoco-agulation, hypovolemia was corrected with fresh frozen plasma (10 ml/kg body weight. In 13 neonates, it was corrected with 6% refortane infusion in a dose of 10 ml/kg. Doppler echocardiography was used to study central hemodynamic parameters and Doppler study was employed to examine regional blood flow in the anterior cerebral and renal arteries.Results. Infusion of 6% refortane and fresh frozen plasma at a rate of 10 ml/hour during an hour was found to normalize the parameters of central hemodynamics and regional blood flow.Conclusion. Comparative analysis of the findings suggests that 6% refortane is the drug of choice in correcting neonatal hypovolemia. Fresh frozen plasma should be infused in hemostatic disorders. 

  12. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a newborn who was exposed to addictive opiate drugs while in the mother’s womb. Causes Neonatal ... Increased muscle tone Irritability Poor feeding Rapid breathing Seizures Sleep problems Slow weight gain Stuffy nose, sneezing ...

  13. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  14. Neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions.

  15. Continuing Education Preferences, Facilitators, and Barriers for Nursing Home Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Mary J; Kim, Myoung Jin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the continuing education needs for nursing home nurses in rural central Illinois and to determine any potential facilitators or barriers to obtaining continuing education. Data were collected using the Educational Needs Assessment questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were computed to examine continuing education preferences, facilitators, and barriers among nursing home nurses. Independent samples t tests were used to compare preferences between administrative and staff nurses. The sample included 317 nurses from 34 facilities. The five top needs were related to clinical problems. Administrative nurses had greater needs for professional issues, managerial skills, and quality improvement than staff nurses. Barriers included rural settings, need for vacation time for programs, and inadequate staffing. Continuing education needs of nursing home nurses in Illinois are similar to previous studies conducted in Arizona and North Carolina. Continuing education barriers were mostly organizational, rather than personal. J Contin Nurs Educ. 2018;49(1):26-33. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of a strategy for teaching neonatal resuscitation in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enweronu-Laryea, Christabel; Engmann, Cyril; Osafo, Alexandra; Bose, Carl

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a strategy for teaching neonatal resuscitation on the cognitive knowledge of health professionals who attend deliveries in Ghana, West Africa. Train-the-trainer model was used to train health professionals at 2-3 day workshops from 2003 to 2007. Obstetric Anticipatory Care and Basic Neonatal Care modules were taught as part of Neonatal Resuscitation Training package. American Neonatal Resuscitation Program was adapted to the clinical role of participants and local resources. Cognitive knowledge was evaluated by written pre- and post-training tests. The median pre-training and post-training scores were 38% and 71% for midwives, 43% and 81% for nurses, 52% and 90% for nurse anaesthetists, and 62% and 98% for physicians. All groups of the 271 professionals (18 nurse anaesthetists, 55 nurses, 68 physicians, and 130 midwives) who completed the course showed significant improvement (pfacilities were less likely to achieve passing post-test scores than midwives at secondary and tertiary facilities [35/53 vs. 24/26 vs. 45/51 (p=0.004)] respectively. Evidence-based neonatal resuscitation training adapted to local resources significantly improved cognitive knowledge of all groups of health professionals. Further modification of training for midwives working at primary level health facilities and incorporation of neonatal resuscitation in continuing education and professional training programs are recommended.

  17. Neonatal orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil M Al-Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital complications due to ethmoiditis are rare in neonates. A case of orbital abscess due to acute ethmoiditis in a 28-day-old girl is presented. A Successful outcome was achieved following antimicrobial therapy alone; spontaneous drainage of the abscess occurred from the lower lid without the need for surgery. From this case report, we intend to emphasize on eyelid retraction as a sign of neonatal orbital abscess, and to review all the available literature of similar cases.

  18. Possible Prevention of Neonatal Death: A Regional Population-Based Study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshida, Shigeki; Yanagi, Takahide; Ono, Tetsuo; Tsuji, Shunichiro; Takahashi, Kentaro

    2016-03-01

    The neonatal mortality rate in Japan has currently been at the lowest level in the world. However, it is unclear whether there are still some potentially preventable neonatal deaths. We, therefore, aimed to examine the backgrounds of neonatal death and the possibilities of prevention in a region of Japan. This is a population-based study of neonatal death in Shiga Prefecture of Japan. The 103 neonatal deaths in our prefecture between 2007 and 2011 were included. After reviewing by a peer-review team, we classified the backgrounds of these neonatal deaths and analyzed end-of-life care approaches associated with prenatal diagnosis. Furthermore, we evaluated the possibilities of preventable neonatal death, suggesting specific recommendations for its prevention. We analyzed 102 (99%) of the neonatal deaths. Congenital malformations and extreme prematurity were the first and the second most common causes of death, respectively. More than half of the congenital abnormalities (59%) including malformations and chromosome abnormality had been diagnosed before births. We had 22 neonates with non-intensive care including eighteen cases with congenital abnormality and four with extreme prematurity. Twenty three cases were judged to have had some possibility of prevention with one having had a strong possibility of prevention. Among specific recommendations of preventable neonatal death, more than half of them were for obstetricians. There is room to reduce neonatal deaths in Japan. Prevention of neonatal death requires grater prenatal care by obstetricians before birth rather than improved neonatal care by neonatologists after birth.

  19. A qualitative study of attitudes and values surrounding stillbirth and neonatal mortality among grandmothers, mothers, and unmarried girls in rural Amhara and Oromiya regions, Ethiopia: unheard souls in the backyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisay, Mitike Molla; Yirgu, Robel; Gobezayehu, Abebe Gebremariam; Sibley, Lynn M

    2014-01-01

    In Ethiopia, neonatal mortality and stillbirth are high and underreported. This study explored values related to neonatal mortality and stillbirth and the visibility of these deaths in rural Ethiopia among 3 generations of women. We conducted a qualitative study in 6 rural districts of the Oromiya and Amhara regional states during May 2012. We included 30 focus groups representing grandmothers, married women (mothers), and unmarried girls in randomly selected kebeles (villages). Until the 40th day of life, neonates are considered to be strangers to the community (not human). Their deaths are not talked about; they are buried in the house or in the backyard. Mothers are forbidden to mourn their loss lest they offend God and bring on future neonatal losses. Women who repeatedly lose their neonates may be blamed, mistreated, and dishonored through divorce. Neonatal death and stillbirth are attributed to supernatural powers, although some women and girls associate these deaths with poverty and lack of education. The desire for increased visibility of neonatal death is mixed. Unlike the grandmothers and unmarried girls, most of the married women want death to be visible to draw the attention of policy makers. Women prefer home birth and consider themselves lucky to be able to give birth at home. At present, there is no national vital registration system. Neonatal death and stillbirth are hidden and the magnitude is likely underrepresented. The delayed recognition of personhood, attribution of death to supernatural causes, social repercussions for women who experience a pregnancy loss, preference for home birth, and lack of a vital registration system all contribute to the invisibility of perinatal deaths. Increasing the visibility of (and counting) these deaths may require multifaceted behavior-change interventions. © 2014 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  20. Journal club: Integrating research awareness into postgraduate nurse training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Davis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence-based nursing requires nurses to maintain an awareness of recently published research findings to integrate into their clinical practice. In the South African setting keeping up with recent literature has additional challenges, including the diversity of nurses’ home language, geographically foreign origins of published work, and limited economic resources. Students enrolled in a postgraduate programme came from various paediatric settings and displayed limited awareness of nursing literature as an evidence base for practice. Objectives: The study aimed to design and introduce a journal club as an educational strategy into the postgraduate programmes in children’s nursing at the University of Cape Town (UCT, and then to refine the way it is used to best serve programme outcomes and facilitate student learning whilst still being an enjoyable activity. Method: An action research methodology using successive cycles of ‘assess-plan-act-observe’ was used to design, implement and refine the structure of a journal club within the postgraduate diploma programme over four academic years. Six educators actively tracked and reflected on journal club sessions, and then analysed findings during and after each annual cycle to plan improvement and increasing programme alignment. Results: Considerable refinement of the intervention included changing how it was structured, the preparation required by both students and educators, the article selection process and the intervention’s alignment with other learning activities in the programme. Conclusion: Journal club facilitated an increase in student awareness and reading of nursing literature, offering the opportunity to consider application of published research to current nursing practice. Another benefit was enabling students to become familiar with the specialised and technical language of research, children’s nursing and the critical care of children and neonates, by speaking

  1. Nursing Competency: Definition, Structure and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Fukada, Mika

    2018-01-01

    Nursing competency includes core abilities that are required for fulfilling one’s role as a nurse. Therefore, it is important to learly define nursing competency to establish a foundation for nursing education curriculum. However, while the concepts surrounding nursing competency are important for improving nursing quality, they are still not yet completely developed. Thus, challenges remain in establishing finitions and structures for nursing competency, competency levels necessary for nurs...

  2. iNICU - Integrated Neonatal Care Unit: Capturing Neonatal Journey in an Intelligent Data Way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harpreet; Yadav, Gautam; Mallaiah, Raghuram; Joshi, Preetha; Joshi, Vinay; Kaur, Ravneet; Bansal, Suneyna; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2017-08-01

    Neonatal period represents first 28 days of life, which is the most vulnerable time for a child's survival especially for the preterm babies. High neonatal mortality is a prominent and persistent problem across the globe. Non-availability of trained staff and infrastructure are the major recognized hurdles in the quality care of these neonates. Hourly progress growth charts and reports are still maintained manually by nurses along with continuous calculation of drug dosage and nutrition as per the changing weight of the baby. iNICU (integrated Neonatology Intensive Care Unit) leverages Beaglebone and Intel Edison based IoT integration with biomedical devices in NICU i.e. monitor, ventilator and blood gas machine. iNICU is hosted on IBM Softlayer based cloud computing infrastructure and map NICU workflow in Java based responsive web application to provide translational research informatics support to the clinicians. iNICU captures real time vital parameters i.e. respiration rate, heart rate, lab data and PACS amounting for millions of data points per day per child. Stream of data is sent to Apache Kafka layer which stores the same in Apache Cassandra NoSQL. iNICU also captures clinical data like feed intake, urine output, and daily assessment of child in PostgreSQL database. It acts as first Big Data hub (of both structured and unstructured data) of neonates across India offering temporal (longitudinal) data of their stay in NICU and allow clinicians in evaluating efficacy of their interventions. iNICU leverages drools based clinical rule based engine and deep learning based big data analytical model coded in R and PMML. iNICU solution aims to improve care time, fills skill gap, enable remote monitoring of neonates in rural regions, assists in identifying the early onset of disease, and reduction in neonatal mortality.

  3. A psychologist-led educational intervention results in a sustained reduction in neonatal intensive care unit infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans eVan Rostenberghe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though in the corporate world psychological science has been widely used, the formal use of evidence- based psychology in important areas of clinical medicine has been scanty at best. It was the aim of this study to determine the efficacy of a psychologist-led two-week nurse educator training on the infection rate in the NICU. Materials and methods: Six senior neonatal nurses underwent in 2007 a training course covering the retrieval of evidence and knowledge of psychological principles that would allow them to share the evidence in such a way that evidence is effectively brought into practice. The course was led by a psychologist. The nurses created and delivered their own teaching modules, all focused on infection control. The rates of bacteraemia, 2 years prior to intervention were analyzed and compared with the rate following the intervention for three years.Results: The immediate output of the course included three teaching modules (hand washing, sterile procedures, general measures to control infection. These modules were subsequently administered to the NICU nurses in structured and regular continuous nursing education (CNE sessions. The psychological techniques taught in the course were applied. Bacteraemia in the NICU significantly decreased in the year of the course and the subsequent years when compared to previous years.Conclusion: This study suggests that a psychologist-led course, followed by a structured CNE can lead to a sustainable reduction in infection rates in a NICU.

  4. Nursing on the medical ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Judith M

    2004-12-01

    This paper considers some issues confronting contemporary medical nursing and draws upon psychoanalytic theories to investigate some seemingly straightforward and taken-for-granted areas of medical nursing work. I am arguing that the everyday work of medical nurses in caring for patients is concerned with bringing order to and placing boundaries around inherently unsettled and destabilized circumstances. I am also arguing that how nurses manage and organize their work in this regard stems from traditional practices that tend to be taken for granted and not explicitly thought about. It is therefore difficult for nurses to consider changing these practices that often have negative consequences for the nurses. I want to examine the impact upon nurses of the consequences of three taken-for-granted nursing practices: (i) the tendency of nurses to confine their reactions to what is going on so as to present a caring self; (ii) the tendency of nurses in their everyday talk to patients to confine, limit and minimize meaning; and (iii) the tensions and ambiguities that emerge for nurses in the policing function they perform in confining patients to the bed or the ward. Negative consequences on nurses of these practices potentially include stress and confusion regarding their ability to care for patients; an undervaluing of nursing skills; and a deterioration in the nurse-patient relationship. Clinical supervision for medical nurses is proposed as a means of facilitating greater understanding of the nature of nurses' relationships with patients and the complex dimensions of their medical nursing role.

  5. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-01-01

    Background A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between coun...

  6. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  7. Nurse competence: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah A

    2012-10-01

      The purpose of this analysis was to explore the concept of nurse competence.   Data sources include EBSCOhost, Gale PowerSearch, ProQuest, PubMed Medline, Google Scholar, and Online Journal of Issues in Nursing.   This paper utilizes Rodgers' evolutionary method to analyze the concept of nurse competence.   Antecedents to nurse competence include personal and external motivations. Attributes include integrating knowledge into practice, experience, critical thinking, proficient skills, caring, communication, environment, motivation, and professionalism. Consequences include confidence, safe practice, and holistic care. Implications for nursing responsibility regarding defining nurse competence and ensuring nurse competence need to be identified. More research is needed to determine the best evaluation methods for the different facets of nurse competence. © 2012, The Author. International Journal of Nursing Knowledge © 2012, NANDA International.

  8. INVISIBLE MURDERER: NEONATAL TETANUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonca SONMEZ

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal tetanus (NNT has been secondary in the whole world in the death list of diseases which can be protected by the help of vaccine. It’s an important community health problem in the less-developed countries in which pre-birth care services are limited, assisting a mother at childbirth by uneducated people in dirty atmosphere and the immunity against tetanus is not enough. Studies have shown that minor part of the cases have been expressed in most of the countries. Because of that NNT have been called as “silent/invisible murderer”. In Turkey, in the year of 2003 it has been seen 15 cases, and 12 of them have been resulted in death. The methods which will be applied to carry out the elimination of NNT are; the vaccination of pregnant women with at least two doses tetanus toxoid and providing clean birth conditions for all of the pregnant women. However, in Turkey the proportion of the women who have two doses of tetanus vaccine is 41%. To eliminate NNT in our country, all the pregnant women must be attained, the ones who are attained must be presented with qualified pre-birth care service which also includes tetanus immunity and the births must be carried out under healty conditions. As smallpox and polio eradication, NNT elimination will also be accomplished by self-sacrificing works of personnel in primary health care. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2006; 5(3.000: 229-233

  9. Neonatal aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Nigel E; Veldtman, Gruschen R; Benson, Lee N

    2005-09-01

    Neonatal aortic stenosis is a complex and heterogeneous condition, defined as left ventricular outflow tract obstruction at valvular level, presenting and often requiring treatment in the first month of life. Initial presentation may be catastrophic, necessitating hemodynamic, respiratory and metabolic resuscitation. Subsequent management is focused on maintaining systemic blood flow, either via a univentricular Norwood palliation or a biventricular route, in which the effective aortic valve area is increased by balloon dilation or surgical valvotomy. In infants with aortic annular hypoplasia but adequately sized left ventricle, the Ross-Konno procedure is also an attractive option. Outcomes after biventricular management have improved in recent years as a consequence of better patient selection, perioperative management and advances in catheter technology. Exciting new developments are likely to significantly modify the natural history of this disorder, including fetal intervention for the salvage of the hypoplastic left ventricle; 3D echocardiography providing better definition of valve morphology and aiding patient selection for a surgical or catheter-based intervention; and new transcutaneous approaches, such as duel beam echo, to perforate the valve.

  10. Severe neonatal parechovirus infection and similarity with enterovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Krediet, Tannette G.; Gerards, Leo J.; de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris; van Loon, Anton M.

    Background: Enteroviruses (EV) are an important cause of neonatal disease including hepatitis, meningoencephalitis, and myocarditis that can lead to death or severe long-term sequelae. Less is known about severe neonatal infection caused by the parechoviruses (PeV) of which type 1 (PeV1) and type 2

  11. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  12. Neonatal hypothermia in sub-Saharan Africa: A review | Onalo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result and Conclusion: Neonatal hypothermia is a major condition of public health importance in countries of sub- Saharan Africa. Awareness of the burden of the disease is still low in some communities. Risk factors for neonatal hypothermia in the region include poverty, home delivery, low birthweight, early bathing of ...

  13. Can Resistin be a New Indicator of Neonatal Sepsis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didem Aliefendioglu

    2014-02-01

    Conclusion: Resistin levels were higher in premature newborns with sepsis and correlated with IL-6 levels, which is an indicator of neonatal sepsis. This suggests that resistin may also be used in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. However, it has limited value when compared with the other inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and IL-6.

  14. Congenital anomalies of the neonatal head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, C.B.; Teele, R.L.; Dobkin, G.R.; Fine, C.; Bundy, A.L.; Doubilet, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    US is a noninvasive modality that has proved highly valuable in the assessment of congenital intracranial anomalies in the neonate. The patterns of malformation must be familiar to those who obtain and interpret neonatal cranial sonograms. The authors present a variety of cases of congenital anomalies studied with US, including agenesis of the corpus callosum, Dandy-Walker malformation, occipital enecphalocele, congenital hydrocephalus, vein of Galen aneurysm, hydranencephaly, holoprosencephaly, absence of the septum pellucidum, schizencephaly, and hypoplastic cerebellum. Correlation with other radiographic modalities and pathologic follow-up, available in a majority of cases, is included

  15. Noninvasive Ventilation in Premature Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Keri Ann

    2016-04-01

    The use of noninvasive ventilation is a constantly evolving treatment option for respiratory disease in the premature infant. The goals of these noninvasive ventilation techniques are to improve gas exchange in the premature infant's lungs and to minimize the need for intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation. The goals of this article are to consider various uses of nasal interfaces, discuss skin care and developmental positioning concerns faced by the bedside nurse, and discuss the medical management aimed to reduce morbidity and mortality. This article explores the nursing role, the advances in medical strategies for noninvasive ventilation, and the team approach to noninvasive ventilation use in this population. Search strategy included a literature review on medical databases, such as EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PubMed, and NeoReviews. Innovative products, nursing research on developmental positioning and skin care, and advanced medical management have led to better and safer outcomes for premature infants requiring noninvasive ventilation. The medical focus of avoiding long-term mechanical ventilation would not be possible without the technology to provide noninvasive ventilation to these premature infants and the watchful eye of the nurse in terms of careful positioning, preventing skin breakdown and facial scarring, and a proper seal to maximize ventilation accuracy. This article encourages nursing-based research to quantify some of the knowledge about skin care and positioning as well as research into most appropriate uses for noninvasive ventilation devices.

  16. [Medication errors in a neonatal unit: One of the main adverse events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqué Ruiz, M T; Moretones Suñol, M G; Rodríguez Miguélez, J M; Sánchez Ortiz, E; Izco Urroz, M; de Lamo Camino, M; Figueras Aloy, J

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal units are one of the hospital areas most exposed to the committing of treatment errors. A medication error (ME) is defined as the avoidable incident secondary to drug misuse that causes or may cause harm to the patient. The aim of this paper is to present the incidence of ME (including feeding) reported in our neonatal unit and its characteristics and possible causal factors. A list of the strategies implemented for prevention is presented. An analysis was performed on the ME declared in a neonatal unit. A total of 511 MEs have been reported over a period of seven years in the neonatal unit. The incidence in the critical care unit was 32.2 per 1000 hospital days or 20 per 100 patients, of which 0.22 per 1000 days had serious repercussions. The ME reported were, 39.5% prescribing errors, 68.1% administration errors, 0.6% were adverse drug reactions. Around two-thirds (65.4%) were produced by drugs, with 17% being intercepted. The large majority (89.4%) had no impact on the patient, but 0.6% caused permanent damage or death. Nurses reported 65.4% of MEs. The most commonly implicated causal factor was distraction (59%). Simple corrective action (alerts), and intermediate (protocols, clinical sessions and courses) and complex actions (causal analysis, monograph) were performed. It is essential to determine the current state of ME, in order to establish preventive measures and, together with teamwork and good practices, promote a climate of safety. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (Punit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Partos domiciliares planejados assistidos por enfermeiras obstétricas: transferências maternas e neonatais Partos domiciliarios planificados atendidos por enfermeras obstétricas: traslados maternales y neonatales Planned home births assisted by nurse midwives: maternal and neonatal transfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Green Koettker

    2013-02-01

    intensiva neonatal. Según el estudio, el parto domiciliario planificado atendido por enfermeras obstétricas según protocolo de atención, exhibió buenos resultados maternales y neonatales, inclusive cuando fue necesario efectuar traslados hospitalarios.The objective of this explorative and descriptive study was to describe the rates and reasons for intrapartum transfers from home to hospital among women assisted by nurse midwives, and the outcomes of those deliveries. The sample consisted of eleven women giving birth and their newborns, from January 2005 to December 2009. Data was collected from the maternal and neonatal records and was analyzed using descriptive statistics. The transfer rate was 11%, most of the women were nulliparous (63.6%, and all of them were transferred during the first stage of labor. The most common reasons for transfer were arrested cervical dilation, arrested progress of the fetal head and cephalopelvic disproportion. Apgar scores were >7 for 81.8% of the newborns; and there were no admissions to the neonatal intensive care unit. The results show that planned home births assisted by nurse midwives following a clinical protocol, had good outcomes even when a transfer to the hospital was needed.

  19. Role of massage therapy on reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and preterm neonates: a review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhawan Deep; Kabra, Nandkishor S; Balasubramanian, Haribalakrishna

    2017-09-13

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH) is one of the leading causes of admissions in nursery throughout the world. It affects approximately 2.4-15% of neonates during the first 2 weeks of life. To evaluate the role of massage therapy for reduction of NNH in both term and preterm neonates. The literature search was done for various randomized control trials (RCTs) by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE. This review included total of 10 RCTs (two in preterm neonates and eight in term neonates) that fulfilled inclusion criteria. In most of the trials, Field massage was given. Six out of eight trials reported reduction in bilirubin levels in term neonates. However, only one trial (out of two) reported significant reduction in bilirubin levels in preterm neonates. Both trials in preterm neonates and most of the trials in term neonates (five trials) reported increased stool frequencies. Role of massage therapy in the management of NNH is supported by the current evidence. However, due to limitations of the trials, current evidences are not sufficient to use massage therapy for the management of NNH in routine practice.

  20. Managing neonatal bowel obstruction: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desoky SM

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah M Desoky,1 Ranjit I Kylat,2 Unni Udayasankar,1 Dorothy Gilbertson-Dahdal1 1Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Neonatal intestinal obstruction is a common surgical emergency and occurs in approximately 1 in 2,000 live births. The causes of obstruction are diverse with varied embryological origins, and some underlying etiologies are not yet well described. Some findings of neonatal bowel obstruction can be detected prenatally on ultrasound imaging. The obstruction is classified as “high” when the level of obstruction is proximal to the ileum, and “low” when the level of obstruction is at the ileum or colon. Early diagnosis of the type of intestinal obstruction and localization of the obstructive bowel segment guides timely and appropriate management of the underlying pathologic entity. Neonatal bowel obstructions are ideally managed at specialized centers with a large volume of neonatal surgery and dedicated pediatric surgical and anesthesia expertise. Although surgical intervention is necessary in most cases, initial management strategies often target underlying metabolic, cardiac, or respiratory abnormalities. Imaging plays a key role in early and accurate diagnosis of the abnormalities. When bowel obstruction is suspected clinically, initial imaging workup usually involves abdominal radiography, which may direct further evaluation with fluoroscopic examination such as upper gastrointestinal (UGI contrast study or contrast enema. This article provides a comprehensive review of clinical and radiological features of common and less common causes of intestinal obstruction in the neonatal age group, including esophageal atresia, enteric duplication cysts, gastric volvulus, congenital microgastria, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, duodenal atresia

  1. Tracks: Nurses and the Tracking Network

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast highlights the utility of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network for nurses in a variety of work settings. It features commentary from the American Nurses Association and includes stories from a public health nurse in Massachusetts.

  2. The implementation of neonatal peritoneal dialysis in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sevim; Bilgin, Leyla; Gunduz, Mehmet; Uncu, Nermin; Azili, Mujdem Nur; Tiryaki, Tugrul

    2012-10-01

    To investigate etiology, outcome and complications related to neonatal peritoneal dialysis (PD). Neonates treated with PD in our neonatal intensive care unit during 2007-2010 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 4036 hospitalized neonates; 20 neonates (0.5%) who underwent 21 cycles of PD [7 preterm, 13 term; 13 female, 7 male] were included. The mean birth weight was 2930.2 ± 720.6 g (1120-4570), mean gestational age was 37.5 ± 3.5 weeks (27-41). The etiologic disorders included inborn errors of metabolism (propionic acidemia, methylmalonic acidemia, citrullinemia, glutaric aciduria type 2, maple syrup urine disease, 10), or acute renal failure secondary to perinatal asphyxia (4), sepsis (2), prematurity (2), hypoplastic left heart syndrome (1), kernicterus (1). The complications included peritonitis (2), early leakage (4), hemorrhage (1), catheter removal (3) and occlusion (2). The mortality rate was 50%. The gestational ages and birth weights of surviving neonates were higher (p neonates, chronic renal failure (1), severe (4) and moderate neuromotor impairment (2) developed within 4-43 months. PD, although invasive, is an effective therapy in neonates. The complexity and invasiveness of the procedure is probably responsible for high rate of complications and mortality. If appropriate catheter selection and technique in the placement should be done, PD might improve outcome.

  3. School Nurse Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endsley, Patricia

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this scoping review was to survey the most recent (5 years) acute care, community health, and mental health nursing workload literature to understand themes and research avenues that may be applicable to school nursing workload research. The search for empirical and nonempirical literature was conducted using search engines such as Google Scholar, PubMed, CINAHL, and Medline. Twenty-nine empirical studies and nine nonempirical articles were selected for inclusion. Themes that emerged consistent with school nurse practice include patient classification systems, environmental factors, assistive personnel, missed nursing care, and nurse satisfaction. School nursing is a public health discipline and population studies are an inherent research priority but may overlook workload variables at the clinical level. School nurses need a consistent method of population assessment, as well as evaluation of appropriate use of assistive personnel and school environment factors. Assessment of tasks not directly related to student care and professional development must also be considered in total workload.

  4. [Homophobia among nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Herazo, Edwin; Cogollo, Zuleima

    2010-09-01

    Homophobia is defined as a general negative attitude towards homosexual persons, with implications on public health. This fact has been less investigated among nursing students. The objective of this review was to learn about the prevalence of homophobia and its associated variables among nursing students. A systematic review was performed on original articles published in EBSCO, Imbiomed, LILACS, MEDLINE, Ovid, and ProQuest, including articles published between 1998 and 2008 in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Keywords used were homophobia, homosexuality, and nursing students. Descriptive analysis was performed. Eight studies were analyzed. The incidence of homophobia in nursing students is between 7% and 16%. Homophobia is more common among males and religious conservatism people. Homophobia is quite frequent in nursing students. This negative attitude toward homosexuality may affect services and care giving by nursing professions and could have negative implications in nursing practice.

  5. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  6. Congenital anomalies in rural black South African neonates - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infants, including abnormal neonates, born on the days when no infants were ... defined as any gross developmental defect apparent on ... Multiple congenital abnormalities. 9. 1,18 ... chromosomal disorders included a trisomy 13, a trisomy 18.

  7. Transient neonatal diabetes or neonatal hyperglycaemia: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transient neonatal diabetes and neonatal hyperglycaemia both present in the neonatal period with features of hyperglycaemia, dehydration and weight loss. Differentiating these conditions clinically is difficult. We describe the case of a 13 day old female whom we managed recently who could have had either condition.

  8. The value of neonatal autopsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal autopsy rates were in decline internationally at the end of the last century. Our objective was to assess the current value of neonatal autopsy in providing additional information to families and healthcare professionals.

  9. Comparing nurse managers and nurses' perceptions of nurses' self-leadership during capacity building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Karien; Cairns, Lindi

    2014-05-01

    This paper compares the perceptions of nurse managers and nurses about self-leadership of professional nurses while taking ownership of capacity building during unit management. The Nursing Strategy for South Africa states that the competency of nurses is dependent upon factors that lead to capacity building. A quantitative design was followed by conducting a survey. The target population included nurse managers and professional nurses working at an academic public hospital in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. The findings indicate shortcomings in relation to advising professional nurses about self-direction while taking ownership of their daily pressures and stresses associated with unit management. Professional nurses should develop their confidence by focusing on their self-leadership strengths when managing a unit. Recommendations are made to promote self-leadership while taking ownership of nurses during capacity building of unit management. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Teamwork among midwives during neonatal resuscitation at a maternity hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrammert, Johan; Sapkota, Sabitri; Baral, Kedar; Kc, Ashish; Målqvist, Mats; Larsson, Margareta

    2017-06-01

    The ability of health care providers to work together is essential for favourable outcomes in neonatal resuscitation, but perceptions of such teamwork have rarely been studied in low-income settings. Neonatal resuscitation is a proven intervention for reducing neonatal mortality globally, but the long-term effects of clinical training for this skill need further attention. Having an understanding of barriers to teamwork among nurse midwives can contribute to the sustainability of improved clinical practice. To explore nurse midwives' perceptions of teamwork when caring for newborns in need of resuscitation. Nurse midwives from a tertiary-level government hospital in Nepal participated in five focus groups of between 4 and 11 participants each. Qualitative Content Analysis was used for analysis. One overarching theme emerged: looking for comprehensive guidelines and shared responsibilities in neonatal resuscitation to avoid personal blame and learn from mistakes. Participants discussed the need for protocols relating to neonatal resuscitation and the importance of shared medical responsibility, and the importance of the presence of a strong and transparent leadership. The call for clear and comprehensive protocols relating to neonatal resuscitation corresponded with previous research from different contexts. Nurse midwives working at a maternity health care facility in Nepal discussed the benefits and challenges of teamwork in neonatal resuscitation. The findings suggest potential benefits can be made from clarifying guidelines and responsibilities in neonatal resuscitation. Furthermore, a structured process to deal with clinical incidents must be considered. Management must be involved in all processes. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sustained Reduction in Bloodstream Infections in Infants at a Large Tertiary Care Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Sara; Haithcock, Sarah; Smith, P. Brian; Goldberg, Ronald; Bidegain, Margarita; Tanaka, David; Carriker, Charlene; Ericson, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Reduction of bloodstream infections (BSI) has emerged as an important patient safety goal. Implementation of central line insertion bundles, standardized line care protocols, and health care provider education programs have reduced BSI in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) around the country. The ability of large tertiary care centers to decrease nosocomial infections, including BSI, has been demonstrated. However, long-term BSI reductions in infants are not well documented. We sought to demonstrate that a low incidence of BSI can be maintained over time in a tertiary care NICU. Subjects 6,790 infants admitted to a large, tertiary care NICU between 2005 and 2013. Design Retrospective intervention study. Methods A staged, multifaceted infection prevention plan was implemented beginning in October 2007 under nursing leadership. The incidence of BSI was determined annually for 2005-2013. Results Baseline BSI incidence for infants admitted to the NICU was 5.15 and 6.08 episodes per 1,000 infant-days in 2005 and 2006, respectively. After protocol implementation, the incidence of BSI decreased to 2.14/1,000 infant-days and 2.44/1,000 infant-days in 2008 and 2009, respectively. Yearly incidence remained low over the next 4 years and decreased even further to 0.20-0.45 infections/1,000 infant days. This represents a 92% decrease in BSI over a period of >5 years. Conclusions Implementation of a nursing-led comprehensive infection control initiative can effectively produce and maintain a reduction in the incidence of BSI in infants at a large tertiary care NICU. What this study adds Long term reductions in neonatal BSI are possible with implementation of a multidisciplinary team approach and strong nursing leadership. PMID:25915573

  12. Intraoperative fluid therapy in neonates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differences from adults and children in physiology and anatomy of neonates inform our ... is based on energy expenditure indexed to bodyweight.2 Energy ... fragile and poorly keratinised.5 ... neonates means that very conservative fluid regimes in neonates ..... I make an estimation of insensible loss from the skin, viscera,.

  13. Ultrasonography of Neonatal Cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is as an important tool for differentiation of obstructive and non-obstructive causes of jaundice in infants and children. Beyond two weeks of age, extrahepatic biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis are the two most common causes of persistent neonatal jaundice: differentiation of extrahepatic biliary atresia, which requires early surgical intervention, is very important. Meticulous analysis should focus on size and configuration of the gallbladder and anatomical changes of the portahepatis. In order to narrow the differential diagnosis, combined approaches using hepatic scintigraphy, MR cholangiography, and, at times, percutaneous liver biopsy are necessary. US is useful for demonstrating choledochal cyst, bile plug syndrome, and spontaneous perforation of the extrahepatic bile duct

  14. The effect of high risk pregnancy on duration of neonatal stay in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrasiabi, Narges; Mohagheghi, Parisa; Kalani, Majid; Mohades, Gholam; Farahani, Zahra

    2014-08-01

    High risk pregnancies increase the risk of neonatal mortality and morbidity. In order to identify the influence of pregnancy complications on the period of neonatal stay in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs), an analysis has been carried out in our center. In a cross-sectional-descriptive analytical study, the data including NICU length of stay was gathered from 526 medical records of neonates. We also assessed their maternal complications such as premature rapture of membranes (PROM), urinary tract infection (UTI), preeclampsia, oligohydramnios, and twin/triplet pregnancy. Finally we analyzed the relation between variables by SPSS statistics software version 19. The level of significance was considered PUTI (P=0.02), multiple gestation (P=0.03), and oligohydramnios (P=0.003). We found a positive correlation between numbers of gestation and length of NICU stay (P=0.03). A positive correlation existed between neonatal complication and length of NICU stay (P<0.001). By increasing maternal health level and prenatal care services, neonatal outcome can be improved and length of stay in NICUs decreased.

  15. NOMID - a neonatal syndrome of multisystem inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torbiak, R.P.; Cockshott, W.P. (Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Radiology); Dent, P.B. (Chedoke-McMaster Hospitals, Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Pediatrics)

    1989-08-01

    Neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease is a rare disorder first described by Lorber in 1973. An additional 29 cases have been recorded. Two patients are described here, one with a 17 year follow-up. The typical features are a rash, fever, adenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and a severe, deforming arthropathy predominantly affecting large joints. The most striking feature is the onset in the neonatal period. Other associated features include inflammation, chronic meningitis, anemia, and persistent leukocytosis. Most, if not all, patients develop bizarre epiphyseal radiographic findings that are virtually pathognomonic. This disease is distinct from Still disease. (orig.).

  16. Biomarkers of multiorgan injury in neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Molloy, Eleanor J

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major contributor to neurodevelopmental deficits including cerebral palsy in term and near-term infants. The long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is difficult to predict with certainty in first few days of life. Multiorgan involvement is common but not part of the diagnostic criteria for NE. The most frequently involved organs are the heart, liver, kidneys and hematological system. Cerebral and organ involvement is associated with the release of organ specific biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. These biomarkers may have a role in the assessment of the severity of asphyxia and long-term outcome in neonates with NE.

  17. Neonatal Graves' Disease with Maternal Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akangire, Gangaram; Cuna, Alain; Lachica, Charisse; Fischer, Ryan; Raman, Sripriya; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal Graves' disease presenting as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a diagnostic challenge because the differential includes a gamut of liver and systemic diseases. We present a unique case of neonatal Graves' disease in a premature infant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia born to a mother with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and remote history of Graves' disease. Infant was treated with a combination of methimazole, propranolol, and potassium iodide for 4 weeks. Thyroid function improved after 8 weeks of treatment with full recovery of thyroid function, disappearance of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, and resolution of failure to thrive and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This case provides several clinical vignettes as it is a rare, severe, presentation of an uncommon neonatal disease, signs, symptoms, and clinical history presented a diagnostic challenge for neonatologists and endocrinologists, normal newborn screen was misleading, and yet timely treatment led to a full recovery.

  18. Nursing, Nursing Education, and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, Thompson; And Others

    In response to the current crisis in the field of nursing, a study examined nursing students' perceived work-related stress and differences among associate degree, diploma, and baccalaureate nursing programs in their preparation of nursing students. The 171 subjects, representing the three different nursing programs, completed a questionnaire…

  19. Effectiveness of virtual classroom training in improving the knowledge and key maternal neonatal health skills of general nurse midwifery students in Bihar, India: A pre- and post-intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Neeraj; Kumar, Somesh; Balasubramaniam, Sudharsanam Manni; Bhargava, Saurabh; Sinha, Pallavi; Bakshi, Bhawna; Sood, Bulbul

    2016-01-01

    In 2008-09, the National Health Systems Resource Center of India reported overall quality of nurse-midwifery education in Bihar as grossly sub-optimal. To address this, we implemented a competency-based training using virtual classrooms in two general nurse midwives (GNM) schools of Bihar. The students from remotely located nursing institutions were now able to see live demonstrations of maternal and newborn health (MNH) practices performed by a trained faculty on simulation models at instructor location. To evaluate the effectiveness of virtual classroom training in improving the MNH-related skills of the nursing-midwifery students in Bihar, India. This study used a pre- and post-intervention design without a control group. Students from two public GNM schools of Bihar. Final-year students from both the GNM schools who have completed their coursework in MNH. A total of 83 students from selected GNM schools were assessed for their competencies in six key MNH practices using objective structured clinical examination method prior to intervention. A 72hour standardized training package was then implemented in these schools through virtual classroom approach. Post-intervention, 92 students from the next batch who attended virtual training were assessed for the same competencies. The mean student score assessed before the intervention was 21.3 (95% CI, 19.9-22.6), which increased to 62.0 (95% CI, 60.3-63.7) post-intervention. This difference was statistically significant. When adjusted for clustering using linear regression analysis, the students in post-intervention scored 52.3 (95% CI, 49.4%-55.3%) percentage points higher than pre-intervention, and this was statistically significant. Virtual classroom training was found to be effective in improving knowledge and key MNH skills of GNM students in Bihar, India. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Nursing in Malawi: nursing theory in the movement to professionalize nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultemeier, Kaye I

    2012-04-01

    Nursing in Malawi has been predominately a technical trade and only recently has begun the transition to a profession with autonomy and advanced degree preparation. Nursing theories provide a framework for the evolution of nursing to an independent profession. Theories provide a means for the articulation of the nursing role to other members of the healthcare team including consumers. Healthcare and human needs are basic and the guidance provided by nursing theories, including Nightingale's, gives language and structure to the education of nurses as the profession moves into advanced practice in a developing country.

  1. Immunoreactive erythropoietin concentrations in neonatal rats and the effects of hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemons, G.K.; Fitzsimmons, S.L.; DeManincor, D.

    1987-01-01

    We attempted to find answers to what are the circulating, hepatic and renal erythropoietin (Ep) levels in normal rat neonates measured daily through the first three weeks of life and when they attain sexual maturity, how are these Ep levels altered by exposure to hypoxia, and whether can it be transferred to the nursing neonatal animals? Since we established earlier that in the fetal rat the liver is the main Ep producing tissue, we attempted to determine the age at which the switch from liver to kidney occurred in both the normal and the hypoxic neonatal rat. 2 figs

  2. Nurses' perspectives on the intersection of safety and informed decision making in maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Carrie H; Zlatnik, Marya G; Kennedy, Holly Powell; Lyndon, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    To explore maternity nurses' perceptions of women's informed decision making during labor and birth to better understand how interdisciplinary communication challenges might affect patient safety. Constructivist grounded theory. Four hospitals in the western United States. Forty-six (46) nurses and physicians practicing in maternity units. Data collection strategies included individual interviews and participant observation. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method, dimensional analysis, and situational analysis (Charmaz, 2006; Clarke, 2005; Schatzman, 1991). The nurses' central action of holding off harm encompassed three communication strategies: persuading agreement, managing information, and coaching of mothers and physicians. These strategies were executed in a complex, hierarchical context characterized by varied practice patterns and relationships. Nurses' priorities and patient safety goals were sometimes misaligned with those of physicians, resulting in potentially unsafe communication. The communication strategies nurses employed resulted in intended and unintended consequences with safety implications for mothers and providers and had the potential to trap women in the middle of interprofessional conflicts and differences of opinion. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  3. Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-03-01

    Mar 1, 2017 ... Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate. Henok Tadele*. 1 ... the chest wall. Initial treatment included covering the heart with sterile-saline soaked dressing, starting systemic antibiotics and supportive care. A staged ... of thoracoabdominal EC, anterior diaphragmatic hernia, lower sternal defect and ...

  4. Rebound hyperbilirubinaemia in neonates admitted to Mofid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    term neonates without a positive Coombs test were included, and only 1 patient was readmitted with rebound hyperbilirubinaemia. (this was thought to be due to breastmilk jaundice). Our ndings are therefore similar to those of Del Vecchio et al.,[8] who reported that 1 in 48 newborns required readmission for phototherapy.

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of health professionals regarding pain assessment and management in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verusca Kelly Capellini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple factors can have an effect on pain management in neonates, which motivated us to analyze the knowledge and attitudes held by doctors, nurses and nursing assistants who work in neonatal units in a hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, regarding neonatal pain assessment and management. This study is descriptive and was conducted with 57 health professionals. The results of the questionnaires revealed that only one professional believed that neonates do not feel pain, and 53 professionals stated the contrary, but were not familiar with neonate pain assessment scales. Professionals indicated fentanyl and midazolam as adequate analgesics for acute pain. Umbilical catheterization, gastric probing and heel pad puncture were considered painful procedures and indications for the use of analgesia.  Health professionals are knowledgeable about pain in neonates, but this knowledge is not reflected in clinical practice. It is essential for professionals to be trained regarding knowledge transfer so that neonate pain assessment and management can be implemented. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i2.23611.

  6. The impact of nurse working hours on patient safety culture: a cross-national survey including Japan, the United States and Chinese Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghui; Fujita, Shigeru; Seto, Kanako; Ito, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Huang, Chiu-Chin; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2013-10-07

    A positive patient safety culture (PSC) is one of the most critical components to improve healthcare quality and safety. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), developed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has been used to assess PSC in 31 countries. However, little is known about the impact of nurse working hours on PSC. We hypothesized that long nurse working hours would deteriorate PSC, and that the deterioration patterns would vary between countries. Moreover, the common trends observed in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan may be useful to improve PSC in other countries. The purpose of this study was to clarify the impact of long nurse working hours on PSC in Japan, the US, and Chinese Taiwan using HSOPS. The HSOPS questionnaire measures 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, with higher scores indicating a more positive PSC. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using a generalized linear mixed model to evaluate the impact of working hours on PSC outcome measures (patient safety grade and number of events reported). Tukey's test and Cohen's d values were used to verify the relationships between nurse working hours and the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC. Nurses working ≥60 h/week in Japan and the US had a significantly lower OR for patient safety grade than those working working ≥40 h/week had a significantly higher OR for the number of events reported. The mean score on 'staffing' was significantly lower in the ≥60-h group than in the Japan and Chinese Taiwan. Patient safety grade deteriorated and the number of events reported increased with long working hours. Among the 12 sub-dimensions of PSC, long working hours had an impact on 'staffing' and 'teamwork within units' in Japan, the US and Chinese Taiwan.

  7. Immunoglobulins in the eggs of the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Ashley N; Flajnik, Martin F; Rumfelt, Lynn L; Wourms, John P

    2005-01-01

    Elasmobranchs, which include the sharks, skates, and rays, emerged over 450 million years ago and are the oldest vertebrates to possess an adaptive immune system. They have evolved diverse reproductive modes, with a variety of physiological adaptations that enhance reproductive success. The nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum, is an aplacental, viviparous elasmobranch in which the egg and its associated vitelline vasculature are the primary route for maternal-embryonic interactions. During gestation, nurse shark embryos hatch from their eggcases and develop free in the uterus, which is flushed regularly with seawater. Similar to higher vertebrates, embryonic and neonatal nurse sharks possess an immune system that is not fully competent. In birds and bony fishes, maternal immunoglobulins (Ig) stored in the egg during oogenesis confer protective immunity to embryos during gestation. However, early research suggested that such transfer of passive immunity does not occur in sharks. To better understand how elasmobranch embryos are protected from waterborne pathogens during this potentially vulnerable time, we have re-examined the existence of Igs in elasmobranch eggs. Using monoclonal antibodies, we establish the presence of two classes of Igs in nurse shark eggs: 7S IgM and IgNAR. The potential transfer of immunoglobulins from elasmobranch eggs is discussed.

  8. Providing support to nursing students in the clinical environment: a nursing standard requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carina; Moxham, Lorna; Broadbent, Marc

    2016-10-01

    This discussion paper poses the question 'What enables or deters Registered Nurses to take up their professional responsibility to support undergraduate nursing students through the provision of clinical education?'. Embedded within many nursing standards are expectations that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to undergraduate nursing students undertaking clinical placements. Expectations within nursing standards that Registered Nurses provide support and professional development to nursing students are important because nursing students depend on Registered Nurses to help them to become competent practitioners. Contributing factors that enable and deter Registered Nurses from fulfilling this expectation to support nursing students in their clinical learning include; workloads, preparedness for the teaching role, confidence in teaching and awareness of the competency requirement to support students. Factors exist which can enable or deter Registered Nurses from carrying out the licence requirement to provide clinical education and support to nursing students.

  9. Neonatal nutrition and metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thureen, Patti J; Hay, William W

    2006-01-01

    ..., the volume highlights the important longterm effects of fetal and neonatal growth on health in later life. In addition, there are very practical chapters on methods and techniques for assessing nutritional status, body composition, and evaluating metabolic function. Written by an authoritative, international team of cont...

  10. Cost Analysis of Treating Neonatal Hypoglycemia with Dextrose Gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Matthew J; Harding, Jane E; Edlin, Richard

    2018-04-03

    To evaluate the costs of using dextrose gel as a primary treatment for neonatal hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours after birth compared with standard care. We used a decision tree to model overall costs, including those specific to hypoglycemia monitoring and treatment and those related to the infant's length of stay in the postnatal ward or neonatal intensive care unit, comparing the use of dextrose gel for treatment of neonatal hypoglycemia with placebo, using data from the Sugar Babies randomized trial. Sensitivity analyses assessed the impact of dextrose gel cost, neonatal intensive care cost, cesarean delivery rate, and costs of glucose monitoring. In the primary analysis, treating neonatal hypoglycemia using dextrose gel had an overall cost of NZ$6863.81 and standard care (placebo) cost NZ$8178.25; a saving of NZ$1314.44 per infant treated. Sensitivity analyses showed that dextrose gel remained cost saving with wide variations in dextrose gel costs, neonatal intensive care unit costs, cesarean delivery rates, and costs of monitoring. Use of buccal dextrose gel reduces hospital costs for management of neonatal hypoglycemia. Because it is also noninvasive, well tolerated, safe, and associated with improved breastfeeding, buccal dextrose gel should be routinely used for initial treatment of neonatal hypoglycemia. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12608000623392. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Procalcitonin: A Reliable Marker for the Diagnosis of Neonatal Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, Minoo; Bakhshiani, Zahra; Navaei, Fakhri; Saheb Fosoul, Fereshteh; Fouladi, Salomeh; Kazemzadeh, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) In the last few years, serum procalcitonin has been proposed as an early marker of infections in neonates, with varying results. In this study, we aimed to investigate the value of procalcitonin, and C- reactive protein in establishing the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Materials and Methods Blood samples were collected at admission from 69 neonates with suspected infection (admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Units at Alzahra and Dr Beheshti Hospital in and Fatema-Zahra in Najafabad from May 2005 to April 2006). Patients were categorized in different groups according to clinical symptoms of sepsis, bacteriological and laboratory results. Group I consisted of 20 newborns with positive blood cultures and other biological tests which suggested infection. Group II consisted of 49 neonates with negative blood cultures but had two or three of clinical signs of sepsis. The control group included 18 healthy neonates with physiological hyperbilirubinemia and no clinical and biological data of infection, referred to the hospital for bilirubin determination. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) were determined by immunoluminometric assay and nephlometry method respectively. Results Mean levels of procalcitonin and CRP in septic neonates (group I) were significantly higher than the other two groups (P< 0.005). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were determined for all markers and compared with each other. Conclusion We conclude that procalcitonin is a better marker than CRP in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. PMID:23493845

  12. Early onset neonatal sepsis in preterm premature rupture of membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of early onset neonatal sepsis in newborn with various duration of preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Combined Military Hospital, Lahore from November 2009 to November 2010. Material and Methods: Neonates of singleton pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of the membranes (PPROM) with delivery between 30 and 36 weeks gestation were included in the study. The overall frequency of neonatal sepsis was calculated on clinical and serological basis. Comparison of the frequency of sepsis among groups with varying duration of rupture of membranes was done. Results: Out of 164 babies, 84 (51.2%) were female and 80 (48.8%) were male. Mean maternal age was 23 years (range: 18-36 years). Mean gestational age was 33 weeks (range: 30-36 weeks). Sepsis was suspected in 41(25%) babies on clinical grounds. C-reactive protein was raised in 36 (22%) neonates. There was statistically insignificant difference between clinical versus serological diagnosis (p=0.515). Frequency of neonatal sepsis was significantly higher in mothers with longer duration of rupture of membrane (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Frequency of neonatal sepsis was observed to be 22%. PPROM is an important risk factor for early onset neonatal sepsis. (author)

  13. Participatory design methods for the development of a clinical telehealth service for neonatal homecare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garne Holm, Kristina; Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Smith, Anthony C; Clemensen, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal homecare delivered during home visits by neonatal nurses is a common method for supporting families of preterm infants following discharge. Telehealth has been introduced for the provision of neonatal homecare, resulting in positive feedback from parents of preterm infants. While the benefits are beginning to be realised, widespread uptake of telehealth has been limited due to a range of logistical challenges. Understanding user requirements is important when planning and developing a clinical telehealth service. We therefore used participatory design to develop a clinical telehealth service for neonatal homecare. The study adopted a participatory design approach to engage users in the development and design of a new telehealth service. Participatory design embraces qualitative research methods. Creative and technical workshops were conducted as part of the study. Tests of the telehealth service were conducted in the neonatal unit. Participants in this study were former and current parents of preterm infants eligible for neonatal homecare, and clinical staff (medical and nursing) from the neonatal unit. Preterm infants accompanied their parents. Based on the results obtained during the workshops and subsequent testing, we developed an application (app), which was integrated into the medical record at the neonatal unit. The app was used to initiate videoconferences and chat messages between the family at home and the neonatal unit, and to share information regarding infant growth and well-being. Results obtained from the workshops and testing demonstrated the importance of involving users when developing new telehealth applications. The workshops helped identify the challenges associated with delivery of the service, and helped instruct the design of a new telehealth service for neonatal homecare based on the needs of parents and clinical staff.

  14. The Implications of Parental Consanguinity on the Care of Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Approximately 6% of births worldwide, 7.9 million children, are born with a serious genetic congenital abnormality each year. A factor thought to increase the prevalence of birth defects is parental consanguinity, which is a social custom practiced in at least 20% of the world's population. The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between consanguinity and congenital defects. This article also aims to enhance neonatal healthcare practitioners' comprehension of its implications for practice and research. A review of literature was compiled from a search of the online databases Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), PubMed, EBSCO MegaFILE, and Google Scholar. Literature pertinent to this topic primarily consists of research studies that examine the inbreeding depression phenomenon through comparison of the prevalence of birth defects among the offspring of consanguineous and nonconsanguineous couples. Current studies indicate that the progeny of consanguineous couples are at an increased risk of congenital defects compared with those of nonconsanguineous couples. Consanguinity is one risk factor among many that can lead to a major birth defect. Relationships between consanguineous populations and neonatal healthcare practitioners such as registered nurses, advanced practice nurses, and physicians could significantly alter neonatal health outcomes. Specific recommendations such as genetic counseling and therapeutic communication are discussed. Further studies need to investigate the connection between consanguinity and birth defects while controlling for nongenetic variables. Moreover, a focus on consanguineous communities in the United States would prove beneficial.

  15. A survey on job satisfaction among nursing staff before and after introduction of the NIDCAP model of care in a level III NICU in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, Joke M.; Smit, Bert J.; Unk, Karel A.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of introduction of the Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program (NIDCAP) on nursing staff job satisfaction. SUBJECTS: Registered nurses, with specialist neonatal qualifications or in training, in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in

  16. Succession planning for RNs: implementing a nurse management internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, M Cecilia; Olson-Sitki, Kristi; Prater, Marsha

    2009-01-01

    The nursing shortage affects all levels, including the pivotal role of nurse managers, who may find themselves functioning in a complex, stressful work environment. In this increasingly difficult milieu, succession planning for nurse manager turnover is imperative. The authors describe an evidence-based, theoretically driven nurse management internship that allows staff nurses to explore the nurse manager role.

  17. Neonatal hypothermia in sub-Saharan Africa: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onalo, R

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a major factor in neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. High prevalence of hypothermia has been reported widely even from warmer tropical countries. In spite of the World Health Organization's recommendation of maintenance of warm chain in newborn care, hypothermia continues to be a common neonatal condition which has remained under-recognized, under-documented, and poorly-managed. This review aims at providing the incidence of and risk factors for neonatal hypothermia as well as provides a pathophysiological overview and management options for neonates with the condition in sub-Saharan Africa. All available published literature on neonatal hypothermia was searched electronically and manually. The principal electronic reference libraries and sites searched were PubMed, Embase, Ajol, Cochrane Reference Libraries and Google Scholar. The search terms used included 'neonatal hypothermia,' 'Cold stress in newborn' 'thermal care of the newborn,' 'neonatal thermogenesis,' 'neonatal cold injury,' among others. Pertinent books and monographs were accessed. Data in formats inaccessible to the reviewer were excluded. Neonatal hypothermia is a major condition of public health importance in countries of sub- Saharan Africa. Awareness of the burden of the disease is still low in some communities. Risk factors for neonatal hypothermia in the region include poverty, home delivery, low birthweight, early bathing of babies, delayed initiation of breastfeeding and inadequate knowledge among health workers. Low-tech facilities to prevent heat losses and provide warmth are available in sub-Saharan Africa and are thus recommended as well as continuous efforts at sensitizing caregivers on the thermal needs of newborns.

  18. Programs that Internationalize Nursing Curricula in Baccalaureate Schools of Nursing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Gay J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of a national survey of baccalaureate nursing programs are presented concerning programs for study abroad, international exchange programs, and other approaches to internationalizing nursing curricula, including courses dealing with health care and nursing in foreign countries. (Author/MSE)

  19. Incidence of congenital heart disease among neonates in a neonatal unit of a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, S.; Sabir, M.U.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence and pattern of various congenital heart disease in a neonatal unit of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: The prospective study was carried out in the neonatal unit of Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from September 2008 to August 2011. All 5800 neonates admitted with gestational age of >28 weeks irrespective of birthweight were included in the study. Neonatologist/Paediatrician carried out the neonatal examination during the first 12 hours of life. Neonates suspected of having congenital heart disease were further evaluated by pulse oxymetry, X-ray chest and echocardiography to ascertain final diagnosis and type of lesion. Data was collected on a predesigned proforma containing information regarding gender, mode of delivery, gestational age, weight at birth, family history, and associated malformations. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 5800 neonates, 87 (1.5%) were found to have congenital heart disease with an incidence of 15/1000. There was a male preponderance. Most common lesion was ventricular septal defect 27(31.3%), followed by atrial septal defect 20 (22.9%), patent ductus arteriosus 13 (14.94%), tetralogy of fallot 06 (6.89%), transposition of great arteries 04 (4.59%), Pulmonary stenosis 05 (5.79%) and 03(3.44%) had atrioventricular canal defects. Conclusion: Congenital heart disease is a common congenital anomaly. Its incidence varies from centre to centre due to different factors like nature of the sample, method of detection and early examination by a neonatologist/paediatrician. In this study a higher incidence is reported because it was carried out in a tertiary care unit, which is a referral hospital and all the neonates admitted in the unit were included in the study. (author)

  20. Opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for the obstetric physician: a survey of neonatal and obstetric training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, C J; Johnston, L; Lee, C; Bernstein, P S; Goffman, D

    2018-04-01

    Our goal was to garner opinions regarding neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians. We sought to evaluate obstacles to neonatal resuscitation training for obstetric physicians and possible solutions for implementation challenges. We distributed a national survey via email to all neonatal-perinatal medicine fellowship directors and obstetrics & gynecology residency program directors in the United States. This survey was designed by a consensus method. Ninety-eight (53%) obstetric and fifty-seven (51%) neonatal program directors responded to our surveys. Eighty-eight percent of neonatologists surveyed believe that obstetricians should be neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) certified. The majority of surveyed obstetricians (>89%) believe that obstetricians should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Eighty-six percent of obstetric residents have completed training in NRP, but only 19% of obstetric attendings are NRP certified. Major barriers to NRP training that were identified include time, lack of national requirement, lack of belief it is helpful, and cost. Most obstetric attendings are not NRP certified, but the majority of respondents believe that obstetric providers should have some neonatal resuscitation training. Our study demonstrates that most respondents support a modified neonatal resuscitation course for obstetric physicians.

  1. Pentraxin 3 concentrations of the mothers with preterm premature rupture of membranes and their neonates, and early neonatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Mustafa Ali; Gunes, Tamer; Coban, Dilek; Ozgun, Mahmut Tuncay; Akgun, Hulya; Kurtoglu, Selim

    2015-07-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an acute phase reactant which has been used to detect intra-amniotic infections (IAI) in pregnancy, but the prognostic value of PTX3 concentrations on neonates has not been studied. We aimed to investigate the relationship between maternal PTX3-neonatal PTX3 concentrations and early neonatal outcome. The mothers diagnosed with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) (n = 28) and their preterm infants (n = 28) were included in the study. PTX3 concentrations were studied in plasma in the maternal peripheral blood and umbilical/peripheral vein in the neonates. The relationship between the mPTX3-nPTX3 concentrations and neonatal outcome were investigated using non-parametric tests and binary logistic regression analysis. The mean mPTX3 concentration was 10.35 ± 7.82 μg/L. Ten (35.7%) of all mothers were within the normal range and 18 (64.3%) in high percentile (≥ 97.5 percentile). There was no relation between mPTX3 concentrations and clinical or histologic chorioamnionitis, latency of PPROM, and early neonatal outcome. Mean nPTX3 concentrations was 9.18 ± 7.83 μg/L and high nPTX3 concentrations were detected in five (17.8%) neonates. nPTX3 concentrations were inversely correlated with gestational age and correlated with rate of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and mortality. Neonates with high nPTX3 concentrations also have lowered APGAR scores, increased rate of respiratory distress syndrome, clinical sepsis, IVH, necrotizing enterocolitis and prolonged NICU stay. High PTX3 concentrations of the newborns are associated with some worsened early neonatal outcome including lower gestational age at delivery, increased rate of IVH and mortality. Maternal PTX3 concentrations are not an adequate marker in defining clinical or histologic chorioamnionitis and early neonatal outcome.

  2. [Influence of neonatal diseases and treatments on the development of cerebral palsy in preterm infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tao; Rong, Luo; Wang, Qiu; You, Yi; Fu, Jun-Xian; Kang, Lin-Min; Wu, Yan-Qiao

    2013-03-01

    To investigated the risk factors of cerebral palsy development in preterm infants. This study included 203 preterm infants (gestation age neonatal period, were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Multivariate logistic analysis for the risk factors associated with cerebral palsy in neonatal period found significant differences in the occurrence of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, OR = 39.87, P neonatal (OR = 2.18, P neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (OR = 1.72, P CPAP, OR = 0.21, P neonatal jaundice may increase the risk in the development of CP in preterm infant, while CPAP may decrease the risk of cerebral palsy.

  3. Reducing hospital-acquired pressure ulcers using bundle methodology in pediatric and neonatal patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy: An integrative review and call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtwright, Suzanne E; Mastro, Kari A; Preuster, Christa; Dardashti, Navid; McGill, Sandra; Madelon, Myrlene; Johnson, Donna

    2017-10-01

    This review focuses on identifying (1) evidence of the effectiveness of care bundle methodology to reduce hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPUs) in pediatric and neonatal patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy and (2) barriers to implementing HAPU care bundles in this at-risk population. An integrative review was conducted and reported following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. A search of the scientific literature was performed. Studies included were published between January 2011 and February 2016. A total of seven articles met inclusion criteria. Data were extracted from each published article and analyzed to identify common themes, specifically bundle methodology and barriers to implementing HAPU bundles, in this population. There is limited research on effectiveness of care bundle methodology in reducing HAPUs in children, and no research specific to its effectiveness in pediatric or neonatal ECMO patients. No research was identified studying barriers to implementation of HAPU care bundles in this population. Nurses are well poised to test innovative strategies to prevent HAPUs. Nurses should consider implementing and testing bundle methodology to reduce HAPU in this at-risk population, and conduct research to identify any barriers to implementing this strategy. There is literature to support the use of nurses as unit-based skin care champions to facilitate teamwork and reliable use of the bundle, both critical components to the success of bundle methodology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. An audit of some health facilities and equipment for neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-19

    Apr 19, 2016 ... fifteen countries including Nigeria where 80% of mater- nal and newborn ... per 1000 live births and an under-five mortality rate of. 102 per 1000 live .... southern Nigeria. The distribution of equipments for basic neonatal resus-.

  5. Student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, S L; Raj, L; Prater, L S; Putturaj, M

    2014-09-01

    A profound nursing shortage exists in India. Increasingly nursing students in India are opting to migrate to practise nursing abroad upon graduation. Perceptions and attitudes about nursing are shaped during student experiences. The purpose in conducting this research was to illuminate student nurses' perceived challenges of nursing in India. This study took place at a hospital-based, private mission non-profit school of nursing in Bengaluru, India. Purposive sampling of nursing students yielded 14 participants. Photovoice, a qualitative participatory action research methodology, was used. Data were collected between August 2013 and January 2014. A strong international collaboration between researchers resulted in qualitative thematic interpretation of photographs, critical group dialogue transcripts, individual journal entries and detailed field notes. Two main themes were identified including the perceived challenges of a hierarchal system and challenges related to limited nursing workforce capacity. Subcategories of a hierarchal system included challenges related to image, safety, salary and balance. Subcategories of limited workforce capacity were migration, work overload, physical demand, incongruence between theory and practice, and knowledge. Nursing as a profession in India is still in its infancy when measured against standard criteria. Change in health policy is needed to improve salary, safety for nurses, and nurse to patient ratios to address hierarchal and workforce capacity challenges in India. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  6. Cultivating future nurse leaders with student nurses associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akans, Merlana; Harrington, Maura; McCash, John; Childs, Ashlyn; Gripentrog, Jessica; Cole, Sharon; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Searing, Kimberly; Fuehr, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Student nurses associations (SNAs) assist in developing tomorrow's nurse leaders. In this article, executive board members of an SNA in a traditional baccalaureate nursing program at a public regional university recounted common themes in their participation in an SNA. These broad themes included leadership, mentorship and communication, all which foster professional development through the acquisition of specific knowledge, skills and experiences. © 2013 AWHONN.

  7. Scholarship in nursing: Degree-prepared nurses versus diploma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All but one (n = 18) nursing educators who obtained a degree as first qualification are educators in the private sector that include both universities as well as nursing colleges of private hospital groups. Data further revealed that most nurse educators and those in managerial positions were degree prepared. More degree ...

  8. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  9. Just-in-Time Video Laryngoscopy Versus Direct Laryngoscopy for Neonatal Intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgurich, Erin; Arnemann, Cynthia; Amon, Kim; Horton, Rose; Carlson, Jestin N

    As neonatal endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a low-frequency, high-consequence event, it is essential that providers have access to resources to aid in ETI. We sought to determine the impact of video laryngoscopy (VL) with just-in-time training on intubation outcomes over direct laryngoscopy (DL) when performed by neonatal nurses. We conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study with neonatal nurses employed at a level 2 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Nurses performed both DL and VL on a neonatal mannequin using a CMAC (Karl Storz Corp, Tuttlingen, Germany) either with the assistance of the screen (VL) or without (DL). Before performing the intubation, providers were given a just-in-time, brief education presentation and allowed to practice with the device. Each ETI attempt was reviewed to obtain the percentage of glottic opening (POGO) score, time to intubation (TTI, time from insertion of the blade into the mouth until the first breath was delivered), and time from blade insertion until the best POGO score. We enrolled 19 participants, with a median (interquartile range) of 20 (9-26) years of experience and having a median of 2 (1-3) intubations within the past year. None had used VL in the NICU previously. Median TTI did not differ between DL and VL: 19.9 (15.3-41.5) vs 20.3 (17.9-24.4) (P = 1). POGO scores and the number of attempts also did not differ between DL and VL. In our simulated setting, just-in-time VL training provided similar intubation outcomes compared with DL in ETI performed by neonatal nurses. Just-in-time VL education may be an alternative to traditional DL for neonatal intubations.

  10. Nurses' creativity: advantage or disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari Isfahani, Sara; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali; Fallahi Khoshknab, Masood; Peyrovi, Hamid; Khanke, Hamid Reza

    2015-02-01

    Recently, global nursing experts have been aggressively encouraging nurses to pursue creativity and innovation in nursing to improve nursing outcomes. Nurses' creativity plays a significant role in health and well-being. In most health systems across the world, nurses provide up to 80% of the primary health care; therefore, they are critically positioned to provide creative solutions for current and future global health challenges. The purpose of this study was to explore Iranian nurses' perceptions and experiences toward the expression of creativity in clinical settings and the outcomes of their creativity for health care organizations. A qualitative approach using content analysis was adopted. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews with 14 nurses who were involved in the creative process in educational hospitals affiliated to Jahrom and Tehran Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Four themes emerged from the data analysis, including a) Improvement in quality of patient care, b) Improvement in nurses' quality of work, personal and social life, c) Promotion of organization, and d) Unpleasant outcomes. The findings indicated that nurses' creativity in health care organizations can lead to major changes of nursing practice, improvement of care and organizational performance. Therefore, policymakers, nurse educators, nursing and hospital managers should provide a nurturing environment that is conducive to creative thinking, giving the nurses opportunity for flexibility, creativity, support for change, and risk taking.

  11. Maternal Super Obesity and Neonatal Morbidity after Term Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Marcela C; Vladutiu, Catherine J; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Manuck, Tracy A; Boggess, Kim A; Stamilio, David M

    2016-10-01

    Objective To estimate the association between maternal super obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 50 kg/m(2)) and neonatal morbidity among neonates born via cesarean delivery (CD). Methods Retrospective cohort of singleton neonates delivered via CD ≥ 37 weeks in the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit Cesarean Registry. Maternal BMI at delivery was stratified as 18.5 to 29.9 kg/m(2), 30 to 39.9 kg/m(2), 40 to 49.9 kg/m(2), and ≥ 50 kg/m(2). Primary outcomes included acute (5-minute Apgar score neonatal injury, and/or transient tachypnea of the newborn) and severe (grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage, necrotizing enterocolitis, seizure, respiratory distress syndrome, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, meconium aspiration, ventilator support ≥ 2 days, sepsis and/or neonatal death) neonatal morbidity. Odds of neonatal morbidity were estimated for each BMI category adjusting for clinical and operative characteristics. Results Of 41,262 maternal-neonatal dyads, 36% of women were nonobese, 49% had BMI of 30 to 39.9 kg/m(2), 12% had BMI of 40 to 49.9 kg/m(2), and 3% were super obese. Compared with nonobese women, super obese women had twofold odds of acute (5 vs. 10%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.59-2.73) and severe (3 vs. 6%; aOR: 2.08; 95% CI: 1.59-2.73) neonatal morbidity. Conclusion Among term infants delivered via CD, maternal super obesity is associated with increased risk of neonatal morbidity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Acute renal failure: Nephrosonographic findings in asphyxiated neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Ashraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the incidence of acute renal failure (ARF and nephrosonographic findings among asphyxiated neonates, and to correlate this with uric acid levels and the severity of hypoxic encephalopathy, we studied 80 full-term appropriate-for-date singleton neonates with perinatal asphyxia, and 30 healthy full-term neonates as controls from March 2006 to February 2007. A detailed history, thorough clinical examination along with investigations, including urine examination, 24-h urine collection, ultrasonography of abdomen and cranium, serum electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid were obtained. ARF developed in 45% (36/80 of the asphyxiated neonates. Forty-eight (60% neonates showed significant elevation of blood urea and 41 (51.3% neonates had significant elevation of serum creatinine than the control group (P < 0.001. Sixty-two (77.5% neonates developed significant elevation of serum uric acid levels, and nephrosonography revealed hyperechogenicity in all of them, while only two among the healthy neonates showed the raised uric acid levels (P < 0.001. Nonoliguric renal failure was seen 28/36 (77.8% of the neonates with ARF, whereas eight (22.2% neonates had oliguric renal failure. Eight (27.8% patients among ARF patients maintained abnormal biochemical parameters after 2 weeks, and of whom four patients died after variable lengths of time with a mortality rate of 11.11%. Kidneys are the most common organs involved in perinatal asphyxia, and uric acid might be a causative factor for failure in addition to hypoxic insult. Routine use of kidney function test, along with abdominal ultrasonography form an important screening tool to detect any additional morbidity in these patients.

  13. Neonatal Seizure Models to Study Epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Kasahara

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutic strategies for epilepsy include anti-epileptic drugs and surgical treatments that are mainly focused on the suppression of existing seizures rather than the occurrence of the first spontaneous seizure. These symptomatic treatments help a certain proportion of patients, but these strategies are not intended to clarify the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the primary process of epilepsy development, i.e., epileptogenesis. Epileptogenic changes include reorganization of neural and glial circuits, resulting in the formation of an epileptogenic focus. To achieve the goal of developing “anti-epileptogenic” drugs, we need to clarify the step-by-step mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis for patients whose seizures are not controllable with existing “anti-epileptic” drugs. Epileptogenesis has been studied using animal models of neonatal seizures because such models are useful for studying the latent period before the occurrence of spontaneous seizures and the lowering of the seizure threshold. Further, neonatal seizure models are generally easy to handle and can be applied for in vitro studies because cells in the neonatal brain are suitable for culture. Here, we review two animal models of neonatal seizures for studying epileptogenesis and discuss their features, specifically focusing on hypoxia-ischemia (HI-induced seizures and febrile seizures (FSs. Studying these models will contribute to identifying the potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers of epileptogenesis.

  14. Neonatal Hyperglycemia due to Transient Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Fargas-Berríos, N.; García-Fragoso, L.; García-García, I.; Valcárcel, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hyperglycemia is a metabolic disorder found in the neonatal intensive care units. Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a very uncommon cause of hyperglycemia in the newborn, occurring in 1 in every 400,000 births. There are two subtypes of neonatal diabetes mellitus: permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) and transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). We describe a term, small for gestational age, female neonate with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus who presented with poor ...

  15. Surgical procedures performed in the neonatal intensive care unit on critically ill neonates: feasibility and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, M.S.; Jado, A.M.; Al-Bassam, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Transferring unstable, ill neonates to and from the operating rooms carries significant risks and can lead to morbidity. We report on our experience in performing certain procedures in critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). We examined the feasibility and safety for such an approach. All surgical procedures performed in the NICU between January 1999 and December 2005 were analyzed in terms of demographic data, diagnosis, preoperative stability of the patient, procedures performed, complications and outcome. Operations were performed at beside in the NICU in critically ill, unstable neonates who needed emergency surgery, in neonates of low birth weight (<1000 gm) and in neonates on special equipments like higher frequency ventilators and nitrous oxide. Thirty-seven surgical procedures were performed including 12 laparotomies, bowel resection and stomies, 7 repairs of congenital diaphragmatic hernias, 4 ligations of patent ductus arteriosus and various others. Birth weights ranged between 850 gm and 3500 gm (mean 2000 gm). Gestational age ranged between 25 to 42 weeks (mean, 33 weeks). Age at surgery was between 1 to 30 days (mean, 30 days). Preoperatively, 19 patients (51.3%) were on inotropic support and all were intubated and mechanically ventilated. There was no mortality related to surgical procedures. Postoperatively, one patient developed wound infection and disruption. Performing major surgical procedures in the NICU is both feasible and safe. It is useful in very low birth weight, critically ill neonates who have definite risk attached to transfer to the operating room. No special area is needed in the NICU to perform complication-free surgery, but designing an operating room within the NICU will be ideal. (author)

  16. [Exploring nurse, usage effectiveness of mobile nursing station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fang-Mei; Lee, Ting-Ting

    2013-04-01

    A mobile nursing station is an innovative cart that integrates a wireless network, information technology devices, and online charts. In addition to improving clinical work and workflow efficiencies, data is integrated among different information systems and hardware devices to promote patient safety. This study investigated the effectiveness of mobile nursing cart use. We compared different distributions of nursing activity working samples to evaluate the nursing information systems in terms of interface usability and usage outcomes. There were two parts of this study. Part one used work sampling to collect nursing activity data necessary to compare a unit that used a mobile nursing cart (mobile group, n = 18) with another that did not (traditional group, n = 14). Part two applied a nursing information system interface usability questionnaire to survey the mobile unit with nurses who had used a mobile nursing station (including those who had worked in this unit as floating nurses) (n = 30) in order to explore interface usability and effectiveness. We found that using the mobile nursing station information system increased time spent on direct patient care and decreased time spent on indirect patient care and documentation. Results further indicated that participants rated interface usability as high and evaluated usage effectiveness positively. Comments made in the open-ended question section raised several points of concern, including problems / inadequacies related to hardware devices, Internet speed, and printing. This study indicates that using mobile nursing station can improve nursing activity distributions and that nurses hold generally positive attitudes toward mobile nursing station interface usability and usage effectiveness. The authors thus encourage the continued implementation of mobile nursing stations and related studies to further enhance clinical nursing care.

  17. [Studies of flomoxef in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Narita, A; Matsumoto, K; Nakazawa, S; Suzuki, H; Nakanishi, Y; Nagao, K; Nakazawa, S; Niinou, K

    1991-11-01

    Studies on pharmacokinetics and clinical effects of flomoxef (FMOX), a parenteral oxacephem antibiotic, were carried out in neonates. The results obtained are summarized as follows. 1. Mean peak serum concentrations of FMOX upon single administrations at doses of 20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg were 33.3 +/- 7.33 micrograms/ml and 68.9 micrograms/ml, respectively. 2. Mean urinary recovery rates of FMOX in the first 6 hours after administration of the above doses were 35.2% and 48.3%, respectively. 3. FMOX was administered to 4 cases including 1 prophylactic case, 1 case each with aspiration pneumonia and sepsis, hypodermic abscess of the head, and itrauterine infection, at a dose of 20-30 mg/kg 2 or 3 times a day. Clinically, excellent results were obtained in 3 cases including an methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus case. 4. No side effects nor abnormal laboratory test results were observed.

  18. Job satisfaction in mainland China: comparing critical care nurses and general ward nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Tao, Hong; Ellenbecker, Carol Hall; Liu, Xiaohong

    2013-08-01

    To explore the level of nurses' job satisfaction and compare the differences between critical care nurses and general ward nurses in Mainland China. Hospitals continue to experience high nurse turnover. Job satisfaction is a key factor to retain skilled nurses. The differences in job satisfaction among critical care nurses and general ward nurses are unknown. A cross-sectional design was selected for this descriptive correlation study. Cross-sectional study of critical care nurses (n = 446) and general ward nurses (n = 1118) in 9 general hospitals by means of questionnaires that included the Chinese Nurses Job Satisfaction Scale and demographic scale. The data were collected from June 2010-November 2010. Chinese nurses had moderate levels of job satisfaction, were satisfied with co-workers and family/work balance; and dissatisfied with pay and professional promotion. Critical care nurses were younger; less educated and had less job tenure when compared with nurses working on general wards. Critical care nurses were significantly less satisfied than general ward nurses with many aspects of their job. Levels of nurses' job satisfaction can be improved. The lower job satisfaction of critical care nurses compared with general ward nurses should warn the healthcare administrators and managers of potentially increasing the critical care nurses turn over. Innovative and adaptable managerial interventions need to be taken to improve critical care nurse' job satisfaction and retain skilled nurse. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. [Clinical efficacy of flomoxef in neonatal bacterial infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, H; Hirano, Y; Maruyama, S

    1993-03-01

    One hundred and seventy one neonates were treated with flomoxef (FMOX) and the clinical efficacy and safety were evaluated. The ages of the patients ranged from 0 to 28 days, and their body weights from 450 to 4300 g. Dose levels were 12.4 to 24.9 mg/kg every 8 or 12 hours for 1 to 10 days. Fifty two patients who responded to the FMOX treatment included 5 neonates with sepsis, 17 with suspected sepsis, 9 with urinary tract infections, 12 with pneumonia, 8 with intrauterine infections, and 1 with omphalitis. The other neonates could not be retrospectively diagnosed as bacterial infections. Of 52 patients, clinical results were excellent in 15, good in 34, fair in 1, and poor in 2. And the FMOX treatment was effective in 13 out of 14 patients in which causative bacteria were identified. The drug was well tolerated, but 6 neonates out of 33 over 5 days old had diarrhea. From these results, empiric treatment with FMOX against neonatal bacterial infection was as clinically useful as that of combination with ampicillin and gentamicin or cefotaxime and ampicillin in our neonatal intensive care unit. But, as this study did not include neonate with meningitis, efficacy to meningitis was not evaluated.

  20. Determinants of stress for staff in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Astbury, J; Yu, V Y

    1982-01-01

    Components of stress for 22 paediatric consultants and 29 nursing sisters working in neonatal intensive care units were studied. Ten situations were rated for their intensity of stress and their frequency of occurrence. For intensity of stress, significantly more paediatric consultants rated the competing demands of personal life versus work as highly stressful, than did nursing sisters. For frequency of stress, significantly more paediatric consultants rated 4 situations as frequently occurr...

  1. The prevalence of neonatal jaundice and risk factors in healthy term neonates at National District Hospital in Bloemfontein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background Neonatal jaundice affects one in two infants globally. The jaundice is the result of an accumulation of bilirubin as foetal haemoglobin is metabolised by the immature liver. High serum levels of bilirubin result in lethargy, poor feeding and kernicterus of the infant. Aim The main aim of this article was to determine the prevalence of neonatal jaundice and secondly to explore its risk factors in healthy term neonates. Setting Maternity ward, National District Hospital, Bloemfontein, South Africa. Methods In this cross-sectional study, mothers and infants were conveniently sampled after delivery and before discharge. The mothers were interviewed and their case records were reviewed for risk factors for neonatal jaundice and the clinical appearance and bilirubin levels of the infants were measured with a non-invasive transcutaneous bilirubin meter. Results A total of 96 mother-infant pairs were included in the study. The prevalence of neonatal jaundice was 55.2%; however, only 10% of black babies who were diagnosed with jaundice appeared clinically jaundiced. Normal vaginal delivery was the only risk factor associated with neonatal jaundice. Black race and maternal smoking were not protective against neonatal jaundice as in some other studies. Conclusion More than half (55.2%) of healthy term neonates developed neonatal jaundice. As it is difficult to clinically diagnose neonatal jaundice in darker pigmented babies, it is recommended that the bilirubin level of all babies should be checked with a non-invasive bilirubin meter before discharge from hospital or maternity unit as well as during the first clinic visit on day 3 after birth.

  2. Effects of nursing process-based simulation for maternal child emergency nursing care on knowledge, attitude, and skills in clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunghee; Shin, Gisoo

    2016-02-01

    Since previous studies on simulation-based education have been focused on fundamental nursing skills for nursing students in South Korea, there is little research available that focuses on clinical nurses in simulation-based training. Further, there is a paucity of research literature related to the integration of the nursing process into simulation training particularly in the emergency nursing care of high-risk maternal and neonatal patients. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of nursing process-based simulation on knowledge, attitudes, and skills for maternal and child emergency nursing care in clinical nurses in South Korea. Data were collected from 49 nurses, 25 in the experimental group and 24 in the control group, from August 13 to 14, 2013. This study was an equivalent control group pre- and post-test experimental design to compare the differences in knowledge, attitudes, and skills for maternal and child emergency nursing care between the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group was trained by the nursing process-based simulation training program, while the control group received traditional methods of training for maternal and child emergency nursing care. The experimental group was more likely to improve knowledge, attitudes, and skills required for clinical judgment about maternal and child emergency nursing care than the control group. Among five stages of nursing process in simulation, the experimental group was more likely to improve clinical skills required for nursing diagnosis and nursing evaluation than the control group. These results will provide valuable information on developing nursing process-based simulation training to improve clinical competency in nurses. Further research should be conducted to verify the effectiveness of nursing process-based simulation with more diverse nurse groups on more diverse subjects in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Implementation of Pain Management and Assessment in Neonatal Intensive Care Units of Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Rahimi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Neonatal pain causes changes in the structure and function of brain in addition to acute physiologic symptoms and is followed by delayed development of infants. This study aims to determine the implementation of pain management and assessment in neonatal intensive care units. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 138 nurses working in neonatal intensive care units through census. The data were collected using researcher – made questionnaire including two parts: pain management and assessment and demographic information. The minimum and maximum scores were 0 and 552, respectively, shown in the form of percentage. FINDINGS: At a response rate of 80.23%, the mean age of participants was 31.76±5.41 years and the mean experience of nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit was 4.36 ± 3.58 years. The cases of implementation of pain management and assessment were as follows: care management for pain reduction (72.8%, allow parents to relieve pain (68.5%, swaddling (66.7%, pain assessment while implementing therapeutic and caring measures (62.9%, the use of sucrose solution (61.6%, teaching parents about observing pain symptoms in the infant’s face (58.7%, recording infant’s pain behaviors and the method for relieving the pain (52.4%, pain assessment at least every 4 hours (52.2% and the use of valid tools for pain assessment (36.8%. CONCLUSION: According to the results of this study, pain management and assessment was implemented in more than half of the cases.

  4. Congenital hypothyroidism in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneela Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children and it occurs in approximately 1:2,000-1:4,000 newborns. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of CH in neonates. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was conducted in neonatal units of the Department of Pediatrics Unit-I, King Edward Medical University/Mayo Hospital, Lahore and Lady Willington Hospital Lahore in 6 months (January-June 2011. Materials and Methods: Sample was collected by non-probability purposive sampling. After consent, 550 newborn were registered for the study. Demographic data and relevant history was recorded. After aseptic measures, 2-3 ml venous blood analyzed for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level by immunoradiometric assay. Treatment was started according to the individual merit as per protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was analyzed by SPSS 17 and Chi-square test was applied to find out the association of CH with different variables. Results: The study population consisted of 550 newborns. Among 550 newborns, 4 (0.8% newborns had elevated TSH level. CH had statistically significant association with mother′s hypothyroidism (P value 0.000 and mother′s drug intake during the pregnancy period (P value 0.013. Conclusion: CH is 0.8% in neonates. It has statistically significant association with mother′s hypothyroidism and mother′s drug intake during pregnancy.

  5. Emancipatory Nursing Praxis: A Theory of Social Justice in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Robin R

    Emancipatory nursing praxis (ENP) is a middle-range nursing theory of social justice developed from an international, grounded theory study of the critical factors influencing nurses' perceptions of their role in social justice. The ENPs implementing processes (becoming, awakening, engaging, and transforming) and 2 conditional contexts (relational and reflexive) provide an in-depth understanding of the transformative learning process that determines nurse engagement in social justice. Interpretive findings include the voice of Privilege primarily informed ENP theory, the lack of nursing educational and organizational support in social justice role development, and the advocate role should expand to include the role of an ally.

  6. Impact of the design of neonatal intensive care units on neonates, staff, and families: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahheidari, Marzieh; Homer, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Newborn intensive care is for critically ill newborns requiring constant and continuous care and supervision. The survival rates of critically ill infants and hospitalization in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have improved over the past 2 decades because of technological advances in neonatology. The design of NICUs may also have implications for the health of babies, parents, and staff. It is important therefore to articulate the design features of NICU that are associated with improved outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the main features of the NICU design and to determine the advantages and limitations of the designs in terms of outcomes for babies, parents, and staff, predominately nurses. A systematic review of English-language, peer-reviewed articles was conducted for a period of 10 years, up to January 2011. Four online library databases and a number of relevant professional Web sites were searched using key words. There were 2 main designs of NICUs: open bay and single-family room. The open-bay environment develops communication and interaction with medical staff and nurses and has the ability to monitor multiple infants simultaneously. The single-family rooms were deemed superior for patient care and parent satisfaction. Key factors associated with improved outcomes included increased privacy, increased parental involvement in patient care, assistance with infection control, noise control, improved sleep, decreased length of hospital stay, and reduced rehospitalization. The design of NICUs has implications for babies, parents, and staff. An understanding of the positive design features needs to be considered by health service planners, managers, and those who design such specialized units.

  7. Microcephaly in north-east Brazil: a retrospective study on neonates born between 2012 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares de Araújo, Juliana Sousa; Regis, Cláudio Teixeira; Gomes, Renata Grigório Silva; Tavares, Thiago Ribeiro; Rocha Dos Santos, Cícera; Assunção, Patrícia Melo; Nóbrega, Renata Valéria; Pinto, Diana de Fátima Alves; Bezerra, Bruno Vinícius Dantas; Mattos, Sandra da Silva

    2016-11-01

    To assess the number of children born with microcephaly in the State of Paraíba, north-east Brazil. We contacted 21 maternity centres belonging to a paediatric cardiology network, with access to information regarding more than 100 000 neonates born between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2015. For 10% of these neonates, nurses were requested to retrieve head circumference measurements data from delivery-room books. We used three separate criteria to classify whether a neonate had microcephaly: (i) the Brazilian Ministry of Health proposed criterion: term neonates (gestational age ≥ 37 weeks) with a head circumference of less than 32 cm; (ii) Fenton curves: neonates with a head circumference of less than -3 standard deviation for age and gender; or (iii) the proportionality criterion: neonates with a head circumference of less than ((height/2))+10) ± 2. Between 1 and 31 December 2015, nurses obtained data for 16 208 neonates. Depending on which criterion we used, the number of neonates with microcephaly varied from 678 to 1272 (4.2-8.2%). Two per cent (316) of the neonates fulfilled all three criteria. We observed temporal fluctuations of microcephaly prevalence from late 2012. The numbers of microcephaly reported here are much higher than the 6.4 per 10 000 live births reported by the Brazilian live birth information system. The results raise questions about the notification system, the appropriateness of the diagnostic criteria and future implications for the affected children and their families. More studies are needed to understand the epidemiology and the implications for the Brazilian health system.

  8. Reducing neonatal pain during routine heel lance procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Carla; Hidinger, Andrea; Wilkinson-Faulk, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    To measure the difference in pain scores for newborns who were held and swaddled while undergoing routine heel lance procedures compared to newborns who were lying on their backs and not swaddled during heel lance. Additionally, we sought to compare the total amount of time it took to collect the specimens in each group. A total of 42 neonates recruited from a large tertiary hospital were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Infants in the experimental group (n = 22) were swaddled and held in an upright position during routine heel lance procedures while neonates in the control group (n = 20) remained in a standard care position. Pain was measured with the Neonatal Inventory Pain Scale (NIPS) at two points in time for each group (just before the heel lance procedure and at the completion of the heel lance). Total collection time was measured using a stopwatch accurate to 1/100th of a second. Specimen quality was measured based on the number of rejected specimens for each group. Descriptive statistics and t tests were used to analyze the data. The mean NIPS score for neonates who were swaddled and held during the procedure (experimental group) was significantly lower (M = 1.3, SD = .9) than the score for infants in the standard position (control group) (M = 2.7, SD = 1.3), t (40) = -4.48, p lance procedures offers nurses a nonpharmacologic method of neonatal pain reduction for heel sticks. This technique can be easily implemented on any unit independent of facility protocols. Furthermore, the technique is not associated with any cost or policy development, making it more likely that nurses can use it in practice.

  9. Magnetoencephalographic signatures of numerosity discrimination in fetuses and neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleger, Franziska; Landerl, Karin; Muenssinger, Jana; Draganova, Rossitza; Reinl, Maren; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle; Weiss, Magdalene; Wacker-Gußmann, Annette; Huotilainen, Minna; Preissl, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Numerosity discrimination has been demonstrated in newborns, but not in fetuses. Fetal magnetoencephalography allows non-invasive investigation of neural responses in neonates and fetuses. During an oddball paradigm with auditory sequences differing in numerosity, evoked responses were recorded and mismatch responses were quantified as an indicator for auditory discrimination. Thirty pregnant women with healthy fetuses (last trimester) and 30 healthy term neonates participated. Fourteen adults were included as a control group. Based on measurements eligible for analysis, all adults, all neonates, and 74% of fetuses showed numerical mismatch responses. Numerosity discrimination appears to exist in the last trimester of pregnancy.

  10. Bilirubin-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Preterm Neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchko, Jon F

    2016-06-01

    Bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in preterm neonates remains a clinical concern. Multiple cellular and molecular cascades likely underlie bilirubin-induced neuronal injury, including plasma membrane perturbations, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest. Preterm newborns are particularly vulnerable secondary to central nervous system immaturity and concurrent adverse clinical conditions that may potentiate bilirubin toxicity. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy in preterm neonates may be subtle and manifest primarily as recurrent symptomatic apneic events. Low-bilirubin kernicterus continues to be reported in preterm neonates, and although multifactorial in nature, is often associated with marked hypoalbuminemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neonatal Cushing Syndrome: A Rare but Potentially Devastating Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-03-01

    Neonatal Cushing syndrome (CS) is most commonly caused by exogenous administration of glucocorticoids and rarely by endogenous hypercortisolemia. CS owing to adrenal lesions is the most common cause of endogenous CS in neonates and infants, and adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) represent most cases. Many ACTs develop in the context of a TP53 gene mutation, which causes Li-Fraumeni syndrome. More rarely, neonatal CS presents as part of other syndromes such as McCune-Albright syndrome or Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Management usually includes resection of the primary tumor with or without additional medical treatment, but manifestations may persist after resolution of hypercortisolemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Consequences of Inadequate Staffing Include Missed Care, Potential Failure to Rescue, and Job Stress and Dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen Rice; Lyndon, Audrey; Ruhl, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate responses of registered nurse members of the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN) to a survey that sought their recommendations for staffing guidelines and their perceptions of the consequences of inadequate nurse staffing. The goal was to use these member data to inform the work of the AWHONN nurse staffing research team. Secondary analysis of responses to the 2010 AWHONN nurse staffing survey. Online. AWHONN members (N = 884). Review of data from an online survey of AWHONN members through the use of thematic analysis for descriptions of the consequences of inadequate nurse staffing during the childbirth process. Three main themes emerged as consequences of inadequate staffing or being short-staffed: Missed Care, Potential for Failure to Rescue, and Job-Related Stress and Dissatisfaction. These themes are consistent with those previously identified in the literature related to inadequate nurse staffing. Based on the responses from participants in the 2010 AWHONN nurse staffing survey, consequences of inadequate staffing can be quite serious and may put patients at risk for preventable harm. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-07-01

    To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost.

  14. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... Cystic fibrosis is a disease passed down through families. CF causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in ...

  15. Clinical practice: neonatal resuscitation. A Dutch consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, F.A.M.; van Veenendaal, M.B.; Mulder, A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    The updated Dutch guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation assimilate the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the 2004 guidelines and controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed, and recommendations for daily practice are provided and

  16. Nurses' beliefs and values about doing cue-based care in an NICU in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Jen-Jiuan; Chen, Shu-Yueh; Yin, Ying-Ti

    2004-12-01

    Although advances in medical technology have increased the survival rate of preterm infants, science is no cure-all for these high-risk patients. A growing number of studies report that caregiving interventions cause physiological and behavioral distress in such infants. The results have prompted changes in caregiving practices, attempting to reduce stress and strengthen protection for the infants, in order to promote their stability and development in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) . This study uses qualitative research methods to grasp the richness and diversity of nurses' beliefs and experience in the taking care of preterm infants. Ten groups of questions explore how NICU nurses take care of premature infants, nurses' perspectives on cue-based care, and the extent to which NICU nurses practice cue-based care. The results generated three themes: (1) timely and skillful management of the preterm infants; (2) compassionate and holistic care for the infants and their highly stressed families; and (3) the relationship between good nursing care and meeting the needs of preterm infants, families, physicians, units, and the environment. It is apparent that the approach to care delivery in NICU practice is still clinical-based, and that there are some obstacles to the delivery of cue-based care. The reasons for this include lack of knowledge, incomplete collaboration with team members, and insufficient support from the administrative systems. To improve the quality of nursing care and preterm infant outcomes, it will be necessary to educate NICU nurses on cue-based care, to enhance collaboration among all team members, to reduce their non-nursing workload, and to re-design NICUs for optimal cue-based care.

  17. Hematopoietic growth factors in neonatal medicine: the use of enterally administered hematopoietic growth factors in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Darlene A; Christensen, Robert D

    2004-03-01

    The practice of complete bowel rest in prematurely delivered neonates and those who have undergone surgery for congenital anomalies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is common in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). However, increased recognition of the critical role of growth factors in GI development suggests that this practice might be modified to include the administration of synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions designed to bridge the neonate between their intra-uterine environment and that of the NICU. This article reviews advances in administering synthetic amniotic fluid-like solutions in the NICU.

  18. Adverse events during air and ground neonatal transport: 13 years' experience from a neonatal transport team in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Johannes; Olsson, Linn; Svensson, Amelie; Håkansson, Stellan

    2015-07-01

    To study the prevalence of adverse events (AEs) associated with neonatal transport, and to categorize, classify and assess the risk estimation of these events. Written comments in 1082 transport records during the period 1999-2011 were reviewed. Comments related to events that infringed on patient and staff safety were included as AEs, and categorized and further classified as complaint, imminent risk of incident/negative event, actual incident or actual negative event. AEs were also grouped into emergency or planned transports, and risk estimation was calculated according to a risk assessment tool and defined as low, intermediate, high or extreme risk. AEs (N = 883) were divided into five categories: logistics (n = 337), organization (n = 177), equipment (n = 165), vehicle (n = 129) and medical/nursing care (n = 75). Eighty-five percent of AEs were classified as incidents or negative events. The majority of AEs were estimated to be of low or intermediate risk in both planned and emergency transports. AEs estimated to be of high or extreme risk were significantly more frequent in emergency transports (OR = 10.1; 95% CI: 5.0-20.9; p transport, often related to imperfect transport logistics or equipment failure. AEs of high or extreme risk were more frequent in emergency transports.

  19. Hazards of pentazocine for neonatal analgesia: a single-centre experience over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osifo, O D; Aghahowa, S E

    2008-09-01

    In developing countries, neonatal analgesia for surgical procedures is a major challenge where postoperative care is inadequate. To report experience of pentazocine for neonatal surgery in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. A retrospective study of surgical neonates who received pentazocine at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital in Benin City between January 1998 and December 2007. During the period, 2590 paediatric operations were performed including 368 (14.2%) neonates, 49 (13.3%) of whom had pentazocine. The other neonates received a variety of analgesics. Of 56 neonates who developed respiratory depression, 40 (71.4%) had pentazocine (pneonates aged between 9 hours and 28 days [mean (SD) 12 (1.2) days] died between 1 and 36 hours following 8-hourly administration of 0.5 mg/kg pentazocine. In older children who had pentazocine, over-sedation was also a problem but there were no deaths. Deaths in neonates were mainly owing to persistent respiratory depression which was compounded by the unavailability of a paediatric ventilator. However, many neonates responded to naloxone. All neonates who died had an autopsy and no lesion was found which could have compromised respiratory function. The use of pentazocine in neonates was associated with high morbidity and mortality. Caution is required when using pentazocine for neonatal analgesia where post-operative respiratory support is insufficient.

  20. Neonates with reduced neonatal lung function have systemic low-grade inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chawes, Bo L.K.; Stokholm, Jakob; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Background: Children and adults with asthma and impaired lung function have been reported to have low-grade systemic inflammation, but it is unknown whether this inflammation starts before symptoms and in particular whether low-grade inflammation is present in asymptomatic neonates with reduced...... lung function. ObjectiveWe sought to investigate the possible association between neonatal lung function and biomarkers of systemic inflammation.  Methods: Plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and CXCL8 (IL-8) were measured at age 6 months in 300 children.......  Results: The neonatal forced expiratory volume at 0.5 seconds was inversely associated with hs-CRP (β-coefficient, −0.12; 95% CI, −0.21 to −0.04; P approach, including hs-CRP, IL-6...

  1. Implementation of dextrose gel in the management of neonatal hypoglycaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter, Marene; Halibullah, Ikhwan; Leung, Laura; Jacobs, Susan

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dextrose gel in the management of neonatal hypoglycaemia in the postnatal wards at an Australian tertiary level perinatal centre. An audit was performed before and after implementation of dextrose gel. Pre-implementation, neonatal hypoglycaemia was managed with feed supplementation alone, and dextrose gel was used in addition to feed supplementation in the post-implementation phase. Outcomes included admission to neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for management of hypoglycaemia, proportion of neonates who achieved normoglycaemia (defined as blood glucose ≥2.6 mmol/L, with no clinical signs after one or two treatment attempts) and proportion of neonates with hypoglycaemia recurrence after normoglycaemia and one or two treatment attempts. NICU admission for treatment of hypoglycaemia reduced significantly post-implementation of dextrose gel (29/100 (29%) vs. 14/100 (14%), P = 0.01). No significant difference was seen in the proportion of neonates achieving normoglycaemia (71/100 (71%) vs. 75/100 (75%), P = 0.52), but hypoglycaemia recurrence was higher in the post-implementation group (22/71 (31%) vs. 37/75 (49%), P = 0.02). Dextrose gel is effective in the management of neonatal hypoglycaemia in the postnatal ward setting, reducing admission to NICU and mother-infant separation. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. Neonatal staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome: clinical and outbreak containment review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neylon, Orla

    2012-01-31

    Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a toxin-mediated exfoliating skin condition predominated by desquamation and blistering. Neonatal outbreaks have already been reported; however, our outbreak highlights the potential for SSSS following neonatal health promotion measures such as intra-muscular vitamin K administration and metabolic screening (heel prick) as well as effective case containment measures and the value of staff screening. Between February and June 2007, five confirmed cases of neonatal SSSS were identified in full-term neonates born in an Irish regional maternity hospital. All infants were treated successfully. Analysis of contact and environmental screening was undertaken, including family members and healthcare workers. Molecular typing on isolates was carried out. An outbreak control team (OCT) was assembled and took successful prospective steps to prevent further cases. All five Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested positive for exfoliative toxin A, of which two distinct strains were identified on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Two cases followed staphylococcal inoculation during preventive measures such as intra-muscular vitamin K administration and metabolic screening (heel prick). None of the neonatal isolates were methicillin resistant. Of 259 hospital staff (70% of staff) screened, 30% were colonised with S. aureus, and 6% were positive for MRSA carriage. This is the first reported outbreak of neonatal SSSS in Ireland. Effective case containment measures and clinical value of OCT is demonstrated. Results of staff screening underlines the need for vigilance and compliance in hand disinfection strategies in maternity hospitals especially during neonatal screening and preventive procedures.

  3. Parents and nurses balancing parent-infant closeness and separation: a qualitative study of NICU nurses' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Nancy; Genest, Christine; Niela-Vilén, Hannakaisa; Charbonneau, Lyne; Axelin, Anna

    2016-08-20

    When a newborn requires neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) hospitalization, parent and infant experience an unusual often prolonged separation. This critical care environment poses challenges to parent-infant closeness. Parents desire physical contact and holding and touching are particularly important. Evidence shows that visitation, holding, talking, and skin to skin contact are associated with better outcomes for infants and parents during hospitalization and beyond. Thus, it would be important to understand closeness in this context. The purpose of this study was to explore from nurses' perspective, what do parents and nurses do to promote parent-infant closeness or provoke separation. Qualitative methods were utilized to attain an understanding of closeness and separation. Following ethics approval, purposive sampling was used to recruit nurses with varying experience working different shifts in NICUs in two countries. Nurses were loaned a smartphone over one work shift to record their thoughts and perceptions of events that occurred or experiences they had that they considered to be closeness or separation between parents and their hospitalized infant. Sample size was determined by saturation (18 Canada, 19 Finland). Audio recordings were subjected to inductive thematic analysis. Team meetings were held to discuss emerging codes, refine categories, and confirm these reflected data from both sites. One overarching theme was elaborated. Balancing closeness and separation was the major theme. Both parents and nurses engaged in actions to optimize closeness. They sought closeness by acting autonomously in infant caregiving, assuming decision-making for their infant, seeking information or skills, and establishing a connection in the face of separation. Parents balanced their desire for closeness with other competing demands, such as their own needs. Nurses balanced infant care needs and ability to handle stimulation with the need for closeness with parents

  4. Caring experiences of nurse educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigsby, K A; Megel, M E

    1995-12-01

    Central to nursing practice today is the theme of caring. Yet nursing faculty are themselves experiencing a lack of caring. Faculty frequently voice the complaint that no one in the school of nursing work environment cares about them as they struggle to balance the demands of work with the demands of a personal life. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to facilitate understanding of the caring experiences of nurses who teach. The question guiding this study was, "How do nurse educators experience caring in their work situations?" Nomination and purposive sampling techniques were used to select seven nurse faculty as participants. Unstructured interviews, lasting approximately one hour, were audiotaped and transcribed. Colaizzi's (1978) methodology was used to analyze the resulting data. Resulting themes included: 1) Caring is Connection and 2) Caring is a Pattern of Establishing and Maintaining Relationships. The use of narrative, journaling, and dialogue are suggested as techniques that will help nurse educators experience caring in schools of nursing.

  5. Potential NICU Environmental Influences on the Neonate's Microbiome: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Lacey E; Bradshaw, Wanda; Brandon, Debra H

    2015-10-01

    To identify how the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment potentially influences the microbiome high-risk term and preterm infants. Electronic databases utilized to identify studies published in English included PubMed, Google Scholar, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and BioMedSearcher. Date of publication did not limit inclusion in the review. Two hundred fifty articles were assessed for relevance to the research question through title and abstract review. Further screening resulted in full review of 60 articles. An in-depth review of all 60 articles resulted in 39 articles that met inclusion criteria. Twenty-eight articles were eliminated on the basis of the type of study and subject of interest. Studies were reviewed for information related to environmental factors that influence microbial colonization of the neonatal microbiome. Environment was later defined as the physical environment of the NICU and nursery caregiving activities. Studies were characterized into factors that impacted the infant's microbiome—parental skin, feeding type, environmental surfaces and caregiving equipment, health care provider skin, and antibiotic use. Literature revealed that various aspects of living within the NICU environment do influence the microbiome of infants. Caregivers can implement strategies to prevent environment-associated nosocomial infection in the NICU such as implementing infection control measures, encouraging use of breast milk, and decreasing the empirical use of antibiotics.

  6. Group B streptococcal neonatal parotitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias Costa, Filipa; Ramos Andrade, Daniel; Cunha, Filipa Inês; Fernandes, Agostinho

    2015-06-10

    Acute neonatal parotitis (ANP) is a rare condition, characterised by parotid swelling and other local inflammatory signs. The most common pathogen is Staphylococcus aureus, but other organisms can be implicated. We describe the case of a 13-day-old term newborn, previously healthy, with late-onset group B Streptococcus (GBS) bacteraemia with ANP, who presented with irritability, reduced feeding and tender swelling of the right parotid. Laboratory evaluation showed neutrophilia, elevated C reactive protein and procalcitonin, with normal serum amylase concentration. Ultrasound findings were suggestive of acute parotitis. Empiric antibiotic therapy was immediately started and adjusted when culture results became available. The newborn was discharged after 10 days, with clinical improvement within the first 72 h. Although S. aureus is the most common pathogen implicated in ANP, GBS should be included in the differential diagnosis. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  7. Analysis of In-hospital Neonatal Death in the Tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in China: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen-Hong Wang; Li-Zhong Du; Xiao-Lu Ma; Li-Ping Shi; Xiao-Mei Tong; Hong Liu; Guo-Fang Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background:Globally,the proportion of child deaths that occur in the neonatal period remains a high level of 37-41%.Differences of cause in neonate death exist in different regions as well as in different economic development countries.The specific aim of this study was to investigate the causes,characteristics,and differences of death in neonates during hospitalization in the tertiary Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of China.Methods:All the dead neonates admitted to 26 NICUs were included between January 1,2011,and December 31,2011.All the data were collected retrospectively from clinical records by a designed questionnaire.Data collected from each NICU were delivered to the leading institution where the results were analyzed.Results:A total of 744 newborns died during the l-year survey,accounting for 1.2% of all the neonates admitted to 26 NICUs and 37.6% of all the deaths in children under 5 years of age in these hospitals.Preterm neonate death accounted for 59.3% of all the death.The leading causes of death in preterm and term infants were pulmonary disease and infection,respectively.In early neonate period,pulmonary diseases (56.5%) occupied the largest proportion ofpreterm deaths while infection (27%) and neurologic diseases (22%) were the two main causes of term deaths.In late neonate period,infection was the leading cause of both preterm and term neonate deaths.About two-thirds of neonate death occurred after medical care withdrawal.Of the cases who might survive if receiving continuing treatment,parents' concern about the long-term outcomes was the main reason of medical care withdrawal.Conclusions:Neonate death still accounts for a high proportion of all the deaths in children under 5 years of age.Our study showed the majority of neonate death occurred in preterm infants.Cause of death varied with the age of death and gestational age.Accurate and prompt evaluation of the long-term outcomes should be carried out to guide the critical

  8. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as late onset neonatal jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Umar Amin; Ahmad, Nisar; Rasool, Akhter; Choh, Suhail

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of adrenal hemorrhage vary depending on the degree and rate of hemorrhage, as well as the amount of adrenal cortex compromised by hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage that presented with late onset neonatal jaundice. The cause of adrenal hemorrhage was birth asphyxia.

  9. A quality project to improve compliance with AAP guidelines for inpatient management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Kimberly M; Campbell, Jessica; Shaniuk, Paul; McClead, Richard E

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to improve compliance with published guidelines regarding management of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in infants admitted to a general pediatric hospital ward and to improve support for their breastfeeding mothers. This quality improvement project was conducted by using Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles and statistical process control methods. Study subjects were infants > 35 weeks' gestation admitted for hyperbilirubinemia to the general inpatient ward of a large, freestanding pediatric hospital. We developed and implemented a guideline for the inpatient management of jaundiced neonates, with ongoing feedback given to the faculty on group performance. Outcome measures included monthly compliance scores based on American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines for management of neonates > 35 weeks' gestation and the percentage of admitted jaundiced, breastfeeding infants whose mothers received lactation consultation during hospitalization. To determine the AAP compliance score, we reviewed and assigned points to each patient admission for completion of a standard evaluation, avoidance of unnecessary intravenous (IV) fluids and peripheral IV line placement, avoidance of rebound bilirubin checks while in the hospital, and the bilirubin level at discharge. Mean monthly AAP compliance scores increased from 60.5% of total possible points during the baseline period (January 2010-December 2010) to 90.4% during the intervention period (January 2011-December 2011). Lactation consultations increased from 48% during our baseline period to 63% during our early intervention period and to 90% during the last 5 months of our intervention. Length of stay was unchanged during the baseline and intervention periods. Interprofessional collaboration between nurses and physicians combined with a thoughtful campaign to increase awareness of published guidelines were successful in improving the care of infants admitted with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia.

  10. Is facility based neonatal care in low resource setting keeping pace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many com- munity based interventions designed to address neonatal mortality ... ties, local data is very crucial but still very scanty7. ... The nurses work in 8 hour shifts and on average each shift has .... In-born. Home. Total (%). Low APGAR Score. 7 (3.9). 173 (96.1). 0 (0.0). 180(15.1) ..... entry, literature search and write up.

  11. Quality Improvement of Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Chou, An-Kuo; Chen, Yu-Lien; Chou, Hung-Chieh; Tsao, Po-Nien; Hsieh, Wu-Shiun

    2017-06-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is widely used in neonates, but the clinical practice varies. However, nursing practice differs among individuals, and an inappropriate application method may delay the respiratory therapy, influence the beneficial effect of NCPAP, and increase complications. We introduced a quality improvement project to expedite the application of NCPAP therapy and decrease the incidence of nasal trauma. A new strategy of mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits and a written protocol was implemented from April 2006. All medical staff answered a questionnaire to assess their basic knowledge before and after intensive training. The records of the patients who were treated with NCPAP from October 2005 to November 2006 were reviewed. Fifty-nine medical staff were involved in the project, and their mean score for the questionnaire improved from 69.2 points to 98.3 points after training. From October 2005 to November 2006, 113 infants were recruited in total and 82 of them were admitted after the protocol was implemented. The NCPAP cart dramatically shortened the preparation time (from 520 seconds to 72 seconds) and the application time (from 468 seconds to 200 seconds). The use of the nursing protocol significantly decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in the study population (45.2% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.006), but not in infants with a birth weight of < 1000 g. Risk factors for nasal skin trauma included lower gestational age and birth weight, longer duration of NCPAP use, and lack of standardized nursing care. The mobile NCPAP cart with prepacked fixation kits is a practical way of expediting the initiation of NCPAP therapy. The written nursing protocol decreased the incidence of nasal trauma in infants, except for those with an extremely low birth weight. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Clonidine for sedation and analgesia for neonates receiving mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsik, Olga; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Norman, Elisabeth; Bruschettini, Matteo

    2017-05-10

    Although routine administration of pharmacologic sedation or analgesia during mechanical ventilation in preterm neonates is not recommended, its use in clinical practice remains common. Alpha-2 agonists, mainly clonidine and dexmedetomidine, are used as adjunctive (or alternative) sedative agents alongside opioids and benzodiazepines. Clonidine has not been systematically assessed for use in neonatal sedation during ventilation. To assess whether clonidine administered to term and preterm newborn infants receiving mechanical ventilation reduces morbidity and mortality rates. To compare the intervention versus placebo, no treatment, and dexmedetomidine; and to assess the safety of clonidine infusion for potential harms.To perform subgroup analyses according to gestational age; birth weight; administration method (infusion or bolus therapy); dose, duration, and route of clonidine administration; and pharmacologic sedation as a co-intervention. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 12) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to January 10, 2017), Embase (1980 to January 10, 2017), and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL; 1982 to January 10, 2017). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials. We searched for randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized controlled trials, and cluster trials comparing clonidine versus placebo, no treatment, or dexmedetomidine administered to term and preterm newborns receiving mechanical ventilation via an endotracheal tube. For the included trial, two review authors independently extracted data (e.g. number of participants, birth weight, gestational age, all-cause death during initial hospitalization, duration of respiratory support, sedation

  13. Stress level among intensive care nurses in the municipality of Paraná (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Cristina Inoue

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify stress levels among intensive care nurses who work in the municipality of Western Paraná, Brazil. Methodology. This is a cross-sectional cohort study, carried out from May to July 2010, included 60 nurses from intensive care units (adult, pediatric, or neonatal of five hospitals. All participants completed the Bianchi Stress Scale. Results. The mean participant age was 31 years; 70% of the nurses were women, 33% had more than 15 years of experience, and 88% conducted care activities. The general level of stress was medium. Stress levels were low for relationships with other units and supervisors, activities related to adequate functioning of the unit and the coordination of activities of the unit. Levels were medium for the following domains: activities related to personnel management, labor conditions for the development of nursing activities, and delivery of care to patient; this last domain was related to the following stress factors: facing patient death, attending to emergencies in the unit, advising patients' family members, and conducting tasks in the minimal time available. Conclusion. Although the general stress level was medium, the identification of domains with a high score can be used to plan intervention strategies to preserve the health of intensive care nurses and, in turn, improve quality of care delivered to severely ill patients.

  14. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  15. Exame físico de enfermagem do recém-nascido a termo: software auto-instrucional Examen físico de enfermería del recién nacido: software auto-instruccional Nursing physical examination of the full-term neonate: self-instructional software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria das Graças de Oliveira Fernandes

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa trata da elaboração de um software voltado ao ensino de enfermagem neonatológica para o curso de graduação, cujo conteúdo é o exame físico de recém-nascido a termo (RNT. O software foi elaborado seguindo as fases de planejamento, desenvolvimento do conteúdo e avaliação. A construção dos módulos baseou-se na teoria moderna da aprendizagem de Gagné, sendo estruturado no plano Keller e no enfoque sistêmico. Os objetivos foram elaborar e avaliar o conteúdo dos módulos auto-instrucionais para serem utilizados como estratégia de ensino no curso de graduação de enfermagem. Após sua estruturação, o material passou pelo crivo de 11 peritas da área de enfermagem neonatológica que emitiram conceitos bom ou excelente para os 42 itens expostos.La investigación trata de la elaboración de un software que enfoca la enseñanza de enfermería neonatológica para un curso de pregrado, cuyo contenido es el examen físico del recién-nacido a término (RNT. El software fue elaborado según las fases de planeamiento, desarrollo de contenido y evaluación. La construcción de los módulos se fundamentó en la teoría moderna de Gagné, siendo estructurado en el plano Keller y en el enfoque sistémico. Los objetivos fueron elaborar y evaluar el contenido de los módulos auto-instruccionales para su utilización como estrategia de enseñanza en el curso de pregrado de enfermería. Después de su estructuración, el material pasó por el análisis de 11 peritos en el área de enfermería neonatológica, que emitieron conceptos buenos o excelentes para los 42 ítem expuestos.The purpose of this research is to elaborate software about the physical examination of full-term newborns (TNB for neonatal nursing teaching at undergraduate level. The software was developed according to the phases of planning, content development and evaluation. The construction of the modules was based on Gagné's modern learning theory and structured on the

  16. Risk of hearing loss in small for gestational age neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melani Rakhmi Mantu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Small for gestational age (SGA neonates often have intrauterine growth restriction due to placental insufficiency and chronic hypoxia. These conditions may cause developmental impairment, psychosocial disabilities, or metabolic dysfunction in later life. Previous studies have shown greater incidence of speech and language disabilities, learning impairment, and neuromotor dysfunction in term SGA infants compared to term appropriate for gestational age (AGA infants. Objective To compare hearing loss in SGA and AGA neonates using otoocoustic emission (OAE tests and to study correlations between maternal risk factors and hearing loss in SGA neonates. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in St. Borromeus Hospital, Limijati Hospital, and Melinda Hospital in Bandung from February to May 2010. Study subjects consisted of full-term neonates born in these three hospitals. A retrospective medical record review was performed for this study. Statistical analysis was done by multivariable logistic-regression. Results There was a total of 4279 subjects in our study, including 100 SGA neonates and 4179 AGA neonates. We observed a greater percentage of OAE 'refer' (indicating abnormal OAE results in the SGA group compared to the AGA group (P<0.001, Z=13.247. For suhjects with OAE 'refer' results, we also analyzed the correlation to the following maternal risk factors: smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma. We also found significant differences between  those with and without each of the four maternal risk factors studied (P< 0.001. By using multivariant analysis to compare SGA and AGA neonates, we found the odds ratio (OR to he 4.34 (95% CI 2.52 to 7.49, P=0.001, meaning the SGA group had a 4.34 times higher risk of hearing loss than the AGA group. Conclusion SGA neonates had a higher risk of hearing loss than AGA neonates. In addition, maternal smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and asthma significantly correlated to

  17. Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Early Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available to improve treatment results in premature infants with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS, by establishing developmental mechanisms and elaborating methods for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Material and methods. The paper analyzes the results of a clinical observation and laboratory, instrumental, immunological, morphological, and radiological studies of 320 premature neonates at 26—35 weeks gestational age. The following groups of neonates were identified: 1 40 premature neonatal infants without NRDS and with the physiological course of an early neonatal period (a comparison group; 2 190 premature neonates with severe NRDS in whom the efficiency of therapy with exogenous surfactants, such as surfactant BL versus curosurf, was evaluated; 3 90 premature newborn infants who had died from NRDS at its different stages. Results. The poor maternal somatic, obstetric, and gynecological histories in the early periods of the current pregnancy create prerequisites for its termination, favor the development of severe acute gestosis, and cause abnormal placental changes. Each gestational age is marked by certain placental changes that promote impaired uterineplacentalfetal blood flow and premature birth. Alveolar and bronchial epithelial damages, including those ante and intranatally, microcircula tory disorders play a leading role in the tanatogenesis of NRDS. Intranatal hypoxia and amniotic fluid aspiration are one of the important factors contributing to alveolar epithelial damage and NRDS in premature neonates. Exogenous surfactants prevent the development of hyaline membranes and are useful in the normalization of ventilation-perfusion relationships and lung biomechanical properties. Conclusion. This study could improve the diagnosis and treatment of NRDS, which assisted in reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation from 130±7.6 to 65±11.6 hours, the number of complications (the incidence of intragastric

  18. Causes of Acute Intranatal and Postnatal Hypoxia in Neonatal Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the causes of acute intranatal hypoxia and reveal a relationship of placental changes to respiratory failure (RF in newborn infants. Subjects and methods. The investigation included 252 neonates with the complicated course of an early neonatal period. Their gestational age was 26 weeks to 40 weeks, birth weight varied from 850 g to 4100 g. 95.3% of the newborn infants were born with a low Apgar score and RF, which required mechanical ventilation immediately after birth. The neonatal status was clinically evaluated; the values of blood gas composition and acid-base balance were recorded; the pathogen was discharged from the tracheobronchial tree; chest X-ray survey and placental morphological examination were performed. Results. The main cause of neonatal respiratory failure is chronic intrauterine hypoxia caused by placental inflammatory changes and fetal-placental blood circulatory disorders, which gives rise to preterm delivery, cerebral hemodynamic disorders, and neonatal amniotic fluid aspiration. Bacteriological examination of tracheobronchial aspirations showed that no microflora growth occured in the majority of the newborns acute intranatal hypoxia. Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were isolated in 12.3% and 8.7%, respectively. Growth of в-hemolytic streptococcus was observed in 2.8% of cases. The rate of microbial association specific only for rate premature infants with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS was 4.8%. Conclusion. Placental changes causing fetal-placental circulatory disorders were ascertained to be responsible for acute intranatal and postnatal neonatal hypoxia. Placental inflammatory changes occurred in the majority of cases, as confirmed by bacteriological examinations of neonatal infants. Isolation of the varying microbial flora in infants with RF to a greater extent is, indicative of the infectious process occurring in the maternal body. Key words: acute intranatal

  19. HIV and pregnancy: Maternal and neonatal evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cecchini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Data regarding epidemiological aspects, antiretroviral drug safety, and outcomes of HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns are limited in Argentina. We underwent a retrospective analysis of registries of HIV-infected pregnant women assisted at Helios Salud, Buenos Aires, Argentina (1997-2006. Variables associated with preterm delivery and neonatal complications were analyzed by univariate and logistic regression analyses. A total of 204 mother-child binomium were included. Maternal age (median: 29 years; 32.5% without prior diagnosis of HIV-infection. Baseline median CD4 T-cell count: 417 cell/μl; 98% received antiretroviral drugs during pregnancy [2 nucleoside analogs plus either nevirapine (55% or a protease inhibitor (32%]. Overall incidence of toxicity was 12.5%: rash (8%, anemia (3.5% and hepatotoxicity (1%. Rash was associated with exposure to nevirapine. Eighty one percent and 50% reached HIV-viral loads <1000 and <50 copies/ml at the end of pregnancy, respectively. Twenty six percent had obstetric complications and 16% had preterm delivery. Of the newborns, 1.6% had congenital defects and 9% had neonatal complications. Overall neonatal mortality was 1% and perinatal transmission was 0.7%. Protease inhibitor use and obstetric complications were associated to preterm delivery while obstetric complications were associated with neonatal complications. In our population, hepatotoxicity was low despite frequent use of nevirapine. Protease inhibitor use was associated to preterm delivery. A favorable virological response and a low rate of perinatal transmission was observed, what supports the consensus that antiretroviral therapy benefits during pregnancy outweigh risks of maternal and neonatal adverse events.

  20. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  1. Nurse-perceived Patient Adverse Events and Nursing Practice Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hee Kang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the occurrence of patient adverse events in Korean hospitals as perceived by nurses and examine the correlation between patient adverse events with the nurse practice environment at nurse and hospital level. Methods: In total, 3096 nurses working in 60 general inpatient hospital units were included. A two-level logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: At the hospital level, patient adverse events included patient falls (60.5%, nosocomial infections (51.7%, pressure sores (42.6% and medication errors (33.3%. Among the hospital-level explanatory variables associated with the nursing practice environment, ‘physician- nurse relationship’ correlated with medication errors while ‘education for improving quality of care’ affected patient falls. Conclusions: The doctor-nurse relationship and access to education that can improve the quality of care at the hospital level may help decrease the occurrence of patient adverse events.

  2. A enfermagem na triagem neonatal - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v25i2.2226 Nursing in newborn screening - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v25i2.2226

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Sanson Zagonel

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Estudo realizado junto ao Serviço de Referência em Triagem Neonatal no estado do Paraná (Fepe, objetivando identificar o índice de coletas de sangue inadequadas recebidas pelo laboratório da Fepe, para realização do exame, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2002. Foram estudadas fichas cadastrais dos registros internos do laboratório da Fepe, e analisados 222.366 exames, em que identificamos 2.787 com necessidade de repetição por imperícia e erros técnicos nas coletas. Os critérios utilizados na classificação foram: transfusão de sangue, sangue insuficiente, hemolisado, envelhecido, excesso, contaminado e ressecado. Com base nos dados levantados e analisados, verificamos que os maiores índices de erros estão no sangue insuficiente e envelhecido, indicando dificuldades na execução da técnica de coleta, que podem estar relacionadas à falta de conhecimento técnico-científico e desvalorização do exame, às trocas de profissionais treinados por outros não qualificados e à demora significativa no envio das amostras de sangue ao laboratório, realçando a falta de sensibilidade quanto à importância do exame.This paper deals with a study undertaken at Paraná Newborn Screening Reference Service (Fepe. Its aim was to identify the level of inadequate blood samples received by Fepe laboratory for testing from January to December 2002. A study was made from Fepe Laboratory internal medical records and 222,366 tests were examined, in which we identified 2,787 as needing to be repeated due to mistakes made during sample collection. The criteria used for classification were as follows: blood transfusion, insufficient, haemolysed, old, excess, contaminated and dried blood. Based on obtained and analysed data, we were able to determine that the greatest amount of errors relates to insufficient and old blood, indicating difficulties in carrying out the collection technique, which may be concerned to: lack of technical and

  3. Nurses and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, Rory

    Nurses' use of social media and other electronic communications has increased significantly with growing numbers of social media opportunities, platforms and applications including blogs, social networking sites, video sites and online chat rooms and forums.

  4. Certified nurse-midwife

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and universities. Most nurse-midwives graduate at the Master's degree level. These programs must be accredited by the ... beyond their experience. These cases may include high-risk pregnancies and care for pregnant women who also ...

  5. Concept analysis: nurse-to-nurse lateral violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embree, Jennifer L; White, Ann H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of nurse-to-nurse lateral violence (LV). Published literature--LV among nurses is significant and results in social, psychological, and physical consequences, negative patient and nursing outcomes, and damaged relationships. An extensive review of literature through Health Source, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ProQuest health, and Medical Complete was used to determine agreement and disagreement across disciplines and emerging trends. This concept analysis demonstrates that nurse-to-nurse LV is nurse-to-nurse aggression with overtly or covertly directing dissatisfaction toward another. Origins include role issues, oppression, strict hierarchy, disenfranchising work practices, low self-esteem, powerlessness perception, anger, and circuits of power. The result of this analysis provides guidance for further conceptual and empirical research as well as for clinical practice. Organizations must learn how to eliminate antecedents and provide nurses with skills and techniques to eradicate LV to improve the nursing work environment, patient care outcomes, and nurse retention.

  6. Neonatal delivery weight and risk of future maternal diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Andrea E; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis; Källen, Karin B M

    2018-01-01

    To investigate associations between neonatal delivery weight and future risk of maternal type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Data included in the Swedish Medical Birth Registry and Swedish National Diabetes Registry were merged to include all women born during 1930-1989; patients with pre-existing diabetes or gestational diabetes were excluded. Cox regression analyses were performed to identify associations between the neonatal delivery weight from the most recent pregnancy and later occurrence of diabetes. There were 1 873 440 patients included in the analyses. An increased risk of type 1 (hazard ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.23-4.01) or type 2 diabetes (hazard ratio 2.77, 95% CI 2.68-2.87) was observed among patients who had a large for gestational age neonate compared with patients who had neonates within one standard definition of the mean weight for gestational age; the odds of developing type 1 (odds ratio 10.27, 95% CI 7.37-14.31) or type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 8.50, 95% CI 6.01-12.02) within 1 year of delivery was also increased compared with patients who had a neonate within one standard deviation of the mean weight for gestational age. Delivering a large for gestational age neonate was a potent risk factor for the later development of maternal type 1 or type 2 diabetes. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. NEONATES (BIRTH – 1 MONTH)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    Major defects in neonatal skin have serious consequences for the health of the baby, but fortunately these are very rare. Early diagnosis of the genodermatoses can be life-saving. Birthmarks, also known as naevi, are usually first noted in neonates, and can be very alarming for parents. A variety of infections can.

  8. The Association of Organizational Culture and Quality Improvement Implementation With Neonatal Outcomes in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahl, Sukhy; Lee, Shoo K; Baker, G Ross; Cronin, Catherine M G; Stevens, Bonnie; Ye, Xiang Y

    2015-01-01

    Studies of adult patient populations suggest that organizational culture is associated with quality improvement (QI) implementation, as well as patient outcomes. However, very little research on organizational culture has been performed in neonatal patient populations. This combined cross-sectional survey and retrospective cohort study assessed employee perceptions of organizational culture and QI implementation within 18 Canadian neonatal intensive care units. The associations between these data and neonatal outcomes in extremely preterm infants (born at culture and QI implementation varied according to occupation and age. Higher hierarchical culture was associated with increased survival without major morbidities (odds ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.06), as were higher QI implementation scores (odds ratio range, 1.20-1.36 by culture type). Our data suggest that organizational culture, particularly hierarchical culture, and level of QI implementation may play a role in neonatal outcomes. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Views of parents and health-care providers regarding parental presence at bedside rounds in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzyb, M J; Coo, H; Rühland, L; Dow, K

    2014-02-01

    To examine the views of parents and health-care providers regarding parental presence during neonatal intensive care rounds. Cross-sectional survey of parents whose children were admitted to a tertiary-care neonatal intensive care unit (n=81). Medical trainees (n=67) and nurses (n=28) were also surveyed. The majority of parents reported that attending rounds reduced their anxiety and increased their confidence in the health-care team. Nurses were more likely than medical trainees to support parental presence at rounds (P=0.02). About three-quarters of medical trainees and nurses thought discussion is inhibited and 69% of trainees felt teaching is decreased when parents attend rounds. Most parents who attended rounds found the experience beneficial, but medical trainees' views were mixed. The positive impact on parents, and the learning opportunities created in family-centered care and communication when parents are present on rounds, should be highlighted for trainees and other neonatal intensive care personnel.

  10. Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Nursing Homes Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... Reason For Living in A Nursing Home Some type of disability with activities of daily living (ADLs) ...

  11. O sentido do ser-mãe-que-tem-a-possibilidade-de-tocar-o-filho-prematuro na unidade intensiva: contribuições para a enfermagem neonatal El significado de ser la madre-que-tiene-la-posibilidad-de-tocar-al-hijo-prematuro en la unidad de cuidados intensivos: contribuciones para la enfermería neonatal The meaning of being the mother-that-has-the-possibility-to-touch-the-premature-baby in the intensive unit: contributions for the neonatal nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia de Jesus Melo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo na abordagem teórico-metodológica heideggeriana com o objetivo de desvelar o sentido do ser-mãe que tem a possibilidade de tocar o filho prematuro na UTIN. Após aprovação foi desenvolvida entrevista fenomenológica com nove mulheres-mães. A análise compreensiva constituiu oito unidades de significação, e a hermenêutica permitiu desvelar o movimento existencial do sermãe em sua cotidianidade, nos modos de ser da inautenticidade e impessoalidade, movida pelo falatório, ambiguidade e temor, modos de ocupação. Ao compreender como sua a possibilidade de ter um filho prematuro, toca-o cautelosamente e cuidadosamente, transita para um entendimento no qual não mais se ocupa, se preo-cupa. Ao pre-ocupar, o ser-mãe estabelece a possibilidade de ser-aí-com-o-filho. Foi possível entender este modo de ser mãe, no qual passa por estágios antes de ver o bebê como seu e confiar em si. Possibilitar que toque seu filho, compreendendo-a em sua individualidade, singularidade, mostrou-se como um cuidado ao RNP em sua complexidade como ser-aí.Estudio en el enfoque teórico-metodológico heideggeriana con el objetivo de revelar el sentido del ser la madre que tiene la possibilidad de tocar el hijo prematuro en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatal. Después de la aprobación, fue desarrollada una entrevista fenomenológica con nueve madres. El análisis comprehensivo constituyó ocho unidades de significación, la hermenéutica permitió revelar el movimiento existencial del ser madre en su cotidianidad, en los modos de ser de la falta de autenticidad e impersonalidad, movida por el chisme, la ambigüedad y miedo, modos de ocupación. Al comprender como de ella la posibilidad de tener un bebé prematuro, lo toca con cautela y cuidado, transita para un entendimiento en el cual no más se ocupa, se preocupa. Al preocuparse, el ser madre establece la posibilidad de ser-ahí-con-el-hijo. Fue posible entender este modo de ser madre, que

  12. Does routine gowning reduce nosocomial infection and mortality rates in a neonatal nursery? A Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S G; Lim, S H; Malathi, I

    1995-11-01

    A 1 year prospective study on routine gowning before entering a neonatal unit was conducted in a maternity hospital in Singapore. This study was done based on previous work by Donowitz, Haque and Chagla and Agbayani et al., as there have been no known studies done in Singapore. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that routine gowning before entering a neonatal nursery does not reduce nosocomial infection and mortality rate. A total of 212 neonates from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and 1694 neonates from the neonatal special care unit (NSCU) were studied. Neonates admitted during the 1 year study were assigned to the gowning (control) and no routine gowning (trial) group on every alternate 2 months. The hospital infection control nurse provided data on nosocomial infection. The overall nosocomial infection rate in the NICU was 24% (25 of 104 admissions) during gowning periods compared to 16.6% (18 of 108 admissions) when plastic aprons were not worn before entry. In the NSCU, the overall infection rate was 1.5% (12 of 800 admissions) during gowning periods compared to 2.1% (19 of 894 admissions) when no gown was worn before entry. Results of the study found no significant differences in the incidences of nosocomial infection and mortality in the neonates. The cost of gowns used during the no routine gowning periods was S$2012.8 compared to S$3708 used during the routine gowning procedure. The investigators recommend that routine gowning before entering a neonatal unit is not essential and cost effective for the purpose of reducing infection. Rather the focus should be on adequate handwashing by all hospital personnel and visitors before handling neonates.

  13. Maternal haemoglobin and short-term neonatal outcome in preterm neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Savajols

    Full Text Available To determine whether there is a significant association between maternal haemoglobin measured before delivery and short-term neonatal outcome in very preterm neonates.We included prospectively all live births occurring from 25 to 32+6 weeks of gestation in a tertiary care centre between January 1(st 2009 and December 31(st 2011. Outborn infants and infants presenting with lethal malformations were excluded. Three hundred and thirty-nine mothers and 409 infants met the inclusion criteria. For each mother-infant pair a prospective record of epidemiologic data was performed and maternal haemoglobin concentration recorded within 24 hours before delivery was retrospectively researched. Maternal haemoglobin was divided into quartiles with the second and the third one regarded as reference as they were composed of normal haemoglobin values. Short-term outcome was defined as poor in case of death during hospital stay and/or grades III/IV intraventricular haemorrhage and/or periventricular leukomalacia and/or necessity of ventriculoperitoneal shunt.The global rate of poor short-term neonatal outcome was 11.4% and was significantly associated with low maternal haemoglobin values. This association remained significant after adjustment for antenatal corticosteroids therapy, gestational age, parity, mechanism of preterm birth, mode of delivery and birth weight (aOR = 2.97 CI 95% [1.36-6.47]. There was no relation between short-term neonatal outcome and high maternal haemoglobin concentration values.We show that low maternal haemoglobin concentration at delivery is an independent risk factor for poor short-term neonatal outcome in very preterm neonates. This study is one of the first to show such an association within the preterm population.

  14. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice.

  15. Interpretation of neonatal chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hye Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Plain radiographs for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit are obtained using the portable X-ray equipment in order to evaluate the neonatal lungs and also to check the position of the tubes and catheters used for monitoring critically-ill neonates. Neonatal respiratory distress is caused by a variety of medical or surgical disease conditions. Clinical information about the gestational week, respiratory symptoms, and any events during delivery is essential for interpretation of the neonatal chest radiographs. Awareness of common chest abnormality in the prematurely born or term babies is also very important for chest evaluation in the newborn. Furthermore, knowledge about complications such as air leaks and bronchopulmonary dysplasia following treatment are required to accurately inform the clinicians. The purpose of this article was to briefly review radiographic findings of chest diseases in newborns that are relatively common in daily practice

  16. Association of the nurse work environment with nurse incivility in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica G; Morin, Karen H; Lake, Eileen T

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether nurse coworker incivility is associated with the nurse work environment, defined as organisational characteristics that promote nurse autonomy. Workplace incivility can negatively affect nurses, hospitals and patients. Plentiful evidence documents that nurses working in better nurse work environments have improved job and health outcomes. There is minimal knowledge about how nurse coworker incivility relates to the United States nurse work environment. Quantitative, cross-sectional. Data were collected through online surveys of registered nurses in a southwestern United States health system. The survey content included the National Quality Forum-endorsed Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index and the Workplace Incivility Scale. Data analyses were descriptive and correlational. Mean levels of incivility were low in this sample of 233 staff nurses. Incivility occurred 'sporadically' (mean = 0.58; range 0.00-5.29). The nurse work environment was rated highly (mean = 3.10; range of 1.00-4.00). The nurse work environment was significantly inversely associated with coworker incivility. The nurse manager qualities were the principal factor of the nurse work environment associated with incivility. Supportive nurse managers reduce coworker incivility. Nurse managers can shape nurse work environments to prevent nurse incivility. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Developing a prenatal nursing care International Classification for Nursing Practice catalogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Coenen, A; Tao, H; Jansen, K R; Jiang, A L

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a prenatal nursing care catalogue of International Classification for Nursing Practice. As a programme of the International Council of Nurses, International Classification for Nursing Practice aims to support standardized electronic nursing documentation and facilitate collection of comparable nursing data across settings. This initiative enables the study of relationships among nursing diagnoses, nursing interventions and nursing outcomes for best practice, healthcare management decisions, and policy development. The catalogues are usually focused on target populations. Pregnant women are the nursing population addressed in this project. According to the guidelines for catalogue development, three research steps have been adopted: (a) identifying relevant nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes; (b) developing a conceptual framework for the catalogue; (c) expert's validation. This project established a prenatal nursing care catalogue with 228 terms in total, including 69 nursing diagnosis, 92 nursing interventions and 67 nursing outcomes, among them, 57 nursing terms were newly developed. All terms in the catalogue were organized by a framework with two main categories, i.e. Expected Changes of Pregnancy and Pregnancy at Risk. Each category had four domains, representing the physical, psychological, behavioral and environmental perspectives of nursing practice. This catalogue can ease the documentation workload among prenatal care nurses, and facilitate storage and retrieval of standardized data for many purposes, such as quality improvement, administration decision-support and researches. The documentations of prenatal care provided data that can be more fluently communicated, compared and evaluated across various healthcare providers and clinic settings. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  18. Nursing Reclaims its Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Donna

    1982-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the nurses' role: what the nurse is, what the nurse does, how the nurse is viewed by society, why nurses suffer burnout, nursing costs, and health care system reform. (CT)

  19. Nursing doctoral education in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Meryem

    2004-10-01

    Quality health care is an issue of concern worldwide, and nursing can and must play a major and global role in transforming the healthcare environment. Doctorally prepared nurses are very much needed in the discipline to further develop and expand the science, as well as to prepare its future educators, scholars, leaders, and policy makers. In 1968, the Master of Science in Nursing Program was initiated in Turkey, followed by the Nursing Doctoral Education Program in 1972. Six University Schools of Nursing provide nursing doctoral education. By the graduating year of 2001, 154 students had graduated with the Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (Ph.D.), and 206 students were enrolled in related courses. Many countries in the world are systematically building various collaborative models in their nursing doctoral education programs. Turkey would like to play an active role in creating collaborative nursing doctoral education programs with other countries. This paper centres on the structure and model of doctoral education for nurses in Turkey. It touches on doctoral programs around the world; describes in detail nursing doctoral education in Turkey, including its program structure, admission process, course units, assessment strategies and dissertation procedure; and discusses efforts to promote Turkey as a potential partner in international initiatives to improve nursing doctoral education.

  20. Treating Hypotension in Preterm Neonates With Vasoactive Medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Joynt

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Preterm neonates often have hypotension which may be due to various etiologies. While it is controversial to define hypotension in preterm neonates, various vasoactive medications are commonly used to provide the cardiovascular support to improve the blood pressure, cardiac output, or to treat shock. However, the literature on the systemic and regional hemodynamic effects of these antihypotensive medications in neonates is deficient and incomplete, and cautious translation of findings from other clinical populations and animal studies is required. Based on a literature search on published reports, meta-analytic reviews, and selected abstracts, this review discusses the current available information on pharmacologic actions, clinical effects, and side effects of commonly used antihypotensive medications including dopamine, dobutamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, vasopressin, and milrinone in preterm neonates.

  1. The "old internationals": Canadian nurses in an international nursing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapeyre, Jaime; Nelson, Sioban

    2010-12-01

    The vast devastation caused by both the First World War and the influenza pandemic of 1918 led to an increased worldwide demand for public health nurses. In response to this demand, a number of new public health training programs for nurses were started at both national and international levels. At the international level, one of two influential programs in this area included a year-long public health nursing course offered by the League of Red Cross Societies, in conjunction with Bedford College in London, England. In total, 341 nurses from 49 different countries have been documented as participants in this initiative throughout the interwar period, including 20 Canadians. Using archival material from the Canadian Nurses Association and the Royal College of Nursing, as well as articles from the journals Canadian Nurse, American Journal of Nursing and British Journal of Nursing, this paper examines these nurses' commitment to internationalism throughout their careers and explores the effect of this commitment on the development of nursing education and professionalization at the national level.

  2. Neonatal status of twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božinović Dragica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple pregnancy is a pregnancy where more than one fetus develops simultaneously in the womb, as a result of the ovulation and fertilization of more than one egg. It is relatively rare in humans and represents the rest of the phylogenetic stages. The most common are twins and they indicate the development of two fetuses in the womb. The frequency of twin pregnancies is about 1%. Multiple pregnancies belong to a group of high-risk pregnancies because of the many complications that occur during the pregnancy: higher number of premature deliveries, bleeding, early neonatal complications and higher perinatal morbidity and mortality. Such pregnancies and infants require greater supervision and monitoring. The aim of this study was to determine the percentage of baby twins born at the maternity ward of the General Hospital in Prokuplje and their morbidity and mortality. Data on the total number of deliveries, number of twins, parity and maternal age, gestational age, body weight of twins, method of delivery, Apgar score and perinatal mortality were collected and statistically analyzed by means of retrospective analysis of operative birth and neonatal protocol for 6 years (2005 of 2010. Out of 4527 mothers who gave birth 43 were pairs of twins, or 0.95% of women gave birth to twins. These babies are more likely born by Caesarean section, but delivered with slightly lower birth weight.

  3. Risk factors of kernicterus; a study in 312 icteric neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behjati Ardakani S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kernicterus, also known as bilirubin encephalopathy, is a neurologic syndrome resulting from the deposition of unconjugated bilirubin in the basal ganglia and brainstem nuclei. Indirect bilirubin is toxic for brain. Neurologic dysfunction (BIND that include acute phase (hyperbilirubin encephalopathy and chronic phase (Kernicterus resulting from hyperbilirubinemia and disruption of blood brain barrier. In this study, the association between bilirubin encephalopathy and risk factors was evaluated. Methods: In this retrospective study, 312 icteric neonates were admitted in the neonatal ward of Children's Hospital, Medical Center, Tehran, and 305 of these cases were evaluated. Patient histories were taken and physical examinations were performed. For each patient, the age, sex, birth weight, time of discharge from the hospital and risk factors were recorded, and a questionnaire was completed. Results: In this study, of the 305 icteric neonates evaluated, 25 cases had kernicterus. Risk factors included acidosis, prematurity, hemolysis, hypoglycemia, sepsis, respiratory distress, low birth weight, ABO incompatibility and G6PD deficiency. The mean level of bilirubin in cases of kernicterus was 32 mg/dl and in the others was 20 mg/dl (p=0.001. Kernicterus was most common among high risk neonates (p<0.001. Birth weight less than 2,500 gm was also an important factor (p=0.04. Conclusion: High-risk neonates need prompt treatment for hyperbilirubinemia compared to low risk neonates.

  4. Quantifying Neonatal Sucking Performance: Promise of New Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilouto, Gilson J; Cunningham, Tommy J; Mullineaux, David R; Tamilia, Eleonora; Papadelis, Christos; Giannone, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    Neonatal feeding has been traditionally understudied so guidelines and evidence-based support for common feeding practices are limited. A major contributing factor to the paucity of evidence-based practice in this area has been the lack of simple-to-use, low-cost tools for monitoring sucking performance. We describe new methods for quantifying neonatal sucking performance that hold significant clinical and research promise. We present early results from an ongoing study investigating neonatal sucking as a marker of risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. We include quantitative measures of sucking performance to better understand how movement variability evolves during skill acquisition. Results showed the coefficient of variation of suck duration was significantly different between preterm neonates at high risk for developmental concerns (HRPT) and preterm neonates at low risk for developmental concerns (LRPT). For HRPT, results indicated the coefficient of variation of suck smoothness increased from initial feeding to discharge and remained significantly greater than healthy full-term newborns (FT) at discharge. There was no significant difference in our measures between FT and LRPT at discharge. Our findings highlight the need to include neonatal sucking assessment as part of routine clinical care in order to capture the relative risk of adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes at discharge. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Nursing: What's a Nurse Practitioner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as advanced practice nurses, or APNs) have a master's degree in nursing (MS or MSN) and board certification ... NP training emphasizes disease prevention, reduction of health risks, and thorough patient education. Like doctors, NPs are ...

  6. Why the history of nursing ethics matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Marsha D

    2017-05-01

    Modern American nursing has an extensive ethical heritage literature that extends from the 1870s to 1965 when the American Nurses Association issued a policy paper that called for moving nursing education out of hospital diploma programs and into colleges and universities. One consequence of this move was the dispersion of nursing libraries and the loss of nursing ethics textbooks, as they were largely not brought over into the college libraries. In addition to approximately 100 nursing ethics textbooks, the nursing ethics heritage literature also includes hundreds of journal articles that are often made less accessible in modern databases that concentrate on the past 20 or 30 years. A second consequence of nursing's movement into colleges and universities is that ethics was no longer taught by nursing faculty, but becomes separated and placed as a discrete ethics (later bioethics) course in departments of philosophy or theology. These courses were medically identified and rarely incorporated authentic nursing content. This shift in nursing education occurs contemporaneously with the rise of the field of bioethics. Bioethics is rapidly embraced by nursing, and as it develops within nursing, it fails to incorporate the rich ethical heritage, history, and literature of nursing prior to the development of the field of bioethics. This creates a radical disjunction in nursing's ethics; a failure to more adequately explore the moral identity of nursing; the development of an ethics with a lack of fit with nursing's ethical history, literature, and theory; a neglect of nursing's ideal of service; a diminution of the scope and richness of nursing ethics as social ethics; and a loss of nursing ethical heritage of social justice activism and education. We must reclaim nursing's rich and capacious ethics heritage literature; the history of nursing ethics matters profoundly.

  7. The aging nursing workforce: How to retain experienced nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremye D

    2006-01-01

    In the face of an anticipated nursing shortage, healthcare organizations must evaluate their culture, operations, and compensation system to ensure that these elements align with organizational efforts to retain nurses who are approaching retirement age. Management should focus on enhancing elements of job satisfaction and job embeddedness that will motivate nurses to remain both in the workforce and with their employer. Although much of this responsibility falls on the nurse manager, nurse managers are often not provided the necessary support by top management and are neither recognized nor held accountable for nurse turnover. Other retention initiatives can include altering working conditions to reduce both physical and mental stress and addressing issues of employee health and safety. As for compensation, organizations may be well-served by offering senior nursing staff flexible working hours, salary structures that reward experience, and benefit programs that hold value for an aging workforce.

  8. A meta-ethnography and theory of parental ethical decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Sara A; Nolan, Marie T

    2013-07-01

    To synthesize the existing qualitative literature about parent ethical decision making in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and to investigate the potential impact of culture on parents' decision making experiences. PubMed, CINAHL plus, and PsychInfo using the search terms parental decision making, culture, race, decision making, and parental decisions. Qualitative research studies investigating decision making for infants in the NICU from the parents' perspective were included. Studies involving older pediatric populations were excluded. Ten primary qualitative research articles were included. The primary author read all manuscripts and tabulated themes related to parents' ethical decision making. Study findings were synthesized using meta-ethnography involving translating concepts of separate studies into one another, exploring contradictions, and organizing these concepts into new theories. Key themes included parent involvement in decision making, parental role, necessity of good information, need for communication, desire for hope and compassion conveyed by providers, decision making satisfaction, and trust in caregiving team. A preliminary theoretical framework of ethical parent decision making was modeled based on the proposed relationships between the themes. Parent preferences for their involvement in decision making, their perceptions of communication with providers, and their relationships with providers are all important factors in the experience of making decisions for their infants. Needs of parents were the same regardless the ethnic or racial diversity of study participants. © 2013 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  9. Effect of material and training on guideline-compliant neonatal resuscitation in the delivery room

    OpenAIRE

    Dold, Simone Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life requires a complex physiological process, nevertheless most neonates manage to go through it on their own. Only 10% need respiratory assistance. Neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) including chest compressions (CC) is with < 1% a rare event in the delivery room. However medical staff needs to be proficient in neonatal CPR and in handling the different devices. Training, based on international resuscitation guidelin...

  10. A systematic review of the burden of neonatal mortality and morbidity in the ASEAN Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hoang T; Doyle, Lex W; Lee, Katherine J; Graham, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal morbidity and mortality are major global public health challenges representing an increasing proportion of overall under-5 child mortality, with the vast majority of neonatal deaths occurring in resource-limited settings. In the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region, it is estimated that approximately 200 000 neonatal deaths occur annually with reported estimates of the neonatal mortality rate ranging from 1 to over 30 per 1000 live-births, depending on the setting. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review of published data on neonatal morbidity and mortality from the ASEAN region over the last 10 years. Very few published studies reporting neonatal morbidity and mortality in this region were found. Importantly, data are available from just a few countries, with an underrepresentation of the most resource-limited settings. The majority of the studies describing mortality and morbidity were retrospective surveys or focussed on a specific cause of neonatal morbidity. Studies included findings from a range of settings, from neonatal intensive care to community settings utilizing verbal autopsy. Therefore, comprehensive and prospective data are needed to inform priorities and potential interventions to improve neonatal care and reduce neonatal mortality in this region.

  11. Vivência de enfermeira no cuidado transpessoal às famílias de neonatos egressos da unidade de terapia intensiva Vivencia de enfermera en el cuidado transpersonal a familias de neonatos egresados de la unidad de cuidados intensivos Experience of a nurse in transpersonal caring for families of neonates discharged from the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Favero

    2012-01-01

    nursing in transpersonal care for families of neonates discharged from the intensive care unit. METHODS: A qualitative research of the descriptive case study type. We used the Theory of Transpersonal Caring, operationalized by the caring process of Lacerda. Seven families were followed and became study participants. Data were collected by means of documents and archived records. RESULTS: The care practices of family caregivers, their demands and needs; and, the importance of nursing in the process of hospitalization, discharge and home care were detected. CONCLUSION: This pathway enabled understanding that the actions of caring must be allied to humane care, and of the necessity for investment in research capable of combining home care with transpersonal caring in nursing and other health care professions.

  12. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhoumeng [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Fisher, Jeffrey W. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Wang, Ran [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Institute of Food Safety, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing 210014 (China); Ross, Matthew K. [Center for Environmental Health Sciences, Department of Basic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States); Filipov, Nikolay M., E-mail: filipov@uga.edu [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States); Interdisciplinary Toxicology Program, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data

  13. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: • We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. • We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. • Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data.

  14. Workplace violence against nursing students and nurses: an Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, Nicola; Heponiemi, Tarja

    2011-06-01

    Nurses and nursing students are exposed to workplace violence. To compare the characteristics and effects of violence in nursing students and nurses in order to assess the phenomenon and take preventive action. A retrospective survey was conducted in three Italian university schools of nursing. At the end of a lecture, 346 of 349 students agreed to fill out a questionnaire that included domains on violence, mental health, job stress, and organizational justice. This group was compared with 275 nurses from a general hospital (94.2% participation rate). The prevalence of subjects reporting at least one upsetting episode of physical or verbal violence during their lifetime activity in clinical settings was 43% in nurses and 34% in nursing students. Nurses reported more physical assaults (odds ratio [OR] 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.35-6.18), threats (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.39-5.79), and sexual harassment (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.15-5.54) during the previous 12 months than students. Nurses were mostly assaulted or harassed by patients or their relatives and friends ("external" violence), whereas students often reported verbal and also physical violence on the part of colleagues, staff, and others, including teachers, doctors, and supervisors ("internal" violence). Verbal violence was associated with high levels of psychological problems, as measured by the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire, in both students and nurses. Verbal violence was also associated with high job strain, low social support, and low organizational justice, but only among nursing students. Preventive action is urgently needed to control patient-to-worker and worker-to-worker violence in clinical settings. Not only nurses, but also nursing students, would benefit from multilevel programs of violence prevention. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. The management of neonatal pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, Rami

    2012-05-01

    Most neonates with clinically significant pulmonary hypertension (PH) will have either persistent PH of the newborn (PPHN) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Cyanotic congenital heart disease must be actively ruled out as part of the differential diagnosis of PPHN. The maintenance of ductal patency with prostaglandins E1 or E2 in cases of doubt is safe and potentially beneficial given their pulmonary vasorelaxant properties. Specific tools in the treatment of PPHN include modern ventilatory strategies, inhaled nitric oxide, sildenafil, prostacyclin and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Rarely will a cardiac lesion be primarily responsible for neonatal PH although pulmonary vein stenosis and the persistence of an arterial duct must be considered, particularly in the older preterm baby with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  16. Management of neonatal jaundice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Wan Seng Lian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical Practice Guidelines on Management of Neonatal Jaundice 2003 was updated by a multidisciplinary development group and approved by the Ministry of Health Malaysia in 2014. A systematic review of 13 clinical questions was conducted using evidence retrieved mainly from Medline and Cochrane databases. Critical appraisal was done using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Recommendations were formulated based on the accepted 103 evidences and tailored to local setting as stated below. Neonatal jaundice (NNJ is a common condition seen in primary care. Multiple risk factors contribute to severe NNJ, which if untreated can lead to adverse neurological outcomes. Visual assessment, transcutaneous bilirubinometer (TcB and total serum bilirubin (TSB are the methods used for the detection of NNJ. Phototherapy remains the mainstay of the treatment. Babies with severe NNJ should be followed-up to detect and manage sequelae. Strategies to prevent severe NNJ include health education, identification of risk factors, proper assessment and early referral.

  17. [In utero thrombosis of neonates: inherited thrombophilia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Andrea; Mogyorósy, Gábor; Kiss, Csongor; Pataki, István; Amir Houshang, Shemirani; Oláh, Eva

    2009-04-19

    Thromboembolic events are relatively uncommon in childhood. It involves mainly children under one year of age and adolescents, with an incidence is 5.1/10000 live births. Authors present a course of disease of seven cases with neonatal thromboembolic events (2.5/admissions), diagnosed and treated at the Neonatal Division of Department of Pediatrics. In three of seven cases thrombosis proved to be of intrauterine origin. In each of the latter cases, inherited thrombophilia of the mothers was detected. Additional risk factors including infection could be revealed only in one case. Using in vivo and post mortem DNA analysis, mother-like-thrombophilia could not be confirmed in any of the newborns. Based on their experiences, authors suppose that undetected predisposing factors added to maternal thrombophilia can be considered as etiological factor. Authors suggest the intensive follow-up of pregnant women with thrombophilia and also their fetuses.

  18. Gastrointestinal ultrasound in neonates, infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, Maria Luisa; Roque, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    Today US plays an important and increasing role in the assessment of many, partially age-specific conditions in the GI tract in neonates, infants and children. Knowledge of the potential capabilities of US and its restrictions together with a skillful performance of GI US examination can provide essential anatomic and functional diagnostic information in many pediatric GI disorders. The aim of this review is to highlight the potential of ultrasound (US) in the evaluation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in neonates, infants and children. Basic and potential applications of modern US tools in pediatric GI tract are addressed, the GI US examination technique is discussed – including some common and/or typical clinical applications of and indications for US

  19. A health partnership to reduce neonatal mortality in four hospitals in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntigurirwa, Placide; Mellor, Kathy; Langer, Daniel; Evans, Mari; Robertson, Emily; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Groves, Alan; Lissauer, Tom

    2017-06-01

    A health partnership to improve hospital based neonatal care in Rwanda to reduce neonatal mortality was requested by the Rwandan Ministry of Health. Although many health system improvements have been made, there is a severe shortage of health professionals with neonatal training. Following a needs assessment, a health partnership grant for 2 years was obtained. A team of volunteer neonatologists and paediatricians, neonatal nurses, lactation consultants and technicians with experience in Rwanda or low-income countries was assembled. A neonatal training program was provided in four hospitals (the 2 University hospitals and 2 district hospitals), which focused on nutrition, provision of basic respiratory support with nasal CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure), enhanced record keeping, thermoregulation, vital signs monitoring and infection control. To identify if care delivery improved, audits of nutritional support, CPAP use and its complications, and documentation in newly developed neonatal medical records were conducted. Mortality data of neonatal admissions was obtained. Intensive neonatal training was provided on 27 short-term visits by 10 specialist health professionals. In addition, a paediatric doctor spent 3 months and two spent 6 months each providing training. A total of 472 training days was conducted in the neonatal units. For nutritional support, significant improvements were demonstrated in reduction in time to initiation of enteral feeds and to achieve full milk feeds, in reduction in maximum postnatal weight loss, but not in days for regaining birth weight. Respiratory support with bubble CPAP was applied to 365 infants in the first 18 months. There were no significant technical problems, but tissue damage, usually transient, to the nose and face was recorded in 13%. New medical records improved documentation by doctors, but nursing staff were reluctant to use them. Mortality for University teaching hospital admissions was reduced from 23

  20. Nursing care for stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tulek, Zeliha; Poulsen, Ingrid; Gillis, Katrin

    2018-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of the clinical nursing practice in European countries in accordance with the European Stroke Strategies (ESS) 2006, and to examine to what extent the ESS have been implemented in stroke care nursing in Europe. BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death...... comprising 61 questions based on the ESS and scientific evidence in nursing practice was distributed to representatives of the European Association of Neuroscience Nurses, who sent the questionnaire to nurses active in stroke care. The questionnaire covered the following areas of stroke care: Organization...... of stroke services, Management of acute stroke and prevention including basic care and nursing, and Secondary prevention. RESULTS: Ninety-two nurses in stroke care in 11 European countries participated in the survey. Within the first 48 hours after stroke onset, 95% monitor patients regularly, 94% start...

  1. Benefits of nurse prescribing for patients in pain: nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Karen; Courtenay, Molly

    2008-07-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore nurses' views on the benefits of adopting the role of prescribing for patients with acute and chronic pain. It was envisioned that the advent of nurse prescribing would be beneficial to the efficiency and effectiveness of the United Kingdom National Health Service. Research to date does indeed indicate that nurse prescribing can be beneficial to patients, nurses and the health service in general. Despite the expansion of nurse prescribing, there is little evidence of its impact according to nurses working in specialist areas, such as with patients in acute and chronic pain. Interviews were conducted during 2006 and 2007 with 26 nurses qualified to prescribe medicines for patients in acute and chronic pain. This was a qualitative study and a thematic analysis was conducted. Nurses reported a number of benefits, including faster access to treatment, improved quality of care, more appropriate prescribing of medication, improved safety, improved relations and communication with patients, greater efficiency and cost effectiveness. Nurses benefited from increased job satisfaction, credibility with patients and healthcare professionals and also gained knowledge through prescribing. There is potential for the benefits of nurse prescribing to be expanded beyond the United Kingdom in settings where nurses hold similar roles in the treatment of pain, although further research using a wider range of research methods is recommended to substantiate these findings.

  2. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  3. Changes in nurse education: being a nurse teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Graham

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine changes in nursing education through the personal accounts of nurse teachers. This paper is based on 37 in-depth interviews within a central London Healthcare Faculty, which took place between August 2003 and March 2004 and totalled 34.4h or 305,736 words. There were thirty female and seven male participants, who between them shared 1015 years of nursing experience, averaging at 27.4 years (min7-max 42). These nursing years included 552 years of teaching practice, the average time being 15 years spent in a formal teaching role (min 0.5-max 29). Each interview was subjected to a process of thematic content analysis as described by Miles and Huberman. This paper identifies how nurse teachers try to combine teaching with a nursing role. The Government, the NHS, the Universities and the Nursing and Midwifery Council all articulate contradictory visions of the nurse teacher role, which raises the question of what additional value (if any) is gained from combining nursing practice and its teaching. This tension has led to a default situation where the longer a nurse works as a teacher the less likely it is that they will maintain any nursing practice.

  4. Happiness in the neonatal intensive care unit: Merits of ethnographic fieldwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jónína Einarsdóttir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research has focused on the destructive effects of distress on professionals who work in ethically complex wards such as neonatal intensive units (NICUs. This article examines the accounts of health professionals, including nurses, pediatricians and assistant nurses, of their work at a NICU in Iceland. The aim is to understand how health professionals, who work under stressful conditions in an ethically sensitive ward, can counteract the negative sides of work too such a degree that they experience happiness. The collection of data was based on the ethnographic fieldwork, and the methods used were participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The professionals evaluated their wellbeing in line with conventional definitions of happiness. Working with children and opportunities to help others, engage in social relations and experience professional pride contributed to their happiness at work. Nonetheless, they did not dismiss the difficult experiences, and when confronted with these the professionals negotiated their meanings and the goals and priorities of work. In contrast to the findings of much quantitative and survey-based research, the professionals attributed constructive meanings to stress and argued that the positive experiences at work buffered the negative ones. Research on happiness would benefit from multifaceted methodological and theoretical perspectives. Thanks to its openness to the unforeseen, controversial, contradictory, and ambiguous aspects of human life, ethnography can contribute to happiness research and research on job satisfaction.

  5. Nursing Practice and Education in Australia : An Overview(The Research Society of School of Health Sciences The 41st Meeting)

    OpenAIRE

    吉澤, 豊子; Debra, Anderson; School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology /

    2006-01-01

    The many career opportunities open to registered nurses in Australia. They include Registered Nurse Level, Clinical Nurse Level, Clinical Nurse Consultant Level, Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Manager/Nurse Educator, Director of Nursing, Director of Nursing and Chief Executive Officer. In 1984 nurse education was transferred to education sector (universities) and now all nurse education is conducted through a bachelor's degree at universities. This degree is three years long and when students grad...

  6. Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalotte Mörelius

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout. Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments. Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU (n=33 and nurses working in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP (n=14 using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person. Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once. Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient, poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores. Conclusion. When comparing these nurses with existing norm data for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses. Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

  7. Joinng the ranks: nurses as role models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidhizar, Ruth

    2005-01-01

    The average age of today's nurse is 45. The average age of today's nurse educator is 55. Not only is the mean age of nurses increasing, but the United States is also facing a national nursing shortage crisis--with fewer and fewer nurses both in the field and entering the profession. Massive advertising campaigns highlighting flexible nursing opportunities, increased incentives from health care agencies in need of nurses, and newly created flexible shift opportunities for nurses include strategies aimed at addressing this shortage. Fortunately, nursing education programs are seeing an increase in applicants, and many schools of nursing are filling their slots for new students to capacity. But this problem will not be solved by solely tempting new recruits.

  8. Maternal or neonatal infection: association with neonatal encephalopathy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenster, Meike; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Ruel, Theodore; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Tam, Emily W; Partridge, John Colin; Barkovich, Anthony James; Ferriero, Donna M; Glass, Hannah C

    2014-07-01

    Perinatal infection may potentiate brain injury among children born preterm. The objective of this study was to examine whether maternal and/or neonatal infection are associated with adverse outcomes among term neonates with encephalopathy. This study is a cohort study of 258 term newborns with encephalopathy whose clinical records were examined for signs of maternal infection (chorioamnionitis) and infant infection (sepsis). Multivariate regression was used to assess associations between infection, pattern, and severity of injury on neonatal magnetic resonance imaging, as well as neurodevelopment at 30 mo (neuromotor examination, or Bayley Scales of Infant Development, second edition mental development index encephalopathy, chorioamnionitis was associated with a lower risk of brain injury and adverse outcomes, whereas signs of neonatal sepsis carried an elevated risk. The etiology of encephalopathy and timing of infection and its associated inflammatory response may influence whether infection potentiates or mitigates injury in term newborns.

  9. Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    mortality and they have been the reasons for the wide variation in mortality rates among the health facilities reporting. Objective: ... A study in Indonesia about determinants of neonatal ..... antenatal visit, frequency of visits and administration of.

  10. A systems perspective on nursing productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Nicola; Hughes, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Recent New Zealand reports have identified the nursing workforce for its potential to make a significant contribution to increased productivity in health services. The purpose of this paper is to review critically the recent and current labour approaches to improve nursing productivity in New Zealand, in a context of international research and experience. An examination of government documents regarding productivity, and a review of New Zealand and international literature and research on nursing productivity and its measurement form the basis of the paper. It is found that productivity improvement strategies are influenced by theories of labour economics and scientific management that conceptualise a nurse as a labour unit and a cost to the organisation. Nursing productivity rose significantly with the health reforms of the 1990s that reduced nursing input costs but impacts on patient safety and nurses were negative. Current approaches to increasing nursing productivity, including the "productive ward" and reconfiguration of nursing teams, also draw on manufacturing innovations. Emerging thinking considers productivity in the context of the work environment and changing professional roles, and proposes reconceptualising the nurse as an intellectual asset to knowledge-intensive health organisations. Strategies that take a systems approach to nursing productivity, that view nursing as a capital asset, that focus on the interface between nurse and working environment and measure patient and nurse outcomes are advocated. The paper shows that reframing nursing productivity brings into focus management strategies to raise productivity while protecting nursing and patient outcomes.

  11. Neonatal mucosal immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torow, N; Marsland, B J; Hornef, M W; Gollwitzer, E S

    2017-01-01

    Although largely deprived from exogenous stimuli in utero, the mucosal barriers of the neonate after birth are bombarded by environmental, nutritional, and microbial exposures. The microbiome is established concurrently with the developing immune system. The nature and timing of discrete interactions between these two factors underpins the long-term immune characteristics of these organs, and can set an individual on a trajectory towards or away from disease. Microbial exposures in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts are some of the key determinants of the overall immune tone at these mucosal barriers and represent a leading target for future intervention strategies. In this review, we discuss immune maturation in the gut and lung and how microbes have a central role in this process.

  12. Feeding premature neonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Mie S.; Juhl, Sandra M.; Sangild, Per T.

    2017-01-01

    Kinship, understood as biogenetic proximity, between a chosen animal model and a human patient counterpart, is considered essential to the process of ‘translating’ research from the experimental animal laboratory to the human clinic. In the Danish research centre, NEOMUNE, premature piglets are fed...... a novel milk diet (bovine colostrum) to model the effects of this new diet in premature infants. Our ethnographic fieldwork in an experimental pig laboratory and a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in 2013–2014 shows that regardless of biogenetics, daily practices of feeding, housing, and clinical care...... the researchers refer to as the ‘translatability’ of the results. In the NICU, parents of premature infants likewise imagine a kind of interspecies kinship when presented with the option to supplement mother's own milk with bovine colostrum for the first weeks after birth. However, in this setting the NICU...

  13. Neonatal heart rate prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Yumna; Jeremic, Aleksander; Tan, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Technological advances have caused a decrease in the number of infant deaths. Pre-term infants now have a substantially increased chance of survival. One of the mechanisms that is vital to saving the lives of these infants is continuous monitoring and early diagnosis. With continuous monitoring huge amounts of data are collected with so much information embedded in them. By using statistical analysis this information can be extracted and used to aid diagnosis and to understand development. In this study we have a large dataset containing over 180 pre-term infants whose heart rates were recorded over the length of their stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). We test two types of models, empirical bayesian and autoregressive moving average. We then attempt to predict future values. The autoregressive moving average model showed better results but required more computation.

  14. Neonatal bartter syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkash, J.; Salat, S. M.; Khan, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    A pre-term baby girl was born following a pregnancy complicated by severe polyhydramnios at a gestational age of 36 weeks. She was initially suffering from respiratory distress consistent with idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, and altered electrolyte imbalance with hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. However, during the third week of life when she had dehydration along with significant electrolyte imbalance, Bartter's syndrome was considered which was supported by findings of high renin and aldosterone levels. Treatment was done by correction of electrolytes and dehydration along with indomethacin. The drug was well tolerated. The infant showed correction of electrolyte imbalance. The features of this case suggest an extreme form of Bartter's syndrome presenting from the early days of life. The syndrome is reported because of it's rarity and alerts pediatricians to the antenatal and neonatal variant of Bartter's syndrome. (author)

  15. Cerebral blood oxygenation measurements in neonates with optoacoustic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Stephen; Petrov, Irene Y.; Petrov, Yuriy; Richardson, C. Joan; Fonseca, Rafael A.; Prough, Donald S.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral hypoxia is a major contributor to neonatal/infant mortality and morbidity including severe neurological complications such as mental retardation, cerebral palsy, motor impairment, and epilepsy. Currently, no technology is capable of accurate monitoring of neonatal cerebral oxygenation. We proposed to use optoacoustics for this application by probing the superior sagittal sinus (SSS), a large central cerebral vein. We developed and built a multi-wavelength, optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and laser diode optoacoustic systems for measurement of SSS blood oxygenation in the reflection mode through open anterior or posterior fontanelles and in the transmission mode through the skull in the occipital area. In this paper we present results of initial tests of the laser diode system for neonatal cerebral oxygenation measurements. First, the system was tested in phantoms simulating neonatal SSS. Then, using the data obtained in the phantoms, we optimized the system's hardware and software and tested it in neonates admitted in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The laser diode system was capable of detecting SSS signals in the reflection mode through the open anterior and posterior fontanelles as well as in the transmission mode through the skull with high signal-to-noise ratio. Using the signals measured at different wavelengths and algorithms developed for oxygenation measurements, the laser diode system provided real-time, continuous oxygenation monitoring with high precision at all these locations.

  16. Renal inflammatory response to urinary tract infection in rat neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarepour, M; Moradpoor, H; Emamghorashi, F; Owji, S M; Roodaki, M; Khamoushi, M

    2015-09-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections. Maternal UTI is a risk factor for neonatal UTI. The aim of the present study was to determine the severity of renal inflammation in neonate rats born from mothers with induced UTI. Twelve pregnant rats (Sprague-Dawley) were included in study. The rats were divided into two groups (six rats in each group). In the first group, pyelonephritis was induced in the third trimester of pregnancy and the second group was used as a control group. After delivery, the neonates were divided into three groups based on days after birth (the 1 st, 3 rd and 7 th days after birth). In each group, two neonates of each mother were killed and a midline abdominal incision was made and both kidneys were aseptically removed. On the 7 th day, rat mothers were killed and their kidneys were removed. The preparations were evaluated with a bright field microscope for inflammatory response. Renal pathology showed inflammation in all UTI-induced mothers, but only two cases of neonates (2.1%) showed inflammation in the renal parenchyma. There was no relation between the positive renal culture and the pathological changes. We conclude that neonates with UTI born to UTI-induced mothers showed a lesser inflammatory response.

  17. Renal inflammatory response to urinary tract infection in rat neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zarepour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common bacterial infections. Maternal UTI is a risk factor for neonatal UTI. The aim of the present study was to determine the severity of renal inflammation in neonate rats born from mothers with induced UTI. Twelve pregnant rats (Sprague-Dawley were included in study. The rats were divided into two groups (six rats in each group. In the first group, pyelonephritis was induced in the third trimester of pregnancy and the second group was used as a control group. After delivery, the neonates were divided into three groups based on days after birth (the 1 st, 3 rd and 7 th days after birth. In each group, two neonates of each mother were killed and a midline abdominal incision was made and both kidneys were aseptically removed. On the 7 th day, rat mothers were killed and their kidneys were removed. The preparations were evaluated with a bright field microscope for inflammatory response. Renal pathology showed inflammation in all UTI-induced mothers, but only two cases of neonates (2.1% showed inflammation in the renal parenchyma. There was no relation between the positive renal culture and the pathological changes. We conclude that neonates with UTI born to UTI-induced mothers showed a lesser inflammatory response.

  18. Reducing neonatal deaths in South Africa: Progress and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rhoda

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Although current levels of the neonatal mortality rate (NMR are within reach of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG target of 12 per 1 000 live births, the absolute number of deaths is unacceptably high for a lower-middle-income country such as South Africa (SA. Neonatal mortality over the last decade has declined very slowly, and is not commensurate with the level of government investment in healthcare. The recent neonatal mortality rate of 21 per 1 000 live births reported by the SA Demographic Health Survey is of major concern. This paper reviews recent efforts to reduce the neonatal mortality rate, including support for the implementation of neonatal policies and plans, and strengthening programmes to deliver low-cost, high-impact interventions. We review recent estimates of the NMR and causes of neonatal deaths, and discuss how the mortality from preventable causes of death could be reduced. If SA is to meet the SDG target, special attention should be given to the availability of high-impact interventions, providing an adequate number of appropriately trained healthcare providers and a more active role played by ward-based community health workers and district clinical specialist teams.

  19. [Sedation and analgesia practices among Spanish neonatal intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Alvarez, A; Carbajal, R; Courtois, E; Pertega-Diaz, S; Muñiz-Garcia, J; Anand, K J S

    2015-08-01

    Pain management and sedation is a priority in neonatal intensive care units. A study was designed with the aim of determining current clinical practice as regards sedation and analgesia in neonatal intensive care units in Spain, as well as to identify factors associated with the use of sedative and analgesic drugs. A multicenter, observational, longitudinal and prospective study. Thirty neonatal units participated and included 468 neonates. Of these, 198 (42,3%) received sedatives or analgesics. A total of 19 different drugs were used during the study period, and the most used was fentanyl. Only fentanyl, midazolam, morphine and paracetamol were used in at least 20% of the neonates who received sedatives and/or analgesics. In infusions, 14 different drug prescriptions were used, with the most frequent being fentanyl and the combination of fentanyl and midazolam. The variables associated with receiving sedation and/o