WorldWideScience

Sample records for neonatal deafness influences

  1. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  2. Black deaf individuals' reading skills: influence of ASL, culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M; Anderson, Melissa L; Gilbert, Gizelle L; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education. (The descriptor Black is used throughout the present article, as Black Deaf individuals prefer this term to African American. For purposes of parallel construction, the term White is used instead of European American.) It was found that Black Deaf study participants scored lower on measures of both reading and ASL. These findings provide implications for possible interventions at the primary, secondary, and college levels of education.

  3. Influence and adaptability in families with deaf parents and hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzi, B M

    1990-12-01

    This study assessed the influence of individual family members in functional families, primarily to determine whether hearing children of deaf parents have more influence than do hearing children of hearing parents. Eight families with deaf parents and a hearing child and eight all hearing families were videotaped while planning a family meal together. It was found that deaf-parented families share many traits with hearing families. However, there were some differences. The hearing children of deaf parents had a greater number and percentage of their ideas accepted than did the hearing children of hearing parents. Differences were also noted between the deaf fathers and the hearing fathers. The deaf-parented families were more adaptable, as measured by the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale. The observed difference in child influence, in and of itself, is neither good nor bad. Deafness of one family member, in an auditory dependent environment, may require a more flexible family power structure. Professionals assessing deaf-parented families should be sensitive to the special adaptive needs required for healthy functioning of the family.

  4. The effect of long-term unilateral deafness on the activation pattern in the auditory cortices of French-native speakers: influence of deafness side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veuillet Evelyne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In normal-hearing subjects, monaural stimulation produces a normal pattern of asynchrony and asymmetry over the auditory cortices in favour of the contralateral temporal lobe. While late onset unilateral deafness has been reported to change this pattern, the exact influence of the side of deafness on central auditory plasticity still remains unclear. The present study aimed at assessing whether left-sided and right-sided deafness had differential effects on the characteristics of neurophysiological responses over auditory areas. Eighteen unilaterally deaf and 16 normal hearing right-handed subjects participated. All unilaterally deaf subjects had post-lingual deafness. Long latency auditory evoked potentials (late-AEPs were elicited by two types of stimuli, non-speech (1 kHz tone-burst and speech-sounds (voiceless syllable/pa/ delivered to the intact ear at 50 dB SL. The latencies and amplitudes of the early exogenous components (N100 and P150 were measured using temporal scalp electrodes. Results Subjects with left-sided deafness showed major neurophysiological changes, in the form of a more symmetrical activation pattern over auditory areas in response to non-speech sound and even a significant reversal of the activation pattern in favour of the cortex ipsilateral to the stimulation in response to speech sound. This was observed not only for AEP amplitudes but also for AEP time course. In contrast, no significant changes were reported for late-AEP responses in subjects with right-sided deafness. Conclusion The results show that cortical reorganization induced by unilateral deafness mainly occurs in subjects with left-sided deafness. This suggests that anatomical and functional plastic changes are more likely to occur in the right than in the left auditory cortex. The possible perceptual correlates of such neurophysiological changes are discussed.

  5. Dominant ER Stress-InducingWFS1Mutations Underlie a Genetic Syndrome of Neonatal/Infancy-Onset Diabetes, Congenital Sensorineural Deafness, and Congenital Cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franco, Elisa; Flanagan, Sarah E; Yagi, Takuya; Abreu, Damien; Mahadevan, Jana; Johnson, Matthew B; Jones, Garan; Acosta, Fernanda; Mulaudzi, Mphele; Lek, Ngee; Oh, Vera; Petz, Oliver; Caswell, Richard; Ellard, Sian; Urano, Fumihiko; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal diabetes is frequently part of a complex syndrome with extrapancreatic features: 18 genes causing syndromic neonatal diabetes have been identified to date. There are still patients with neonatal diabetes who have novel genetic syndromes. We performed exome sequencing in a patient and his unrelated, unaffected parents to identify the genetic etiology of a syndrome characterized by neonatal diabetes, sensorineural deafness, and congenital cataracts. Further testing was performed in 311 patients with diabetes diagnosed before 1 year of age in whom all known genetic causes had been excluded. We identified 5 patients, including the initial case, with three heterozygous missense mutations in WFS1 (4/5 confirmed de novo). They had diabetes diagnosed before 12 months (2 before 6 months) (5/5), sensorineural deafness diagnosed soon after birth (5/5), congenital cataracts (4/5), and hypotonia (4/5). In vitro studies showed that these WFS1 mutations are functionally different from the known recessive Wolfram syndrome-causing mutations, as they tend to aggregate and induce robust endoplasmic reticulum stress. Our results establish specific dominant WFS1 mutations as a cause of a novel syndrome including neonatal/infancy-onset diabetes, congenital cataracts, and sensorineural deafness. This syndrome has a discrete pathophysiology and differs genetically and clinically from recessive Wolfram syndrome. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. Personal factors that influence deaf college students' academic success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, John A; Kelly, Ronald R; Matchett, Mary Karol

    2012-01-01

    Research tells us that academic preparation is key to deaf students' success at college. Yet, that is not the whole story. Many academically prepared students drop out during their first year. This study identified entering deaf college students' personal factors as assessed by their individual responses to both the Noel-Levitz College Student Inventory Form B and the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory, second edition (LASSI). Entering students in 3 successive cohorts (total n =437) participated in this study. Results show that in addition to entry measurements of reading and mathematic skills, personal factors contributed to the academic performance of students in their first quarter in college. The Noel-Levitz provided the comparatively better predictive value of academic performance: Motivation for Academic Study Scale (e.g., desire to finish college). The LASSI also showed statistically significant predictors, the Self-Regulation Component (e.g., time management) and Will Component (e.g., self-discipline), but accounted for relatively less variability in the students' initial grade point averages. For this group of underprepared students, results show that personal factors can play a significant role in academic success. Deaf students' personal factors are discussed as they relate to other first-year college students and to their subsequent academic performance and persistence.

  7. Semantic and pragmatic factors influencing deaf and hearing students' comprehension of english sentences containing numeral quantifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ronald R; Berent, Gerald P

    2011-01-01

    This research contrasted deaf and hearing students' interpretive knowledge of English sentences containing numeral quantifier phrases and indefinite noun phrases. A multiple-interpretation picture task methodology was used to assess 305 participants' judgments of the compatibility of sentence meanings with depicted discourse contexts. Participants' performance was assessed on the basis of hearing level (deaf, hearing) and grade level (middle school, high school, college). The deaf students were predicted to have differential access to specific sentence interpretations in accordance with the relative derivational complexity of the targeted sentence types. Hypotheses based on the pressures of derivational economy on acquisition were largely supported. The results also revealed that the deaf participants tended to overactivate pragmatic processes that yielded principled, though non-target, sentence interpretations. Collectively, the results not only contribute to the understanding of English acquisition under conditions of restricted access to spoken language input, they also suggest that pragmatic factors may play a broad role in influencing, and compromising, deaf students' reading comprehension and written expression.

  8. Evaluation of the influence of maternal parity on neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal Parity has been shown to increase the risk of adverse neonatal outcomes, such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), prematurity, and mortality. The study was designed to evaluate the influence of maternal parity on neonatal anthropometric parameters among Hausas in Kano. Five hundred and twenty one ...

  9. Fetal metabolic influences of neonatal anthropometry and adiposity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, Jean M

    2015-01-01

    Large for gestational age infants have an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular and metabolic complications during life. Knowledge of the key predictive factors of neonatal adiposity is required to devise targeted antenatal interventions. Our objective was to determine the fetal metabolic factors that influence regional neonatal adiposity in a cohort of women with previous large for gestational age offspring.

  10. Maternal Music Exposure during Pregnancy Influences Neonatal Behaviour: An Open-Label Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study evaluated the effect of antenatal music exposure to primigravida healthy mothers on the behaviour of their term appropriate-for-date newborns assessed using Brazelton Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (BNBAS. Methods. This was a single-centre, randomized, open-label controlled trial. Primigravida mothers aged 19–29 years, free of chronic medical diseases or significant deafness, with singleton pregnancy, with a gestation of 20 weeks or less, were randomized to listen to a pre-recorded music cassette for approximately 1 hour/day in addition to standard antenatal care (intervention arm or standard care only (control arm. Perinatal factors with adverse effect on neonatal behaviour were deemed as protocol violations. Outcome measure included scores on 7 clusters of BNBAS. Primary analysis was per protocol. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01278329. Results. One hundred and twenty-six newborns in the music group and 134 in the control group were subjected to BNBAS assessment. The infants of mothers exposed to music during pregnancy performed significantly better on 5 of the 7 BNBAS clusters. The maximal beneficial effect was seen with respect to orientation (ES 1.13, 95% CI 0.82–1.44, <0.0001 and habituation (ES 1.05, 95% CI 0.53–1.57, =0.0001. Conclusion. Prenatal music exposure to mother significantly and favourably influences neonatal behaviour.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in neonates: does the cause influence the outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Shabih; Nair, Arun K; Pai, Mangalore G; Al Khusaiby, Saleh M

    2004-10-01

    To determine the influence of the cause of pulmonary hypertension in neonates on overall outcome. Analytical study. Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU) at Royal Hospital in Muscat, Sultanate of Oman, from July 1998 to June 2003. All neonates with the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, based on history, clinical examination and 2-D echocardiogram were reviewed with respect to the cause of hypertension (primary or secondary), birth weight, Apgar score, gender, inborn/outborn and outcome. According to the outcome, neonates were divided into two groups, group A (survived) and group B (expired). Both groups were compared for described variables using Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 7.5 for Windows and Epi Info version 6. Out of 37 neonates with pulmonary hypertension, Group A comprised of 22 neonates while group B had 15 neonates, giving a mortality of 40 % (15/37). The mean birth weight between the two groups showed no significant differences, 3088 +/- 479 gram and 2962 +/- 454 gram, p =0.42, respectively. Similarly, no difference in the one and five Apgar scores were noted, 4.9 +/- 2.1 and 4.7 +/- 1.3, p = 0.73 and 7.4 +/- 1.5 and 6.7 +/- 1.4, p = 0.16, respectively. The place of birth had also no significant influence on the outcome, however, the cause of pulmonary hypertension was noted to be significantly associated with the outcome, p =0.004. The cause of pulmonary hypertension in neonates does influence the survival. Primary pulmonary hypertension in neonates was noted to be associated with poor outcome as compared to secondary pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Screening for neonatal deafness in resource-poor countries: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusanya BO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Bolajoko O Olusanya Centre for Healthy Start Initiative, Ikoyi, Nigeria Abstract: Newborn or neonatal hearing screening (NHS is offered routinely in high-income countries as an essential and mandatory intervention for the early detection of infants with permanent congenital or early-onset hearing loss. However, NHS is rarely offered presently in the vast majority of low- and middle-income countries, which account for over 80% of the incidence and burden of permanent congenital or early-onset hearing loss worldwide. This review provides an overview of the current status of NHS programs in the most developmentally disadvantaged low-and middle-income countries with a per capita income of approximately US$6,000 or less against the backdrop of relevant recommendations for effective NHS programs. It highlights the key obstacles to the delivery and uptake of NHS services based on a review of available literature from the eligible countries. It proposes strategies for addressing these challenges and examines the crucial role of pediatricians and primary care physicians in providing leadership for the requisite multidisciplinary efforts to develop and promote effective NHS services in low- and middle-income countries. Keywords: early detection, intervention, newborn screening, early childhood development, developing countries

  13. Fetal metabolic influences of neonatal anthropometry and adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Jean M; Lindsay, Karen L; Walsh, Jennifer M; Horan, Mary; Molloy, Eleanor J; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2015-11-10

    Large for gestational age infants have an increased risk of obesity, cardiovascular and metabolic complications during life. Knowledge of the key predictive factors of neonatal adiposity is required to devise targeted antenatal interventions. Our objective was to determine the fetal metabolic factors that influence regional neonatal adiposity in a cohort of women with previous large for gestational age offspring. Data from the ROLO [Randomised COntrol Trial of LOw Glycaemic Index in Pregnancy] study were analysed in the ROLO Kids study. Neonatal anthropometric and skinfold measurements were compared with fetal leptin and C-peptide results from cord blood in 185 cases. Analyses were performed to examine the association between these metabolic factors and birthweight, anthropometry and markers of central and generalised adiposity. Fetal leptin was found to correlate with birthweight, general adiposity and multiple anthropometric measurements. On multiple regression analysis, fetal leptin remained significantly associated with adiposity, independent of gender, maternal BMI, gestational age or study group assignment, while fetal C-peptide was no longer significant. Fetal leptin may be an important predictor of regional neonatal adiposity. Interventional studies are required to assess the impact of neonatal adiposity on the subsequent risk of childhood obesity and to determine whether interventions which reduce circulating leptin levels have a role to play in improving neonatal adiposity measures.

  14. Could Neonatal Hypernatremia Dehydration Influence Hearing Status?

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    Hassan Boskabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neonatal hypernatremia dehydration (NHD is a dangerous condition in neonates, which is accompanied by acute complications (renal failure, cerebral edema, and cerebral hemorrhage and chronic complications (developmental delay. Children begin learning language from birth, and hearing impairment interferes with this process. We assessed the hearing status of infants with hypernatremia dehydration.   Materials and Methods: In a case-control study in 110 infants presenting at the Ghaem Hospital (Mashhad, Iran between 2007 and 2011, we examined the incidence of hearing impairment in infants suffering from hypernatremia dehydration (serum sodium >150 mEq/L in comparison with infants with normal sodium level (serum sodium ≤150 mEq/L.   Results: Three of 110 cases examined in the study group showed a transient hearing impairment. A mean serum sodium level of 173mg/dl was reported among hearing-impaired infants.   Conclusion:  Transient hearing impairment was higher in infants with hypernatremia; although this difference was not significant (P>0.05. Hearing impairment was observed in cases of severe hypernatremia.  

  15. Sudden Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Sudden Deafness On this page: What is sudden deafness? What ... find additional information about SSHL? What is sudden deafness? Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL), commonly known as ...

  16. Choice of surrogate tissue influences neonatal EWAS findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xinyi; Teh, Ai Ling; Chen, Li; Lim, Ives Yubin; Tan, Pei Fang; MacIsaac, Julia L; Morin, Alexander M; Yap, Fabian; Tan, Kok Hian; Saw, Seang Mei; Lee, Yung Seng; Holbrook, Joanna D; Godfrey, Keith M; Meaney, Michael J; Kobor, Michael S; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Karnani, Neerja

    2017-12-05

    Epigenomes are tissue specific and thus the choice of surrogate tissue can play a critical role in interpreting neonatal epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) and in their extrapolation to target tissue. To develop a better understanding of the link between tissue specificity and neonatal EWAS, and the contributions of genotype and prenatal factors, we compared genome-wide DNA methylation of cord tissue and cord blood, two of the most accessible surrogate tissues at birth. In 295 neonates, DNA methylation was profiled using Infinium HumanMethylation450 beadchip arrays. Sites of inter-individual variability in DNA methylation were mapped and compared across the two surrogate tissues at birth, i.e., cord tissue and cord blood. To ascertain the similarity to target tissues, DNA methylation profiles of surrogate tissues were compared to 25 primary tissues/cell types mapped under the Epigenome Roadmap project. Tissue-specific influences of genotype on the variable CpGs were also analyzed. Finally, to interrogate the impact of the in utero environment, EWAS on 45 prenatal factors were performed and compared across the surrogate tissues. Neonatal EWAS results were tissue specific. In comparison to cord blood, cord tissue showed higher inter-individual variability in the epigenome, with a lower proportion of CpGs influenced by genotype. Both neonatal tissues were good surrogates for target tissues of mesodermal origin. They also showed distinct phenotypic associations, with effect sizes of the overlapping CpGs being in the same order of magnitude. The inter-relationship between genetics, prenatal factors and epigenetics is tissue specific, and requires careful consideration in designing and interpreting future neonatal EWAS. This birth cohort is a prospective observational study, designed to study the developmental origins of health and disease, and was retrospectively registered on 1 July 2010 under the identifier NCT01174875 .

  17. Factors Influencing Parental Participation in Neonatal Pain Alleviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomaa, Anna-Kaija; Korhonen, Anne; Pölkki, Tarja

    2016-01-01

    Neonates are likely to experience numerous painful procedures in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Parents have expressed a wish to be more involved in their infants' pain alleviation. The purpose of this study was to describe parents' perceptions concerning the factors that influence parental participation in pain alleviation in an NICU. The qualitative study was conducted in level II and III NICUs (7 units) of Finland's four university hospitals. Data were collected through open-ended questionnaires and analyzed using inductive content analysis. Factors that promoted parental participation consisted of five main categories: parental counseling by staff, parents' awareness of their own role, parents' motivation to participate in pain relief, family-friendly facilities and good communication. Factors hindering parental participation consisted of eight categories, including restrictive environment, lack of knowledge, everyday life requirements, underestimation of parents, the nature of the medical procedures, procedure- and pain-related emotions, deteriorated health status of the child and mother and (8) uncertainty of parenting. This study revealed a number of factors that are important to take into account when improving parental involvement in neonatal pain alleviation. Especially, parental participation can be promoted by providing sufficient counseling based on the parents' needs and creating facilities that support parents' participation. Parents should be engaged as partners in caregiving and decision making, and they should be given space to assume the role of parents during their child's hospitalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Influence of Personal Characteristics on Rumor Knowledge and Transmission among the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Eighty deaf college students listed the current rumors they knew and number of people to whom they typically transmit rumors. These two variables were then related to anxiety level, extraversion, gender, preferred mode of communication, and type of high school attended. More anxious students knew more rumors than did less anxious deaf students.…

  19. The influence of cochlear implants on behaviour problems in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Romero, Ma Salud

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to analyse the relationship between behaviour problems in deaf children and their auditory and communication development subsequent to cochlear implantation and to examine the incidence of these problems in comparison to their hearing peers. This study uses an ex post facto prospective design with a sample of 208 Spanish children, of whom 104 were deaf subjects with cochlear implants. The first objective assesses the relationships between behaviour problems, auditory integration, and social and communication skills in the group of deaf children. The second compares the frequency and intensity of behaviour problems of the group of deaf children with their hearing peers. The correlation analysis showed a significant association between the internal index of behaviour problems and auditory integration and communication skills, such that deaf children with greater auditory and communication development had no behaviour problems. When comparing behaviour problems in deaf children versus their hearing peers, behavioural disturbances are significantly more frequent in the former. According to these findings, cochlear implants may not guarantee adequate auditory and communicative development that would normalise the behaviour of deaf children.

  20. Children, Deaf, of Deaf Parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, A.E.; van den Bogaerde, B.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children with Deaf parents usually grow up in the Deaf community, that is if their parents offer them a sign language and are active members of the community. These Deaf children are similar to other children of linguistic and cultural minorities in many ways. They are also different in that

  1. Deaf Epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C.; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf…

  2. American Sign Language Syntax and Analogical Reasoning Skills Are Influenced by Early Acquisition and Age of Entry to Signing Schools for the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henner, Jon; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L; Novogrodsky, Rama; Hoffmeister, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Failing to acquire language in early childhood because of language deprivation is a rare and exceptional event, except in one population. Deaf children who grow up without access to indirect language through listening, speech-reading, or sign language experience language deprivation. Studies of Deaf adults have revealed that late acquisition of sign language is associated with lasting deficits. However, much remains unknown about language deprivation in Deaf children, allowing myths and misunderstandings regarding sign language to flourish. To fill this gap, we examined signing ability in a large naturalistic sample of Deaf children attending schools for the Deaf where American Sign Language (ASL) is used by peers and teachers. Ability in ASL was measured using a syntactic judgment test and language-based analogical reasoning test, which are two sub-tests of the ASL Assessment Inventory. The influence of two age-related variables were examined: whether or not ASL was acquired from birth in the home from one or more Deaf parents, and the age of entry to the school for the Deaf. Note that for non-native signers, this latter variable is often the age of first systematic exposure to ASL. Both of these types of age-dependent language experiences influenced subsequent signing ability. Scores on the two tasks declined with increasing age of school entry. The influence of age of starting school was not linear. Test scores were generally lower for Deaf children who entered the school of assessment after the age of 12. The positive influence of signing from birth was found for students at all ages tested (7;6-18;5 years old) and for children of all age-of-entry groupings. Our results reflect a continuum of outcomes which show that experience with language is a continuous variable that is sensitive to maturational age.

  3. American Sign Language Syntax and Analogical Reasoning Skills Are Influenced by Early Acquisition and Age of Entry to Signing Schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henner, Jon; Caldwell-Harris, Catherine L.; Novogrodsky, Rama; Hoffmeister, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Failing to acquire language in early childhood because of language deprivation is a rare and exceptional event, except in one population. Deaf children who grow up without access to indirect language through listening, speech-reading, or sign language experience language deprivation. Studies of Deaf adults have revealed that late acquisition of sign language is associated with lasting deficits. However, much remains unknown about language deprivation in Deaf children, allowing myths and misunderstandings regarding sign language to flourish. To fill this gap, we examined signing ability in a large naturalistic sample of Deaf children attending schools for the Deaf where American Sign Language (ASL) is used by peers and teachers. Ability in ASL was measured using a syntactic judgment test and language-based analogical reasoning test, which are two sub-tests of the ASL Assessment Inventory. The influence of two age-related variables were examined: whether or not ASL was acquired from birth in the home from one or more Deaf parents, and the age of entry to the school for the Deaf. Note that for non-native signers, this latter variable is often the age of first systematic exposure to ASL. Both of these types of age-dependent language experiences influenced subsequent signing ability. Scores on the two tasks declined with increasing age of school entry. The influence of age of starting school was not linear. Test scores were generally lower for Deaf children who entered the school of assessment after the age of 12. The positive influence of signing from birth was found for students at all ages tested (7;6–18;5 years old) and for children of all age-of-entry groupings. Our results reflect a continuum of outcomes which show that experience with language is a continuous variable that is sensitive to maturational age. PMID:28082932

  4. Sensorineural deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve deafness; Hearing loss - sensorineural; Acquired hearing loss; SNHL; Noise-induced hearing loss; NIHL; Presbycusis ... that carries the signals to the brain. Sensorineural deafness that is present at birth (congenital) is most ...

  5. Visual Processing Recruits the Auditory Cortices in Prelingually Deaf Children and Influences Cochlear Implant Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Maojin; Chen, Yuebo; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Junpeng; Liu, Jiahao; Zhang, Xueyuan; Cai, Yuexin; Chen, Suijun; Li, Xianghui; Chen, Ling; Zheng, Yiqing

    2017-09-01

    Although visual processing recruitment of the auditory cortices has been reported previously in prelingually deaf children who have a rapidly developing brain and no auditory processing, the visual processing recruitment of auditory cortices might be different in processing different visual stimuli and may affect cochlear implant (CI) outcomes. Ten prelingually deaf children, 4 to 6 years old, were recruited for the study. Twenty prelingually deaf subjects, 4 to 6 years old with CIs for 1 year, were also recruited; 10 with well-performing CIs, 10 with poorly performing CIs. Ten age and sex-matched normal-hearing children were recruited as controls. Visual ("sound" photo [photograph with imaginative sound] and "nonsound" photo [photograph without imaginative sound]) evoked potentials were measured in all subjects. P1 at Oz and N1 at the bilateral temporal-frontal areas (FC3 and FC4) were compared. N1 amplitudes were strongest in the deaf children, followed by those with poorly performing CIs, controls and those with well-performing CIs. There was no significant difference between controls and those with well-performing CIs. "Sound" photo stimuli evoked a stronger N1 than "nonsound" photo stimuli. Further analysis showed that only at FC4 in deaf subjects and those with poorly performing CIs were the N1 responses to "sound" photo stimuli stronger than those to "nonsound" photo stimuli. No significant difference was found for the FC3 and FC4 areas. No significant difference was found in N1 latencies and P1 amplitudes or latencies. The results indicate enhanced visual recruitment of the auditory cortices in prelingually deaf children. Additionally, the decrement in visual recruitment of auditory cortices was related to good CI outcomes.

  6. Growth restriction and gender influence cerebral oxygenation in preterm neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, Emily; Baerts, Willem; Alderliesten, Thomas; Derks, Jan; Lemmers, Petra; van Bel, Frank

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of fetal growth restriction and gender on cerebral oxygenation in preterm neonates during the first 3 days of life. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, The Netherlands. PATIENTS: 68 (41 males)

  7. Deaf epistemology: Deafhood and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Peter C; O'Hearn, Amanda; McKee, Michael; Steider, Anne; Thew, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Deaf epistemology constitutes the nature and extent of the knowledge that deaf individuals acquire growing up in a society that relies primarily on audition to navigate life. Deafness creates beings who are more visually oriented compared to their auditorily oriented peers. How hearing individuals interact with deaf individuals shapes how deaf individuals acquire knowledge and how they learn. Aspects of the Deaf episteme, not caused by deafness but by Deafhood, have a positive impact on how deaf individuals learn, resist audism, stay healthy, and navigate the world. Research on psychology, health, and education are reviewed to illustrate how visually oriented beings think and view the world differently from the majority. The article provides support to the theory of multiple epistemologies,and has implications for families, teachers, and researchers.

  8. Effects of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal response characteristics in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, James B; Shepherd, Robert K; Nayagam, David A X; Wise, Andrew K; Heffer, Leon F; Landry, Thomas G; Irvine, Dexter R F

    2014-09-01

    We have previously shown that neonatal deafness of 7-13 months duration leads to loss of cochleotopy in the primary auditory cortex (AI) that can be reversed by cochlear implant use. Here we describe the effects of a similar duration of deafness and cochlear implant use on temporal processing. Specifically, we compared the temporal resolution of neurons in AI of young adult normal-hearing cats that were acutely deafened and implanted immediately prior to recording with that in three groups of neonatally deafened cats. One group of neonatally deafened cats received no chronic stimulation. The other two groups received up to 8 months of either low- or high-rate (50 or 500 pulses per second per electrode, respectively) stimulation from a clinical cochlear implant, initiated at 10 weeks of age. Deafness of 7-13 months duration had no effect on the duration of post-onset response suppression, latency, latency jitter, or the stimulus repetition rate at which units responded maximally (best repetition rate), but resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the ability of units to respond to every stimulus in a train (maximum following rate). None of the temporal response characteristics of the low-rate group differed from those in acutely deafened controls. In contrast, high-rate stimulation had diverse effects: it resulted in decreased suppression duration, longer latency and greater jitter relative to all other groups, and an increase in best repetition rate and cut-off rate relative to acutely deafened controls. The minimal effects of moderate-duration deafness on temporal processing in the present study are in contrast to its previously-reported pronounced effects on cochleotopy. Much longer periods of deafness have been reported to result in significant changes in temporal processing, in accord with the fact that duration of deafness is a major factor influencing outcome in human cochlear implantees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The influence of language deprivation in early childhood on L2 processing: An ERP comparison of deaf native signers and deaf signers with a delayed language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotara, Nils; Salden, Uta; Kügow, Monique; Hänel-Faulhaber, Barbara; Röder, Brigitte

    2012-05-03

    To examine which language function depends on early experience, the present study compared deaf native signers, deaf non-native signers and hearing German native speakers while processing German sentences. The participants watched simple written sentences while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. At the end of each sentence they were asked to judge whether the sentence was correct or not. Two types of violations were introduced in the middle of the sentence: a semantically implausible noun or a violation of subject-verb number agreement. The results showed a similar ERP pattern after semantic violations (an N400 followed by a positivity) in all three groups. After syntactic violations, native German speakers and native signers of German sign language (DGS) with German as second language (L2) showed a left anterior negativity (LAN) followed by a P600, whereas no LAN but a negativity over the right hemisphere instead was found in deaf participants with a delayed onset of first language (L1) acquisition. The P600 of this group had a smaller amplitude and a different scalp distribution as compared to German native speakers. The results of the present study suggest that language deprivation in early childhood alters the cerebral organization of syntactic language processing mechanisms for L2. Semantic language processing instead was unaffected.

  10. The influence of language deprivation in early childhood on L2 processing: An ERP comparison of deaf native signers and deaf signers with a delayed language acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skotara Nils

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine which language function depends on early experience, the present study compared deaf native signers, deaf non-native signers and hearing German native speakers while processing German sentences. The participants watched simple written sentences while event-related potentials (ERPs were recorded. At the end of each sentence they were asked to judge whether the sentence was correct or not. Two types of violations were introduced in the middle of the sentence: a semantically implausible noun or a violation of subject-verb number agreement. Results The results showed a similar ERP pattern after semantic violations (an N400 followed by a positivity in all three groups. After syntactic violations, native German speakers and native signers of German sign language (DGS with German as second language (L2 showed a left anterior negativity (LAN followed by a P600, whereas no LAN but a negativity over the right hemisphere instead was found in deaf participants with a delayed onset of first language (L1 acquisition. The P600 of this group had a smaller amplitude and a different scalp distribution as compared to German native speakers. Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that language deprivation in early childhood alters the cerebral organization of syntactic language processing mechanisms for L2. Semantic language processing instead was unaffected.

  11. Influence of habitat and intrinsic characteristics on survival of neonatal pronghorn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Christopher N.; Jenks, Jonathan A.; Grovenburg, Troy W.; Klaver, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Increased understanding of the influence of habitat (e.g., composition, patch size) and intrinsic (e.g., age, birth mass) factors on survival of neonatal pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) is a prerequisite to successful management programs, particularly as they relate to population dynamics and the role of population models in adaptive species management. Nevertheless, few studies have presented empirical data quantifying the influence of habitat variables on survival of neonatal pronghorn. During 2002–2005, we captured and radiocollared 116 neonates across two sites in western South Dakota. We documented 31 deaths during our study, of which coyote (Canis latrans) predation (n = 15) was the leading cause of mortality. We used known fate analysis in Program MARK to investigate the influence of intrinsic and habitat variables on neonatal survival. We generated a priori models that we grouped into habitat and intrinsic effects. The highest-ranking model indicated that neonate mortality was best explained by site, percent grassland, and open water habitat; 90-day survival (0.80; 90% CI = 0.71–0.88) declined 23% when grassland and water increased from 80.1 to 92.3% and 0.36 to 0.40%, respectively, across 50% natal home ranges. Further, our results indicated that grassland patch size and shrub density were important predictors of neonate survival; neonate survival declined 17% when shrub density declined from 5.0 to 2.5 patches per 100 ha. Excluding the site covariates, intrinsic factors (i.e., sex, age, birth mass, year, parturition date) were not important predictors of survival of neonatal pronghorns. Further, neonatal survival may depend on available land cover and interspersion of habitats. We have demonstrated that maintaining minimum and maximum thresholds for habitat factors (e.g., percentages of grassland and open water patches, density of shrub patches) throughout natal home ranges will in turn, ensure relatively high (>0.50) neonatal survival rates

  12. Influence of Habitat and Intrinsic Characteristics on Survival of Neonatal Pronghorn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N Jacques

    Full Text Available Increased understanding of the influence of habitat (e.g., composition, patch size and intrinsic (e.g., age, birth mass factors on survival of neonatal pronghorn (Antilocapra americana is a prerequisite to successful management programs, particularly as they relate to population dynamics and the role of population models in adaptive species management. Nevertheless, few studies have presented empirical data quantifying the influence of habitat variables on survival of neonatal pronghorn. During 2002-2005, we captured and radiocollared 116 neonates across two sites in western South Dakota. We documented 31 deaths during our study, of which coyote (Canis latrans predation (n = 15 was the leading cause of mortality. We used known fate analysis in Program MARK to investigate the influence of intrinsic and habitat variables on neonatal survival. We generated a priori models that we grouped into habitat and intrinsic effects. The highest-ranking model indicated that neonate mortality was best explained by site, percent grassland, and open water habitat; 90-day survival (0.80; 90% CI = 0.71-0.88 declined 23% when grassland and water increased from 80.1 to 92.3% and 0.36 to 0.40%, respectively, across 50% natal home ranges. Further, our results indicated that grassland patch size and shrub density were important predictors of neonate survival; neonate survival declined 17% when shrub density declined from 5.0 to 2.5 patches per 100 ha. Excluding the site covariates, intrinsic factors (i.e., sex, age, birth mass, year, parturition date were not important predictors of survival of neonatal pronghorns. Further, neonatal survival may depend on available land cover and interspersion of habitats. We have demonstrated that maintaining minimum and maximum thresholds for habitat factors (e.g., percentages of grassland and open water patches, density of shrub patches throughout natal home ranges will in turn, ensure relatively high (>0.50 neonatal survival rates

  13. [Therapeutic values of dance movement and its influence on psychomotor development of deaf persons as a form of socialization and integration with the environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Zofia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the work was to show to what extent esthetic education, mainly dance, influences the level of socialization of deaf persons, and how important the integration of the examined with the outside world is. The effectiveness of the Dance Theatre "Pinokio" of the J. Korczak Special Training and Educational Center in Przemyśl was verified by diagnostic soundings. Source material was also used in the study (chronicles, press articles, interviews with instructors of the ensemble). Young deaf people participated in dance practices with pleasure. The motivation of the young deaf people to enter the dance group was of mature character. They take part in dance activities because of their love to dance (70%), instructor's engagement (20%), and the health aspect (10%). The therapy effectiveness depended on how long they participated in the dance group. Deaf people who dance for a longer time (3 years 70%, 1 year 20%, 2 years 10%) had a more mature outlook on life, better school grades (80%), and started conversation with other people more easily (instructor's opinion). The self-consciousness of participants after practice manifested itself by relaxation (50%), joy (30%), and resolution in taking decisions (15%). Only 5% of the examined felt tired and fed-up. Polish choreo-therapeutists trust mainly their own intuition and also use information found in articles and publications, which, however, are not easily accessed. The scarcity of qualified therapeutic dancing instructors limits application of choreo-therapy on a wider scale.

  14. Do biological and bedsite characteristics influence survival of neonatal white-tailed deer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Colter Chitwood

    Full Text Available Coyotes recently expanded into the eastern U.S. and potentially have caused localized white-tailed deer population declines. Research has focused on quantifying coyote predation on neonates, but little research has addressed the potential influence of bedsite characteristics on survival. In 2011 and 2012, we radiocollared 65 neonates, monitored them intensively for 16 weeks, and assigned mortality causes. We used Program MARK to estimate survival to 16 weeks and included biological covariates (i.e., sex, sibling status [whether or not it had a sibling], birth weight, and Julian date of birth. Survival to 16 weeks was 0.141 (95% CI = 0.075-0.249 and the top model included only sibling status, which indicated survival was lower for neonates that had a sibling. Predation was the leading cause of mortality (35 of 55; 64% and coyotes were responsible for the majority of depredations (30 of 35; 86%. Additionally, we relocated neonates for the first 10 days of life and measured distance to firebreak, visual obstruction, and plant diversity at bedsites. Survival of predation to 10 days (0.726; 95% CI = 0.586-0.833 was weakly associated with plant diversity at bedsites but not related to visual obstruction. Our results indicate that neonate survival was low and coyote predation was an important source of mortality, which corroborates several recent studies from the region. Additionally, we detected only weak support for bedsite cover as a covariate to neonate survival, which indicates that mitigating effects of coyote predation on neonates may be more complicated than simply managing for increased hiding cover.

  15. [Assessment of hydration on the stratum corneum and the influencing factors in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngmee; Shin, Eunjin

    2007-08-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the skin hydration level in various body sites and identify the influencing factors in neonates. An exploratory comparison study was designed to measure the stratum corneum hydration, using a National DM-R2 on the forehead, abdomen, buttocks, and the back of the hands and feet of 198 neonates including 92 premature infants. The results showed 32.7%-36.5% of stratum corneum hydration for all sites. Premature infants revealed a higher hydration level on the peripheral sites (dorsal hand and feet) than those of the full-term infants, possibly resulting from therapeutic regimens including an incubator or radiant warmer. Infants in an incubator showed a higher hydration level than those in radiant warmers, suggesting more attention to fluid management for infants in the open environment. In addition, all stratum corneum hydration measurements except one, from the forehead, showed a positive correlation with postnatal age in full-term infants while showing no relation to any measurements in premature infants. The study demonstrated the very low skin hydration levels in hospitalized neonates, particularly in premature neonates with more susceptible skin hydration instability despite therapeutic interventions for fluid balance. More vigilant fluid management is imperative in neonates, particularly those in the open environment.

  16. Deaf Epistemology: The Deaf Way of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    The standard epistemology requires the use of hard science to gain knowledge and discover the truth. In contrast, Deaf epistemology relies heavily on personal testimonies, personal experiences, and personal accounts to document knowledge. In recent years, a number of deaf schools have adopted deaf-centric policies shaped by Deaf epistemology in an…

  17. Neonatal BCG vaccination influences cytokine responses to Toll-like receptor ligands and heterologous antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyne, B; Donath, S; Germano, S; Gardiner, K; Casalaz, D; Robins-Browne, R M; Amenyogbe, N; Messina, N L; Netea, M G; Flanagan, K L; Kollmann, T; Curtis, N

    2018-02-03

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination is associated with a reduction in all-cause infant mortality in high-mortality settings. The underlying mechanisms remain uncertain but long-term modulation of the innate immune response (trained immunity) may be involved. Whole blood, collected 7 days post randomisation from 212 neonates enrolled in a randomised trial of neonatal BCG vaccination, was stimulated with killed pathogens and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands to interrogate cytokine responses. BCG-vaccinated infants had increased production of IL-6 in unstimulated samples and decreased production of IL-1ra, IL-6, and IL-10 and the chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1 following stimulation with peptidoglycan (TLR2) and R848 (TLR7/8). BCG-vaccinated infants also had decreased MCP-1 responses following stimulation with heterologous pathogens. Sex and maternal BCG vaccination status interacted with neonatal BCG vaccination. Neonatal BCG vaccination influences cytokine responses to TLR ligands and heterologous pathogens. This effect is characterised by decreased anti-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses in the context of higher levels of IL-6 in unstimulated samples. This supports the hypothesis that BCG vaccination modulates the innate immune system. Further research is warranted to determine if there is an association between these findings and the beneficial non-specific (heterologous) effects of BCG vaccine on all-cause mortality.

  18. Neural Activity During Mental Rotation in Deaf Signers: The Influence of Long-Term Sign Language Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Wu, Qiu-Lin; Zhang, Jiong; Yin, Jing-Jing; Ma, Shu-Hua

    2018-01-02

    Mental rotation is the brain's visuospatial understanding of what objects are and where they belong. Previous research indicated that deaf signers showed behavioral enhancement for nonlinguistic visual tasks, including mental rotation. In this study, we investigated the neural difference of mental rotation processing between deaf signers and hearing nonsigners using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The participants performed a block-designed experiment, consisting of alternating blocks of comparison and rotation periods, separated by a baseline or fixation period. Mental rotation tasks were performed using three-dimensional figures. fMRI images were acquired during the entire experiment, and the fMRI data were analyzed with Analysis of Functional NeuroImages. A factorial design analysis of variance was designed for fMRI analyses. The differences of activation were analyzed for the main effects of group and task, as well as for the interaction of group by task. The study showed differences in activated areas between deaf signers and hearing nonsigners on the mental rotation of three-dimensional figures. Subtracting activations of fixation from activations of rotation, both groups showed consistent activation in bilateral occipital lobe, bilateral parietal lobe, and bilateral posterior temporal lobe. There were different main effects of task (rotation versus comparison) with significant activation clusters in the bilateral precuneus, the right middle frontal gyrus, the bilateral medial frontal gyrus, the right interior frontal gyrus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the right anterior cingulate, and the bilateral posterior cingulate. There were significant interaction effects of group by task in the bilateral anterior cingulate, the right inferior frontal gyrus, the left superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the left middle temporal gyrus, and the right inferior parietal lobe. In simple effects of deaf

  19. Deaf epistemology: the deaf way of knowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Thomas K

    2010-01-01

    The standard epistemology requires the use of hard science to gain knowledge and discover the truth. In contrast, Deaf epistemology relies heavily on personal testimonies, personal experiences, and personal accounts to document knowledge. In recent years, a number of deaf schools have adopted deaf-centric policies shaped by Deaf epistemology in an effort to improve academic performance of deaf students. Because of federal laws, all schools are now expected to show accountability in the performance of their students, with data becoming increasingly available for public scrutiny. The preliminary data from three well-known deaf schools are beginning to show that the effectiveness of deaf-centric approaches can be substantiated by the standard epistemology. For this reason, Deaf epistemology and the standard epistemology should not always be viewed as having an oxymoronic relationship.

  20. Potential NICU Environmental Influences on the Neonate's Microbiome: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Lacey E; Bradshaw, Wanda; Brandon, Debra H

    2015-10-01

    To identify how the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) environment potentially influences the microbiome high-risk term and preterm infants. Electronic databases utilized to identify studies published in English included PubMed, Google Scholar, Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and BioMedSearcher. Date of publication did not limit inclusion in the review. Two hundred fifty articles were assessed for relevance to the research question through title and abstract review. Further screening resulted in full review of 60 articles. An in-depth review of all 60 articles resulted in 39 articles that met inclusion criteria. Twenty-eight articles were eliminated on the basis of the type of study and subject of interest. Studies were reviewed for information related to environmental factors that influence microbial colonization of the neonatal microbiome. Environment was later defined as the physical environment of the NICU and nursery caregiving activities. Studies were characterized into factors that impacted the infant's microbiome—parental skin, feeding type, environmental surfaces and caregiving equipment, health care provider skin, and antibiotic use. Literature revealed that various aspects of living within the NICU environment do influence the microbiome of infants. Caregivers can implement strategies to prevent environment-associated nosocomial infection in the NICU such as implementing infection control measures, encouraging use of breast milk, and decreasing the empirical use of antibiotics.

  1. American Sign Language and Academic English: Factors Influencing the Reading of Bilingual Secondary School Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Hoffmeister, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    For many years, researchers have sought to understand the reading development of deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) students. Guided by prior research on DHH and hearing students, in this study we investigate the hypothesis that for secondary school DHH students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL)/English bilingual schools for the deaf, academic English proficiency would be a significant predictor of reading comprehension alongside ASL proficiency. Using linear regression, we found statistically significant interaction effects between academic English knowledge and word reading fluency in predicting the reading comprehension scores of the participants. However, ASL remained the strongest and most consistent predictor of reading comprehension within the sample. Findings support a model in which socio-demographic factors, ASL proficiency, and word reading fluency are primary predictors of reading comprehension for secondary DHH students. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@.com.

  2. The influence of the type of embryo culture medium on neonatal birthweight after single embryo transfer in IVF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouw, C.G.; Kostelijk, E.H.; Doejaaren, E.; Hompes, P.G.A.; Lambalk, C.B.; Schats, R.

    2012-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does the type of medium used to culture fresh and frozenthawed embryos influence neonatal birthweight after single embryo transfer (SET) in IVF? SUMMARY ANSWER A comparison of two commercially available culture media showed no significant influence on mean birthweight and mean

  3. Beethoven's deafness, the defiance of a genius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ludwig van Beethoven, one of the greatest composers in History, was tormented for his whole life by a progressive deafness without definitive diagnosis. Many authors published studies about the etiologic possibilities of the deafness of the music genius with different explanations about his auditory loss. In this work, the author discusses the implications of Beethoven's progressive deafness to the creation of his word, as well as etiologic assumptions of his disease. Would Beethoven have had the same ingeniousness he showed in his symphonies if he did not have hypacusis and tinnitus? What is the influence of his deafness on his work and life? Could he have had a more precise diagnosis and specially a treatment nowadays? Would we have the brilliant composer if he had deafness today? We surely could not have!

  4. Deafness and motor abilities level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zwierzchowska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The audition injury hinders some motor motions and the organised coordination at the higher level and may be a cause of disturbances and disorder in some motor abilities adoption. It was assumed that deafness including its aetiology and injury mechanism may significantly influence the motor development of human being. The study aimed in checking if the deafness, as a result of various unfavourable factors, determines the motor development of children and youngsters. Consequently the dependency between qualitative features i.e.: signed motor level and aetiology, audition injury mechanism and the deafness degree was examined. The mechanism and aetiology of hearing correlated with the motor abilities displayed statistically significant dependencies in few motor trials only. Revealed correlations regarded mostly the coordination trials excluding the flexibility one. Statistically significant dependencies between the audition diminution and the motor abilities level were not found.

  5. Marital Quality in Deaf-Deaf and Deaf-Hearing Marriages

    OpenAIRE

    Mosier, Anthony G.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess similarities and differences in marital adjustment between Deaf-Deaf and Deaf-hearing married couples. In examining marital adjustment, Spanier's Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale (RDAS) was translated from English to American Sign Language (ASL) and administered to 30 Deaf-Deaf and 22 Deaf-hearing couple respondents. Although there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Deaf-Deaf couples tended to have higher marital adj...

  6. Culture media influenced laboratory outcomes but not neonatal birth weight in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tai-lang; Zhang, Yi; Li, Sai-jiao; Zhao, Meng; Ding, Jin-li; Xu, Wang-ming; Yang, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Whether the type of culture media utilized in assisted reproductive technology has impacts on laboratory outcomes and birth weight of newborns in in-vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) was investigated. A total of 673 patients undergoing IVF/ICSI and giving birth to live singletons after fresh embryo transfer on day 3 from Jan. 1, 2010 to Dec. 31, 2012 were included. Three types of culture media were used during this period: Quinn's Advantage (QA), Single Step Medium (SSM), and Continuous Single Culture medium (CSC). Fertilization rate (FR), normal fertilization rate (NFR), cleavage rate (CR), normal cleavage rate (NCR), good-quality embryo rate (GQER) and neonatal birth weight were compared using one-way ANOVA and χ (2) tests. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of culture media on laboratory outcomes and birth weight. In IVF cycles, GQER was significantly decreased in SSM medium group as compared with QA or CSC media groups (63.6% vs. 69.0% in QA; vs. 71.3% in CSC, P=0.011). In ICSI cycles, FR, NFR and CR were significantly lower in CSC medium group than in other two media groups. No significant difference was observed in neonatal birthweight among the three groups (P=0.759). Multiple linear regression analyses confirmed that the type of culture medium was correlated with FR, NFR, CR and GQER, but not with neonatal birth weight. The type of culture media had potential influences on laboratory outcomes but did not exhibit an impact on the birth weight of singletons in ART.

  7. The influence of zinc sulfate on neonatal jaundice: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wu, De; Wang, Baotian; Bu, Xiaosong; Tang, Jiulai

    2018-05-01

    Zinc sulfate may be a promising approach to treat neonatal jaundice. However, the results remain controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of zinc sulfate on hyperbilirubinemia among neonates. PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, Cochrane library databases, Ovid, BMJ database, and CINAHL were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of zinc sulfate versus placebo on the prevention of jaundice in neonates were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. The primary outcomes were total serum bilirubin (TSB) on three days and seven days, the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia. Meta-analysis was performed using random- or fixed-effect models. Five RCTs involving 645 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with placebo, zinc sulfate supplementation failed to significantly reduce TSB on three days (mean difference (MD) = 0.09 mg/dL; 95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.49 to 0.67; p = .77), TSB on seven days (MD = -0.37 mg/dL; 95% CI = -98 to 0.25; p = .25) as well as the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 0.74 to 1.76; p = .56). Zinc sulfate showed no influence on phototherapy requirement (OR = 0.90; 95% CI = 0.41 to 1.98; p = .79), but resulted in significantly decreased duration of phototherapy (MD = -16.69 h; 95% CI = -25.09 to -8.3 h; p < .0001). Zinc sulfate could not reduce the TSB on three days and seven days, the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia and phototherapy requirement, but lead to significantly decreased duration of phototherapy.

  8. Influence of Neonatal Hypothyroidism on Hepatic Gene Expression and Lipid Metabolism in Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocos, Carlos; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A.; Kahlon, Nusrat; Herrera, Emilio; Norstedt, Gunnar; Parini, Paolo; Flores-Morales, Amilcar; Fernández-Pérez, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development in mammals. Congenital-neonatal hypothyroidism (CH) has a profound impact on physiology, but its specific influence in liver is less understood. Here, we studied how CH influences the liver gene expression program in adulthood. Pregnant rats were given the antithyroid drug methimazole (MMI) from GD12 until PND30 to induce CH in male offspring. Growth defects due to CH were evident as reductions in body weight and tail length from the second week of life. Once the MMI treatment was discontinued, the feed efficiency increased in CH, and this was accompanied by significant catch-up growth. On PND80, significant reductions in body mass, tail length, and circulating IGF-I levels remained in CH rats. Conversely, the mRNA levels of known GH target genes were significantly upregulated. The serum levels of thyroid hormones, cholesterol, and triglycerides showed no significant differences. In contrast, CH rats showed significant changes in the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, including an increased transcription of PPARα and a reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, cellular sterol efflux, triglyceride assembly, bile acid synthesis, and lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a decrease of intrahepatic lipids. Finally, CH rats responded to the onset of hypothyroidism in adulthood with a reduction of serum fatty acids and hepatic cholesteryl esters and to T3 replacement with an enhanced activation of malic enzyme. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that neonatal hypothyroidism influences the hepatic transcriptional program and tissue sensitivity to hormone treatment in adulthood. This highlights the critical role that a euthyroid state during development plays on normal liver physiology in adulthood. PMID:22666351

  9. Influence of neonatal hypothyroidism on hepatic gene expression and lipid metabolism in adulthood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruymán Santana-Farré

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones are required for normal growth and development in mammals. Congenital-neonatal hypothyroidism (CH has a profound impact on physiology, but its specific influence in liver is less understood. Here, we studied how CH influences the liver gene expression program in adulthood. Pregnant rats were given the antithyroid drug methimazole (MMI from GD12 until PND30 to induce CH in male offspring. Growth defects due to CH were evident as reductions in body weight and tail length from the second week of life. Once the MMI treatment was discontinued, the feed efficiency increased in CH, and this was accompanied by significant catch-up growth. On PND80, significant reductions in body mass, tail length, and circulating IGF-I levels remained in CH rats. Conversely, the mRNA levels of known GH target genes were significantly upregulated. The serum levels of thyroid hormones, cholesterol, and triglycerides showed no significant differences. In contrast, CH rats showed significant changes in the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, including an increased transcription of PPARα and a reduced expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol uptake, cellular sterol efflux, triglyceride assembly, bile acid synthesis, and lipogenesis. These changes were associated with a decrease of intrahepatic lipids. Finally, CH rats responded to the onset of hypothyroidism in adulthood with a reduction of serum fatty acids and hepatic cholesteryl esters and to T3 replacement with an enhanced activation of malic enzyme. In summary, we provide in vivo evidence that neonatal hypothyroidism influences the hepatic transcriptional program and tissue sensitivity to hormone treatment in adulthood. This highlights the critical role that a euthyroid state during development plays on normal liver physiology in adulthood.

  10. [The influence of patient-controlled epidural analgesia on labor progress and neonatal outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepka, Rafał; Zukowski, Maciej; Michalczyk, Michał; Nikodemski, Tomasz; Torbé, Andrzej; Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Mikołajek-Bedner, Wioletta; Czajka, Ryszard

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to check the influence of patient control epidural analgesia on labor progress and neonatal outcome. 144 parturients were included into the clinical trial. In 73 cases patient control epidural analgesia was used and in 71 cases pethidine (meperidine) solution was given intravenously. Apgar score, umbilical artery pH, pain intensity the time of the first, second and third stage of labor the rate of episiotomy and uterine postpartum abrasions and the rate of caesarean sections and vaginal operative delivery were compared. The time of the second stage of labor was significantly longer in the study group (40.99 vs 26.49 min, p- neonatal outcome was comparable in both groups. There were no differences in the time of the first and the second stage of labor in primiparas and multiparas analyzed separately. Visual Analogue Score was lower in the study group (Ch(2)-12,48, p-0.25), especially in the subgroups of primiparas and multiparas. Patient control epidural analgesia does not affect the time of the first and second stage of labor, oxytocin augmentation of labor may be the reason of that. This method is a more effective way of relieving labor pain. An increase of operative delivery is not observed after patient control epidural analgesia on condition that low doses and concentrations of analgesic drugs are used.

  11. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... impossible, to hear. They can often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. ... certain medicines, and surgery. NIH: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

  12. Preventing disability through understanding international megatrends in Deaf bilingual education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Baell, I M; Alvarez-Dardet, C; Ruiz, M T; Ortiz, R; Esteban, M L; Ferreiro, E

    2008-02-01

    Education is a basic prerequisite for d/Deaf people's health. Deaf education varies considerably from country to country and we still know very little about the reasons for such variation. To identify international megatrends that influence the current Deaf bilingual education move (Deaf Bilingual-Bicultural education; DBiBi) worldwide. Using the Delphi technique, 41 experts in d/Deaf education (nine Deaf, 32 hearing) from 18 countries identified, ranked, and rated international megatrends in DBiBi education. The process revealed six main essential elements of the international implementation of DBiBi education and nine main barriers against it. The top five promoting forces in that list in order of priority were: (1) societal and political changes towards a growing acceptance of diversity and Deaf issues; (2) growing Deaf activism, self-awareness and empowerment; (3) scientific research in sign linguistics and bilingualism; (4) changes in the d/Deaf educational community; and (5) international cooperation. The top five hindering forces included: (1) the view of deafness as a medical condition with a technological solution; (2) phonocentrism and societal resistance to the unknown; (3) educational and d/Deaf educational policies; (4) DBiBi education weaknesses; and (5) invisibility, heterogeneity and underperformance of the d/Deaf population. The results of this study reveal that social/political changes and a medical/social model of Deaf people's health can promote or limit Deaf people's educational options much more than changes within the education system itself, and that a transnational perspective is needed in deciding how best to support DBiBi education at a national and local level in an increasingly globalised world.

  13. Central auditory function of deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaredt, Marc A; Ebbers, Lena; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-06-01

    The highly variable benefit of hearing devices is a serious challenge in auditory rehabilitation. Various factors contribute to this phenomenon such as the diversity in ear defects, the different extent of auditory nerve hypoplasia, the age of intervention, and cognitive abilities. Recent analyses indicate that, in addition, central auditory functions of deafness genes have to be considered in this context. Since reduced neuronal activity acts as the common denominator in deafness, it is widely assumed that peripheral deafness influences development and function of the central auditory system in a stereotypical manner. However, functional characterization of transgenic mice with mutated deafness genes demonstrated gene-specific abnormalities in the central auditory system as well. A frequent function of deafness genes in the central auditory system is supported by a genome-wide expression study that revealed significant enrichment of these genes in the transcriptome of the auditory brainstem compared to the entire brain. Here, we will summarize current knowledge of the diverse central auditory functions of deafness genes. We furthermore propose the intimately interwoven gene regulatory networks governing development of the otic placode and the hindbrain as a mechanistic explanation for the widespread expression of these genes beyond the cochlea. We conclude that better knowledge of central auditory dysfunction caused by genetic alterations in deafness genes is required. In combination with improved genetic diagnostics becoming currently available through novel sequencing technologies, this information will likely contribute to better outcome prediction of hearing devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Parental influence on clinical management during neonatal intensive care: a survey of US neonatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean M; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D; Mally, Pradeep

    2013-08-01

    Family-centered care (FCC), which includes involving parents in conversations about medical management, is increasingly employed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Our aim was to determine which care decisions are discussed by neonatologists with families most frequently and the percentage of clinicians influenced by such conversations. Anonymous web-based survey provided to 2137 neonatologists assessing information sharing and parental involvement. Thousand and two neonatologists responded in which 893 fully completed the surveys. 88% practice FCC. Topics most frequently discussed with parents were blood transfusion, steroids for lung disease and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) surgery, each being reported and discussed by more than 90% of respondents. Many therapies, including aminoglycoisdes, total parenteral nutrition, and phototherapy, were discussed with parents by far fewer clinicians. Additionally, parents had most influence on clinicians in two categories, blood transfusion and steroids, with more than 70% reporting that their practice was influenced by parental opinion if communicated. For some topics, such as PDA surgery and central line placement, conversations impacted few clinicians. FCC appears to have an impact on NICU clinical decision-making processes, some more than others. Further investigation in this area may provide information on how to best communicate with families and run effective, efficient FCC rounds.

  15. Influence of mode of delivery at term on the neonatal respiratory morbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehdashtian, M.

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory morbidity is an important complication of elective cesarean section. Our objective was to find out the incidence of respiratory distress in term neonates delivered by elective cesarean section and compare it with neonates delivered vaginally. We evaluated one thousands infants delivered by elective cesarean section and normal vaginal delivery for respiratory distress. Among 500 cesarean done, 27 (5.4%) neonates had respiratory distress and among 500 vaginal delivery infants, 8(1.6%) developed respiratory Distress (P<0.001). The odd ratio for neonatal respiratory distress was 3.38, almost threefold higher in cesarean section group than those delivered vaginally. (author)

  16. THE DEAFNESS, THE DEAF AND HIS DISCURSE

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    Neuma Chaveiro

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The knowledge of LIBRAS – Brazilian Sign Language – is determining to the process of structuring the discursive formations and to the constitution of the deaf one. The present work aims to discuss the LIBRAS as an important tool of structuring the discursive of the deaf individual an as a facilitating factor in the description of his health problems. The data constitute two texts, one of them wrote by a deaf skilled in LIBRAS and the other wrote by a deaf who does not express himself in this kind of language. It was verified that the first text’s author is consistent, has mobility and moves easily through the discursive formations, but otherwise is the text belonging to the other patient. It can be stated that the Brazilian sign language – LIBRAS – is a decisive tool in the working out of the deaf discursive formations and the comprehension of his discourse by the health area professionals provide a larger understanding of the constitution of the deaf identity, a fundamental aspect for an improvement in the services offered in the health area. KEYWORDS: Deafness; Communication; Sign Language.

  17. Being a Deaf Role Model: Deaf People's Experiences of Working with Families and Deaf Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Katherine D.; Young, Alys M.

    2011-01-01

    The experiences of being a deaf role model have been little explored in the literature. This paper explores the role of the deaf role model as perceived by d/Deaf adults who carried out this role, when working with deaf young people, parents of deaf children, and professionals who work with them. The data were collected from part of the evaluation…

  18. Deafness, Teacher-of-the-Deaf Support and Self-Concept in Australian Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remine, Maria D.; Care, Esther; Grbic, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether self-concept scores of deaf students vary according to age at diagnosis of deafness, the degree of deafness and the number of visits students receive from a teacher of the deaf. Thirty-seven deaf students between the ages of 12 and 18 attending inclusive educational settings in Western Australia participated in the…

  19. Representations of deaf characters in children's picture books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B; Moses, Annie M

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters, despite increased inclusion of deaf characters in children's literature over the past two decades. The present study analyzed the portrayal of deaf characters in picture books for children ages 4-8 years. A content analysis of 20 children's picture books was conducted in which the books were analyzed for messages linked to pathological and cultural categories. Results indicated that these books did not portray Deaf characters from a cultural perspective but, rather, highlighted aspects of deafness as a medical condition, one that requires fixing and that perpetuates stereotypes of deafness as a disability.

  20. Influence of iron status on risk of maternal or neonatal infection and on neonatal mortality with an emphasis on developing countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabin, Loretta; Brabin, Bernard J.; Gies, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of neonatal death in developing countries. This review investigates whether host iron status affects the risk of maternal and/or neonatal infection, potentially contributing to neonatal death, and summarizes the iron acquisition mechanisms described for pathogens causing

  1. PERSONAL IDENTITY IN DEAF ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors influencing the identity deaf adolescents. The study involved 67 deaf adolescents (38 boys and 29 girls aged 16 to 19 students of secondary school. Ninety-three hearing children constituted a comparison group. The structure of identity was explored on the basis of identification references given by the subjects who were to reply in writing, 20 times running, to the question: „Who Am I?” the test, adapted from M. H. Kuhn and T. S. McPartland by Martines and Silvestre (1995 given in written and signed mode.Results showed that the hearing status as well as mode of communication influence the description of personal identity. It was found that deaf adoles­cents used more descriptions especially in the fol­lowing categories: Civil Status, Body and Physical Appearance, Tastes and Activities, Friendship and Relationships, Personal and Social Situation, Negative Personal Traits, and Neutral Personality Traits. Although this study could demonstrate im­pact independent variables on identity, the data raise the need for further, preferably longitudinal, research. This complex phenomenon has to be examined more closely.Combined self-descriptive processes lead to the development of an organized, learned and dynamic identity, and subjective description of an individ­ual has strong emotional consequences for the in­dividual in question.

  2. Deaf Autism: Common Instructional Practices Described by Deaf Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Felicia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to identify common instructional practices described by teachers of the deaf with students who are deaf with autism that increase both student engagement and instructional outcomes. As the diversity of students increase within deaf/hard of hearing programs, research is emerging in the area of deaf autism.…

  3. Deaf Sociality and the Deaf Lutheran Church in Adamorobe, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an ethnographic analysis of "deaf sociality" in Adamorobe, a village in Ghana, where the relatively high prevalence of hereditary deafness has led to dense social and spatial connections. Deaf people are part of their hearing environment particularly through family networks, and produce deaf sociality through many…

  4. Deafness and Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This brief overview provides information on the definition, incidence, and characteristics of children with hearing impairments and deafness. The federal definitions of hearing impairment and deafness are provided. The different types of hearing loss are noted, including: (1) conductive (caused by diseases or obstructions in the outer or middle…

  5. Environmental factors influencing biological rhythms in newborns: From neonatal intensive care units to home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Clarissa; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Photic and non-photic environmental factors are suggested to modulate the development of circadian rhythms in infants. Our aim is to evaluate the development of biological rhythms (circadian or ultradian) in newborns in transition from Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) to home and along the first 6 months of life, to identify masking and entraining environment factors along development. Ten newborns were evaluated in their last week inside the NICU and in the first week after being delivered home; 6 babies were also followed until 6 months of corrected age. Activity, recorded with actimeters, wrist temperature and observed sleep and feeding behavior were recorded continuously along their last week inside the NICU and in the first week at home and also until 6 months of corrected age for the subjects who remained in the study. Sleep/wake and activity/rest cycle showed ultradian patterns and the sleep/wake was strongly influenced by the 3 h feeding schedule inside the NICU, while wrist temperature showed a circadian pattern that seemed no to be affected by environmental cycles. A circadian rhythm emerges for sleep/wake behavior in the first week at home, whereas the 3 h period vanishes. Both activity/rest and wrist temperature presented a sudden increase in the contribution of the circadian component immediately after babies were delivered home, also suggesting a masking effect of the NICU environment. We found a positive correlation of postconceptional age and the increase in the daily component of activity and temperature along the following 6 months, while feeding behavior became arrhythmic.

  6. [Screening of common deaf genes in pregnant women and prevention of deafness at birth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minjie; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Nan; Zhong, Su; Zhao, Yangyu; Wei, Yuan

    2015-06-01

    To determine the carrier rate for common mutations causing deafness among pregnant women in order to prevent births of deaf children. For 893 pregnant women, 2 mL peripheral venous blood was taken and DNA was extracted. A deafness DNA microarray screening was applied to such samples, and DNA sequencing was applied to husbands of women with positive screening results. A total of 40 carriers were detected, with the overall mutation rate being 4.48%. Among such carriers, GJB2 235delC was the most common heterozygous mutation (18 cases) and the mutation rate was 2.02%. GJB2 299A-T heterozygous mutation was detected in 7 cases with a mutation rate of 0.78%. IVS7-2A to G heterozygous mutation was detected in 9 cases with a mutation rate of 1.02%. There were 2 cases carrying GJB3 heterozygous mutation and 2 cases of mitochondrial 12S rRNA heterozygous mutation, with a mutation rate of 0.22%. IVS7-2A>G with GJB3 538C>T double heterozygous mutation was detected in 1 case, and IVS7-2A>G with GJB2 299A-T double heterozygous mutation was detected in another case, with the mutation rate of each being 0.11%. DNA sequencing has failed to find presence of mutations in the same gene in the husbands. The results of neonatal hearing follow-up were all normal. Applications of the deaf genes screening in pregnant women may play prove to be valuable for the early detection for neonatal deafness.

  7. Heritability and complex segregation analysis of deafness in Jack Russell Terriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strain George M

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between patterns of pigmentation and deafness in the dog has a long-documented history, with reports dating back over one hundred years. Long suspected of having a genetic basis, the search for loci with a pronounced influence in the expression of hearing loss in the dog has yet to be successful. No studies in the dog to date have found a possible influence of a specific colour locus associated with deafness. The present study is intended to evaluate the heritability of deafness in the Jack Russell Terrier (JRT, characterize the mode of inheritance, and evaluate the existence of a sex, coat colour, or coat texture influence on the expression of sensorineural deafness. Results The estimation of heritability of deafness in the JRT was 0.22 when deafness was considered a binary (normal/deaf trait and 0.31 when deafness was considered a three-category (normal/unilateral/bilateral deafness. The influence of coat colour in the incidence of JRT deafness was statistically significant, indicating that dogs with more white are more likely to be deaf. The influence of sex or coat texture was not statistically significant in the incidence of JRT deafness. Complex segregation analysis revealed a model of a single locus with a large effect on the binary measure of hearing loss is not supported. Conclusion This is the first attempt, to our knowledge, to characterize a genetic component responsible for deafness in the JRT. The heritability of deafness in the JRT was found to be 0.22 and 0.31 considering deafness to be a two-category or three-category trait, respectively. There appears to be an influence of coat colour on the expression of deafness. In an attempt to characterize the mode of inheritance of deafness in the JRT, a model of a single locus with a large effect on hearing loss is not supported with this data. Further study is needed to determine if a single locus may be influencing deafness in the JRT. While the

  8. Neonatal neurosonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riccabona, Michael, E-mail: michael.riccabona@klinikum-graz.at

    2014-09-15

    Paediatric and particularly neonatal neurosonography still remains a mainstay of imaging the neonatal brain. It can be performed at the bedside without any need for sedation or specific monitoring. There are a number of neurologic conditions that significantly influence morbidity and mortality in neonates and infants related to the brain and the spinal cord; most of them can be addressed by ultrasonography (US). However, with the introduction of first CT and then MRI, neonatal neurosonography is increasingly considered just a basic first line technique that offers only orienting information and does not deliver much relevant information. This is partially caused by inferior US performance – either by restricted availability of modern equipment or by lack of specialized expertise in performing and reading neurosonographic scans. This essay tries to highlight the value and potential of US in the neonatal brain and briefly touching also on the spinal cord imaging. The common pathologies and their US appearance as well as typical indication and applications of neurosonography are listed. The review aims at encouraging paediatric radiologists to reorient there imaging algorithms and skills towards the potential of modern neurosonography, particularly in the view of efficacy, considering growing economic pressure, and the low invasiveness as well as the good availability of US that can easily be repeated any time at the bedside.

  9. Neonatal pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  10. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis: its role in prevention of deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, M K

    2014-01-01

    Deafness is a global problem. In India deafness ranges from 4 % in urban to 11 % in rural and slum areas, out of which 50 % is conductive hearing loss hence curable. Genetic transmission accounts for 50 % of the cases of congenital deafness, and of these, around 30 % are syndromic and 70 % are non-syndromic. Genetic counseling is going to make aware the parents of all appropriate treatments. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis can help to have a baby free from genetic deafness. Procedure is almost safe, harmless, non-invasive and ethically acceptable. While Amniocentesis is a non-invasive method, prenatal genetic testing through Chorionic villous sampling is invasive. The connexin 26 (CX26W 24X) mutations are the most common cause of non-syndromic hearing loss and easy to identify by polymerase chain reaction. There is always co-morbidity after cochlear implantation and the person remains handicapped while baby after PGD shall be having healthy normal life and person prone to environmental factors may be counseled and guided to prevent deafness in next generation. Public must be made aware of noise pollution, tobacco toxicity and consanguinity. The Obstetrician and Pediatrician apart from ENT surgeon should be involved to prevent antenatal or neonatal deafness.

  11. [Incidence of fetal macrosomia among single live birth neonates and influencing factors in Xi' an, 2010-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q; Bai, R H; Wang, L L; Dang, S N; Mi, B B; Yan, H

    2016-08-10

    To analyze the incidence and influencing factors on fetal macrosomia among single live birth neonates in Xi' an. A questionnaire survey was conducted among women at the childbearing age who were selected through multi stage stratified random sampling in Xi 'an during 2010-2013. All the childbearing aged women involved, were in pregnancy or having definite pregnancy outcomes. A total of 4 970 women at childbearing age and their infants were investigated. The overall incidence of fetal macrosomia weight among the single live birth neonates under study, was 9.7% during 2010-2013 (8.9% in 2010, 8.1% in 2011, 10.0% in 2012 and 10.1% in 2013, respectively). The incidence rates of fetal macrosomia appeared 10.5% in the central district and, 8.6% in the rural-urban area of Xi'an. There were statistically significant differences (Pmacrosomia. The incidence of fetal macrosomia in Xi' an was higher than the national figures. The incidence of fetal macrosomia was higher in the central district than in rural-urban area. Having male neonate, postmature birth, gestational diabetes, being multipara, drinking during pregnancy were the risk factors related to fetal macrosomia.

  12. Influence of iron on plutonium absorption by the adult and neonatal rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Ruemmler, P.S.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    To determine how iron affects plutonium absorption, adult rats were gavaged with 238 Pu nitrate (pH 2) after they had been fed an iron-deficient diet or treated with iron supplements. Neonatal rats born to dams on an iron-deficient diet were also gavaged with 238 Pu. An iron-deficient diet resulted in enhanced 238 Pu absorption both in the adults and in neonates born to iron-deficient dams. Ferric iron increased 238 Pu absorption 12-fold in adult rats; injected iron-dextran reduced that increase; gavaged ferrous iron reduced 238 Pu absorption to one-third of the control value. Rat neonates absorbed 30 to 40 times as much 238 Pu as adults; absorption was lowered in groups that received iron supplements: Iron-dextran caused a 50% reduction; ferric iron, 95%; and ferrous iron, greater than 95%. The results demonstrate an effect of the oxidation state of iron on plutonium absorption in adult rats different from that observed in suckling rats. The results suggest that the high rate of 238 Pu absorption by neonatal animals is due not only to the permeability of their intestines but also to their high demand for iron

  13. INFLUENCE OF FETOPLACENTAL INSUFFICIENCY ON THE FORMATION OF PERINATAL PATHOLOGY IN PRETERM NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Molokanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to identify features of early neonatal period in preterm infants of women with fetoplacental insufficiency (FPI. Patients and methods: we conducted a retrospective study of early neonatal period in 76 preterm infants with gestational age from 28 to 36 weeks. Of these, 31 were born by women with FPI (study group and 45 neonates from mothers without complications during pregnancy (control group. We analyzed course of pregnancy and delivery in both groups. Infant’s conditions were assessed using Apgar and Silverman Score. Neurological status, severity of respiratory and cardio-vascular failure were take into account in the first 7 days of life. Results: women with FPI had significantly higher levels of total extragenital pathology, hypertension was found only in mothers of the main group. The extent of Doppler abnormalities in most cases was light, while the most severe 3d grade was detected only in 4 women (12,9%, which had caused the birth of infants in severe asphyxia. Pathology of respiratory and central nervous system was dominated in preterm infants of both groups. Conclusions: the number of infants with serious conditions born by mothers with FPI is significantly higher than that determined by the deterioration of the utero-placental blood flow. Preterm neonates in women with FPI form a risk group of perinatal asphyxia.

  14. Inattentional deafness in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koreimann, Sabrina; Gula, Bartosz; Vitouch, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    While inattentional blindness is a modern classic in attention and perception research, analogous phenomena of inattentional deafness have been widely neglected. We here present the first investigation of inattentional deafness in and with music under controlled experimental conditions. Inattentional deafness in music is defined as the inability to consciously perceive an unexpected musical stimulus when attention is focused on a certain facet of the piece. Participants listened to a modification of the first 1'50″ of Richard Strauss' Thus Spake Zarathustra; while the control group just listened, the experimental group had to count the number of timpani beats. An e-guitar solo served as the unexpected event. In Study 1, experimental data from n = 115 participants were analyzed. Non-musicians were compared with musicians to investigate the impact of expertise. In Study 2 (n = 47), the scope of the inattentional deafness effect was investigated with a more salient unexpected stimulus. Results demonstrate an inattentional deafness effect under dynamic musical conditions. Quite unexpectedly, the effect was structurally equivalent even for musicians. Our findings clearly show that sustained inattentional deafness exists in the musical realm, in close correspondence to inattentional blindness with dynamic visual stimuli.

  15. Cochlear implantation in children with bacterial meningitic deafness: The influence of the degree of ossification and obliteration on impedance and charge of the implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durisin, Martin; Büchner, Andreas; Lesinski-Schiedat, Anke; Bartling, Sönke; Warnecke, Athanasia; Lenarz, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To determine impedance values and charge consumption following cochlear implantation post-meningitic deaf children depending on the grade of cochlear ossification and obliteration. Post-meningitic deaf (n=49) and control (n=43) children treated with cochlear implants were included in the study. Impedance and charge values were calculated for each group. The degree of ossification of the cochlea was evaluated from a high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan whereas the degree of obliteration was determined intraoperatively by the surgeon. Pneumococci were the principal pathogen responsible for bacterial meningitis, followed by meningococci. In HRCT scans, the degree of ossification was 1 and 2 in 29% of patients. The results of the intraoperative assessment of the cochlea showed obliteration grade 1 in 38% and grade 2 in 23% of cases. Children in the meningitis group showed significant higher impedances comparing to the control group. A significantly increased charge consumption was observed in patients with a grade 2 ossification when compared to those without ossification (P=0.02). Discussion Cochlea implanted children with meningitis-related deafness exhibit higher impedances, especially in the region of the basal and middle turn, however, not depending on the degree of cochlear ossification. High impedances and charge in the meningitis group may be explained by alterations in the central auditory pathway or on the electrode surface. To optimize the outcome in post-meningitic deaf children, surgery is advisable at an early stage prior to the onset of cochlear ossification.

  16. Influence of weight at enterostomy reversal on surgical outcomes in infants after emergent neonatal stoma creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Lindsay J; Sinyard, Robert D; Rialon, Kristy L; Englum, Brian R; Tracy, Elizabeth T; Rice, Henry E; Adibe, Obinna O

    2017-01-01

    Neonates after emergent enterostomy creation frequently require reversal at low weight because of complications including cholestasis, dehydration, dumping, failure to thrive, and failure to achieve enteral independence. We investigated whether stoma reversal at low weight (stoma type, reversal indication, operative details, and complications were examined. Patients were categorized by weight at reversal of less than 2kg, 2.01-2.5kg, 2.51-3.5kg, and greater than 3.5kg. Data were analyzed using univariable and multivariable regression with significance level of pstoma reversal may be acceptable when required for progression of neonatal care. Level III, Treatment Study (Retrospective comparative study). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Influence of mask type and mask position on the effectiveness of bag-mask ventilation in a neonatal manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deindl, Philipp; O'Reilly, Megan; Zoller, Katharina; Berger, Angelika; Pollak, Arnold; Schwindt, Jens; Schmölzer, Georg M

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical face mask with an air cushion rim might be placed accidentally in a false orientation on the newborn's face or filled with various amounts of air during neonatal resuscitation. Both false orientation as well as variable filling may reduce a tight seal and therefore hamper effective positive pressure ventilation (PPV). We aimed to measure the influence of mask type and mask position on the effectiveness of PPV. Twenty neonatal staff members delivered PPV to a modified, leak-free manikin. Resuscitation parameters were recorded using a self-inflatable bag PPV with an Intersurgical anatomical air cushion rim face mask (IS) and a size 0/1 Laerdal round face mask. Three different positions of the IS were tested: correct position, 90° and 180° rotation in reference to the midline of the face. IS masks in each correct position on the face but with different inflation of the air cushion (empty, 10, 20 and 30 mL). Mask leak was similar with mask rotation to either 90° or 180° but significantly increased from 27 (13-73) % with an adequate filled IS mask compared to 52 (16-83) % with an emptied air cushion rim. Anatomical-shaped face mask had similar mask leaks compared to round face mask. A wrongly positioned anatomical-shaped mask does not influence mask leak. Mask leak significantly increased once the air cushion rim was empty, which may cause failure in mask PPV.

  18. Influence of thermal drive on central sleep apnea in the preterm neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourneux, Pierre; Cardot, Virginie; Museux, Nathanaëlle; Chardon, Karen; Léké, André; Telliez, Frédéric; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Bach, Véronique

    2008-04-01

    The incidence of apnea in neonates depends on a number of factors, including sleep state and thermoregulation. To assess the role of thermal drive (body heat loss [BHL]) in the mechanisms underlying short episodes of central apnea during active and quiet sleep in neonates. Twenty-two neonates (postconceptional age: 36.3 +/- 0.9 weeks) were exposed at thermoneutral (incubator temperature: 32.5 degrees C), warm (34.2 degrees C), and cool (30.4 degrees C) conditions during 3 consecutive morning naps. Oxygen consumption (VO2), skin and rectal temperatures, and central apnea were scored during active sleep and quiet sleep. The thermal drive was expressed as BHL calculated using indirect partitional calorimetry. As expected, apnea occurred more frequently in active sleep than in quiet sleep (P apnea in active sleep was higher in the warm condition (P apnea episodes were less frequent (P apnea were correlated with the BHL: the greater the BHL (body cooling), the less frequent and the shorter the apnea episodes. In contrast, no relationship between apnea and mean skin or rectal temperature was observed. Apneic events were more closely related to BHL than to body temperatures. In cool exposure, the decreases in the duration and frequency of apneic episodes suggest that these events depend on the metabolic drive (which is proportional to energy expenditure).

  19. Constructions of Deafness and Deaf Education: Exploring Normalcy and Deviance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejes, Thomas P., V

    2009-01-01

    Ideas and definitions of deafness are complicated and deeply contested, including the constraints over what ought to be normal, especially for a child. This research examines what it means to be deaf and disabled under the guise of normalcy and deviance. Social control institutions, such as schools, provide deaf children with a unique opportunity…

  20. Deaf History in K-12 DHH Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Allison H

    2015-01-01

    Deaf children, like all children, deserve a quality education; one that includes the history of their own culture and people. Unfortunately, Deaf history curriculum for Deaf students is seriously lacking in availability. The goal of this thesis is simple; to provide D/deaf students with a quality Deaf history curriculum, from which they can learn about themselves, thus helping them to develop their Deaf identities.The curriculum included in Deaf History in K-12 Classrooms consists of two unit...

  1. Deaf Mothers and Breastfeeding: Do Unique Features of Deaf Culture and Language Support Breastfeeding Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Nancy P.; Cuculick, Jess; Starr, Matthew; Panko, Tiffany; Widanka, Holly; Dozier, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Background Deaf mothers who use American Sign Language (ASL) consider themselves a linguistic minority group, with specific cultural practices. Rarely has this group been engaged in infant-feeding research. Objectives To understand how ASL-using Deaf mothers learn about infant feeding and to identify their breastfeeding challenges. Methods Using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach we conducted four focus groups with Deaf mothers who had at least one child 0–5 years. A script was developed using a social ecological model (SEM) to capture multiple levels of influence. All groups were conducted in ASL, filmed, and transcribed into English. Deaf and hearing researchers analyzed data by coding themes within each SEM level. Results Fifteen mothers participated. All had initiated breastfeeding with their most recent child. Breastfeeding duration for eight of the mothers was three weeks to 12 months. Seven of the mothers were still breastfeeding, the longest for 19 months. Those mothers who breastfed longer described a supportive social environment and the ability to surmount challenges. Participants described characteristics of Deaf culture such as direct communication, sharing information, use of technologies, language access through interpreters and ASL-using providers, and strong self-advocacy skills. Finally, mothers used the sign ‘struggle’ to describe their breastfeeding experience. The sign implies a sustained effort over time which leads to success. Conclusions In a setting with a large population of Deaf women and ASL-using providers, we identified several aspects of Deaf culture and language which support BF mothers across institutional, community, and interpersonal levels of the SEM. PMID:23492762

  2. Intertextuality and Narrative Practices of Young Deaf Students in Classroom Contexts: A Microethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjeong

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how intertextuality influences the narrative practices of young deaf children in two classrooms. Specifically, the study examines how variations in what texts are made available to juxtapose and variations in how texts are juxtaposed influence the narratives young deaf children produce. A major premise underlying these two…

  3. Gut microbiota, the immune system, and diet influence the neonatal gut-brain axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Michael P; Zaghouani, Habib; Niklas, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual framework for a gut-brain axis has existed for decades. The Human Microbiome Project is responsible for establishing intestinal dysbiosis as a mediator of inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, and neurodevelopmental disorders in adults. Recent advances in metagenomics implicate gut microbiota and diet as key modulators of the bidirectional signaling pathways between the gut and brain that underlie neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders in adults. Evidence linking intestinal dysbiosis to neurodevelopmental disease outcomes in preterm infants is emerging. Recent clinical studies show that intestinal dysbiosis precedes late-onset neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in intensive care nurseries. Moreover, strong epidemiologic evidence links late-onset neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in long-term psychomotor disabilities of very-low-birth-weight infants. The notion of the gut-brain axis thereby supports that intestinal microbiota can indirectly harm the brain of preterm infants. In this review, we highlight the anatomy and physiology of the gut-brain axis and describe transmission of stress signals caused by immune-microbial dysfunction in the gut. These messengers initiate neurologic disease in preterm infants. Understanding neural and humoral signaling through the gut-brain axis will offer insight into therapeutic and dietary approaches that may improve the outcomes of very-low-birth-weight infants.

  4. Influence of maternal antibodies on active pertussis toxoid immunization of neonatal mice and piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polewicz, Monika; Gracia, Aleksandra; Buchanan, Rachelle; Strom, Stacy; Halperin, Scott A; Potter, Andrew A; Babiuk, Lorne A; Gerdts, Volker

    2011-10-13

    Whooping cough caused by infection with Bordetella pertussis, is a serious illness in infants and young children. Mortality due to whooping cough is being reported in infants too young to be immunized as well as those who have not completed their series of vaccinations. One of the major factors that interferes with successful active immunization in early life is the presence of maternal antibodies (MatAbs). Using the mouse and pig models, we evaluated the effect of maternal antibodies on active immunization with pertussis toxoid (PTd) and explored strategies to overcome this interference. Our results indicate that passively transferred maternal antibodies interfered with active immunization using pertussis toxoid. The level of passively transferred antibodies directly correlated with the level of interference observed. However, this interference could be overcome by using a second booster immunization or by co-formulating the toxoid with novel adjuvants. These results support the need for novel vaccine formulations that are optimized for the neonate and that can be used not only to modulate the inherently biased neonatal immune system but also to prime the response in the presence of passively transferred maternal antibodies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Adult deafness: Towards new paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhos, David; Aussedat, Charles; Legris, Elsa; Aoustin, Jean-Marie; Nevoux, Jérôme

    2017-11-01

    Screening and early treatment of deafness regardless of age is essential. Deafness leads to social isolation, depression, and decreased cognitive function. The diagnosis requires an otoscopy and a confirmation of the type and degree of deafness by audiometry. Sudden deafness and meningitis are neuro-sensorial emergencies. Deafness may be the mode of disclosure of an autoimmune disease or part of the evolutionary profile. Hearing complaints with a normal classical audiogram may be the manifestation of a so-called "hidden" hearing loss and must be explored more carefully. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Deafness and sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moine, A; Frachet, B; Van Den Abbeele, T; Tison, P; Battesti, J P

    1990-01-01

    The cochleovestibular tract is seldom involved by sarcoidosis (about 50 cases have been described since 1948). As a clinical expression of sarcoidosis, deafness is fluctuant in 50% of all cases, bilateral, and most often associated with facial palsy and uveitis, the vestibular reflexes being reduced. The histological studies demonstrate lesions at all levels from the cochlea to be brain stem, but the main mechanism is an infiltration of the arachnoid vessels. The prognosis of sarcoidosis deafness is usually poor in spite of corticosteroid therapy. This paper is illustrated by 3 cases observed in Avicenne Hospital.

  7. Supporting Deaf Students--and All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuknis, Christina; Santini, Joseph; Appanah, Thangi

    2017-01-01

    Two faculty members and a Ph.D. student at Gallaudet University, the world's only university for the deaf, explain the concept of Deaf-Gain, which reframes the idea of hearing loss into one of gaining deafness and recognizes the contributions that deaf people make to society. This narrative assumes that deaf students and all students bring…

  8. Hereditary and microbiological factors influencing the airway immunological profile of neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Følsgaard, Nilofar

    2012-01-01

    recently reported an association between abnormal bacterial colonization with M. catarrhalis, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae of the upper airways of neonates and later development of asthma. This led to the hypothesis that the interaction between genetics and this microbiome in very early life may cause......Asthma and wheezing together with the other atopic disorders; allergy, eczema and rhinitis are the most common chronic diseases in children with major impact on quality of life for patients and significant socioeconomic costs due to health care utilization. The airway mucosa is constantly exposed...... to environmental factors such as microorganisms, airborne allergens and pollutants. Depending on the composition of this exposome, specific types of immune cells become activated releasing a fingerprint of cytokines and chemokines in the airway mucosa. The immune competence of the new-born child determines...

  9. Widespread auditory deficits in tune deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer L; Zalewski, Christopher; Brewer, Carmen; Lucker, Jay; Drayna, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate auditory function in individuals with deficits in musical pitch perception. We hypothesized that such individuals have deficits in nonspeech areas of auditory processing. We screened 865 randomly selected individuals to identify those who scored poorly on the Distorted Tunes test (DTT), a measure of musical pitch recognition ability. Those who scored poorly were given a comprehensive audiologic examination, and those with hearing loss or other confounding audiologic factors were excluded from further testing. Thirty-five individuals with tune deafness constituted the experimental group. Thirty-four individuals with normal hearing and normal DTT scores, matched for age, gender, handedness, and education, and without overt or reported psychiatric disorders made up the normal control group. Individual and group performance for pure-tone frequency discrimination at 1000 Hz was determined by measuring the difference limen for frequency (DLF). Auditory processing abilities were assessed using tests of pitch pattern recognition, duration pattern recognition, and auditory gap detection. In addition, we evaluated both attention and short- and long-term memory as variables that might influence performance on our experimental measures. Differences between groups were evaluated statistically using Wilcoxon nonparametric tests and t-tests as appropriate. The DLF at 1000 Hz in the group with tune deafness was significantly larger than that of the normal control group. However, approximately one-third of participants with tune deafness had DLFs within the range of performance observed in the control group. Many individuals with tune deafness also displayed a high degree of variability in their intertrial frequency discrimination performance that could not be explained by deficits in memory or attention. Pitch and duration pattern discrimination and auditory gap-detection ability were significantly poorer in the group with tune deafness

  10. A national perspective on teachers' efficacy beliefs in deaf education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garberoglio, Carrie Lou; Gobble, Mark E; Cawthon, Stephanie W

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' sense of efficacy, or the belief that teachers have of their capacity to make an impact on students' performance, is an unexplored construct in deaf education research. This study included data from 296 respondents to examine the relationship of teacher and school characteristics with teachers' sense of efficacy in 80 different deaf education settings in the US. Deaf education teachers reported high overall efficacy beliefs but significantly lower efficacy beliefs in the area of student engagement than in instructional strategies and classroom management. Teachers' years of experience showed a significant relationship with efficacy beliefs, yet it was the teachers' perceived collective efficacy of their educational setting that ultimately predicted teachers' sense of efficacy. These findings lend credence to the need for further examination of school processes that influence teacher beliefs and attitudes in deaf education settings.

  11. Children of Deaf Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerde, B.; Baker, A.E.; Gertz, G.; Boudreault, P.

    2016-01-01

    The hearing children of Deaf parents grow up in two cultures with two languages. They are similar to other bilingual, bicultural children in many ways but are special also. They can be in conflict between two worlds and often carry an extra burden of responsibility in functioning as a bridge between

  12. Sampling the Deaf Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Henry E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Two graduate students in deaf education wore ear plugs for two months to simulate hearing loss, and recorded their experiences and feelings. Excerpts from their journals are presented, commenting on such daily activities as shopping at a mall, watching television, driving, babysitting, and attending a football game. (JDD)

  13. Pedophilia and Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay; Rich, Steve

    1997-01-01

    Data from 22 cases of individuals with deafness suffering from pedophilia indicate a number of factors that distinguish them from hearing pedophiles. Differences include a prevalence of Primitive Personality Disorder, a high rate of brain damage, illiteracy, poorer communication skills, and psychiatric illnesses. Legal issues, prevention, and…

  14. Metabolic disorders prevalence in sudden deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Oiticica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to establish the frequency of metabolic disorders among patients with sudden deafness and to compare this frequency with data from population surveys. INTRODUCTION: No consensus has been reached regarding the prevalence of metabolic disorders among sudden deafness patients or their influence as associated risk factors. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled all sudden deafness patients treated in the Otolaryngology Department of the University of São Paulo between January 1996 and December 2006. Patients were subjected to laboratory exams including glucose and cholesterol levels, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction, triglycerides, free T4 and TSH. RESULTS: The sample comprised 166 patients. We observed normal glucose levels in 101 (81.5% patients and hyperglycemia in 23 (18.5% patients, which is significantly different (p < 0.0001 compared to the diabetes mellitus prevalence (7.6% in the Brazilian population. Cholesterol levels were normal in 78 patients (49.7% and abnormal in 79 (50.3% patients, which is significantly different compared to the Brazilian population (p = 0.0093. However, no differences were observed in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fraction (p = 0.1087 or triglyceride levels (p = 0.1474 between sudden hearing loss patients and the Brazilian population. Normal levels of thyroid hormones were observed in 116 patients (78.4%, and abnormal levels were observed in 32 (21.6% patients. Compared with the prevalence of thyroid disorders in the general population (10%, statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (p = 0.0132 between these two groups. DISCUSSION: Among sudden deafness patients, we observed frequencies of hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders that were more than twice those of the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Hyperglycemia and thyroid disorders are much more frequent in patients with sudden deafness than in the general population and should be

  15. Skin-to-skin holding in the neonatal intensive care unit influences maternal milk volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, N M; Valentine, C J; Renfro, L; Burns, P; Ferlic, L

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of early initiation of skin-to-skin (STS) holding on lactation, we compared 24-hour milk volumes of mothers of ventilated low birth weight infants in an STS group to mothers in a non-STS control group. Mean 24-hour milk volumes at 2, 3, and 4 weeks after delivery of mothers participating in STS holding were compared with those of a retrospective control group from the 12-month period immediately preceding the introduction of STS holding in the neonatal intensive care unit. A repeated-measures analysis of variance adjusting for baseline volumes (1 week after delivery) was used to evaluate the difference in milk volumes between STS and control groups. Sixteen mothers initiated STS holding during the 2-month study period. Eight mothers met study criteria by initiating STS holding during the first 4 weeks after delivery. During a 2-week period the study group had a strong linear increase in milk volume in contrast to no indicative change of the control group's milk volume. STS holding of low birth weight infants initiated in the early intensive care phase can result in a significant increase in maternal milk volume, thereby overcoming the frequently seen insufficient lactation experienced by these mothers.

  16. [Influence of neonatal and maternal factors on the prevalence of vernix caseosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, B; Labandeira, J; León-Muiños, E; Romarís, R; Ramírez-Santos, A; González-Vilas, D; Fernández-Prieto, R; Toribio, J

    2011-11-01

    At birth, vernix caseosa can cover the whole body surface or accumulate only on the back and in the skin folds. Interest in its composition and function and its possible applications in adults has increased in recent years. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of vernix caseosa in newborn infants in the health care area of Ferrol, Spain, and to assess its relationship with neonatal and maternal factors. We performed a prospective study of 1000 newborns seen within the first 3 days of life in our hospital. Vernix caseosa was observed in 42.9% of cases. The clinical profile associated with the presence of vernix caseosa was the following: healthy newborn girl with a high birth weight, born at term by normal vaginal delivery to a multiparous mother who had received medication and dietary supplements during pregnancy. The absence of vernix caseosa was associated with the presence of physiological scaling of the newborn and erythema toxicum neonatorum. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. Unique Patterns of Body Composition and Anthropometric Measurements During Maturation in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Neonates: Opportunities for Modifying Nutritional Therapy and Influencing Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algotar, Anushree; Shaikhkhalil, Ala K; Siler-Wurst, Kim; Sitaram, Swetha; Gulati, Ish; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2018-01-01

    Body composition is an important predictor of long-term outcomes in neonates and may be altered by several factors. Innovative methods like air displacement plethysmography (ADP) can safely and reliably measure body composition, potentially assisting in individualization of nutrition therapy. 1) To characterize patterns of body composition change in convalescing neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and examine factors leading to variation. 2) To evaluate if the time interval between 2 measurements via ADP can detect significant changes. NICU infants underwent anthropometry and body composition measurements by ADP at 37.5±0.7 weeks (Time 1) and 41.0±0.7 weeks (Time 2) postmenstrual age. Nutrition data were recorded. Data were analyzed using paired t-tests and linear regression models, presented as mean±SE, median (IQR), or %. Twenty-two neonates (54% males, 32.2±0.9 weeks gestation) were evaluated with a median interval of 3.6 (2.9-4.0) weeks between studies. Mean weight and % body fat increased significantly. There was no significant difference between mean weight and mean % body fat compared with normal references. Abdominal girth increased and mid-arm circumference decreased (pcomposition can effectively assess nutrition status of fragile NICU infants. Although, an interval of 2.9-4.0 weeks between consecutive measurements detected significant changes in body composition, more frequent measurements are needed to determine nutrition factors responsible for body composition changes. © 2017 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Teaching English to Deaf Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kalivodová, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis focuses on the process of teaching the English language to students who are deaf. The objective of the theoretical part is to present possible differences in the process of teaching a foreign language that result from the different identity of deaf students and to illustrate the situation of teaching a foreign language to deaf students. The practical part aims to present various methods that may assist during the process of teaching. It also describes the observed lessons...

  19. The effect of age on physical fitness of deaf elementary school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Esther; Visscher, Chris; Houwen, Suzanne

    The aim of this study was to measure physical fitness of deaf Dutch elementary school children compared with hearing children and to investigate the influence of age on physical fitness. Deaf children were physically less fit than hearing children. Overall, physical fitness increased with age in

  20. Influence of birth order, birth weight, colostrum and serum immunoglobulin G on neonatal piglet survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Rafael A; Lin, Xi; Campbell, Joy M; Moeser, Adam J; Odle, Jack

    2012-12-23

    Intake of colostrum after birth is essential to stimulate intestinal growth and function, and to provide systemic immunological protection via absorption of Immunoglobulin G (IgG). The birth order and weight of 745 piglets (from 75 litters) were recorded during a one-week period of farrowing. Only pigs weighing greater than 0.68 kg birth weight were chosen for the trial. Sow colostrum was collected during parturition, and piglets were bled between 48 and 72 hours post-birth. Piglet serum IgG and colostral IgG concentrations were determined by radial immunodiffusion. Sow parity had a significant (P birth order accounted for another 4% of the variation observed in piglet serum IgG concentration (P birth weight had no detectable effect. Piglet serum IgG concentration had both a linear (P Birth order had no detectable effect on survival, but birth weight had a positive linear effect (P birth had a 68% survival rate, and those weighing 1.6 kg (n = 158) had an 89% survival. We found that the combination of sow colostrum IgG concentration and birth order can account for 10% of the variation of piglet serum IgG concentration and that piglets with less than 1,000 mg/dl IgG serum concentration and weight of 0.9 kg at birth had low survival rate when compared to their larger siblings. The effective management of colostrum uptake in neonatal piglets in the first 24 hrs post-birth may potentially improve survival from birth to weaning.

  1. Ethanol Influences on Bax Associations with Mitochondrial Membrane Proteins in Neonatal Rat Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Marieta Barrow; Siler-Marsiglio, Kendra; Paiva, Michael; Kotler, Alexandra; Rogozinski, Jonathan; Kubovec, Stacey; Coursen, Mary; Madorsky, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    These studies investigated interactions taking place at the mitochondrial membrane in neonatal rat cerebellum following ethanol exposure, and focused on interactions between pro-apoptotic Bax and proteins of the permeability transition pore (PTP), voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), and adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), of the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes, respectively. Cultured cerebellar granule cells were used to assess the role of these interactions in ethanol neurotoxicity. Analyses were made at the age of maximal cerebellar ethanol vulnerability (P4), compared to the later age of relative resistance (P7), to determine whether differential ethanol sensitivity was mirrored by differences in these molecular interactions. We found that following ethanol exposure, Bax pro-apoptotic associations with both VDAC and ANT were increased, particularly at the age of greater ethanol sensitivity, and these interactions were sustained at this age for at least two hours post-exposure. Since Bax:VDAC interactions disrupt protective VDAC interactions with mitochondrial hexokinase (HXK), we also assessed VDAC:HXK associations following ethanol treatment, and found such interactions were altered by ethanol treatment, but only at two-hours post-exposure, and only in the P4, ethanol-sensitive cerebellum. Ethanol neurotoxicity in cultured neuronal preparations was abolished by pharmacological inhibition of both VDAC and ANT interactions with Bax, but not by a Bax channel blocker. Therefore, we conclude that at this age, within the constraints of our experimental model, a primary mode of Bax-induced initiation of the apoptosis cascade following ethanol insult involves interactions with proteins of the PTP complex, and not channel formation independent of PTP constituents. PMID:22767450

  2. Levels of DDT and its metabolites in placenta, maternal and cord blood and their potential influence on neonatal anthropometric measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Al-Doush, Inaam; Alsabbaheen, Ammar; Mohamed, Gamal El Din; Rabbah, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of in utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) have shown mixed results for the harmful effects on fetal growth and development. This cross-sectional study was designed to: (1) examine the extent of DDT exposure in 1578 women, aged 28.5 ± 6.0 who delivered between June 2005 and 2006 in the area of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; and (2) assess its influence on neonatal anthropometric measurement of newly born babies. DDT and its metabolites, namely 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p′-DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p′-DDD) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2′ bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p′-DDT) were measured in cord and maternal serum as well as placenta by Gas Chromatography coupled with an Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD). p,p′-DDE was detected in 28.3% of cord and 54.4% of maternal serum, reflecting past exposure, whereas the p,p′-DDT was only found in 0.46% cord and 1.2% maternal samples. As expected the p,p′-DDE cord levels (0.197 ± 0.961 μg/L) were 2.8 times lower than the maternal levels (0.551 ± 1.778 μg/L), and both were significantly correlated (r = 0.517) suggesting its transplacental transfer. The picture was different in placental tissues. p,p′-DDE and p,p′-DDT were detected in 84% and 99% of placental tissues, with the highest p,p′-DDT in placental tissues (29.62 ± 158.282 µg/kg dry wt.) compare to p,p′-DDE (10.167 ± 18.851 μg/kg dry wt.). In general, the presence of DDT metabolites in our participants indicates that these chemicals are still relevant despite the fact that they have been banned or restricted in the study area for many years. Our results support the view for an association between low in utero exposure to DDT and the anthropometric development of the fetus leading to a reduction in its head circumference, crown–heel length, birth weight and birth height. Since the reduction in these measures was independent of gestational age and/or preterm births

  3. Levels of DDT and its metabolites in placenta, maternal and cord blood and their potential influence on neonatal anthropometric measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Saleh, Iman, E-mail: iman@kfshrc.edu.sa [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Doush, Inaam; Alsabbaheen, Ammar [Environmental Health Section, Biological and Medical Research Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Gamal El Din [Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Scientific Computing Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, P.O. Box 3354, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Rabbah, Abdullah [Department of Pediatrics, King Khalid Hospital, Al-Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies of in utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) have shown mixed results for the harmful effects on fetal growth and development. This cross-sectional study was designed to: (1) examine the extent of DDT exposure in 1578 women, aged 28.5 {+-} 6.0 who delivered between June 2005 and 2006 in the area of Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia; and (2) assess its influence on neonatal anthropometric measurement of newly born babies. DDT and its metabolites, namely 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p Prime -DDE), 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDD) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2 Prime bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p Prime -DDT) were measured in cord and maternal serum as well as placenta by Gas Chromatography coupled with an Electron Capture Detector (GC/ECD). p,p Prime -DDE was detected in 28.3% of cord and 54.4% of maternal serum, reflecting past exposure, whereas the p,p Prime -DDT was only found in 0.46% cord and 1.2% maternal samples. As expected the p,p Prime -DDE cord levels (0.197 {+-} 0.961 {mu}g/L) were 2.8 times lower than the maternal levels (0.551 {+-} 1.778 {mu}g/L), and both were significantly correlated (r = 0.517) suggesting its transplacental transfer. The picture was different in placental tissues. p,p Prime -DDE and p,p Prime -DDT were detected in 84% and 99% of placental tissues, with the highest p,p Prime -DDT in placental tissues (29.62 {+-} 158.282 Micro-Sign g/kg dry wt.) compare to p,p Prime -DDE (10.167 {+-} 18.851 {mu}g/kg dry wt.). In general, the presence of DDT metabolites in our participants indicates that these chemicals are still relevant despite the fact that they have been banned or restricted in the study area for many years. Our results support the view for an association between low in utero exposure to DDT and the anthropometric development of the fetus leading to a reduction in its head circumference, crown-heel length, birth weight and birth height. Since the reduction in these

  4. Quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing students in Ibadan metropolis, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiyeola, Mofadeke T; Adeyemo, Adebolajo A

    2018-01-01

    Quality of Life encompasses an individual's well-being and health, social participation and satisfaction with functional daily living. Disabilities such as deafness can impact on the quality of life with spatial variance to the environment. Deafness causes communicative problems with significant consequences in cognitive, social, and emotional well-being of affected individuals. However, information relating to the quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing individuals, especially students in developing countries like Nigeria, which could be used to design special health-related interventions is sparse. This study examined the quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing students in Ibadan metropolis, Nigeria. One hundred and ten deaf and hard of hearing students participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were drawn from all four secondary schools for the Deaf in Ibadan metropolis. The 26 item Brief version of the WHO Quality of Life questionnaire was used for data collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics at statistical significance of pquality of life. Attending the special school for the Deaf, upper socio-economic status and age (≥17years) are significantly associated with better quality of life. However, gender and age at onset of hearing loss had no significant influence on the quality of life. The Deaf community available in the special school appeared to protect against stigma and discrimination, while also promoting social interactions between deaf and hard of hearing individuals.

  5. The influence of probiotics for preterm neonates on the incidence of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Julie A; Smith, Birgitte; Greisen, Gorm

    2017-01-01

    or dermatologist. We found no indication that probiotics may prevent AD when administered to neonates birth until discharge home. Factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system have been assumed to be of particular importance in atopic dermatitis, and hence, our unique...

  6. Influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature in a bench model of neonatal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hendrik S; Ullrich, Tim L; Bührer, Christoph; Czernik, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2017-02-01

    Clinical studies show that non-invasive respiratory support by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) affects gas conditioning in the upper airways, especially in the presence of mouth leaks. Using a new bench model of neonatal CPAP, we investigated the influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. The model features the insertion of a heated humidifier between an active model lung and an oropharyngeal head model to simulate the recurrent expiration of heated, humidified air. During unsupported breathing, physiological temperature and humidity were attained inside the model oropharynx, and mouth opening had no significant effect on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. During binasal CPAP, the impact of mouth opening was investigated using three different scenarios: no conditioning in the CPAP circuit, heating only, and heated humidification. Mouth opening had a strong negative impact on oropharyngeal humidification in all tested scenarios, but heated humidification in the CPAP circuit maintained clinically acceptable humidity levels regardless of closed or open mouths. The model can be used to test new equipment for use with CPAP, and to investigate the effects of other methods of non-invasive respiratory support on gas conditioning in the presence of leaks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Identity development in deaf adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2014-01-01

    We studied identity development during 5 years in 11 deaf adolescents who attend a school for deaf children in the highest level of regular secondary education (age between 14 and 19 years). Identity development is conceptualized by the processes of exploration and commitment formation, as

  8. Anger communication in deaf children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rieffe, C.J.; Meerum Terwogt, M.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how deaf children express their anger towards peers and with what intentions. Eleven-year-old deaf children (n = 21) and a hearing control group (n = 36) were offered four vignettes describing anger-evoking conflict situations with peers. Children were asked how they

  9. Perceived Stress among Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine G.; Ouellette, Sue E.; Kang, Youngmi

    2006-01-01

    The Present Article describes the effectiveness of stress management classes in decreasing perceived stress among Deaf adults. Deaf adults may experience unique stressors, in addition to circumstances associated with increased stress in the general population. The Perceived Stress Scale (S. Cohen, Kamarck, & Mermelstein, 1983) was used as a…

  10. Social Connectedness of Deaf Retirees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sherry; Roberson, Len

    2013-01-01

    The intergenerational connectedness that has traditionally bound members of the Deaf community to each other is changing amidst the current technological and cultural landscape. This study explores perceptions of Deaf retirees concerning their usefulness to younger generations and their need to stay connected to each other despite increasing…

  11. Are Deaf Students Visual Learners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Morrison, Carolyn; Lukomski, Jennifer; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol

    2013-01-01

    It is frequently assumed that by virtue of their hearing losses, deaf students are visual learners. Deaf individuals have some visual-spatial advantages relative to hearing individuals, but most have been linked to use of sign language rather than auditory deprivation. How such cognitive differences might affect academic performance has been…

  12. Overview on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    It may seem that deaf-blindness refers to a total inability to see or hear. However, in reality deaf-blindness is a condition in which the combination of hearing and visual losses in children cause "such severe communication and other develop mental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for…

  13. Rhythm Deficits in "Tone Deafness"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxton, Jessica M.; Nandy, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    It is commonly observed that "tone deaf" individuals are unable to hear the beat of a tune, yet deficits on simple timing tests have not been found. In this study, we investigated rhythm processing in nine individuals with congenital amusia ("tone deafness") and nine controls. Participants were presented with pairs of 5-note sequences, and were…

  14. Sports and the Deaf Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David A.; Ellis, M. Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    The increasingly sedentary American lifestyle has resulted in a growing number of overweight and out-of-shape school-age children. Deaf children are not exempt from this trend, yet there is little evidence that public school programs for these children are doing anything to counter it. Much can be done to assist deaf students, not only in becoming…

  15. Evaluative expression in deaf children's written narratives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijsterveldt, E.M. van; Hell, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    Background: Deaf children vary in the use of and proficiency in signed language. The majority of studies on writing skills of children who are deaf did not assess deaf children's proficiency in signed language and/or grouped together deaf children with varying sign language skills. Aims: Adopting a

  16. A Field Evaluation of Devices for Maintaining Contact with Mobile Deaf and Deaf-Blind Children: Electronic Communication with Deaf and Deaf-Blind Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, William; And Others

    Behavioral and engineering tests were conducted in the field and laboratory to assess effectiveness and usefulness of the Vibralert, an electronic device for maintaining contact with deaf and deaf-blind children and adults. The vibrating portable signal system was used by 24 deaf and hearing parents to maintain contact with their deaf children at…

  17. The Understanding of Time by Deaf Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser-Grodecka, Irmina; Cieszynska, Jagoda

    The natural sign language used by deaf children in Poland makes no distinction between present, future, and past tenses. Deaf pupils do not understand the notions of temporal sequence and duration of time intervals, and so are prevented from thinking of and planning for the future. The study with 15 deaf 12-year-old pupils and 15 deaf 14-year-old…

  18. Neonatal sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 week and before 3 months of age. Causes Neonatal sepsis can be caused by bacteria such as Escherichia ... and Tests Lab tests can help diagnose neonatal sepsis and identify the cause of the infection. Blood tests may include: Blood ...

  19. Apartheid in deaf education: examining workforce diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only 3 deaf administrators of color were identified. The study describes how "apartheid" or "intellectual oppression" may result from unchanged hiring practices in K-12 programs for the deaf and in postsecondary institutions. Using a bottle metaphor, the researchers describe how deaf persons of color are often stuck in "a bottleneck on the highway to opportunity." Relevant data underscore that the field of deaf education must diversify its professional force in order to utilize the intellectual, linguistic, and multicultural proficiencies of hearing teachers of color, deaf teachers, and deaf teachers of color.

  20. Neonatal CD8 T-cell hierarchy is distinct from adults and is influenced by intrinsic T cell properties in respiratory syncytial virus infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy J Ruckwardt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Following respiratory syncytial virus infection of adult CB6F1 hybrid mice, a predictable CD8+ T cell epitope hierarchy is established with a strongly dominant response to a K(d-restricted peptide (SYIGSINNI from the M2 protein. The response to K(dM2(82-90 is ∼5-fold higher than the response to a subdominant epitope from the M protein (NAITNAKII, D(bM(187-195. After infection of neonatal mice, a distinctly different epitope hierarchy emerges with codominant responses to K(dM2(82-90 and D(bM(187-195. Adoptive transfer of naïve CD8+ T cells from adults into congenic neonates prior to infection indicates that intrinsic CD8+ T cell factors contribute to age-related differences in hierarchy. Epitope-specific precursor frequency differs between adults and neonates and influences, but does not predict the hierarchy following infection. Additionally, dominance of K(dM2(82-90-specific cells does not correlate with TdT activity. Epitope-specific Vβ repertoire usage is more restricted and functional avidity is lower in neonatal mice. The neonatal pattern of codominance changes after infection at 10 days of age, and rapidly shifts to the adult pattern of extreme K(dM2(82-90-dominance. Thus, the functional properties of T cells are selectively modified by developmental factors in an epitope-specific and age-dependent manner.

  1. [Preterm breech before 35 weeks of gestation: What is the influence of the delivery route on neonatal condition?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruey, N; Reinbold, D; Creveuil, C; Dreyfus, M

    2015-11-01

    The mode of delivery for preterm breech is still controversial, while no randomized study has been completed. The question of a protective effect of cesarean section on neonatal outcome arises. The objective of this study was to compare mortality and neonatal morbidity for children born before 35 weeks of gestation in breech presentation, depending on the route of delivery. This was a retrospective study done in University Hospital type 3 over five years, comparing neonatal mortality and different neonatal morbidity criteria for children born between 25 weeks of gestation and 34 weeks+6 days spread into two groups according to their mode of delivery: elective caesarean section before labor and vaginal delivery. Statistical analysis was performed with an adjustment for gestational age and weight of the newborn. No significant difference between the two groups was found with regard to neonatal mortality. Among the various morbidity criteria studied, only the head entrapment rate and serious traumatic injury occurrence were significantly increased in the "intent to vaginal delivery" group. pH at birth and Apgar scores at five minutes were not significantly different between the two groups. This work shows an increased risk of traumatic complications for vaginal delivery with no increase in other neonatal complications. It seems reasonable in this particular context to allow an attempt at vaginal delivery on condition of strict compliance with safety regulations relating to breech delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Fostering Positive Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom /

    OpenAIRE

    Hipskind, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    All Deaf children deserve to have opportunities to openly explore, examine, and affirm their own Deaf identities at school, yet there is a shortage of curricula and resources dedicated to this basic need. The aim of this thesis is to provide Deaf children with such opportunities. The curriculum within- Fostering Deaf Identity Development in a K-2 Deaf Classroom- consists of two units that address positive Deaf identity formation. The first unit focuses on the characterization and affirmation ...

  3. Investigating how high school deaf students spend their leisure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Arabmomeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on deaf students' interests in spending their leisure times. We design a questionnaire and distribute among all deaf students who are enrolled in high schools in two provinces of Iran. The questionnaire consists of three parts, in the first part, we ask female and male deaf students about their interests in various entertainment activities in Likert scale. In terms of gender, we find out that walking inside or outside house is number one favorite exercise for female students while male students mostly prefer to walk on the streets. Although male students prefer to go biking or running activities, female students prefer to go for picnic or similar activities. This could be due to limitations on female for running or biking inside cities. While going to picnic with members of family or friends is the third popular activity for male students, stretching exercises is third most popular activity among female students. Breathing exercise is the fourth most popular activity among both male and female students. The second part of the survey is associated with the barriers for having no exercise among deaf students. According to our survey, while lack of good attention from public and ordinary people on exercising deaf students is believed to be number one barrier among male students, female students blame lack of transportation facilities as the most important barrier. However, both female and male students believe these two items are the most important factors preventing them to exercise. Lack of awareness for exercising deaf students and lack of good recreational facilities are the third most important barriers among male and female students. The last part of the survey attempted to detect important entertainment activities. Watching TV, entertaining with mobile devices, chatting with friends and watching DVD or movies were the most important items influencing deaf students' free times.DOI: 10.5267/j.msl.2012

  4. Influence of Brain Stem on Axial and Hindlimb Spinal Locomotor Rhythm Generating Circuits of the Neonatal Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jean-Xavier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The trunk plays a pivotal role in limbed locomotion. Yet, little is known about how the brain stem controls trunk activity during walking. In this study, we assessed the spatiotemporal activity patterns of axial and hindlimb motoneurons (MNs during drug-induced fictive locomotor-like activity (LLA in an isolated brain stem-spinal cord preparation of the neonatal mouse. We also evaluated the extent to which these activity patterns are affected by removal of brain stem. Recordings were made in the segments T7, L2, and L5 using calcium imaging from individual axial MNs in the medial motor column (MMC and hindlimb MNs in lateral motor column (LMC. The MN activities were analyzed during both the rhythmic and the tonic components of LLA, the tonic component being used as a readout of generalized increase in excitability in spinal locomotor networks. The most salient effect of brain stem removal was an increase in locomotor rhythm frequency and a concomitant reduction in burst durations in both MMC and LMC MNs. The lack of effect on the tonic component of LLA indicated specificity of action during the rhythmic component. Cooling-induced silencing of the brain stem reproduced the increase in rhythm frequency and accompanying decrease in burst durations in L2 MMC and LMC, suggesting a dependency on brain stem neuron activity. The work supports the idea that the brain stem locomotor circuits are operational already at birth and further suggests an important role in modulating trunk activity. The brain stem may influence the axial and hindlimb spinal locomotor rhythm generating circuits by extending their range of operation. This may represent a critical step of locomotor development when learning how to walk in different conditions and environments is a major endeavor.

  5. Prevalence, heritability and genetic correlations of congenital sensorineural deafness and pigmentation phenotypes in the Border Collie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Risio, Luisa; Lewis, Tom; Freeman, Julia; de Stefani, Alberta; Matiasek, Lara; Blott, Sarah

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate prevalence, heritability and genetic correlations of congenital sensorineural deafness (CSD) and pigmentation phenotypes in the Border Collie. Entire litters of Border Collies that presented to the Animal Health Trust (1994-2008) for assessment of hearing status by brain stem auditory evoked response (BAER) at 4-10 weeks of age were included. Heritability and genetic correlations were estimated using residual maximum likelihood (REML). Of 4143 puppies that met the inclusion criteria, 97.6% had normal hearing status, 2.0% were unilaterally deaf and 0.4% were bilaterally deaf. Heritability of deafness as a trichotomous trait (normal/unilaterally deaf/bilaterally deaf) was estimated at 0.42 using multivariate analysis. Genetic correlations of deafness with iris colour and merle coat colour were 0.58 and 0.26, respectively. These results indicate that there is a significant genetic effect on CSD in Border Collies and that some of the genes determining deafness also influence pigmentation phenotypes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The influence of the type of embryo culture medium on neonatal birthweight after single embryo transfer in IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergouw, Carlijn G; Kostelijk, E Hanna; Doejaaren, Els; Hompes, Peter G A; Lambalk, Cornelis B; Schats, Roel

    2012-09-01

    Does the type of medium used to culture fresh and frozen-thawed embryos influence neonatal birthweight after single embryo transfer (SET) in IVF? A comparison of two commercially available culture media showed no significant influence on mean birthweight and mean birthweight adjusted for gestational age, gender and parity (z-scores) of singletons born after a fresh or frozen-thawed SET. Furthermore, we show that embryo freezing and thawing cycles may lead to a significantly higher mean birthweight. Animal studies have shown that culture media constituents are responsible for changes in birthweight of offspring. In human IVF, there is still little knowledge of the effect of medium type on birthweight. Until now, only a small number of commercially available culture media have been investigated (Vitrolife, Cook(®) Medical and IVF online medium). Our study adds new information: it has a larger population of singleton births compared with the previously published studies, it includes outcomes of other media types (HTF and Sage(®)), not previously analysed, and it includes data on frozen-thawed SETs. This study was a retrospective analysis of birthweights of singleton newborns after fresh (Day 3) or frozen-thawed (Day 5) SET cycles, using embryos cultured in either of two different types of commercially available culture media, between 2008 and 2011. Before January 2009, a single-step culture medium was used: human tubal fluid (HTF) with 4 mg/ml human serum albumin. From January 2009 onwards, a commercially available sequential medium was introduced: Sage(®), Quinn's advantage protein plus medium. Singletons born after a fresh SET (99 embryos cultured in HTF and 259 in Sage(®)) and singletons born after a frozen-thawed SET (32 embryos cultured in HTF only, 41 in HTF and Sage(®) and 86 in Sage(®) only) were analysed. Only patients using autologous gametes without the use of a gestational carrier were considered. Also excluded were (vanishing) twins, triplets

  7. Neonatal mortality in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, F R; Schuman, K L; Lyon, J L

    1982-09-01

    A cohort study of neonatal mortality (N = 106) in white singleton births (N = 14,486) in Utah for January-June 1975 was conducted. Using membership and activity in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon) as a proxy for parental health practices, i.e., tobacco and alcohol abstinence, differential neonatal mortality rates were calculated. The influence of potential confounding factors was evaluated. Low activity LDS members were found to have an excess risk of neonatal death five times greater than high activity LDS, with an upper bound of a two-sided 95% confidence interval of 7.9. The data consistently indicate a lower neonatal mortality rate for active LDS members. Non-LDS were found to have a lower rate than either medium or low activity LDS.

  8. Informed consent and deafness in South Africa: Guidelines for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-01

    Dec 1, 2017 ... and who had normal hearing during the critical language-learning years of childhood, will ... sociopolitical context of South Africa, which has significantly influenced the educational and linguistic status of deaf persons. This paper .... mental-health issues, it should be borne in mind that aside from language ...

  9. Representations of Deaf Characters in Children's Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golos, Debbie B.; Moses, Annie M.

    2011-01-01

    Picture books can influence how children perceive people of different backgrounds, including people with disabilities whose cultures differ from their own. Researchers have examined the portrayal of multicultural characters with disabilities in children's literature. However, few have specifically considered the portrayal of deaf characters,…

  10. Maternal low glycaemic index diet, fat intake and postprandial glucose influences neonatal adiposity--secondary analysis from the ROLO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Mary K; McGowan, Ciara A; Gibney, Eileen R; Donnelly, Jean M; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2014-08-01

    The in utero environment is known to affect fetal development however many of the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between maternal dietary macronutrient intake and lifestyle throughout pregnancy and neonatal weight and adiposity. This was an analysis of 542 mother and infant pairs from the ROLO study (Randomised cOntrol trial of LOw glycaemic index diet versus no dietary intervention to prevent recurrence of fetal macrosomia). Food diaries as well as food frequency and lifestyle and physical activity questionnaires were completed during pregnancy. Maternal anthropometry was measured throughout pregnancy and neonatal anthropometry was measured at birth. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed the main maternal factor associated with increased birth weight was greater gestational weight gain R2adj 23.3% (F = 11.547, p maternal factor associated with increased birth length was non-smoking status R2adj 27.8% (F = 6.193, p Neonatal central adiposity (determined using waist:length ratio) was negatively associated with maternal age, and positively associated with the following parameters: smoking status, maternal pre-pregnancy arm circumference, percentage energy from saturated fat in late pregnancy, postprandial glucose at 28 weeks gestation and membership of the control group with a positive trend towards association with trimester 2 glycaemic load R2adj 38.1% (F = 8.000, p maternal diet and lifestyle factors were associated with neonatal anthropometry . Low glycaemic index dietary intervention in pregnancy was found to have a beneficial effect on neonatal central adiposity. Additionally, central adiposity was positively associated with maternal dietary fat intake and postprandial glucose highlighting the important role of healthy diet in pregnancy in promoting normal neonatal adiposity. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN54392969.

  11. Group Psychotherapy with Deaf Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, H. E. Eugene; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The process and outcome of group psychotherapy with deaf adolescents from a Texas public school is reported to illustrate the medium's use in managing normal adolescent adjustment problems at home and at school. (CL)

  12. Using the "Common European Framework of Reference for Languages" to Teach Sign Language to Parents of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoddon, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    No formal Canadian curriculum presently exists for teaching American Sign Language (ASL) as a second language to parents of deaf and hard of hearing children. However, this group of ASL learners is in need of more comprehensive, research-based support, given the rapid expansion in Canada of universal neonatal hearing screening and the…

  13. Locus of Control, Interest in Schooling and Science Achievement of Some Deaf and Typical Secondary School Students in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatoye, R. Ademola; Aanu, E. Mosunmola

    2010-01-01

    This study compared locus of control, interest in school and science achievement of typical and deaf secondary school students. The study also investigated influence of students' locus of control and interest in school on general science achievement. Seventy two (72) deaf and 235 typical children were purposively selected from eight secondary…

  14. Neonatal immune responses to TLR2 stimulation: Influence of maternal atopy on Foxp3 and IL-10 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gold Diane R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal atopic background and stimulation of the adaptive immune system with allergen interact in the development of allergic disease. Stimulation of the innate immune system through microbial exposure, such as activation of the innate Toll-like-receptor 2 (TLR2, may reduce the development of allergy in childhood. However, little is known about the immunological effects of microbial stimulation on early immune responses and in association with maternal atopy. Methods We analyzed immune responses of cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC from 50 healthy neonates (31 non-atopic and 19 atopic mothers. Cells were stimulated with the TLR2 agonist peptidoglycan (Ppg or the allergen house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae (Derf1, and results compared to unstimulated cells. We analyzed lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine secretion of CBMC. In addition, we assessed gene expression associated with T regulatory cells including the transcription factor Foxp3, the glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor (GITR, and the cytotoxic lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4. Lymphocyte proliferation was measured by 3H-Thymidine uptake, cytokine concentrations determined by ELISA, mRNA expression of T cell markers by real-time RT-PCR. Results Ppg stimulation induced primarily IL-10 cytokine production, in addition to IFN-γ, IL-13 and TNF-α secretion. GITR was increased following Ppg stimulation (p = 0.07. Ppg-induced IL-10 production and induction of Foxp3 were higher in CBMC without, than with maternal atopy (p = 0.04, p = 0.049. IL-10 production was highly correlated with increased expression of Foxp3 (r = 0.53, p = 0.001, GITR (r = 0.47, p = 0.004 and CTLA4 (r = 0.49, p = 0.003, independent of maternal atopy. Conclusion TLR2 stimulation with Ppg induces IL-10 and genes associated with T regulatory cells, influenced by maternal atopy. Increased IL-10 and Foxp3 induction in CBMC of non-atopic compared to atopic mothers, may indicate an increased capacity to

  15. Deaf child--a general practitioner's responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Bivas; Bora, Haradhan; Bandyopadhyay, S N; Mukhopadhyay, S; Basu, S K

    2005-10-01

    The power of a child's speaking language never develops if he is deaf. Deafness persists if it is not detected early. Childhood deafness is either congenital or acquired. At birth, doctors or attendants can detect deafness by arousing the baby with sudden loud noise. At 4 months onwards mothers and doctors can detect deafness. The baby at this age can turn its head or eyes towards the source of the sound. By 12 months to 2 years of age it is very difficult to detect deafness. By the age of 3 years children again become co-operative and it becomes easier to detect deafness. Children should always be screened for deafness while being admitted to nursery classes. In school going age ie, 5 years onwards loss of tests can be employed to detect deafness. If a child is suspected be deaf, a general practitioner's responsibility is to refer him to an ENT specialist earlier. Any child whose mother believes her child is deaf should be given due attention. Otitis media with effusion, enlarged adenoid, chronic suppurative otitis media, recurrent otitis media are some diseases to be carefully looked into by the general practitioners. Now-a-days cochlear implantation surgery is gaining popularity to give hearing to deaf child. Moreover regular screening for deafness should be included school heath programme.

  16. Joining the Diaspora of Deaf Memoirists: A Personal Account of Writing Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Donna

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes how, and why, she tackled a lifetime of questions about her deafness and experiences of being deaf by writing a memoir called The Art of Being Deaf. While researching her memoir, the author discovered that the questions about her deafness that she most needed to answer were her own. Having first read many…

  17. Examining a Sample of Black Deaf Individuals on the Deaf Acculturation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson Schmitt, Shawn S.; Leigh, Irene W.

    2015-01-01

    The current study sought to identify and analyze how Black deaf and hard-of-hearing people conceptualize their deaf and hard-of-hearing identities. That is, what cultural and linguistic factors are involved and how do they interact? An existing measure of Deaf cultural identity, the Deaf Acculturation Scale (DAS), was used to evaluate these…

  18. Quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing students in Ibadan metropolis, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mofadeke T Jaiyeola

    Full Text Available Quality of Life encompasses an individual's well-being and health, social participation and satisfaction with functional daily living. Disabilities such as deafness can impact on the quality of life with spatial variance to the environment. Deafness causes communicative problems with significant consequences in cognitive, social, and emotional well-being of affected individuals. However, information relating to the quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing individuals, especially students in developing countries like Nigeria, which could be used to design special health-related interventions is sparse. This study examined the quality of life of deaf and hard of hearing students in Ibadan metropolis, Nigeria. One hundred and ten deaf and hard of hearing students participated in this cross-sectional study. Participants were drawn from all four secondary schools for the Deaf in Ibadan metropolis. The 26 item Brief version of the WHO Quality of Life questionnaire was used for data collection. The data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics at statistical significance of p<0.05. Majority (57.8% of the deaf and hard of hearing students had poor quality of life. Attending the special school for the Deaf, upper socio-economic status and age (≥17years are significantly associated with better quality of life. However, gender and age at onset of hearing loss had no significant influence on the quality of life. The Deaf community available in the special school appeared to protect against stigma and discrimination, while also promoting social interactions between deaf and hard of hearing individuals.

  19. Joining the diaspora of deaf memoirists: a personal account of writing deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDONALD, Donna

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, the author describes how, and why, she tackled a lifetime of questions about her deafness and experiences of being deaf by writing a memoir called The Art of Being Deaf. While researching her memoir, the author discovered that the questions about her deafness that she most needed to answer were her own. Having first read many memoirs by other deaf writers and novels with deaf characters, the author set about composing her own narrative of deafness in a fresh way. She not only came to an improved understanding of her deaf self, but grew into a more authentic understanding of her whole self, reconciling her memories of the deaf girl she once was with the adult deaf woman she is now. The author illustrates how the act of writing a memoir can be an important tool in resolving questions of identity.

  20. Steroid Treatments Equally Effective Against Sudden Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6, 2011 Steroid Treatments Equally Effective Against Sudden Deafness Injecting steroids into the middle ear works just ... when it comes to restoring hearing for sudden deafness patients. This finding, the result of a large ...

  1. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England) and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA). The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004). Both films are clas...

  2. Neonatal arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Banani; Basu, Srikanta; Parmar, Veena R

    2006-02-01

    Neonatal arrhythmias are not uncommon; however, they rarely cause hemodynamic compromise. This paper aims to study the etiology, spectrum and outcome of neonates with arrhythmias who presented to a pediatric department. All neonates, either inborn or brought to the pediatric emergency with rhythm disorders, between August 1999 to August 2002, were included prospectively. Evaluation including a search for secondary causes of rhythm disorder and a chest X-ray, standard 12-lead electrocardiography and echocardiography in all. The management required in each and the outcomes were noted. Nine neonates were identified, of which 4 were inborn. Tachycardia was seen in 8 neonates and bradycardia in only one. Three neonates had an antenatal onset of arrhythmias; in the rest it was postnatal in onset. Five neonates had a secondary rhythm disorder, secondary to metabolic derangements in 4 and a cardiac mass in 1. Five had ventricular arrhythmias and 5 had hemodynamic compromise due to the arrhythmia. The outcome was poor in 4 and was related to the underlying illness. Tachyarrhythmia is more common than bradyarrhythmia in the neonate. Arrhythmias secondary to various metabolic causes are more common than primary rhythm disorders.

  3. Tuberculosis neonatal

    OpenAIRE

    Pastor Durán, Xavier

    1986-01-01

    PROTOCOLOS TERAPEUTICOS. TUBERCULOSIS NEONATAL 1. CONCEPTO La tuberculosis neonatal es la infección del recién nacido producida por el bacilo de Koch. Es una situación rara pero grave que requiere un diagnóstico precoz y un tratamiento enérgico..

  4. Apartheid in Deaf Education: Examining Workforce Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Rusher, Melissa; Andrews, Jean F.; Coryell, Judy

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 3,227 professionals in 313 deaf education programs found that 22.0% of teachers and 14.5% of administrators were deaf--a less than 10% increase in deaf professionals since 1993. Additionally, 21.7% of teachers and 6.1% of administrators were professionals of color. Of these minority teachers, only 2.5% were deaf persons of color. Only…

  5. Representations of Sound in American Deaf Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Russell S.

    2007-01-01

    Sound plays a prominent role in narrative description of characters and environs in mainstream American literature. A review of American Deaf literature shows that the representations of sound held for deaf writers are in extensional and oppositional terms. American deaf writers, in their descriptions of entities, characters, functions, and…

  6. Violent Offenders in a Deaf Prison Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katrina R.; Vernon, McCay; Capella, Michele E.

    2005-01-01

    Previous research suggested an unexplained difference in the patterns of offending behaviors among deaf people when compared to hearing people. This study, conducted in Texas, compares the incidence and types of violent offenses of a deaf prison population in comparison to the hearing prison population. Sixty-four percent of deaf prisoners were…

  7. Deafness and the Riddle of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lennard J.

    2007-01-01

    In the past, much discrimination against deaf people was based on the assumption that they were in fact people without language--that is, dumb. "Dumb" carried the sense of being not only mute but also stupid, as in a "dumb" animal. The status of deaf people has changed in important ways, as deaf activists and scholars have reshaped the idea of…

  8. Deaf on the Lifeline of Mumbai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusters, Annelies

    2009-01-01

    This article is a result of my MSc Deaf Studies dissertation that is situated on an intersection between Deaf geography, anthropology and Deafhood theory. During five weeks of participatory observation and interviews in Mumbai, my attention was drawn to the city's lifeline: the suburban train system. It appeared that Deaf people tend to travel in…

  9. Deaf Children's Knowledge of Internal Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elaine; Badger, Terry

    1991-01-01

    Data from 80 deaf children and 190 hearing children, ages 5-15, indicated that there were no intergroup differences on the Draw-a-Person Test; deaf children in successively older age groups knew more internal body parts than younger subjects; and deaf children knew less about internal body parts than hearing children. (Author/JDD)

  10. Teaching deaf learners. Psychological and developmental foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoors, H.E.T.; Marschark, M.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching Deaf Learners: Psychological and Developmental Foundations explores how deaf students (children and adolescents) learn and the conditions that support their reaching their full cognitive potential -- or not. Beginning with an introduction to teaching and learning of both deaf and hearing

  11. Does concurrent in utero exposure to buprenorphine and antidepressant medications influence the course of neonatal abstinence syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Alane B; O'Brien, Liam; Alto, William A; Wong, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether concurrent in utero exposure to buprenorphine and antidepressants impacts the course of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in infants. A retrospective cohort study of 148 infants who were exposed to buprenorphine during pregnancy. Univariate and bivariate analyses were used to examine associations between concurrent maternal use of buprenorphine and antidepressants as compared to maternal use of buprenorphine alone. The time to onset of NAS resolution was significantly longer in infants exposed to both buprenorphine and antidepressants during pregnancy when compared to those exposed to buprenorphine alone (129.8 h versus 70.2 h, p = 0.042). Women who are prescribed both antidepressants and buprenorphine during pregnancy should be counseled about the possibility of a prolonged course of neonatal abstinence syndrome.

  12. Maternal low glycaemic index diet, fat intake and postprandial glucose influences neonatal adiposity – secondary analysis from the ROLO study

    OpenAIRE

    Horan, Mary K; McGowan, Ciara A; Gibney, Eileen R; Donnelly, Jean M; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2014-01-01

    Background The in utero environment is known to affect fetal development however many of the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the association between maternal dietary macronutrient intake and lifestyle throughout pregnancy and neonatal weight and adiposity. Methods This was an analysis of 542 mother and infant pairs from the ROLO study (Randomised cOntrol trial of LOw glycaemic index diet versus no dietary intervention to prevent recurrence ...

  13. The influence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies in conjunction with gestational hyperglycemia on neonatal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Wu, Tian-mei; Ming, Wei-jie; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Xiao-min

    2015-01-01

    To determine the predictive value of the presence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies with respect to neonatal outcomes. A total of 311 pregnant women with abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results were enrolled in this study. Maternal glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA), islet cell autoantibodies (ICA) and insulin autoantibodies (IAA) were tested in fasting blood both on the day following the routine OGTT and before delivery. The birth weight, Apgar score, blood glucose and outcomes of each neonate were later evaluated and recorded. 1. In this study, 33.9% of the pregnant women with gestational hyperglycemia had detectable levels of one or more types of anti-islet cell antibodies in the third trimester. The proportion of women who produced GADA and/or ICA was significantly higher in the group of women with gestational hyperglycemia than in the control group (P<0.05). The groups similarly differed in the proportion of women who tested positive for any anti-islet cell antibody (P<0.05). 2. Of the patients in our study, those who produced GADA exhibited an increase in uterine and umbilical arterial pulsatility indexes (PIs) during the third trimesters compared with the control group (P˂0.05). Additionally, an increased frequency of fetal growth restriction (FGR) was observed in the infants of women who produced IAA during pregnancy compared with those without autoantibodies (P˂0.05). 3. The rate of newborn admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) was significantly associated with the presence of maternal ICA during the third trimester (OR, 6.36; 95% CI, 1.22-33.26). 4. The incidence of neonatal asphyxia was associated with the presence of maternal GADA in both the second (OR, 10.44; 95% CI, 1.46-74.92) and the third (OR, 8.33; 95% CI, 1.45-47.82) trimesters. Approximately one-third of the women with gestational hyperglycemia produced anti-islet cell antibodies. The incidence of FGR was higher in women with gestational

  14. The influence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies in conjunction with gestational hyperglycemia on neonatal outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Li

    Full Text Available To determine the predictive value of the presence of maternal islet beta-cell autoantibodies with respect to neonatal outcomes.A total of 311 pregnant women with abnormal 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT results were enrolled in this study. Maternal glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA, islet cell autoantibodies (ICA and insulin autoantibodies (IAA were tested in fasting blood both on the day following the routine OGTT and before delivery. The birth weight, Apgar score, blood glucose and outcomes of each neonate were later evaluated and recorded.1. In this study, 33.9% of the pregnant women with gestational hyperglycemia had detectable levels of one or more types of anti-islet cell antibodies in the third trimester. The proportion of women who produced GADA and/or ICA was significantly higher in the group of women with gestational hyperglycemia than in the control group (P<0.05. The groups similarly differed in the proportion of women who tested positive for any anti-islet cell antibody (P<0.05. 2. Of the patients in our study, those who produced GADA exhibited an increase in uterine and umbilical arterial pulsatility indexes (PIs during the third trimesters compared with the control group (P˂0.05. Additionally, an increased frequency of fetal growth restriction (FGR was observed in the infants of women who produced IAA during pregnancy compared with those without autoantibodies (P˂0.05. 3. The rate of newborn admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU was significantly associated with the presence of maternal ICA during the third trimester (OR, 6.36; 95% CI, 1.22-33.26. 4. The incidence of neonatal asphyxia was associated with the presence of maternal GADA in both the second (OR, 10.44; 95% CI, 1.46-74.92 and the third (OR, 8.33; 95% CI, 1.45-47.82 trimesters.Approximately one-third of the women with gestational hyperglycemia produced anti-islet cell antibodies. The incidence of FGR was higher in women with

  15. Low empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netten, Anouk P; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; Soede, Wim; Dirks, Evelien; Briaire, Jeroen J; Frijns, Johan H M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy. The study group (mean age 11.9 years) consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids) and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups were compared using self-reports, a parent-report and observation tasks to rate the children's level of empathy, their attendance to others' emotions, emotion recognition, and supportive behavior. Deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than normal hearing children, regardless of their type of hearing device. The level of emotion recognition was equal in both groups. During observations, deaf and hard of hearing children showed more attention to the emotion evoking events but less supportive behavior compared to their normal hearing peers. Deaf and hard of hearing children attending mainstream education or using oral language show higher levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than deaf and hard of hearing children who use sign (supported) language or attend special education. However, they are still outperformed by normal hearing children. Deaf and hard of hearing children, especially those in special education, show lower levels of empathy than normal hearing children, which can have consequences for initiating and maintaining relationships.

  16. Low empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (preadolescents compared to normal hearing controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk P Netten

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (preadolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy.The study group (mean age 11.9 years consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups were compared using self-reports, a parent-report and observation tasks to rate the children's level of empathy, their attendance to others' emotions, emotion recognition, and supportive behavior.Deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than normal hearing children, regardless of their type of hearing device. The level of emotion recognition was equal in both groups. During observations, deaf and hard of hearing children showed more attention to the emotion evoking events but less supportive behavior compared to their normal hearing peers. Deaf and hard of hearing children attending mainstream education or using oral language show higher levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than deaf and hard of hearing children who use sign (supported language or attend special education. However, they are still outperformed by normal hearing children.Deaf and hard of hearing children, especially those in special education, show lower levels of empathy than normal hearing children, which can have consequences for initiating and maintaining relationships.

  17. Neonatal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Shastri, Sweta; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-03-01

    Neonatal hypertension (HT) is a frequently under reported condition and is seen uncommonly in the intensive care unit. Neonatal HT has defined arbitrarily as blood pressure more than 2 standard deviations above the base as per the age or defined as systolic BP more than 95% for infants of similar size, gestational age and postnatal age. It has been diagnosed long back but still is the least studied field in neonatology. There is still lack of universally accepted normotensive data for neonates as per gestational age, weight and post-natal age. Neonatal HT is an important morbidity that needs timely detection and appropriate management, as it can lead to devastating short-term effect on various organs and also poor long-term adverse outcomes. There is no consensus yet about the treatment guidelines and majority of treatment protocols are based on the expert opinion. Neonate with HT should be evaluated in detail starting from antenatal, perinatal, post-natal history, and drug intake by neonate and mother. This review article covers multiple aspects of neonatal hypertension like definition, normotensive data, various etiologies and methods of BP measurement, clinical features, diagnosis and management.

  18. Tirosinemia neonatal Neonatal tyrosinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael J. Manotas Cabarcas

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available Mediante la técnica de Udenfriend y Cooper, se midieron los niveles de tirosina en la sangre del cordón de 26 prematuros y 31 niños de término, con el fin de comparar las concentraciones según la edad gestacional y detectar la presencia de la tirosinemia neonatal. Se encontró un caso de esta entidad en un niño de 31 semanas de edad gestacional, lo cual correspondió al 3.8% de los prematuros y al 1.8% del grupo total. La concentración de tirosina en el paciente fue de 53 JJ.M. El promedio de las concentraciones en los prematuros menores de 32 semanas fue de 16.8 :t 6.3 JJ.M; el de los niños entre 33 y 36 semanas fue de 19.3 :t 7.6 JJ.M y el de los niños de término, de 17.2 :t 9.4 JJ.M. Las pruebas estadísticas no mostraron tendencias ni diferencias significativas entre estas concentraciones. El promedio ponderado para el grupo total fue 17.7 :t 7.3 JJ.M. Se recomienda establecer programas de tamizaje para detectar este problema porque puede presentar repercusiones neurológicas posteriores.

    By means of the Udenfriend-Cooper technique, levels of tyrosine were measured in the cord blood of 26 preterm and 31 term Infants; the objective was to compare tyrosine concentrations according to gestational age and to detect the presence of neonatal tyrosinemia. A case of this disease was found In an Infant with 31 weeks of gestational age; this case represented 3.8% of preterm Infants and 1.8% of the total group. Average tyrosine concentration according to age was as follows: 16.8: ± 6.3  µM in Infants under 32 weeks of gestational age; 19.3: ±: 7.6 µM In those between 33 and 36 weeks and 17.2 : ±: 9.4 µM In the term Infants

  19. Neonatal retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tero T Kivelä

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available From 7% to 10% of all retinoblastomas and from 44% to 71% of familial retinoblastomas in developed countries are diagnosed in the neonatal period, usually through pre- or post-natal screening prompted by a positive family history and sometimes serendipitously during screening for retinopathy of prematurity or other reasons. In developing countries, neonatal diagnosis of retinoblastoma has been less common. Neonatal retinoblastoma generally develops from a germline mutation of RB1, the retinoblastoma gene, even when the family history is negative and is thus usually hereditary. At least one-half of infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have unilateral tumors when the diagnosis is made, typically the International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (Murphree Group B or higher, but most germline mutation carriers will progress to bilateral involvement, typically Group A in the fellow eye. Neonatal leukokoria usually leads to the diagnosis in children without a family history of retinoblastoma, and a Group C tumor or higher is typical in the more advanced involved eye. Almost all infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have at least one eye with a tumor in proximity to the foveola, but the macula of the fellow eye is frequently spared. Consequently, loss of reading vision from both eyes is exceptional. A primary ectopic intracranial neuroblastic tumor known as trilateral retinoblastoma is no more common after neonatal than other retinoblastoma. For many reasons, neonatal retinoblastoma may be a challenge to eradicate, and the early age at diagnosis and relatively small tumors do not guarantee the preservation of both eyes of every involved child. Oncology nurses can be instrumental in contributing to better outcomes by ensuring that hereditary retinoblastoma survivors receive genetic counseling, by referring families of survivors to early screening programs when they are planning for a baby, and by providing psychological and practical support

  20. Neonatal Retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Tero T.; Hadjistilianou, Theodora

    2017-01-01

    From 7% to 10% of all retinoblastomas and from 44% to 71% of familial retinoblastomas in developed countries are diagnosed in the neonatal period, usually through pre- or post-natal screening prompted by a positive family history and sometimes serendipitously during screening for retinopathy of prematurity or other reasons. In developing countries, neonatal diagnosis of retinoblastoma has been less common. Neonatal retinoblastoma generally develops from a germline mutation of RB1, the retinoblastoma gene, even when the family history is negative and is thus usually hereditary. At least one-half of infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have unilateral tumors when the diagnosis is made, typically the International Intraocular Retinoblastoma Classification (Murphree) Group B or higher, but most germline mutation carriers will progress to bilateral involvement, typically Group A in the fellow eye. Neonatal leukokoria usually leads to the diagnosis in children without a family history of retinoblastoma, and a Group C tumor or higher is typical in the more advanced involved eye. Almost all infants with neonatal retinoblastoma have at least one eye with a tumor in proximity to the foveola, but the macula of the fellow eye is frequently spared. Consequently, loss of reading vision from both eyes is exceptional. A primary ectopic intracranial neuroblastic tumor known as trilateral retinoblastoma is no more common after neonatal than other retinoblastoma. For many reasons, neonatal retinoblastoma may be a challenge to eradicate, and the early age at diagnosis and relatively small tumors do not guarantee the preservation of both eyes of every involved child. Oncology nurses can be instrumental in contributing to better outcomes by ensuring that hereditary retinoblastoma survivors receive genetic counseling, by referring families of survivors to early screening programs when they are planning for a baby, and by providing psychological and practical support for parents when

  1. Deaf Education in a Planetarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Muxue; Hintz, E. G.; Jones, M.; Lawler, J.; Fisler, A.; Mumford, H.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years we have struggled with the difficulty of giving a planetarium show to a deaf audience. This is especially true for a younger audience with limited reading abilities. You must illuminate the ASL signer which causes light splash onto the dome. You must slow the presentation down to allow for time to interpret and then point. A slower presentation can have an adverse impact on the learning of the hearing students if the presentation is made to a mixed audience. To address these issues, we are currently working on methods to improve deaf education in a planetarium environment. We will present an overview of the current project along with efforts to establish baselines comprehension levels for both deaf and hearing children. This work is partially funded by an NSF IIS-1124548 grant and funding from the Sorenson Foundation.

  2. Responses to pain in school-aged children with experience in a neonatal intensive care unit: cognitive aspects and maternal influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmeister, Johanna; Demirakça, Süha; Zohsel, Katrin; Flor, Herta; Hermann, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that school-aged (9-14 yr) preterm and fullterm children with neonatal pain exposure exhibit elevated heat pain thresholds and heightened perceptual sensitization to tonic painful heat when tested under standard conditions [Hermann C, Hohmeister J, Demirakca S, Zohsel K, Flor H. Long-term alteration of pain sensitivity in school-aged children with early pain experiences. Pain 2006;125:278-85]. Here, changes in the psychosocial context of pain responses in these children, who had been hospitalized >or=7 days after birth including >or=3 days of treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), are reported. Nineteen preterm (or=37 weeks gestational age) with NICU experience, recruited retrospectively and selected based on strict exclusion criteria, and 20 fullterm control children participated. Preterm NICU children endorsed more pain catastrophizing as compared to controls. Mothers of preterm children, who had been more severely ill and had been hospitalized longer than fullterm NICU children, were more likely to engage in solicitous pain-related behavior. Maternal influence was also assessed by comparing heat pain thresholds and perceptual sensitization to tonic painful heat obtained in the presence versus absence (i.e. standard testing conditions) of the mother. In all three groups, maternal presence was associated with increased heat pain thresholds. Control children habituated significantly more to tonic heat when their mother was present. The NICU children showed overall significantly less habituation than the controls; there was no modulating effect of maternal presence. Especially in highly vulnerable children such as preterms, neonatal pain exposure and prolonged hospitalization may, aside from neuronal plasticity, promote maladaptive pain-related cognitions and foster parental behavior that reinforces the child's pain response.

  3. Deaf children learning to sign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Kyle

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It used to be thought that deaf children had a language difficulty. Research we have carried out on deaf children in deaf families from the age of three months, indicates that deaf children learn sign language as effectively as hearing children learn to speak. In contrast, deaf children from hearing homes, even in signing programmes at school lag behind in the acquisition of sign language even up to the age of 11 years. Some initial intervention work has been carried out with families to introduce sign language earlier and several possible means of improving the language environment of deaf children are explored in this paper. Costumava-se pensar que as crianças surdas tinham dificuldade de linguagem. Uma pesquisa que realizamos com crianças surdas, de famílias surdas, a partir de 3 meses de idade, indica que crianças surdas aprendem a língua de sinais tão eficazmente quanto crianças ouvintes aprendem a falar. Em contraste, crianças surdas, de lares ouvintes, mesmo estando em programas para o aprendizado de sinais na escola, ficam atrás na aquisição da língua de sinais até a idade de 11 anos de idade. Alguns trabalhos iniciais de intervenção, que têm sido realizados com as famílias para introduzir a língua de sinais mais cedo, bem como vários meios possíveis de enriquecer o meio lingüístico de crianças surdas são explorados nesse artigo.

  4. Genetics of Hearing and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANGELI, SIMON; LIN, XI; LIU, XUE ZHONG

    2015-01-01

    This article is a review of the genes and genetic disorders that affect hearing in humans and a few selected mouse models of deafness. Genetics is playing an increasingly critical role in the practice of medicine. This is not only in part to the importance that genetic knowledge has on traditional genetic diseases but also in part to the fact that genetic knowledge provides an understanding of the fundamental biological process of most diseases. The proteins coded by the genes related to hearing loss (HL) are involved in many functions in the ear, such as cochlear fluid homeostasis, ionic channels, stereocilia morphology and function, synaptic transmission, gene regulation, and others. Mouse models play a crucial role in understanding of the pathogenesis associated with these genes. Different types of familial HL have been recognized for years; however, in the last two decades, there has been tremendous progress in the discovery of gene mutations that cause deafness. Most of the cases of genetic deafness recognized today are monogenic disorders that can be broadly classified by the mode of inheritance (i.e., autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked, and mitochondrial inheritance) and by the presence of associated phenotypic features (i.e., syndromic; and nonsyndromic). In terms of nonsyndromic HL, the chromosomal locations are currently known for ~ 125 loci (54 for dominant and 71 for recessive deafness), 64 genes have been identified (24 for dominant and 40 for recessive deafness), and there are many more loci for syndromic deafness and X-linked and mitochondrial DNA disorders (http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Thus, today’s clinician must understand the science of medical genetics as this knowledge can lead to more effective disease diagnosis, counseling, treatment, and prevention. PMID:23044516

  5. The Genetics of Deafness in Domestic Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Although deafness can be acquired throughout an animal’s life from a variety of causes, hereditary deafness, especially congenital hereditary deafness, is a significant problem in several species. Extensive reviews exist of the genetics of deafness in humans and mice, but not for deafness in domestic animals. Hereditary deafness in many species and breeds is associated with loci for white pigmentation, where the cochlear pathology is cochleo-saccular. In other cases, there is no pigmentation association and the cochlear pathology is neuroepithelial. Late onset hereditary deafness has recently been identified in dogs and may be present but not yet recognized in other species. Few genes responsible for deafness have been identified in animals, but progress has been made for identifying genes responsible for the associated pigmentation phenotypes. Across species, the genes identified with deafness or white pigmentation patterns include MITF, PMEL, KIT, EDNRB, CDH23, TYR, and TRPM1 in dog, cat, horse, cow, pig, sheep, ferret, mink, camelid, and rabbit. Multiple causative genes are present in some species. Significant work remains in many cases to identify specific chromosomal deafness genes so that DNA testing can be used to identify carriers of the mutated genes and thereby reduce deafness prevalence. PMID:26664958

  6. Antenatal diagnosis of congenital deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, G

    1988-01-01

    Advances in the field of antenatal diagnosis have made possible the detection of profound sensorineural hearing loss prior to birth. Fetal motion in response to sound and auditory evoked potential testing can determine the presence of fetal hearing in the third trimester of pregnancy. Imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging hold promise for the diagnosis of some forms of congenital deafness in the second trimester fetus. The methods by which congenital deafness soon may be diagnosed and the implications for the otologist are discussed.

  7. 1 A DEAF ADULT LITERACY COLLECTIVE Debra Aarons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATEVG

    In this paper, we present a description of an adult Deaf Literacy project in South Africa. The project is under the auspices of the Deaf Community of Cape Town, a grassroots organisation run by Deaf people to serve the needs of the historically disadvantaged Deaf. The literacy project is staffed by Deaf signers, paired with ...

  8. The effects of spatial attention on motion processing in deaf signers, hearing signers, and hearing nonsigners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Rain G; Dobkins, Karen R

    2002-06-01

    Visual abilities in deaf individuals may be altered as a result of auditory deprivation and/or because the deaf rely heavily on a sign language (American Sign Language, or ASL). In this study, we asked whether attentional abilities of deaf subjects are altered. Using a direction of motion discrimination task in the periphery, we investigated three aspects of spatial attention: orienting of attention, divided attention, and selective attention. To separate influences of auditory deprivation and sign language experience, we compared three subject groups: deaf and hearing native signers of ASL and hearing nonsigners. To investigate the ability to orient attention, we compared motion thresholds obtained with and without a valid spatial precue, with the notion that subjects orient to the stimulus prior to its appearance when a precue is presented. Results suggest a slight advantage for deaf subjects in the ability to orient spatial attention. To investigate divided attention, we compared motion thresholds obtained when a single motion target was presented to thresholds obtained when the motion target was presented among confusable distractors. The effect of adding distractors was found to be identical across subject groups, suggesting that attentional capacity is not altered in deaf subjects. Finally, to investigate selective attention, we compared performance for a single, cued motion target with that of a cued motion target presented among distractors. Here, deaf, but not hearing, subjects performed better when the motion target was presented among distractors than when it was presented alone, suggesting that deaf subjects are more affected by the presence of distractors. In sum, our results suggest that attentional orienting and selective attention are altered in the deaf and that these effects are most likely due to auditory deprivation as opposed to sign language experience. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  9. [The influence of mode of delivery on the level of catecholamines in umbilical cord blood of neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-xuan; Zhang, Wei-yuan

    2009-05-19

    To determine whether mode of delivery is associated with the level of catecholamines in umbilical cord blood of neonates. A study was carried out on 150 neonates. Among them 90 were healthy while 60 were diagnosed fetal distress. Then the subjects were first divided into 5 groups according to different modes of delivery: 30 were delivered by spontaneous labor for vaginal delivery without any pain relief; 30 by vaginal delivery with epidural anaesthesia; 30 by caesarean section without labor; 30 by vaginal delivery with low forceps because of fetal distress and 30 by caesarean section of emergency because of fetal distress. After delivery, umbilical cord blood of both artery and vein was collected for determination of norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), and dopamine (DA). (1) The concentration of NE and E of umbilical artery were different in each group (P < 0.01), the group with the highest concentrations of NE and E was the ones delivered by vaginal delivery with low forceps [(73 +/- 6) ng/L, (37.8 +/- 1.8) ng/L] while caesarean section [(35 +/- 5) ng/L, (27.2 +/- 1.2) ng/L] was associated with significantly lower concentrations of NE and E of umbilical artery. The ones delivered by vaginal delivery with low forceps [(33.7 +/- 4.5) ng/L] and caesarean section of emergency [(32.9 +/- 4.5) ng/L] had higher concentrations of DA compared with any other group (P < 0.01). (2) The concentration of NE and E of umbilical vein were different in each group (P < 0.01) just like that of umbilical artery. The ones delivered by vaginal delivery with low forceps and caesarean section of emergency had higher concentrations of DA compared with any other group (P < 0.01). (3) The neonates with fetal distress had higher levels of catecholamine both in umbilical artery and umbilical vein than the healthy ones (P < 0.01); at the same time, the ones with fetal distress got lower Apgar scores 1, 5, 10 min after born contrasted to the healthy ones. If no indication for caesarean section

  10. Neonatal Nursing

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, Doreen; Morris, Maryke

    1994-01-01

    "Neonatal Nursing" offers a systematic approach to the nursing care of the sick newborn baby. Nursing actions and responsibilities are the focus of the text with relevant research findings, clinical applications, anatomy, physiology and pathology provided where necessary. This comprehensive text covers all areas of neonatal nursing including ethics, continuing care in the community, intranatal care, statistics and pharmokinetics so that holistic care of the infant is described. This book shou...

  11. Reflections on Deaf Education: Perspectives of Deaf Senior Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Len; Shaw, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Parents with deaf children face many challenges in making educational choices, developing language and a sense of belonging. Other key aspects of life including concept development and social competency are also critical decision points faced by parents. Developing language, whether it is through spoken or signed modalities, is of utmost…

  12. Social competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine G Akers

    Full Text Available Early experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care.

  13. Social competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Katherine G; Yang, Zhen; DelVecchio, Dominic P; Reeb, Bethany C; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce S; Tang, Akaysha C

    2008-06-30

    Early experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care.

  14. [Acoustic recognition of emotions and musical perceptive abilities in young deaf person].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, L; Rousteau, G

    2012-01-01

    What influence does being deaf have on the ability to recognise emotions in other people? What perceptive abilities can be found in deaf people that are based on the acoustic recognition of emotions? Studies concerning the most useful acoustic clues in the recognition of emotions remain scarce. Beyond the uttered words, emotions are perceptible through the music of speech i.e. its words, its parameters (namely the intensity), the pitch and the timbre or colour of a sound, as well as its rhythm. The protocol of assessment developed in this study shows evidence of a correlation between the recognition of fundamental emotions and the perceptive musical abilities of deaf patients. This concept is relevant when regarding any deaf patient; irrespective of hearing aid type or re-education method.

  15. Late emotional effects of rehabilitation during childhood and their impact on coping with deafness in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichengreen, Adva; Hoofien, Dan

    2017-07-01

    This study examined potential influences of childhood rehabilitation and over-normalization on coping with disability in adulthood. A total of 88 deaf and hard-of-hearing students were interviewed retrospectively about their childhood and completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological environment-directedness and present emotional and behavioral coping with deafness. It was partially supported that over-normative parental attitude negatively affected coping with deafness through the mediation of elevated environment-directedness. Intensity of childhood rehabilitation was not found to affect adulthood coping with deafness. However, post-hoc analyses supported this mediation path when rehabilitation had been intensive yet not prolonged. Alleviating changes in the perception and practice of rehabilitation are suggested.

  16. Leadership style in the deaf community: an exploratory case study of a university president.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamm-Larew, Deborah; Stanford, Jevetta; Greene, Robert; Heacox, Christopher; Hodge, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A qualitative mini-case study of I. King Jordan and his leadership style explores the influence of a transformational leader on Gallaudet University and the Deaf community. The study features a template-style semistructured interview with Jordan regarding his perceptions of leadership and his personal insights. The study highlights the attributes of transformational leadership and encourages further research into leadership as a tool for change in the Deaf community and the disability rights movement. This exploration of the leadership style of Gallaudet's first Deaf president is especially timely; the study was conducted between Jordan's retirement announcement and the Gallaudet Board of Trustees' decision to rescind an offer to his announced successor to become the university's next president. That tumultuous transition accentuated the disconnect between Jordan's transformational, charismatic leadership style, which affected generations of the Deaf community, and his followers' dissatisfaction with his management and successor planning.

  17. Deaf students' knowledge of subtle lexical properties of transitive and intransitive English verbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Gerald P; Kelly, Ronald R; Albertini, John A; Toscano, Rose Marie

    2013-01-01

    Deaf learners' acquisition of fundamental lexical properties of high-frequency English verbs related to transitivity and intransitivity was examined, including the subtle distinction between unergative and unaccusative verbs. A 140-item sentence acceptability rating scale was used to assess this lexical knowledge in deaf college students at two English proficiency levels, plus a control group of hearing native English speakers. Hypotheses addressed the influence of relative derivational complexity and overall English proficiency on verb acquisition. Though the hearing group showed greater accuracy in sentence acceptability judgments and greater accuracy tied to overall English proficiency, the two deaf groups displayed fairly robust knowledge of targeted verbs' fundamental transitive and intransitive lexical properties. Nevertheless, verb acquisition remains a formidable challenge. Further research should assess deaf students' knowledge of these lexical properties in lower-frequency English verbs, including unaccusative verbs prevalent in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) and other academic discourse.

  18. [Teaching sign language to the families of the deaf: focusing the learning process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, Sueli Aparecida; de Lacerda, Cristina Broglia Feitosa; Marques, Penélope Leme

    2005-01-01

    According to bilingual education, only through sign language will deaf children attain linguistic and cognitive development, enabling them to learn a second language--spoken or written. However, it is also necessary for families to learn sign language in order to have a more efficient communication. To analyze methodological aspects of the teaching-learning process of Sign Language to family groups. Transcription and analysis of video recordings were made. The practice of teaching of the deaf teacher modifies itself during the research period and his attitude influences the way by which parents participate. The teaching methodology used by the deaf teacher interferes significantly in the motivation/participation of parents, followed by the acceptance of deafness and sign language.

  19. Modified areal cartography in auditory cortex following early- and late-onset deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen; Chabot, Nicole; Kok, Melanie A; Lomber, Stephen G

    2014-07-01

    Cross-modal plasticity following peripheral sensory loss enables deprived cortex to provide enhanced abilities in remaining sensory systems. These functional adaptations have been demonstrated in cat auditory cortex following early-onset deafness in electrophysiological and psychophysical studies. However, little information is available concerning any accompanying structural compensations. To examine the influence of sound experience on areal cartography, auditory cytoarchitecture was examined in hearing cats, early-deaf cats, and cats with late-onset deafness. Cats were deafened shortly after hearing onset or in adulthood. Cerebral cytoarchitecture was revealed immunohistochemically using SMI-32, a monoclonal antibody used to distinguish auditory areas in many species. Auditory areas were delineated in coronal sections and their volumes measured. Staining profiles observed in hearing cats were conserved in early- and late-deaf cats. In all deaf cats, dorsal auditory areas were the most mutable. Early-deaf cats showed further modifications, with significant expansions in second auditory cortex and ventral auditory field. Borders between dorsal auditory areas and adjacent visual and somatosensory areas were shifted ventrally, suggesting expanded visual and somatosensory cortical representation. Overall, this study shows the influence of acoustic experience in cortical development, and suggests that the age of auditory deprivation may significantly affect auditory areal cartography. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hystrix-like ichthyosis with deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Hystrix-like ichthyosis with deafness Hystrix-like ichthyosis with deafness Printable PDF Open All Close All ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hystrix-like ichthyosis with deafness (HID) is a disorder characterized by ...

  1. The Consequence Deafness has on the Psychological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Consequence Deafness has on the Psychological and Academic Development of deaf students. The case of Alpha special school for the deaf in Addis Ababa, Hermata and Mendera Junior School at Jimma Town.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy syndrome Deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy syndrome Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Deafness-dystonia-optic neuronopathy (DDON) syndrome, also known as ...

  3. Satisfaction Levels and Factors Influencing Satisfaction With Use of a Social App for Neonatal and Pediatric Patient Transfer Information Systems: A Questionnaire Study Among Doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Iee; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Sun Jun; Cho, Soo Chul; Kim, Il Nyeo

    2016-08-04

    The treatment of neonatal and pediatric patients is limited to certain medical institutions depending on treatment difficulty. Effective patient transfers are necessary in situations where there are limited medical resources. In South Korea, the government has made a considerable effort to establish patient transfer systems using various means, such as websites, telephone, and so forth. However, in reality, the effort has not yet been effective. In this study, we ran a patient transfer information system using a social app for effective patient transfer. We analyzed the results, satisfaction levels, and the factors influencing satisfaction. Naver Band is a social app and mobile community application which in Korea is more popular than Facebook. It facilitates group communication. Using Naver Band, two systems were created: one by the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the other by the Department of Pediatrics at Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital, South Korea. The information necessary for patient transfers was provided to participating obstetricians (n=51) and pediatricians (n=90). We conducted a survey to evaluate the systems and reviewed the results retrospectively. The number of patients transferred was reported to increase by 65% (26/40) obstetricians and 40% (23/57) pediatricians. The time taken for transfers was reported to decrease by 72% (29/40) obstetricians and 59% (34/57) pediatricians. Satisfaction was indicated by 83% (33/40) obstetricians and 89% (51/57) pediatricians. Regarding factors influencing satisfaction, the obstetricians reported communication with doctors in charge (P=.03) and time reduction during transfers (P=.02), whereas the pediatricians indicated review of the diagnosis and treatment of transferred patients (P=.01) and the time reduction during transfers (P=.007). The users were highly satisfied and different users indicated different factors of satisfaction. This finding implies that users' requirements should be

  4. Toward a theory of deaf ethnos: deafnicity -- D/deaf (Homaemon - Homoglosson - Homothreskon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Richard Clark

    2010-01-01

    Should ethnicity be used to interpret relations between the Deaf community and the hearing people? Recent scholarship questioning the merits of Deaf ethnicity suggests a need to reexamine the use of ethnicity when describing Deaf identity and culture. This article provides an overview of key contributions to race and ethnicity discourse in the 20th century, identifies epistemological and ontological errors to avoid, suggests adherence to the classical Greek concept of ethnos as an alternative to ethnie, and argues for the continuing significance of Deaf ethnicity. Specifically, I propose that Deaf ethnicity is a triadic relational nexus that approximates communities of origin, language, and religion. This is expressed as Deafnicity approximately D/deaf (Hómaemon * Homóglosson * Homóthreskon). Deafnicity offers a promising alternative for examining relations between Deaf and hearing communities, exploring variance between nationalized Deaf communities, and expanding our understanding of audism.

  5. Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context

    OpenAIRE

    Kisch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-day Israel. The consequences of deafness vary considerably between different Bedouin groups as well as along gender lines. The emergence of a local sign language, in several Bedouin groups with exceptionally high rates of deafness, account for significant differences in the experience of deafness by bot...

  6. The Church of Deaf Sociality: Deaf Churchgoing Practices and "Sign Bread and Butter" in Bangalore, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedner, Michele

    2014-01-01

    This article ethnographically analyzes the practices of deaf young adults in Bangalore, India. As sign language is not used by families, schools, or other institutions, the church is a crucial educational space. Churchgoing provides deaf young adults with opportunities to orient themselves toward other deaf young adults, to develop new ideas of…

  7. The Impact of Maternal Deafness on Cradling Laterality with Deaf and Hearing Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieratzki, Jechil S.; Woll, Bencie

    2004-01-01

    A recent article in the "Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education" (Leigh, Brice, & Meadow-Orlans, 2004) explored attachment between deaf mothers and their 18-month-old children and reported relationship patterns similar to those for hearing dyads. The study reported here explores a marker of early mother-child relationships: cradling…

  8. A Phenomenological Study of Online Learning for Deaf Students in Postsecondary Education: A Deaf Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Patricia Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the effects of online learning for deaf college students as opposed to the mainstream classroom setting. This study specifically analyzed the writing and reading skills of deaf students in general and the development of English literacy of prelingually deaf students and those from non-English…

  9. Beethoven's deafness, the defiance of a genius

    OpenAIRE

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Ludwig van Beethoven, one of the greatest composers in History, was tormented for his whole life by a progressive deafness without definitive diagnosis. Many authors published studies about the etiologic possibilities of the deafness of the music genius with different explanations about his auditory loss. In this work, the author discusses the implications of Beethoven's progressive deafness to the creation of his word, as well as etiologic assumptions of his disease. Would Beet...

  10. MULTIMEDIA BASED LEARNING MATERIALS FOR DEAF STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Luqman Hidayat; Gunarhadi; Furqon Hidayatulloh

    2017-01-01

    Deaf students have different abilities from students who have the ability to hear a lesson at school. Barriers to hear experienced by students with hearing impairment can affect the language, academic, and social skills of deaf students. Deaf students can still obtain information from other senses that are still functioning, such as the senses of sight, touch, taste and smell or of residual hearing that still exist. In the world of education, one way to overcome this obstacle is by making mul...

  11. Factors Contributing to Successful Employment Outcomes for Hispanic Women Who Are Deaf: Utilization of Chi-Squared Automatic Interaction Detector and Logistic Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Amber M.

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic women who are deaf constitute a heterogeneous group of individuals with varying vocational needs. To understand the unique needs of this population, it is important to analyze how consumer characteristics, presence of public supports, and type of services provided influence employment outcomes for Hispanic women who are deaf. The purpose…

  12. Cochlear implantation in children with single-sided deafness: does aetiology and duration of deafness matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Susan; Prosse, Susanne; Laszig, Roland; Wesarg, Thomas; Aschendorff, Antje; Hassepass, Frederike

    2015-01-01

    For adult patients with single-sided deafness (SSD), treatment with a cochlear implant (CI) is well established as an acceptable and beneficial hearing rehabilitation method administered routinely in clinical practice. In contrast, for children with SSD, CI has been applied less often to date, with the rationale to decide either on a case-by-case basis or under the realm of clinical research. The aim of our clinical study was to evaluate the longitudinal benefits of CI for a group of children diagnosed with SSD and to compare their outcomes with respect to patient characteristics. Evaluating a pool of paediatric SSD patients presenting for possible CI surgery revealed that the primary aetiology of deafness was congenital cochlear nerve deficiency. A subgroup of children meeting the CI candidacy criteria for the affected ear (the majority with acquired hearing loss) were enrolled in the study. Preliminary group results suggest substantial improvements in speech comprehension in noise and in the ability to localise sound, which was demonstrated through objective and subjective assessments after CI treatment for the group, with results varying from patient to patient. Our study shows a trend towards superior outcomes for children with acquired hearing loss and a shorter duration of hearing loss compared to congenitally deafened children who had a longer duration of SSD. This indicates an interactive influence of the age at onset, aetiology and duration of deafness upon the restoration of binaural integration and the overall benefits of sound stimulation to two ears after CI treatment. Continued longitudinal investigation of these children and further studies in larger groups may provide more guidance on the optimal timing of treatment for paediatric patients with acquired and congenital SSD. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Reduced procedural motor learning in deaf individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine eLévesque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies in the deaf suggest that cross-modal neuroplastic changes may vary across modalities. Only a handful of studies have examined motor capacities in the profoundly deaf. These studies suggest the presence of deficits in manual dexterity and delays in movement production. As of yet, the ability to learn complex sequential motor patterns has not been explored in deaf populations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the procedural learning skills of deaf adults. A serial reaction-time task (SRTT was performed by 18 deaf subjects and 18 matched controls to investigate possible motor alteration subsequent to auditory deprivation. Deaf participants had various degrees of hearing loss. Half of the experimental group were early-deaf adults mostly using hearing aids, the remaining half were late-deaf adults using a cochlear implant. Participants carried out a repeating 12-item sequence of key presses along with random blocks containing no repeating sequence. Non-specific and sequence-specific learning was analyzed in relation to individual features related to the hearing loss. The results revealed significant differences between groups in sequence-specific learning, with deaf subjects being less efficient than controls in acquiring sequence-specific knowledge. We interpret the results in light of cross-modal plasticity and the auditory scaffolding hypothesis.

  14. "I am the book"--Deaf poets' views on signed poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton-Spence, Rachel; de Quadros, Ronice Müller

    2014-10-01

    Despite research commenting on and analyzing signed poetry, there is little research exploring the aims and intentions of the signing poets. This paper considers the producers of signed poetry, rather than their products. Using material gathered from interviews with three established signing deaf poets, we consider what they hope to achieve when they perform their poetry, including who they aim their work at, and how their perceived audiences influence their performances. This allows us to understand more clearly what challenges audiences face when trying to understand the poetry and how the poets can help audiences meet those challenges. We find that signing poets understand how deaf audiences have been conditioned to respond to poetry, and create connections between themselves and deaf audiences by using the shared specific cultural and linguistic experiences of deaf people. Although deaf audiences are their ultimate preferred audiences, poets welcome hearing audiences, especially if their engagement with the poetry leads to increased understanding of Deaf culture or encourages them to learn sign language. The close, embodied relationship between the poet, poem, and audience makes them inseparable. Written poetry may be abstracted and contained in a book; in contrast, the signing poet is, in effect, the book. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. [Relationship between HBeAg from HBsAg positive mothers and regulatory T cells in neonates and its influence on HBV intrauterine transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, H Y; Yang, Z Q; Xu, X X; Wang, X F; Wang, B; Shi, X H; Fu, Z D; Wang, B; Wang, S P

    2017-10-10

    Objective: To explore the relationship between HBeAg in HBsAg positive mothers and CD(4)(+)CD(25)(+) Foxp3 (+)regulatory T cells (Treg) in newborns, as well as how they would influence the increasing risk on HBV intrauterine transmission. Methods: We collected information on general demographic characteristics and delivery on 270 HBsAg positive mothers and their newborns from the Third People's Hospital of Taiyuan. Fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) and chemiluminescence immunoassay (CLIA) were used to detect HBV DNA and HBV serological markers in peripheral blood from both mothers and neonates. The expression of Treg and other immune cells in peripheral blood of neonates were detected with flow cytometry (FCM). Results: Maternal HBeAg positive rates were associated with an increased risk of intrauterine transmission ( OR =4.08, 95 %CI : 1.89-8.82). Rates of Treg in newborns born to HBsAg-positive mothers were higher than that of the negative group ( Z =2.29, P =0.022). Each pair of the subjects was assigned to five different groups according to the HBeAg titers of mothers. Frequencies of both Treg and HBeAg in newborns and HBV DNA in mothers between the above said 5 groups showed similar trends of changing patterns and the differences between groups were statistically significant(χ(2)=18.73, P HBV DNA, mother's HBeAg titers were positively related to the percentage of Treg in their newborns ( r(s) =0.19, P =0.039). In addition, the frequencies of Treg were negatively correlated with pDC and CD(4)(+) T cell in their newborns ( r(s) =-0.21, P =0.017; r(s) =-0.23, P =0.009). Conclusion: HBeAg from HBsAg positive mothers might have inhibited the function of neonatal DC cells and T cells to reduce the immune response to HBV by up-regulating the proportion of Treg and finally increased the risk of HBV intrauterine transmission.

  16. The development of analogical reasoning in deaf children and their parents' communication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, Marcin; Galkowski, Tadeusz

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the results of a study of the development of analogical reasoning in deaf children coming from two different linguistic environments (deaf children of deaf parents--sign language, deaf children of hearing parents--spoken language) and in hearing children, as well as to compare two groups of deaf children to a group of hearing children. In order to estimate the development of children's analogical reasoning, especially the development of their understanding of different logical relations, two age groups were singled out in each population of children: younger (9- and 10-year-olds) and older (12- and 13-year-olds). In this way it is possible to assess the influence of early and consistent sign-language communication on the development of the conceptual system in deaf children and to establish whether early and consistent sign-language communication with deaf children affects their mental development to the same extent as early and consistent spoken-language communication with hearing children. The children were given three series of analogy tasks based on different logical relations: (a) a series of verbal analogy tasks (the relations of opposite, part-whole, and causality); (b) a series of numerical analogy tasks (the relations of class membership, opposite, and part-whole); and (c) a series of figural-geometric analogy tasks (the relations of opposite and part-whole). It was found that early and consistent sign-language communication with deaf children plays an almost equivalent role in the development of verbal, numerical, and spatial reasoning by analogy as early and consistent spoken-language communication with hearing children.

  17. Enhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA regulation via systematic neonatal novelty exposure: the influence of maternal HPA function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Dinces

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the rat, repeated brief exposures to novelty early in life can induce long-lasting enhancements in adult cognitive, social, emotional, and neuroendocrine function. Family-to-family variations in these intervention effects on adult offspring are predicted by the mother’s ability to mount a rapid corticosterone (CORT response to the onset of an acute stressor. Here, in Long-Evans rats, we investigated whether neonatal and adulthood novelty exposure, each individually and in combination, can enhance offspring HPA regulation. Using a 2x2 within-litter design, one half of each litter were exposed to a relatively novel non-home environment for 3-min (Neo_Novel daily during infancy (PND1-21 and the other half of the litter remained in the home cage (Neo_Home; we further exposed half of these two groups to early adulthood (PND54-63 novelty exposure in an open field and the remaining siblings stayed in their home cages. Two aspects of HPA regulation were assessed: the ability to maintain a low level of resting CORT (CORTB and the ability to mount a large rapid CORT response (CORTE to the onset of an acute stressor. Assessment of adult offspring’s ability to regulate HPA regulation began at 370 days of age. We further investigated whether the novelty exposure effects on offspring HPA regulation are sensitive to the context of maternal HPA regulation by assessing maternal HPA regulation similarly beginning 7 days after her pups were weaned. We found that at the population level, rats receiving neonatal, but not early adulthood exposure or both, showed a greater rapid CORTE than their home-staying siblings. At the individual family level, these novelty effects are positively associated with maternal CORTE. These results suggest that early experience of novelty can enhance the offspring’s ability to mount a rapid response to environmental challenge and the success of such early life intervention is critically dependent upon the context of maternal

  18. Congenital and prolonged adult-onset deafness cause distinct degradations in neural ITD coding with bilateral cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Kenneth E; Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Bilateral cochlear implant (CI) users perform poorly on tasks involving interaural time differences (ITD), which are critical for sound localization and speech reception in noise by normal-hearing listeners. ITD perception with bilateral CI is influenced by age at onset of deafness and duration of deafness. We previously showed that ITD coding in the auditory midbrain is degraded in congenitally deaf white cats (DWC) compared to acutely deafened cats (ADC) with normal auditory development (Hancock et al., J. Neurosci, 30:14068). To determine the relative importance of early onset of deafness and prolonged duration of deafness for abnormal ITD coding in DWC, we recorded from single units in the inferior colliculus of cats deafened as adults 6 months prior to experimentation (long-term deafened cats, LTDC) and compared neural ITD coding between the three deafness models. The incidence of ITD-sensitive neurons was similar in both groups with normal auditory development (LTDC and ADC), but significantly diminished in DWC. In contrast, both groups that experienced prolonged deafness (LTDC and DWC) had broad distributions of best ITDs around the midline, unlike the more focused distributions biased toward contralateral-leading ITDs present in both ADC and normal-hearing animals. The lack of contralateral bias in LTDC and DWC results in reduced sensitivity to changes in ITD within the natural range. The finding that early onset of deafness more severely degrades neural ITD coding than prolonged duration of deafness argues for the importance of fitting deaf children with sound processors that provide reliable ITD cues at an early age.

  19. Comparison of two different neonatal skin care practices and their influence on transepidermal water loss in healthy newborns within first 10 days of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboni, R; Roberta, R; Patrizi, A; Cocchi, G; Faldella, G; Raone, B

    2014-10-01

    Physiologic post-partum skin adaptation to the relative dry extra-uterine environment is a dynamic process which begins immediately after birth. Considering the differences from adult skin, the neonatal skin is more prone to damage by environmental factors; therefore, skin care regimens should be age adapted to ensure a good epidermal maturation. The effects of two different skin care practices were evaluated by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurement in 94 newborns aged ≤ 10 days: group 1 (G1), newborns washed only with a cotton washcloth moistened with water; group 2 (G2), newborns washed with liquid baby cleansers and hydrated with moisturizers. These recordings were compared to TEWL baseline values of the same neonates and to adults' values. A prospective study was conducted in healthy full-term newborns, measuring TEWL with TEWAMETER® TM300. The areas tested were the volar forearm and the popliteal fossa. In G1 (52 subjects), TEWL mean values were 6.65 ± 2.81 SD (g/m2/h) at volar forearm and 7.49 ± 2.47 SD (g/m2/h) at popliteal fossa. In G2 (42 subjects), TEWL mean values were 8.83 ± 3.05 SD (g/m2/h) at volar forearm and 10.18 ± 3.64 SD (g/m2/h) at popliteal fossa. There were statistically significant differences of TEWL mean values between G1 and G2, newborns and adults, baseline and post-skin care procedures. Tested skin care regimens could influence the process of functional adaptation of skin, in the early postnatal period. We could hypothesize that daily washing with liquid baby cleansers and moisturizing may delay the natural maturation of skin barrier function.

  20. Neonatal Kraniefraktur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine Marie Harries; Stantchev, Hristo

    2015-01-01

    During the latest decades the incidence of birth traumas has decreased significantly. Even so the traumas still contribute to an increased mortality and morbidity. We present a case of spontaneous neonatal skull fracture following a normal vaginal delivery. Abnormal facial structure was seen...

  1. Neonatal Jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Væth, Michael; Schendel, Diana

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that infants transferred to a neonatal ward after delivery had an almost twofold increased risk of being diagnosed with infantile autism later in childhood in spite of extensive controlling of obstetric risk factors. We therefore decided to investigate other reasons ...

  2. Study of Deafness Associated with DFNB59 Gene (pejvakin Mutation in Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Raeisi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Hearing loss is the most frequent sensory disorder affecting 1 in 500 neonates with more than 50% of inherited cases. This trait is a very heterogeneous disorder and happens due to genetic or environmental causes or both. More than 46 genes may be involved in non-syndromic hearing loss. Recently, DFNB59 gene has been shown to cause deafness in some Iranian populations. The aim of this study was to determine the role of DFNB59 gene mutations causing deafness in a group of 130 deaf pupils in Fars province. Methods: This descriptive-laboratory based study investigated the frequency of DFNB59 gene mutations using PCR-SSCP/HA strategy. Results: Two different DFNB59 polymorphism including 874G>A and 793C>G were found in 1 and 9 of 130 patients studied respectively. However, no DFNB59 mutation was identified. Conclusion: The results of this study shows that the association of DFNB59 mutations with deafness in Fars province is very low.

  3. Deaf mobile application accessibility requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Shelena Soosay; Hussain, Azham; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-08-01

    Requirement for deaf mobile applications need to be analysed to ensure the disabilities need are instilled into the mobile applications developed for them. Universal design is understandable to comply every user needs, however specific disability is argued by the authors to have different need and requirements. These differences are among the reasons for these applications being developed to target for a specific group of people, however they are less usable and later abandoned. This study focuses on deriving requirements that are needed by the deaf in their mobile applications that are meant specifically for them. Studies on previous literature was conducted it can be concluded that graphic, text, multimedia and sign language interpreter are among mostly required features to be included in their mobile application to ensure the applications are usable for this community.

  4. Bringing Hearing to the Deaf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shipsey, Ian (Purdue)

    2006-06-12

    In his talk, Shipsey will discuss the cochlear implant, the first device to successfully allow the profoundly deaf to regain some sense of hearing. A cochlear implant is a small electronic apparatus. Unlike a normal hearing aid, which amplifies sound, a cochlear implant is surgically implanted behind the ear where it converts sound waves into electrical impulses. These implants have instigated a popular but controversial revolution in the treatment of deafness, and they serve as a model for research in neuroscience and biomedical engineering. Shipsey will discuss the physiology of natural hearing from the perspective of a physicist. He will also touch on the function of cochlear implants in the context of historical treatments, electrical engineering, psychophysics, clinical evaluation of efficacy and personal experience. Finally, Shipsey will address the social implications of cochlear implantation and the future outlook for auditory prostheses.

  5. Independent and combined influence of neonatal and current body composition on academic performance in youth: The UP & DOWN Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Cornejo, I; Tejero-González, C M; Castro-Piñero, J; Conde-Caveda, J; Cabanas-Sanchez, V; Sallis, J F; Veiga, Óscar L

    2015-06-01

    Unhealthy body composition is a cause for concern across the lifespan. The objective of this study was to examine the independent and combined associations between neonatal and current body composition with academic performance among youth. This cross-sectional study was conducted with a total of 1557 youth (745 girls) aged 10.4 ± 3.4 years. Birth weight and length at birth were self-reported. Current body composition was assessed by body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and percentage of body fat (BF%). Academic performance was assessed through schools records. Birth weight was related to all academic variables in boys, independent of potential confounders, including BMI; whereas WC, BMI and BF% were related to all academic performance indicators in both boys and girls, independent of potential confounders, including birth weight (all P academic performance were observed in both boys and girls for grade point average (GPA) indicator. Boys in the group with none adverse effect had significantly higher scores in GPA (score +0.535; 95% confidence interval, 0.082-0.989) than boys in the group of both adverse effects (P academic performance in youth. © 2014 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2014 World Obesity.

  6. Administration of saccharin to neonatal mice influences body composition of adult males and reduces body weight of females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlee, Sebastian D; Simon, Becky R; Scheller, Erica L; Alejandro, Emilyn U; Learman, Brian S; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2014-04-01

    Nutritional or pharmacological perturbations during perinatal growth can cause persistent effects on the function of white adipose tissue, altering susceptibility to obesity later in life. Previous studies have established that saccharin, a nonnutritive sweetener, inhibits lipolysis in mature adipocytes and stimulates adipogenesis. Thus, the current study tested whether neonatal exposure to saccharin via maternal lactation increased susceptibility of mice to diet-induced obesity. Saccharin decreased body weight of female mice beginning postnatal week 3. Decreased liver weights on week 14 corroborated this diminished body weight. Initially, saccharin also reduced male mouse body weight. By week 5, weights transiently rebounded above controls, and by week 14, male body weights did not differ. Body composition analysis revealed that saccharin increased lean and decreased fat mass of male mice, the latter due to decreased adipocyte size and epididymal, perirenal, and sc adipose weights. A mild improvement in glucose tolerance without a change in insulin sensitivity or secretion aligned with this leaner phenotype. Interestingly, microcomputed tomography analysis indicated that saccharin also increased cortical and trabecular bone mass of male mice and modified cortical bone alone in female mice. A modest increase in circulating testosterone may contribute to the leaner phenotype in male mice. Accordingly, the current study established a developmental period in which saccharin at high concentrations reduces adiposity and increases lean and bone mass in male mice while decreasing generalized growth in female mice.

  7. Films about the deaf: the representations of deaf and sign languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes two films about deafness which have not been investigated in the Brazilian academic context. They are Mandy (directed by Alexander Mackendrick, 1952, England and After the Silence (by Fred Gerber, 1996, USA. The analysis is supported by Cultural Studies and Deaf Studies, especially on the concepts of cultural pedagogies, deaf culture, deaf identities, sign language, as well as on the analysis of other films about deaf people conducted by Thoma (2004. Both films are classified as drama, and particular attention was given to how deaf characters are represented, highlighting scenes showing the difficulties deaf people face in a hearing society. It is worth noting that in the end of both films the deaf characters manage to speak and hear. The pedagogical impact of these films is questioned as they show that the deaf may be able to speak and hear after using Sign Language. Deaf representations, deaf education and sign language are present in both films, although there is a difference in approach between them.

  8. Deaf education in China: history, current issues, and emerging deaf voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, Richard R; Johnson, Kathryn E; Hui, Yang Jun

    An overview is provided of (a) deaf education in China, (b) views of deaf Chinese, and (c) recent empowering international collaborations. China's national policy focuses on oral/aural education and hearing rehabilitation. However, everyday practice in schools for deaf children includes various forms of Chinese Sign Language. Early childhood education focuses on speech and hearing. Elementary and secondary school curricula reflect low expectations for deaf students and lack the same academic content provided to hearing students. There are limited higher education opportunities. There are no support services such as note takers or interpreters for mainstreamed students. There are no deaf teacher preparation or interpreter training programs. Jobs are few; the vast majority of deaf adults are unemployed. Deaf people interviewed for the article describe their needs, their dreams, and the changes they are witnessing, which result in part from recent empowering international collaborations.

  9. The influence of a clear layer on near-infrared spectrophotometry measurements using a liquid neonatal head phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.

    1999-01-01

    It is difficult to test near-infrared spectrophotometry instruments in vivo. Therefore we constructed a liquid phantom which mimics the neonatal head. It consists of a spherical 3.5 mm thick layer of silicone rubber simulating skin and bone and a 0.5 mm thick clear layer of polypropylene imitating cerebrospinal fluid. It acts as container for a liquid solution with Intralipid, 60 μmol l -1 haemoglobin and yeast. The solution was oxygenated using oxygen and then deoxygenated by the yeast. From the instrumental (Critikon 2020) algorithm, we found that with increasing scattering (0.5%, 1%, 1.5% and 2% Intralipid concentration) the reading was increasingly offset from the expected value of 0 μmol l -1 by 55.7, 68.6, 76.5 and 80.4 μmol l -1 (oxyhaemoglobin) and 16.0, 24.4, 29.6 and 31.7 μmol l -1 (deoxyhaemoglobin). This reduced the range of the oxygen saturation reading from the expected 100% to 31.5, 21.1, 14.3 and 11.5%. Haemoglobin concentration changes were increasingly underestimated by a factor of two to four. For a second algorithm based on the diffusion approximation the offsets were smaller: oxyhaemoglobin 11.4, 17.8, 22.5 and 25.1 μmol l -1 and deoxyhaemoglobin 1.3, 3.4, 5.2 and 6.0 μmol l -1 . The range of the oxygen saturation reading was higher: 41.3, 29.2, 23.4 and 16.6%. Concentration changes were underestimated by a factor of six to ten. This study demonstrates the need to develop algorithms which take into consideration anatomical structures. (author)

  10. Morphological sensitivity in deaf readers of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Schreuder, R.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2011-01-01

    Deaf children experience difficulties with reading comprehension. These difficulties are not completely explained by their difficulties with the reading of single short words. Whether deaf children and adults lag behind in the morphological processing of longer words is therefore examined in two

  11. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The association between deafness and ocular problems is well established; however the nature and prevalence of these problems are diverse across the globe. Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the nature and prevalence of ophthalmologic abnormalities in deaf students and offer treatment to ...

  12. Social Information Processing in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jesús; Saldaña, David; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the processing of social information in deaf and hearing adolescents. A task was developed to assess social information processing (SIP) skills of deaf adolescents based on Crick and Dodge's (1994; A review and reformulation of social information-processing mechanisms in children's social adjustment.…

  13. Deaf Children on the Causes of Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffe, Carolien; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Smit, Cootje

    2003-01-01

    Explores whether Dutch deaf children, ages 9 to 11 years old, are more concerned with the loss of the desired state, while their hearing peers focus on conditions that lead to the negative outcome. Reveals that deaf children concentrate on the fulfillment of desires in their emotion predications and explanations. (CMK)

  14. Development of Implanted Deaf Children's Conversational Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maner-Idrissi, Gaid; Dardier, Virginie; Pajon, Cecile; Tan-Bescond, Geraldine; David, Kristell; Deleau, Michel; Godey, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of preverbal development have highlighted the recurrent difficulties experienced by deaf children in acquiring knowledge of the social rules and social skills pertaining to discourse. We expected cochlear implants in children with bilateral profound deafness to improve their use of verbal language, so that their communication…

  15. Communities of Practice: Literacy and Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Ann-Elise; Simonsen, Eva

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to discuss young deaf children's access to literacy within a sociocultural perspective. We introduce the concept of communities of practice as an aspect in early literacy development for young deaf children. Preschools are learning communities and thus constitute communities of practice. Our discussion on the use of communities…

  16. Waardenburg syndrome in childhood deafness in Cameroon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare hereditary disorder essentially characterised by deafness and pigment disorders of the eyes, hair and skin. Methods. Between October 2010 and December 2011, we identied six patients with WS during an aetiological survey of 582 deaf participants recruited in schools ...

  17. Learning from Success: High Achieving Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the main findings of a study of twenty-seven high achieving deaf students in England which sought the views of the deaf students, their parents, teachers, and other school professionals on reasons for success. It is a replication of a previous American study but in a UK context. The main findings match those of the American…

  18. Numerical Estimation in Deaf and Hearing Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Rebecca; Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patty; Davidson, Wendy A.; Murphy, Derek; Nordmann, Emily

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students often lag behind hearing peers in numerical and mathematical abilities. Studies of hearing children with mathematical difficulties highlight the importance of estimation skills as the foundation for formal mathematical abilities, but research with adults is limited. Deaf and hearing college students were assessed on the…

  19. Translanguaging, Learning and Teaching in Deaf Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    This paper critiques the role of translanguaging in deaf education by examining how, and under what conditions, translanguaging practices can enhance learning and teaching. The paper explores the premise that translanguaging represents an additive view of bilingualism and multilingualism for deaf learners and offers an innovative departure from,…

  20. Feelings and Emotions in Deaf Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Cristina

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the feelings and emotions of deaf adolescents. The study examines the emotional domain of 34 prelingual severely and profoundly deaf adolescents, matched by sex and age with hearing class peers. A sentence completion task (Loeb and Sarigiani, 1986) is employed to assess such feelings as happiness, sadness,…

  1. Signposts to Development: Theory of Mind in Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfe, Tyron; Want, Stephen C.; Siegal, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Two studies investigated the effect of language input on theory of mind by comparing the performance of deaf native-signing children (ages 4 to 8) raised by deaf signing parents and deaf late-signing children raised by hearing parents on "thought picture" measures of theory of mind. Findings indicated that deaf late signers showed…

  2. Violence against Deaf Women: Effect of Partner Hearing Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L.; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of Deaf female undergraduate students, the current study sought to investigate the prevalence, correlates, and characteristics of intimate partner violence victimization in hearing-Deaf and Deaf-Deaf relationships. Initial results suggest that similarities in hearing status and communication preference are associated with increased…

  3. Without Boundaries: An Inquiry into Deaf Epistemologies through a Metaparadigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate on Deaf epistemologies reflects two major paradigms in deaf education: positivism and constructivism. The present article investigates Deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm, which should blur the boundaries among different paradigms and connect the epistemological inquiry to instructional practice for d/Deaf students. The…

  4. Present Scenario of Childhood Deafness: A Tertiary Level Health Care Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Shankar Majumdar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans today. Approximately 63 million people in India suffer from significant auditory impairment. Materials and Methods Fifty children of 0-7 years age group, presented to a tertiary level center in Kolkata were assessed by objective and behavioural audiological tests. Result Mean age of presentation was found to be 40.5 months. No risk factor could be identified in 72% of the cases. 47% fell into the profoundly deaf category. Discussion Numerous studies agree that half of the infants with sensorineural hearing loss have no risk factors at birth and thus would be missed by a targeted hearing screening.  Conclusion India certainly faces a worse situation regarding childhood deafness. Implementation of universal neonatal hearing screening along with pre-school hearing assessment can certainly change the scenario.

  5. [Neonatal cholestasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquete, M L

    2000-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: To warn pediatricians about the early recognition of cholestasis in newborns and infants. METHODS: A bibliographic research about cholestasis was performed using Medline, and emphasizing the most relevant publications of the last 30 years. RESULTS: The concept of cholestasis and the causes of cholestatic tendency in newborns and infants are described. Several causes of intra and extrahepatic cholestasis are reported as well. In this review, only the diseases with diagnostic, therapeutic or prognostic peculiarities are commented, including extrahepatic biliary atresia, idiopathic neonatal hepatitis, galactosemia, and Alagille s syndrome. Furthermore, several resources are discussed for the diagnosis of cholestasis. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of the diagnosis of cholestasis through the detection of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns who present jaundice after 14 days of life is a goal that could change the prognosis of several diseases responsible for neonatal cholestasis.

  6. Neonatal Kraniefraktur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine Marie Harries; Stantchev, Hristo

    2015-01-01

    During the latest decades the incidence of birth traumas has decreased significantly. Even so the traumas still contribute to an increased mortality and morbidity. We present a case of spontaneous neonatal skull fracture following a normal vaginal delivery. Abnormal facial structure was seen......, and the fracture was identified with an MRI. The fractures healed without neurosurgical intervention. Case reports show that even in uncomplicated vaginal deliveries skull fractures can be seen and should be suspected in children with facial abnormalities....

  7. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  8. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs

  9. Body Perception and Action Following Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, M S; Landry, S P; Pagé, S; Maheu, M; Champoux, F

    2016-01-01

    The effect of deafness on sensory abilities has been the topic of extensive investigation over the past decades. These investigations have mostly focused on visual capacities. We are only now starting to investigate how the deaf experience their own bodies and body-related abilities. Indeed, a growing corpus of research suggests that auditory input could play an important role in body-related processing. Deafness could therefore disturb such processes. It has also been suggested that many unexplained daily difficulties experienced by the deaf could be related to deficits in this underexplored field. In the present review, we propose an overview of the current state of knowledge on the effects of deafness on body-related processing.

  10. Neonatal Listeriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Yu Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In Western developed countries, Listeria monocytogenes is not an uncommon pathogen in neonates. However, neonatal listeriosis has rarely been reported in Taiwan. We describe two cases collected from a single medical institute between 1990 and 2005. Case 1 was a male premature baby weighing 1558 g with a gestational age of 31 weeks whose mother had fever with chills 3 days prior to delivery. Generalized maculopapular rash was found after delivery and subtle seizure developed. Both blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture collected on the 1st day yielded L. monocytogenes. In addition, he had ventriculitis complicated with hydrocephalus. Neurologic development was normal over 1 year of follow-up after ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. Case 2 was a 28-weeks' gestation male premature baby weighing 1180 g. Endotracheal intubation and ventilator support were provided after delivery due to respiratory distress. Blood culture yielded L. monocyto-genes. Cerebrospinal fluid showed pleocytosis but the culture was negative. Brain ultrasonography showed ventriculitis. Sudden deterioration with cyanosis and bradycardia developed on the 8th day and he died on the same day. Neonatal listeriosis is uncommon in Taiwan, but has significant mortality and morbidity. Early diagnosis of perinatal infection relies on high index of suspicion in perinatal health care professionals. [J Formos Med Assoc 2007;106(2:161-164

  11. BILINGUALISM: MULTICULTURALISM HOLOPRAXIOLOGY OF THE VENEZUELAN DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the child has been made regularly and without many prejudices or tbacks,  until this had some physical characteristic or perceptual, who twisted his attention.  To those who were born with the inability to listen or hear properly, excluded in all respects. At the end of the 20th century, the deaf began to defend their identity and differed between Deafness (lack of hearing of deafness, with "S", which is a socio-anthropological perspective, which includes the use of sign language and the learning of reading and writing of the Spanish (bilingualism in their training. This research had as general objective to unveil bilingualism from an intercultural intersubjectivity of the deaf in Venezuela by applying a qualitative related paradigm with methodology fenomenologica-hermeneutica of Max Van Manen. The information collected observing and interviewing in depth (12 deaf students, parents or representatives (6, (3 researchers and educational specialists deaf and listeners (12. To analyze and triangulate information, obtained the following conclusions about the bilingual deaf: their physical and intellectual abilities are exactly the same to the listeners;  they can achieve the necessary qualification for any job; is required the language of signs so that you can put into practice the language; those who have the organizational capacity to develop oral language, it should not hinder him this opportunity, without detriment to the learning of the language of signs and the systematic training of the deaf teachers and deaf family, educational managers, political and employer of the deaf is essentially required.

  12. Is there a deafness duration limit for cochlear implants in post-lingual deaf adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, In Seok; Park, Sera; Kim, Hee-Nam; Lee, Won-Sang; Kim, Sung Huhn; Kim, Jung-Ha; Choi, Jae Young

    2014-02-01

    Patients with post-lingual deafness should not be excluded from cochlear implantation (CI) on the basis of duration of deafness. We found that the prognosis was favorable in patients who developed deafness after adolescence, even in those with extremely long-term deafness. CI is an effective treatment for post-lingual deafness. However, it remains unclear whether CI would benefit patients with extremely long-term deafness. We evaluated the auditory performance after CI of patients who had been deaf for more than 30 years. The study enrolled 81 adults with post-lingual deafness. Speech perception tests were performed preoperatively and 12 months postoperatively, and factors affecting the postoperative auditory performance were investigated. The subjects were divided into groups according to the duration of deafness and the postoperative speech perception scores were compared. A marked improvement in the open-set speech perception scores (mono/disyllabic words and sentences) after implantation was seen in all groups, and no significant difference in the improvement in speech perception scores was observed among the groups. Age at onset of deafness was closely related to the postoperative performance, and patients who had lost their hearing before adolescence performed poorly.

  13. Computational solution for the auxiliary in the literacy of deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Lopes Fernandes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The learning of the deaf is a great challenge for educators, especially in Portuguese-speaking course. Brazilian schools are not prepared for suits with deaf, because they lack trained professionals. Current Brazilian educational policies, seeking socialize all deaf and not deaf students. The Brazilian deaf community uses LIBRAS, Brazilian sign language as their main form of communication between them. Integrating LBS and Portuguese is one of the main current challenges and the use of computers has helped a lot.

  14. On the possibilities and limits of "DEAF DEAF SAME": Tourism and empowerment camps in Adamorobe (Ghana, Bangalore and Mumbai (India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Ilana Friedner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article qualitatively analyzes the ways that the discourse of "deaf universalism" circulates within two common deaf practices: tourism and engaging in interventions. Arguing that the largely Northern-situated discipline of Deaf Studies does not adequately examine how deaf bodies and discourses travel, ethnographic data compiled in India and Ghana during transnational encounters is employed to examine how claims of "sameness" and "difference" are enacted and negotiated. Similarly, this article examines how deaf individuals and groups deploy the concepts of deaf "heavens" and "hells" to analyze their travel experiences and justify interventions. We argue that deaf travelers and those engaging in interventions, mostly from Northern countries, employ teleological concepts that they attempt to impose on deaf "others." Adopting a critical approach, this article argues for the importance of carving out a space within Deaf Studies for allowing non-Northern concepts to come to the fore. Keywords: Deaf, Development, Universalism, Discourse, India, Ghana

  15. [Influences of maternal and external environment on the early establishment of gastrointestinal microflora of neonatal baby--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shouqing; Mu, Chunlong; Zhu, Weiyun

    2015-02-04

    The human intestinal microbiota is essential in nutrients utilization, organ development, host metabolism, pathogen resistance, and regulation of immune responses. The establishment of early gut microflora in newborn infants experiences periods from less to more, simple to complex and unstable to stable and can be influenced by various factors. This article summarizes the effects of delivery mode, delivery period, rearing methods as well as antibiotics on the development of intestinal bacterial community.

  16. Literatura Surda/Deaf Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lodenir Becker Karnopp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente artigo é proceder a uma análise dos livros de literatura infantil Cinderela Surda e Rapunzel Surda, focalizando os sentidos produzidos sobre identidades e diferenças. As análises desses livros pretendem contribuir para a discussão da produção de uma literatura surda, que está vinculada às discussões sobre cultura e identidade. Na investigação desses materiais, os textos e as imagens produzidas evidenciam que os autores buscam o caminho da auto-representação do grupo de surdos, através da luta pelo estabelecimento do que reconhecem como suas identidades e suas diferenças. Tais evidências estão no uso da língua de sinais, em suas formas de narrar as histórias e/ou de adaptar histórias clássicas, tendo como base suas formas de existência, suas formas de ler, traduzir, conceber e julgar os produtos culturais que consomem e que produzem. This article aims to present an analysis of the fairy tales, Deaf Cinderella and Deaf Rapunzel, focusing on the meanings produced from identities and differences. The analyses of these two books intend to give a contribution to the discussion on the production of deaf literature, which is linked to the discussions on culture and identity. In the investigation of these books, the texts and the images produced show that the authors seek the path to self- representation of the deaf community, through the struggle for the establishment of what they recognize as their identities and differences. Such evidences are in the use of sign language, in their ways of narrating their stories and/or of adapting classic fairy tales, having as a basis their existential ways of being, their ways of reading, translating, conceiving and judging the cultural products which they consume and produce.

  17. Low Empathy in Deaf and Hard of Hearing (Pre)Adolescents Compared to Normal Hearing Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netten, Anouk P.; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C. P. M.; Soede, Wim; Dirks, Evelien; Briaire, Jeroen J.; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy. Methods The study group (mean age 11.9 years) consisted of 122 deaf and hard of hearing children (52 children with cochlear implants and 70 children with conventional hearing aids) and 162 normal hearing children. The two groups were compared using self-reports, a parent-report and observation tasks to rate the children’s level of empathy, their attendance to others’ emotions, emotion recognition, and supportive behavior. Results Deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than normal hearing children, regardless of their type of hearing device. The level of emotion recognition was equal in both groups. During observations, deaf and hard of hearing children showed more attention to the emotion evoking events but less supportive behavior compared to their normal hearing peers. Deaf and hard of hearing children attending mainstream education or using oral language show higher levels of cognitive empathy and prosocial motivation than deaf and hard of hearing children who use sign (supported) language or attend special education. However, they are still outperformed by normal hearing children. Conclusions Deaf and hard of hearing children, especially those in special education, show lower levels of empathy than normal hearing children, which can have consequences for initiating and maintaining relationships. PMID:25906365

  18. Influence of the calcium concentration in the presence of organic phosphorus on the physicochemical compatibility and stability of all-in-one admixtures for neonatal use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Sousa Valeria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm infants need high amounts of calcium and phosphorus for bone mineralization, which is difficult to obtain with parenteral feeding due to the low solubility of these salts. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical compatibility of high concentrations of calcium associated with organic phosphate and its influence on the stability of AIO admixtures for neonatal use. Methods Three TPN admixture formulas were prepared in multilayered bags. The calcium content of the admixtures was adjusted to 0, 46.5 or 93 mg/100 ml in the presence of a fixed organic phosphate concentration as well as lipids, amino acids, inorganic salts, glucose, vitamins and oligoelements at pH 5.5. Each admixture was stored at 4°C, 25°C or 37°C and evaluated over a period of 7 days. The physicochemical stability parameters evaluated were visual aspect, pH, sterility, osmolality, peroxide formation, precipitation, and the size of lipid globules. Results Color alterations occurred from the first day on, and reversible lipid film formation from the third day of study for the admixtures stored at 25°C and 37°C. According to the parameters evaluated, the admixtures were stable at 4°C; and none of them presented precipitated particles due to calcium/phosphate incompatibility or lipid globules larger than 5 μm, which is the main parameter currently used to evaluate lipid emulsion stability. The admixtures maintained low peroxide levels and osmolarity was appropriate for parenteral administration. Conclusion The total calcium and calcium/phosphorus ratios studied appeared not to influence the physicochemical compatibility and stability of AIO admixtures.

  19. Influence of some bacterial and host factors on colonization and invasiveness of Escherichia coli K1 in neonatal rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Wullenweber, M; Beutin, L; Zimmermann, S; Jonas, C

    1993-01-01

    Of 209 healthy infants examined, 44 (21.1%) carried Escherichia coli K1 in their feces. Of these 44 isolates, 36 (81.8%) were attributed to 10 different known clonal groups of E. coli K1 and 4 isolates represented unknown types. The influence of mannose-resistant (MR) adhesins, aerobactin production, and resistance to serum on colonization and invasiveness of E. coli K1 in orally infected inbred LEW baby rats was investigated. Strains expressing MR adhesins had significantly higher colonizati...

  20. Stigma in mothers of deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Hossein; Mohammadi, Eissa; Mohammadi, Mohammad Ali; Pirzadeh, Akbar; Mahmoudi, Hamzeh; Ansari, Ismail

    2015-03-01

    A deaf child creates a feeling of stigma in many hearing parents. Stigma in mothers can have a negative impact on a child's treatment and rehabilitation process. Therefore, this study was conducted to evaluate the extent of stigma in mothers with deaf children. This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 among 90 mothers with deaf children. The data-collection instrument included the stigma scale in the mothers of children with disabilities. The reliability and validity of the instrument were confirmed through content validity and Cronbach's alpha coefficient (α=86%), respectively. Data were analyzed using SPSS-15 software. Results showed that most mothers suffer from stigma due to having a deaf child. The mean stigma score was 96.48 ±27.72. In total, 24.4% of mothers reported that they had received strange and mocking looks; 72.2% regarded child deafness as a sign of divine retribution; and 33.3% felt ashamed of their child's deafness. There was an inverse relationship between the mother's level of education and mean stigma scores (Pchildren with a cochlear implant was lower than that of mothers of children with earphones (86.70 vs. 99.64), and this difference tended towards significance (P=0.057). This study showed that half of all mothers with deaf children were scorned and felt ashamed of having a deaf child in the family because of the stigma. The majority of mothers with deaf children felt stigmatized, and only their education and residency status affected this issue. The mothers of cochlear-implanted children perceived less stigma. Due to the various social and psychological problems caused by hearing impairment, it is necessary to consider the emotional health and psychological state of the mothers in addition to rehabilitation programs and standard services for the children themselves.

  1. [Ludwig van Beethoven: an autoimmune deafness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P J

    1995-01-01

    The author reminds us of the great moments of Beethoven's life and of the different stages of his deafness onset, until to last instants. The post-mortem examination, performed by doctor Wagner, and the scientific studies of the remains, during the exhumations, are reported. Beethoven's deafness was clearly a sensorineural impairment and the previously suggested prevalent hypotheses are discussed. A new theory is emphasized, based on modern studies about autoimmune sensorineural hearing losses in relation with chronic inflammatory bowel ailment. Conclusion is that Beethoven's deafness was probably owing to a primary autoimmune degeneration of the organ of Corti, giving rise to atrophy of the auditory nerve.

  2. O significado do grupo de apoio para a família de recém-nascidos de risco e equipe de profissionais na unidade neonatal The influence of support groups on the family of risk newborns and on neonatal unit workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Buarque

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar o significado do grupo de apoio para a família de recém-nascidos de risco e equipe de profissionais na unidade neonatal. METODOLOGIA: Utilizou-se a abordagem qualitativa e, como referencial teórico, o cuidado centrado na família. O estudo foi realizado na unidade neonatal do Hospital Prontolinda, em Pernambuco. No período de janeiro a junho de 2004, foram realizadas 25 reuniões do grupo de apoio para a família. A coleta de dados foi realizada através da observação participante das reuniões do grupo e de entrevistas gravadas com 13 mães, seis pais, duas avós e 16 profissionais de saúde. As falas foram submetidas à análise de conteúdo, modalidade temática. RESULTADOS: A análise evidenciou que o grupo de apoio para a família de neonatos de risco proporcionou informação, apoio emocional e fortalecimento aos pais e familiares para que vivenciassem o nascimento e a hospitalização do filho na unidade neonatal, além de tê-los capacitado para assumir os cuidados com o recém-nascido. Paralelamente, houve crescimento interpessoal mútuo na interação entre pais, familiares e equipe de profissionais da unidade neonatal. CONCLUSÕES: O grupo de apoio para a família de neonatos de risco na unidade neonatal representa uma abordagem fundamentada nos princípios do cuidado centrado na família. A partir de tais princípios, pode-se restabelecer a competência parental, ajudar a equipe de profissionais a respeitar valores e sentimentos dos familiares, bem como contribuir para que pais e profissionais trabalhem em parceria na unidade neonatal.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of support groups on the family of risk newborn infants and on neonatal unit workers. METHODS: We used a qualitative approach, and as theoretical basis, family-centered care. The study was conducted in the neonatal unit of Hospital Prontolinda, in Pernambuco, Brazil. From January to June 2004, 25 meetings were held by the family support

  3. Suicide in deaf populations: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapur Navneet

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have found that deaf individuals have higher rates of psychiatric disorder than those who are hearing, while at the same time encountering difficulties in accessing mental health services. These factors might increase the risk of suicide. However, the burden of suicidal behaviour in deaf people is currently unknown. The aim of the present review was to provide a summary of literature on suicidal behaviour with specific reference to deaf individuals. The objectives of the review were to establish the incidence and prevalence of suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe risk factors for suicidal behaviour in deaf populations; describe approaches to intervention and suicide prevention that have been used in deaf populations. Methods A number of electronic databases (e.g. Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE, Dissertation Abstracts International, Web of Science, ComDisDome, ASSIA, Education Sage Full Text, Google Scholar, and the grey literature databases FADE and SIGLE were explored using a combination of key words and medical subject headings as search terms. Reference lists of papers were also searched. The Science and Social Sciences Citation Index electronic databases were used to identify studies that had cited key papers. We also contacted experts and organisations with an interest in the field. Results Very few studies focussed specifically on suicide in deaf populations. Those studies that were included (n = 13 generally involved small and unrepresentative samples. There were limited data on the rate of suicidal behaviour in deaf people. One study reported evidence of hearing impairment in 0.2% of all suicide deaths. Another found that individuals with tinnitus seen in specialist clinics had an elevated rate of suicide compared to the general population. The rates of attempted suicide in deaf school and college students during the previous year ranged from 1.7% to 18%, with lifetime rates as high as 30

  4. Change deafness, dual-task performance, and domain-specific expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G; Bochtler, Katharina S

    2018-05-01

    In a change deafness manipulation using radio broadcasts of sporting events, we show that change deafness to a switch in talker increases when listeners are asked to monitor both lexical and indexical information for change. We held semantic content constant and demonstrated a change deafness rate of 85% when participants listened to the home team broadcast of a hockey game that switched midway to the away team broadcast with a different announcer. In Study 2, participants were asked to monitor either the indexical characteristics ( listen for a change in announcer) or both the indexical and semantic components ( listen for a change in announcer or a goal scored). Monitoring both components led to significantly greater change deafness even though both groups were alerted to the possibility of a change in announcer. In Study 3, we changed both the indexical and the semantic components when the broadcast switched from a hockey game to a basketball game. We found a negative correlation between sports expertise and change deafness. The results are discussed in terms of the nature of perceptual representation and the influence of expertise and evolution on attention allocation.

  5. Silencing Deafness: Displacing Disability in the Nineteenth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esme Cleall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article traces the way in which the language of displacement and silence were used in nineteenth-century discussions of deafness and connects this tendency to the marginalised place deaf experience occupies historically. Throughout the nineteenth century, a period which saw the consolidation of ‘the deaf and dumb’ as a social category, the word ‘forgetting’ crept into numerous discussions of deafness by both deaf and hearing commentators. Some, such as the educationalist Alexander Graeme Bell, were overt in their desire to forget deafness, demanding disability was ‘bred out’ and deaf culture condemned to the forgotten past. Others used the term ambivalently and sometimes metaphorically discussing the deaf as ‘forgotten’ by society, and ‘children of silence’. Some even pleaded that people who were deaf were not forgotten. But, though varied, the use of the imagery of forgetting and silence to evoke deafness is recurrent, and may, therefore, be seen to reveal something about how deaf experience can be approached as a displacement where deafness was spatially and imaginatively marginalised. I argue that one of the consequences of the conceptual framing of deafness through the language of forgetting was actively to silence deafness and to neutralise the idea that disability should be marginal and could be forgotten.

  6. The Role of Sign Phonology and Iconicity during Sign Processing: The Case of Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, Ellen; Hermans, Daan; Knoors, Harry; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the influence of sign phonology and iconicity during sign processing in deaf children, the roles of these sign features were examined using an experimental sign-picture verification paradigm. Participants had to make decisions about sign-picture pairs, manipulated according to phonological sign features (i.e., hand shape, movement,…

  7. Deaf Children Attending Different School Environments: Sign Language Abilities and Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasuolo, Elena; Valeri, Giovanni; Di Renzo, Alessio; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Volterra, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether full access to sign language as a medium for instruction could influence performance in Theory of Mind (ToM) tasks. Three groups of Italian participants (age range: 6-14 years) participated in the study: Two groups of deaf signing children and one group of hearing-speaking children. The two groups of deaf…

  8. Futurism in the Education of the Deaf: Directions and Alternatives for the 80's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, William J. A.

    The author presents a rationale for the study of futurism in education and analyzes the effects of significant future changes upon deaf education in the 80s. The roles that change agents play in influencing the permanence of innovations within the school are examined: advocacy, information sharing, and organizational development training.…

  9. Low empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, A.P.; Rieffe, C.; Theunissen, S.C.P.M.; Soede, W.; Dirks, E.; Briaire, J.J.; Frijns, J.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the level of empathy in deaf and hard of hearing (pre)adolescents compared to normal hearing controls and to define the influence of language and various hearing loss characteristics on the development of empathy. Methods The study group (mean age

  10. Deaf adolescents in a hearing world: a review of factors affecting psychosocial adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Patrick J; Strauss, Gillie

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence has long been viewed as a time of rapid change in many domains including physical, cognitive, and social. Adolescents must adapt based on developing skills and needs and acclimate to growing environmental pressures. Deaf adolescents are often faced with the additional challenge of managing these adaptations in a hearing world, where communication and access to information, especially about their social world, are incomplete at best and nonexistent at worst. This article discusses the research on several factors that influence a deaf adolescent's adaptation, including quality of life, self-concept, and identity development. Gaps in our knowledge are pointed out with suggestions for future research programs that can facilitate optimal development in adolescents who are deaf.

  11. When Being Deaf Is Centered: d/Deaf Women of Color's Experiences with Racial/Ethnic and d/Deaf Identities in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Lissa

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of d/Deaf students are successfully completing college; the reasons for such a low graduation rate is unknown (Destler & Buckly, 2011). Most research on d/Deaf college students lack racial/ethnic diversity within the study; thus, it is unclear how d/Deaf Students of Color are faring in higher education or what experiences…

  12. Acoustics outreach program for the deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsawad, Cameron T.; Berardi, Mark L.; Whiting, Jennifer K.; Lawler, M. Jeannette; Gee, Kent L.; Neilsen, Tracianne B.

    2016-03-01

    The Hear and See methodology has often been used as a means of enhancing pedagogy by focusing on the two strongest learning senses, but this naturally does not apply to deaf or hard of hearing students. Because deaf students' prior nonaural experiences with sound will vary significantly from those of students with typical hearing, different methods must be used to build understanding. However, the sensory-focused pedagogical principle can be applied in a different way for the Deaf by utilizing the senses of touch and sight, called here the ``See and Feel'' method. This presentation will provide several examples of how acoustics demonstrations have been adapted to create an outreach program for a group of junior high students from a school for the Deaf and discuss challenges encountered.

  13. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines

  14. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs

  15. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  16. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  17. Neonatal sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Dessì

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper on neonatal sepsis, after a short presentation of etiopathogenesis and physiopathology, we will briefly present the clinical picture, the diagnosis and the therapy. Concerning diagnosis, we will focus our attention on procalcitonin (PCT, serum amyloid A (SAA, presepsin (sCD14 and metabolomics. Three practical tables complete the review. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  18. The influence of rAAV2-mediated SOX2 delivery into neonatal and adult human RPE cells; a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezati, Razie; Etemadzadeh, Azadeh; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Samiei, Shahram; Ranaei Pirmardan, Ehsan; Davari, Malihe; Najafabadi, Hoda Shams

    2018-02-01

    Cell replacement is a promising therapy for degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Since the human retina lacks regeneration capacity, much attention has been directed toward persuading for cells that can differentiate into retinal neurons. In this report, we have investigated reprogramming of the human RPE cells and concerned the effect of donor age on the cellular fate as a critical determinant in reprogramming competence. We evaluated the effect of SOX2 over-expression in human neonatal and adult RPE cells in cultures. The coding region of human SOX2 gene was cloned into adeno-associated virus (AAV2) and primary culture of human neonatal/adult RPE cells were infected by recombinant virus. De-differentiation of RPE to neural/retinal progenitor cells was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR and ICC for neural/retinal progenitor cells' markers. Gene expression analysis showed 80-fold and 12-fold over-expression for SOX2 gene in infected neonatal and adult hRPE cells, respectively. The fold of increase for Nestin in neonatal and adult hRPE cells was 3.8-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively. PAX6 expression was increased threefold and 2.5-fold in neonatal/adult treated cultures. Howbeit, we could not detect rhodopsin, and CHX10 expression in neonatal hRPE cultures and expression of rhodopsin in adult hRPE cells. Results showed SOX2 induced human neonatal/adult RPE cells to de-differentiate toward retinal progenitor cells. However, the increased number of PAX6, CHX10, Thy1, and rhodopsin positive cells in adult hRPE treated cultures clearly indicated the considerable generation of neuro-retinal terminally differentiated cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Directory of Services for the Deaf in the United States; American Annals of the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doctor, Powrie, Ed.

    1969-01-01

    The directory contains a listing (made in October, 1968) of teachers of the deaf, teachers in training, teacher educators, and training centers. A directory of services lists religious workers with the deaf, American organizations, adult education programs, international programs, agencies of the United Nations, summer camps, social and…

  20. "Deaf discourse": the social construction of deafness in a Bedouin community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisch, S.

    2008-01-01

    Among the Al-Sayyid Arab-Bedouin, the use of an indigenous sign language is widespread and provides the foundation of a signing community shared by hearing and deaf people. Cases with comparable high incidences of deafness have in recent years stimulated debates in diverse academic disciplines.

  1. Deafness among the Negev Bedouin: an interdisciplinary dialogue on deafness, marginality and context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kisch, S.

    2012-01-01

    Shifra Kisch analyses the social consequences of deafness and the sociolinguistic context of signing among the Negev Bedouin, the native Arab inhabitants of the southern arid region of present-day Israel. The consequences of deafness vary considerably between different Bedouin groups as well as

  2. Access to English Language Acquisition in Ghana Schools for the Deaf: Are the Deaf Students Handicapped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obosu, Gideon Kwesi; Opoku-Asare, Nana Afia; Deku, Prosper

    2016-01-01

    This paper primarily discusses the challenges deaf students in Ghana are likely to grapple with as they access education provided for them in English language. The arguments discussed in this paper are supported by findings from a multiple site case study of five Schools for the Deaf purposively sampled from four regions of Ghana. Observations…

  3. Auxological evaluation in patients with a 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: normal prevalence of obesity and neonatal length and gender influence on body mass index evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, R; Derain-Court, J; Braunstein, D; Veyrat, M; Gaudart, J; Giuliano, F; Philip, N

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate auxological parameters in children and adults with a 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS) and to compare prevalence of obesity to that in the French general population. 102 patients with 22q11.2 DS (49 males, 53 females) were recruited from birth to adulthood through a reference center in southern France. Mean BMI Z score and mean height were normal (0.07 ± 1.49 SD, -0.87 ± 1.36 SDS, respectively). 16.1% of patients were overweight (including obese), 57% out of them being born small for gestational age for length versus 25% of non-overweight patients. During infancy, BMI increased in girls (+0.89 SD Z score). Childhood: 14.7% were overweight, prevalence similar to that of the in French children population. Adulthood: 19.2% were overweight. BMI Z scores were inversely correlated with neonatal length (p = 0.026) and female sex (p = 0.032) but positively associated with neonatal weight (p = 0.036). From analysis of neonatal data, 22q11.2 DS newborns were significantly shorter with regard to their weight (p 22q11.2 DS to that in the French population. The BMI Z score was inversely correlated with neonatal length and female gender but positively associated with neonatal weight. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Cognitive behaviour modification: a technique for teaching subtraction skills to hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing elementary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Y A

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of using the Cognitive Behaviour Modification (CBM) technique on the subtraction skills of third grade hearing and deaf/hard-of-hearing students. The results indicated that the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students and the CBM and non-CBM hearing students made more progress in solving the subtraction problems than the non-CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students. The results also showed that there were no significant differences between the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing and the non-CBM hearing students; and there were no significant differences between the CBM and non-CBM hearing students. The results revealed that the CBM hearing students achieved significantly higher post-test scores than the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students. However, the CBM deaf/hard-of-hearing students obtained a significantly higher gain score compared to the CBM and non-CBM hearing students. Implications for teachers and suggestions for future research are discussed in this paper.

  5. 34 CFR 396.1 - What is the Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf and Individuals Who Are Deaf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Who Are Deaf and Individuals Who Are Deaf-Blind program? 396.1 Section 396.1 Education Regulations of... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TRAINING OF INTERPRETERS FOR INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF AND INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE DEAF-BLIND General § 396.1 What is the Training of Interpreters for Individuals Who Are Deaf and...

  6. A Review of Deafness and Mental Health: A Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Patrick K.

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated is the effect of deafness on healthy mental development based on Erikson's eight stages of man, and reported is a survey of the mental health status of students at the California School for the Deaf. (DB)

  7. [What do we know about Ludwig van Beethoven's deafness?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latkowski, B; Komorowska, A; Modzelewska, E

    1991-01-01

    The authors described some details from the life of Beethoven, emphasizing his problem linked with his progressive deafness. The etiology of the deafness is not known. The authors discussed their own hypothesis of "music language".

  8. Statistics about Hearing, Balance, Ear Infections and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info Statistics about Hearing, Balance, Ear Infections, and Deafness Quick Statistics Charts and Tables What the Numbers ... NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 31 Center Drive, MSC ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: maternally inherited diabetes and deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions MIDD Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Maternally inherited diabetes and deafness ( MIDD ) is a form of diabetes that is ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: renal tubular acidosis with deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorders and Deafness Health Topic: Hearing Problems in Children Health Topic: Kidney Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Renal tubular acidosis with deafness Additional NIH Resources (2 ...

  11. Preliminary cardiological examinations in deaf children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokicki, Władysław; Markiewicz-Łoskot, Grazyna; Michalewska, Aleksandra; Włudarczyk, Witold; Mizia, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    There is some evidence that deaf children are more threatened than the general population by dangerous heart arrhythmias. An example is Jervell-Lange-Nielsen syndrome (one of the forms of long QT syndrome) which is characterised primarily by congenital deafness and prolongation of the QT interval. The aim of this study was to perform preliminary cardiological examinations on 162 deaf children (76 girls and 86 boys, 3-15 years old, mean age 10.5 +/- 2.8 years) who attend the Regional School Centre for Deaf Children in Katowice. The data in our analysis was obtained from case histories (school records and special questionnaires sent to parents), physical examinations with special regard to the cardiovascular system, double blood pressure measurement and 12 lead surface electrocardiogram. In the studied group, 90 children (55.5%) were congenitally deaf. Within this group, 24 children manifested tachycardia while 4 children manifested-bradycardia. A-V block of I degree was found in 3 children. Incomplete right bundle branch block (RBBB) was observed in 44 children while a complete RBBB was noticed in 1 child. QTc interval was prolonged (> 0.44s) in 12 children suffering from congenital form of deafness and in 16 children suffering from all causes of deafness. On the basis of case history, physical examination, and standard 12-lead electrocardiogram, we established the occurrence of risk factors according to the new diagnostic criteria of Schwartz et al. with relative points assigned to the electrocardiographical, clinical and familial findings. These points when summed up represent the risk of sudden death caused by ventricular arrhythmia due to long QT syndrome. In the studied group (according to the Schwartz criteria), 2 (1.2%) children had high probability (> or = 4 points) of long QT syndrome (LQTS), 25 (15.4%) children had intermediate probability of LQTS (2-3 points) and 135 children had low probability of LQTS (< or = 1 point).

  12. Influência do tipo de estímulo visual na produção escrita de surdos sinalizadores sem queixas de alterações na escrita Influence of the type of visual stimulus in the written production of deaf signers without complaints of writing impairments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gloria Gomes Rodrigues

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a influência do tipo de estímulo visual sobre a produção escrita de surdos sinalizadores sem queixas de alterações na escrita. MÉTODOS: Participaram 14 surdos, de ambos os gêneros, com idades entre 8 e 13 anos, usuários da Língua Brasileira de Sinais, alunos da terceira e quarta séries do Ensino Fundamental de uma escola especial para surdos. Foram avaliados por meio de produções escritas baseadas em dois tipos de estímulos: uma sequência de quatro figuras e uma figura de ação. Cada produção foi pontuada de acordo com critérios adaptados da teoria das Competências Comunicativas (Genérica, Enciclopédica, e Linguística. RESULTADOS: Na análise da Competência Genérica não houve diferença entre as produções a partir da sequencia ou da figura de ação. Entretanto, notou-se que a figura de ação propiciou mais produções de gênero narrativo, enquanto as figuras em sequência eliciaram mais descrições. Quanto às Competências Enciclopédica e Linguística, ambos os estímulos visuais proporcionaram resultados semelhantes nas produções escritas. Tanto na Competência Enciclopédica quanto na Linguística, o desempenho dos surdos foi aquém do esperado para a faixa de escolaridade, demonstrando conhecimento parcial sobre a língua portuguesa escrita. No entanto, observou-se que as figuras sequenciadas propiciaram organização de ideias e coesão global um pouco mais elaboradas. CONCLUSÃO: Nenhum dos tipos de estímulo visual, seja figura de ação ou sequência de figuras, propicia melhores desempenhos de produção escrita de surdos sinalizadores sem queixas de alterações na escrita para a maior parte dos aspectos analisados.PURPOSE: To analyze the influence of the type of visual stimulus on the written production of deaf signers without complaints of writing impairments. METHODS: Participants were 14 deaf subjects, of both genders, with ages between 8 and 13 years, students of third and

  13. 77 FR 20553 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... the requirement for National Deaf Blind Equipment Distribution Program (NDBEDP) certified programs to... to better enable selected participants to fully meet the needs of eligible low- income, deaf-blind...

  14. 77 FR 42187 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-18

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010, Section 105, Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, Order... Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals, CG Docket No. 10-210. Form Number: N/A. Type of Review: Revision of a...

  15. Effects on Deaf Patients of Medication Education by Pharmacists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyoguchi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Deaf people often experience difficulty in understanding medication information provided by pharmacists due to communication barriers. We held medication education lectures for deaf and hard of hearing (HH) individuals and examined the extent to which deaf participants understood medication-related information as well as their attitude about…

  16. 76 FR 31261 - Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 64 Relay Services for Deaf-Blind Individuals AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... to establish the National Deaf-Blind Equipment Distribution Program (NDBEDP) pilot program in... environments shall be considered when determining whether the individual is deaf-blind under clauses (c)(2)(i...

  17. The Early Years: Parents and Young Deaf Children Reading Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Lori

    2017-01-01

    Research is just beginning to describe the role of reading in the lives of families with deaf children. While the time that deaf children spend reading or being read to represents only a small part of their lives at home, research highlights its importance for young children--hearing as well as deaf. Children whose parents read to them at home…

  18. Self-Esteem and Coping Strategies among Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambor, Edina; Elliott, Marta

    2005-01-01

    Research studies on the determinants of self-esteem of deaf individuals often yield inconsistent findings. The current study assessed the effects on self-esteem of factors related to deafness, such as the means of communication at home and severity of hearing loss with hearing aid, as well as the coping styles that deaf people adopt to cope with…

  19. Teachers' Perceptions of Communication Needs of Deaf Children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communication has been identified as one of the greatest areas of difficulty for the deaf. Both the receptive and expressive communication pose barriers in almost all aspects of life of the deaf. This study endeavors to examine teachers' perceptions of communication needs of deaf children in Kenyan school system.

  20. The Importance of Early Sign Language Acquisition for Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M. Diane; Hauser, Peter C.; Miller, Paul; Kargin, Tevhide; Rathmann, Christian; Guldenoglu, Birkan; Kubus, Okan; Spurgeon, Erin; Israel, Erica

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have used various theories to explain deaf individuals' reading skills, including the dual route reading theory, the orthographic depth theory, and the early language access theory. This study tested 4 groups of children--hearing with dyslexia, hearing without dyslexia, deaf early signers, and deaf late signers (N = 857)--from 4…

  1. Refinement of the locus for non-syndromic sensorineural deafness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-syndromic X-linked deafness is a rare form of genetic deafness in humans accounting for a small proportion of all hereditary hearing loss. Different clinical forms of non-syndromic X-linked deafness have been described, and most of these have been mapped. Here, we report a Chinese family affected by a congenital ...

  2. Characteristics of Individuals with Congenital and Acquired Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Dawn M.; Hirdes, John P.; Stolee, Paul; Strong, J. Graham; Poss, Jeff; Tjam, Erin Y.; Bowman, Lindsay; Ashworth, Melody

    2009-01-01

    Using a standardized assessment instrument, the authors compared 182 adults with congenital deaf-blindness and those with acquired deaf-blindness. They found that those with congenital deaf-blindness were more likely to have impairments in cognition, activities of daily living, and social interactions and were less likely to use speech for…

  3. Multiply Handicapped Deaf Children: Medical, Educational, and Psychological Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    An extensive survey of the literature examines five major etiologies - prenatal rubella, premature birth, complications of Rh factor, meningitis, and genetics - in terms of their relevance to deafness and other disabilities. Following this survey, results of a study of 1,468 deaf children to determine causes of secondary handicaps in deaf children…

  4. Reading Efficiency of Deaf and Hearing People in Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, Francisco J.; Saldaña, David; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Isabel R.

    2015-01-01

    Different studies have showed poor reading performance in the deaf compared to the hearing population. This has overshadowed the fact that a minority of deaf children learns to read successfully and reaches levels similar to their hearing peers. We analyze whether deaf people deploy the same cognitive and learning processes in reading as their…

  5. Congenital non-syndromal deafness at Adamarobe, an isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to determine the prevalence, incidence and audiometric characteristics of deafness was done at Adamarobe, an isolated deaf village in Ghana. The procedures adopted include collection of family histories, pedigree, otoscopy and audiometric evaluation. As it turned out, a total of 45 deaf persons were identified in ...

  6. Language policy and literacy among deaf people in Lesotho ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as yet, failed to change the trend whereby deaf learners remain the most discriminated against. The article further argues that denying deaf learners an opportunity to acquire literacy through the Lesotho Sign Language, which is their primary language, contributes to the unsatisfactory state of deaf education in Lesotho.

  7. Ensuring the Success of Deaf Students in Inclusive Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jessica L.; Lieberman, Lauren J.; Ellis, M. Kathleen; Hilgenbrinck, Linda C.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 85% of all deaf and hard-of-hearing students in the United States are educated in public school programs. This high percentage makes it very likely that physical educators will at some point have to teach a student who is deaf or hard-of-hearing. It is considered best practice for all educators to be aware of Deaf culture,…

  8. Reaching the Summit: Deaf Adults as Essential Partners in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne-Firl, Bridgetta

    2016-01-01

    How do we reach the summit in terms of supporting the best transition possible for each young deaf or hard of hearing individual in the United States? Should professionals who are hearing work alone to succeed with deaf and hard of hearing students? No matter how good the intention, if we want deaf and hard of hearing students to transition from…

  9. Cultural Conflict in a School for Deaf Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erting, Carol J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes deafness as a sociocultural phenomenon similar to ethnicity, and discusses cultural conflict between hearing educators and deaf parents in a school for deaf children. Reports that misunderstandings often arise because parents and hearing educators use linguistic symbols and terminology differently. (KH)

  10. Deaf Employees' Empowerment in Two Different Communication Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backenroth, G. A. M.

    1997-01-01

    This study with 64 deaf employees working in either signing work groups or nonsigning workgroups found that employees' perceived empowerment was significantly higher in the signing work groups. Deaf associates in signing work groups experienced greater psychological stress and role conflicts, whereas deaf associates in nonsigning groups…

  11. The influence of the induction of farrowing on live birth, body mass, appearance of dystocia, mortality and surviving of neonatal pigs in litter during the first ten days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jović Slavoljub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of the the day of farrowing induction on the number of newborn piglets (live born and dead born, body mass and mortality of neonatal pigs in litter by the tenth day of age. For the investigation purpose, there were chosen 167 pregnant animals, 34 gilts and 133 sows, divided into 3 groups each, according to the day of pregnancy when prostaglandin analogue, dinoprost-tromethamine, was applied (from 112th to 114th day. Fastest- induced parturition was in gilts which were administered dinoprost on the 113th day of pregnancy, (34,30 ± 6,23 h after application, that is, in sows which were administered prostaglandin on the 114th day of pregnancy, (29,57 ± 4,14 h after application of dinoprost. Most gilts (75 % and sows (90,91% started farrowing 24-36 h after dinoprost application, when it was given on the 113th day of pregnancy. During daily twelve-hour working time (7-19 h, 67,07% out of all the treated animals started farrowing. When farrowing was induced on the 112th day of pregnancy, 17 sows (12,78% needed obstetric assistance for dystocia, while 47 (35,34 % sows had troublesome farrowing. Along with the delayed induction, body mass of newborn pigs increased, and the largest recorded weight was 1,27 kg in sows, that is 1,38 kg in gilts, which were given dinoprost on the 114th day of pregnancy, with the lowest number of live born pigs of body mass less than 1 kg (23,76%. In this experiment there was determined the connection between the body mass and vitality of newborn piglets, so the lowest mortality rate of the pigs by the 10th day of age was noticed in sows and gilts which were given dinoprost on the 114th day of pregnancy (11,05%, in regard to the pigs born of sows and gilts which were given dinoprost on the 112th day of pregnancy (15,39 %.

  12. The signal transduction pathway of PKC/NF-κB/c-fos may be involved in the influence of high glucose on the cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High glucose could induce structure and function change in cardiomyocytes, PKC plays a core effect in the onset and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy, but its underlying downstream signal transduction pathway is still not completely understood. Objectives To study the influence of high glucose on the structure, function and signal transduction pathway of PKC (Protein Kinase C/NF-κB(Nuclear factor-κB/c-fos in cultured cardiomyocytes. Methods Using cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats as a model, groups were divided into: control group (glucose: 5 mmol/L; high glucose group (glucose: 10 mmol/L, 15 mmol/L, 20 mmol/L, 25.5 mmol/L; equimolar mannital group (5 mmol/L glucose + 20.5 mmol/L maninital; high glucose(25.5 mmol/L add PKC inhibitor (Ro-31-8220, 50 nmol/L; high glucose (25.5 mmol/L add NF-κB inhibitor (BAY11-7082, 5 μmol/L. The cellular contracting frequency and volumes were measured and the expression of PKC-α, PKC-β2, p-PKC-α, p-PKC-β2, NF-κB, p-NF-κB, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α and c-fos were measured by western blot or RT-PCR. Results Cardiomyocytes cultured in high glucose level, but not iso-osmotic mannital, showed an increased pulsatile frequency and higher cellular volumes consistent with the increased glucose levels, and also higher expression of PKC-α, PKC-β2, p-PKC-α, p-PKC-β2, NF-κB, p-NF-κB, TNF-α and c-fos. The addition of Ro-31-8220 and BAY11-7082 could partly reverse these changes induced by high glucose level. Conclusion High glucose significantly increased the pulsatile frequency and cellular volumes of cultured cardiomyocytes via PKC/NF-κB/c-fos pathway, which might lead to diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  13. Influence of volume replacement with colloids versus crystalloids in neonates on venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on fluid retention, fluid balance, and ECMO runtime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrancken, Sabine L; Heijst, Arno Fvan; Zegers, Miranda; der Staak, Frans Hvan; Liem, K Djien; van Heijst, Arno F; van der Staak, Frans H

    2005-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we compared the effects of colloid versus crystalloid fluid replacement on the clinical signs of capillary leakage syndrome in 30 neonates with pulmonary hypertension due to meconium aspiration syndrome on venoarterial membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO). Before 2000, 15 neonates received volume replacement with a pasteurized plasma protein solution (3.8% albumin); after 2000, 15 neonates received normal saline. Patient characteristics and pre-ECMO values did not differ between the two groups. Total fluid balance was also equal. Diuretic use was significantly higher in the colloid group (p runtime (p < 0.05). Serum colloid osmotic pressure, albumin, urea nitrogen, and creatinine were significantly higher in the colloid group (p < 0.0001, < 0.0001, < 0.001, and < 0.05, respectively). Duration of VA-ECMO, of artificial ventilation after ECMO treatment, and the mortality rate did not differ between the two groups. We conclude that volume replacement with crystalloids in neonates on VA-ECMO aggravated the edema in a preexisting situation of capillary leakage syndrome, whereas volume replacement with colloids could impair the kidney function.

  14. Gênero e surdez / Gender and deafness

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    Madalena Klein

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo propõe-se discutir a temática da surdez, articulando-a com discussões referentes a gênero e sexualidade, tomando por referência autores da perspectiva dosEstudos Culturais em Educação e dos Estudos Surdos. A surdez e os surdos, assim como o gênero, são entendidos a partir da diferença cultural. No mercado de trabalho em geral, as surdas são discriminadas, porém são a maioria no professorado, o que é uma conseqüência da feminização do trabalho docente. A crescente presença feminina na liderança dos movimentos surdos pode estar relacionada a essa maioria de professoras, que carregam para os movimentos características da organização escolar. Analisamos dois artigos sobre o tema, além de um encontro sobre mulheres surdas ocorrido em Pelotas – RS, onde as participantes destacaram seu papel na luta política da associação dos surdos, enquanto aos homens cabe o papel de organizar as atividades de lazer e esportes. A luta pelos direitos das mulheres surdas vem crescendo no Brasil e há necessidade de haver mais estudos sobre essa temática.Abstract This paper discusses the topic of deafness, articulating it with discussions referring to gender and sexuality, based on authors from the perspectives of Cultural Studies in Education and Deaf Studies. Deafness and deaf people, as the gender issue, are understood through a cultural difference perspective. Deaf women are discriminated inthe workplace in general, but they are the majority in the teaching profession, a consequence of the feminization of the teaching work. The increasing female presence as leaders of deaf movements may be related to this greater rate of women as teachers, who carry the features of the school organization onto the movements. Two papers onthe topic were examined, as well as a meeting on deaf women occurring in Pelotas – RS, whose participants highlighted their role in the political struggle by the deaf people’s association, while men take

  15. Health promotion of families of deaf children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Albuquerque Frota

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the impact of hearing loss in the family dynamics of the deaf child; identify the family’s knowledge about deafness, understand how parents experience the diagnosis and treatment of child with hearing impairment. Methods: The study has aqualitative approach developed at the Center for Integrated Medical Care - NAMI, attached to the University of Fortaleza - UNIFOR located in Fortaleza - CE, Brazil. The participants were six mothers of children with hearing impairment. Data collection was carried outthrough participant observation and semi-structured interview. The Thematic Analysis of Bardin was used for processing the data. Results: After coding, some categories emerged from the discourse: Misinformation of Hearing Loss; impact of the discovery of hearingloss, caregivers and facilitators of the development of the deaf children. Conclusion: The birth of a deaf child alters the previous family balance, causing specific problems, such as the communication barrier, whose solution is related to how to handle the situation. Itis necessary to promote changes, emphasizing the involvement of caregivers and loved as facilitators of deaf child’s development. In Phonoaudiology, this attitude represents discovering new ways to identify the need for the subject, which requires strategies thatvalue their opinion, allowing the expression of expectations, perceptions, representations and feelings.

  16. The influence of prolonged preterm premature rupture of the membranes on neonatal outcome of the presenting and non-presenting twin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aviad; Skornick-Rapaport, Avital; Cohen, Yoni; Mandel, Dror; Rimon, Eli

    2014-10-01

    To compare the neonatal outcome in twin gestations complicated by prolonged preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Between the years 2000 and 2010 we identified 48 women with twin pregnancies who were diagnosed as having PPROM and a latency period to delivery >24h. We compared the neonatal morbidity and mortality between the presenting and non-presenting twins, assuming that the rupture occurred in the lower sac. Importantly, in 30 women we were able to identify the location of the ruptured sac by ultrasound examination demonstrating oligohydramnion. In these 30 cases, neonatal outcome of fetuses in the ruptured sac and those in the intact sac were compared. The median gestational age was 31 weeks (range 28-33) with a median latency period between PPROM and delivery of 9 days (range 1-18). Of the identified ruptures 90% (27/30) occurred in the lower sac (presenting twin). There was no significant difference between the presenting and non-presenting twin in terms of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Moreover, no difference was found when fetuses with ruptured sac were compared to those with intact membrane sac. Importantly, the outcomes were not affected by the length of the latency period. The current study results demonstrated that the outcome of fetuses exposed to prolonged preterm rupture of membranes is similar to that of fetuses with intact membranes. Our data suggest that rupture of membranes per se did not cause any deleterious clinical manifestations or lead to clinical discordant inflammation and poor neonatal outcome, supporting a conservative management of twin pregnancies with PPROM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neonatal hypokalemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarici D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dilek Sarici1, S Umit Sarici21Kecioren Research and Education Hospital, Kecioren, Ankara, 2Chief of Division of Neonatology, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: In this article, distribution of potassium (K+ in body fluids, pathophysiology, causes, clinical signs and symptoms, and the evaluation and treatment of neonatal hypokalemia are reviewed. K+ is the most important intracellular cation and normal serum K+ is stabilized between 3.5 and 5.5 mEq/L. Hypokalemia may be caused by increased renal losses, increased extrarenal (gastrointestinal losses, redistribution or prolonged insufficient K+ intake. Clinical signs and symptoms occur as the result of functional changes in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and the heart. Hypokalemia is usually asymptomatic when K+ levels are between 3.0 and 3.5 mEq/L; however, there may sometimes be slight muscle weakness. Moderate hypokalemia is observed when serum K+ is between 2.5 and 3.0 mEq/L. Proximal muscle weakness is observed most commonly in lower extremities; cranial muscles are normal, but constipation and distention are prominent. Severe hypokalemia develops when serum K+ falls below 2.5 mEq/L. Rhabdomyolysis, myoglobinuria, severe muscle weakness, paralysis, respiratory distress, and respiratory arrest are observed. The clinical signs and symptoms may be unremarkable in cases of chronically developing hypokalemia; however, appropriate treatment is essential when serum K+ level falls below 2.5 mEq/L as the most dangerous complication of hypokalemia is fatal cardiac arrythmia, and changes visible with electrocardiography may not always correlate with the level of hypokalemia. Sodium (Na+, K+, chloride (Cl-, bicarbonate, creatinine, blood sugar, magnesium (Mg, plasma renin activity, aldosterone, and blood gases should be investigated by laboratory testing. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatinine kinase, and

  18. Deaf Culture and Competing Discourses in a Residential School for the Deaf: "Can Do" versus "Can't Do"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Catherine A.; Placier, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    From an ethnographic case study of a state-funded residential school for the Deaf, the authors employed Critical Discourse Analysis to identify competing discourses in the talk of educators. These discourses are embedded in the historical oppression and labeling of deaf people as disabled and the development of Deaf culture as a counter-discourse.…

  19. The Attitudes of the Holy Land Institute for the Deaf-Salt, Jordan towards Deaf Socially and Educationally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziadat, Ayed H.; Atiyat, Fatima A.

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed to recognize the attitudes of the Holy Land Institute for the Deaf-Salt, Jordan towards Deaf Socially and Educationally in the academic year 2016-2017, which consists of instructional and vocational staff towards deaf socially and educationally according to some variables (gender, age, the level of education). The sample of the…

  20. The neonatal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flodmark, O.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical examination of the CNS in the neonate is often difficult in cases of complex pathology. Diagnostic imaging of the neonatal brain has become extremely useful and in the last decade has developed in two main directions: CT and US. MR imaging has been used recently with varying success in the diagnosis of pathology in the neonatal brain. Despite technical difficulties, this imaging method is likely to become increasingly important in the neonate. The paper examines the normal neonatal brain anatomy as seen with the different modalities, followed by pathologic conditions. Attention is directed to the common pathology, in asphyxiated newborns, the patholphysiology of intraventicular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia in the preterm neonate, and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the term neonate. Pitfalls, artifacts, and problems in image interpretation are illustrated. Finally, the subsequent appearance of neonatal pathology later in infancy and childhood is discussed

  1. Amplified somatosensory and visual cortical projections to a core auditory area, the anterior auditory field, following early- and late-onset deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carmen; Chabot, Nicole; Kok, Melanie A; Lomber, Stephen G

    2015-09-01

    Cross-modal reorganization following the loss of input from a sensory modality can recruit sensory-deprived cortical areas to process information from the remaining senses. Specifically, in early-deaf cats, the anterior auditory field (AAF) is unresponsive to auditory stimuli but can be activated by somatosensory and visual stimuli. Similarly, AAF neurons respond to tactile input in adult-deafened animals. To examine anatomical changes that may underlie this functional adaptation following early or late deafness, afferent projections to AAF were examined in hearing cats, and cats with early- or adult-onset deafness. Unilateral deposits of biotinylated dextran amine were made in AAF to retrogradely label cortical and thalamic afferents to AAF. In early-deaf cats, ipsilateral neuronal labeling in visual and somatosensory cortices increased by 329% and 101%, respectively. The largest increases arose from the anterior ectosylvian visual area and the anterolateral lateral suprasylvian visual area, as well as somatosensory areas S2 and S4. Consequently, labeling in auditory areas was reduced by 36%. The age of deafness onset appeared to influence afferent connectivity, with less marked differences observed in late-deaf cats. Profound changes to visual and somatosensory afferent connectivity following deafness may reflect corticocortical rewiring affording acoustically deprived AAF with cross-modal functionality. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Use of In vivo Imaging to Monitor the Progression of Experimental Mouse Cytomegalovirus Infection in Neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Macquin, Cécile; Bahram, Seiamak; Georgel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV or HHV-5) is a life-threatening pathogen in immune-compromised individuals. Upon congenital or neonatal infection, the virus can infect and replicate in the developing brain, which may induce severe neurological damage, including deafness and mental retardation. Despite the potential severity of the symptoms, the therapeutic options are limited by the unavailability of a vaccine and the absence of a specific antiviral therapy. Furthermore, a precise description of ...

  3. Assessing deaf cultural competency of physicians and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Lisa; LaHousse, Sheila F; Nakaji, Melanie C; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2011-03-01

    The Medical Students, Cancer Control, and the Deaf Community Training program (DCT) intended to create physicians who were culturally competent to care for deaf patients were evaluated. DCT medical students (n = 22), UCSD medical faculty (n = 131), and non-DCT medical students (n = 211) were anonymously surveyed about their perceptions related to deaf patients, deaf cultural competency, and interpreter use. The faculty and non-DCT medical students displayed less knowledge than the DCT students. These findings suggest that training medical students in deaf cultural competency can significantly increase their capacity to care for community members and reduce the health disparities experienced by this community.

  4. Deafness, a Social Stigma: Physician Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, M K

    2014-12-01

    Hearing is an essential sensory sense of an individual for development of speech which is crucial for verbal communication and personality development. It is the second most common form of disability after loco motor disability in India. Disabling hearing loss is more than 40 dB hearing loss in better ear in a person more than 15 years of age and greater than 30 dB hearing loss in better hearing ear below 14 years of age. WHO estimated 360 million individuals in the world with disabling hearing loss, out of which 91 % are adults and only 9 % are children. Early and accurate identification of birth asphyxia, hyperbilirubinemia, auditory neuropathy Presbyacusis and avoiding noise pollution and discouraging use of mobile phone, tobacco chewing/smoking, in those who are prone to deafness, an intervention is a must to decrease deafness from our society. Deafness prevention can only be possible with mutual cooperation with dedication of different medical and non-medical personnel and also by helping the persons with deafness. We have to focus not only on the children but also on senior citizens as most alarming, up to 40 %, incidence of deafness is in senior citizens above the age of 75 years. Timely cure and preventive measures are essential for better socio-economic state of the country. By helping the persons with deafness, we will not only be doing a great service to the Nation but also to the society at large.

  5. Symptom and Surface: Disruptive Deafness and Medieval Medical Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsy, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    This essay examines constructions of deafness in medieval culture, exploring how deaf experience disrupts authoritative discourses in three textual genres: medical treatise, literary fiction, and autobiographical writing. Medical manuals often present deafness as a physical defect, yet they also suggest how social conditions for deaf people can be transformed in lieu of treatment protocols. Fictional narratives tend to associate deafness with sin or social stigma, but they can also imagine deaf experience with a remarkable degree of sympathy and nuance. Autobiographical writing by deaf authors most vividly challenges diagnostic models of disability, exploring generative forms of perception that deafness can foster. In tracing the disruptive force that deaf experience exerts on perceived notions of textual authority, this essay reveals how medieval culture critiqued the diagnostic power of medical practitioners. Deafness does not simply function as a symptom of an individual problem or a metaphor for a spiritual or social condition; rather, deafness is a transformative capacity affording new modes of knowing self and other.

  6. Dementia and the Deaf community: knowledge and service access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John; Young, Alys

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns culturally Deaf people in the United Kingdom who use British Sign Language (BSL). Its objective was to explore how Deaf people's knowledge about dementia and access to services is mediated by their minoritised cultural-linguistic status. Twenty-six members of the Deaf community participated in one of three Deaf-led focus groups in BSL corresponding with the sample of: Deaf people over the age of 60 without dementia; Deaf people aged 18-60 working professional roles unconnected with dementia services; ordinary members of the Deaf community aged 18-60. Data were subjected to a thematic content analysis. Participants' concerns about their poor levels of knowledge and understanding of dementia were augmented by their awareness that without sustained social contact in BSL opportunities for earlier recognition of dementia would be lost. Although primary care services were identified as the first port of call for dementia-related concerns, there was widespread mistrust of their effectiveness because of failures in communication and cultural competence. Confirmed diagnosis of dementia was not viewed as a gateway to services and support because Deaf organisations, dementia-related organisations and mainstream adult services were perceived to be ill-equipped to respond to the needs of Deaf people with dementia. Locating problems of late diagnosis within the Deaf community's poor awareness and knowledge of dementia fails to recognise the structural barriers Deaf people face in timely access to services and accurate recognition of dementia-related changes.

  7. Ethical Issues in Conducting Research With Deaf Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehofer, Deirdre; Thew, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users represent a small population at risk for marginalization from research and surveillance activities resulting from cultural, language, and ethical challenges. The Deaf community’s view of deafness as a cultural identity, rather than a disability, contradicts the medical community’s perception of deafness as a disease or deficiency in need of correction or elimination. These differences continue to have significant cultural and social implications within the Deaf community, resulting in mistrust of research opportunities. Two particularly contentious ethical topics for the Deaf community are the absence of community representation in genetic research and the lack of accessible informed consents and research materials. This article outlines a series of innovative strategies and solutions to these issues, including the importance of community representation and collaboration with researchers studying deaf populations. PMID:24134363

  8. RELATION OF DEAF PERSONS TOWARDS BILINGUALISM AS COMMUNICATION MODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Salkić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Bilingualism of a deaf child implies concurrent cognition and usage of sign language, as community language and oral-voice language as language of greater community in which deaf persons live. Today, most authors consider that deaf persons should know both of these languages and that deaf persons need to be educated in both languages, because of their general communication and complete psycho-social development. Through research on sample of 80 deaf examinees, we affirmed the kind of relation that deaf persons have towards bilingualism, bilingual way of education and communication. The research results have shown that bilingualism and bilingual way of education and communication is acceptable to deaf persons and that there is no statistically significant difference between the sub-samples of examinees.

  9. [Megadolichobasilar anomaly causing acute deafness with vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, M H; Radeloff, A; Bink, A; Gstöttner, W; Ziemann, U

    2008-01-01

    Megadolichobasilar anomaly, a dilatant arteriopathy of the basilar artery attributable to chronic arterial hypertension, can cause cranial nerve compression syndromes of the cerebellopontine angle or infarcts of the vertebrobasilar circulation. In this paper, we report on a patient with known megadolichobasilar anomaly and a partially thrombosed fusiform aneurysm of the basilar artery, who presented with acute-onset vertigo and subsequent deafness due to thromboembolic occlusion of the labyrinthine artery. Because of the vascular origin of the patient's symptoms, his vertigo disappeared over time while the deafness persisted.

  10. Plosive Features of Pronunciation with Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Kovacevic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This research shows the results of efficiency in articulating plosives and the discrimination of plosive couples with deaf children in the elementary school. For the purpose of this research we have used: a global articulation test and a test to distinguish phonemes. The study was performed on 24 deaf students, and the results indicate the existence of differences in the discrimination of plosive pairs between students of younger and older age, but also the lack of difference in the articulation of plosives between the two groups of participants.

  11. Speech Experience Shapes the Speechreading Network and Subsequent Deafness Facilitates It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Myung-Whan; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee; Oh, Seung-Ha

    2009-01-01

    Speechreading is a visual communicative skill for perceiving speech. In this study, we tested the effects of speech experience and deafness on the speechreading neural network in normal hearing controls and in two groups of deaf patients who became deaf either before (prelingual deafness) or after (postlingual deafness) auditory language…

  12. The Development of Analogical Reasoning in Deaf Children and Their Parents' Communication Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, Marcin; Galkowski, Tadeusz

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the results of a study of the development of analogical reasoning in deaf children coming from two different linguistic environments (deaf children of deaf parents--sign language, deaf children of hearing parents--spoken language) and in hearing children, as well as to compare two groups of deaf children…

  13. Suppression of serotonin hyperinnervation does not alter the dysregulatory influences of dopamine depletion on striatal neuropeptide gene expression in rodent neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, G J; Walker, P D

    1999-10-15

    Sixty days following neonatal dopamine depletion (>98%) with 6-hydroxydopamine, preprotachykinin and preprodynorphin mRNA levels were significantly reduced (67 and 78% of vehicle controls, respectively) in the anterior striatum as determined by in situ hybridization while preproenkephalin mRNA expression was elevated (133% of vehicle controls). Suppression of the serotonin hyperinnervation phenomenon in the dopamine-depleted rat with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine yielded no significant alterations in reduced striatal preprotachykinin (66%) or preprodynorphin (64%) mRNA levels, while preproenkephalin mRNA expression remained significantly elevated (140%). These data suggest that striatal serotonin hyperinnervation does not contribute to the development of dysregulated striatal neuropeptide transmission in either direct or indirect striatal output pathways following neonatal dopamine depletion.

  14. Time Perception during Neonatal Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; De Bernardo, Giuseppe; Res, Giulia; Sordino, Desiree; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Weiner, Gary; Cavallin, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of time perception during a simulated complex neonatal resuscitation. Participants in 5 neonatal resuscitation program courses were directly involved in a complex simulation scenario. They were asked to assume the role of team leader, assistant 1, or assistant 2. At the end of the scenario, each participant completed a questionnaire on perceived time intervals for key resuscitation interventions. During the scenario, actual times were documented by an external observer and video recorded for later review. In addition, participants were asked to evaluate their self-perceived level of stress and preparation. Health care providers (68 physicians and 40 nurses) were involved in 36 scenarios. Perceived time intervals for the initiation of key resuscitation interventions were shorter than the actual time intervals, regardless of the participant's role in the scenario. Self-assessed levels of stress and preparation did not influence time perception. Health care providers underestimate the passage of time, irrespective of their role in a simulated complex neonatal resuscitation. Participant's self-assessed levels of stress and preparation were not related to the accuracy of their time perception. These findings highlight the importance of assigning a dedicated individual to document interventions and the passage of time during a neonatal resuscitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal and Fetal Determinants of Neonatal Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breij, Laura M; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M; Briceno, Daniela; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2015-01-01

    Body composition in early life influences the development of obesity during childhood and beyond. It is, therefore, important to adequately determine neonatal body composition. Fetal growth and maternal factors might influence neonatal fat mass percentage (FM%), independent of birth weight. In 194 healthy neonates, we investigated neonatal body composition, measured by air-displacement plethysmography (PEAPOD), and its associations with estimated fetal weight (EFW), neonatal anthropometric data, maternal preconceptional body mass index (BMI) and maternal weight gain during pregnancy. There was a large variation in neonatal FM%, even in case of a similar birth weight, corrected for gender and gestational age. Neonatal FM% was associated with EFW at 30 and 36 weeks of gestation and with catch-up in weight between 30 and 36 weeks of gestation, but not with EFW at 20 weeks (p Neonatal FM% was also associated with preconceptional BMI of the mother (p maternal weight gain. Our study shows that term neonates have a large variation in FM%. Neonatal FM% is associated with EFW at 30 and 36 weeks, catch-up in weight between 30 and 36 weeks of gestation and preconceptional BMI of the mother. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  17. The role of music in deaf culture: deaf students' perception of emotion in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2006-01-01

    Although emotional interpretation of music is an individual and variable experience, researchers have found that typical listeners are quite consistent in associating basic or primary emotions such as happiness, sadness, fear, and anger to musical compositions. It has been suggested that an individual with a sensorineural hearing loss, or any lesion in auditory perceptors in the brain may have trouble perceiving music emotionally. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether students with a hearing loss who associate with the deaf culture, assign the same emotions to music as students without a hearing loss. Sixty-two elementary and junior high students at a Midwestern state school for the deaf and students at neighboring elementary and junior high schools served as participants. Participants at the state school for the deaf had hearing losses ranging from moderate to severe. Twelve film score excerpts, composed to depict the primary emotions-happiness, sadness, and fear, were used as the musical stimuli. Participants were asked to assign an emotion to each excerpt. Results indicated a significant difference between the Deaf and typical hearing participants' responses, with hearing participants' responses more in agreement with the composers' intent. No significant differences were found for age or gender. Analyses of the Deaf participants' responses indicate that timbre, texture, and rhythm are perhaps the musical elements most influential in transmitting emotion to persons with a hearing loss. Adaptive strategies are suggested for assisting children who are deaf in accessing the elements of music intended to portray emotion.

  18. Attitudes toward the capabilities of deaf and hard of hearing adults: insights from the parents of deaf and hard of hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Kathryn; McLeod, Sharynne; McKinnon, David H; Ching, Teresa Y C

    2015-01-01

    Children who are d/Deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) grow up in environments influenced by their parents' attitudes, which may facilitate or impede these children's development and participation (World Health Organization, 2007). The attitudes of 152 Australian parents of DHH children ages 3 years 7 months to 9 years 5 months (M = 6 years 5 months) were investigated with the Opinions About Deaf People Scale (Berkay, Gardner, & Smith, 1995a). The parents' responses showed very positive attitudes toward the capabilities of DHH adults, particularly on items describing their intellectual and vocational capabilities. Parents' responses to most of the items on the scale were positively skewed, raising questions about its validity as a research tool when used with parents of DHH children. The study findings suggest that for these children, parents' attitudes may facilitate rather than present an environmental barrier to their development.

  19. Hearing Disorders and Deafness - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information Translations Spanish (español) Expand Section Hearing Disorders and Deafness: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  20. Deaf Sex Offenders in a Prison Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Katrina; Vernon, McCay

    2003-01-01

    A study of 41 sex offenders who are deaf found the rate of sexual offending was 4 times the rate of sexual offending by hearing offenders, with 30% recidivism. Sixty-two percent of subjects were functionally illiterate. However, the performance IQs were comparable to those of the overall prison population. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  1. Cerebral Malaria Complicated by Blindness, Deafness and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A diagnosis of cerebral malaria was made, and the patient was commenced on intravenous quinine and parenteral paracetamol. He was transfused while on admission in the emergency room. The patient regained consciousness after 12 days of treatment but was found to have blindness and deafness following reviews by.

  2. Ophthalmologic abnormalities among deaf students in Kaduna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deaf children has been reported to vary from 33 to. 60%.[1-5] Globally, these range between 23% (in. Nepal);[6] 33% (in ... communication in a few. All the students had systemic examination. The ophthalmic .... auditory syndrome[15] that have been defined in other reports were also found in this study. They include Usher ...

  3. Potentials of Rubella Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Benjamin F.

    Potentials of three classifications of rubella deaf blind children are discussed. Potentials for children at the middle trainable level and below are discussed for the areas of communication skills, daily living skills, mobility and orientation, vocational effort, and self-control and social interaction. For children in the upper trainable through…

  4. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities | Cronje | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three members of a family with features of the 'leopard' syndrome are described. The important findings were generalized lentigo, deafness, and cardiac and electrocardiographic abnormalities. Progressive obstructive cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias are features of the condition which may be present, and are potentially ...

  5. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral

  6. Grapheme-Phoneme Acquisition of Deaf Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.; Lederberg, Amy R.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    We examined acquisition of grapheme-phoneme correspondences by 4 deaf and hard-of-hearing preschoolers using instruction from a curriculum designed specifically for this population supplemented by Visual Phonics. Learning was documented through a multiple baseline across content design as well as descriptive analyses. Preschoolers who used sign…

  7. Deaf Children's Bimodal Bilingualism and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanwick, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research into deaf children's bilingualism and bilingual education through a synthesis of studies published over the last 15 years. This review brings together the linguistic and pedagogical work on bimodal bilingualism to inform educational practice. The first section of the review provides a synthesis of…

  8. Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience: Insights from Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corina, David; Singleton, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    The condition of deafness presents a developmental context that provides insight into the biological, cultural, and linguistic factors underlying the development of neural systems that impact social cognition. Studies of visual attention, behavioral regulation, language development, and face and human action perception are discussed. Visually…

  9. Deaf Students' Metacognitive Awareness during Language Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Carolyn; Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Convertino, Carol M.; Borgna, Georgianna; Dirmyer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This study explored deaf and hearing university students' metacognitive awareness with regard to comprehension difficulties during reading and classroom instruction. Utilising the Reading Awareness Inventory (Milholic, V. 1994. "An inventory to pique students' metacognitive awareness of reading strategies." "Journal of Reading"…

  10. Health Care Access among Deaf People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenburg, Alexa; Fellinger, Paul; Fellinger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Access to health care without barriers is a clearly defined right of people with disabilities as stated by the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities. The present study reviews literature from 2000 to 2015 on access to health care for deaf people and reveals significant challenges in communication with health providers and gaps in…

  11. Sexual Health Behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. Objective We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Methods Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18–64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N=1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Results Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs. 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs. 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs. 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Conclusion Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower-income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. PMID:26242551

  12. Neural networks mediating sentence reading in the deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ann Hirshorn

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work addresses the neural bases of sentence reading in deaf populations. To better understand the relative role of deafness and English knowledge in shaping the neural networks that mediate sentence reading, three populations with different degrees of English knowledge and depth of hearing loss were included – deaf signers, oral deaf and hearing individuals. The three groups were matched for reading comprehension and scanned while reading sentences. A similar neural network of left perisylvian areas was observed, supporting the view of a shared network of areas for reading despite differences in hearing and English knowledge. However, differences were observed, in particular in the auditory cortex, with deaf signers and oral deaf showing greatest bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG recruitment as compared to hearing individuals. Importantly, within deaf individuals, the same STG area in the left hemisphere showed greater recruitment as hearing loss increased. To further understand the functional role of such auditory cortex re-organization after deafness, connectivity analyses were performed from the STG regions identified above. Connectivity from the left STG toward areas typically associated with semantic processing (BA45 and thalami was greater in deaf signers and in oral deaf as compared to hearing. In contrast, connectivity from left STG toward areas identified with speech-based processing was greater in hearing and in oral deaf as compared to deaf signers. These results support the growing literature indicating recruitment of auditory areas after congenital deafness for visually-mediated language functions, and establish that both auditory deprivation and language experience shape its functional reorganization. Implications for differential reliance on semantic vs. phonological pathways during reading in the three groups is discussed.

  13. Sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiman, Erica; Haynes, Sharon; McKee, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the sexual health behaviors of Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users. We sought to characterize the self-reported sexual behaviors of Deaf individuals. Responses from 282 Deaf participants aged 18-64 from the greater Rochester, NY area who participated in the 2008 Deaf Health were analyzed. These data were compared with weighted data from a general population comparison group (N = 1890). We looked at four sexual health-related outcomes: abstinence within the past year; number of sexual partners within the last year; condom use at last intercourse; and ever tested for HIV. We performed descriptive analyses, including stratification by gender, age, income, marital status, and educational level. Deaf respondents were more likely than the general population respondents to self-report two or more sexual partners in the past year (30.9% vs 10.1%) but self-reported higher condom use at last intercourse (28.0% vs 19.8%). HIV testing rates were similar between groups (47.5% vs 49.4%) but lower for certain Deaf groups: Deaf women (46.0% vs 58.1%), lower-income Deaf (44.4% vs 69.7%) and among less educated Deaf (31.3% vs 57.7%) than among respondents from corresponding general population groups. Deaf respondents self-reported higher numbers of sexual partners over the past year compared to the general population. Condom use was higher among Deaf participants. HIV was similar between groups, though HIV testing was significantly lower among lower income, less well-educated, and female Deaf respondents. Deaf individuals have a sexual health risk profile that is distinct from that of the general population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 75 FR 10294 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... ON DEAFNESS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DISORDERS, including consideration of personnel qualifications..., Division of Intramural Research, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 5...

  15. 75 FR 57473 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, including consideration of personnel qualifications..., Director, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders...

  16. Influência de estímulos visuais na produção escrita de surdos sinalizadores com queixas de alterações na escrita Influence of visual stimuli in the written production of deaf signers with complaints of writing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natali da Silva Lustre

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência de dois tipos de estímulos visuais na produção escrita de surdos sinalizadores com queixas de alterações na escrita. MÉTODOS: Participaram 13 estudantes surdos sinalizadores com queixas de alterações na escrita, sendo sete do gênero masculino e seis do feminino. A média de idade foi de 13 anos, e os sujeitos apresentavam perda auditiva neurossensorial de grau severo ou profundo (pior que 71 dBNA na média das frequências de 500 Hz, 1 e 2 kHz. A escolaridade dos participantes variou de 3ª à 8ª séries do Ensino Fundamental de escolas pública e particular. Os surdos foram avaliados quanto ao desempenho em LIBRAS e realizaram produções escritas com base em estímulos visuais de uma figura de ação e de figuras em sequência, as quais foram analisadas segundo critérios adaptados de acordo com a Teoria das Competências Comunicativas (Genérica, Enciclopédica e Línguística. Os dados foram analisados estatisticamente. RESULTADOS: Em relação à Competência Genérica, a tipologia do discurso predominante foi a Narração. Quanto às competências Enciclopédica e Linguística, ambas se mostraram prejudicadas independente dos estímulos apresentados. CONCLUSÃO: Os dois tipos de estímulos visuais estudados não propiciaram produções escritas diferenciadas nos surdos sinalizadores com queixas de alterações na escrita.PURPOSE: To investigate the influence of two types of visual stimuli in the written production of deaf signers with complaints of reading and writing alterations. METHODS: Participants were 13 deaf students who were users of sign language and had complaints of reading and writing alterations (seven male and six female. Subjects' mean age was 13 years, and they presented severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss (average threshold lower than 71 dBHL in the frequencies of 500 Hz, 1 and 2 kHz. The educational level of participants ranged from 3rd to 8th grades of public and

  17. A comparative perspective on the experiences of deaf and hard of hearing individuals as students at mainstream and special schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, Panayiotis; Aravi, Christiana

    Integration of individuals categorized as having special educational needs in mainstream schools has become a dominant policy in many countries. Changes in recent years in the field traditionally called "special education" have significantly influenced the education of deaf and hard of hearing individuals. The movements against segregation and toward integration and, more recently, inclusion, have created the conditions for educational changes, not only in mainstreaming but in special education. The article brings to light the views and experiences of deaf and hard of hearing people as students at special schools and mainstream schools, in order to compare the two systems from the viewpoints of those involved and to explore the possible implications of these views and experiences for the development of the educational system in Cyprus regarding inclusive education. Particular attention is given to improvement of the education of deaf and hard of hearing children.

  18. Neonatal orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Y Gogri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital abscess generally occurs in older children but it can rarely affect infants and neonates too. We report a case of community acquired methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA neonatal orbital abscess in a 12-day-old term female neonate with no significant past medical history or risk factor for developing the infection. The case highlights the importance of consideration of CA-MRSA as a causative agent of neonatal orbital cellulitis even in a neonate without any obvious predisposing condition. Prompt initiation of appropriate medical therapy against MRSA and surgical drainage of the abscess prevents life threatening complications of orbital cellulitis which more often tend to be fatal in neonates.

  19. Congenital and neonatal pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Michael D

    2007-09-01

    The greatest risk of death from pneumonia in childhood is in the neonatal period. It is estimated that pneumonia contributes to between 750000-1.2 million neonatal deaths annually, accounting for 10% of global child mortality. Congenital and neonatal pneumonias are often a difficult disease to identify and treat, with clinical manifestations often being non-specific. Many of the normal lung defences are compromised in the fetus and neonate, leading to an increased susceptibility to infection. The aetiology and epidemiology of congenital and neonatal pneumonias will depend on the clinical setting and population that the baby belongs to, the stage in the perinatal period, the gestational age of the baby and the definition of pneumonia. Diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies are therefore also dependent on these factors, and will differ depending on the clinical setting. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning congenital and neonatal pneumonia worldwide and discusses future directions in the prevention of the disease.

  20. Determinants of neonatal mortality in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titaley, Christiana R; Dibley, Michael J; Agho, Kingsley; Roberts, Christine L; Hall, John

    2008-07-09

    which significantly influence neonatal mortality in Indonesia. Low birth weight and short birth interval infants as well as perinatal health services factors, such as the availability of skilled birth attendance and postnatal care utilization should be taken into account when planning the interventions to reduce neonatal mortality in Indonesia.

  1. Determinants of neonatal mortality in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agho Kingsley

    2008-07-01

    address community, household and individual level factors which significantly influence neonatal mortality in Indonesia. Low birth weight and short birth interval infants as well as perinatal health services factors, such as the availability of skilled birth attendance and postnatal care utilization should be taken into account when planning the interventions to reduce neonatal mortality in Indonesia.

  2. Developmental pharmacokinetics of gentamicin in preterm and term neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Elisabet I; Sandström, Marie; Honoré, Per Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    as having a significant influence on the central volume of distribution, with a preterm neonate having a larger central volume of distribution per kilogram of bodyweight than a term neonate. Cystatin C and creatinine were not correlated with gentamicin clearance in this study population. The external...

  3. In search of a new, linguistically and culturally sensitive paradigm in deaf education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Laurene; Thumann, Helen

    2007-01-01

    For more than a century, educators have recognized the low academic achievement of deaf children in America. Teacher training programs in deaf education historically have emphasized medical-pathological views of deaf people and deaf education rather than appropriate pedagogies that draw upon and build on deaf students' linguistic and cultural knowledge. A recent and growing interest in educating deaf children bilingually acknowledges the value of American Sign Language and English in the classroom. The authors address the dire need for prospective teachers and teacher educators to rethink their views of deaf people and, in doing so, rethink the teaching methodologies in deaf education.

  4. Without boundaries: an inquiry into deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing debate on Deaf epistemologies reflects two major paradigms in deaf education: positivism and constructivism. The present article investigates Deaf epistemologies through a metaparadigm, which should blur the boundaries among different paradigms and connect the epistemological inquiry to instructional practice for d/Deaf students. The author states that researchers and educators should not be obsessed with defending a particular paradigm and attacking others, but should move toward paradigmatic integration. If successful instructional practices are to be fully understood, each paradigm needs insights from the others. Furthermore, effective classroom instruction should be based on the goal of the educational activity and the ability of the students in the classroom. Mainstream theories and research in English literacy education can and should be applicable to d/Deaf students; furthermore, using appropriate instructional tools, teachers of the d/Deaf can and should teach phonologically related skills to their students.

  5. The Role of Parents in the Development of Deaf Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IWONA JAGOSZEWSKA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Both the parents and the deaf children live with a disability. The specificity of deafness has a significant impact on the functioning of the families which often requires support of their care and educational functions. Therefore, it is vital to establish a cooperation between parents and proper institutions and specialists. Hearing dysfunction requires intensification of parents actions in the field of recognizing and developing the strong sides of deaf child

  6. Comparative study of verbal originality in deaf and hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R A; Khatena, J

    1975-04-01

    Verbal originality scores were obtained from Onomatopoeia and Images, Form 1B, given to 181 deaf and 236 hearing Ss aged 10 to 19 yr. The hearing Ss scored significantly higher than the deaf Ss. Significant main effects for age were found but not for sex. The only significant interaction was found for hearing status and age. Deaf Ss became more productive as age increased, while performance of hearing Ss relative to age fluctuated.

  7. Deaf Students, Teachers, and Interpreters in the Chemistry Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Brenda C.; Wynne, Dorothy H.; MacDonald, Gina

    2002-02-01

    This report describes an undergraduate research program at James Madison University that includes deaf and hard-of-hearing students from Gallaudet University, deaf teachers from schools for the Deaf, and both professional interpreters and students engaged in sign language interpreter training. Methods used over a three-year period to maximize participation and expand research opportunities for the students, teachers, and interpreters are shared with the hope that similar projects might be encouraged and replicated in other programs.

  8. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    OpenAIRE

    Jablan, Branka; Stanimirov, Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children...

  9. The effect of multimedia stories about American deaf celebrities on Taiwanese hearing students' attitudes toward job opportunities for the deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Jing-Ming

    In Taiwan, hearing people generally think deaf individuals can only do jobs requiring minimal communication. The present study was planned to help change hearing people's attitudes toward deaf people's job competence. Multimedia stories of deaf celebrities, e.g., physicians, lawyers, university presidents, professors, senior government officials, and movie stars, were developed. A multimedia computer reading program was developed in which graphic organizers, picture clues, video, and voice were integrated to make reading more exciting and pleasant. Materials were developed to be suitable for dissemination on CD. Regarding attitude change, all differences between pretests and posttests were statistically significant: Hearing students' attitudes toward deaf and hard of hearing people changed positively and significantly. It is recommended that the CD featuring American deaf celebrities be distributed to make hearing people understand deaf people's potential, and to contribute to an environment conducive to their employment in Taiwan.

  10. When hearing clients work with a deaf therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampel, Julie B

    2010-06-01

    Not being able to hear can present significant challenges for the therapist and for the deaf therapist/hearing client dyad. It can also create opportunities. Although the literature indicates that most culturally Deaf therapists work with Deaf clients due to their mutual use of American Sign Language, I describe (a) the background of an audiologically deaf therapist who relies on speech reading rather than sign language, and (b) this therapist's clinical work with hearing clients. Some of the relational dynamics of these treatments are identified, and I conclude by noting how attention to communication can benefit the work of all psychotherapists. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Handling Deafness Problem of Scheduled Multi-Channel Polling MACs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fulong; Liu, Hao; Shi, Longxing

    Combining scheduled channel polling with channel diversity is a promising way for a MAC protocol to achieve high energy efficiency and performance under both light and heavy traffic conditions. However, the deafness problem may cancel out the benefit of channel diversity. In this paper, we first investigate the deafness problem of scheduled multi-channel polling MACs with experiments. Then we propose and evaluate two schemes to handle the deafness problem. Our experiment shows that deafness is a significant reason for performance degradation in scheduled multi-channel polling MACs. A proper scheme should be chosen depending on the traffic pattern and the design objective.

  12. Emergency Department utilization among Deaf American Sign Language users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Winters, Paul C; Sen, Ananda; Zazove, Philip; Fiscella, Kevin

    2015-10-01

    Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users comprise a linguistic minority population with poor health care access due to communication barriers and low health literacy. Potentially, these health care barriers could increase Emergency Department (ED) use. To compare ED use between deaf and non-deaf patients. A retrospective cohort from medical records. The sample was derived from 400 randomly selected charts (200 deaf ASL users and 200 hearing English speakers) from an outpatient primary care health center with a high volume of deaf patients. Abstracted data included patient demographics, insurance, health behavior, and ED use in the past 36 months. Deaf patients were more likely to be never smokers and be insured through Medicaid. In an adjusted analysis, deaf individuals were significantly more likely to use the ED (odds ratio [OR], 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11-3.51) over the prior 36 months. Deaf American Sign Language users appear to be at greater odds for elevated ED utilization when compared to the general hearing population. Efforts to further understand the drivers for increased ED utilization among deaf ASL users are much needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Don’t Assume Deaf Students are Visual Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Paivio, Allan; Spencer, Linda J.; Durkin, Andreana; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Machmer, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In the education of deaf learners, from primary school to postsecondary settings, it frequently is suggested that deaf students are visual learners. That assumption appears to be based on the visual nature of signed languages—used by some but not all deaf individuals—and the fact that with greater hearing losses, deaf students will rely relatively more on vision than audition. However, the questions of whether individuals with hearing loss are more likely to be visual learners than verbal learners or more likely than hearing peers to be visual learners have not been empirically explored. Several recent studies, in fact, have indicated that hearing learners typically perform as well or better than deaf learners on a variety of visual-spatial tasks. The present study used two standardized instruments to examine learning styles among college deaf students who primarily rely on sign language or spoken language and their hearing peers. The visual-verbal dimension was of particular interest. Consistent with recent indirect findings, results indicated that deaf students are no more likely than hearing students to be visual learners and are no stronger in their visual skills and habits than their verbal skills and habits, nor are deaf students’ visual orientations associated with sign language skills. The results clearly have specific implications for the educating of deaf learners. PMID:28344430

  14. Neonatal characteristics and perinatal complications in neonates with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergaz-Shaltiel, Zivanit; Engel, Offra; Erlichman, Ira; Naveh, Yaron; Schimmel, Michael S; Tenenbaum, Ariel

    2017-05-01

    The annual rate of Down syndrome (DS) births in Jerusalem is stable, regardless of prenatal screening, and diagnostic measures. We aimed to evaluate our historical cohort for obstetrical characteristics and the neonatal course and complications. We reviewed computerized medical files of neonates with the diagnosis of DS born in the four main hospitals in Jerusalem between the years 2000 and 2010 and evaluated for maternal history and primary neonatal hospitalization. A total of 403 neonates were diagnosed with DS. The average maternal age was 35.6 years, 73% were born via spontaneous vaginal delivery. In all gestational ages, the mean birth weight and head circumference percentiles were significantly lower than the general population (P < 0.001 for both) and at each week the HC percentile was lower than the weight percentile (P < 0.0001), worse among males. Mortality during the primary hospitalization was 3.7%. The most common anomalies were cardiac (79%) with either congenital defects or functional abnormalities, neither influenced the length of hospitalization. The main reasons for prolonged hospitalization were prematurity and anomalies of other (non-cardiac) organs. Common perinatal complications included respiratory failure or need for oxygen supplementation (32%), hyperbilirubinemia (23%), sepsis (6.4%), and feeding difficulties (13%). About 84% were fed by human milk; of those, two thirds were exclusively breast-fed and one third were supplemented with infant formula. In conclusion, infants with DS were small for gestational age with relatively reduced head circumference. Despite the increased rate of congenital anomalies and perinatal complications, most infants were discharged home in good medical condition and were exclusively breastfed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Infantile variant of Bartter syndrome and sensorineural deafness: A new autosomal recessive disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, D.; Shalev, H.; Carmi, Rivka; Ohaly, M. [Univ. of the Negev, Ashkelon (Israel)

    1995-12-04

    The infantile variant of Bartter syndrome (IBS) is usually associated with maternal polyhydramnios, premature birth, postnatal polyuria and hypokalemic hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and a typical appearance. IBS is thought to be an autosomal recessive trait. Several congenital tubular defects are associated with sensorineural deafness (SND). However, an association between the IBS and SND has not been reported so far. Here we describe 5 children of an extended consanguineous Bedouin family with IBS and SND. In 3 of the cases, the typical electrolyte imbalance and facial appearance were detected neonatally. SND was detected as early as age 1 month, suggesting either coincidental homozygotization of 2 recessive genes or a pleiotropic effect of one autosomal recessive gene. This association suggests that evaluation of SND is warranted in every case of IBS. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Neonatal Arrhythmias: Atrial Flutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Gonchar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the current data on the diagnosis of neonatal arrhythmias, covers the prevalence, mechanisms of formation, diagnosis and treatment of one type of cardiac arrhythmias — atrial flutter. Clinical observation in terms of the diagnosis and treatment of atrial flutter in a newborn in the early neonatal period is given.

  17. Neonatal cardiac emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal cardiac emergencies. The neonatal period is one that fills many generalists with fear – this article will help to dispel these concerns. George A Comitis, MB ChB, DCH (SA), DA (SA), FCPaed (SA), Cert Cardiology (SA) Paed. Consultant, Paediatric Cardiology Service of the Western Cape, Red Cross War Memorial ...

  18. TECHNOLOGY AND DEAF EDUCATION: POSSIBILITIES OF INTERVENTION

    OpenAIRE

    Lívia Maria Ninci Martins; Heloísa Andreia de Matos Lins

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about an analysis of the potentials in the use of technology in deaf education, given the elements necessary for the realization of a bilingual education project (Libras-Portuguese), the scarce production in the field and the daily challenges of the so called inclusion process. For this, we present clippings of a case study that aimed to two distinct and parallel projects, but related: a description and analysis of the use of mobile computers (tablets), their implications for te...

  19. Conversion Deafness Presenting as Sudden Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Piao Wang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion deafness is a somatoform disorder characterized by hearing loss without an anatomic or pathophysiologic lesion. Clinically, discrepancies between behavior hearing thresholds and objective electrophysiologic examinations, such as impedance audiometry, otoacoustic emissions (OAE, and auditory brainstem response (ABR, will raise the suspicion of this disorder. It is judged to be due to psychological factors and that patients do not intentionally produce the symptom. Conversion deafness is sometimes reported in children but is extremely rare among adults. Two young adults with this disease are presented. These 2 patients were both under enormous stress from the national entrance examinations for universities. Pure tone audiometry showed bilateral hearing deterioration, but OAE and ABR were normal. The hearing of both patients recovered after treatment. The diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this disorder are also discussed. It is important to discover the psychological stress in patients with conversion deafness. This report aims to increase awareness of this condition and avoid unnecessary steroid use in its treatment.

  20. Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Predictors of early neonatal mortality at a neonatal intensive care unit of a specialized referral teaching hospital in. Ethiopia. Bogale Worku1, Assaye Kassie2, Amha Mekasha1, Birkneh Tilahun1, Alemayehu Worku3. Abstract. Background: The larger fraction of infant mortality is that of neonatal; and early neonatal death is ...

  1. Factors Affecting the Weaning from Nasal CPAP in Preterm Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Identification of the weight and postmenstrual age (PMA at successful weaning of NCPAP in preterm neonates and the factors influencing the successful wean. Study Design. Retrospective review of 454 neonates ≤32 weeks of gestational age (GA who were placed on NCPAP and successfully weaned to room air was performed. Results. Neonates had a mean birth weight (BW of 1357±392 grams with a mean GA of 29.3±2.2 weeks. Neonates were weaned off NCPAP at mean weight of 1611±432 grams and mean PMA of 32.9±2.4 weeks. Univariate analysis showed that chorioamnionitis, intubation, surfactant use, PDA, sepsis/NEC, anemia, apnea, GER and IVH were significantly associated with the time to NCPAP wean. On multivariate analysis, among neonates that were intubated, BW was the only significant factor (<0.001 that was inversely related to time to successful NCPAP wean. Amongst non-intubated neonates, along with BW (<0.01, chorioamnionitis (<0.01, anemia (<0.0001, and GER (<0.02 played a significant role in weaning from NCPAP. Conclusion. Neonates were weaned off NCPAP at mean weight of 1611±432 grams and mean PMA of 32.9±2.4 weeks. BW significantly affects weaning among intubated and non-intubated neonates, though in neonates who were never intubated chorioamnionitis, anemia and GER also significantly affected the duration on NCPAP.

  2. Complex Word Reading in Dutch Deaf Children and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoogmoed, Anne H.; Knoors, Harry; Schreuder, Robert; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex derivational words and compounds compared to…

  3. A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children's Reading Comprehension Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Fiona E.; Cain, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although deaf children typically exhibit severe delays in reading achievement, there is a paucity of research looking at their text-level comprehension skills. We present a comparison of deaf and normally hearing readers' profiles on a commonly used reading comprehension assessment: the Neale Analysis of Reading Ability II. Methods:…

  4. A Developmental Model Applied to Problems of Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Hilde S.

    2000-01-01

    This "classic" article (1972) in the field of deaf studies includes some interpretive notes for current readers. The article examines the effect of deafness on basic developmental tasks at each of the eight developmental stages of Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development and explains the more successful passage through these…

  5. Emotion Understanding in Deaf Children with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefferink, Carin H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Ketelaar, Lizet; De Raeve, Leo; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    It is still largely unknown how receiving a cochlear implant affects the emotion understanding in deaf children. We examined indices for emotion understanding and their associations with communication skills in children aged 2.5-5 years, both hearing children (n = 52) and deaf children with a cochlear implant (n = 57). 2 aspects of emotion…

  6. (Meta)Communication Strategies in Inclusive Classes for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Celeste Azulay; Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2009-01-01

    How can an inclusive classroom for deaf students be successful? The use of metacommunication strategies by teachers and hearing peers seems promising. Schools that promote this approach tend to improve deaf students' psychosocial development and academic achievement. However, this is not a general rule. The present study identifies the elements of…

  7. The Horror of Being Deaf and in Prison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, McCay

    2010-01-01

    Being deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant…

  8. Complex word reading in Dutch deaf children and adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogmoed, A.H. van; Knoors, H.E.T.; Schreuder, R.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Children who are deaf are often delayed in reading comprehension. This delay could be due to problems in morphological processing during word reading. In this study, we investigated whether 6th grade deaf children and adults are delayed in comparison to their hearing peers in reading complex

  9. Coping and Late-Deafness: An Examination of Two Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jill M.; Kashubeck-West, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the psychometric properties of two measures of coping in a sample of individuals with acquired hearing loss, specifically late-deafness. Methods: Using a quantitative descriptive design, coping of participants (N = 277) with late-deafness was measured to examine the reliability and validity of the Ways of Coping Questionnaire…

  10. A Sociolinguistic Profile of the Peruvian Deaf Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Elizabeth; Parks, Jason

    2010-01-01

    A sociolinguistic survey of the sign language used by the deaf communities of Peru was conducted in November and December of 2007. For eight weeks, our survey team visited six deaf communities in the cities of Lima, Arequipa, Cusco, Trujillo, Chiclayo, and Iquitos. Using sociolinguistic questionnaires and recorded text testing (RTT) tools, we…

  11. [From gene to disease: deafness and connexin 26

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefsloot, L.H.; Kemperman, M.H.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Deafness is genetically heterogeneous, yet it is estimated that approximately half of the heritable cases of autosomal recessive deafness are caused by mutations in the gene coding for connexin 26. Connexin 26 is thought to have an essential role in the transport of potassium ions back to the

  12. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  13. Haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf and hearing individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, R; Kappers, A.M.L.; Postma, A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated haptic spatial configuration learning in deaf individuals, hearing sign language interpreters and hearing controls. In three trials, participants had to match ten shapes haptically to the cut-outs in a board as fast as possible. Deaf and hearing sign language users

  14. Effect of Peer Education on Deaf Secondary School Students' HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effect of an AIDS education program on deaf secondary school students' knowledge, attitude and perceived susceptibility to AIDS using peer education. Two secondary schools matched for ownership (government), composition (mixture of hearing and deaf) and teaching arrangement (separate ...

  15. Visual Impairment and Ocular Findings among Deaf and Hearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of visual impairment and ocular findings among hearing impaired chil-dren in a school for the deaf in the Cape Coast Municipality of Ghana. A cross-sectional descrip-tive study design was undertaken amongst children in the school for the deaf who had been ...

  16. Awareness and Regulation of Emotions in Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieffe, Carolien

    2012-01-01

    In this study, deaf children's understanding of their own emotions was compared with that of hearing peers. Twenty-six deaf children (mean age 11 years) and 26 hearing children, matched for age and gender, were presented with various tasks that tap into their emotion awareness and regulation (coping) regarding the four basic emotions (happiness,…

  17. Vocabulary Knowledge of Deaf and Hearing Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchet, Thomastine; Marschark, Marc; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Sapere, Patricia; Dirmyer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Deaf children generally are found to have smaller English vocabularies than hearing peers, although studies involving children with cochlear implants have suggested that the gap may decrease or disappear with age. Less is known about the vocabularies of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) postsecondary students or how their vocabulary knowledge relates…

  18. Motor Development of Deaf Children with and without Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheysen, Freja; Loots, Gerrit; Van Waelvelde, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a cochlear implant (CI) on the motor development of deaf children. The study involved 36 mainstreamed deaf children (15 boys, 21 girls; 4- to 12-years old) without any developmental problems. Of these children, 20 had been implanted. Forty-three hearing children constituted a comparison…

  19. Text Revision in Deaf and Hearing Bilingual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruggi, Lilia A.; Gutiérrez-Cáceres, Rafaela

    2016-01-01

    In this study we explored the revision process and strategies implemented by deaf and hearing students who attend the same bilingual school context (LIS and Italian). For that we analysed and compared the types and quality of revisions made by deaf and hearing participants to their first draft of a narrative text ("Frog, Where Are You?")…

  20. Deaf College Students' Perceptions of Their Social-Emotional Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomski, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    This study examined differences between deaf and hearing students' perceptions of their social emotional adjustment as they transition to college. The 16PF-Adolescent Personality Questionnaire Life Difficulties Scale was completed by 205 deaf students and 185 hearing students. A multivariate analyses of variance and subsequent univariate tests…

  1. Learning via Direct and Mediated Instruction by Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patricia; Convertino, Carol; Pelz, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    Four experiments investigated classroom learning by deaf college students receiving lectures from instructors signing for themselves or using interpreters. Deaf students' prior content knowledge, scores on postlecture assessments of content learning, and gain scores were compared to those of hearing classmates. Consistent with prior research, deaf…

  2. Interpreted Writing Center Tutorials with College-Level Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Rebecca Day

    2011-01-01

    Deaf students are attending mainstream postsecondary institutions in increasing numbers. This study attempts to fill a gap in the literature regarding deaf students' writing tutorials with hearing tutors and interpreters. It consists of observation of tutoring sessions, interviews, and collection and grounded theory analysis of relevant documents…

  3. Are Deaf Students' Reading Challenges Really about Reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschark, Marc; Sapere, Patricia; Convertino, Carol M.; Mayer, Connie; Wauters, Loes; Sarchet, Thomastine

    2009-01-01

    Reading achievement among deaf students typically lags significantly behind hearing peers, a situation that has changed little despite decades of research. This lack of progress and recent findings indicating that deaf students face many of the same challenges in comprehending sign language as they do in comprehending text suggest that…

  4. Casefinding Criteria for Use in Identifying Deaf-Blind Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Catherine E.

    The study was undertaken to develop casefinding criteria for identifying deaf-blind children. Referral sources and investigative potentials were obtained from a demographic survey of 164 cases of deaf-blind persons in Louisiana. Inquiry sheets on the possible sources of casefinding twice were sent to and ranked by a panel of 20 persons, including…

  5. Technologies of Language and the Embodied History of the Deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary, Leland

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the linguistic situation of the deaf and the shift in linguistic ideology from graphocentrism to orocentrism, which forms the scenario in which deaf people are struggling to legitimize their natural form of expression. Questions both graphocentrism and orocentrism and proposes neutral terms and a neutral perspective from which orality…

  6. Acceptance of Deaf Students by Hearing Students in Regular Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Cristina

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 792 hearing students (ages 10-20) in 22 Spanish schools found students with deafness are well received socially by hearing classmates. Hearing students in general felt that students with deafness might be better looked after at a special school and did not work as hard as hearing students. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  7. ORGANIZATION PRACTICES OF THE DEAF COMMUNITY: ARTICULATIONS FROM CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Camatti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The deaf community has often been understood as a safe place in which the deaf difference can be reliably and cozily experienced. The aim of this paper is to understand how the deaf community is organized and narrated as such. Post-structuralist studies have been used to analyze the materials produced for this research. Deaf teachers and students from deaf schools who have actively participated in community movements were interviewed. The analysis of the materials has shown that belonging to a community involves following a living code created with a common intention. In the deaf community, the reference grounding its organization is what has been known as cultural artifacts of deaf people. However, belonging to the community is delimited by the extent to which one is able or willing to move in accordance to the community rules. Thus, we can see that the community aggregates elements other than just the feeling of being deaf, only justified by sharing the same culture.

  8. Monitoring the Achievement of Deaf Pupils in Sweden and Scotland: Approaches and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendar, Ola; O'Neill, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades there have been major developments in deaf education in many countries. Medical and technical advances have made it possible for more deaf children to hear and speak successfully. Most deaf pupils learn in ordinary classes in mainstream schools. In this article we explore patterns of achievements of deaf pupils to see if…

  9. Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages within "Oral" Schools for the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin-Jaffe, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in…

  10. Single-Sided Deafness Leads to Unilateral Aural Preference within an Early Sensitive Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Andrej; Hubka, Peter; Heid, Silvia; Tillein, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Unilateral deafness has a high incidence in children. In addition to children who are born without hearing in one ear, children with bilateral deafness are frequently equipped only with one cochlear implant, leaving the other ear deaf. The present study investigates the effects of such single-sided deafness during development in the congenitally…

  11. An Analysis of the Reading Strategies Used by Adult and Student Deaf Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banner, Alyssa; Wang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and examine effective reading strategies used by adult deaf readers compared with student deaf readers. There were a total of 11 participants: 5 deaf adults ranging from 27 to 36 years and 6 deaf students ranging from 16 to 20 years. Assessment methods included interview and think-aloud procedures in which…

  12. Examining Deaf Students' Equitable Access to Science vis-a-vis Contemporary Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Annemarie D.

    2017-01-01

    As a Deaf individual, it is important to ensure the growth of the Deaf community as science-literate members of society. While many predecessors have contributed to the body of research in Deaf pedagogy, there is still much to be done in safeguarding Deaf learners' equitable access to science education. One area of concern is in narrowing the…

  13. Perspectiva General sobre la Sordo-Ceguera (Overview on Deaf-Blindness). DB-LINK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Barbara

    This overview provides basic information on the causes of deaf-blindness and the particular challenges faced by individuals who are deaf-blind. Causes of deaf-blindness include various syndromes, multiple congenital anomalies, prematurity, congenital prenatal dysfunction, and various postnatal causes. Differences between people deaf-blind from…

  14. Whole language and deaf bilingual-bicultural education--naturally!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, D; Ewoldt, C

    1996-10-01

    This position paper discusses how the tenets of Whole Language and Deaf Bilingual-Bicultural Education complement each other. It stresses that Whole Language is based on natural processes through which children can translate their constructs of personal experiences, observations, and perspectives into modes of communication that include written language and, in the present case, American Sign Language. The paper is based on two emphases: (a) Whole Language emphasizes a two-way teaching/learning process, teachers learning from children, and vice versa; and (b) Deaf Bilingual-Bicultural Education emphasizes American Sign Language as a language of instruction and builds on mutual respect for the similarities and differences in the sociocultural and socioeducational experiences and values of Deaf and hearing people. Both Whole Language and Deaf Bilingual-Bicultural Education attempt to authenticate curriculum by integrating Deaf persons' worldviews as part of educational experience.

  15. Environmental assessment overview, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 3 figs

  16. Inclusive instruction and learning for deaf students in postsecondary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S; Long, G; Snell, K

    1999-01-01

    This article explores how students who are deaf and their instructors experience mainstream college classes. Both quantitative and qualitative procedures were used to examine student access to information and their sense of belonging and engagement in learning. Instructors were asked to discuss their approach to teaching and any instructional modifications made to address the needs of deaf learners. Results indicate that deaf students viewed classroom communication and engagement in a similar manner as their hearing peers. Deaf students were more concerned about the pace of instruction and did not feel as much a part of the 'university family' as did their hearing peers. Faculty generally indicated that they made few if any modifications for deaf students and saw support service faculty as responsible for the success or failure of these students. We discuss results of these and additional findings with regard to barriers to equal access and strategies for overcoming these barriers.

  17. The significance of deaf identity for psychological well-being

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapman, Madeleine; Dammeyer, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    and hearing), and marginal (neither deaf nor hearing)—were associated with levels of psychological well-being and a number of other variables. The sample was 742 adults with hearing loss in Denmark. The study found that those with a deaf, hearing or bicultural identity had significantly higher levels......Research has paid attention to how deaf identity affects life outcomes such as psychological well-being. However, studies are often carried out with small samples and without controlling for other variables. This study examined how different forms of identity—deaf, hearing, bicultural (deaf...... of psychological well-being than those with a marginal identity. Further, it found that additional disability, educational level, and feeling discriminated against significantly and independently explained the degree of psychological well-being. Results are discussed here with respect to social identity theory...

  18. Neonatal Tele-Homecare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Kristina Garne

    Neonatal homecare (NH) implies that parents manage tube feeding and care of their preterm infant at home supported by home visits from neonatal nurses, to monitor infant growth and the well-being of the family. Home visits are costly and time consuming in rural areas. The overall aim of this study...... was to develop a telehealth service for NH without home visits - neonatal tele-homecare (NTH) and test it in an observational study. Participatory design (PD) methods were conducted to facilitate involvement of the end-users (parent of preterm infants and clinicians) in the development of the telehealth service...

  19. The neonatal chest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Luisa [Servico de Imagiologia Geral do Hospital de Santa Maria, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-035 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mluisalobo@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Lung diseases represent one of the most life threatening conditions in the newborn. Important progresses in modern perinatal care has resulted in a significantly improved survival and decreased morbidity, in both term and preterm infants. Most of these improvements are directly related to the better management of neonatal lung conditions, and infants of very low gestational ages are now surviving. This article reviews the common spectrum of diseases of the neonatal lung, including medical and surgical conditions, with emphasis to the radiological contribution in the evaluation and management of these infants. Imaging evaluation of the neonatal chest, including the assessment of catheters, lines and tubes are presented.

  20. Comparison of Students' Achievement: Deaf, Learning Disabled, and Deaf with a Learning Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caemmerer, Jacqueline M.; Cawthon, Stephanie W.; Bond, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of students who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) have a co-occurring disability. Although assessing as well as diagnosing learning disabilities (LDs) is particularly difficult in this population, it is important to properly identify students who may be eligible for academic interventions or accommodations. This study analyzed…

  1. Educational Outcomes of Young People in Scotland Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Intersections of Deafness and Social Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, Mariela; Riddell, Sheila; O'Neill, Rachel; Weedon, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the intersection between deafness and social class in the context of the unstable economic circumstances in Scotland following the 2007 recession. More specifically, this research investigated the following in the case of young people who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH): (1) the interaction between educational attainment…

  2. Symposium on Research and Utilization of Educational Media for Teaching the Deaf: Individualizing Instruction for the Deaf Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf, Lincoln, NE.

    Presented are the proceedings of a conference dealing with individualizing instruction for the deaf through greater use of educational media to permit the deaf student to progress at a maximum learning rate. Included are a report on the year's activities of Media Services and Captioned Films, and keynote addresses by James J. Gallagher on the…

  3. Language development in deaf children’s interactions with deaf and hearing adults. A Dutch longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatter-Folmer, H.A.K.; Hout, R.W.N.M. van; Kolen, E.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2006-01-01

    The language development of two deaf girls and four deaf boys in Sign Language of the Netherlands (SLN) and spoken Dutch was investigated longitudinally. At the start, the mean age of the children was 3;5. All data were collected in video-recorded semistructured conversations between individual

  4. Deaf identities in a multicultural setting: The Ugandan context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atekyereza, Peter R.; Kirumira, Edward K.; Hojer, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    Often located far apart from each other, deaf and hearing impaired persons face a multiplicity of challenges that evolve around isolation, neglect and the deprivation of essential social services that affect their welfare and survival. Although it is evident that the number of persons born with or acquire hearing impairments in later stages of their lives is increasing in many developing countries, there is limited research on this population. The main objective of this article is to explore the identities and experiences of living as a person who is deaf in Uganda. Using data from semi-structured interviews with 42 deaf persons (aged 19–41) and three focus group discussions, the study findings show that beneath the more pragmatic identities documented in the United States and European discourses there is a matrix of ambiguous, often competing and manifold forms in Uganda that are not necessarily based on the deaf and deaf constructions. The results further show that the country's cultural, religious and ethnic diversity is more of a restraint than an enabler to the aspirations of the deaf community. The study concludes that researchers and policy makers need to be cognisant of the unique issues underlying deaf epistemologies whilst implementing policy and programme initiatives that directly affect them. The upper case ‘D’ in the term deaf is a convention that has been used since the early 1970s to connote a ‘socially constructed visual culture’ or a linguistic, social and cultural minority group who use sign language as primary means of communication and identify with the deaf community, whereas the lower case ‘d’ in deaf refers to ‘the audio logical condition of hearing impairment’. However, in this article the lower case has been used consistently. PMID:28730015

  5. Visual advantage in deaf adults linked to retinal changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Codina

    Full Text Available The altered sensory experience of profound early onset deafness provokes sometimes large scale neural reorganisations. In particular, auditory-visual cross-modal plasticity occurs, wherein redundant auditory cortex becomes recruited to vision. However, the effect of human deafness on neural structures involved in visual processing prior to the visual cortex has never been investigated, either in humans or animals. We investigated neural changes at the retina and optic nerve head in profoundly deaf (N = 14 and hearing (N = 15 adults using Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT, an in-vivo light interference method of quantifying retinal micro-structure. We compared retinal changes with behavioural results from the same deaf and hearing adults, measuring sensitivity in the peripheral visual field using Goldmann perimetry. Deaf adults had significantly larger neural rim areas, within the optic nerve head in comparison to hearing controls suggesting greater retinal ganglion cell number. Deaf adults also demonstrated significantly larger visual field areas (indicating greater peripheral sensitivity than controls. Furthermore, neural rim area was significantly correlated with visual field area in both deaf and hearing adults. Deaf adults also showed a significantly different pattern of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL distribution compared to controls. Significant correlations between the depth of the RNFL at the inferior-nasal peripapillary retina and the corresponding far temporal and superior temporal visual field areas (sensitivity were found. Our results show that cross-modal plasticity after early onset deafness may not be limited to the sensory cortices, noting specific retinal adaptations in early onset deaf adults which are significantly correlated with peripheral vision sensitivity.

  6. Season of birth shapes neonatal immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Birth season has been reported to be a risk factor for several immune-mediated diseases. We hypothesized that this association is mediated by differential changes in neonatal immune phenotype and function with birth season. We sought to investigate the influence of season of birth on cord blood...... immune cell subsets and inflammatory mediators in neonatal airways. Cord blood was phenotyped for 26 different immune cell subsets, and at 1 month of age, 20 cytokines and chemokines were quantified in airway mucosal lining fluid. Multivariate partial least squares discriminant analyses were applied...... to determine whether certain immune profiles dominate by birth season, and correlations between individual cord blood immune cells and early airway immune mediators were defined. We found a birth season-related fluctuation in neonatal immune cell subsets and in early-life airway mucosal immune function...

  7. Cochlear implant: Speech and language development in deaf and hard of hearing children following implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Almost 200 cochlear implantations were done in the four centers (two in Belgrade, per one in Novi Sad and Niš in Serbia from 2002 to 2009. Less than 10% of implantees were postlingually deaf adults. The vast majority, i.e. 90% were pre- and perilingually profoundly deaf children. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of improved auditory perception due to cochlear implantation on comprehension of abstract words in children as compared with hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids and normal hearing children. Methods. Thirty children were enrolled in this study: 20 hearing impaired and 10 normal hearing. The vocabulary test was used. Results. The overall results for the whole test (100 words showed a significant difference in favor of the normal hearing as compared with hearing impaired children. The normal hearing children successfully described or defined 77.93% of a total of 100 words. Success rate for the cochlear implanted children was 26.87% and for the hearing impaired children with conventional hearing aids 20.32%. Conclusion. Testing for abstract words showed a statistically significant difference between the cochlear implanted and the hearing impaired children with hearing aids (Mann- Whitney U-test, p = 0.019 implying considerable advantage of cochlear implants over hearing aids regarding successful speech development in prelingually deaf children.

  8. Deaf capital: an exploration of the relationship between stigma and value in deaf multilevel marketing participation in Urban India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedner, Michele

    2014-12-01

    This article ethnographically examines how some deaf people in urban India have begun to orient themselves toward the future by participating in multilevel marketing businesses. In the absence of other structural possibilities for deaf future-making, deaf Indians have turned to such businesses in search of social, economic, and moral livelihood. This article analyzes participation in one particular business and asks how participating within the business both enables and disables the cultivation of specific ideas of development. Particular attention is devoted to exploring the multiple registers of the concept of "deaf development" and how such development may be cultivated through multilevel marketing businesses. This article aims to make a critical intervention in medical anthropology studies of disability by arguing that disability (or in this case deafness) can function as a source of value, therefore highlighting tensions between stigma and value. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  9. Sonomammography in Neonatal Mastauxe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Ghanshyam Kachewar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Prominence or even enlargement of one or both breasts is known in neonates. It is believed to be a physiological response to falling levels of maternal estrogen towards last trimester of pregnancy. This input stimulates prolactin release from the newborn's pituitary leading to transient neonatal breast enlargement. This phenomenon is independent of the gender of the neonate. It presents in the first few weeks of life and resolves subsequently. Often fluid discharge is noted from the prominent or swollen breast that resolves without treatment in subsequent weeks. Manual breast manipulation for discharge removal may lead to undesirable effects like local irritation, enhanced enlargement, prolonged tissue hypertropy or even mastitis. A case of such 7-days female neonate is presented here backed with imaging evaluation for confirmation of diagnosis. Typical sonomammographic findings are described. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 22-24

  10. Neonatal Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The presentation, treatment, and outcome of neonatal cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (SVT were studied in 42 children, using neurology clinic records (1986-2005 at Indiana University School of Medicine.

  11. Neonatal pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Bhalla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions.

  12. Neonatal herpes simplex pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Lissauer, T J; Shaw, P J; Underhill, G

    1984-01-01

    A neonate with herpes simplex pneumonia is described. Herpes simplex infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia in newborn infants, even in the absence of clinically apparent herpes in the mother.

  13. Maternal and neonatal tetanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58 000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  14. Baha-mediated rehabilitation of patients with unilateral deafness: selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroul, N; Akkari, M; Pavier, Y; Gilain, L; Mom, T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to identify clinical criteria for optimizing rehabilitation of patients with unilateral deafness using the Baha device. We made a retrospective study of 102 patients with unilateral deafness requesting auditory rehabilitation over a period of 5 years. All subjects underwent a series of stereo audiometric tests, with and without Baha worn on a headband, and were then referred to a hearing care specialist for a real life trial of 15 days. The Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI) questionnaire was administered. Patients refusing the implantation were retrospectively submitted to a questionnaire specifically designed to ask the reasons for refusal. We measured stereo audiometric test results, age, aetiology of deafness, duration of auditory deprivation on the rehabilitated ear, and GHSI score. At the conclusion of testing, the implantation rate was 29%. During preoperative testing, the improvement in understanding of speech-in-noise was 22 ± 11% for patients agreeing to the implantation versus 13 ± 11% for patients refusing the implantation. Age, aetiology of deafness and duration of auditory deprivation had no influence on the implantation decision. Speech-in-noise testing and aided stereo audiometric gain were the only two measures showing statistically significant differences between the groups agreeing to and refusing the implantation. There were multiple reasons for refusal of the implantation. Among these, the four principal reasons were: absence of perceived benefit during stereo audiometric testing (59%), requirement for surgery (35%), cost of the solution (44%), and aesthetics (41%). Hence, no other criteria except the preoperative improvement in understanding of speech-in-noise and the aided gain from Baha worn on a headband were found to be predictive of the patient's acceptance of surgical implantation of a bone-anchored implant/abutment for Baha. Speech-in-noise testing with and without Baha worn on a headband has a role to

  15. Hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada Aggravated neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

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    Ana Campo González

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La mayoría de las veces la ictericia en el recién nacido es un hecho fisiológico, causado por una hiperbilirrubinemia de predominio indirecto, secundario a inmadurez hepática e hiperproducción de bilirrubina. El objetivo de este estudio fue determinar el comportamiento de la hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal en el Hospital Docente Ginecoobstétrico de Guanabacoa en los años 2007 a 2009. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo y retrospectivo de 173 recién nacidos que ingresaron al Departamento de Neonatología con diagnóstico de hiperbilirrubinemia agravada. RESULTADOS. La incidencia de hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada fue del 3,67 % y predominó en hermanos con antecedentes de ictericia (56,65 %. El tiempo de aparición fue de 48 a 72 h (76,87 % y entre los factores agravantes se hallaron el nacimiento pretérmino y el bajo peso al nacer. La mayoría de los pacientes fueron tratados con luminoterapia (90,17 %. CONCLUSIÓN. La hiperbilirrubinemia neonatal agravada constituye un problema de salud. Los factores agravantes son la prematuridad y el bajo peso al nacer. La luminoterapia es una medida terapéutica eficaz para su tratamiento.INTRODUCTION. Most of times jaundice in newborn is a physiological fact due to hyperbilirubinemia of indirect predominance, secondary to liver immaturity and to bilirubin hyperproduction. The aim of present of present study was to determine the behavior of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in the Gynecology and Obstetrics Teaching Hospital of Guanabacoa municipality from 2007 to 2009. METHODS. A retrospective and descriptive study was conducted in 173 newborn patients admitted in the Neonatology Department diagnosed with severe hyperbilirubinemia. RESULTS. The incidence of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was of 3,67% with predominance in brothers with a history of jaundice (56,65%. The time of appearance was of 48 to 72 hrs (76,87% and among the aggravating factors were the preterm birth and

  16. [Screening of common deafness gene mutations in 17 000 Chinese newborns from Chengdu based on microarray analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Kangmo; Xiong, Yehua; Yu, Hao; Zou, Ling; Ran, Longrong; Liu, Deshun; Yin, Qin; Xu, Yingwen; Fang, Xue; Song, Zuling; Huang, Lijia; Tan, Dayong; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2014-10-01

    To achieve early diagnosis for inheritable hearing loss and determine carrier rate of deafness causing gene mutations in order to provide information for premarital, prenatal and postnatal genetic counseling. A total of 17 000 dried heel blood spots of normal newborns in Chengdu were collected with informed consent obtained from their parents. Genomic DNA was extracted from dried blood spots using Qiagen DNA extraction kits. Microarrays with 9 common mutation loci of 4 deafness-associated genes in Chinese population were used. Nine hot mutations including GJB2 (35delG, 176del16, 235delC and 299delAT), GJB3 (538C> T), SLC26A4 (IVS 7-2A> G, 2168A> G), and mitochondrial DNA 12S rRNA (1555A> G, 1494C> T) were detected by PCR amplification and microarray hybridization. Mutations detected by microarray were verified by Sanger DNA sequencing. Of the 17 000 new-borns, 542 neonates had mutations of the 4 genes. Heterozygous mutations of GJB2, at 235delC, 299delAT, and 176del16 were identified in 254, 55, and 15 newborns, respectively. Two newborns had homozygous mutation of GJB2, 235delC. Heterozygous mutations at 538C> T of GJB3, 2168A> G and IVS 7-2A> G of SLC26A4 were found in 23, 17 and 128 newborns, respectively. For mutation analysis of mitochondrial DNA 12S rRNA, 1494C> T and 1555A> G were homogeneous mutations in 4 and 42 neonates, respectively. In addition, 6 complexity mutations were detected, which demonstrated that one newborn had heterozygous mutations at GJB2 235delC and SLC26A4, IVS7-2A> G, one had heterozygous mutation GJB2 235delC and 12S rRNA homogeneous mutation, 1555 A> G, one heterozygous mutations at GJB2, 299delAT, and GJB3, 538C> T, one at GJB2, 299delAT and 12S rRNA, 1555 A> G, two at GJB2, 299delAT, and SLC26A4, IVS7-2A> G. All mutations as above were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The total mutation carrier rate of the 4 deafness genes is 3.19% in healthy newborns at Chengdu. Mutations of GJB2 and SLAC26A4 are major ones (86.5% of total). The

  17. Neonatal orbital abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil M Al-Salem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital complications due to ethmoiditis are rare in neonates. A case of orbital abscess due to acute ethmoiditis in a 28-day-old girl is presented. A Successful outcome was achieved following antimicrobial therapy alone; spontaneous drainage of the abscess occurred from the lower lid without the need for surgery. From this case report, we intend to emphasize on eyelid retraction as a sign of neonatal orbital abscess, and to review all the available literature of similar cases.

  18. Deaf Adults' Reasons for Genetic Testing Depend on Cultural Affiliation: Results from a Prospective, Longitudinal Genetic Counseling and Testing Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreault, Patrick; Baldwin, Erin E.; Fox, Michelle; Dutton, Loriel; Tullis, LeeElle; Linden, Joyce; Kobayashi, Yoko; Zhou, Jin; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W.; Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between cultural affiliation and deaf adults' motivations for genetic testing for deafness in the first prospective, longitudinal study to examine the impact of genetic counseling and genetic testing on deaf adults and the deaf community. Participants (n = 256), classified as affiliating with hearing, Deaf,…

  19. [Neonatal asphyxia: neurologic outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, A; Stanca, M; Sposato, M; Santoro, F; Danti, F R; Dosi, C; Allemand, F

    2013-08-01

    The neonatal asphyxia is recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality during the pediatric age. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between some neonatal variables and neurological outcome at two years of life in infants with asphyxia, in order to produce a correct prognosis and to grant a rapid and targeted therapy. We have recruited 63 patients whose history and neuroimages suggested a neonatal asphyxia, and we have analysed their clinical- instrumental parameters every three months until two years of life. A correlation study was carried out in order to find a statistical significance indicated by p-value Neonatal seizures are not related to an increased risk to develop epilepsy. Epilepsy alone is a rare event and it usually complicates CP picture. Most subject with both epilepsy and CP are term infants with adequate weight. Preterm VLBW infants have a greater risk to develop a psychomotor delay. Clinical conditions at birth are related to CP severity (several neonatal neurological signs are the greater risk factors). Severely pathological neonatal EEG (background activity) is related to CP severity and an early symptomatic epilepsy onset is related with both epilepsy and CP severity.

  20. THE DEAF PERSON INCLUSION OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mery Gómez Tovar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research that is presented in this study is based on my experience with deaf students from the Psicology and therapist faculty of human communication which is an academic unit from the Juarez University of the Durango state. This article compiles and analyzes the process of inclusive and educational settings that the institution has.  This study is executed from the adoption of the analysis model of the biographic narrative investigation seen from the cualitative paradigm. In this project, the collected information is interpreted through the narrations, interviews, photo evidences and recordings make to the participants in order to give an appropriate response to the different objectives.

  1. Utility of the ImPACT test with deaf adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesman, Jennifer; Pineda, Jill; Carver, Jenny; Brice, Patrick J; Zabel, T Andrew; Schatz, Philip

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the study included empirical examination of the utility of the Immediate and Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) test with adolescents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and to investigate patterns of performance at baseline that may arise in the assessment of this population. Baseline assessment of student-athletes has been conducted on a widespread scale with focus on performance of typically developing student-athletes and some clinical groups, though to date no studies have examined adolescents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. Retrospective and de-identified ImPACT baseline test used with deaf and hard-of-hearing high-school student-athletes (N = 143; 66% male, mean age = 16.11) was examined. Review indicated significant differences in some composite scores between the deaf and hard-of-hearing group and hearing normative comparisons. A possible marker of task misunderstanding was identified to occur more frequently within the deaf and hard-of-hearing sample (13% in deaf sample vs. .31% in hearing sample). Results may provide support for the consideration and use of additional measures to ensure comprehension of task demands when considering this tool for use with deaf and hard-of-hearing adolescents.

  2. The lived experience of depression among culturally Deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, K; Badger, T

    2010-11-01

    Culturally Deaf adults lost hearing at early ages, communicate primarily in American Sign Language (ASL), and self-identify as culturally Deaf. Communication barriers lead to isolation, low self-esteem, abuse, and inadequate health care. Screening Deaf patients for depressive symptoms poses challenge. Nurses are rarely familiar with ASL, and depression screening tools aren't easily translated from English to ASL. Consequently, Deaf adults are not adequately screened for depression. Qualitative interviews were conducted with culturally Deaf adults, and certified interpreters helped to enhance understanding. Text was generated from interview transcriptions and researcher observations. No novel depressive symptoms were described. Various ASL signs were used to represent depression; two participants used a unique gesture that had no meaning to others. Childhood experiences leading to depression included sexual or physical abuse, feeling ostracized from family and like a burden. Suicidal gestures communicated severity of depression. Adults felt interpreters were unwelcome during mental health encounters. No participants were asked about depressive symptoms despite frank manifestations of depression. Study describes antecedents and consequences of depressive symptoms among Deaf adults. Understanding symptom manifestations and challenges experienced by Deaf patients helps identify those at risk for depression, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  3. A comprehensive network and pathway analysis of human deafness genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiou, Georgios A; Stankovic, Konstantina M

    2013-07-01

    To perform comprehensive network and pathway analyses of the genes known to cause genetic hearing loss. In silico analysis of deafness genes using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). Genes relevant for hearing and deafness were identified through PubMed literature searches and the Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage. The genes were assembled into 3 groups: 63 genes that cause nonsyndromic deafness, 107 genes that cause nonsyndromic or syndromic sensorineural deafness, and 112 genes associated with otic capsule development and malformations. Each group of genes was analyzed using IPA to discover the most interconnected, that is, "nodal" molecules, within the most statistically significant networks (p deafness (GPCR), or with predisposition to otosclerosis (TGFB1), but also novel genes that have not been described in the cochlea (HNF4A) and signaling kinases (ERK 1/2). A number of molecules that are likely to be key mediators of genetic hearing loss were identified through three different network and pathway analyses. The molecules included new candidate genes for deafness. Therapies targeting these molecules may be useful to treat deafness.

  4. Health-related vocabulary knowledge among deaf adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Robert Q; Barnett, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Many deaf individuals are at increased risk for fund-of-information deficits, including deficits in health-related information. Research on health information knowledge, an aspect of health literacy, demonstrates an association between low health literacy and health disparities in many populations. Deaf individuals are at particular risk for low health literacy, but no research has been conducted on this topic. To investigate health-related vocabulary knowledge in a sample of deaf adults. A task based on the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine (REALM). Fifty-seven deaf adults reported whether they did or did not comprehend 66 health-related terms from the REALM. Of the participants, 81% possessed a college degree. Thirty-two percent of the deaf participants earned scores on the modified REALM task comparable to REALM scores considered indicative of low health literacy. The pattern of words that were least commonly and most commonly understood differed from normative expectations of hearing REALM respondents. This highly educated deaf participant sample demonstrated risk for low health literacy. The general deaf population is likely at even higher risk for health problems associated with low health literacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Calendar systems and communication of deaf-blind children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablan Branka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain the calendar systems and their role in teaching deaf-blind children. Deaf-blind persons belong to a group of multiple disabled persons. This disability should not be observed as a simple composite of visual and hearing impairments, but as a combination of sensory impairments that require special assistance in the development, communication and training for independent living. In our environment, deaf-blind children are being educated in schools for children with visual impairments or in schools for children with hearing impairments (in accordance with the primary impairment. However, deaf-blind children cannot be trained by means of special programs for children with hearing impairment, visual impairment or other programs for students with developmental disabilities without specific attention required by such a combination of sensory impairments. Deaf-blindness must be observed as a multiple impairment that requires special work methods, especially in the field of communication, whose development is severely compromised. Communication skills in deaf-blind people can be developed by using the calendar systems. They are designed in such a manner that they can be easily attainable to children with various sensory impairments. Calendars can be used to encourage and develop communication between adult persons and a deaf-blind child.

  6. Intimate partner violence against deaf female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Melissa L; Leigh, Irene W

    2011-07-01

    It has been estimated that roughly 25% of all Deaf women in the United States are victims of intimate partner violence (Abused Deaf Women's Advocacy Services [ADWAS]), a figure similar to annual prevalence rates of 16% to 30% for intimate partners in the general population. One goal of the present study was to ascertain the prevalence of intimate partner violence victimization in a sample of Deaf female college students. When comparing the prevalence of physical assault, psychological aggression, and sexual coercion victimization to hearing female undergraduates, the current sample was approximately two times as likely to have experienced victimization in the past year.

  7. Hearing preservation in partial deafness treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarzynski, Henryk; Lorens, Artur; Piotrowska, Anna; Skarzynski, Piotr Henryk

    2010-11-01

    Partial deafness (PD) is a condition in which hearing loss occurs in at least 1 frequency critical to speech understanding. Current options for partial deafness treatment (PDT) rely on preoperative hearing preservation, which, along with the use of different means of acoustic and electric stimulation, enable extending the indications for various assistive hearing devices. Possible solutions include acoustic methods only, the use of hearing aids or middle ear implants, electric complementation, and a combination of electric and acoustic stimulation. A total of 95 patients (63 adults, 32 children) with different types of PD were treated using selected types of electrodes and the optimal "round window" approach to the inner ear, with at least 36 months of observation. The extension of PDT indications created an opportunity for patients with different hearing impairments who obtained no benefit from a hearing aid and did not qualify for standard cochlear implant application. The authors' observations are based on the findings that preservation of preoperative hearing had been achieved in 97.1% of adult patients (8 years' observation) and in 100% of children (6 years' observation). Those results send the important message that PDT is feasible and effective. To allow comparison of PDT results from different studies, the authors developed the Skarzynski PDT classification system, which permits the comparison of postoperative results, including the degree of hearing preservation and, more importantly, the patient's understanding of speech after treatment.

  8. THE VALUE SYSTEM IN DEAF POLISH ADOLESCENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna KOSSEWSKA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is the core stage for the development of the value system, one of the most important determinants of the human identity. The issue discussed in this paper is the perception of the value system by the people with impaired hearing who constitute a cultural minority. Such assumption can be made based on the cross-cultural value survey conducted by S.H. Schwartz. The Schwartz’s approach was chosen in this research to measure the culture on individual level.Sixty-six deaf adolescent students from secondary residential schools aged between15 and 20 years (29 male, 37 female and 93 hearing students from boarding middle schools aged between 15 and 17 years (39 male and 54 female were tested by using the Schwartz Portrait Values Questionnaire.The results showed that the intergroup value system differences were modified by gender. Hearing adolescent males considered bene­volence, hedonism and stimulation as more important than female adolescents did. In the deaf subgroup, the females valued security, power and achievement more than males. The mode of communication within the family had only one significant effect: the use of signing language implies significantly higher level of conformity in comparison to the people who communicate verbally.

  9. “The Gong Gong Was Beaten” —Adamorobe: A “Deaf Village” in Ghana and Its Marriage Prohibition for Deaf Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies Kusters

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adamorobe is a village in Ghana where the historical presence of a hereditary form of deafness resulted in a high number of deaf inhabitants. Over the centuries, a local sign language emerged, which is used between deaf and hearing people in everyday life, rendering Adamorobe into a unique place of inclusion of deaf people. However, in 1975, a law was introduced to reduce the number of deaf people in Adamorobe: deaf people cannot marry each other in order to avoid deaf offspring. In the long term, this law threatens the linguistic and cultural diversity in this village where the use of sign language is omnipresent and where deaf people are perceived as fully productive and worthy members of society. This article is structured around two sets of tensions in the village, Firstly, hearing people’s acceptance and inclusion of the deaf inhabitants, versus the wish to live in a village with no (or less deaf people. Secondly, there is a tension between deaf people’s subjection to, and resistance against, the law, this is a tension that can be observed in the existence of relationships between deaf partners, and abortions when these unions lead to pregnancies.

  10. What hearing children think regarding the inclusion of deaf children in the regular classroom: a comparative study with Brazilian children in a public and a private school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Vargas Dorneles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates how hearing children relate to the presence of a deaf child in a classroom group. An analysis is made of the influence of social class in relation to the acceptance of the deaf child by the hearing children. The 144 children from the 3rd to 5th series that participated in the study were distributed thus: 76 from a private school and 68 from a public school, both from Porto Alegre, RS. The public school largely attended lower level socioeconomic classes, while the private school attended pupils from predominantly middle to upper social classes. All received the same task: Complete a story that describes the reaction of hearing students to the insertion of a new deaf colleague in the classroom group. The study demonstrates that pupils wish to attempt to communicate with the deaf child and would socialize with the child outside the classroom. They demonstrate a somewhat protective discourse in relation to the subject who they consider disabled but not incapable of communicating. Understanding how hearing children relate to, and include a deaf child within the classroom, raises the possibility of new forms of thinking regarding the preparation of hearing children to possible inclusion processes. Recognizing their ideas, feelings and forms of communication aids educational institutions to invest in inclusion policies.

  11. Neonatal nonimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Hassan M; Christensen, Robert D; Lemons, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    As in adults and older children, anemia in newborn infants can be the result of erythropoietic failure, hemorrhage, or hemolysis. When hemolysis is the prime consideration, it can be challenging for physicians caring for neonates to choose from the wide variety of available diagnostic tests. This review describes the authors' opinions regarding rational, consistent, and cost-effective means of making an exact diagnosis of a neonatal hemolytic condition. Two recent advances in the diagnosis of neonatal nonimmune hemolytic disorders are highlighted in this review: introduction of flow cytometry-based Eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) uptake as a screening test to identify RBC membrane defects and next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based panels to uncover exact mutations causing hemolysis. The availability of newer tools such as EMA and NGS to diagnose specific hemolytic conditions, which might otherwise remain unknown, enables neonatal practitioners not only to identify the exact cause of hemolysis but also to discover novel mutations that can be implicated in the cause of neonatal hemolytic processes.

  12. Neonatal Sepsis in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Alexandre; Rand, Katherine; Johnson, Josh A; Gautier, Jacqueline; Koster, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Infections (including sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and tetanus) stand as a major contributor to neonatal mortality in Haiti (22%). Infants acquire bacteria that cause neonatal sepsis directly from the mother's blood, skin or vaginal tract either before or during delivery. Nosocomial and environmental pathogens introduce further risk after delivery. The absence of cohesive medical systems and methods for collecting information limits the available data in countries such as Haiti. This study seeks to add more information on the burden of severe bacterial infections and their etiology in neonates of Haiti. Researchers conducted a secondary retrospective analysis of a de-identified database from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Nos Petit Frères et Soeurs-St. Damien Hospital (NPFS-SDH). Records from 1292 neonates admitted to the NICU at NPFS-SDH in Port-au-Prince Haiti from 2013 to 2015 were reviewed. Sepsis accounted for 708 of 1292 (54.8%) of all admissions to the NICU. Infants admitted for sepsis had a mortality rate of 23% (163 of 708 infants admitted for sepsis). The most common organism cultured was Streptococcus agalactiae, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeroginusa, Enterobacter aerogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus mirabillis Failure to order or obtain a culture was associated with an increased fatality (odds ratio 2.4) for infants with sepsis. Resistance should be a concern when treating empirically. © The Author [2016]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Transient neonatal diabetes or neonatal hyperglycaemia: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transient neonatal diabetes and neonatal hyperglycaemia both present in the neonatal period with features of hyperglycaemia, dehydration and weight loss. Differentiating these conditions clinically is difficult. We describe the case of a 13 day old female whom we managed recently who could have had either condition.

  14. The peculiar needs of deaf people: a study of selected members of the Lincolnshire deaf social group

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K.

    1989-01-01

    In spite of the fact that services for deaf people have been provided since Victorian times, there is no "philosophy of deafness" and services are based upon the subjective observation of deaf people by "hearing" people. This study seeks to formulate such a philosophy, for those unable to hear spoken communication from birth or early childhood, based upon acceptance of the social limitations of being unable to hear in a society where the ready use of that sense is taken for granted.\\ud \\ud In...

  15. Language and culture in the Deaf community: a case study in a South African special school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stander, Marga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An ethnographic case study on Deaf culture was done at the Thiboloha Special School in a rural area of the Free State province in South Africa. Two Deaf learners and three Deaf teaching assistants participated in this study. Although they were all part of the hearing Sotho culture, they were also full participants in the Deaf community. The study was done by means of video recordings, interviews, and questionnaires. The study reveals the diversity of the Deaf community with a vibrant and unique culture associated with this school, which gives them a sense of belonging. The analysis of the questionnaires, interviews, and recordings in this study shows how significant it is for the Deaf to be part of a Deaf community and culture, as well as part of a hearing community. It is important for them to be Deaf (with a capital ‘D’ and have a Deaf identity. It became evident in this study that Deaf people prefer to use Sign Language for communication purposes in the Deaf community. The study also shows the key role the school plays in introducing Deaf learners to Deaf culture and community, and South African Sign Language, which connects them to a wider Deaf and hearing community. The school became the participants’ new community where they found their Deaf identity, their own language and culture. The school fulfilled its role to realise the importance and value of Deaf culture and community and succeeded in de-pathologising deafness. This study confirms the responsibility of and opportunity for schools to educate their Deaf learners about their culture and community.

  16. The contribution of phonological knowledge, memory, and language background to reading comprehension in deaf populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshorn, Elizabeth A.; Dye, Matthew W. G.; Hauser, Peter; Supalla, Ted R.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2015-01-01

    While reading is challenging for many deaf individuals, some become proficient readers. Little is known about the component processes that support reading comprehension in these individuals. Speech-based phonological knowledge is one of the strongest predictors of reading comprehension in hearing individuals, yet its role in deaf readers is controversial. This could reflect the highly varied language backgrounds among deaf readers as well as the difficulty of disentangling the relative contribution of phonological versus orthographic knowledge of spoken language, in our case ‘English,’ in this population. Here we assessed the impact of language experience on reading comprehension in deaf readers by recruiting oral deaf individuals, who use spoken English as their primary mode of communication, and deaf native signers of American Sign Language. First, to address the contribution of spoken English phonological knowledge in deaf readers, we present novel tasks that evaluate phonological versus orthographic knowledge. Second, the impact of this knowledge, as well as memory measures that rely differentially on phonological (serial recall) and semantic (free recall) processing, on reading comprehension was evaluated. The best predictor of reading comprehension differed as a function of language experience, with free recall being a better predictor in deaf native signers than in oral deaf. In contrast, the measures of English phonological knowledge, independent of orthographic knowledge, best predicted reading comprehension in oral deaf individuals. These results suggest successful reading strategies differ across deaf readers as a function of their language experience, and highlight a possible alternative route to literacy in deaf native signers. Highlights: 1. Deaf individuals vary in their orthographic and phonological knowledge of English as a function of their language experience. 2. Reading comprehension was best predicted by different factors in oral deaf and

  17. Reflections on Quality of Life as a College Concern to Facilitate Success of Students Who Are Deaf

    OpenAIRE

    DE Filippo, Carol Lee

    2004-01-01

    Quality of life is an area of nonacademic influence to which college programs can contribute significantly. It is proposed that a satisfying quality of life can enhance college success by increasing degree of academic engagement, regardless of a student's hearing status. A study of the quality of life of 200 deaf and hard-of-hearing students on a mainstream college campus is summarized as an example of how to define and measure baseline wellness using paper surveys and interviews. Life domain...

  18. The value of neonatal autopsy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal autopsy rates were in decline internationally at the end of the last century. Our objective was to assess the current value of neonatal autopsy in providing additional information to families and healthcare professionals.

  19. Auditory and speech performance in deaf children with deaf parents after cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ga Young; Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Eun Yeon; Chung, Eun-Wook; Cho, Yang-Sun; Chung, Won-Ho; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the auditory and speech outcome in deaf children with deaf parents (CDP) after cochlear implantation (CI), emphasizing both the presence of additional caregiver and patients' main communication mode. Retrospective case review. Cochlear implant center at a tertiary referral hospital. Fourteen CDP and 14 age- and sex-matched deaf children with normal-hearing parents (CNH). The Korean version of Ling's stage (K-Ling) and Category of Auditory Perception (CAP) were administered to the children to assess the speech production and auditory perception abilities, preoperatively and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after CI. To elucidate the effects of the additional caregiver and main communication mode of the implanted child, the patients were divided into the following groups: with additional caregiver(s) who have normal hearing (n = 11) versus without additional caregiver (n = 3); sign language plus oral communication (S+O) group (n = 9) versus oral communication only (O) group (n = 5). CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved remarkably in both CDP and CNH, and no significant differences were found between the 2 groups. Within the CDP group, CAP scores and K-Ling stages improved significantly in CDP with an additional caregiver than those without. Auditory perception and speech production performances in the S+O group were similar to those in the O group. CDP can develop similarly to CNH in auditory perception and speech production, if an additional caregiver with normal hearing provides sufficient support and speech input. In addition, using sign language in addition to oral language might not be harmful, and these children can be a communication bridge between their deaf parents and society.

  20. Testicular cancer knowledge among deaf and hearing men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Loren; Nakaji, Melanie; Harry, Kadie M; Oen, Marcia; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2013-09-01

    Testicular cancer typically affects young and middle-aged men. An educational video about prostate and testicular cancer was created in American Sign Language, with English open captioning and voice overlay, so that it could be viewed by audiences of diverse ages and hearing characteristics. This study recruited young Deaf (n = 85) and hearing (n = 90) adult males to help evaluate the educational value of the testicular cancer portion of this video. Participants completed surveys about their general, testicular, and total cancer knowledge before and after viewing the video. Although hearing men had higher pre-test scores than Deaf men, both Deaf and hearing men demonstrated significant increases in General, Testicular, and Total Cancer Knowledge scores after viewing the intervention video. Overall, results demonstrate the value of the video to Deaf and hearing men.

  1. Essential needs and requirements of mobile phones for the deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiao-Ping; Liu, Chien-Hsiou; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Li, Rong-Kwer

    2010-01-01

    Despite their necessity for deaf people in daily life, mobile phones still lack features and functions required by those individuals. While assessing the daily needs of deaf mobile phone users is an important issue for closing this gap, this issue has seldom been addressed. Therefore, we adopted a qualitative research method to extract and construct needs from deaf mobile phone users and translate them into user requirements for mobile phone development. Semistructured interviews and task observations were performed to obtain information from 12 deaf mobile phone users. Context coding was used to code the collected data into needs. The coded needs were then sorted into six categories (social, communication, consumption, entertainment, transportation, and safety) and translated subjectively into three requirements (specific feature-function, general feature-function, and common). The requirements were compared with the functions of the mobile phones of the participants, and five feature-function gaps were identified.

  2. Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hearing impairment and deafness among HIV infected children and adolescents in Harare, Zimbabwe. C Chidziva, J Matsekete, T Bandason, S Shamu, T Dzongodza, N Matinhira, HA Mujuru, C Kunzekwenyika, M Wellington, R Luthy, C Prescott, RA Ferrand ...

  3. The horror of being deaf and in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCay, Vernon

    2010-01-01

    Being Deaf and in prison is a horror. The main fear of prison inmates, whether Deaf or hearing, is that they will be raped, killed, or subjected to other forms of violence. Such fears are based in reality. The recent overcrowding of jails and prisons has increased these problems significantly. A major reason for this situation is the blatant violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act by most jails and prisons in the United States. This includes the failure to provide interpreting services for necessary activities and facilities such as religious services, educational programs, vocational training, faith-based prisons, and mental health treatment for addiction. The author discusses other problems faced by inmates who are Deaf and offers suggestions for correcting injustices faced by those who are Deaf in American jails and prisons.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... junctions that permit the transport of nutrients, charged atoms (ions), and signaling molecules between neighboring cells that ... ichthyosis-deafness syndrome University of Arizona College of Medicine Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (4 links) Foundation ...

  5. Early Interactions with Children Who Are Deaf-Blind

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you instinctively can discriminate between a cry of hunger and a cry of pain. Just as a ... Determined Parents! > Toilet Training Children with Deaf-Blindness: Issues and Strategies > Self-Evaluation Guide for Assessing the ...

  6. Monitoring the Achievement of Deaf Pupils in Sweden and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendar, Nils Ola Ebbe; O'Neill, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    the field to narrow the achievement gap further. The results further suggest that differing methods in two contrasting educational contexts can lead to some similar results and point to the need for different support to children with hearing loss and language disadvantages.......Over the past two decades there have been major developments in deaf education in many countries. Medical and technical advances have made it possible for more deaf children to hear and speak successfully. Most deaf pupils learn in ordinary classes in mainstream schools. In this article we explore...... that deaf children, after two decades of social reform and technical advances, still lag behind their hearing peers. The results also show how large-scale surveys can contribute to a greater understanding of educational outcomes in a small, vulnerable group and make it possible to continue to reform...

  7. Identity patterns and self- and teacher-perceptions of problems for deaf adolescents: a research note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, S H; Edelmann, R J

    1991-11-01

    The present study investigated self- and teacher-perceptions of deaf adolescents in relation to cultural identity. Fifty-one deaf adolescents completed the Porteous Checklist and Deaf Identity Scale presented in British Sign Language. Subjects were assigned to deaf, hearing or dual identity groups. Results suggest that deaf adolescents' self-perceived concerns are not dissimilar in content or severity to those of their hearing peers, although certain issues may assume a particular significance in the presence of deafness. The hypothesis that the hearing identity group would report most problems was not supported. Teachers rated the dual identity group as having the fewest difficulties.

  8. Universal neonatal audiological screening: experience of the University Hospital of Pisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baggiani Angelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The early identification of pre-lingual deafness is necessary to minimize the consequences of hearing impairment on the future communication skills of a baby. According to the most recent international guidelines the deafness diagnosis must occur before the age of three months and the prosthetic-rehabilitative treatment with a traditional hearing aid should start within the first six months. When a Cochlear implant becomes necessary, the treatment should start between the age of 12 months and 18 months. The only way to diagnose the problem early is the implementation of universal neonatal audiological screening programs. Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE is the most adequate test because it's accurate, economic and of simple execution. Automatic auditory brainstem response (AABR is necessary to identify patients with auditory neuropathy but it is also important to reduce the number of false-positives.The 20-30% of infant hearing impairment is represented by progressive or late-onset hearing loss (HL so it's also necessary to establish an audiological follow up program, especially in infants at risk. From November 2005 all neonates born in the University hospital of Pisa undergo newborn hearing screening. From 2008 the screening program follows the guidelines for the execution of the audiological screening in Tuscany which have been formulated by our group according to the 2007 JCIH Position Statement and adaptated to our regional reality by a multidisciplinary effort. From November 2005 to April 2009 8113 neonates born in the Neonatal Unit of Santa Chiara Hospital (Pisa have undergone newborn hearing screening. 7621 neonates (93.9% without risk factors executed only the TEOAE test. 492 (6.1% neonates had audiological risk factors and thus underwent TEOAE and AABR. 84 patients (1,04% failed both TEOAE and AABR tests. 78 of them underwent further investigations. 44 patients resulted falsepositives (the 0,54% of the screened

  9. Cultura escolar, cultura surda e construção de identidades na escola School culture, deaf culture and identity construction within the school context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Salmeron Botelho De Paula

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho se propõe a analisar a questão da relação da cultura escolar, cultura surda e a influência destas na construção da identidade da pessoa surda no contexto escolar. Pretende-se identificar os aspectos relevantes que conectam, regulam e norteiam as relações dentro da escola e o impacto destes na constituição do self do aluno surdo. Através do estudo de parâmetros teóricos que permeiam as culturas, escolar e surda, traça-se um paralelo com pressupostos socioculturais construtivistas, buscando apontar características essenciais para a constituição da noção de eu. O contexto escolar é de extrema importância para a pessoa surda, que em sua maioria, provem de famílias ouvintes. Os estudos sobre identidade surda sugerem que o outro indivíduo surdo é de fundamental importância para construção de uma identidade saudável, visto que entre surdos existe o uso comum de um sistema lingüístico-Libras, que não ocorre de forma natural quando da interação entre surdos e ouvintes.The present paper intends to analyze the issue of school culture, deaf culture and the influence both factors present in the construction of the deaf person's identity within the school context. The aim is to identify relevant aspects that connect, regulate or direct relations within the school and the impact they have in constituting the deaf student's sense of self. Through the study of theoretical parameters that permeate cultures (school and deaf cultures, this paper aims to present parallel sociocultural constructivist suppositions to point out essential characteristics for the constitution of the notion of self. The school context is extremely important to deaf students, the majority of whom come from hearing families. Studies on deaf identity suggest that other deaf individuals are paramount for constructing a healthy identity, since the deaf share a common language system (sign language, inasmuch as interaction between deaf and

  10. Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy with progressive sensorineural deafness (Harboyan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramowicz Marc

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Harboyan syndrome is a degenerative corneal disorder defined as congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED accompanied by progressive, postlingual sensorineural hearing loss. To date, 24 cases from 11 families of various origin (Asian Indian, South American Indian, Sephardi Jewish, Brazilian Portuguese, Dutch, Gypsy, Moroccan, Dominican have been reported. More than 50% of the reported cases have been associated with parental consanguinity. The ocular manifestations in Harboyan syndrome include diffuse bilateral corneal edema occurring with severe corneal clouding, blurred vision, visual loss and nystagmus. They are apparent at birth or within the neonatal period and are indistinguishable from those characteristic of the autosomal recessive CHED (CHED2. Hearing deficit in Harboyan is slowly progressive and typically found in patients 10–25 years old. There are no reported cases with prelinglual deafness, however, a significant hearing loss in children as young as 4 years old has been detected by audiometry, suggesting that hearing may be affected earlier, even at birth. Harboyan syndrome is caused by mutations in the SLC4A11 gene located at the CHED2 locus on chromosome 20p13-p12, indicating that CHED2 and Harboyan syndrome are allelic disorders. A total of 62 different SLC4A11 mutations have been reported in 98 families (92 CHED2 and 6 Harboyan. All reported cases have been consistent with autosomal recessive transmission. Diagnosis is based on clinical criteria, detailed ophthalmological assessment and audiometry. A molecular confirmation of the clinical diagnosis is feasible. A variety of genetic, metabolic, developmental and acquired diseases presenting with clouding of the cornea should be considered in the differential diagnosis (Peters anomaly, sclerocornea, limbal dermoids, congenital glaucoma. Audiometry must be performed to differentiate Harboyan syndrome from CHED2. Autosomal recessive types of CHED (CHED2 and

  11. NEONATES (BIRTH – 1 MONTH)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chantel

    western Johannesburg and also at the. Donald Gordon Medical Centre. Neonatal skin, like the respiratory system, bears the brunt of the extreme change in external environment that characterises birth. NEONATES. 488 CME September 2004 Vol.22 No.9. NEONATES (BIRTH – 1 MONTH). Fig. 1. Café-au-lait macule. Fig. 2.

  12. Neonatal Malaria in the Gambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Conclusions: These data show that neonatal malaria is not uncommon in The Gambia and that the clinical features are akin to those of neonatal septicaemia. Key words: Malaria; septicaemia; neonate: ... mechanisms such as the milk diet of the infant being deficient in p-amino-benzoic acid,. 9 haematological factors such as ...

  13. A Danish family with dominant deafness-onychodystrophy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind-Kezunovic, Dina; Torring, Pernille M

    2013-01-01

    The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown.......The rare hereditary disorder "dominant deafness and onychodystrophy (DDOD) syndrome" (OMIM 124480) has been described in a few case reports. No putative DDOD gene or locus has been mapped and the cause of the disorder remains unknown....

  14. Caring for patients who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Heather L; Hughes-Bell, Aileen; McDuffie, Anna W

    2015-12-01

    Patients who are deaf and hard of hearing often find the American healthcare system to be inaccessible due to communication barriers. This article describes facilities' and providers' requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act to provide qualified interpreters and other assistive devices to patients who are deaf or hard of hearing. Removing communication barriers can protect healthcare providers from potential legal action and lets them deliver consistent, quality healthcare to all patients.

  15. Rings in the neonate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hackett, C B

    2011-02-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus (NLE) is an uncommon disease of the neonate. It is believed to be caused by the transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies to the ribonucleoproteins (Ro\\/SSA, La\\/SSB or rarely U RNP) as these are almost invariably present in NLE sera. The most common clinical manifestations include cutaneous lupus lesions and congenital complete heart block. Hepatobiliary and haematologic abnormalities are reported less frequently. We describe a patient with cutaneous NLE to illustrate and raise awareness of the characteristic annular eruption of this condition. We also emphasize the need for thorough investigation for concomitant organ involvement and for maternal education regarding risk in future pregnancies.

  16. Ultrasonography of Neonatal Cholestasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Ultrasonography (US) is as an important tool for differentiation of obstructive and non-obstructive causes of jaundice in infants and children. Beyond two weeks of age, extrahepatic biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis are the two most common causes of persistent neonatal jaundice: differentiation of extrahepatic biliary atresia, which requires early surgical intervention, is very important. Meticulous analysis should focus on size and configuration of the gallbladder and anatomical changes of the portahepatis. In order to narrow the differential diagnosis, combined approaches using hepatic scintigraphy, MR cholangiography, and, at times, percutaneous liver biopsy are necessary. US is useful for demonstrating choledochal cyst, bile plug syndrome, and spontaneous perforation of the extrahepatic bile duct

  17. Assessing Health Literacy in Deaf American Sign Language Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael; Winters, Paul C.; Fiscella, Kevin; Zazove, Philip; Sen, Ananda; Pearson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Communication and language barriers isolate Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users from mass media, healthcare messages, and health care communication, which when coupled with social marginalization, places them at a high risk for inadequate health literacy. Our objectives were to translate, adapt, and develop an accessible health literacy instrument in ASL and to assess the prevalence and correlates of inadequate health literacy among Deaf ASL users and hearing English speakers using a cross-sectional design. A total of 405 participants (166 Deaf and 239 hearing) were enrolled in the study. The Newest Vital Sign was adapted, translated, and developed into an ASL version of the NVS (ASL-NVS). Forty-eight percent of Deaf participants had inadequate health literacy, and Deaf individuals were 6.9 times more likely than hearing participants to have inadequate health literacy. The new ASL-NVS, available on a self-administered computer platform, demonstrated good correlation with reading literacy. The prevalence of Deaf ASL users with inadequate health literacy is substantial, warranting further interventions and research. PMID:26513036

  18. Assessing Health Literacy in Deaf American Sign Language Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael M; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Winters, Paul C; Fiscella, Kevin; Zazove, Philip; Sen, Ananda; Pearson, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Communication and language barriers isolate Deaf American Sign Language (ASL) users from mass media, health care messages, and health care communication, which, when coupled with social marginalization, places them at a high risk for inadequate health literacy. Our objectives were to translate, adapt, and develop an accessible health literacy instrument in ASL and to assess the prevalence and correlates of inadequate health literacy among Deaf ASL users and hearing English speakers using a cross-sectional design. A total of 405 participants (166 Deaf and 239 hearing) were enrolled in the study. The Newest Vital Sign was adapted, translated, and developed into an ASL version (ASL-NVS). We found that 48% of Deaf participants had inadequate health literacy, and Deaf individuals were 6.9 times more likely than hearing participants to have inadequate health literacy. The new ASL-NVS, available on a self-administered computer platform, demonstrated good correlation with reading literacy. The prevalence of Deaf ASL users with inadequate health literacy is substantial, warranting further interventions and research.

  19. Understanding dementia: effective information access from the Deaf community's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alys; Ferguson-Coleman, Emma; Keady, John

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns older Deaf sign language users in the UK. Its aim was to explore how to enable effective information access and promote awareness and understanding of dementia from a culturally Deaf perspective. A purposive sample of 26 Deaf people without dementia participated in one of three focus groups facilitated directly in British Sign Language (BSL) without an intermediate interpreter. The sample was differentiated by age, role in the Deaf community, and diversity of educational attainment and professional experience. A phenomenological approach underpinned the thematic analysis of data. The findings demonstrate: (i) translation into (BSL) is a necessary but not sufficient condition to support understanding. Attention to culturally preferred means of engagement with information is vital; (ii) the content of information is best presented utilising structures and formats which cohere with Deaf people's visual cognitive strengths; and (iii) the importance of cultural values and cultural practices in raising awareness and building understanding of dementia. These include collective rather than individual responsibility for knowledge transfer and the pan-national nature of knowledge transfer among Deaf people(s). The discussion demonstrates how these specific features of effective information access and awareness building have universal implications relevant to public engagement and the promotion of general knowledge consistent with the National Dementia Strategy (England). © 2014 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Deaf New Zealand Sign Language users' access to healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witko, Joanne; Boyles, Pauline; Smiler, Kirsten; McKee, Rachel

    2017-12-01

    The research described was undertaken as part of a Sub-Regional Disability Strategy 2017-2022 across the Wairarapa, Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast District Health Boards (DHBs). The aim was to investigate deaf New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) users' quality of access to health services. Findings have formed the basis for developing a 'NZSL plan' for DHBs in the Wellington sub-region. Qualitative data was collected from 56 deaf participants and family members about their experiences of healthcare services via focus group, individual interviews and online survey, which were thematically analysed. Contextual perspective was gained from 57 healthcare professionals at five meetings. Two professionals were interviewed, and 65 staff responded to an online survey. A deaf steering group co-designed the framework and methods, and validated findings. Key issues reported across the health system include: inconsistent interpreter provision; lack of informed consent for treatment via communication in NZSL; limited access to general health information in NZSL and the reduced ability of deaf patients to understand and comply with treatment options. This problematic communication with NZSL users echoes international evidence and other documented local evidence for patients with limited English proficiency. Deaf NZSL users face multiple barriers to equitable healthcare, stemming from linguistic and educational factors and inaccessible service delivery. These need to be addressed through policy and training for healthcare personnel that enable effective systemic responses to NZSL users. Deaf participants emphasise that recognition of their identity as members of a language community is central to improving their healthcare experiences.

  1. Enhancement of visual motion detection thresholds in early deaf people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M Shiell

    Full Text Available In deaf people, the auditory cortex can reorganize to support visual motion processing. Although this cross-modal reorganization has long been thought to subserve enhanced visual abilities, previous research has been unsuccessful at identifying behavioural enhancements specific to motion processing. Recently, research with congenitally deaf cats has uncovered an enhancement for visual motion detection. Our goal was to test for a similar difference between deaf and hearing people. We tested 16 early and profoundly deaf participants and 20 hearing controls. Participants completed a visual motion detection task, in which they were asked to determine which of two sinusoidal gratings was moving. The speed of the moving grating varied according to an adaptive staircase procedure, allowing us to determine the lowest speed necessary for participants to detect motion. Consistent with previous research in deaf cats, the deaf group had lower motion detection thresholds than the hearing. This finding supports the proposal that cross-modal reorganization after sensory deprivation will occur for supramodal sensory features and preserve the output functions.

  2. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: Influence of Gestation Length and Timing of Neonatal Examinations on Litter Data in Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies with rodents use varied protocols for determining the timing of neonatal litter examinations and subsequent measurements. Most laboratories determine timing based on the day of birth (DOB); l.e., gestation le...

  3. Deaf Smith County noise analysis: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    An analysis of activities proposed for the three major phases of development of the proposed nuclear waste repository site in Deaf Smith County, Texas, was conducted to quantify the noise levels and the effect of noise resulting from these activities. The report provides additional details of the predictive noise level modeling conducted for the site characterization, repository construction, and repository operation phases. Equivalent day/night sound levels are presented for each phase as sound level contours. Sound levels from onsite and offsite activities are addressed including traffic on access routes, and railroad construction and operation. A description of the predictive models, the analysis methodologies, the noise source inventories, the model outputs, and the evaluation criteria are included. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Disorders of pitch production in tone deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eDalla Bella

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Singing is as natural as speaking for the majority of people. Yet some individuals (i.e., 10-15% are inaccurate singers, typically performing or imitating pitches and melodies inaccurately. This condition, commonly referred to as tone deafness, has been observed both in the presence and absence of deficient pitch perception. In this article we review the existing literature concerning normal singing, poor-pitch singing, and, briefly, the sources of this condition. Considering that pitch plays a prominent role in the structure of both music and speech we also focus on the possibility that pitch production (or imitation is similarly impaired in poor-pitch singers. Preliminary evidence from our laboratory on poor-pitch singing suggests that pitch imitation may be selectively inaccurate in the music domain without being affected in speech. This finding points to separability of mechanisms subserving pitch production in music and language.

  5. Disorders of pitch production in tone deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bella, Simone Dalla; Berkowska, Magdalena; Sowiński, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Singing is as natural as speaking for the majority of people. Yet some individuals (i.e., 10-15%) are poor singers, typically performing or imitating pitches and melodies inaccurately. This condition, commonly referred to as "tone deafness," has been observed both in the presence and absence of deficient pitch perception. In this article we review the existing literature concerning normal singing, poor-pitch singing, and, briefly, the sources of this condition. Considering that pitch plays a prominent role in the structure of both music and speech we also focus on the possibility that speech production (or imitation) is similarly impaired in poor-pitch singers. Preliminary evidence from our laboratory suggests that pitch imitation may be selectively inaccurate in the music domain without being affected in speech. This finding points to separability of mechanisms subserving pitch production in music and language.

  6. Personality characteristics and their connection with learning efficiency of deaf and partially deaf pupils in mainstream primary and secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Kastelic, Helena

    2012-01-01

    This thesis deals with personality characteristics and their connection with learning efficiency of deaf and partially deaf pupils and students in mainstream primary and secondary school. The theoretical part defines learning efficiency and focuses on the most significant factors of learning efficiency, including also personality characteristics of an individual. This thesis represents the idea of inclusion and its advantages and disadvantages and suggests to what extent it is present in our ...

  7. Parental determinants of neonatal body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, N C; Poole, J R; Javaid, M K; Dennison, E M; Robinson, S; Inskip, H M; Godfrey, K M; Cooper, C; Sayer, A Aihie

    2007-02-01

    The prevalence of both childhood and adult obesity is rising in the developed world, and there is increasing interest in its underlying causes. A number of studies suggest a positive relationship between birth weight and childhood body mass index, but less is known about specific prenatal environmental influences on more direct measures of obesity. We used data from the Southampton Women's Survey to investigate parental influences on neonatal body composition ascertained by dual x-ray absorptiometry. Participating mothers were characterized in detail (anthropometry, lifestyle, diet) before and during pregnancy; information was also obtained on their partners. The offspring underwent assessment of fat and lean body mass by dual x-ray absorptiometry within 2 wk of birth. Linear regression methods were used to explore the parental determinants of neonatal body composition. Complete data were available for 448 mother-offspring pairs. Taller women and those with higher parity had offspring with increased birth weight, fat, and lean mass (P body fat at birth (all P Maternal size, parity, smoking history, walking speed, and fat stores are independent determinants of neonatal body composition. If these influences are shown to have persisting effects on body composition through to adulthood, they point to novel public health interventions early in life to prevent later obesity.

  8. Neonatal nutrition and metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thureen, Patti J; Hay, William W

    2006-01-01

    ..., the volume highlights the important longterm effects of fetal and neonatal growth on health in later life. In addition, there are very practical chapters on methods and techniques for assessing nutritional status, body composition, and evaluating metabolic function. Written by an authoritative, international team of cont...

  9. Effect of hypoglycemic anti-deafness capsules in diabetic patients with deafness and toxicological assessment in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiyu; Li, Meng; Guo, Kaoshan; Li, Bin; Hou, Jinjie; Wu, Liping; Liu, Xianyun

    2013-10-01

    Through experiment on animals and clinical trials to explore the safety and efficacy of hypoglycemic anti-deafness capsules on diabetic patients with deafness. Total 296 patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) were randomly divided into two groups. A treatment group of 164 patients (208 ears) was treated with hypoglycemic anti-deafness capsules based on TCM syndrome differentiation. A control group of 132 patients (184 ears) was treated with glibenclamide and conventional drug treatment for deafness. The following were observed: hearing, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h postprandial plasma glucose (2hPG), 24 h urine glucose (24hUG), improvement of main symptoms, platelet function, and changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and lipid peroxide (LPO) levels. In animal studies, Kunming mice, weighing 18-22 g were used. Half of the mice were males and half were females. Wistar rats, weighing 80-120 g were used. Half of the rats were males and half were females. Male Wistar rats, weighing 200-220 g, were also used. Their acute and chronic toxicity was studied. The hearing improvement was 56.7% in the treatment group and 26.6% in the control group. FPG, 2hPG, and 24hUG were improved significantly (P deafness capsules could decrease blood glucose and serum triglycerides of alloxan-induced diabetic rats. This herbal capsule is effective for safely treating diabetic patients with deafness.

  10. Pain reactivity in preterm neonates: examining the sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeri, B O; Gaspardo, C M; Martinez, F E; Linhares, M B M

    2014-11-01

    Early and repeated experiences of pain may have long-term effects on vulnerable newborns hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), and neonatal pain responses may be affected by a variety of factors that neonates encounter. We tested the hypothesis that male preterm neonates exhibited greater pain sensitivity than females by assessing biobehavioural pain reactivity and recovery patterns to painful procedure. Fifty-three infants born preterm and low birthweight who were admitted to NICU were observed during five phases (baseline, antisepsis, puncture, recovery-dressing and recovery-resting). Behavioural pain reactivity was measured using the Neonatal Facial Coding System (NFCS) and the Sleep-Wake States Scale (SWS). The heart rate (HR) was continuously recorded. All measures were assessed based on scores and magnitude of responses. We found that male and female preterm neonates had similar patterns of behavioural pain reactivity and recovery; there were no statistical differences between groups in NFCS and SWS scores. However, male preterm infants presented higher HR immediately in the first minute of the puncture phase and also higher change in maximum HR between the baseline and puncture phases, than female preterm infants. Although we found that male infants showed higher physiological reactivity to painful stimulus in some HR parameters than female infants, the evidences were not sufficient to confirm the influence of sex on biobehavioural response to pain in vulnerable neonates. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  11. Time for a neonatal-specific consensus definition for sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, James L; Wong, Hector R; Shanley, Thomas P; Bizzarro, Matthew J; Saiman, Lisa; Polin, Richard A

    2014-07-01

    To review the accuracy of the pediatric consensus definition of sepsis in term neonates and to determine the definition of neonatal sepsis used. The review focused primarily on pediatric literature relevant to the topic of interest. Neonatal sepsis is variably defined based on a number of clinical and laboratory criteria that make the study of this common and devastating condition very difficult. Diagnostic challenges and uncertain disease epidemiology necessarily result from a variable definition of disease. In 2005, intensivists caring for children recognized that as new drugs became available, children would be increasingly studied and thus, pediatric-specific consensus definitions were needed. Pediatric sepsis criteria are not accurate for term neonates and have not been examined in preterm neonates for whom the developmental stage influences aberrations associated with host immune response. Thus, specific consensus definitions for both term and preterm neonates are needed. Such definitions are critical for the interpretation of observational studies, future training of scientists and practitioners, and implementation of clinical trials in neonates.

  12. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. 77 FR 38128 - Qualification of Drivers; Application for Exemptions; National Association of the Deaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-26

    ... Association of the Deaf AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of... period on its May 25, 2012, notice requesting public comments on the National Association of the Deaf's...

  14. 77 FR 13347 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, including consideration of personnel qualifications... Communication Disorders, 5 Research Court, Room [[Page 13348

  15. 77 FR 57570 - National Institute On Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-18

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: Communication Disorders... Committee: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication [[Page 57571

  16. Maternal and neonatal FTO rs9939609 polymorphism affect insulin sensitivity markers and lipoprotein profile at birth in appropriate-for-gestational-age term neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesteiro, Eva; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J; Ortega-Azorín, Carolina; Guillén, Marisa; Corella, Dolores; Bastida, Sara

    2016-06-01

    The influence of maternal fat mass and obesity (FTO) gene polymorphism on neonatal insulin sensitivity/resistance biomarkers and lipoprotein profile has not been tested. The study aimed to assess the association between the FTO rs9939609 polymorphism in mother-neonate couples and neonatal anthropometrical measurements, insulin sensitivity/resistance, and lipid and lipoprotein concentrations at birth. Fifty-three term, appropriate-for-gestational-age, Caucasian newborns together with their respective mothers participated in a cross-sectional study. Sixty-six percent of mothers and neonates carried the A allele (being AA or AT). TT mothers gained less weight during pregnancy, but non-significant maternal gene influence was found for neonatal bodyweight, body mass index, or ponderal index. Neonates from AA + AT mothers showed lower glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) but higher homeostatic model assessment insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS) and homocysteine than neonates whose mothers were TT. AA + AT neonates had higher insulin and HOMA-IR than TT. The genotype neonatal × maternal association was tested in the following four groups of neonates: TT neonates × TT mothers (nTT × mTT), TT neonates × AA + AT mothers (nTT × mAA + AT), AA + AT neonates × TT mothers (nAA + AT × mTT), and AA + AT neonates × AA + AT mothers (nAA + AT × mAA + AT). Non-significant interactions between neonatal and maternal alleles were found for any parameter tested. However, maternal alleles affected significantly glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR, and homocysteine while neonatal alleles the arylesterase activity. Most significant differences were found between nATT + AA × mTT and nATT + AA × mAA + AT. Glycemia, insulinemia, and HOMA-IR were lower, while the Mediterranean diet adherence (MDA) was higher in the mAA + AT vs. mTT whose children were AA + AT. This dietary fact seems to counterbalance the potential negative effect on glucose homeostasis of

  17. [In vitro fertilization neonates transferred to neonatal medicine. Mid-and long-term outcome in 99 families].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monset-Couchard, M; de Bethmann, O; Relier, J P

    1995-01-01

    To assess the physical and neurodevelopmental status of children born after in vitro fertilization (IVF) as well as the family condition. Follow-up study including physical and developmental examination in available families, and/or interviews of parents/pediatricians/teachers/social workers. The Port-Royal neonatal intensive care unit and follow-up clinic. From 1.1.1987 to 31.12.1992, in 32 single, 71 twin, 28 triple, and one quadruple pregnancies resulting from IVF (total 132), one or more neonates were admitted to the Port-Royal NICU. The outcome is presented for the 99 families followed longer than two years (199 neonates, 166/199 born prematurely). Neurological sequelae (minor, moderate, major), developmental quotients, school level, behavioral disturbances, family conditions. From 21 singletons (2 deaths, 1 lost), 18 survivors were followed: 17 were normal above 2 years (10 above 3 years went to school), 1 had a severe cerebral palsy with low IQ. From 57 twin pregnancies (7 fetal and 9 neonatal deaths), the 98 survivors were followed: 78 were normal above 2 years (65 above 3 years went to school), 20 had some neuro-developmental deficits (of 14 above 3 years, 12 went to school); 25 families had had or still had problems (deaths and/or anomalies (9 cases) and/or sequelae); 3 mothers were single parents (2 divorces and one split). From 20 triple pregnancies (1 fetal and 3 neonatal deaths), 54 out of 56 survivors were normal above 2 years (33 above 3 years went to school); 3 siblings (1 deaf and 1 with cataract) were put in foster care after severe maternal beating; 2 mothers were single parents (one divorce and one split); 4 mothers had repeated breakdowns; one father tried suicide. From one quadruple pregnancy (one fetal and one neonatal deaths), the 2 survivors were normal above 3 years and went to school. Most sequelae involved very low birthweight babies, in association with a number of sleep and behavioural disturbances. From 98 mothers, 16 had 18

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection in NICU admitted neonates in Boushehr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sanjideh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytomegalovirus is the most prevalent cause of congenital infections and the most important cause of congenital deafness. Which it's spread is about 0.64% of all birth which differ based on geolocation, race and socioeconomically situations. This proposal accomplished in the end of July until middle of February 2014 with the goal of studying Cytomegalovirus infection distribution among newborns who are hospitalized in Bushehr Shohadaye Khalij Fars hospital NICU. Material & Method: 80 urine samples were collected between July until February 2014 in NICU of Bushehr Khalij Fars hospitalized neonates. Samples were tested by PCR method on urine samples to find if they are infected by cytomegalovirus. Results: Mean age of neonates was 30.59±9.30 days. Only one newborn under 30 days had Cytomegalovirus and 11 cases older than 30 days had positive reaction. The relation between age and CMV seropositivity was statistically valid (p<0.05.this means only 1.2% of newborns are CMV and 55% are older than 1 month. Conclusion: The pattern of CMV seropositivity shows that most infections may be acquired from environment. According to low prevalence of congenital CMV infection, there is no need to introduce preventive methods and following present guidelines is enough.

  19. Long QT in children with congenital deafness: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseraldin Akbari Asbagh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long QT syndromes (LQT are genetic abnormalities of ventricular repo-larization, with an estimated incidence of about one per 10000 births. It is characterized by prolongation of the QT interval in electrocardiogram (EKG and associated with a high risk for syncope and sudden death in patients. Type of this syndrome is association with congenital deafness. Our objective was to evaluate QT interval in children with congenital deafness.Methods: For 219 patients referred to Imam Khomeini Hospital audiometric clinic in 2011, questionnaire were completed. A total of 23 congenitally deaf children were incl-uded. All patients’ examinations were done by a pediatric cardiologist. Electrocardio-gram is conducted in all children (23 patients with sever and deep congenital deafness. Then the QT interval was measured based on Bazett’s formula. Echocardiography was also performed in these children to assess left ventricular function and the presence of mitral valve prolapse.Results: The overall patients were two hundred and nineteen children. A total of twenty three congenitally deaf children were included and electrocardiogram was obtained. Three children had obviously prolonged QTc (0.48±0.02 second. The median age of them was 6.1±5 year, the median weight was 18±11.3 kilogram and the median of QT interval was 0.48±0.02 second.Conclusion: The QT interval obtained 0.48±0.02 second. In the present study we found prolonged QT in congenital deafness, thus we recommend to evaluate the electrocardio-gram of children with congenital deafness.

  20. In Ovo and dietary administration of oligosaccharides extracted from palm kernel cake influence general health of pre- and neonatal broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faseleh Jahromi, Mohammad; Shokryazdan, Parisa; Idrus, Zulkifli; Ebrahimi, Rohollah; Liang, Juan Boo

    2017-01-01

    Palm kernel cake (PKC) is the main byproduct from the palm oil industry in several tropical countries that contains considerable amounts of oligosaccharide. We earlier demonstrated beneficial prebiotic effects of oligosaccharides extract of PKC (OligoPKC) in starter and finisher broiler birds. This study was envisaged to elucidate the effects of in ovo and/or oral administration of the OligoPKC on prenatal and post-hatched broiler chicks. A total of 140 broiler (Cobb500) eggs were randomly divided into two groups (n = 70 each), and on day 12 of incubation, eggs in one group received in ovo injection of 0.1 mL (containing 20 mg) of OligoPKC, while those in the other group received 0.1 mL of saline (placebo) solution. Of these in ovo placebo or OligoPKC injected eggs, after hatching, six chicks from each group were sampled for day-one analysis, while 48 chicks from each group were randomly allocated to two dietary regimes involving either no feeding or feeding of OligoPKC through basal diet for a 14 days experiment forming the experimental groups as: (i) saline-injected (Control, C), (ii) OligoPKC-injected (PREBovo), (iii) saline-injected, but fed 1% OligoPKC (PREBd), and (iv) OligoPKC-injected and also 1% OligoPKC (PREBovo+d). In ovo injection of prebiotic OligoPKC had no effect on body weight and serum immunoglobulins concentrations of day old chicks, except for IgG, which was increased significantly (P C and PREBovo), but lesser influenced by in ovo OligoPKC injection. Irrespective of its prior in ovo exposure, chicks fed OligoPKC diets had lower population of pathogenic bacteria. Overall serum immunoglobulin status of birds was improved by feeding of OligoPKC but in ovo OligoPKC injection had minor effect on that. In most cases, in ovo OligoPKC injection and feeding of OligoPKC reduced the expression of nutrient transporters in the intestine and improved antioxidant capacity of liver and serum. It is concluded that in ovo injection of OligoPKC increased Ig

  1. 38 CFR 17.152 - Devices to assist in overcoming the handicap of deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Devices to assist in overcoming the handicap of deafness. 17.152 Section 17.152 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... in overcoming the handicap of deafness. Devices for assisting in overcoming the handicap of deafness...

  2. Reading Difficulties in Adult Deaf Readers of French: Phonological Codes, Not Guilty!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Nathalie N.; Baum, Shari R.; Mayberry, Rachel I.

    2012-01-01

    Deaf people often achieve low levels of reading skills. The hypothesis that the use of phonological codes is associated with good reading skills in deaf readers is not yet fully supported in the literature. We investigated skilled and less skilled adult deaf readers' use of orthographic and phonological codes in reading. Experiment 1 used a masked…

  3. Signed Language Working Memory Capacity of Signed Language Interpreters and Deaf Signers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jihong; Napier, Jemina

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of hearing status and age of signed language acquisition on signed language working memory capacity. Professional Auslan (Australian sign language)/English interpreters (hearing native signers and hearing nonnative signers) and deaf Auslan signers (deaf native signers and deaf nonnative signers) completed an…

  4. Sign Vocabulary in Deaf Toddlers Exposed to Sign Language since Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Pasquale; Caselli, Maria Cristina; Di Renzo, Alessio; Gulli, Tiziana; Volterra, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Lexical comprehension and production is directly evaluated for the first time in deaf signing children below the age of 3 years. A Picture Naming Task was administered to 8 deaf signing toddlers (aged 2-3 years) who were exposed to Sign Language since birth. Results were compared with data of hearing speaking controls. In both deaf and hearing…

  5. Semantic Fluency in Deaf Children Who Use Spoken and Signed Language in Comparison with Hearing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C. R.; Jones, A.; Fastelli, A.; Atkinson, J.; Botting, N.; Morgan, G.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Deafness has an adverse impact on children's ability to acquire spoken languages. Signed languages offer a more accessible input for deaf children, but because the vast majority are born to hearing parents who do not sign, their early exposure to sign language is limited. Deaf children as a whole are therefore at high risk of language…

  6. Theatre and Dance with Deaf Students: Researching Performance Practices in a Brazilian School Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berselli, Marcia; Lulkin, Sergio A.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents performance practices created with deaf students in the project "Theater and dance with deaf students," an outreach activity of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). The project took place in the Bilingual Deaf Municipal Elementary School Salomão Watnick in Porto Alegre, Brazil from 2013 to 2015. The…

  7. A novel connexin 26 mutation in a patient diagnosed with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steensel, M.A.M. van; Geel, M. van; Nahuys, M.; Smitt, J.H.; Steijlen, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by erythrokeratoderma, deafness, and keratitis. Scarring alopecia and squamous cell carcinoma can also occur. Most cases described so far were sporadic. Here we present evidence that keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is

  8. A novel connexin 26 mutation in a patient diagnosed with keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steensel, Maurice A. M.; van Geel, Michel; Nahuys, Marc; Smitt, J. Henk Sillevis; Steijlen, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by erythrokeratoderma, deafness, and keratitis. Scarring alopecia and squamous cell carcinoma can also occur. Most cases described so far were sporadic. Here we present evidence that keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome is

  9. Audition and Visual Attention: The Developmental Trajectory in Deaf and Hearing Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Linda B.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Osberger, Mary Joe; Miyamoto, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Two experiments examined visual attention in 5- to 13-year olds who were hearing or deaf with or without cochlear implants. Findings indicated that visual selective attention changes occurred around 8 years for all groups, with deaf children without cochlear implants performing less well than others. Differences between deaf children with and…

  10. Social Identity in Hearing Youth Who Have Deaf Parents: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Tracy Rouly

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study is to describe the perspectives of young children of deaf adults regarding their linguistic and cultural identity. The researcher defined young Children of Deaf Adults (Codas) as Kids of Deaf Adults (Kodas). Kodas represented an interesting subgroup of bilingual, bicultural, and bimodal children with diverse…

  11. An Examination of Home, School, and Community Experiences of High-Achieving Deaf Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kara Kunst

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the academic, community, and family experiences of adults who are profoundly deaf. The deaf adults were categorized as high-achieving by having attended college post-high school. The intent of this study is to give teachers, parents, and other deaf students, insight into the factors responsible for contributing…

  12. 45 CFR 1308.11 - Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness. 1308.11 Section 1308.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... impairment including deafness. (a) A child is classified as deaf if a hearing impairment exists which is so...

  13. Hereditary Deafness in a Former Fishing Village on the Dutch Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyst, Victoria A. S.

    2016-01-01

    In communities with an increased prevalence of hereditary deafness, social, and linguistic adaptations are found in response. Aulbers (1959) describes a high prevalence of deafness in a fishing village on the Dutch coast: Katwijk aan Zee. This article aims to assess the current prevalence of deafness in Katwijk, as well as the current sign…

  14. Deaf Students as a Linguistic and Cultural Minority: Shifting Perspectives and Implications for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Michael; Lieberman, Amy M.

    2016-01-01

    Deaf children have traditionally been perceived and educated as a special needs population. Over the past several decades, many factors have converged to enable a shift in perspective to one in which deaf children are viewed as a cultural and linguistic minority, and the education of deaf children is approached from a bilingual framework. This…

  15. Word and World Knowledge among Deaf Learners with and without Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Carol; Borgna, Georgianna; Marschark, Marc; Durkin, Andreana

    2014-01-01

    Deaf learners frequently demonstrate significantly less vocabulary knowledge than hearing age-mates. Studies involving other domains of knowledge, and perhaps deaf learners' academic performance, indicate similar lags with regard to world knowledge. Such gaps often are attributed to limitations on deaf children's incidental learning by…

  16. 76 FR 58024 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Special Emphasis Panel; R21/R33. Date: October 18, 2011. Time...: Kausik Ray, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders...

  17. 77 FR 47859 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as... privacy. Name of Committee: National Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council. Date...

  18. 76 FR 12744 - National Institute On Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trials-- Communications. Date..., [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders...

  19. 75 FR 17150 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council. The meeting will be open to the public as... privacy. Name of Committee: National Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Advisory Council. Date...

  20. 76 FR 62423 - National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-07

    ... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trials. Date: October 24, 2011....nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Special...