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Sample records for negative pressure dependence

  1. Relative effects of negative versus positive pressure ventilation depend on applied conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberts, Doreen; Malhotra, Atul; Butler, James P; Topulos, George P; Loring, Stephen H; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2012-05-01

    Comparisons of negative versus positive pressure ventilation have imperfectly matched the pressure-time profile or the lung volume history, or have incompletely applied in vivo negative pressure to include the complete thoracic wall and abdomen. Negative pressure exerts the same pattern of lung distension as positive pressure when the pressure-time and volume history profiles are identical and the application of negative pressure is over the whole lung. (1) In isolated (ex vivo) and (2) intact (in vivo) mouse lungs (n = 4/group) (sealed chamber enclosing either the whole lung or whole mouse except for external airway opening), identical and inverse-tidal, square-wave pressure-time profiles were obtained with positive and negative pressure ventilation. (3) Following an identical volume history, surfactant-depleted rabbits (n = 7) were randomly assigned to sustained, static equivalent positive versus negative pressures. (4) Surfactant-depleted anesthetized rabbits (n = 10) with identical volume histories were randomized to positive versus negative ventilation with identical pressure-time characteristics. Matched positive and negative pressure time profiles in ex vivo and in vivo mice resulted in identical tidal volumes. Identical (negative vs. positive) sustained static pressures resulted in similar PaO(2) and end expiratory lung volumes. Positive and negative ventilation with identical volume histories and pressure time characteristics showed no difference in oxygenation or lung volumes. Historical comparisons suggested better oxygenation with negative pressure when the volume history was not identical. These data do not support major biological differences between negative and positive pressure ventilation when waveforms and lung volume history are matched.

  2. The negative correlation between plasma adiponectin and blood pressure depends on obesity: a family-based association study in SAPPHIRe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hung-Yuan; Chiu, Yen-Feng; Hwu, Chii-Min; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng; Hung, Yi-Jen; Fujimoto, Wilfred; Quertermous, Thomas; Curb, J David; Tai, Tong-Yuan; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2008-04-01

    The association between plasma adiponectin level and blood pressure remains inconclusive. Because obese subjects may have different mechanisms to regulate blood pressure, we hypothesized that obesity may be an important modifier. In order to minimize confounding effects from unidentified factors, a family-based design was employed to explore the relationship. A total of 1,048 subjects from 478 Chinese or Japanese families with a mean age of 50.4 +/- 9.0 years were included (the SAPPHIRe (Stanford-Asian Pacific Program in Hypertension and Insulin Resistance) cohort). Blood pressure was recorded automatically and the average of the last two out of three consecutive readings was used in the analysis. A subject with "hypertension" was defined as one with a systolic blood pressure (SBP) > or =140 mm Hg, or a diastolic blood pressure (DBP) > or =90 mm Hg, or who was already on medication for hypertension. Obesity was defined as having a body mass index (BMI) > or =25 kg/m(2). The updated homeostasis model assessment was used for calculating the indices of insulin sensitivity (HOMA2 %S). Fasting plasma adiponectin was determined using radioimmunoassay. Subjects with hypertension had significantly lower plasma adiponectin levels than those without hypertension (5.99 +/- 3.64 microg/ml vs. 6.65 +/- 3.86 microg/ml, P < 0.01). Plasma adiponectin level correlated negatively with hypertension after adjusting for age, sex, and HOMA2%S (odds ratio (OR) 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90-0.98). In subjects without hypertension (n = 349), the plasma adiponectin level correlated negatively with SBP in those who were obese, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and HOMA2 %S (beta = -0.58, P = 0.03). The association was not significant in those without obesity. Plasma adiponectin level correlates negatively with hypertension. In subjects without hypertension, the relationship between plasma adiponectin level and SBP depends on the presence of obesity.

  3. The partitioning of nanoparticles to endothelium or interstitium during ultrasound-microbubble-targeted delivery depends on peak-negative pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiang, Y.-H.; Song, J.; Price, R. J., E-mail: rprice@virginia.edu [University of Virginia, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Patients diagnosed with advanced peripheral arterial disease often face poor prognoses and have limited treatment options. For some patient populations, the therapeutic growth of collateral arteries (i.e. arteriogenesis) that bypass regions affected by vascular disease may become a viable treatment option. Our group and others are developing therapeutic approaches centered on the ability of ultrasound-activated microbubbles to permeabilize skeletal muscle capillaries and facilitate the targeted delivery of pro-arteriogenic growth factor-bearing nanoparticles. The development of such approaches would benefit significantly from a better understanding of how nanoparticle diameter and ultrasound peak-negative pressure affect both total nanoparticle delivery and the partitioning of nanoparticles to endothelial or interstitial compartments. Toward this goal, using Balb/C mice that had undergone unilateral femoral artery ligation, we intra-arterially co-injected nanoparticles (50 and 100 nm) with microbubbles, applied 1 MHz ultrasound to the gracilis adductor muscle at peak-negative pressures of 0.7, 0.55, 0.4, and 0.2 MPa, and analyzed nanoparticle delivery and distribution. As expected, total nanoparticle (50 and 100 nm) delivery increased with increasing peak-negative pressure, with 50 nm nanoparticles exhibiting greater tissue coverage than 100 nm nanoparticles. Of particular interest, increasing peak-negative pressure resulted in increased delivery to the interstitium for both nanoparticle sizes, but had little influence on nanoparticle delivery to the endothelium. Thus, we conclude that alterations to peak-negative pressure may be used to adjust the fraction of nanoparticles delivered to the interstitial compartment. This information will be useful when designing ultrasound protocols for delivering pro-arteriogenic nanoparticles to skeletal muscle.

  4. Piezoelectric enhancement under negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasov, Alexander; McGilly, Leo J.; Wang, Jin; Shi, Zhiyong; Sandu, Cosmin S.; Sluka, Tomas; Tagantsev, Alexander K.; Setter, Nava

    2016-07-01

    Enhancement of ferroelectric properties, both spontaneous polarization and Curie temperature under negative pressure had been predicted in the past from first principles and recently confirmed experimentally. In contrast, piezoelectric properties are expected to increase by positive pressure, through polarization rotation. Here we investigate the piezoelectric response of the classical PbTiO3, Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and BaTiO3 perovskite ferroelectrics under negative pressure from first principles and find significant enhancement. Piezoelectric response is then tested experimentally on free-standing PbTiO3 and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 nanowires under self-sustained negative pressure, confirming the theoretical prediction. Numerical simulations verify that negative pressure in nanowires is the origin of the enhanced electromechanical properties. The results may be useful in the development of highly performing piezoelectrics, including lead-free ones.

  5. Liquids at negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C.; Heyes, D. M.; Powles, J. G.

    2005-03-01

    We have further explored the final stages of the collapse of an unstable cavity or bubble using the Molecular Dynamics computer simulation technique. A nanometre sized spherical volume of molecules was removed from a bulk Lennard-Jones liquid, which being mechanically and thermodynamically unstable, proceeded to collapse. The molecules with the highest kinetic energy were the first to enter the initially empty cavity. The temperature of individual molecules inside the cavity, while the density was still typical of a gas, could reach at least an order of magnitude larger than that of the surrounding liquid, e.g., equivalent to 6,000 K for water, which is not unreasonable for the sonoluminescence effect to be seen. During the filling in of the cavity, the average temperature decreased, as the contents thermally equilibrated with the surrounding liquid. The bubble partially filled in, and then proceeded to partially empty again, and so on in an oscillatory manner, with ever decreasing amplitude towards the final uniform liquid state. This recoil effect is predicted by classical hydrodynamic treatments and has been observed in experiment for much larger bubbles. The temperature, density and normal pressure component were resolved as a function of radius from the centre of the bubble at selected times during the collapsing process. The simulations support the view that MD can provide a realistic representation of the final stages of cavity collapse. It does not make assumptions about equation of state and transport coefficients as would be required for a comparable solution of the Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics equations, and is therefore an especially appropriate description for the final stages of the collapse.

  6. Negative-Pressure Pulmonary Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Mallar; Kallet, Richard H; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Negative-pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) or postobstructive pulmonary edema is a well-described cause of acute respiratory failure that occurs after intense inspiratory effort against an obstructed airway, usually from upper airway infection, tumor, or laryngospasm. Patients with NPPE generate very negative airway pressures, which augment transvascular fluid filtration and precipitate interstitial and alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema fluid collected from most patients with NPPE has a low protein concentration, suggesting hydrostatic forces as the primary mechanism for the pathogenesis of NPPE. Supportive care should be directed at relieving the upper airway obstruction by endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy, institution of lung-protective positive-pressure ventilation, and diuresis unless the patient is in shock. Resolution of the pulmonary edema is usually rapid, in part because alveolar fluid clearance mechanisms are intact. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and management of negative-pressure or postobstructive pulmonary edema.

  7. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana

    Women with a pre-gestational body mass index (BMI) above 30 kg/m2 giving birth by caesarean section are at high risk of surgical wound infection compared with women with a BMI below 30 kg/m2. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (iNPWT) is one strategy to reduce the rate of surgical wound...

  8. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Birke-Sorensen, Hanne; Kruse, Marie;

    Aim: Postoperative wound complications make many surgical procedures unnecessarily complex, particularly in high-risk patients. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy is well recognized in the management of open wounds. In recent years, it has been introduced as well in the management of closed surgical...... incisions to reduce postoperative wound complications, though the evidence base to support this intervention is limited. The aim of this study was to assess if Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) reduces postoperative complications when applied on closed surgical incisions. Method: A systematic review...... formation (52%) compared to standard care. The reduction in wound dehiscence was not statistically significant. The numbers needed to treat were 3 (seroma), 17 (dehiscence), and 25 (infection). Methodical heterogeneity across studies led to downgrading quality of evidence to moderate for infection...

  9. [Negative pressure wound therapy dressings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téot, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There are many different forms of negative pressure wound therapy dressings and it is important to distinguish clearly between each type. They enable the treatment to be adapted to the shape and depth of the wound, its degree of exudation and the persistence of the fibrinous areas on the surface. The machine's traction capacity, measured in mm of mercury (Hg), must be controlled to establish the healing profile: the more powerful the machine and the more contact there is between the foam and the wound, the faster the formation of the granulation tissue. There are many different solutions which are implemented in accordance with the clinical assessment of the wound.

  10. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Bille, Camilla

    Background: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound complications, which may lead to delayed recovery, pain, reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound...... generator are used to allocate the participants into one of two groups (iNPWT vs. standard dressing), stratified by centre and type of CS. The study is conducted at five public hospitals located in three regions of Denmark. Interim analyses will be preformed along the trial using the group sequential method....... The analyses will be performed when sample size reaches 179, 357, 535, 713, and 891, respectively. Population: women with a pre-gestational BMI ≥ 30 undergoing planned or emergency caesarean section. The iNPWT or standard dressings is applied immediately following operation. In the intervention group...

  11. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Maxillofacial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Mellott

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound therapy has greatly advanced the field of wound healing for nearly two decades, by providing a robust surgical adjunct technique for accelerating wound closure in acute and chronic wounds. However, the application of negative pressure wound therapy in maxillofacial applications has been relatively under utilized as a result of the physical articulations and contours of the head and neck that make it challenging to obtain an airtight seal for different negative pressure wound therapy systems. Adapting negative pressure wound therapies for maxillofacial applications could yield significant enhancement of wound closure in maxillofacial applications. The current review summarizes the basic science underlying negative pressure wound therapy, as well as specific maxillofacial procedures that could benefit from negative pressure wound therapy.

  12. Negative pressure device for intra-abdominal pressure reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M; Geido, D; Pracca, F; Sanchez, G; Simini, F; Zoppolo, C [Nucleo de Ingenierfa Biomedica, Universidad de la Republica O. del Uruguay, Hospital de ClInicas, Av. Italia S/N, 11600, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2007-11-15

    A device that generates negative extra-abdominal pressure (ABDOPRE) for treatment of patients with high intra-abdominal pressure was developed. It includes pressure sensors for transducing intra-abdominal pressure through an intra-vesical catheter and negative pressure in the vacuum bell which is placed over the abdomen. By means of a control system, a pattern for reducing IAP is set, according to a clinical protocol. The external negative pressure is generated using a vacuum pump connected to the bell. The system registers the values of interest for the medical history. The system is being tested over ICU patients, registering a satisfactory IAP reduction.

  13. Osmosis at constant volume. Negative pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Zupanovic, Pasko; Brumen, Milan; Fajmut, Ales; Juretic, Davor

    2009-01-01

    A thermodynamic state of solvent and solution separated with an elastic semipermeable membrane, in the box with a fixed volume, is considered. It is shown that the minimum of the free energy is accompanied by the compression of the solution and tension of the solvent caused by the transfer of solvent molecules into compartment with solution. The tensile state of the solvent is described in terms of negative pressure. It is found that the negative pressure as well as compression pressure is of the order of osmotic pressure given by van't Hoff equation. It is proposed that this mechanism could be responsible for the water uptake in tall trees.

  14. Bubbles in the negative pressure domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2015-10-01

    We determine the extension of an ideal liquid by "thermodynamic forces," that is, forces related to entropy growth. We show that the negative pressure corresponds to the case of at most two degrees of freedom.

  15. Negative pressure wound therapy: clinical utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoz H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Heidi Sandoz Accelerate CIC, Mile End Hospital, London, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT, also known as topical negative pressure therapy, has been increasingly used in health care for the management of a wide variety of wounds over the last 2–3 decades. It is an advanced therapy that can be helpful to accelerate wound healing in both acute and chronic wounds by delivering negative pressure (suction to the wound bed. More recent advancements in the application of NPWT have provided clinicians with wider choices of utilization. There are now devices available that can deliver irrigation to the wound bed, be used for closed surgical incisions, or are disposable and highly portable. Systematic reviews considering NPWT have been published previously. These usually focus on one wound group or device and fail to offer practical clinical guidance due to the scrutiny offered to the evidence via a systematic review process. Here, an overview of the history of NPWT, the varieties of device available, their wide clinical application, and the evidence to support its use are explored in a pragmatic way. Keywords: negative pressure, wound, incision, healing, pain 

  16. Pain associated with negative pressure wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldie, Karen

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for a variety of complex wounds. However, pain is anecdotally a common side effect of NPWT affecting quality of life and even precluding some patients from continuing with the treatment. This literature review examines the evidence relating to pain management for patients undergoing NPWT with a view to identifying methods of administration that could minimise pain and allow more patients to benefit from the treatment. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), British Nursing Index (BNI), Embase and Medline databases were accessed to identify relevant studies. Ten studies were found that matched the review inclusion criteria. These demonstrate some potential areas for further research but more evidence is required before any recommendations can be made.

  17. Pressure dependence of the contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiyu; Farouk, T; Ward, C A

    2007-06-07

    When a liquid and its vapor contact a smooth, homogeneous surface, Gibbsian thermodynamics indicates that the contact angle depends on the pressure at the three-phase line of an isothermal system. When a recently proposed adsorption isotherm for a solid-vapor interface is combined with the equilibrium conditions and the system is assumed to be in a cylinder where the liquid-vapor interface can be approximated as spherical, the contact-angle-pressure relation can be made explicit. It indicates that a range of contact angles can be observed on a smooth homogeneous surface by changing the pressure at the three-phase line, but it also indicates that the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is negative, and leads to the prediction that the contact angle increases with pressure. The predicted dependence of the contact angle on pressure is investigated experimentally in a system that has an independent mechanism for determining when thermodynamic equilibrium is reached. The predictions are in agreement with the measurements. The results provide a possible explanation for contact angle hysteresis.

  18. Frequency Dependent Negative Resistance-A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.Susan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Inductors are bulky and costly but reducing the size of the inductors reduces the quality factor. There is also a fundamental limitation of using inductor that it cannot be suitable for the micro miniature structure and integrated circuits applications. Because of these limitations, inductors cannot be used in most of the analog circuit applications. Hence simulated inductors are used as an alternative. In case the simulated inductor becomes floating some linear transformation is used which results in the formation of a new D element called the Frequency Dependent Negative Resistance (FDNR. This paper presents an overview of the basic circuits of simulating the Frequency Dependent Negative Resistance and its various applications in analog circuits in the place of floating inductor.

  19. Evaluation of continuous and intermittent myocardial topical negative pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Gesslein, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    to intermittent therapy shows twice as much granulation tissue formation than that exposed to continuous pressure after 2 weeks of therapy. The present study was designed to elucidate the differences in microvascular blood flow in the left anterior descending artery area between continuous and intermittent......Topical negative pressure, commonly used in wound therapy, has been shown to increase blood flow and stimulate angiogenesis in subcutaneous tissue and skeletal muscle. In wound therapy, intermittent negative pressure is often preferred to continuous negative pressure as tissue exposed...... myocardial topical negative pressure of -50 mmHg....

  20. Negative pressure in shear thickening band of a dilatant fluid

    CERN Document Server

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    We perform experiments and numerical simulations to investigate spatial distribution of pressure in a sheared dilatant fluid of the Taylor-Couette flow under a constant external shear stress. In a certain range of shear stress, the flow undergoes the shear thickening oscillation around 20 Hz. The pressure measurement during the oscillation at the wall of the outer cylinder indicates that a localized negative pressure region rotates around the axis with the flow. The maximum negative pressure is close to the Laplace pressure of the grain radius and nearly independent of the applied shear stress. Simulations of a phenomenological model reveal that the thickened region is dominated by a negative pressure band, which extends along the tensile direction in the flow. Such shear thickening with negative pressure contradicts a naive picture of jamming mechanism, where thickening is expected in the compressing direction with the positive pressure.

  1. EWMA Document: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apelqvist, Jan; Willy, Christian; Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari; Fraccalvieri, Marco; Malmsjö, Malin; Piaggesi, Alberto; Probst, Astrid; Vowden, Peter

    2017-03-01

    1. Introduction Since its introduction in clinical practice in the early 1990's negative pressure wounds therapy (NPWT) has become widely used in the management of complex wounds in both inpatient and outpatient care.(1) NPWT has been described as a effective treatment for wounds of many different aetiologies(2,3) and suggested as a gold standard for treatment of wounds such as open abdominal wounds,(4-6) dehisced sternal wounds following cardiac surgery(7,8) and as a valuable agent in complex non-healing wounds.(9,10) Increasingly, NPWT is being applied in the primary and home-care setting, where it is described as having the potential to improve the efficacy of wound management and help reduce the reliance on hospital-based care.(11) While the potential of NPWT is promising and the clinical use of the treatment is widespread, highlevel evidence of its effectiveness and economic benefits remain sparse.(12-14) The ongoing controversy regarding high-level evidence in wound care in general is well known. There is a consensus that clinical practice should be evidence-based, which can be difficult to achieve due to confusion about the value of the various approaches to wound management; however, we have to rely on the best available evidence. The need to review wound strategies and treatments in order to reduce the burden of care in an efficient way is urgent. If patients at risk of delayed wound healing are identified earlier and aggressive interventions are taken before the wound deteriorates and complications occur, both patient morbidity and health-care costs can be significantly reduced. There is further a fundamental confusion over the best way to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions in this complex patient population. This is illustrated by reviews of the value of various treatment strategies for non-healing wounds, which have highlighted methodological inconsistencies in primary research. This situation is confounded by differences in the advice given by

  2. Origin of the Negative Pressure for Relativistic Boson Condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yang

    2000-01-01

    We study the physical origin of the negative pressure for quantum scalar fields in inflationary models. The vacuum state and other quantum coherent states are explicitly constructed for the charged and uncharged relativistic boson condensates, in which the pressure takes negative values.

  3. Treatment of refractory low-pressure hydrocephalus with an active pumping negative-pressure shunt system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, M Yashar S; Turner, Jay D; Nakaji, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Low-pressure hydrocephalus is a rare type of hydrocephalus characterized by negative intracranial pressure (ICP) and ventriculomegaly. Given the shortcomings of available methods to treat refractory low-pressure hydrocephalus, we set out to develop a new system for evacuation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the ventricular system where existing shunt systems do not produce the necessary gradient for CSF drainage. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of two patients with the diagnosis of negative-pressure hydrocephalus refractory to traditional treatments. We combined a traditional low-pressure, non-siphoning valve with a pumping chamber placed distal to the valve to create a system that could be actively pumped to remove excess CSF. Treatment of negative-pressure hydrocephalus requires the establishment of a lower ventricular drainage pressure than the drainage pressure in the subarachnoid space. In refractory cases, we propose the use of this active negative-pressure pumping system.

  4. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) for the Management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) for the Management of ... that in the management of laparostomy wounds, NPWT provides an easier way to manage ... the frequency of dressings changes required with traditional wound dressings.

  5. The phase diagram of water at negative pressures: virtual ices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, M M; Vega, C; Tribello, G A; Slater, B

    2009-07-21

    The phase diagram of water at negative pressures as obtained from computer simulations for two models of water, TIP4P/2005 and TIP5P is presented. Several solid structures with lower densities than ice Ih, so-called virtual ices, were considered as possible candidates to occupy the negative pressure region of the phase diagram of water. In particular the empty hydrate structures sI, sII, and sH and another, recently proposed, low-density ice structure. The relative stabilities of these structures at 0 K was determined using empirical water potentials and density functional theory calculations. By performing free energy calculations and Gibbs-Duhem integration the phase diagram of TIP4P/2005 was determined at negative pressures. The empty hydrates sII and sH appear to be the stable solid phases of water at negative pressures. The phase boundary between ice Ih and sII clathrate occurs at moderate negative pressures, while at large negative pressures sH becomes the most stable phase. This behavior is in reasonable agreement with what is observed in density functional theory calculations.

  6. Homogeneous nucleation in liquid nitrogen at negative pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baidakov, V. G., E-mail: baidakov@itp.uran.ru; Vinogradov, V. E.; Pavlov, P. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Thermal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-15

    The kinetics of spontaneous cavitation in liquid nitrogen at positive and negative pressures has been studied in a tension wave formed by a compression pulse reflected from the liquid–vapor interface on a thin platinum wire heated by a current pulse. The limiting tensile stresses (Δp = p{sub s}–p, where p{sub s} is the saturation pressure), the corresponding bubble nucleation frequencies J (10{sup 20}–10{sup 22} s{sup –1} m{sup –3}), and temperature induced nucleation frequency growth rate G{sub T} = dlnJ/dT have been experimentally determined. At T = 90 K, the limiting tensile stress was Δp = 8.3 MPa, which was 4.9 MPa lower than the value corresponding to the boundary of thermodynamic stability of the liquid phase (spinodal). The measurement results were compared to classical (homogeneous) nucleation theory (CNT) with and without neglect of the dependence of the surface tension of critical bubbles on their dimensions. In the latter case, the properties of new phase nuclei were described in terms of the Van der Waals theory of capillarity. The experimental data agree well with the CNT theory when it takes into account the “size effect.”.

  7. Negative pressure pulmonary edema revisited: Pathophysiology and review of management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balu Bhaskar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a dangerous and potentially fatal condition with a multifactorial pathogenesis. Frequently, NPPE is a manifestation of upper airway obstruction, the large negative intrathoracic pressure generated by forced inspiration against an obstructed airway is thought to be the principal mechanism involved. This negative pressure leads to an increase in pulmonary vascular volume and pulmonary capillary transmural pressure, creating a risk of disruption of the alveolar-capillary membrane. The early detection of the signs of this syndrome is vital to the treatment and to patient outcome. The purpose of this review is to highlight the available literature on NPPE, while probing the pathophysiological mechanisms relevant in both the development of this condition and that involved in its resolution.

  8. Intracystic negative pressure may promote bone formation around jaw cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yi; HAN Qi-bing; LIU Bing

    2011-01-01

    The growth and enlargement of jaw cysts are associated with raised intracystic pressure and bone resorption surrounding the cysts. The major bone-resorbing cells are the osteoclasts. They are acting under the influence of local bone-resorbing factors: prostaglandins, proteinases and cytokines. It was found that positive pressure enhanced the expression of IL-1αmRNA and protein in epithelial cells of odontogenic keratocyst, and increased the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase and PGE in a co-culture of odontogenic keratocyst fibroblasts and epithelial cells. However, the signal intensities for IL-1α mRNA and protein in the epithelium were significantly decreased after marsupialization which relived intracystic pressure. Experimental study indicated that intermittent negative pressure could promote osteogenesis in human bone marrow-derived stroma cells (BMSCs) in vitro. We propose a hypothesis that bone formation around the cyst of the jaws would be stimulated by intracystic negative pressure.

  9. Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroo Shalabh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two nano-channels filled with the same liquid. Evaporation is simulated in the meniscus by increasing the temperature of the platinum wall for two different cases. Non-evaporating films are obtained at the center of the meniscus. The liquid film in the non-evaporating and adjacent regions is found to be under high absolute negative pressures. Cavitation cannot occur in these regions as the capillary height is smaller than the critical cavitation radius. Factors which determine the critical film thickness for rupture are discussed. Thus, high negative liquid pressures can be stable at the nanoscale, and utilized to create passive pumping devices as well as significantly enhance heat transfer rates.

  10. Negative pressure characteristics of an evaporating meniscus at nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroo, Shalabh C; Chung, Jn

    2011-01-12

    This study aims at understanding the characteristics of negative liquid pressures at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics simulation. A nano-meniscus is formed by placing liquid argon on a platinum wall between two nano-channels filled with the same liquid. Evaporation is simulated in the meniscus by increasing the temperature of the platinum wall for two different cases. Non-evaporating films are obtained at the center of the meniscus. The liquid film in the non-evaporating and adjacent regions is found to be under high absolute negative pressures. Cavitation cannot occur in these regions as the capillary height is smaller than the critical cavitation radius. Factors which determine the critical film thickness for rupture are discussed. Thus, high negative liquid pressures can be stable at the nanoscale, and utilized to create passive pumping devices as well as significantly enhance heat transfer rates.

  11. Negative thermal expansion and its relation to high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, S. K.

    2004-04-01

    Most materials expand when heated. However, many exceptions are now known. Recently, interest in this has been revived with the discovery of isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) in ZrW2O8. From equation of state considerations, one can relate NTE to negative Grüneisen parameters (thermal or electronic). Under pressure, these lead to equation of state anomalies with the pressure derivative of the bulk modules being small or negative. Many of these materials undergo pressure-induced amorphization. This in some of them can be understood on the steric constraint model. It is also argued that NTE in most materials may be understood from the fact that these materials have two degenerate or nearly degenerate energy states. On increase of temperature, the material then samples the lower volume state, leading to NTE.

  12. Negative thermal expansion and its relation to high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, S K [Office of the Principal Scientific Adviser to the Government of India, 324-A, Vigyan Bhawan Annexe, Maulana Azad Road, New Delhi 110011 (India)

    2004-04-14

    Most materials expand when heated. However, many exceptions are now known. Recently, interest in this has been revived with the discovery of isotropic negative thermal expansion (NTE) in ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}. From equation of state considerations, one can relate NTE to negative Grueneisen parameters (thermal or electronic). Under pressure, these lead to equation of state anomalies with the pressure derivative of the bulk modules being small or negative. Many of these materials undergo pressure-induced amorphization. This in some of them can be understood on the steric constraint model. It is also argued that NTE in most materials may be understood from the fact that these materials have two degenerate or nearly degenerate energy states. On increase of temperature, the material then samples the lower volume state, leading to NTE.

  13. Atrial distension, arterial pulsation, and vasopressin release during negative pressure breathing in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B; Damgaard, M; Gabrielsen, A

    2001-01-01

    in eight healthy males, we tested the hypothesis that with similar increases in LA diameter, suppression of AVP release is dependent on the degree of increase in PP. LA diameter increased similarly during the posture change and negative pressure breathing (-9 to -24 mmHg) from between 30 and 31 +/- 1 to 34......During an antiorthostatic posture change, left atrial (LA) diameter and arterial pulse pressure (PP) increase, and plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) is suppressed. By comparing the effects of a 15-min posture change from seated to supine with those of 15-min seated negative pressure breathing...... +/- 1 mm (P breathing from 36 +/- 3 to 42 +/- 3 mmHg (P

  14. Atrial distension, arterial pulsation, and vasopressin release during negative pressure breathing in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B; Damgaard, M; Gabrielsen, A;

    2001-01-01

    During an antiorthostatic posture change, left atrial (LA) diameter and arterial pulse pressure (PP) increase, and plasma arginine vasopressin (AVP) is suppressed. By comparing the effects of a 15-min posture change from seated to supine with those of 15-min seated negative pressure breathing...... in eight healthy males, we tested the hypothesis that with similar increases in LA diameter, suppression of AVP release is dependent on the degree of increase in PP. LA diameter increased similarly during the posture change and negative pressure breathing (-9 to -24 mmHg) from between 30 and 31 +/- 1 to 34...... +/- 1 mm (P breathing from 36 +/- 3 to 42 +/- 3 mmHg (P

  15. Negative pressure treatment for necrotizing fasciitis after chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraia Melchionda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe 2 cases of children with malignant disease who developed severe mucositis with perineal necrotizing fasciitis during severe neutropenia after chemotherapy. Treatment with topical negative pressure therapy with silver foam dressing, together with large spectrum antibiotics, resolved the problem with complete closure of the wound after 30 and 36 days of treatment, respectively.

  16. Negative Pressure Consolidation of Silt Inside Bucket Foundation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Hongyan丁红岩; Liu Yonggang刘永刚; Zhang Puyang张浦阳

    2015-01-01

    A series of model experiments of bucket foundations concerning suction installation and negative pres-sure consolidation in saturated silt were carried out in a cube steel bin at Tianjin University. The experimental re-sults show that the silt inside the bucket has been strengthened by negative pressure, and the strengthening effect decreases with the increase of the distance from the bucket. A three-dimensional numerical model of the experi-ments was built by means of finite element software ABAQUS with fluid-solid coupling method. The results show that the bearing capacity of the silt inside the bucket foundation increases significantly at the former stage of nega-tive pressure consolidation, while the increasing trend slows down over time. The rotation centers of the bucket foundation and the inner soil region tend to be closer to each other based on the consolidation. The bearing capacity of the bucket foundation is improved effectively with the increase of soil strength. The effects of negative pressure consolidation on the bearing capacity of bucket foundation were also illustrated by an actual offshore wind power project case.

  17. Negative radiation pressure and negative effective refractive index via dielectric birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemirovsky, Jonathan; Rechtsman, Mikael C; Segev, Mordechai

    2012-04-09

    We show that light guided in a planar dielectric slab geometry incorporating a biaxial medium has lossless modes with group and phase velocities in opposite directions. Particles in a vacuum gap inserted into the structure experience negative radiation pressure: the particles are pulled by light rather than pushed by it. This effectively one-dimensional dielectric structure represents a new geometry for achieving negative radiation pressure in a wide range of frequencies with minimal loss. Moreover, this geometry provides a straightforward platform for experimentally resolving the Abrahams-Minkowski dilemma.

  18. Negative interstitial pressure in the peritendinous region during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D; Bülow, J

    1999-01-01

    of these observations, microdialysis was performed in the peritendinous region with a colloid osmotic active substance (Dextran 70, 0.1 g/ml) added to the perfusate with the aim of counteracting the negative tissue pressure. Dialysate volume was found to be fully restored (100 +/- 4%) during exercise. It is concluded......In the present study, tissue pressure in the peritendinous area ventral to the human Achilles tendon was determined. The pressure was measured during rest and intermittent isometric calf muscle exercise at three torques (56, 112, and 168 Nm) 20, 40 and 50 mm proximal to the insertion of the tendon...... in 11 healthy, young individuals. In all experiments a linear significant decrease in pressure was obtained with increasing torque [e.g., at 40 mm: -0.4 +/- 0.3 mmHg (rest) to -135 +/- 12 mmHg (168 Nm)]. No significant differences were obtained among the three areas measured. On the basis...

  19. Empirical Formulas for Calculation of Negative Pressure Difference in Vacuum Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kalenik

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of results of empirical investigations of a negative pressure difference in vacuum pipelines with internal diameters of 57, 81, 102 mm. The investigations were performed in an experimental installation of a vacuum sewage system, built in a laboratory hall on a scale of 1:1. The paper contains a review of the literature concerning two-phase flows (liquid-gas in horizontal, vertical and diagonal pipelines. It presents the construction and working principles of the experimental installation of vacuum sewage system in steady and unsteady conditions during a two-phase flow of water and air. It also presents a methodology for determination of formula for calculation of a negative pressure difference in vacuum pipelines. The results obtained from the measurements of the negative pressure difference Δpvr in the vacuum pipelines were analyzed and compared with the results of calculations of the negative pressure difference Δpvr, obtained from the determined formula. The values of the negative pressure difference Δpvr calculated for the vacuum pipelines with internal diameters of 57, 81, and 102 mm with the use of Formula (19 coincide with the values of Δpvr measured in the experimental installation of a vacuum sewage system. The dependence of the negative pressure difference Δpvr along the length of the vacuum pipelines on the set negative pressure in the vacuum container pvzp is linear. The smaller the vacuum pipeline diameter, the greater the negative pressure difference Δpvr is along its length.

  20. Radiation Pressure and Photon Momentum in Negative-Index Media

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Radiation pressure and photon momentum in negative-index media are no different than their counterparts in ordinary (positive-index) materials. This is because the parameters responsible for these properties are the admittance, sqrt(epsilon/mu), and the group refractive index n_g of the material (both positive entities), and not the phase refractive index, n=sqrt(epsilon*mu), which is negative in negative-index media. One approach to investigating the exchange of momentum between electromagnetic waves and material media is via the Doppler shift phenomenon. In this paper we use the Doppler shift to arrive at an expression for the radiation pressure on a mirror submerged in a negative-index medium. In preparation for the analysis, we investigate the phenomenon of Doppler shift in various settings, and show the conditions under which a so-called "inverse" Doppler shift could occur. We also argue that a recent observation of the inverse Doppler shift upon reflection from a negative-index medium cannot be correct,...

  1. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema After Extubation in Appendectomy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Purtuloglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a rare complication that can occur after acute upper airway obstruction or secondary to relax chronic upper airway obstruction and a life-threatening fatal condition. The first cause in the etiology of NPPE is developed laryngospasm after intubation or extubation, while the other causes are epiglottitis, croup, hiccups, foreign body aspiration, pharyngeal hematoma and oropharyngeal tumors. Supportive therapy is usually the only treatment. The fundamental principle of treatment is early diagnosis and to provide adequate oxygenation. Application of positive airway pressure is often provided with CPAP in most of patients, but sometimes re-intubation and mechanical ventilation may be required.

  2. Closed incision management with negative pressure wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, Pascal M; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2014-07-01

    Post-sternotomy mediastinitis is the most severe surgical site infection after sternotomy with an incidence between 1-4% related to the patient co-morbidity. This complication will increase morbidity and mortality and may also have an economic impact. There are guidelines to prevent surgical site infections; however, age and co-morbidities increase and therefore it is important to develop new tools to improve wound healing. This manuscript will give an overview of a new concept using negative pressure wound therapy over a closed incision (so-called, closed incision management) after surgery and will include the principles of negative pressure wound therapy and the positively applied mechanical forces as a permutation of Wolff's law. The use and indication of this therapy is supported by experimental studies divided into physiological and biomechanical property studies. Finally, an overview of clinical studies is given based on the evidence rating scale for therapeutic studies.

  3. Proposed application of lower body negative pressure to cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, E. V.; Debusk, R. F.; Popp, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Potential medical applications are presented of lower body negative pressure to the evaluation and treatment of cardiac patients. The essential features of an LBNP unit and the basic cardiovascular physiology of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) testing are described. Some of the results of previous spaceflight experiences and bedrest studies are summarized. The deconditioning effects of weightlessness experienced by orbiting astronauts are compared with the effects of bedrest restrictions prescribed for convalescing cardiac patients. The potential of LBNP for evaluating both pharmacological and physical activity regimens was examined, particularly in relation to post-myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass patients. Applications of LBNP to the cardiac catheterization laboratory and the out-patient follow-up of cardiac patients are proposed.

  4. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in the Military: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    fistulas . Negative-pressure wound therapy has gained popularity since the time the war in Iraq began, due to its versatility and broad range of indica...inci- dence of now survivable multiple penetrating complex and extensive wounds to the extremities (Figs. 1 through 3). A retrospective analysis of... fistulae with closed suction wound drainage. Contemorary Surg. 1989;34:59–63. 10. Stojadinovic A, Auton A, Peoples GE, et al. Responding to challenges in

  5. Controlling a negative loaded hydraulic cylinder using pressure feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.

    2010-01-01

    the high pass filtered pressure gradient equal tozero is introduced. It yields lead compensation with a markedly improved performance. The sizing of the filter is described taking into account the bandwidth of the directional control valve. The suggested control scheme is implemented and examined......This paper is concerned with the inherent oscillatory nature of pressure compensated velocity control of a hydraulic cylinder subjected to a negative load and suspended by means of an over-center valve. Initially, a linearized stability analysis of such a hydraulic circuit is carried out clearly...... showing that without extra measures such a system will be unstable in a substantial part of the cylinder stroke. The stability criterion is expressed in hard quantities: Cylinder volumes, cylinder area ratio and overcenter valve pilot area ratio. A pressure feed back scheme that has as target to maintain...

  6. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M.; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S.; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers—or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)—has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  7. Kinetic analysis of negative power deposition in low pressure plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The negative power absorption in low pressure plasmas is investigated by means of an analyical model which couples Boltzmann's equation and the quasi-stationary Maxwell's equation. Exploiting standard Hilbert space methods an explicit solution for both, the electric field and the distribution function of the electrons for a bounded discharge configuration subject to an unsymmetrical excitation has been found for the first time. The model is applied to a low pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge. In this context particularly the anomalous skin effect and the effect of phase mixing is discussed. The analytical solution is compared with results from electromagnetic full wave particle in cell simulations. Excellent agreement between the analytical and the numerical results is found.

  8. Dynamic isolation technologies in negative pressure isolation wards

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Zhonglin

    2017-01-01

    This book presents novel design principles and technologies for dynamic isolation based on experimental studies. These approaches have now become the local standard in Beijing and are currently being promoted for use nationwide. Further, the book provides details of measures and guidelines for the design process. Departing from the traditional understanding that isolation wards should be designed with high negative pressure, airtight doors and fresh air, it establishes the basis for designing biological clean rooms, including isolation wards, using a simple and convenient scientific approach. This book is intended for designers, engineers, researchers, hospital management staff and graduate students in heating ventilation air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning technologies and related areas.

  9. Long term negative pressure ventilation: Rescue for the failing fontan?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shriprasad; R; Deshpande; Kevin; O; Maher

    2014-01-01

    Current treatment strategies for single ventricle patients include non-intervention strategy, surgical palliation or primary transplantation. Surgical palliation includes a staged operative course culminating in the Fontan operation. With progress in surgical techniques, the survival has been improving. However, almost all of these Fontan patients will demonstrate pathophysiologic changes that ultimately constitute "Fontan failure physiology". This article reviews the pathophysiologic changes, current approach to management of these patients and proposes a novel way of reversing some of the pathophysiologic changes by utilization of negative pressure ventilation.

  10. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Associated with Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Masana; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) that occurred immediately after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The patient was a 25-year-old man who sustained a facet fracture-dislocation of C5 during a traffic accident. After ACDF, he developed NPPE and needed mechanical ventilation. Fortunately, he recovered fully within 24 hours. NPPE is a rare postoperative complication that may occur after cervical spine surgery. The aims of this report are to present information regarding the diagnosis and emergent treatment of NPPE, and to review the previous literature regarding this serious complication. PMID:25558327

  11. Solvation pressure as real pressure: I. Ethanol and starch under negative pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Uden, N W A V; Faux, D A; Tanczos, A C; Howlin, B; Dunstan, D J

    2003-01-01

    The reality of the solvation pressure generated by the cohesive energy density of liquids is demonstrated by three methods. Firstly, the Raman spectrum of ethanol as a function of cohesive energy density (solvation pressure) in ethanol-water and ethanol-chloroform mixtures is compared with the Raman spectrum of pure ethanol under external hydrostatic pressure and the solvation pressure and hydrostatic pressure are found to be equivalent for some transitions. Secondly, the bond lengths of ethanol are calculated by molecular dynamics modelling for liquid ethanol under pressure and for ethanol vapour. The difference in bond lengths between vapour and liquid are found to be equivalent to the solvation pressure for the C-H sub 3 , C-H sub 2 and O-H bond lengths, with discrepancies for the C-C and C-O bond lengths. Thirdly, the pressure-induced gelation of potato starch is measured in pure water and in mixtures of water and ethanol. The phase transition pressure varies in accordance with the change in solvation pre...

  12. [Changes in intraocular pressure depending on posture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barac, Ramona; Pop, Monica; Tătaru, C; Gheorghe, A; Bădescu, Silvia; Stanciu, Maria; Burcea, M

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an important eye disease that, left untreated, causes irreversible blindness by affecting optic nerve threads. Decreasing intraocular pressure and maintaining it at a low level throughout the day is one of the objectives of antiglaucoma therapy. This is a prospective study conducted on a sample of 80 patients who presented at "Emergency Eye Hospital" Bucharest between 1st of December 2013 30th of July 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: 40 patients with glaucoma and 40 patients without glaucoma (control group). THE OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY: To determine changes in intraocular pressure that may occur depending on body posture and the correlations between changes in intraocular pressure and glaucoma, obesity, hypertension. These IOP changes may be important in the progression of glaucoma regarding that one third of our time is spent on supine position during night. RESULTS AND CONCLUZIONS: IOP varies from sitting down to supine position. IOP increases in supine in most patients (with or without glaucoma) with an average of 1.25 mmHg. The increase among patients with glaucoma is higher (1.67 mmHg) compared to those without glaucoma (0.82 mmHg). In patients with hypertension and glaucoma, IOP increased with 2.62 mmHg. In patients with hypertension and obesity IOP increased with 2.5 mmHg.

  13. Rotational effects on the negative magnetic pressure instability

    CERN Document Server

    Losada, Illa R; Kleeorin, N; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, I

    2012-01-01

    The surface layers of the Sun are strongly stratified. In the presence of turbulence with a weak mean magnetic field, a large-scale instability resulting in the formation of non-uniform magnetic structures, can be excited over the scale of many turbulent eddies or convection cells. This instability is caused by a negative contribution of turbulence to the effective (mean-field) magnetic pressure and has previously been discussed in connection with the formation of active regions and perhaps sunspots. We want to understand the effects of rotation on this instability in both two and three dimensions. We use mean-field magnetohydrodynamics in a parameter regime in which the properties of the negative effective magnetic pressure instability have previously been found to be in agreement with those of direct numerical simulations. We find that the instability is suppressed already for relatively slow rotation with Coriolis numbers (i.e. inverse Rossby numbers) around 0.2. The suppression is strongest at the equator...

  14. Closed incision management with negative pressure wound therapy (CIM): biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Robert Peyton; Kilpad, Deepak V; Zhao, Yabin; Kazala, Richard; McNulty, Amy

    2012-03-01

    A novel closed incision management with negative pressure wound therapy (CIM) has been developed for convenient use with closed incisions that has the potential to be beneficial for patients at risk for postoperative complications. Incisions are typically under lateral tension. This study explored the biomechanical mechanisms by which integrity of the incisional closure is enhanced by CIM. CIM was hypothesized to affect local stresses around closed incisions in a beneficial manner. Finite element analyses (FEA) indicated that application of CIM decreased the lateral stresses ~50% around the incision and changed the direction of the stresses to a distribution that is typical of intact tissue. Bench evaluations corroborated findings that CIM significantly increased the force required to disrupt the closed incision by ~50% as compared with closure alone. In conclusion, using 2 FEAs and bench modeling, CIM was shown to reduce and normalize tissue stresses and bolster appositional forces at the incision.

  15. Negative pressure pulmonary edema following choking on a cookie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toukan, Yazeed; Gur, Michal; Bentur, Lea

    2016-07-01

    A 12-year-old boy developed severe acute respiratory distress during a school break requiring resuscitative measures. The episode started shortly after a short choking episode with a cookie. History, physical examination, laboratory results, chest X-ray, and clinical course supported the diagnosis of negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE). NPPE occurring outside a hospital setting, especially following a short episode of choking on a cookie, is rarely reported in children. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to pulmonary edema can help in distinguishing NPPE from other causes of fulminant respiratory distress, and especially from other causes of noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E25-E27. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Negative consequences associated with dependence in daily cannabis users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earleywine Mitch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cannabis is the most widely consumed illicit substance in America, with increasing rates of use. Some theorists tend to link frequency of use with cannabis dependence. Nevertheless, fewer than half of daily cannabis users meet DSM-IV-TR criteria for cannabis dependence. This study seeks to determine whether the negative aspects associated with cannabis use can be explained by a proxy measure of dependence instead of by frequency of use. Results Over 2500 adult daily cannabis users completed an Internet survey consisting of measures of cannabis and other drug use, in addition to measures of commonly reported negative problems resulting from cannabis use. We compared those who met a proxy measure of DSM-IV-TR criteria for cannabis dependence (N = 1111 to those who did not meet the criteria (N = 1770. Cannabis dependent subjects consumed greater amounts of cannabis, alcohol, and a variety of other drugs. They also had lower levels of motivation, happiness, and satisfaction with life, with higher levels of depression and respiratory symptoms. Conclusion Although all of our subjects reported daily use, only those meeting proxy criteria for cannabis dependence reported significant associated problems. Our data suggest that dependence need not arise from daily use, but consuming larger amounts of cannabis and other drugs undoubtedly increases problems.

  17. Negative consequences associated with dependence in daily cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looby, Alison; Earleywine, Mitch

    2007-01-10

    Cannabis is the most widely consumed illicit substance in America, with increasing rates of use. Some theorists tend to link frequency of use with cannabis dependence. Nevertheless, fewer than half of daily cannabis users meet DSM-IV-TR criteria for cannabis dependence. This study seeks to determine whether the negative aspects associated with cannabis use can be explained by a proxy measure of dependence instead of by frequency of use. Over 2500 adult daily cannabis users completed an Internet survey consisting of measures of cannabis and other drug use, in addition to measures of commonly reported negative problems resulting from cannabis use. We compared those who met a proxy measure of DSM-IV-TR criteria for cannabis dependence (N = 1111) to those who did not meet the criteria (N = 1770). Cannabis dependent subjects consumed greater amounts of cannabis, alcohol, and a variety of other drugs. They also had lower levels of motivation, happiness, and satisfaction with life, with higher levels of depression and respiratory symptoms. Although all of our subjects reported daily use, only those meeting proxy criteria for cannabis dependence reported significant associated problems. Our data suggest that dependence need not arise from daily use, but consuming larger amounts of cannabis and other drugs undoubtedly increases problems.

  18. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in High Risk Patients Undergoing Panniculectomy: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Complications Wounds; Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Wound Healing Delayed; Incisional; Panniculectomy; Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Incisional Vac; Wound Vac; Obese; Renal Failure; Kidney Transplant; Complications; Wound Healing Complication

  19. Negative pressure wound therapy: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. TARGET POPULATION AND CONDITION Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as traditional or conventional therapy in the

  20. Numerical solutions of Williamson fluid with pressure dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehra, Iffat; Yousaf, Malik Muhammad; Nadeem, Sohail

    In the present paper, we have examined the flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with pressure dependent viscosity. The governing equations of motion for Williamson fluid model under the effects of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are modeled and then solved numerically by the shooting method with Runge Kutta Fehlberg for two types of geometries i.e., (i) Poiseuille flow and (ii) Couette flow. Four different cases for pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are assumed and the physical features of pertinent parameters are discussed through graphs.

  1. Numerical solutions of Williamson fluid with pressure dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Zehra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we have examined the flow of Williamson fluid in an inclined channel with pressure dependent viscosity. The governing equations of motion for Williamson fluid model under the effects of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are modeled and then solved numerically by the shooting method with Runge Kutta Fehlberg for two types of geometries i.e., (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. Four different cases for pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porosity are assumed and the physical features of pertinent parameters are discussed through graphs.

  2. Negative affective states and cognitive impairments in nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F Scott; Der-Avakian, Andre; Gould, Thomas J; Markou, Athina; Shoaib, Mohammed; Young, Jared W

    2015-11-01

    Smokers have substantial individual differences in quit success in response to current treatments for nicotine dependence. This observation may suggest that different underlying motivations for continued tobacco use across individuals and nicotine cessation may require different treatments in different individuals. Although most animal models of nicotine dependence emphasize the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine as the major motivational force behind nicotine use, smokers generally report that other consequences of nicotine use, including the ability of nicotine to alleviate negative affective states or cognitive impairments, as reasons for continued smoking. These states could result from nicotine withdrawal, but also may be associated with premorbid differences in affective and/or cognitive function. Effects of nicotine on cognition and affect may alleviate these impairments regardless of their premorbid or postmorbid origin (e.g., before or after the development of nicotine dependence). The ability of nicotine to alleviate these symptoms would thus negatively reinforce behavior, and thus maintain subsequent nicotine use, contributing to the initiation of smoking, the progression to dependence and relapse during quit attempts. The human and animal studies reviewed here support the idea that self-medication for pre-morbid and withdrawal-induced impairments may be more important factors in nicotine addiction and relapse than has been previously appreciated in preclinical research into nicotine dependence. Given the diverse beneficial effects of nicotine under these conditions, individuals might smoke for quite different reasons. This review suggests that inter-individual differences in the diverse effects of nicotine associated with self-medication and negative reinforcement are an important consideration in studies attempting to understand the causes of nicotine addiction, as well as in the development of effective, individualized nicotine cessation

  3. Topical negative pressure in managing severe peritonitis: A positive contribution?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amin Ibrahim Amin; Irshad A Shaikh

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To assess the use of topical negative pressure (TNP) in the management of severe peritonitis.METHODS: This is a four-year prospective analysis from January 2005 to December 2008 of 20 patients requiring TNP following laparotomy for severe peritonitis.RESULTS: There were 11 males with an average age of (59.3 ± 3.95) years. Nine had a perforated viscus,five had anastomotic leaks, three had iatrogenicbowel injury, and a further three had severe pelvic inflammatory disease. TNP and the VAC. Abdominal Dressing System were initially used. These were changed every two to three days. Abdominal closurewas achieved in 15/20 patients within 4.53 ± 1.64 d. One patient required relaparotomy due to residual sepsis. Two patients with severe faecal peritonitis due to perforated diverticular disease received primary anastomosis at second look laparotomy, as sepsis and their general condition improved. In the remaining 5/20 cases, the abdomen was left open due to bowel oedema and or abdominal wall oedema. Dressing was switched to TNP and VAC. GranuFoam.. Three of the five patients returned a few months later for abdominal wall reconstruction and restoration of intestinal continuity. Two patients developed intestinal fistulae. All 20 patients survived. CONCLUSION: The use of TNP is safe. Further studies are needed to assess its value in managing these difficult cases.

  4. Pain and trauma in negative pressure wound therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic; Andrews, Abbye

    2015-02-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is considered an effective wound treatment, but there are a number of issues that need to be addressed for improvements to be made. This review aimed to explore the literature relating to the pain and skin trauma that may be experienced during NPWT. A literature search was carried out using the following databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, PsychINFO, MEDLINE and PsyARTICLES. A total of 30 articles were reviewed. Studies reported varying levels of pain in patients undergoing NPWT, with certain treatment factors affecting the level of pain, such as the NPWT system and the dressing/filler used. Similarly, although there is much less research exploring NPWT-related trauma, findings suggest that dressing and filler type may impact on whether trauma occurs. However, further research needs to consider the different stages of NPWT and how pain and trauma can be minimised during the whole procedure. As both pain and skin trauma impact on the patient's well-being and on wound healing, it is essential that research further explores the factors that may affect the experience of pain and trauma, so as to inform developments in wound care.

  5. [Application of therapy in negative pressure complex wounds in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Sánchez, Rosario; Muñoz-Miguelsanz, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been widely used in the adult patient, contrary to what happens in children, with just a few long series papers. NPWT avoids long and expensive hospital admissions, reducing the hospital costs; it also decreases the family dynamics and allows for an early return to everyday activities. In this article, we present three clinical cases consisting of a toddler, a child and a teenager with complex wounds treated with NPWT in the pediatric surgery department of the Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital in Granada. The results were excellent, with a good adherence to treatment in all cases, achieving a complete closure in two cases; the third case needed a deferred surgical closure after surgical site preparation, and showed a decrease of the wound size after the NPWT. Moreover, successful pain management was achieved during the wound cleansing, which was done under an ambulatory regime. No general anesthesia was needed. From our experience, we propose the NPWT as an alternative therapy to the classic surgical approach for this type of complex lesions in children, which offers the same advantages and results than in adults. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Negative blood oxygen level dependent signals during speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Moreno, Diana; Schiff, Nicholas D; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Speech comprehension studies have generally focused on the isolation and function of regions with positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals with respect to a resting baseline. Although regions with negative BOLD signals in comparison to a resting baseline have been reported in language-related tasks, their relationship to regions of positive signals is not fully appreciated. Based on the emerging notion that the negative signals may represent an active function in language tasks, the authors test the hypothesis that negative BOLD signals during receptive language are more associated with comprehension than content-free versions of the same stimuli. Regions associated with comprehension of speech were isolated by comparing responses to passive listening to natural speech to two incomprehensible versions of the same speech: one that was digitally time reversed and one that was muffled by removal of high frequencies. The signal polarity was determined by comparing the BOLD signal during each speech condition to the BOLD signal during a resting baseline. As expected, stimulation-induced positive signals relative to resting baseline were observed in the canonical language areas with varying signal amplitudes for each condition. Negative BOLD responses relative to resting baseline were observed primarily in frontoparietal regions and were specific to the natural speech condition. However, the BOLD signal remained indistinguishable from baseline for the unintelligible speech conditions. Variations in connectivity between brain regions with positive and negative signals were also specifically related to the comprehension of natural speech. These observations of anticorrelated signals related to speech comprehension are consistent with emerging models of cooperative roles represented by BOLD signals of opposite polarity.

  7. On the dissipation of negative excess porewater pressure induced by excavation in soft soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-qi; YING Hong-wei; XIE Kang-he

    2005-01-01

    Unloading induces negative excess porewater pressure in soil mass around a foundation pit during excavation. In this work, the dissipation rule of negative excess porewater pressure after excavation was studied. Analytical formulas for calculating the negative excess porewater pressures and the effective stresses were derived based on one-dimensional consolidation theory and Terzaghi's effective stress principle. The influence of the dissipation of negative excess porewater pressure on earth pressure inside and outside a foundation pit and the stability of the retaining structure were analyzed through a numerical example. It was indicated that the dissipation of negative excess porewater pressure is harmful to the stability of the retaining structure and that rapid construction can make full use of the negative porewater pressure.

  8. Dependency of radon entry on pressure difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotti, H.; Kalliokoski, P.; Jantunen, M.

    Radon levels, ventilation rate and pressure differences were monitored continuously in four apartment houses with different ventilation systems. Two of them were ventilated by mechanical exhaust, one by mechanical supply and exhaust, and one by natural ventilation. The two-storey houses were constructed from concrete elements on a slab and located on a gravel esker. It was surprising to find that increasing the ventilation rate increased levels of radon in the apartments. Increased ventilation caused increased outdoor-indoor pressure difference, which in turn increased the entry rate of radon and counteracted the diluting effect of ventilation. The increase was significant when the outdoor-indoor pressure difference exceeded 5 Pa. Especially in the houses with mechanical exhaust ventilation the pressure difference was the most important factor of radon entry rate, and contributed up to several hundred Bq m -3 h -1.

  9. Negative interstitial pressure in the peritendinous region during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D; Bülow, J;

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, tissue pressure in the peritendinous area ventral to the human Achilles tendon was determined. The pressure was measured during rest and intermittent isometric calf muscle exercise at three torques (56, 112, and 168 Nm) 20, 40 and 50 mm proximal to the insertion of the tendo...

  10. Use of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Orthopaedic Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    gram -negative bacilli . However, an increased risk of colonization of gram - positive cocci (eg, Staphylococcus aureus) exists. Although NPWT facilitates...noted a significant reduction in nonfermentative gram -negative rods in the NPWT group, whereas no dif- ference was found in the WTD group. However

  11. Mechanistic investigation on pressure dependency of Heckel parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2010-04-15

    This work proposed to study the influence of varying compaction pressure on the plastic energy, elasticity (Young's modulus), particle yield strength, strain hardening, and applied pressures on derived Heckel parameter using material with different densification and deformation mechanisms: ibuprofen (IBN), paracetamol (PCM) (elastic behavior), methyl cellulose (Me-Cel), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), sodium chloride (NaCl) (plastic behavior), and dicalcium phosphate (DCP) (brittle fracture). Force-displacement data were captured during in-die compaction for all materials having different deformation behavior. The apparent mean yield pressure (Py), plastic energy, Young's moduli, strain hardening parameter and rate of increase in Py were calculated from force-displacement compaction profiles obtained across a pressure range of 65-260 MPa. Materials under confined compression loading showed pressure dependent biphasic behavior in Py upon increasing pressure from 65 MPa to 260 MPa. IBN and PCM showed pressure dependency due to simultaneous elasticity and strain hardening upon increasing applied pressure. Me-Cel, MCC, and NaCl showed lower pressure dependency while DCP showed higher change in Py upon increasing pressure as a result of higher yield strength of DCP particles. Apparent mean yield pressure from Heckel analysis was significantly affected by the applied pressure, viscoelastic behavior, particle yield strength, and strain hardening. The simultaneously occurring events of elastic deformation and strain hardening give a false increase in Py at higher applied pressures.

  12. Reductions in Central Venous Pressure by Lower Body Negative Pressure or Blood Loss Elicit Similar Hemodynamic Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-29

    individual r2 values and individual regression line slope values of hemodynamic variables vs. central venous pressure r2 r2 Range Slope Slope Range...JUL 2014 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Reductions in Central Venous Pressure by Lower Body Negative Pressure...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Reductions in central venous pressure by

  13. The use of negative pressure wave treatment in athlete recovery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    [7] indicated an improvement in heart rate and blood pressure responses observed with the ... During exercise of increasing intensity, an increase in blood ... therapy applied to the lower body of athletes will affect .... your treatment session.

  14. The therapeutic effect of negative pressure in treating femoral head necrosis in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin-gang; Wang, Xuezhi; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Miao; Qiu, Yushen; Guo, Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Because negative pressure can stimulate vascular proliferation, improve blood circulation and promote osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, we investigated the therapeutic effect of negative pressure on femoral head necrosis (FHN) in a rabbit model. Animals were divided into four groups (n = 60/group): [1] model control, [2] core decompression, [3] negative pressure and [4] normal control groups. Histological investigation revealed that at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, improvements were observed in trabecular bone shape, empty lacunae and numbers of bone marrow hematopoietic cells and fat cells in the negative pressure group compared to the core decompression group. At week 8, there were no significant differences between the negative pressure and normal control groups. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in the femoral heads in the negative pressure group compared with the core decompression group. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that cell organelles were further developed in the negative pressure group compared with the core decompression group. Microvascular ink staining revealed an increased number of bone marrow ink-stained blood vessels, a thicker vascular lumen and increased microvascular density in the negative pressure group relative to the core decompression group. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that expression levels of both VEGF and BMP-2 were higher in the negative pressure group compared with the core decompression group. In summary, negative pressure has a therapeutic effect on FHN. This effect is superior to core decompression, indicating that negative pressure is a potentially valuable method for treating early FHN.

  15. Effect of negative chemical pressure on the prototypical itinerant magnet MnSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, C.; Khan, M. A.; Saghayezhian, M.; Phelan, W. A.; Young, D. P.; Jin, R. Y.; DiTusa, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of the magnetic and charge transport properties of the itinerant magnetic metal MnSi with the substitution of Al and Ga on the Si site is investigated. We observe an increase in unit cell volume indicating that both Al and Ga substitutions create negative chemical pressure. There are substantial increases in the Curie temperature and the ordered moment demonstrating that the substitutions give the magnetism a stronger itinerant character. The substitutions also increase the range of temperature and field where the skyrmion phase is stable due to a change in the character of the magnetism. In contrast to the behavior of pure MnSi and expectations for the intrinsic anomalous Hall effect, we find a significant temperature dependence to the magnitude and sign of anomalous Hall conductivity constant in Al or Ga substituted samples. This temperature dependence likely reflects changes in the spin-orbit coupling strength with temperature, which may have significant consequences on the helical and skyrmion states. Overall, we observe a continuous evolution of magnetic and charge transport properties through positive to negative pressure.

  16. Controlling a negative loaded hydraulic cylinder using pressure feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.R.; Andersen, T.O.

    2010-01-01

    showing that without extra measures such a system will be unstable in a substantial part of the cylinder stroke. The stability criterion is expressed in hard quantities: Cylinder volumes, cylinder area ratio and overcenter valve pilot area ratio. A pressure feed back scheme that has as target to maintain...

  17. Anomalous pressure dependence of the torsional levels in solid nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnat, D.; Magerl, A.; Vettier, C.; Anderson, I. S.; Trevino, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    Inelastic neutron-scattering measurement of the torsional levels of CH3NO2 and CD3NO2 are presented as functions of pressure and temperature. In contrast to all previously observed pressure dependence of hindered rotors, the ground-state tunnel splitting increases and the energies of the bound torsional levels decrease with pressure. A potential which reproduces these anomalous effects is found and the source of the anomaly explained.

  18. Location-dependent depth and undermining formation of pressure ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yoshiko; Isogai, Zenzo; Mizokami, Fumihiro; Furuta, Katsunori; Nemoto, Tetsuya; Kanoh, Hiroyuki; Yoneda, Masahiko

    2013-08-01

    We examined the location-specific properties of pressure ulcers, focusing on depth and undermining formation, which are often unfavorable factors for ulcer healing. We conducted a retrospective observational study of 2 independent databases on pressure ulcers. Databases from a 200-bed hospital (database A) and a 300-bed hospital (database B) were collected during different time periods. Relationships between ulcer location, ulcer depth, and undermining formation were analyzed. All pressure ulcers were accurately diagnosed and classified according to their locations. A total of 282 pressure ulcers in 189 patients from database A and 232 pressure ulcers in 154 patients from database B were analyzed. It was found that pressure ulcers primarily developed over the sacrum. Ratio of stages III and IV pressure ulcers was high in pressure ulcers of the foot, ankle, and crus on the lower leg. Among the deep pressure ulcers, undermining formation was frequently observed on the greater trochanter, ilium, and sacrum. In contrast, pressure ulcers of the foot, ankle, and crus did not exhibit undermining formation. Our results revealed marked differences in pressure ulcer properties depending on their location. Factors affecting depth and undermining of pressure ulcers appear to be related to anatomical and physical properties of the bone and subcutaneous tissue. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Porous Pipe Characteristics on Soil Wetting Pattern in a Negative Pressure Difference Irrigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurun Nahar Khan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sub-surface irrigation has been widely used to reduce conveyance, evaporation and percolation losses. This system involves the application of water directly into the root zone of crops. Negative Pressure Difference Irrigation (NPDI is one kind of subsurface irrigation which is effective in management of irrigation water. The efficiency of this system is dependent on the soil wetting pattern as well as the characteristics of porous pipe. To examine the effect of characteristics of six different porous pipes on soil wetting pattern using NPDI system, experiments were done in laboratory at a negative pressure (Pn of -3 cm. That Pn was generated by placing water reservoir in a lower level than porous pipe, which was installed vertically at the center of soil column. The water was supplied for four hours and after removing dry soil from the column wetted soil was observed. The experimental results show that the soil wetting pattern varies for each type of porous pipe. The study reveals that the shape of the wetted soil is roughly truncated sphere. The maximum vertical expansion and maximum radial expansion vary with the change in diameter and length of porous pipes. With the change in diameter of 128.6%, the maximum radial expansion differs from 24.1% and 34.48% for X and Y axis respectively. Since the water use efficiency is in the range of 0.94 to 0.97, this advanced method can be used as alternative of other traditional methods

  20. Remedy for fictive negative pressures in biphasic finite element models of the intervertebral disc during unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Galbusera, Fabio; Wilke, Hans-Joachim; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl

    2011-03-01

    Previous biphasic finite element studies investigated the temporal response of a spinal segment under rather simplified loading conditions with no attention to unloading and recovery phases. Employment of existing constitutive relations in porous media yields rather large suction-type pore pressures in the disc as the load suddenly disappears. Such negative pressures are absent in vivo and are hence fictive. The aim of this study was to search for remedies to avoid the computation of negative pressures upon unloading. Partial saturation for the disc or a rest load (RL) higher than 400 N totally eliminated the negative pressures. Decreasing the voids ratio (VR) also led to a reduced negative pressure. When defining a partial saturated disc or using a lower VR in combination with a boundary pressure of 0.25 MPa and a RL of 350 N, no negative pressure was calculated. It appears that the constraint of full saturation and a high mobile fluid fraction of the disc tissues along with inadequate tissue properties are the likely causes of negative pressures during unloading.

  1. Wideband energy reflectance measurements: effects of negative middle ear pressure and application of a pressure compensation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Mark D; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    The wideband energy reflectance (ER) technique has become popular as a tool for evaluating middle ear function. Negative middle ear pressure (MEP) is a prevalent form of middle ear dysfunction, which may impact application of ER measurements in differential diagnosis. A negative MEP may be countervailed by application of an equivalent negative ear canal pressure. The present study examined ER in the same ears under normal and experimentally induced negative MEP conditions. Thirty-five subjects produced at least one negative MEP each (-40 to -225 daPa). Negative MEP significantly altered ER in a frequency-specific manner that varied with MEP magnitude. ER increased for low- to mid-frequencies with the largest change (~0.20 to 0.40) occurring between 1 and 1.5 kHz. ER decreased for frequencies above 3 kHz with the largest change (~-0.10 to -0.25) observed between 4.5 and 5.5 kHz. Magnitude of changes increased as MEP became more negative, as did the frequencies at which maximum changes occurred, and the frequency at which enhancement transitioned to reduction. Ear canal pressure compensation restored ER to near baseline values. This suggests that the compensation procedure adequately mitigates the effects of negative MEP on ER. Theoretical issues and clinical implications are discussed.

  2. Mental rubbernecking to negative information depends on task context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcia K; Mitchell, Karen J; Raye, Carol L; McGuire, Joseph T; Sanislow, Charles A

    2006-08-01

    We previously demonstrated mental rubbernecking during the simple cognitive act of refreshing a just activated representation. Participants saw two neutral and one negative word presented simultaneously and, 425 msec later, were cued to mentally refresh (i.e., think of) one of the no-longer-present words. They were slower to refresh a neutral word than the negative word (Johnson et al., 2005, Experiment 6A). The present experiments extended that work by showing mental rubbernecking when negative items were sometimes the target of refreshing, but not when negative items were present but never the target of refreshing, indicating that expectations influence mental rubbernecking. How expectations might modulate the impact of emotional distraction is discussed.

  3. Measurement of improved pressure dependence of superconducting transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, S.

    2013-06-01

    We describe a technique for making electrical transport measurements in a diamond anvil cell at liquid helium temperature having in situ pressure measurement option, permitting accurate pressure determination at any low temperature during the resistance measurement scan. In general, for four-probe resistivity measurements on a polycrystalline sample, four fine gold wires are kept in contact with the sample with the help of the compression from the soft solid (usually alkali halides such as NaCl, KCl, etc.) acting as a pressure-transmitting medium. The actual pressure on the sample is underestimated if not measured from a ruby sphere placed adjacent to the sample and at that very low temperature. Here, we demonstrate the technique with a quasi-four-probe resistance measurement on an Fe-based superconductor in the temperature range 1.2-300 K and pressures up to 8 GPa to find an improved pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature.

  4. Magnitude of negative interpretation bias depends on severity of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Sun; Mathews, Andrew; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that the magnitude of negative interpretation bias displayed by those with depression is related to the degree of depression they experience. Seventy one depressed participants (scoring 14 and above on the Beck Depression Inventory II) completed tasks spanning three domains of possible negative interpretations: semantic ambiguity; nonverbal ambiguity and situational ambiguity. Regression analyses revealed that just under half of the variance in depressive symptom severity was explained by the combination of negative interpretation bias tasks, with the strongest predictor of depressive symptom severity being negative interpretation of semantic ambiguity when reading ambiguous text descriptions. Subsidiary group analyses confirmed that severely depressed individuals interpreted emotionally ambiguous information in a more negative way than did their mildly or moderately depressed counterparts. These findings indicate that the degree of negative interpretive bias is closely related to depression severity and that bias manifests especially strongly at the most severe levels of depression. Our findings may help us to refine cognitive theories of depression and be helpful in guiding therapy.

  5. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Analysis of Effective Interconnectivity of DegraPol-foams Designed for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Hall

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many wounds heal slowly and are difficult to manage. Therefore Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT was developed where polymer foams are applied and a defined negative pressure removes wound fluid, reduces bacterial burden and increases the formation of granulation tissue. Although NPWT is used successfully, its mechanisms are not well understood. In particular, different NPWT dressings were never compared. Here a poly-ester urethane Degrapol® (DP-foam was produced and compared with commercially available dressings (polyurethane-based and polyvinyl-alcohol-based in terms of apparent pore sizes, swelling and effective interconnectivity of foam pores. DP-foams contain relatively small interconnected pores; PU-foams showed large pore size and interconnectivity; whereas PVA-foams displayed heterogeneous and poorly interconnected pores. PVA-foams swelled by 40 %, whereas DP- and PU-foams remained almost without swelling. Effective interconnectivity was investigated by submitting fluorescent beads of 3, 20 and 45 mm diameter through the foams. DP- and PU-foams removed 70-90 % of all beads within 4 h, independent of the bead diameter or bead pre-adsorption with serum albumin. For PVA-foams albumin pre-adsorbed beads circulated longer, where 20 % of 3 mm and 10 % of 20 mm diameter beads circulated after 96 h. The studies indicate that efficient bead perfusion does not only depend on pore size and swelling capacity, but effective interconnectivity might also depend on chemical composition of the foam itself. In addition due to the efficient sieve-effect of the foams uptake of wound components in vivo might occur only for short time suggesting other mechanisms being decisive for success of NPWT.

  7. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koski, Kristie Jo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  8. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema after Reversing Rocuronium-Induced Neuromuscular Blockade by Sugammadex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzo Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a rare complication that accompanies general anesthesia, especially after extubation. We experienced a case of negative pressure pulmonary edema after tracheal extubation following reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex. In this case, the contribution of residual muscular block on the upper airway muscle as well as large inspiratory forces created by the respiratory muscle which has a low response to muscle relaxants, is suspected as the cause.

  9. Post-operative negative pressure pulmonary oedema in an athletic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sarah K; Johnston, A McD

    2013-03-01

    A case of post-operative negative pressure pulmonary oedema in a young, athletic male is reported. We discuss this rare but life-threatening condition and its aetiology, and review the published literature. Military health care providers need to be aware of this condition as young fit personnel may be at increased risk of developing negative pressure pulmonary oedema in the post-operative period.

  10. Time-dependent water permeation behavior of concrete under constant hydraulic pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Yonghao; Wang Zhongli; Zhou Yue

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, a concrete permeability testing setup was designed to study the behavior of hydraulic concrete subjected to constant hydraulic pressure. The results show that when concrete is subjected to high enough constant hydraulic pressure, it will be permeated, and after it reaches its maximum permeation rate, the permeability coefficient will gradually decrease towards a stable value. A time-dependent model of permeability coefficient for concrete subjected to hydraulic pressure is proposed. It is indicated that the decrease of the permeability coefficient with permeation time conforms well to the negative-exponential decrease model.

  11. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation in a Chronic Non-Healing Right Hip Trochanteric Pressure Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, Kevin W; Bodor, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Complex pressure ulcer wound sites often present with a wide scope of barriers to healing ranging from high colonization of multi-drug-resistant pathogens to tortuous internal anatomy which make the wound recalcitrant to traditional wound care including standard negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi-d) provides an opportunity to manage and heal wounds with indications not met by standard NPWT such as cavitating wounds with complex undermining and tunneling. In this clinical case report, a patient who presented with a chronic, non-healing Stage IV pressure ulcer underwent a tensor fascia lata flap reconstruction that was complicated by a partial flap-tip nonadherence with associated partial dehiscence of the flap incision that proved unresolvable until application of adjunctive NPWTi-d which allowed the wound to experience a robust rate of granulation, contraction, and closure. PMID:28003941

  12. Pressure-dependence of arterial stiffness: potential clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Heusinkveld, Maarten H G; Vanmolkot, Floris H; Roodt, Jos Op 't; Hermeling, Evelien; Delhaas, Tammo; Kroon, Abraham A; Reesink, Koen D

    2015-02-01

    Arterial stiffness measures such as pulse wave velocity (PWV) have a known dependence on actual blood pressure, requiring consideration in cardiovascular risk assessment and management. Given the impact of ageing on arterial wall structure, the pressure-dependence of PWV may vary with age. Using a noninvasive model-based approach, combining carotid artery echo-tracking and tonometry waveforms, we obtained pressure-area curves in 23 hypertensive patients at baseline and after 3 months of antihypertensive treatment. We predicted the follow-up PWV decrease using modelled baseline curves and follow-up pressures. In addition, on the basis of these curves, we estimated PWV values for two age groups (mean ages 41 and 64 years) at predefined hypertensive (160/90 mmHg) and normotensive (120/80 mmHg) pressure ranges. Follow-up measurements showed a near 1 m/s decrease in carotid PWV when compared with baseline, which fully agreed with our model-prediction given the roughly 10 mmHg decrease in diastolic pressure. The stiffness-blood pressure-age pattern was in close agreement with corresponding data from the 'Reference Values for Arterial Stiffness' study, linking the physical and empirical bases of our findings. Our study demonstrates that the innate pressure-dependence of arterial stiffness may have implications for the clinical use of arterial stiffness measurements, both in risk assessment and in treatment monitoring of individual patients. We propose a number of clinically feasible approaches to account for the blood pressure effect on PWV measurements.

  13. Stress dependent thermal pressurization of a fluid-saturated rock

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2008-01-01

    Temperature increase in saturated porous materials under undrained conditions leads to thermal pressurization of the pore fluid due to the discrepancy between the thermal expansion coefficients of the pore fluid and of the solid matrix. This increase in the pore fluid pressure induces a reduction of the effective mean stress and can lead to shear failure or hydraulic fracturing. The equations governing the phenomenon of thermal pressurization are presented and this phenomenon is studied experimentally for a saturated granular rock in an undrained heating test under constant isotropic stress. Careful analysis of the effect of mechanical and thermal deformation of the drainage and pressure measurement system is performed and a correction of the measured pore pressure is introduced. The test results are modelled using a non-linear thermo-poro-elastic constitutive model of the granular rock with emphasis on the stress-dependent character of the rock compressibility. The effects of stress and temperature on therma...

  14. Finite element discretization of Darcy's equations with pressure dependent porosity

    KAUST Repository

    Girault, Vivette

    2010-02-23

    We consider the flow of a viscous incompressible fluid through a rigid homogeneous porous medium. The permeability of the medium depends on the pressure, so that the model is nonlinear. We propose a finite element discretization of this problem and, in the case where the dependence on the pressure is bounded from above and below, we prove its convergence to the solution and propose an algorithm to solve the discrete system. In the case where the dependence on the pressure is exponential, we propose a splitting scheme which involves solving two linear systems, but parts of the analysis of this method are still heuristic. Numerical tests are presented, which illustrate the introduced methods. © 2010 EDP Sciences, SMAI.

  15. Pressure Dependent Wall Relaxation in Polarized $^3$He Gaseous Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C; Chu, P -H; Gao, H; Zhang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Pressure dependence of longitudinal relaxation time (T$_1$) due to the cell wall was observed previously at both room temperature and low temperature in valved Rb-coated refillable $^3$He gaseous cells in \\cite{Zheng2}. The diffusion of $^3$He from measurement cell through a capillary tube to the valve and the subsequent depolarization on the surface of the valve was proposed to possibly explain such a pressure dependence at room temperature \\cite{Saam}. In this paper, we investigate this diffusion effect through measurements of T$_1$ with newly designed Rb-coated Pyrex glass cells at 295 K as well as finite element analysis (FEA) studies. Both the experimental results and FEA studies show that the diffusion effect is insufficient to explain the observed linear pressure-dependent behavior of T$_1$.

  16. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain: new powerful tool for closed wound management: clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Jun; Han, DaeHee; Song, Hyunsuk; Jang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Ha; Park, Myong Chul

    2014-07-01

    Although various reconstructive flap surgeries have been successfully performed, there still are difficult wound complications, such as seroma formation, wound margin necrosis, delayed wound healing, and even flap failures. The negative-pressure wound therapy has been described in detail in the literature to assist open chronic/complex wound closure in reconstructive surgery. However, the negative-pressure wound therapy was difficult to be applied under the incisional closed wounds. A total of 23 patients underwent the various reconstructive flap surgeries with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain. Instead of using regular suction units, Barovac (50-90 mm Hg, Sewoon Medical, Seoul, Republic of Korea) drainage tubes were connected to the wall suction unit, providing continuous high-powered negative pressure. In addition, continuous subatmospheric suction pressure (100-300 mm Hg) was applied. Outcome of the measures was obtained from the incidence of seroma, volume of postoperative drainage, hospitalization period, and incidence of other typical wound complications. Dead space was evaluated postoperatively with ultrasonography. Using continuous high-pressure negative suction drain, successful management of seroma was obtained without any major complication such as wound infection, flap loss, and wound margin necrosis, except for only 1 case of seroma after discharge from the hospital. The indwelling time of the drain in the latissimus dorsi donor site was significantly reduced in comparison with the authors' previous data (P = 0.047). The volume of drainage and hospitalization period were also reduced; however, these were not statistically significant. The dead space with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain was more reduced than in the control group in the immediate postoperative period and confirmed with ultrasonography. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain might be the simple and powerful solution in the management of challenging

  17. Nephelometric determination of turgor pressure in growing gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A L; Pinette, M F

    1987-08-01

    Gas vesicles were used as probes to measure turgor pressure in Ancylobacter aquaticus. The externally applied pressure required to collapse the vesicles in turgid cells was compared with that in cells whose turgor had been partially or totally removed by adding an impermeable solute to the external medium. Since gram-negative bacteria do not have rigid cell walls, plasmolysis is not expected to occur in the same way as it does in the cells of higher plants. Bacterial cells shrink considerably before plasmolysis occurs in hyperosmotic media. The increase in pressure required to collapse 50% of the vesicles as external osmotic pressure increases is less than predicted from the degree of osmotically inducible shrinkage seen with this organism or with another gram-negative bacterium. This feature complicates the calculation of the turgor pressure as the difference between the collapse pressure of vesicles with and without sucrose present in the medium. We propose a new model of the relationship between turgor pressure and the cell wall stress in gram-negative bacteria based on the behavior of an ideal elastic container when the pressure differential across its surface is decreased. We developed a new curve-fitting technique for evaluating bacterial turgor pressure measurements.

  18. Acute nitric oxide synthase inhibition and endothelin-1-dependent arterial pressure elevation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eRapoport

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Key evidence that endogenous nitric oxide (NO inhibits the continuous, endothelin (ET-1-mediated drive to elevate arterial pressure includes demonstrations that ET-1 mediates a significant component of the pressure elevated by acute exposure to NO synthase (NOS inhibitors. This review examines the characteristics of this pressure elevation in order to elucidate potential mechanisms associated with the negative regulation of ET-1 by NO and, thereby, provide potential insight into the vascular pathophysiology underlying NO dysregulation. We surmise that the magnitude of the ET-1-dependent component of the NOS inhibitor-elevated pressure is 1 independent of underlying arterial pressure and other pressor pathways activated by the NOS inhibitors and 2 dependent on relatively higher NOS inhibitor dose, release of stored and de novo synthesized ET-1, and ETA receptor-mediated increased vascular resistance. Major implications of these conclusions include: 1 the marked variation of the ET-1-dependent component, i.e., from 0-100% of the pressure elevation, reflects the NO-ET-1 regulatory pathway. Thus, NOS inhibitor-mediated, ET-1-dependent pressure elevation in vascular pathophysiologies is an indicator of the level of compromised/enhanced function of this pathway; 2 NO is a more potent inhibitor of ET-1-mediated elevated arterial pressure than other pressor pathways, due in part to inhibition of intravascular pressure-independent release of ET-1. Thus, the ET-1-dependent component of pressure elevation in vascular pathophysiologies associated with NO dysregulation is of greater magnitude at higher levels of compromised NO.

  19. [Treatment of surgical wound dehiscence by topical negative pressure therapy: Clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresno-García, Carmen; Alconero-Camarero, Ana Rosa; Fernández-Carro, Belén

    2015-01-01

    Topical negative pressure therapy is an alternative treatment for complex wounds that consists of the direct application of sub-atmospheric pressure, obtaining a number of effects that are beneficial for tissues, promoting the healing of both acute and chronic wounds and complementing surgical procedures. We report the case of a 75 year old man diagnosed with surgical wound dehiscence after a femorotibial bypass graft, who was hospitalized again with the aim to perform the implantation of a topical negative pressure therapy in the infected wound. We designed a care plan for this patient following the steps of the scientific method and basing ourselves on the NANDA, NIC, and NOC taxonomies.

  20. Dependence of Glass Mechanical Properties on Thermal and Pressure History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauchy, Mathieu

    -equilibrium material, the structure and properties of glass depend not only on its composition, but also on its thermal and pressure histories. Here we review our recent findings regarding the thermal and pressure history dependence of indentation-derived mechanical properties of oxide glasses.......Predicting the properties of new glasses prior to manufacturing is a topic attracting great industrial and scientific interest. Mechanical properties are currently of particular interest given the increasing demand for stronger, thinner, and more flexible glasses in recent years. However, as a non...

  1. Effects of intermittent negative pressure on osteogenesis in human bone marrow-derived stroma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi YANG; Miao LIU; Yin-gang ZHANG; Xiong GUO; Peng XU

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of intermittent negative pressure on osteogenesis in human bone marrow-derived stroma cells (BMSCs) in vitro. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from adult marrow donated by a hip osteoarthritis patient with prosthetic replacement and cultured in vitro. The third passage cells were divided into negative pressure treatment group and control group. The treatment group was induced by negative pressure intermittently (pressure: 50 kPa, 30 rain/times, and twice daily). The control was cultured in conventional condition. The osteogenesis of BMSCs was examined by phase-contrast mi-croscopy, the determination of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and the immunohistochemistry of collagen type I. The mRNA expressions of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteoprotegerin ligand (OPGL) in BMSCs were analyzed by real-time poly-merase chain reaction (PCR). Results: BMSCs showed a typical appearance of osteoblast after 2 weeks of induction by intermit-tent negative pressure, the activity of ALP increased significantly, and the expression of collagen type 1 was positive. In the treatment group, the mRNA expression of OPG increased significantly (P<0.05) and the mRNA expression of OPGL decreased significantly (P<0.05) after 2 weeks, compared with the control. Conclusion: Intermittent negative pressure could promote os-teogenesis in human BMSCs in vitro.

  2. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care.

  3. Is post-sternotomy mediastinitis still devastating after the advent of negative-pressure wound therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Marisa; Della Corte, Alessandro; Vicchio, Mariano; Pirozzi, Francesco; Nappi, Gianantonio; Cotrufo, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we reviewed a 15-year experience with the treatment of a severe sequela of cardiac surgery: post-sternotomy mediastinitis. We compared the outcomes of conventional treatment with those of negative-pressure wound therapy, focusing on mortality rate, sternal reinfection, and length of hospital stay.We reviewed data on 157 consecutive patients who were treated at our institution from 1995 through 2010 for post-sternotomy mediastinitis after cardiac surgery. Of these patients, 74 had undergone extensive wound débridement followed by negative-pressure wound therapy, and 83 had undergone conventional treatment, including primary wound reopening, débridement, closed-chest irrigation without rewiring, topical application of granulated sugar for recurrent cases, and final plastic reconstruction with pectoral muscle flap in most cases.The 2 study groups were homogeneous in terms of preoperative data and operative variables (the primary cardiac surgery was predominantly coronary artery bypass grafting). Negative-pressure wound therapy was associated with lower early mortality rates (1.4% vs 3.6%; P = 0.35) and significantly lower reinfection rates (1.4% vs 16.9%; P = 0.001). Significantly shorter hospital stays were also observed with negative pressure in comparison with conventional treatment (mean durations, 27.3 ± 9 vs 30.5 ± 3 d; P = 0.02), consequent to the accelerated process of wound healing with negative-pressure therapy.Lower mortality and reinfection rates and shorter hospital stays can result from using negative pressure rather than conventional treatment. Therefore, negative-pressure wound therapy is advisable as first-choice therapy for deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

  4. Experimental confirmation of the gravitation force negative temperature dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, A L

    2011-01-01

    The experiment with weighing PZT-piezoelectric ceramics, heated up by a high-frequency signal for the temperature of 1.6 C is briefly described. The negative change of piezoelectric ceramics weight having relative value of is confidently registered. The sign and the order of the value of relative temperature change of piezoelectric ceramics weight correspond to the measurements of weight of non-magnetic metal bars which were conducted earlier. What is emphasized as expedient for development of physics of gravitation is conducting similar measurements with use of various materials as samples and in a wide range of temperatures.

  5. The cerebral hemodynamics of normotensive hypovolemia during lower-body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, C. A.; Levine, B. D.; Meyer, Y.; Buckey, J. C.; Lane, L. D.; Borchers, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Although severe hypovolemia can lead to hypotension and neurological decline, many patients with neurosurgical disorders experience a significant hypovolemia while autonomic compensatory mechanisms maintain a normal blood pressure. To assess the effects of normotensive hypovolemia upon cerebral hemodynamics, transcranial Doppler ultrasound monitoring of 13 healthy volunteers was performed during graded lower-body negative pressure of up to -50 mm Hg, an accepted laboratory model for reproducing the physiological effects of hypovolemia. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity declined by 16% +/- 4% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) and the ratio between transcranial Doppler ultrasound pulsatility and systemic pulsatility rose 22% +/- 8%, suggesting cerebral small-vessel vasoconstriction in response to the sympathetic activation unmasked by lower-body negative pressure. This vasoconstriction may interfere with the autoregulatory response to a sudden fall in blood pressure, and may explain the common observation of neurological deficit during hypovolemia even with a normal blood pressure.

  6. High pressure and anesthesia: pressure stimulates or inhibits bacterial bioluminescence depending upon temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosaka, S; Kamaya, H; Ueda, I

    1988-10-01

    Although high pressure is often viewed as a nonspecific stimulus counteracting anesthesia, pressure can either excite or inhibit biological activity depending on the temperature at application. Temperature and pressure are two independent variables that determine equilibrium quantity, e.g., the state of organisms in terms of activity and anesthesia depth. We used the light intensity of luminous bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) as an activity parameter, and studied the effects of pressure and anesthetics on the bacteria's light intensity at various temperatures. The light intensity was greatest at about 30 degrees C at ambient pressure. When the system was pressurized up to 204 atm, the temperature for maximum light intensity was shifted to higher temperatures. Above the optimal temperature for the maximal light intensity, high pressure increased the light intensity. Below the optimal temperature, pressure decreased light intensity. Pressure only shifts the reaction equilibrium to the lower volume state (Le Chatelier's principle). When the volume of the excited state is larger than the resting state, high pressure inhibits excitation, and vice versa. Halothane 0.008 atm and isoflurane 0.021 atm inhibited the light intensity both above and below the optimal temperature. When pressurized, the light intensity increased in the high temperature range but decreased in the low temperature range, as in the control. Thus, high pressure seemingly potentiated the anesthetic action at low temperatures. When the ratio of the light intensity in bacteria exposed to anesthesia and those not exposed to anesthesia was plotted against the pressure, however, the value approached unity in proportion to the pressure increase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. An Evaluation of Personality Traits and Negative Life Events in Explaining Negative Coping Strategies among Drug Dependent People: The Mediating Role of Negative Affects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A beigi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to examine the relationship of personality traits and negative life events with coping styles with the mediating role of negative affects in drug dependent people. Method: This was a correlational study wherein the number of 152 participants (drug users completed Cloninger temperament and character inventory, Paykel life events inventory, positive and negative affect schedule (PANAS, and Endler & Parker’s coping inventory for stressful situations. Results: Novelty seeking had an indirect effect on emotional coping styles. Although anger had a mediating role in this relationship, it did not play such a role in the relationship of low self-directedness and negative life events with emotional coping styles. Harm avoidance had a direct effect on avoidant coping styles. Fear and sadness played a mediating role in the structural relationship of harm avoidance and negative events with avoidant coping styles. Reward dependence had an indirect effect on avoidant coping styles. Sadness had a mediating role in the structural relationship between reward dependence and avoidant coping styles. Conclusion: People with traumatic personality traits show negative affects by experiencing stressful negative events which leads to traumatic coping style, including addiction.

  8. Cardiac Arrest after Connecting Negative Pressure to the Subgaleal Drain during Craniotomy Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monu Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-year-old child operated on for arachnoid cyst in right frontoparietotemporal region had sudden bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest leading to death after connecting negative pressure to the subgaleal drain during craniotomy closure. The surgical procedure was uneventful. It is a common practice to place epidural or subgaleal drains connected to a vacuum system towards the end of craniotomy to prevent accumulation of intracranial and extracranial blood. The phenomenon of bradycardia with hypotension is known to occur following negative pressure application to the epidural, epicranial, or subgaleal space after craniotomy closure. However cardiac arrest as a complication of negative pressure suction drain in neurosurgical patients is not described in the literature.

  9. LIQUID-LIQUID PHASE EQUILIBRIUM OF POLYMER SOLUTIONS AND POLYMER BLENDS UNDER POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE PRESSURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Attila R.Imre

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we would like to give a brief review about the extensibility of the liquid-liquid locus into the negative pressure region. Negative pressure states are hardly explored; most researchers believe that the pressure scale ends at p = 0.We would like to show that this is not true, thep = 0 point is not a special point for liquids, it can be "easily" crossed. We are going to give a few example, where the extension of liquid-liquid locus for polymer blends and solutions below p = 0 gives us some interesting results, like the merging of UCST and LCST branches in weakly interacting polymer solutions or the reason why most UCST blends exhibit pressure induced immiscibility. Also, we will see what happens with the immiscibility island of aqueous polymer solutions when - reaching the critical molar mass - it "disappears".

  10. The Application of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Installation in Diabetic Foot Associated with Phlegmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachal Krzysztof

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers was used successfully for many years. In the case of complications associated with infection by this type of wound treatment to give very good results. From many years of sustained research on a device that could combine the advantages of the negative pressure wound therapy and drainage flow. Finally, in the last year, the first V.A.C. Ulta (KCI, USA devices were included to the Polish hospital departments.

  11. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Following use of Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Bayraktar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE following upper airway obstruction is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The first cause in the etiology of NPPE is developed laryngospasm after intubation or extubation, while the other causes are epiglotitis, croup, hiccups, foreign body aspiration, pharyngeal hematoma and oropharyngeal tumors.The Late diagnosis and treatment causes high morbidity and mortality. The protection of the airway and maintainance of arterial oxygenation will be life saving.In this article we aimed to report  a case of negative pressure pulmonary edema, resolved succesfully after treatment, following use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA.

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy and external fixation device: a simple way to seal the dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulla, Antonio; Farace, Francesco; Uzel, André-Pierre; Casoli, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Negative pressure therapy is widely applied to treat lower limb trauma. However, sealing a negative pressure dressing in the presence of an external fixation device may be difficult and time consuming. Therefore, screws, pins, wires, etc, may preclude the vacuum, preventing the plastic drape to perfectly adhere to the foam. To maintain the vacuum, we tried to prevent air leaking around the screws putting bone wax at the junction between the pins and the plastic drape. This solution, in our hands, avoids air leakage and helps maintain vacuum in a fast and inexpensive way.

  13. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after nasal fracture reduction in an obese female patient: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunkyung; Yi, Junggu; Jeon, Younghoon

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is a rare, but well-known life-threatening complication of acute upper airway obstruction (UAO) which develops after general anesthesia. The pronounced inspiratory efforts following UAO lead to excessive negative inspiratory pressure, which may cause acute pulmonary edema. Early recognition and prompt treatment of NPPE is necessary to prevent patient morbidity and mortality. In addition, the physician should carefully manage the patient who has risk factors of UAO to prevent this situation. We experienced a case of NPPE following laryngospasm after tracheal extubation in an obese patient who underwent open reduction of orbital wall and nasal bone surgery. PMID:26316826

  14. A pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass system that prevents negative pressure at the membrane oxygenator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, T; Maeta, H; Imawaki, S; Shiraishi, Y; Arioka, I; Fukunaga, S; Tanaka, S; Nasu, N

    1993-01-01

    Negative pressure is a problem in pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). To avoid this, the authors designed a pulsatile CPB system containing a Sarns centrifugal pump (CP) and a Univox membrane oxygenator, in which the inertial flow is not obstructed by the CP. In both an in vitro study and a clinical study, negative pressure was not observed in the arterial line of the CPB circuit when this system was used. When a roller pump (RP) was used, however, instead of a CP, negative pressure did occur. In a clinical study using this system, mean pulse pressure was 36 mmHg and hemolysis, expressed as the rate of rise in plasma free hemoglobin from 10 to 70 min of CPB, was 26.2 mg/dl/hr, which did not exceed that seen with a pulsatile CPB using an RP instead of a CP. The hemolysis seen in the study caused no clinical problems. Thus, pulsatile CPB using a CP and Univox membrane oxygenator should be considered for clinical use to prevent the occurrence of negative pressure.

  15. Nephelometric determination of turgor pressure in growing gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, A L; Pinette, M F

    1987-01-01

    Gas vesicles were used as probes to measure turgor pressure in Ancylobacter aquaticus. The externally applied pressure required to collapse the vesicles in turgid cells was compared with that in cells whose turgor had been partially or totally removed by adding an impermeable solute to the external medium. Since gram-negative bacteria do not have rigid cell walls, plasmolysis is not expected to occur in the same way as it does in the cells of higher plants. Bacterial cells shrink considerably...

  16. The transpiration of water at negative pressures in a synthetic tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Tobias D; Stroock, Abraham D

    2008-09-11

    Plant scientists believe that transpiration-the motion of water from the soil, through a vascular plant, and into the air-occurs by a passive, wicking mechanism. This mechanism is described by the cohesion-tension theory: loss of water by evaporation reduces the pressure of the liquid water within the leaf relative to atmospheric pressure; this reduced pressure pulls liquid water out of the soil and up the xylem to maintain hydration. Strikingly, the absolute pressure of the water within the xylem is often negative, such that the liquid is under tension and is thermodynamically metastable with respect to the vapour phase. Qualitatively, this mechanism is the same as that which drives fluid through the synthetic wicks that are key elements in technologies for heat transfer, fuel cells and portable chemical systems. Quantitatively, the differences in pressure generated in plants to drive flow can be more than a hundredfold larger than those generated in synthetic wicks. Here we present the design and operation of a microfluidic system formed in a synthetic hydrogel. This synthetic 'tree' captures the main attributes of transpiration in plants: transduction of subsaturation in the vapour phase of water into negative pressures in the liquid phase, stabilization and flow of liquid water at large negative pressures (-1.0 MPa or lower), continuous heat transfer with the evaporation of liquid water at negative pressure, and continuous extraction of liquid water from subsaturated sources. This development opens the opportunity for technological uses of water under tension and for new experimental studies of the liquid state of water.

  17. Perceiving social pressure not to feel negative predicts depressive symptoms in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckheere, Egon; Bastian, Brock; Fried, Eiko I; Murphy, Sean C; Kuppens, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Western societies often overemphasize the pursuit of happiness, and regard negative feelings such as sadness or anxiety as maladaptive and unwanted. Despite this emphasis on happiness, the amount of people suffering from depressive complaints is remarkably high. To explain this apparent paradox, we examined whether experiencing social pressure not to feel sad or anxious could in fact contribute to depressive symptoms. A sample of individuals (n = 112) with elevated depression scores (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9] ≥ 10) took part in an online daily diary study in which they rated their depressive symptoms and perceived social pressure not to feel depressed or anxious for 30 consecutive days. Using multilevel VAR models, we investigated the temporal relation between this perceived social pressure and depressive symptoms to determine directionality. Primary analyses consistently indicated that experiencing social pressure predicts increases in both overall severity scores and most individual symptoms of depression, but not vice versa. A set of secondary analyses, in which we adopted a network perspective on depression, confirmed these findings. Using this approach, centrality analysis revealed that perceived social pressure not to feel negative plays an instigating role in depression, reflected by the high out- and low instrength centrality of this pressure in the various depression networks. Together, these findings indicate how perceived societal norms may contribute to depression, hinting at a possible malignant consequence of society's denouncement of negative emotions. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Irrigation dynamics associated with positive pressure, apical negative pressure and passive ultrasonic irrigations: a computational fluid dynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, José Enrique; Nurbakhsh, Babak; Layton, Gillian; Bussmann, Markus; Kishen, Anil

    2014-08-01

    Complexities in root canal anatomy and surface adherent biofilm structures remain as challenges in endodontic disinfection. The ability of an irrigant to penetrate into the apical region of a canal, along with its interaction with the root canal walls, will aid in endodontic disinfection. The aim of this study was to qualitatively examine the irrigation dynamics of syringe irrigation with different needle tip designs (open-ended and closed-ended), apical negative pressure irrigation with the EndoVac® system, and passive ultrasonic-assisted irrigation, using a computational fluid dynamics model. Syringe-based irrigation with a side-vented needle showed a higher wall shear stress than the open-ended but was localised to a small region of the canal wall. The apical negative pressure mode of irrigation generated the lowest wall shear stress, while the passive-ultrasonic irrigation group showed the highest wall shear stress along with the greatest magnitude of velocity.

  19. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Vinet, Pascal; Ferrante, John

    1989-01-01

    A new method for the analysis of the experimental data for the pressure dependence of the melting temperature of metals is presented. The method combines Lindemann's law, the Debye model, and a first-order equation of state with the experimental observation that the Grueneisen parameter divided by the volume is constant. It is observed that, based on these assumptions, in the absence of phase transitions, plots of the logarithm of the normalized melting temperature versus the logarithm of the normalized pressure are straight lines. It is found that the normalized-melting--temperature versus normalized-pressure curves accurately satisfy the linear relationship for Al, Ag, Au, Cs, Cu, K, Na, Pt, and Rb. In addition, this technique provides a sensitive tool for detecting phase transitions.

  20. Pressure Dependent Electronic Properties of Organic Semiconductors from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Franz; Carbogno, Christian; Blum, Volker; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    The electronic properties of organic semiconductors typically exhibit a significant dependence on the strain, stress, and pressure. In this contribution, we present the theoretical background, assessment of approximations, and results of electronic and transport properties in the framework of density-functional theory. Our implementation considers the analytical strain derivatives (stress tensor) including the contributions that stem from (a) van-der-Waals interactions and (b) the Fock-exchange in hybrid functionals. We validate our approach by investigating the geometric and electronic changes that occur in polyacetylene and anthracene under hydrostatic pressure. We show that the fraction of exact exchange included in the calculations is critical - and non-trivial to choose - for a correct description of these systems. Furthermore, we point out trends for the electrical conductivity under pressure and identify the dominant charge carriers and transport directions.

  1. LARGE DEVIATIONS AND MODERATE DEVIATIONS FOR SUMS OF NEGATIVELY DEPENDENT RANDOM VARIABLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li; Wan Chenggao; Feng Yanqin

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we obtain the large deviations and moderate deviations for negatively dependent (ND) and non-identically distributed random variables defined on (-∞, +∞). The results show that for some non-identical random variables, precise large deviations and moderate deviations remain insensitive to negative dependence structure.

  2. Weak laws of large numbers for arrays of rowwise negatively dependent random variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Taylor

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Weak laws of large numbers for arrays of rowwise negatively dependent random variables are obtained in this paper. The more general hypothesis of negative dependence relaxes the usual assumption of independence. The moment conditions are similar to previous results, and the stochastic bounded condition also provides a generalization of the usual distributional assumptions.

  3. Enhanced optoelectronic property of ZnO under negative pressure condition: a first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Santosh; Nath Tripathi, Madhvendra

    2016-08-01

    In contrary to high pressure phases of ZnO, recent experimental evidence suggests that β-BeO type lattice modification of ZnO may be realised under negative pressure condition generated by lattice mismatch or by applying strain. The first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT) is employed to investigate the negative pressure phase β-BeO, and the outcomes of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of this phase are compared with the ambient condition wurtzite B4 phase of ZnO. Our phase transition study shows that the B4 phase transforms into the β-BeO phase around negative pressure of -4 GPa and this new phase retains its structural stability even under more negative pressure. Further, the volume of the β-BeO phase increases resulting in a low-density phase with more anisotropic nature and distorted tetrahedral around Zn (or O) atoms along with (2 + 2) coordination as compared to B4 phase. The electronic structure of low-density β-BeO phase changes significantly, however, the band gaps of both the phases are almost same. The change in electronic structure of β-BeO phase turns into a significant blue shift in lower energy region of optical spectra. Moreover, the smaller effective mass values of charge carriers in β-BeO phase compared to B4 phase indicate high mobilities of charge carriers to attain enhanced conductivity. Further, the analysis of optical properties of β-BeO phase indicate the smaller values of reflectivity and absorption coefficients and consequently an enhanced transmittance value of 90% in visible region of optical spectra. The lower effective masses of charge carriers and enhancement in transmittance makes the low density negative pressure β-BeO phase suitable for achieving enhanced optoelectronic property of ZnO.

  4. The Relationship of Cavitation to the Negative Acoustic Pressure Amplitude in Ultrasonic Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Bo Fan; Juan Tu; Lin-Jiao Luo; Xia-Sheng Guo; Pin-Tong Huang; Dong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the cavitation and acoustic peak negative pressure in the high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field is analyzed in water and tissue phantom.The peak negative pressure at the focus is determined by a hybrid approach combining the measurement with the simulation.The spheroidal beam equation is utilized to describe the nonlinear acoustic propagation.The waveform at the focus is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone in water.The relationship between the source pressure amplitude and the excitation voltage is determined by fitting the measured ratio of the second harmonic to the fundamental component at the focus,based on the model simulation.Then the focal negative pressure is calculated for arbitrary voltage excitation in water and tissue phantom.A portable B-mode ultrasound scanner is applied to monitor HIFU-induced cavitation in real time,and a passive cavitation detection (PCD) system is used to acquire the bubble scattering signals in the HIFU focal volume for the cavitation quantification.The results show that:(1) unstable cavitation starts to appear in degassed water when the peak negative pressure of HIFU signals reaches 13.5 MPa;and (2) the cavitation activity can be detected in tissue phantom by B-mode images and in the PCD system with HIFU peak negative pressures of 9.0 MPa and 7.8 MPa,respectively,which suggests that real-time B-mode images could be used to monitor the cavitation activity in two dimensions,while PCD systems are more sensitive to detect scattering and emission signals from cavitation bubbles.

  5. A modified Burzynski criterion for anisotropic pressure-dependent materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FARZAD MOAYYEDIAN; MEHRAN KADKHODAYAN

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the Burzynski criterion, which was introduced for isotropic pressure-dependent materials, is modified for anisotropic pressure-dependent materials in plane-stress condition. The modified criterion can be calibrated with 10 experimental data points such as tensile stress at 0°, 45° and 90°, compressive stress at 0° and 90° and R-values in tensile stress at 0°, 45° and 90° from rolling direction and also biaxial tensilestress and tensile R-value. To identify the anisotropic parameters an error function is set up through comparison of the predicted yield stresses and R-values with those from experiments. Then the Downhill simplex method is applied to solve 10 high-nonlinearity equations. Finally, considering Al 2008-T4 (BCC), Al 2090-T3 (FCC),AZ31 (HCP) and also Mg–0.5% Th alloy, Mg–4% Li alloy, pure textured magnesium, textured magnesium andTi–4Al–1/4O2, which are HCP materials with ep¼ 1%; 5%; 10% as case studies and comparing the results for the modified Burzynski criterion with experiments, it is shown that the Burzynski criterion is appropriate for pressure-dependent anisotropic materials with proper accuracy.

  6. Electrical admittance for filling of the heart during lower body negative pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Yujia; Holm, S; Jenstrup, M;

    2000-01-01

    lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in humans. Changes in Thorax(ICW) were compared with positron emission tomography-determined C(15)O-labeled erythrocytes over the heart. During -40 mmHg LBNP, the blood volume of the heart decreased by 21 +/- 3% as the erythrocyte volume was reduced by 20 +/- 2...

  7. Outcome of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy for Open Abdomen Treatment After Nontraumatic Lower Gastrointestinal Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Claus Anders; Fabricius, Rasmus; Kleif, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the risk factors for failure to achieve fascial closure after use of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in an open abdomen (OA). We aimed at analyzing possible risk factors for failure of fascial closure and the risk of fistulas after nontrauma lower gastrointestinal...

  8. Using the Solving Problems Together Psychoeducational Group Counseling Model as an Intervention for Negative Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri Lynn; Khurshid, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), that focuses on working with students who struggle with negative peer pressure. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  9. Using the Solving Problems Together Psychoeducational Group Counseling Model as an Intervention for Negative Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kimberly R.; Rushing, Jeri Lynn; Khurshid, Ayesha

    2011-01-01

    Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), that focuses on working with students who struggle with negative peer pressure. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of…

  10. The use of negative pressure in critical necrotizing fasciitis treatment: a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Kui; Xu, Bing; Wu, Jia-Jun; Wu, Minjie; Lu, Shuliang; Xie, Ting

    2014-09-01

    Surgery complemented by antibiotics forms the backbone of the successful management of necrotizing fasciitis. But it will be very difficult to clear away extensive necrotizing tissue thoroughly in critically ill patients when their vital signs are unstable. The authors report the case of a 33-year-old woman who had extensive necrotizing fasciitis of the right lower limb with septic shock. The patient was severely anemic and malnutrition and had been given conservative debridement at bedside, that is, only detached necrotizing tissues was taken away while some other necrotizing tissue still remained, so that the skin tissue within the same area could be saved as much as possible. After debridement, negative pressure was applied at 125 mm Hg. Broad-spectrum antibiotics and effective supplementation were also complemented, thus controlling the septic shock. All necrotizing tissues were detached, and the sparing vital skin on necrotizing fascia was preserved successfully after negative pressure treatment. The patient was finally saved. In conclusion, negative pressure treatment may help diminish toxin absorbance, detach gangrene tissue, and preserve sparing vital tissue. This case suggests the value of combined use of negative pressure therapy and conservative debridement in critically ill patients with extensive necrotizing fasciitis.

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigation of pressure-dependent Raman spectra of triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landerville, Aaron C.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Grant, Christian D.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Oleynik, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The experimental pressure dependent Raman spectra of triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) are determined up to 24.5 GPa, and compared with those obtained using density functional theory (DFT) up to 27 GPa. The density functional theory calculations include the Grimme empirical van der Waals correction, as well as corrections for both thermal and zero-point energy contributions to pressure. DFT-predicted crystal structure of TATB at ambient conditions, the equation of state, and Raman spectra up to 24.5 GPa are in good agreement with experiment. Pressure-dependence of specific vibrational modes is discussed in detail. Further, the comparison of experimental and calculated Raman spectra of TATB offers evidence that no first-order polymorphic phase transition occurs at least up to 27 GPa.

  12. NEGATIVE PRESSURE WOUND THERAPY (NPWT FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DIABETIC FOOT WOUND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesiana Heris Santy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Complications often experienced by people with diabetes are complications in the feet ( 15 % called diabetic foot ( Akhtyo , 2009 . Where the injury to the leg if not treated properly will lead to infections and ultimately need to be amputated .The purpose of writing articles is to review and discuss the evidence-based literature bersadarkanpraktice of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Effectiveness ( NPWT on the healing of diabetic foot ulcers.One technology that is used to prevent and avoid lower limb amputation is the technique of negative pressure or Negative Pressure Wound Therapy ( NPWT . This negative pressure technique has grown rapidly and now has been widely used in many countries , especially in Western European countries ( Germany and the United States . Negative pressure technique has the advantage that it is relatively cheaper cost than the use of hyperbaric oxygen . Results obtained by several studies that the use of NPWT may improve wound healing process through efforts to create a moist wound environment and decrease edema that becomes optimal wound healing , throw that out of the wound exudate so that the protease enzyme in the exudate also go wasted , this enzyme is known to interfere wound healing process . The other benefit is that it can stimulate cell growth by increasing angiogenesis physically , so that the growth of new cells will be maximal Abstrak : Komplikasi sering dialami pengidap diabetes adalah komplikasi pada kaki (15% disebut kaki diabetes (Akhtyo, 2009.Dimana luka pada kaki jika tidak ditangani dengan baik akan menyebabkan terjadinya infeksi dan akhirnya perlu di amputasi. Tujuan penulisan artikel adalah mengkaji dan membahas literature bersadarkan evidence based praktice  tentang Efektifitas Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT pada penyembuhan ulkus kaki Diabetik. Salah satu teknologi yang digunakan untuk mencegah dan menghindari amputasi ekstremitas bawah adalah  teknik tekanan negatif atau Negative

  13. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moris Topaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound′s environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

  14. Upper airway collapsibility evaluated by a negative expiratory pressure test in severe obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Romano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the usefulness of measuring upper airway collapsibility with a negative expiratory pressure application as a screening test for severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. INTRODUCTION: OSA is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and it may have serious consequences. Its recognition may have important implications during the perioperative period. Increased upper airway collapsibility is one of the main determinants of OSA, and its evaluation could be useful for identifying this condition. METHODS: Severe OSA and normal subjects (24 in each group were matched by body mass index and referred to our sleep laboratory. The subjects were enrolled in an overnight sleep study, and a diurnal negative expiratory pressure test was performed. Flow drop (DV and expiratory volume were measured in the first 0.2 s (V02 of the negative expiratory pressure test. RESULTS: DV (% and V02 (% values were statistically different between normal and OSA subjects. OSA patients showed a greater decrease in flow than normal subjects. In addition, severely OSA patients exhaled during the first 0.2 s of the negative expiratory pressure application was an average of only 11.2% of the inspired volume compared to 34.2% for the normal subjects. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristics showed that V02 (% and DV (% could accurately identify severe OSA in subjects with sensitivities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively, and specificities of 95.8% and 91.7%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: V02 (% and DV (% are highly accurate parameters for detecting severe OSA. The pharyngeal collapsibility measurement, which uses negative expiratory pressure during wakefulness, is predictive of collapsibility during sleep.

  15. Negative Expiratory Pressure Technique: An Awake Test to Measure Upper Airway Collapsibility in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Helena Larramona; Marcus, Carole L.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Morera, Joan C. Oliva; Huang, Jingtao; Farre, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Upper airway (UA) collapsibility is a major pathophysiologic feature of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In adolescents, it is measured by obtaining the slope of pressure-flow relationship (SPF) while applying negative nasal pressure during sleep. An easier technique to assess UA collapsibility, consisting of application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) during wakefulness, has demonstrated differences between control and OSAS subjects. We hypothesized that the NEP technique would correlate with SPF as a measurement of UA collapsibility in adolescents. Design: During wakefulness, NEP of −5 cm H2O in the seated and supine position was applied during the first second of expiration. The area under the expiratory flow-volume curve during NEP was compared to tidal breathing (RatioNEP). In addition, adolescents underwent SPF measurements during sleep. Two SPF techniques were performed to measure the activated and relatively hypotonic UA. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Participants: Seven adolescents with OSAS and 20 controls. Results: In the seated position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and both hypotonic SPF (r = −0.39, P = 0.04) and activated SPF (r = −0.62, P = 0.001). In the supine position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and activated SPF (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and a trend for hypotonic SPF (r = −0.38, P = 0.06). Conclusions: The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique correlates with the hypotonic and activated slope of pressure-flow relationship measurements. The seated position showed the strongest correlation. The NEP technique can be used as an alternative method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. Citation: Carrera HL, Marcus CL, McDonough JM, Morera JC, Huang J, Farre R, Montserrat JM. Negative expiratory pressure technique: an awake test to measure upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1783–1791. PMID:26158888

  16. Combined Negative- and Positive-Pressure Ventilation for the Treatment of ARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Raymondos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Tracheal intubation and positive-pressure ventilation as the current standard of care for the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS seem to have reached their limit in terms of a further relevant reduction of the still very high mortality. Case Presentation. A 75-year-old male patient developed ARDS after abscess drainage with deteriorating oxygenation, despite positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP values above 15 cm H2O. We applied external negative-pressure ventilation with a chamber respirator using −33 cm H2O at inspiration and −15 cm H2O at expiration, combined with conventional pressure support using a PEEP of about 8 cm H2O and a pressure support of 4–12 cm H2O. Alveolar infiltrates disappeared rapidly and PaO2/FiO2 values surpassed 300 mmHg after the first application and 500 mmHg after the second. Negative-pressure ventilation was used for 6–18 hours/day over five days. Now, 13 years later, the patient is still alive and has a good quality of life. Conclusion. Using this or similar concepts, not only in intubated patients but also as a noninvasive approach in patients with ARDS, offers new options that may genuinely differ from the present therapeutic approaches and may, therefore, have the potential to decrease the present high mortality from ARDS.

  17. Impact of lower body negative pressure induced hypovolemia on peripheral venous pressure waveform parameters in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alian, Aymen A; Galante, Nicholas J; Stachenfeld, Nina S; Silverman, David G; Shelley, Kirk H

    2014-07-01

    Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) creates a reversible hypovolemia by sequestrating blood volume in the lower extremities. This study sought to examine the impact of central hypovolemia on peripheral venous pressure (PVP) waveforms in spontaneously breathing subjects. With IRB approval, 11 healthy subjects underwent progressive LBNP (baseline, -30, -75, and -90 mmHg or until the subject became symptomatic). Each was monitored for heart rate (HR), finger arterial blood pressure (BP), a chest respiratory band and PVP waveforms which are generated from a transduced upper extremity intravenous site. The first subject was excluded from PVP analysis because of technical errors in collecting the venous pressure waveform. PVP waveforms were analyzed to determine venous pulse pressure, mean venous pressure, pulse width, maximum and minimum slope (time domain analysis) together with cardiac and respiratory modulations (frequency domain analysis). No changes of significance were found in the arterial BP values at -30 mmHg LBNP, while there were significant reductions in the PVP waveforms time domain parameters (except for 50% width of the respiration induced modulations) together with modulation of the PVP waveform at the cardiac frequency but not at the respiratory frequency. As the LBNP progressed, arterial systolic BP, mean BP and pulse pressure, PVP parameters and PVP cardiac modulation decreased significantly, while diastolic BP and HR increased significantly. Changes in hemodynamic and PVP waveform parameters reached a maximum during the symptomatic phase. During the recovery phase, there was a significant reduction in HR together with a significant increase in HR variability, mean PVP and PVP cardiac modulation. Thus, in response to mild hypovolemia induced by LBNP, changes in cardiac modulation and other PVP waveform parameters identified hypovolemia before detectable hemodynamic changes.

  18. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures contribute to negative pressures in a mechanical lung model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Opdahl, Helge; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Borchsenius, Fredrik; Skjønsberg, Ole Henning

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Removal of pulmonary secretions in mechanically ventilated patients usually requires suction with closed catheter systems or flexible bronchoscopes. Manual ventilation is occasionally performed during such procedures if clinicians suspect inadequate ventilation. Suctioning can also be performed with the ventilator entirely disconnected from the endotracheal tube (ETT). The aim of this study was to investigate if these two procedures generate negative airway pressures, which may contribute to atelectasis. Methods The effects of device insertion and suctioning in ETTs were examined in a mechanical lung model with a pressure transducer inserted distal to ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm internal diameter (ID). A 16 Fr bronchoscope and 12, 14 and 16 Fr suction catheters were used at two different vacuum levels during manual ventilation and with the ETTs disconnected. Results During manual ventilation with ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm ID, and bronchoscopic suctioning at moderate suction level, peak pressure (PPEAK) dropped from 23, 22 and 24.5 cm H2O to 16, 16 and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Maximum suction reduced PPEAK to 20, 17 and 11 cm H2O, respectively, and the end-expiratory pressure fell from 5, 5.5 and 4.5 cm H2O to –2, –6 and –17 cm H2O. Suctioning through disconnected ETTs (open suction procedure) gave negative model airway pressures throughout the duration of the procedures. Conclusions Manual ventilation and open suction procedures induce negative end-expiratory pressure during endotracheal suctioning, which may have clinical implications in patients who need high PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure). PMID:28725445

  19. Circulatory responses to lower body negative pressure in young Afghans and Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Bülow, Jens; Simonsen, Lene;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We have previously shown that Afghans residing in Denmark for at least 12 years exhibit a lower 24-h ambulatory blood pressure compared to Danes. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the lower blood pressure reflects attenuated compensatory baroreflex responses...... in the Afghans. METHODS: On a controlled diet (2,822 cal/day, 55-75 mmol + 2 mmol Na+/kg/day), 12 young males of Afghan (Afghans) and 12 young males of Danish (Danes) origin were exposed to a two-step lower body negative pressure (LBNP) protocol of -20 and -50 mmHg, respectively, each of 10-min duration. RESULTS......: Afghans had lower 24-h systolic blood pressure compared to Danes (115 ± 2 vs. 123 ± 1 mmHg, p

  20. The pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the composition and size of casein micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengjie; Jin, Shaoming; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Liang; Ren, Fazheng

    2015-04-15

    The effects of lactose on the changes in the composition and size of casein micelles induced by high-pressure treatment and the related mechanism of action were investigated. Dispersions of ultracentrifuged casein micelle pellets with 0-10% (w/v) lactose were subjected to high pressure (400 MPa) at 20 °C for 40 min. The results indicated that the level of non-sedimentable caseins was positively related to the amount of lactose added prior to pressure treatment, and negatively correlated to the size. A mechanism for the pressure-induced, lactose-dependent changes in the casein micelles is proposed. Lactose inhibits the hydrophobic interactions between the micellar fragments during or after pressure release, through the hydrophilic layer formed by their hydrogen bonds around the micellar fragments. In addition, lactose does not favour the association between calcium and the casein aggregates after pressure release. Due to these two functions, lactose inhibited the formation of larger micelles after pressure treatment.

  1. Using portable negative pressure wound therapy devices in the home care setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke JR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Joshua R Burke, Rachael Morley, Mustafa Khanbhai Academic Surgery Unit, Education and Research Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is the continuous or intermittent application of subatmospheric pressure to the surface of a wound that improves the wound environment, accelerates healing, and reduces wound closure time. Since its first documented use, this technology has lent itself to a number of adaptations, most notably, the development of portable devices facilitating treatment in the home care setting. With advancing surgical standards, wound healing is an important rate-limiting factor in early patient discharge and often a major cost of inpatient treatment. The efficacy of NPWT in the home care setting has been investigated through rate of wound closure, time in care, and patient experience. Rate of wound closure is the most appropriate primary end point. Much can be gleaned from patient experience, but the future success of portable NPWT will be measured on time in care and therefore cost effectiveness. However, there is a lack of level 1a evidence demonstrating increased efficacy of portable over inpatient NPWT. The development of portable NPWT is an encouraging innovation in wound care technology, and extending the benefits to the home care setting is both possible and potentially more beneficial. Keywords: portable, negative pressure wound therapy, vacuum-assisted closure, topical negative pressure therapy

  2. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after craniotomy through the endonasal transsphenoidal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Mengchan; Luo, Zhen; Liu, Juan; Yang, Yaoxin; Li, Yu

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of negative pressure pulmonary edema that occurred in the post-anesthesia care unit in a patient who had undergone transsphenoidal resection of a pituitary adenoma. Negative pressure pulmonary edema is an uncommon complication of general anesthesia. In this case, the patient’s nasal cavity had been filled with surgical packs and she had not become accustomed to breathing through her mouth, in addition to her large tongue and small oropharyngeal cavity, residual effect of anesthetic may resulting in tongue falling which caused airway obstruction. The main causative factor is excessive negative intrathoracic pressure generated by the patient’s spontaneous forced inspiration in an effort to overcome the airway obstruction. It typically developed rapidly, and may be life threatening if not diagnosed promptly. After re-intubation for a short period of mechanical ventilation with positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP 10 cm H2O) and a bolus of intravenous furosemide, the patient recovered rapidly and discharged 8 days after surgery. PMID:26131257

  3. A non-randomised, controlled clinical trial of an innovative device for negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers in traumatic paraplegia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rajeshwar N; Dwivedi, Mukesh K; Bhagat, Amit K; Raj, Saloni; Agarwal, Rajiv; Chandra, Abhijit

    2016-06-01

    The conventional methods of treatment of pressure ulcers (PUs) by serial debridement and daily dressings require prolonged hospitalisation, associated with considerable morbidity. There is, however, recent evidence to suggest that negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) accelerates healing. The commercial devices for NPWT are costly, cumbersome, and electricity dependent. We compared PU wound healing in traumatic paraplegia patients by conventional dressing and by an innovative negative pressure device (NPD). In this prospective, non-randomised trial, 48 traumatic paraplegia patients with PUs of stages 3 and 4 were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups: group A (n = 24) received NPWT with our NPD, and group B (n = 24) received conventional methods of dressing. All patients were followed up for 9 weeks. At week 9, all patients on NPD showed a statistically significant improvement in PU healing in terms of slough clearance, granulation tissue formation, wound discharge and culture. A significant reduction in wound size and ulcer depth was observed in NPD as compared with conventional methods at all follow-up time points (P = 0·0001). NPWT by the innovative device heals PUs at a significantly higher rate than conventional treatment. The device is safe, easy to apply and cost-effective.

  4. Early activation of the coagulation system during lower body negative pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaar, M; Johansson, P I; Nielsen, L B;

    2009-01-01

    We considered that a moderate reduction of the central blood volume (CBV) may activate the coagulation system. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) is a non-invasive means of reducing CBV and, thereby, simulates haemorrhage. We tested the hypothesis that coagulation markers would increase following...... moderate hypovolemia by exposing 10 healthy male volunteers to 10 min of 30 mmHg LBNP. Thoracic electrical impedance increased during LBNP (by 2.6 +/- 0.7 Omega, mean +/- SD; P rate was unchanged during LBNP, while mean arterial pressure decreased (84 +/- 5 to 80...

  5. The Evidence-Based Principles of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Trauma & Orthopedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Novak; Khan, Wasim S; J, Palmer

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy is a popular treatment for the management of both acute and chronic wounds. Its use in trauma and orthopedics is diverse and includes the acute traumatic setting as well as chronic troublesome wounds associated with pressure sores and diabetic foot surgery. Efforts have been made to provide an evidence base to guide its use however this has been limited by a lack of good quality evidence. The following review article explores the available evidence and describes future developments for its use in trauma and orthopaedic practice. PMID:25067971

  6. Histomorphological observation of surgical debridement combined with negative pressure therapy in treatment of diabetic foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Yun Dong

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Epidermal cells on the fascia side of the flap could be derived from the stem cells. Negative pressure wound therapy would attract not only cells but also other elements such as growth factors, cytokines, some nutrients and extracellular matrix. With the formation of the appropriate microenvironment after debridement, the migrated cells can grow, differentiate and spread, eventually leading to the epithelization on the fascia side of the flap in diabetic foot.

  7. Nonlinear systems dynamics in cardiovascular physiology: The heart rate delay map and lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary study of the applicability of nonlinear dynamic systems analysis techniques to low body negative pressure (LBNP) studies. In particular, the applicability of the heart rate delay map is investigated. It is suggested that the heart rate delay map has potential as a supplemental tool in the assessment of subject performance in LBNP tests and possibly in the determination of susceptibility to cardiovascular deconditioning with spaceflight.

  8. Topical negative pressure improves autograft take by altering nutrient diffusion: A hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhai; Han, Chunmao

    2014-01-01

    The one-step surgical procedure for dermal substitutes combined with topical negative pressure (TNP) has proven effective for treating deep skin defects with improved graft take. The primary mechanism by which TNP improves autograft take is unknown. Some studies suggest that TNP promotes the rapid angiogenesis of dermal substitutes, improving graft take. However, at the early stage of one-step transplantation, the vascular system has not formed and imbibition is the main mode of nutrient supp...

  9. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy and Skin Graft in Madura Foot Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Gül

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Madura foot is a rare, loca, chronic granulomatous skin infection which commonly affects the adult male foot. Medical treatment reduces the size of the lesion but surgical excision is necessary for radical treatment. We present a case of a 59 year old male farmer diagnosed as actinomadura of the right foot treated with medical treatment, total excision, negative pressure wound therapy and split thickness skin graft.

  10. Negative-pressure pulmonary oedema in a patient undergoing shoulder arthroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Raj Gogia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An 18-year-old ASA-I patient who underwent elective left shoulder arthroscopy developed severe airway obstruction post-extubation due to fluid extravasation from the shoulder joint into the neck and airway tissue. Re-intubation for relief of obstruction resulted in negative-pressure pulmonary oedema. The patient was electively ventilated in the intensive care unit and recovered uneventfully. A high index of suspicion along with monitoring of neck circumference can prevent this kind of complication.

  11. Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Following use of Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) following upper airway obstruction is a non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. The first cause in the etiology of NPPE is developed laryngospasm after intubation or extubation, while the other causes are epiglotitis, croup, hiccups, foreign body aspiration, pharyngeal hematoma and oropharyngeal tumors.The Late diagnosis and treatment causes high morbidity and mortality. The protection of the airway and maintainance of arterial oxygenation will be life saving...

  12. Post extubation negative pressure pulmonary edema due to posterior mediastinal cyst in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Prakash Kumar

    2014-01-01

    A 3-month-old male child underwent uneventful inguinal herniotomy under general anesthesia. After extubation, airway obstruction followed by pulmonary edema appeared for which the baby was reintubated and ventilated. The baby made a complete recovery and extubated after about 2 h. A post-operative computed tomography scan revealed a posterior mediastinal cystic mass abutting the tracheal bifurcation. Presumably, extrinsic compression by the mass on the tracheal bifurcation led to the development of negative pressure pulmonary edema.

  13. Post extubation negative pressure pulmonary edema due to posterior mediastinal cyst in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kumar Dubey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old male child underwent uneventful inguinal herniotomy under general anesthesia. After extubation, airway obstruction followed by pulmonary edema appeared for which the baby was reintubated and ventilated. The baby made a complete recovery and extubated after about 2 h. A post-operative computed tomography scan revealed a posterior mediastinal cystic mass abutting the tracheal bifurcation. Presumably, extrinsic compression by the mass on the tracheal bifurcation led to the development of negative pressure pulmonary edema.

  14. [Acute Postoperative Negative Pressure Pulmonary Edema Caused by the Compression of Brachiocephalic Artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Miki; Iwai, Hidetaka; Fukatsu, Ken; Shimada, Mami; Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of negative-pressure pulmonary edema occurring by tracheal obstruction caused by the brachiocephalic artery. The patient had deformed thorax with cerebral palsy, which deformed thorax placing the brachiocephalic artery high over the trachea, resulting in close and tight contact between the artery and trachea. Additional deformity of the thorax associated with myotonic attacks after general anesthesia might shorten the distance between the sternal notch and the vertebral body, resulting in the tracheal obstruction by the artery.

  15. Negative pressure wound treatment with polyvinyl alcohol foam and polyhexanide antiseptic solution instillation in posttraumatic osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Michael S; Graafland, Niels; Bernards, Alexandra T; Nelissen, Rob G H H; van Dissel, Jaap T; Jukema, Gerrolt N

    2009-01-01

    In a retrospective, case-control cohort study an assessment was made of the clinical outcome of patients with osteomyelitis treated with a new modality of negative pressure wound therapy, so called negative pressure instillation therapy. In this approach, after surgical debridement, a site of osteomyelitis is treated with negative pressure of at least 300 mmHg applied through polyvinyl alcohol dressing. The polyvinyl alcohol foam is irrigated through the tubes three times a day with a polyhexanide antiseptic solution. In 30 patients (14 males; mean age 52 [range, 26-81]) admitted between 1999 and 2003 with osteomyelitis of the pelvis or lower extremity, we assessed time to wound closure, number of surgical procedures and rate of recurrence of infection as well as need for rehospitalizations. For comparison, a control group of 94 patients (males, 58; mean age 47 [range, 9-85]), matched for site and severity of osteomyelitis, was identified in hospital records between 1982 and 2002. These patients underwent standard surgical debridement, implantation of gentamicin polymethylmethacrylate beads and long-term intravenous antibiotics. In the Instillation group the rate of recurrence of infection was 3/30 (10%), whereas 55/93 (58.5%) of the controls had a recurrence (p<0.0001). Moreover, in those treated with instillation the total duration of hospital stay was shorter and number of surgical procedures smaller as compared with the controls (all p<0.0001). We conclude that in posttraumatic osteomyelitis negative pressure instillation therapy reduces the need for repeated surgical interventions in comparison with the present standard approach.

  16. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community), pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC) (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings). Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8%) were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group) during follow-up (time to healing 79 days). The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT) and 5.7 (SC); 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT) and 5.0 (SC) months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034. PMID:22839453

  17. A pilot randomised controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy to treat grade III/IV pressure ulcers [ISRCTN69032034

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby Rebecca L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is widely promoted as a treatment for full thickness wounds; however, there is a lack of high-quality research evidence regarding its clinical and cost effectiveness. A trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III/IV pressure ulcers would be worthwhile but premature without assessing whether such a trial is feasible. The aim of this pilot randomised controlled trial was to assess the feasibility of conducting a future full trial of NPWT for the treatment of grade III and IV pressure ulcers and to pilot all aspects of the trial. Methods This was a two-centre (acute and community, pilot randomised controlled trial. Eligible participants were randomised to receive either NPWT or standard care (SC (spun hydrocolloid, alginate or foam dressings. Outcome measures were time to healing of the reference pressure ulcer, recruitment rates, frequency of treatment visits, resources used and duration of follow-up. Results Three hundred and twelve patients were screened for eligibility into this trial over a 12-month recruitment period and 12/312 participants (3.8% were randomised: 6 to NPWT and 6 to SC. Only one reference pressure ulcer healed (NPWT group during follow-up (time to healing 79 days. The mean number of treatment visits per week was 3.1 (NPWT and 5.7 (SC; 6/6 NPWT and 1/6 SC participants withdrew from their allocated trial treatment. The mean duration of follow-up was 3.8 (NPWT and 5.0 (SC months. Conclusions This pilot trial yielded vital information for the planning of a future full study including projected recruitment rate, required duration of follow-up and extent of research nurse support required. Data were also used to inform the cost-effectiveness and value of information analyses, which were conducted alongside the pilot trial. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69032034.

  18. Facets of negative affectivity and blood pressure in middle-aged men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel V. Igna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Research results suggesting that facets of negative affectivity, i.e. anxiety, anger-hostility, and depression, relate to incident cardiovascular diseases have been steadily increasing. Evidence for depression has been especially extensive. Elevated blood pressure, a major risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, is one probable mediator in this context. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship of specific key elements of depressive disposition, i.e. depressive symptoms, hopelessness and vital exhaustion, with health behavior and blood pressure. Study sample was comprised of 710 middle-aged men. Participants completed self-report questionnaires assessing health behavior, depressive symptoms, vital exhaustion and hopelessness. Statistical analyses involved descriptive analyses, correlations and path analysis. Depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion associated with several unfavorable lifestyles such as smoking, alcohol consumption, and inactivity (standardized solution coefficients: 0.10, 0.14, 0.17, accordingly. However, no significant direct associations with blood pressure could be found for depressive symptoms or vital exhaustion. Hopelessness associated only with unhealthy diet (standardized solution coefficient -0.10 Moreover, for hopelessness, results showed a direct but inverse association with systolic blood pressure (standardized solution coefficient -0.08. Results suggest that the previously reported relations of depression and vital exhaustion with blood pressure could be mediated by unfavorable lifestyles. The relation of hopelessness with adverse health behaviors seems to be less significant. Also, the role of hopelessness as a risk factor of elevated blood pressure is not supported by the results of this study.

  19. Biosorption effects of copper ions on Candida utilis under negative pressure cavitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZU Yuan-gang; ZHAO Xiu-hua; HU Mao-sheng; REN Yuan; XIAO Peng; ZHU Lei; CAO Yu-jie; ZHANG Yao

    2006-01-01

    Under the optimal condition of copper ions adsorption on yeast, we found some different effects among static adsorption,shaking adsorption and negative pressure cavitation adsorption, and the methods of yeast with different pretreatments also affect adsorption of copper ions. At the same time, the change of intercellular pH before and after adsorption of copper with BCECF was studied. The copper distribution was located by using PhenGreen (dipotassium salt and diacetate), and the surface of yeast was observed by an atomic force microscope. The results showed that negative pressure cavitation can improve bioadsorption capacity of copper ions on yeast. However, the yeasts' pretreatment has a higher effect on bioadsorption. It indicates that heavy metal bioadsorption on yeast has much relation with its cellular molecule basis. With the adsorping, the intercellular pH of yeast increased gradually and changed from acidity to alkalescence. These results may suggest that negative pressure cavitation can compel heavy metals to transfer from the cell surface into inside cell and make the surface of yeast coarse.

  20. Negative Pressures and the First Water Siphon Taller than 10.33 Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Francisco; Rivera, Rodrigo; Romero-Maltrana, Diego; Villanueva, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    A siphon is a device that is used to drain a container, with water rising inside a hose in the form of an inverted U and then going down towards a discharge point placed below the initial water level. The siphon is the first of a number of inventions of the ancients documented about 2.000 years ago by Hero of Alexandria in his treatise Pneumatics, and although the explanation given by Hero was essentially correct, there is nowadays a controversy about the underlying mechanism that explains the working of this device. Discussions concerning the physics of a siphon usually refer to concepts like absolute negative pressures, the strength of liquid’s cohesion and the possibility of a siphon working in vacuum or in the presence of bubbles. Torricelli understood the working principle of the barometer and the impossibility of pumping water out of wells deeper than 10.33 m. Following Torricelli’s ideas it would also not be possible to build a siphon that drives pure water to ascend higher than 10.33 m. In this work, we report the first siphon that drives water (with surfactant) to ascend higher than the Torricellian limit. Motivated by the rising of sap in trees, we built a 15.4 m siphon that shows that absolute negative pressures are not prohibited, that cohesion plays an important role in transmitting forces through a fluid, and that surfactants can help to the transport of water in a metastable regime of negative pressures. PMID:27054847

  1. Using Clifford Algebra to Understand the Nature of Negative Pressure Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Gene

    2014-03-01

    The geometric algebra of 3-D Euclidean space, a sub-discipline of Clifford algebra, is a useful tool for analyzing wave propagation. We use geometric algebra to explore the concept of negative pressure. In free space a straightforward extension of Maxwell's equations using geometric algebra yields a theory in which classical electromagnetic waves coexist with nonelectromagnetic waves having retrograde momentum. By retrograde momentum we mean waves carrying momentum pointing in the opposite direction of energy flow. If such waves exist, they would have negative pressure. In rebounding from a wall, they would pull rather than push. In this presentation we use standard methods of analyzing energy and momentum conservation and their flow through the surface of an enclosed volume to illustrate the properties of both the electromagnetic and nonelectromagnetic solutions of the extended Maxwell equations. The nonelectromagnetic waves consist of coupled scalar and electric waves and coupled magnetic and pseudoscalar waves. They superimpose linearly with electromagnetic waves. We show that the nonelectromagnetic waves, besides having negative pressure, propagate with the speed of light and do not interact with conserved electric currents. Hence, they have three properties in common with dark energy.

  2. Negative pressure pulmonary edema%负压性肺水肿

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐勇胜

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure pulmonary edema is a common pediatric disease,but also often to be ignored,which occurs from the upper airway obstruction caused by the change in the absolute value of negative intrathoracic pressure increase,resulting in a corresponding respiratory physiology,hemodynamic changes,common causes include laryngitis,whooping cough,foreign body,such as obstructive sleep apnea.Therefore,it is important to know the common causes of negative pressure pulmonary edema and to treat the patients in time.%负压性肺水肿是儿科常见的疾病,也容易被忽视,其发生源自上气道梗阻造成的胸内负压变化的绝对值加大,从而造成相应的呼吸生理、血流动力学改变,常见的原因包括喉炎、百日咳、气管异物、阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停等.因此熟悉负压性肺水肿的常见诱因,及时进行相关治疗,是救治的关键.

  3. Negative pressure pulmonary edema after nasal fracture reduction in an obese female patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi EK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eunkyung Choi,1 Junggu Yi,1 Younghoon Jeon,2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea Abstract: Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE is a rare, but well-known life-threatening complication of acute upper airway obstruction (UAO which develops after general anesthesia. The pronounced inspiratory efforts following UAO lead to excessive negative inspiratory pressure, which may cause acute pulmonary edema. Early recognition and prompt treatment of NPPE is necessary to prevent patient morbidity and mortality. In addition, the physician should carefully manage the patient who has risk factors of UAO to prevent this situation. We experienced a case of NPPE following laryngospasm after tracheal extubation in an obese patient who underwent open reduction of orbital wall and nasal bone surgery. Keywords: airway obstruction, negative pressure pulmonary edema, laryngospasm, nasal surgery, obese

  4. System identification of baroreflex response to mild lower body negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletti, Federico; Ferrario, Manuela; Xu, Da; Greaves, Danielle K; Shoemaker, Kevin J; Arbeille, Philippe; Cerutti, Sergio; Hughson, Richard L; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The effect of mild lower body negative pressure (LBNP) on baroreflex control of arterial blood pressure (ABP) has long been thought to affect cardiopulmonary baroreflex only, although recent studies have pointed out that arterial baroreceptors may be transiently unloaded too after the rapid onset of mild LBNP. This paper presents a spectral decomposition method for the black box identification of the contribution of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreflexes to beat-by-beat variability of ABP in response to mild LBNP levels. The significant decrease of mean and diastolic arterial pressure and of the arterial baroreflex mediated contribution to overall variability of ABP which was found, suggested that the unloading of arterial baroreceptors may be reflected by an altered dynamic response of arterial baroreflex, too. In addition, arterial baroreflex mediated modulations were found to be the main player in the modulation of beat-by-beat fluctuations of ABP, while the role of cardiopulmonary baroreflex mediated responses appeared to contribute very little.

  5. Case report: (Pre)syncopal symptoms associated with a negative internal jugular venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Fisher, James P;

    2014-01-01

    A siphon is suggested to support cerebral blood flow but appears not to be established because internal jugular venous (IJV) pressure is close to zero in upright humans. Thus, in eleven young healthy males, IJV pressure was 9 ± 1 mmHg (mean ± SE) when supine and fell to 3 ± 1 mmHg when seated......, and middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA Vmean; P ... MCA Vmean decreased and yet within the time of observation ScO2 was not necessarily affected. These findings support the hypothesis that a negative IJV pressure that is a prerequisite for creation of a siphon provokes venous collapse inside the dura, and thereby limits rather than supports CBF....

  6. Cardiovascular regulatory response to lower body negative pressure following blood volume loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M.; Ghista, D. N.; Sandler, H.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the cardiovascular regulatory responses to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) stress, both in the absence of and following blood or plasma volume loss, the latter being factors regularly observed with short- or long-term recumbency or weightlessness and associated with resulting cardiovascular deconditioning. Analytical expressions are derived for the responses of mean venous pressure and blood volume pooled in the lower body due to LBNP. An analysis is presented for determining the HR change due to LBNP stress following blood volume loss. It is concluded that the reduced orthostatic tolerance following long-term space flight or recumbency can be mainly attributed to blood volume loss, and that the associated cardiovascular responses characterizing this orthostatic intolerance is elicited by the associated central venous pressure response.

  7. Timer switch to convert suction apparatus for negative pressure wound therapy application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surath Amarnath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT is an established modality in the treatment of chronic wounds, open fractures, and post-operative wound problems. This method has not been widely used due to the high cost of equipment and consumables. This study demonstrates an indigenously developed apparatus which gives comparable results at a fraction of the cost. Readily available materials are used for the air-tight dressing. Materials and Methods: Equipment consists of suction apparatus with adjustable pressure valve set to a pressure 125-150 mmHg. An electronic timer switch with a sequential working time of 5 min and a standby time of 3 min provides the required intermittent negative pressure. Readily available materials such as polyvinyl alcohol sponge, suction drains and steridrapes were used to provide an air tight wound cover. Results: A total of 90 cases underwent 262 NPWT applications from 2009 to 2014. This series, comprised of 30 open fractures, 21 post-operative and 39 chronic wounds. The wound healing rate in our study was comparable to other published studies using NPWT. Conclusion: The addition of electronic timer switch will convert a suction apparatus into NPWT machine, and the results are equally effective compared to more expensive counter parts. The use of indigenous dressing materials reduces the cost significantly.

  8. Timer switch to convert suction apparatus for negative pressure wound therapy application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarnath, Surath; Reddy, Mettu Rami; Rao, Chayam Hanumantha; Surath, Harsha Vardan

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is an established modality in the treatment of chronic wounds, open fractures, and post-operative wound problems. This method has not been widely used due to the high cost of equipment and consumables. This study demonstrates an indigenously developed apparatus which gives comparable results at a fraction of the cost. Readily available materials are used for the air-tight dressing. Equipment consists of suction apparatus with adjustable pressure valve set to a pressure 125-150 mmHg. An electronic timer switch with a sequential working time of 5 min and a standby time of 3 min provides the required intermittent negative pressure. Readily available materials such as polyvinyl alcohol sponge, suction drains and steridrapes were used to provide an air tight wound cover. A total of 90 cases underwent 262 NPWT applications from 2009 to 2014. This series, comprised of 30 open fractures, 21 post-operative and 39 chronic wounds. The wound healing rate in our study was comparable to other published studies using NPWT. The addition of electronic timer switch will convert a suction apparatus into NPWT machine, and the results are equally effective compared to more expensive counter parts. The use of indigenous dressing materials reduces the cost significantly.

  9. Activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems and baseline arterial blood pressure in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftanas, L I; Sidorova, P V; Pavlov, S V; Makhnev, V P; Korenek, V V; Reva, N V; Amstislavskaya, T G

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present work was to identify possible associations between individual balances in the activity of the positive and negative reinforcement motivation systems using a method based on emotional modulation of the startle reaction (EMSR) by motivationally significant emotionally positive and negative contextual visual stimuli and measures of cardiovascular system activity. Studies were performed using healthy males (mean age 30.29 +/- 9.8 years) with normal and first-episode excessive increases in arterial blood pressure (systolic blood pressure to greater than 140 mmHg, diastolic to greater than 90 mmHg). Cluster analysis of EMSR data identified groups of individuals with different activity profiles for the positive and negative reinforcement systems. Groups of subjects with changes in the balance of activity towards a lower level of positive reinforcement system activity (smaller startle reflexes to positive contextual stimuli) or a higher level of negative reinforcement system activity (larger startle reactions to threatening contextual stimuli) showed significantly greater baseline SBP and DBP. The possible mechanisms of the modulatory influences of the balance of system activities on autonomic vascular regulatory processes are discussed.

  10. [Is "the resistance to negative reinforcement" a feature of alcohol dependence syndrome?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin

    2006-10-01

    In 1979, "Alcoholism Diagnosis Committee, the Ministry of Health and Welfare" established the diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence syndrome, which included "the resistance to negative reinforcement". The author raises a question about this criterion which indicates the condition that "an individual continues to drink despite alcohol-related physical diseases, rejection by his/her family or economic poverty and drinking-related criminal problem." The author defines this condition not as "resistance to negative reinforcement" but as "resistance to punishment." Furthermore, the author can not find the data supporting that "the resistance to negative reinforcement" in the correct sense exists in the individuals with alcohol dependence syndrome. In a theoretical sense, an opposite idea seems to exist. There is an observed fact that can be regarded as a phenomenon that explains the involvement of "negative reinforcement" in enhancement of psychological dependence as in the case of the secondary development of psychological dependence. Consequently, the author would have to say that defining "the resistance to negative reinforcement" as one of common features of alcohol dependence syndrome or one of diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence syndrome is inappropriate.

  11. How the bending kinematics of swimming lampreys build negative pressure fields for suction thrust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad J; Fogerson, Stephanie M; Costello, John H; Morgan, Jennifer R; Dabiri, John O; Colin, Sean P

    2016-12-15

    Swimming animals commonly bend their bodies to generate thrust. For undulating animals such as eels and lampreys, their bodies bend in the form of waves that travel from head to tail. These kinematics accelerate the flow of adjacent fluids, which alters the pressure field in a manner that generates thrust. We used a comparative approach to evaluate the cause-and-effect relationships in this process by quantifying the hydrodynamic effects of body kinematics at the body-fluid interface of the lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, during steady-state swimming. We compared the kinematics and hydrodynamics of healthy control lampreys to lampreys whose spinal cord had been transected mid-body, resulting in passive kinematics along the posterior half of their body. Using high-speed particle image velocimetry (PIV) and a method for quantifying pressure fields, we detail how the active bending kinematics of the control lampreys were crucial for setting up strong negative pressure fields (relative to ambient fields) that generated high-thrust regions at the bends as they traveled all along the body. The passive kinematics of the transected lamprey were only able to generate significant thrust at the tail, relying on positive pressure fields. These different pressure and thrust scenarios are due to differences in how active versus passive body waves generated and controlled vorticity. This demonstrates why it is more effective for undulating lampreys to pull, rather than push, themselves through the fluid. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  13. Evaluation of Cutaneous Blood Flow During Lower Body Negative Pressure to Prevent Orthostatic Intolerance of Bedrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Marilyn

    1991-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance is markedly impaired in most of the crewmembers during space flight and could seriously compromise crew safety during and immediately after landing. NASA investigators are studying the use of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) as a countermeasure to this intolerance. It is hypothesized that the continuously changing vascular pressure induced by sinusoidal LBNP with an additional countermeasure of salt and water will help crewmembers to be in a more acceptable physiologic condition to enter the earth's atmosphere. In ground based studies, subjects on bedrest provide the model for studying the physiologic effects of weightlessness. When subjects are treated with sinusoidal LBNP, negative pressures ranging from 0 to -60 mm/Hg are administered during a two hour period. This increases body fluids in the legs and lower body. This paper reports the results of two subjects who were placed on bedrest for six days. The subjects were randomly selected for either the control or treatment mode. The subject receiving the treatment mode ingested salt tablets and water on day 4 of the bedrest period. A ramp LBNP of two hours was next administered to this subject. The control subject did not receive anything during the bedrest period. Laser Doppler was used to measure the cutaneous blood flow of the forearm and calf to monitor vasoconstrictor effects of the baroreceptor reflex. Data indicated that skin blood flow in the treatment subject was higher than baseline in the forearm while the skin blood flow was decreased in the control subject.

  14. Surface Tension and Negative Pressure Interior of a Non-Singular `Black Hole'

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, Pawel O

    2015-01-01

    The constant density interior Schwarzschild solution for a static, spherically symmetric collapsed star has a divergent pressure when its radius $R\\le\\frac{9}{8}R_s=\\frac{9}{4}GM$. We show that this divergence is integrable, and induces a non-isotropic transverse stress with a finite redshifted surface tension on a spherical surface of radius $R_0=3R\\sqrt{1-\\frac{8}{9}\\frac{R}{R_s}}$. For $r < R_0$ the interior Schwarzschild solution exhibits negative pressure. When $R=R_s$, the surface is localized at the Schwarzschild radius itself, $R_0=R_s$, and the solution has constant negative pressure $p =-\\bar\\rho$ everywhere in the interior $r

  15. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  16. A randomized, controlled trial of negative pressure wound therapy of pressure ulcers via a novel polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Marcus James Dermot; Driver, Sara; Coghlan, Patrick; Greenwood, John Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to look for any local, clinically apparent response, within and around a debrided wound, to a novel biocompatible polyurethane foam during repeated, short-term implantation, and (2) to assess the material's efficacy as a negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) interface compared with a widely used, commercially available foam. Twenty pressure ulcers in 18 patients underwent surgical debridement, then randomization to receive novel treatment or control foam as the wound interface for NPWT. Dressing changes every 2-3 days allowed qualitative wound assessment and quantitative measurement to compare outcomes. No adverse reaction was observed in any patient receiving the new foam. The new "novel foam" performed as a NPWT interface as effectively as the control "standard foam." In deep wounds, the new foam was easier to remove, fragmented less, and showed less retention than the control foam. No marginal in-growth occurred, making removal less traumatic and reducing bleeding from cavity wall granulations. The results support previous large animal studies, and independent ISO10993 testing, that the new foam is safe and biocompatible. Its efficacy as an NPWT interface, nontraumatic removal with low fragmentation and retention rate, favors the new material, especially in deep cavity wounds.

  17. Superficial Burn Wound Healing with Intermittent Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Under Limited Access and Conventional Dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnegowda, Thittamaranahalli Muguregowda; Padmanabha Udupa, Echalasara Govindarama; Rao, Pragna; Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Thermal injury is associated with several biochemical and histopathological alteration in tissue. Analysis of these objective parameters in research and clinical field are common to determine healing rate of burn wound. Negative pressure wound therapy has been achieved wide success in treating chronic wounds. This study determines superficial burn wound healing with intermittent negative pressure wound therapy under limited access and conventional dressings METHODS A total 50 patients were randomised into two equal groups: limited access and conventional dressing groups. Selective biochemical parameters such as hydroxyproline, hexosamine, total protein, and antioxidants, malondialdhyde (MDA), wound surface pH, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and nitric oxide (NO) were measured in the granulation tissue. Histopathologically, necrotic tissue, amount of inflammatory infiltrate, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix deposition (ECM) were studied to determine wound healing under intermittent negative pressure. RESULTS Patients treated with limited access have shown significant increase in the mean hydroxyproline, hexosamine, total protein, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and decrease in MDA, MMP-2, wound surface pH, and NO. Histopathologic study showed that there was a significant difference after 10 days of treatment between limited access vs conventional dressing group, Median (Q1, Q3)=3 (2, 4.25) vs 2 (1.75, 4). CONCLUSION Limited access was shown to exert its beneficial effects on wound healing by increasing ground substance, antioxidants and reducing MMP-2 activity, MDA, NO and providing optimal pH, decreasing necrotic tissue, amount of inflammatory infiltrate, increasing ECM deposition and angiogenesis. PMID:27853690

  18. Hysteresis in response to descending and ascending lower-body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Clare Marie; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Kenney, Richard A.; Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe

    1987-01-01

    Changes in the indices of fluid redistribution and cardiovascular responses during graduated orthostatic stress were measured in 12 men subjected for 25 min to lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) test protocol that involved stepwise decreases (from the starting pressure of -8 to the final -50 mm Hg), followed by stepwise increases (back to -8 mm Hg) of LBNP. The values of many variables measured during the descending phase of LBNP were significantly different from the respective values measured during the ascending phase. These differences appear to be caused by a component of fluid translocation that occurs during LBNP and cannot be reversed within the duration of the procedure. It is hypothesized that this slowly-reversed component is the sequestration of fluid in the interstitial and the lymphatic compartments.

  19. Kinetic analysis of negative power deposition in inductive low pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Negative power deposition in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by means of an analytical model which couples Boltzmann’s equation and the quasi-stationary Maxwell’s equations. Exploiting standard Hilbert space methods an explicit solution for both, the electric field and the distribution function of the electrons for a bounded discharge configuration subject to an unsymmetrical excitation is found for the first time. The model is applied to a low pressure ICP discharge. In this context particularly the anomalous skin effect and the effect of phase mixing is discussed. The analytical solution is compared with results from electromagnetic full wave particle in cell simulations. Excellent agreement between the analytical and the numerical results is found.

  20. Increased serum urea to creatinine ratio and its negative correlation with arterial pressure in canine babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygner, Wojciech; Gójska-Zygner, Olga

    2014-09-01

    The increase of the serum urea to creatinine ratio (UCR) was observed in dogs infected with Babesia canis. Previous studies have suggested that decrease of blood pressure can be one of the reasons for this phenomenon. In this work statistically significant increase of the UCR was observed in dogs with babesiosis. Comparison of the UCR between 23 azotaemic dogs and 25 non-azotaemic dogs infected with Babesia canis showed statistically significantly higher mean of the UCR in azotaemic dogs. Correlations between UCR and systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP and MAP) in 48 dogs infected with B. canis were negative (UCR and SAP: r = -0.3909; UCR and DAP: r = -0.3182; UCR and MAP: r = -0.3682) and statistically significant (p babesiosis. However, the correlations were not high, and there was no statistically significant correlation between UCR and arterial pressures in azotaemic dogs. Thus, it seems that decrease of blood pressure in dogs with babesiosis explains only partially the cause of increased UCR in infected dogs. The other authors suggested hyperureagenesis and myocardial injury as a potential reason for the increased UCR in canine babesiosis. Thus, further studies are needed to determine causes of increased UCR in dogs with babesiosis, especially on the connection between UCR changes and the concentrations of plasma cardiac troponins and ammonia, and the occurrence of occult blood on fecal examination.

  1. Negative-pressure wound therapy in the management of diabetic Charcot foot and ankle wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2013-09-23

    As the prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to rise, innovative medical and surgical treatment options have increased dramatically to address diabetic-related foot and ankle complications. Among the most challenging clinical case scenarios is Charcot neuroarthropathy associated with soft tissue loss and/or osteomyelitis. In this review article, the authors present a review of the most common utilizations of negative-pressure wound therapy as an adjunctive therapy or combined with plastic surgery as it relates to the surgical management of diabetic Charcot foot and ankle wounds.

  2. Negative-pressure wound therapy in the management of diabetic Charcot foot and ankle wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal L. Ramanujam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the prevalence of diabetes mellitus continues to rise, innovative medical and surgical treatment options have increased dramatically to address diabetic-related foot and ankle complications. Among the most challenging clinical case scenarios is Charcot neuroarthropathy associated with soft tissue loss and/or osteomyelitis. In this review article, the authors present a review of the most common utilizations of negative-pressure wound therapy as an adjunctive therapy or combined with plastic surgery as it relates to the surgical management of diabetic Charcot foot and ankle wounds.

  3. Meta-analysis of negative-pressure wound therapy for closed surgical incisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, N; Birke-Sorensen, H; Kruse, M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative wound complications are common following surgical procedures. Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is well recognized for the management of open wounds and has been applied recently to closed surgical incisions. The evidence base to support this intervention is limited....... RESULTS: Ten studies met the inclusion criteria, reporting on 1311 incisions in 1089 patients. NPWT was associated with a significant reduction in wound infection (relative risk (RR) 0·54, 95 per cent c.i. 0·33 to 0·89) and seroma formation (RR 0·48, 0·27 to 0·84) compared with standard care...

  4. Advances in research on mechanisms of the effect of negative pressure wound treatment in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT refers to apply a highly porous material between the wound and a semipermeable membrane, and it is then connected to a suction apparatus, leading to a minimal deformation of wound, resulting in promoting cell proliferation and wound repair. These devices may significantly expedite wound healing, facilitate the formation of granulation tissue, and reduce the complexity of subsequent reconstructive operations. In recent years, along with wide clinical use, the therapeutic effect of NPWT has been recognized, but the mechanism of its clinical effect still needs further research. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.15

  5. Negative pressure pulmonary oedema: an alarming complication of general anaesthesia in a young healthy male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Afonso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure pulmonary oedema is a rare but potentially harmful event[1,3]. The mechanisms of this pulmonary injury are not totally understood. It is believed that airway obstruction, as caused by laryngospasm after extubation, combined with the attempt of a forced inspiring effort, produce a negative intrathoracic pressure, increasing the venous return with a consequent rise of the hydrostatic pressure, ultimately leading to a leakage of fluid to the extracellular compartment. Nevertheless, it is possible that other factors may contribute to this condition, including hypoxia, cardiogenic and neurogenic mechanisms[2]. We present the case of a healthy 20-years-old male, who underwent a deferred left clavicle osteosynthesis. Immediately after surgery, the patient developed irritative cough and marked dyspnoea. There were no auscultatory anomalies and the plain chest radiograph was normal. He did not show clinical improvement after increasing oxygen supply and bronchodilators, and was then transferred to our hospital for further evaluation. A thoracic Computed Tomography (CT scan was performed (figure 1, revealing multiple areas of ground glass aspect and alveolar filling with centrilobular distribution, suggesting alveolar haemorrhage. The patient remained under observation for 48 hours, with clear signs of clinical improvement and no further complications, with no need for positive pressure ventilation. He was discharged being asymptomatic and with no signs of respiratory distress, after a control CT scan showing radiologic improvement. This case highlights the need to be aware of this diagnosis, that is usually self-limited but can be life-threatening and require specific treatment.

  6. Flame Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Coupled with Negative Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Ion Molecule Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Bhat, Suhail Muzaffar; Shiea, Jentaie

    2017-07-01

    Flame atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (FAPCI) combined with negative electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was developed to detect the ion/molecule reactions (IMRs) products between nitric acid (HNO3) and negatively charged amino acid, angiotensin I (AI) and angiotensin II (AII), and insulin ions. Nitrate and HNO3-nitrate ions were detected in the oxyacetylene flame, suggesting that a large quantity of nitric acid (HNO3) was produced in the flame. The HNO3 and negatively charged analyte ions produced by a negative ESI source were delivered into each arm of a Y-shaped stainless steel tube where they merged and reacted. The products were subsequently characterized with an ion trap mass analyzer attached to the exit of the Y-tube. HNO3 showed the strongest affinity to histidine and formed (Mhistidine-H+HNO3)- complex ions, whereas some amino acids did not react with HNO3 at all. Reactions between HNO3 and histidine residues in AI and AII resulted in the formation of dominant [MAI-H+(HNO3)]- and [MAII-H+(HNO3)]- ions. Results from analyses of AAs and insulin indicated that HNO3 could not only react with basic amino acid residues, but also with disulfide bonds to form [M-3H+(HNO3)n]3- complex ions. This approach is useful for obtaining information about the number of basic amino acid residues and disulfide bonds in peptides and proteins.

  7. Pressure-dependence of the phase transitions and thermal expansion in zirconium and hafnium pyrovanadate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallington, Leighanne C.; Hester, Brett R.; Kaplan, Benjamin S.; Wilkinson, Angus P.

    2017-05-01

    Low or negative thermal expansion (NTE) has been previously observed in members of the ZrP2O7 family at temperatures higher than their order-disorder phase transitions. The thermoelastic properties and phase behavior of the low temperature superstructure and high temperature negative thermal expansion phases of ZrV2O7 and HfV2O7 were explored via in situ variable temperature/pressure powder x-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transition temperatures of ZrV2O7 and HfV2O7 exhibited a very strong dependence on pressure (∼700 K GPa), with moderate compression suppressing the formation of their NTE phases below 513 K. Compression also reduced the magnitude of the coefficients of thermal expansion in both the positive and negative thermal expansion phases. Additionally, the high temperature NTE phase of ZrV2O7 was found to be twice as stiff as the low temperature positive thermal expansion superstructure (24 and 12 GPa respectively).

  8. Pressure-dependence of the phase transitions and thermal expansion in zirconium and hafnium pyrovanadate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallington, Leighanne C.; Hester, Brett R.; Kaplan, Benjamin S.; Wilkinson, Angus P. (GIT)

    2017-05-01

    Low or negative thermal expansion (NTE) has been previously observed in members of the ZrP2O7 family at temperatures higher than their order-disorder phase transitions. The thermoelastic properties and phase behavior of the low temperature superstructure and high temperature negative thermal expansion phases of ZrV2O7 and HfV2O7 were explored via in situ variable temperature/pressure powder x-ray diffraction measurements. The phase transition temperatures of ZrV2O7 and HfV2O7 exhibited a very strong dependence on pressure (~700 K GPa), with moderate compression suppressing the formation of their NTE phases below 513 K. Compression also reduced the magnitude of the coefficients of thermal expansion in both the positive and negative thermal expansion phases. Additionally, the high temperature NTE phase of ZrV2O7 was found to be twice as stiff as the low temperature positive thermal expansion superstructure (24 and 12 GPa respectively).

  9. Anomalous dependence of the heat capacity of supercooled water on pressure and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Stepanov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In some papers, dependences of the isobaric heat capacity of water versus pressure and temperature were obtained. It is shown that these dependences contradict both the dependence of heat capacity on temperature for supercooled water, and an important thermodynamic equation for the dependence of heat capacity on pressure. A possible explanation for this contradiction is proposed.

  10. Effect Of Pressure On The Temperature Dependence Of Water Solubility In Forsterite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, E.; Bolfan-Casanova, N.; Koga, K.

    2005-12-01

    dependence of water solubility in olivine is that there exist different pressure regimes where the temperature dependence is either positive or negative, this being controlled by the composition of the fluid.

  11. Topical negative pressure improves autograft take by altering nutrient diffusion: A hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuanhai; Han, Chunmao

    2014-01-16

    The one-step surgical procedure for dermal substitutes combined with topical negative pressure (TNP) has proven effective for treating deep skin defects with improved graft take. The primary mechanism by which TNP improves autograft take is unknown. Some studies suggest that TNP promotes the rapid angiogenesis of dermal substitutes, improving graft take. However, at the early stage of one-step transplantation, the vascular system has not formed and imbibition is the main mode of nutrient supply. TNP can shorten the diffusion distance from the wound bed to the graft, leading to the timely renewal of the wound exudate via suction, removing any surplus exudate, and reducing tissue edema. In addition, TNP can regulate the local blood flow and inhibit bacterial colonization. Therefore, we hypothesized that TNP establishes a rapid balance between the nutrient supply to the wound bed and nutritional requirement of the graft via these pathways in the relatively closed, moist environment, improving autograft take. However, this balance could be affected by any negative pressure, intermittent or continuous. It is necessary to test this hypothesis in laboratory and clinical studies of the mode of nutrient supply in the imbibition phase and the change in exudate content.

  12. Matching Biological Mesh and Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Reconstructing an Open Abdomen Defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Caviggioli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of open abdominal defects is a clinical problem which general and plastic surgeons have to address in cooperation. We report the case of a 66-year-old man who presented an abdominal dehiscence after multiple laparotomies for a sigmoid-rectal adenocarcinoma that infiltrated into the abdominal wall, subsequently complicated by peritonitis and enteric fistula. A cutaneous dehiscence and an incontinent abdominal wall resulted after the last surgery. The abdominal wall was reconstructed using a biological porcine cross-linked mesh Permacol (Covidien Inc., Norwalk, CT. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT, instead, was used on the mesh in order to reduce wound dimensions, promote granulation tissue formation, and obtain secondary closure of cutaneous dehiscence which was finally achieved with a split-thickness skin graft. Biological mesh behaved like a scaffold for the granulation tissue that was stimulated by the negative pressure. The biological mesh was rapidly integrated in the abdominal wall restoring abdominal wall continence, while the small dehiscence, still present in the central area, was subsequently covered with a split-thickness skin graft. The combination of these different procedures led us to solve this complicated case obtaining complete wound closure after less than 2 months.

  13. An Alternative Treatment Strategy for Complicated Chronic Wounds: Negative Pressure Therapy over Mesh Skin Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Maruccia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive skin defect represents a real problem and major challenge in plastic and reconstructive surgery. On one hand, skin grafts offer a practical method to deal with skin defects despite their unsuitability for several complicated wounds. On the other hand, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT, applied before skin grafting, promotes granulation tissue growth. The aim of the study is to evaluate the improvement in wound healing given by the merger of these two different approaches. We treated 23 patients for large wounds of multiple factors. Of these, 15 were treated with the application of V.A.C.® Therapy (KCI Medical S.r.l., Milan, Italy, in combination with skin grafts after a prior unsuccessful treatment of 4 weeks with mesh skin grafts and dressings. Another 8 were treated with only mesh skin graft. Pain reduction and wound area reduction were found statistically significant (p<0.0009, p<0.0001. Infection was resolved in almost all patients. According to our study, the use of the negative pressure wound therapy over mesh skin grafts is significantly effective especially in wounds resistant to conventional therapies, thereby improving the rate of skin graft take.

  14. Comparison of the silicone oil removal rate between vitrectomy and manual syringe negative pressure approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhong; Wu, Rong Han; Zhou, Ye Hui

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the silicone oil removal rate between vitrectomy and manual syringe negative pressure approach. Thirty-five silicone oil-filled eyes were enrolled and allocated for manual (n = 19) and vitrectomy (n = 16) removal approaches. For manual approach, a 10-ml syringe was connected to the 23-gauge cannula through a short section of blood transfusion tube. Removal was started after pulling and fixing the plunger to the end part. The syringe was pulled away immediately once the residual of silicone oil cannot be observed through the cornea. For vitrectomy approach, the only difference was the source of negative pressure, i.e., the blood transfusion tube was connected to the cannula directly to remove the silicone oil. Silicone oil removal rate was defined as the volume of silicone oil divided by the time taken for removal. The mean time taken for silicone oil removal was faster for manual approach than vitrectomy approach (4.13 ± 1.41 vs. 6.14 ± 1.49, p = 0.001). Furthermore, the silicone oil removal rate was larger for manual approach (1.42 ± 0.30 vs. 0.90 ± 0.16 ml/min, p oil removal. The manual approach is more convenient and efficient.

  15. [Experience with the negative pressure closure system of chronic wounds in pediatric patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghi-Richerand, A; Gómez-Chavarría, J; González-Sánchez, M; Saleme-Cruz, J; Garavito, E

    2013-01-01

    To show the results and advantages of using the negative pressure closure system in a pediatric population with infections and wound closure defects. A retrospective analysis was conducted on pediatric patients in whom the VAC(®) negative pressure wound closure system was used in the Shriners Hospital for Children, Mexico, from January 2008 to December 2012. We were able to include 8 patients treated with this system. We evaluated the cause for use, wound colonizing microorganism, number of days of stay at the hospital, number of times applied, interval of application, and number of days in the hospital until discharge after VAC(®) application, and final treatment. The average days after VAC aplication till discharge was 13.7 days. The final treatment in 7 of the 8 patients was direct closure or application of skin grafts for closure of the wounds. Through this study we were able to observe that, after the application of this treatment, there was an increase in the granulation tissue at the wounds, as well as resolution of the infection. We were able to confirm the efficiency of this treatment in controlling the infection and decreasing skin defects, allowing an easier and earlier wound closure. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Experience with local negative pressure (vacuum method in the treatment of complex wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Wada

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Use of topical negative pressure over difficult-to-heal wounds has been studied. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects from negative pressure in the treatment of complex wounds. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case series developed at Hospital das Clínicas, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with complex wounds were treated with the vacuum system and then underwent a surgical procedure to close the wound. RESULTS: 85% of the skin grafts took well, and 87.5% of the local flaps were successful, thus demonstrating adequate wound preparation. The wounds were closed within shorter times than observed using other conventional treatments In two cases, the vacuum system was also used to stabilize the skin grafts over the wounds. CONCLUSIONS: Use of the vacuum method is safe and efficient for preparing wounds for surgical closure. It allows for an improvement of local wound conditions, and healthy granulation tissue develops with control over local infection.

  17. Negative pressure and nanocrystalline silver dressings for nonhealing ulcer: A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Martín, Luis C; García-Martínez, Lourdes; Román-Curto, Concepción; Sánchez-Hernández, Miguel V; Suárez-Fernández, Ricardo M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds have a high prevalence and wound care, treatment, and prevention consume large quantities of resources. Chronic wounds are a growing challenge for clinicians. A prospective randomized pilot study was conducted to assess the effectiveness in terms of reduction in area and safety of the combined use of negative-pressure wound therapy and nanocrystalline silver dressings as compared to negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) alone in the management of outpatients with chronic wounds. A total of 17 patients were included in the study, 10 were treated with the combined method and 7 with NPWT. Patients were followed for 6 weeks, with a final assessment at 3 months. Clinical improvement, microbiologic data, and toxicity of silver were evaluated. The antibacterial effects of ionic silver together with the development of granulation tissue promoted by NPWT reduced significantly the median extension of the wound between weeks 3 and 6 of treatment. The combination with silver also reduced bacterial colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the bacterial load on the surface of the wound. The silver levels correlated positively with the extension of the wound, although in none of the patients' toxic levels were reached. The combination of NPWT with nanocrystalline silver dressings was safe and as effective as NPWT alone.

  18. Pressure-volume curves: revisiting the impact of negative turgor during cell collapse by literature review and simulations of cell micromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yiting; Zhang, Yanxiang; Zheng, Quan-Shui; Tyree, Melvin T

    2014-07-01

    The Scholander-Hammel pressure chamber has been used in thousands of papers to measure osmotic pressure, πc , turgor pressure, Pt , and bulk modulus of elasticity, ε, of leaf cells by pressure-volume (PV) curve analysis. PV analysis has been questioned in the past. In this paper we use micromechanical analysis of leaf cells to examine the impact on PV curve analysis of negative turgor in living cells (Pt ). Models predict negative Pt (-0.1 to -1.8 MPa) depending on leaf cell size and shape in agreement with experimental values reported by J. J. Oertli. Modeled PV curves have linear regions even when Pt is quite negative, contrary to the arguments of M.T. Tyree. Negative Pt is totally missed by PV curve analysis and results in large errors in derived πc and Pt but smaller errors in ε. A survey of leaf cell sizes vs habitat (arid, temperate, and rainforest), suggests that the majority of published PV curves result in errors of 0.1-1.8 MPa in derived πc and Pt , whereby the error increases with decreasing cell size. We propose that small cell size in leaves is an ecological adaptation that permits plants to endure negative values of water potential with relatively little water loss. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. Preconditioning the pressure operator for the time dependent Stokes problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    In implicit time stepping procedures for the linearized Navier Stokes equations, a linear perturbed Stokes problem must be solved at each time step. Many methods for doing this require a good preconditioner for the resulting pressure operator (Schur complement). In contrast to the time independent Stokes equations where the pressure operator is well conditioned, the pressure operator for the perturbed system becomes more illconditioned as the time step is reduced (and/or the Reynolds number is increased). The authors describe the method for solving the coupled velocity/pressure systems and, in particular, show how to construct good preconditioners for the poorly conditioned pressure operator.

  20. Pressure dependence of the Boson peak in poly(butadiene)

    CERN Document Server

    Frick, B

    2002-01-01

    Variation of pressure and temperature in inelastic neutron scattering experiments allows us to separate density and thermal energy contributions. We summarise briefly the influence of pressure and temperature on the dynamic scattering law of the polymer glass former poly(butadiene) far below the glass transition. We also show the advantage of using a liquid-niobium pressure cell in such studies. The effect of pressure on the boson peak is to shift the peak towards higher energies and to reduce the low-frequency modes more strongly below the boson-peak maximum than above. A decrease in the Debye-Waller factor with increasing pressure is observed. (orig.)

  1. The role of negative emotionality and impulsivity in depressive/anxiety disorders and alcohol dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, L.; Vogelzangs, N.; van den Brink, W.; Smit, J. H.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Penninx, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Background. Much is still unclear about the role of personality in the structure of common psychiatric disorders such as depressive/anxiety disorders and alcohol dependence. This study will therefore examine whether various traits of negative emotionality and impulsivity showed shared or specific as

  2. Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph A. LaManna; Scott A. Mangan; Alfonso Alonso; Norman A. Bourg; Warren Y. Brockelman; Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin; Li-Wan Chang; Jyh-Min Chiang; George B. Chuyong; Keith Clay; Richard Condit; Susan Cordell; Stuart J. Davies; Tucker J. Furniss; Christian P. Giardina; I. A. U. Nimal Gunatilleke; C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke; Fangliang He; Robert W. Howe; Stephen P. Hubbell; Chang-Fu Hsieh; Faith M. Inman-Narahari; David Janík; Daniel J. Johnson; David Kenfack; Lisa Korte; Kamil Král; Andrew J. Larson; James A. Lutz; Sean M. McMahon; William J. McShea; Hervé R. Memiaghe; Anuttara Nathalang; Vojtech Novotny; Perry S. Ong; David A. Orwig; Rebecca Ostertag; Geoffrey G. Parker; Richard P. Phillips; Lawren Sack; I-Fang Sun; J. Sebastián Tello; Duncan W. Thomas; Benjamin L. Turner; Dilys M. Vela Díaz; Tomáš Vrška; George D. Weiblen; Amy Wolf; Sandra Yap; Jonathan A. Myers

    2017-01-01

    Theory predicts that higher biodiversity in the tropics is maintained by specialized interactions among plants and their natural enemies that result in conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). By using more than 3000 species and nearly 2.4 million trees across 24 forest plots worldwide, we show that global patterns in tree species diversity reflect not only...

  3. Complete Moment Convergence and Mean Convergence for Arrays of Rowwise Extended Negatively Dependent Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongfeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors first present a Rosenthal inequality for sequence of extended negatively dependent (END random variables. By means of the Rosenthal inequality, the authors obtain some complete moment convergence and mean convergence results for arrays of rowwise END random variables. The results in this paper extend and improve the corresponding theorems by Hu and Taylor (1997.

  4. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a Neotropical palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Visser, Marco D.; Wright, S. Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    2014-01-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a

  5. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a Neotropical palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Visser, Marco D.; Wright, S. Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    2014-01-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a

  6. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a Neotropical palm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Visser, Marco D.; Wright, S. Joseph; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C.

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a

  7. Lower body positive and negative pressure alter thermal and hemodynamic responses after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journeay, W Shane; Reardon, Francis D; Jean-Gilles, Sartre; Martin, C Ryan; Kenny, Glen P

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of upright lower body positive and negative pressure (LBPP/LBNP) application on the post-exercise thermal response. It was hypothesized that the application of LBPP would decrease core temperature secondary to increases in skin blood flow (SkBF) and sweating, whereas the application of LBNP would maintain core temperature secondary to attenuated SkBF and sweating responses. There were six subjects who randomly underwent each of the following treatments in the upright posture, separated by a minimum of 48 h: 1) +45 mmHg LBPP; 2) -20 mmHg LBNP; or 3) no pressure for 45 min after performing 15 min of cycle ergometry exercise at 70% of their VO2peak. Measurements included mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (SV), total peripheral resistance (TPR), mean skin temperature (Tsk), mean heat flux, esophageal temperature (Tes), SkBF, and sweat rate. After the application of LBPP, we observed a significantly greater decrease in core temperature relative to the LBNP and control conditions (p restoration of hemodynamics while LBNP and control prolonged the post-exercise hemodynamic state. We conclude that during recovery from exercise in the upright seated posture, core temperature recovery is affected by compromised SkBF and sweating secondary to nonthermal cardiovascular influences.

  8. Vasoactive neuroendocrine responses associated with tolerance to lower body negative pressure in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Sather, T. M.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that peripheral vasoconstriction and orthostatic tolerance are associated with increased circulating plasma concentrations of noradrenaline, vasopressin and renin-angiotensin. Sixteen men were categorized as having high (HT, n=9) or low (LT, n=7) tolerance to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) based on whether the endpoint of their pre-syncopal-limited LBNP (peak LBNP) exposure exceeded -60 mmHg. The two groups were matched for age, height, weight, leg volume, blood volume and maximal oxygen uptake, as well as baseline blood volume and plasma concentrations of vasoactive hormones. Peak LBNP induced similar reductions in mean arterial pressure in both groups. The reduction in leg arterial pulse volume (measured by impedance rheography), an index of peripheral vascular constriction, from baseline to peak LBNP was greater (Pplasma concentrations of vasopressin (pVP, Delta=+7.2 +/- 2.0 pg ml-1) and plasma renin-angiotensin (PRA, Delta=+2.9 +/- 1.3 ng Ang II ml-1 h-1) compared to average elevations of pVP (+2.2 +/- 1.0 pg ml-1) and PRA (+0.1 +/- 0.1 ng Ang II ml-1 h-1) in the LT group. Plasma noradrenaline concentrations were increased (Prenin-angiotensin and vasopressin systems may contribute to sustaining arterial pressure and orthostatic tolerance by their vasoconstrictive actions.

  9. Monte Carlo Algorithm for Least Dependent Non-Negative Mixture Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, S A; Kraskov, A; Grassberger, P; Astakhov, Sergey A.; St\\"ogbauer, Harald; Kraskov, Alexander; Grassberger, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We propose a simulated annealing algorithm (called SNICA for "stochastic non-negative independent component analysis") for blind decomposition of linear mixtures of non-negative sources with non-negative coefficients. The de-mixing is based on a Metropolis type Monte Carlo search for least dependent components, with the mutual information between recovered components as a cost function and their non-negativity as a hard constraint. Elementary moves are shears in two-dimensional subspaces and rotations in three-dimensional subspaces. The algorithm is geared at decomposing signals whose probability densities peak at zero, the case typical in analytical spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution. The decomposition performance on large samples of synthetic mixtures and experimental data is much better than that of traditional blind source separation methods based on principal component analysis (MILCA, FastICA, RADICAL) and chemometrics techniques (SIMPLISMA, ALS, BTEM) The source codes of SNICA, MILCA and th...

  10. Heart Rate Variability during Simulated Hemorrhage with Lower Body Negative Pressure in High and Low Tolerant Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    body negative pressure in high and low tolerant subjects Carmen Hinojosa-Laborde1*, Caroline A. Rickards2, Kathy L. Ryan1 andVictor A. Convertino1 1 US...University School of Medicine, USA *Correspondence: Carmen Hinojosa-Laborde, U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, 3698 Chambers Pass, Fort Sam...Goldwater, D. J., Mont - gomery, L. D., and Convertino, V. A. (1986). Cardiovascular dynamics associated with tolerance to lower body negative pressure

  11. Cardiovascular response to lower body negative pressure stimulation before, during, and after space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baisch, F.; Beck, L.; Blomqvist, G.; Wolfram, G.; Drescher, J.; Rome, J. L.; Drummer, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is well known that space travel cause post-flight orthostatic hypotension and it was assumed that autonomic cardiovascular control deteriorates in space. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) was used to assess autonomic function of the cardiovascular system. METHODS: LBNP tests were performed on six crew-members before and on the first days post-flight in a series of three space missions. Additionally, two of the subjects performed LBNP tests in-flight. LBNP mimics fluid distribution of upright posture in a gravity independent way. It causes an artificial sequestration of blood, reduces preload, and filtrates plasma into the lower part of the body. Fluid distribution was assessed by bioelectrical impedance and anthropometric measurements. RESULTS: Heart rate, blood pressure, and total peripheral resistance increased significantly during LBNP experiments in-flight. The decrease in stroke volume, the increased pooling of blood, and the increased filtration of plasma into the lower limbs during LBNP indicated that a plasma volume reduction and a deficit of the interstitial volume of lower limbs rather than a change in cardiovascular control was responsible for the in-flight response. Post-flight LBNP showed no signs of cardiovascular deterioration. The still more pronounced haemodynamic changes during LBNP reflected the expected behaviour of cardiovascular control faced with less intravascular volume. In-flight, the status of an intra-and extravascular fluid deficit increases sympathetic activity, the release of vasoactive substances and consequently blood pressure. Post-flight, blood pressure decreases significantly below pre-flight values after restoration of volume deficits. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the cardiovascular changes in-flight are a consequence of a fluid deficit rather than a consequence of changes in autonomic signal processing.

  12. 'Help me! I'm old!' How negative aging stereotypes create dependency among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudin, Genevieve; Alexopoulos, Theodore

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effects of negative aging stereotypes on self-reported loneliness, risk-taking, subjective health, and help-seeking behavior in a French sample of older adults. The aim of this study was to show the detrimental effects of negative aging stereotypes on older adults' self-evaluations and behaviors, therefore contributing to the explanations of the iatrogenic effect of social environments that increase dependency (e.g., health care institutions). In the first experiment conducted on 57 older adults, we explored the effects of positive, neutral, or negative stereotype activation on the feeling of loneliness and risk taking decision. The second experiment (n = 60) examined the impact of stereotype activation on subjective health, self-reported extraversion as well as on a genuine help-seeking behavior, by allowing participants to ask for the experimenter's help while completing a task. As predicted, negative stereotype activation resulted in lower levels of risk taking, subjective health and extraversion, and in higher feelings of loneliness and a more frequent help-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that the mere activation of negative stereotypes can have broad and deleterious effects on older individuals' self-evaluation and functioning, which in turn may contribute to the often observed dependency among older people.

  13. Additive Effects of Sinusoidal Lower Body Negative Pressure on Cardiovascular Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Keita; Oyama, Fuyuki; Yoshida, Hisao; Iwanaga, Koichi

    2017-02-01

    Sinusoidal lower body negative pressure (SLBNP) has been used to investigate the cardiovascular response to slow periodic changes in blood shifts, but measurements of slow fluctuations take a long time if measured for each period of SLBNP separately. Our study aimed to investigate whether the cardiovascular responses to superimposed SLBNP (S-SLBNP), which is expected to reduce the measurement time, are different from responses measured individually. S-SLBNP was configured by superimposing two conventional SLBNPs (C-SLBNP) at 180-s and 30-s periods in the pressure range from 0 to -25 mmHg. As the S-SLBNP has double the static load of C-SLBNP, we also used offset SLBNP (O-SLBNP), which has the same static load level as S-SLBNP. Heart rate (HR), thoracic impedance (Z0), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured from 11 male subjects. The transfer functions of gains from MAP to HR (Gain-HR/MAP) and from Z0 to HR (Gain-HR/Z0) were calculated as indexes of arterial baroreflex and cardiopulmonary baroreflex regulation of HR, respectively. The Gain-HR/MAP in the 180-s period (2.11 ± 0.17 bpm/mmHg; mean ± SEM) was larger than that of the 30-s period (1.04 ± 0.09 bpm/mmHg); however, there was no significant difference between the SLBNP conditions. The Gain-HR/Z0 in C-SLBNP (9.37 ± 1.47 bpm/ohm) was smaller than that of the other conditions [18.46 ± 2.45 bpm/ohm (O-SLBNP); 16.09 ± 2.29 bpm/ohm (S-SLBNP)]. Using S-SLBNP could reduce the measurement time needed to examine the arterial baroreflex. However, the cardiopulmonary baroreflex was modified by the static load of SLBNP.Ishibashi K, Oyama F, Yoshida H, Iwanaga K. Additive effects of sinusoidal lower body negative pressure on cardiovascular responses. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(2):137-141.

  14. Severe hypotension related to high negative pressure suction drainage on a thoracic epidural drain during multilevel spinal fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmbhatt, Anjalee; Hall, Nicholas D P; Bradley, William Pierre Litherland

    2013-11-15

    Hypotension or bradycardia or both related to intracranial hypotension after craniotomy has been reported in the literature. However, such reports are uncommon with thoracic epidural drains. We describe a case in which application of high negative pressure suction to a thoracic epidural drain caused a sudden decrease in arterial blood pressure.

  15. Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent p53-negative tumor cell death during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausse, V; Goloudina, A R; Uyanik, B; Kochetkova, E Y; Richaud, S; Fedorova, O A; Hammann, A; Bardou, M; Barlev, N A; Garrido, C; Demidov, O N

    2016-04-14

    Inactivation of p53 found in more than half of human cancers is often associated with increased tumor resistance to anti-cancer therapy. We have previously shown that overexpression of the phosphatase Wip1 in p53-negative tumors sensitizes them to chemotherapeutic agents, while protecting normal tissues from the side effects of anti-cancer treatment. In this study, we decided to search for kinases that prevent Wip1-mediated sensitization of cancer cells, thereby interfering with efficacy of genotoxic anti-cancer drugs. To this end, we performed a flow cytometry-based screening in order to identify kinases that regulated the levels of γH2AX, which were used as readout. Another criterion of the screen was increased sensitivity of p53-negative tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) in a Wip1-dependent manner. We have found that a treatment with a low dose (75 nM) of MK-1775, a recently described specific chemical inhibitor of Wee1, decreases CDDP-induced H2AX phosphorylation in p53-negative cells and enhances the Wip1-sensitization of p53-negative tumors. We were able to reduce CDDP effective concentration by 40% with a combination of Wip1 overexpression and Wee1 kinase inhibition. We have observed that Wee1 inhibition potentiates Wip1-dependent tumor sensitization effect by reducing levels of Hipk2 kinase, a negative regulator of Wip1 pathway. In addition, during CDDP treatment, the combination of Wee1 inhibition and Wip1 overexpression has a mild but significant protective effect in normal cells and tissues. Our results indicate that inhibition of the negative regulators of Wip1 pathway, Wee1 and Hipk2, in p53-negative tumors could potentiate efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents without concomitant increase of cytotoxicity in normal tissues. The development and clinical use of Wee1 and Hipk1 kinase chemical inhibitors might be a promising strategy to improve anti-cancer therapy.

  16. Pressure-dependent dielectric properties in a polyurethane elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Seung Won; Shin, Jae Sup; Shin, Min Jae; Kim, Chy Hyung

    2017-04-01

    The dielectric responses of polyurethane films were investigated in the pressure range from atmospheric to 20 kpsi and in the frequency range from 0.05 Hz to 4 KHz at -50, 0, 29, 50, and 80 ° C, where T g is close to -15 ° C (α-relaxation) and where the glass temperature of the chain extender is about 80 ° C (I-relaxation). When a higher pressure was applied to the material, a lower dielectric constant (k' ) was obtained owing to the suppression of polarization motions by the external pressure. However, k' increased with rising pressure at temperatures above 50 ° C and at high frequencies due to the predominant thermal effect expanding the film outwards, where a dispersive α-relaxation occurred. Both α- and I-relaxations followed the pressure-frequency superposition principle with a different shifting factor, a( p), where the α-relaxation showed a faster migration of the relaxation time with changing pressure and a( p) values larger than those of I-relaxation. The two relaxations observed at 29 ° C demonstrated linear relations between 1/k' and pressure and between ln a( p) and pressure, regardless of the film thickness.

  17. Pressure dependence of donor excitation spectra in AlSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, L.; McCluskey, M.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2002-01-16

    We have investigated the behavior of ground to bound excited-state electronic transitions of Se and Te donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Using broadband far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, we observe qualitatively different behaviors of the electronic transition energies of the two donors. While the pressure derivative of the Te transition energy is small and constant, as might be expected for a shallow donor, the pressure derivatives of the Se transition energies are quadratic and large at low pressures, indicating that Se is actually a deep donor. In addition, at pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, we observe evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the selenium electronic transitions and a two-phonon mode.

  18. Study on Negative-pressure Precision Millet Seed-metering Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huali Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional millet drilling method has a problem of labor-intensive artificial thinning-out, so a negative-pressure precision millet seed-metering device was designed to realize millet precision dibble seeding. Single factor experiment researches effect of rotational speed and air-chamber vacuum of seed-metering device on its seed-metering passing rate, repeat-sowing rate and leak-sowing rate. By means of orthogonal experiment method, optimal parameters of seed-metering device were defined, which was 20 r/min rotational speed, 4 mm bore diameter, 1.5 KPa air-chamber vacuum and 55 mm air cut valve arc length. The field test result shows that the seed-metering device meets completely standards of “Single-seed (Precise Seeder Technological Requirements” and agronomic requirements.

  19. Negative pressure effects in SrTiO 3 nanoparticles investigated by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, XueWei; Wu, DaJian; Liu, XiaoJun

    2008-02-01

    The size effects on SrTiO 3 nanoparticles have been investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy with changing the grain size in the range 10-80 nm. The intensities of the first-order polar TO 2 and TO 4 modes increase as the grain size reduces, suggesting the enhanced interaction of the surface-defect dipoles on the grain boundary. By contrast, the intensities for the first-order nonpolar TO 3 mode decrease with reducing the grain size. Further we have found that the Raman frequencies of the vibration modes are very sensitive to the variation of the grain size. The softening of the TO 2 and TO 3 modes with decreasing the grain size indicates the increase of the Ti-O bond length, which is consistent with the lattice expansion investigated by XRD. We have ascribed the size effects to the negative pressure effects due to the enhanced interaction of the surface-defect dipoles.

  20. Negative pressures during swing phase in below-knee prostheses with rubber sleeve suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, N; Pearson, J R; Cockrell, J L; Mikishko, H A; Koepke, G H

    1975-01-01

    Negative pressures in the small space between the distal stump and the below-knee prosthetic socket were measured during swing phase for a series of nine subjects. A molded rubber sleeve connecting the prosthesis and the thigh was found to enhance this effect so that suction suspension occurred during the entire swing phase. Deterioration of the suction occurred when the sleeve was intentionally pierced, and when other suspensions such as a suprapatellar cuff or thigh band were tested. The findings indicate that the total-contact socket, gel liner and elastic sleeve combine to create suction in the below-knee socket which improves overall comfort and function for the patient in using the prosthesis.

  1. Negative-Pressure Cavitation Extraction of Secoisolariciresinol Diglycoside from Flaxseed Cakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Tian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The negative-pressure cavitation extraction (NPCE technique was applied firstly to extract secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG from flaxseed cakes. The significant extraction parameters were screened by fractional factorial design (FFD. The optimal parameters were determined using the central composite design (CCD with the two variables, NaOH amount and the liquid/solid ratio. The conditions of the extraction were optimized by using response surface methodology (RSM. Under the optimal conditions, the extraction yield and the extraction purity of SDG was 16.25 mg/g and 3.86%, respectively. The efficiency of NPCE was compared with that of conventional extraction methods. Our results demonstrated that NPCE was comparable to the well-known ultrasound-assisted extraction in term of extraction yield and purity. This extraction technique has advantages of less time-consuming, low solvent usage and high throughput capability.

  2. Fluid Shifts: Otoacoustical Emission Changes in Response to Posture and Lower Body Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgoza, R.; Kemp, D.; Ebert, D.; Danielson, R.; Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the NASA Fluid Shifts Study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. Due to the invasive nature of direct measures of ICP, a noninvasive technique of monitoring ICP is desired for use during spaceflight. The phase angle and amplitude of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) have been shown to be sensitive to posture change and ICP (1, 2), therefore use of OAEs is an attractive option. OAEs are low-level sounds produced by the sensory cells of the cochlea in response to auditory stimulation. These sounds travel peripherally from the cochlea, through the oval window, to the ear canal where they can be recorded. OAE transmission is sensitive to changes in the stiffness of the oval window, occurring as a result of changes in cochlear pressure. Increased stiffness of the oval window largely affects the transmission of sound from the cochlea at frequencies between 800 Hz and 1600 Hz. OAEs can be self-recorded in the laboratory or on the ISS using a handheld device. Our primary objectives regarding OAE measures in this experiment were to 1) validate this method during preflight testing of each crewmember (while sitting, supine and in head-down tilt position), and 2) determine if OAE measures (and presumably ICP) are responsive to lower body negative pressure and to spaceflight. METHODS: Distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) and transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) were recorded preflight using the Otoport Advance OAE system (Otodynamics Ltd., Hatfield, UK). Data were collected in four conditions (seated

  3. Tolerance of Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) in endurance runners, weightlifters, swimmers and nonathletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Thirteen endurance runners (R), 12 weightlifters (WL), 12 swimmers (SW) and 10 nonathletes (NA) were tested for their tolerance of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in consecutive 5 minute stages at -20, -30, -40, -50 and -60 torr. Each subject also performed an exercise test on a bicycle ergometer with progressive workloads to exhaustion to determined aerobic capacity. The R had a much higher aerobic capacity than any of the other groups, but a significantly lower LBNP tolerance. While responses in heart rate and pulse pressure were quite similar in all 4 groups, the rate of increase in leg volume relative to LBNP stress (leg compliance, LC) was considerably greater in R than in the other athletes and NA. The greater LC in R could be attributed not only to a more rapid shift of blood to the lower extremities but also to a greater tendency for edema formation, both contributing to a more rapid loss in effective central blood volume for a given LBNP stress. These results substantiate earlier observations which led to the conclusion that endurance running is not advisable as a training regimen for astronauts.

  4. Development of micropump-actuated negative pressure pinched injection for parallel electrophoresis on array microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bowei; Jiang, Lei; Xie, Hua; Gao, Yan; Qin, Jianhua; Lin, Bingcheng

    2009-09-01

    A micropump-actuated negative pressure pinched injection method is developed for parallel electrophoresis on a multi-channel LIF detection system. The system has a home-made device that could individually control 16-port solenoid valves and a high-voltage power supply. The laser beam is excitated and distributes to the array separation channels for detection. The hybrid Glass-PDMS microfluidic chip comprises two common reservoirs, four separation channels coupled to their respective pneumatic micropumps and two reference channels. Due to use of pressure as a driving force, the proposed method has no sample bias effect for separation. There is only one high-voltage supply needed for separation without relying on the number of channels, which is significant for high-throughput analysis, and the time for sample loading is shortened to 1 s. In addition, the integrated micropumps can provide the versatile interface for coupling with other function units to satisfy the complicated demands. The performance is verified by separation of DNA marker and Hepatitis B virus DNA samples. And this method is also expected to show the potential throughput for the DNA analysis in the field of disease diagnosis.

  5. Wound Penetration of Cefazolin, Ciprofloxacin, Piperacillin, Tazobactam, and Vancomycin During Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Matthew P.; Niece, Krista L.; Rizzo, Julie A.; Akers, Kevin S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses subatmospheric pressure as a noninvasive adjunct to treat wounds and has demonstrated clinical efficacy by accelerating healing of a variety of acute and chronic wounds. NPWT may also play a role in preventing or treating wound infections, possibly by increasing wound penetration of antibiotics. However, clinical data in patients undergoing antibiotic and NPWT treatment are limited. Approach: To evaluate the wound penetration of antibiotics in NPWT patients, we conducted a prospective, observational study of burn and trauma patients treated with NPWT and systemic antibiotics. We evaluated the plasma pharmacokinetic profile of systemic vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, cefazolin, and piperacillin/tazobactam, as well as total and unbound antibiotic concentrations in wound exudate from the same patients. Results: Data from 32 patients with 37 wounds undergoing NPWT demonstrated that vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam all penetrated wounds with exudate to plasma concentration ratios more than 0.8. Cefazolin did not penetrate wounds in patients undergoing NPWT as effectively, with an average exudate to plasma concentration ratio of 0.51. Innovation: Clinical data on the wound penetration of antibiotics in patients undergoing NPWT are limited, but these data suggest that antibiotics have different capacities for wound penetration during NPWT that should be considered when making clinical decisions. Conclusion: This initial report suggests that (1) vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam effectively penetrate wounds during NPWT and (2) cefazolin as well as other antibiotics may not penetrate wounds during NPWT.

  6. Uniaxial pressure dependence of the antiferromagnetic order in UPt3

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, N. H.; Rodière, P.; Fåk, B.; Huxley, A.; Flouquet, J.; Fernández-Díaz, M. T.; Yakhou, F.

    The weak antiferromagnetic order of the heavy-fermion superconductor UPt3 has been investigated by elastic neutron-scattering measurements under applied uniaxial pressure up to 6 kbar along the a and c axes of the hexagonal crystal structure. For p||c the small antiferromagnetically ordered moment of 0.02μB/U-atom shows a non-linear decrease for increasing pressures and is still not completely suppressed at the maximum applied pressure of 6 kbar. For p||a a significant increase in the magnetic Bragg peak intensity is observed, which suggests an incomplete domain repopulation and confirms the presence of a single-k structure.

  7. Development of a Pressure-Dependent Constitutive Model with Combined Multilinear Kinematic and Isotropic Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a pressure-dependent constitutive model with combined multilinear kinematic and isotropic hardening is presented. The constitutive model is developed using the ABAQUS user material subroutine (UMAT). First the pressure-dependent plasticity model is derived. Following this, the combined bilinear and combined multilinear hardening equations are developed for von Mises plasticity theory. The hardening rule equations are then modified to include pressure dependency. The method for implementing the new constitutive model into ABAQUS is given.

  8. Negative frequency-dependent preferences and variation in male facial hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janif, Zinnia J; Brooks, Robert C; Dixson, Barnaby J

    2014-01-01

    Negative frequency-dependent sexual selection maintains striking polymorphisms in secondary sexual traits in several animal species. Here, we test whether frequency of beardedness modulates perceived attractiveness of men's facial hair, a secondary sexual trait subject to considerable cultural variation. We first showed participants a suite of faces, within which we manipulated the frequency of beard thicknesses and then measured preferences for four standard levels of beardedness. Women and men judged heavy stubble and full beards more attractive when presented in treatments where beards were rare than when they were common, with intermediate preferences when intermediate frequencies of beardedness were presented. Likewise, clean-shaven faces were least attractive when clean-shaven faces were most common and more attractive when rare. This pattern in preferences is consistent with negative frequency-dependent selection.

  9. Enhancing Extraction of Drug-Drug Interaction from Literature Using Neutral Candidates, Negation, and Clause Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokharaeian, Behrouz; Diaz, Alberto; Chitsaz, Hamidreza

    2016-01-01

    Motivation Supervised biomedical relation extraction plays an important role in biomedical natural language processing, endeavoring to obtain the relations between biomedical entities. Drug-drug interactions, which are investigated in the present paper, are notably among the critical biomedical relations. Thus far many methods have been developed with the aim of extracting DDI relations. However, unfortunately there has been a scarcity of comprehensive studies on the effects of negation, complex sentences, clause dependency, and neutral candidates in the course of DDI extraction from biomedical articles. Results Our study proposes clause dependency features and a number of features for identifying neutral candidates as well as negation cues and scopes. Furthermore, our experiments indicate that the proposed features significantly improve the performance of the relation extraction task combined with other kernel methods. We characterize the contribution of each category of features and finally conclude that neutral candidate features have the most prominent role among all of the three categories. PMID:27695078

  10. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Martina; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N; Bowie, Andrew G

    2006-10-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling. Expression of SARM blocked gene induction 'downstream' of TRIF but not of MyD88. SARM associated with TRIF, and 'knockdown' of endogenous SARM expression by interfering RNA led to enhanced TRIF-dependent cytokine and chemokine induction. Thus, the fifth mammalian TIR adaptor SARM is a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling.

  11. The impact of negative emotions on self-concept abstraction depends on accessible information processing styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Linda M; Rovenpor, Daniel R; Lair, Elicia C

    2016-10-01

    Research suggests that anger promotes global, abstract processing whereas sadness and fear promote local, concrete processing (see Schwarz & Clore, 2007 for a review). Contrary to a large and influential body of work suggesting that specific affective experiences are tethered to specific cognitive outcomes, the affect-as-cognitive-feedback account maintains that affective experiences confer positive or negative value on currently dominant processing styles, and thus can lead to either global or local processing (Huntsinger, Isbell, & Clore, 2014). The current work extends this theoretical perspective by investigating the impact of discrete negative emotions on the self-concept. By experimentally manipulating information processing styles and discrete negative emotions that vary in appraisals of certainty, we demonstrate that the impact of discrete negative emotions on the spontaneous self-concept depends on accessible processing styles. When global processing was accessible, individuals in angry (negative, high certainty) states generated more abstract statements about themselves than individuals in either sad (Experiment 1) or fearful (Experiment 2; negative, low certainty) states. When local processing was made accessible, however, the opposite pattern emerged, whereby individuals in angry states generated fewer abstract statements than individuals in sad or fearful states. Together these studies provide new insights into the mechanisms through which discrete emotions influence cognition. In contrast to theories assuming a dedicated link between emotions and processing styles, these results suggest that discrete emotions provide feedback about accessible ways of thinking, and are consistent with recent evidence suggesting that the impact of affect on cognition is highly context-dependent. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. A STUDY OF NEGATIVE PRESSURE WOUND THERAPY: VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE IN CHRONIC NON-HEALING ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhamotharan Senraman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study evaluates the advantage of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy-Vacuum Assisted Closure over Conventional Dressing in the management of chronic non-healing ulcers. METHODS From June 2014 to June 2015, 50 patients were selected (25 cases and 25 controls. After wound debridement, VAC dressing is applied. Pre VAC and post VAC culture and sensitivity is taken. Dressing is given for 72 hours and intermittent suction is given for 10 mins. in an hour, daily for 12 hours with negative pressure ranging from 100 to 125 mmHg. Rest of the time drain of the VAC dressing is connected to the Romovac suction drain. Doppler study to assess the vascularity of the limb before the procedure and X-ray is taken to rule out osteomyelitis. Control group patients are given conventional dressings. RESULTS The gender, age and ulcer distributions were almost equal in the case and control groups and were found to be statistically insignificant. Duration of hospital stay in days was found to be statistically significant between groups. Majority (52% of cases left hospital within 3 weeks’ time, while a major chunk (88% of control population stayed more than 3 weeks. VAC dressing shows better results in patients with normal Doppler study. VAC dressing have better results in patients with 48% undergoing split skin grafting and less rate (8% of amputation as against none undergoing split skin grafting and 24% needing amputation in the control group. Patients with sterile pre-VAC culture were not turning unsterile after VAC, but 90% unsterile turns sterile after VAC. CONCLUSION NPWT is a novel technique for managing an open wound by submitting the wound either to intermittent or continuous subatmospheric pressure. Here, we did a study to study the advantage of vacuum assisted closure over conventional dressing in the management of chronic non-healing ulcers and concluded that VAC decreases hospital stay, improves pus culture sterility, has better result in

  13. Collision-induced dissociation analysis of negative atmospheric ion adducts in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2013-05-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed on atmospheric ion adducts [M + R](-) formed between various types of organic compounds M and atmospheric negative ions R(-) [such as O2(-), HCO3(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO2(-), NO3(-), and NO3(-)(HNO3)] in negative-ion mode atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. All of the [M + R](-) adducts were fragmented to form deprotonated analytes [M - H](-) and/or atmospheric ions R(-), whose intensities in the CID spectra were dependent on the proton affinities of the [M - H](-) and R(-) fragments. Precursor ions [M + R](-) for which R(-) have higher proton affinities than [M - H](-) formed [M - H](-) as the dominant product. Furthermore, the CID of the adducts with HCO3(-) and NO3(-)(HNO3) led to other product ions such as [M + HO](-) and NO3(-), respectively. The fragmentation behavior of [M + R](-) for each R(-) observed was independent of analyte type (e.g., whether the analyte was aliphatic or aromatic, or possessed certain functional groups).

  14. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF–dependent Toll-like receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Michael; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N.; Bowie, Andrew G.

    2006-01-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll–interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signalin...

  15. Exploiting potency of negative pressure in wound dressing using limited access dressing and suction-assisted dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Role of negative pressure dressing and moist wound healing are well established in the treatment of both acute and chronic wounds with certain advantages and disadvantages in both the techniques. Both these techniques prevents wound colonization, but the negative pressure dressing method has proved to have a greater potency to remove secretions, prevent wound invasion and eradication established infection. In both these techniques there is no accessibility to wound environment. Limited access dressing (LAD is a moist wound dressing with negative pressure. It provides limited access to the wound through two small ports for both dressers and pathogens. The LAD design has notable advantages like wound isolation that reduces chance of wound colonization and safe disposal of infected materials (important factor to reduce hospital-acquired infections, while avoiding some major disadvantages such as opacity of dressing materials, inaccessible offensive smelling wound environment, and relatively high treatment costs. In LAD a definite intermittent negative pressure regimen is followed. The intermittent negative pressure (cycle of 30 minutes suction and 3 1 / 2 hours rest is effective. Overall, the LAD is a safe and effective alternative to conventional dressing methods. LAD is an excellent research tool for wound healing as frequent/continuous record of wound healing is possible without disturbing the wound healing process. LAD is an effective dressing for limb salvage in cases of acute and chronic complex wounds. Leech effect prevents wound related systematic response syndrome and sepsis. Suction-assisted dressing (SAD is a combination of semiocclusive dressing with negative pressure. It works by removal of fluids by intermittent (like LAD negative pressure and preventing bacterial invasion. SAD is especially advantageous where soakage is less, there is no dead tissue covering the wound (e.g., following skin grafting, superficial skin wounds (e

  16. Siglec-F-dependent negative regulation of allergen-induced eosinophilia depends critically on the experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Sarah J; Richards, Hannah E; Crocker, Paul R

    2014-07-01

    Siglec-8 and siglec-F are paralogous membrane proteins expressed on human and murine eosinophils respectively. They bind similar sialylated and sulphated glycans and mediate eosinophil apoptosis when cross-linked with antibodies or glycan ligands. In models of allergic eosinophilic airway inflammation, siglec-F was shown previously to be important for negatively regulating eosinophilia. It was proposed that this was due to siglec-F-dependent apoptosis, triggered via engagement with ligands that are upregulated on bronchial epithelium. Our aim was to further investigate the functions of siglec-F by comparing two commonly used models of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation that differ in the dose and route of administration of ovalbumin. In confirmation of published results, siglec-F-deficient mice had enhanced lung tissue eosinophilia in response to intranasal ovalbumin delivered every other day. However, following aerosolised ovalbumin delivered daily, there was no influence of siglec-F deficiency on lung eosinophilia. Expression of siglec-F ligands in lung tissues was similar in both models of allergen induced inflammation. These data demonstrate that siglec-F-dependent regulation of eosinophilia is subtle and depends critically on the model used. The findings also indicate that mechanisms other than ligand-induced apoptosis may be important in siglec-F-dependent suppression of eosinophilia. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A new phase diagram of water under negative pressure: The rise of the lowest-density clathrate s-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yingying; Zhu, Chongqin; Wang, Lu; Cao, Xiaoxiao; Su, Yan; Jiang, Xue; Meng, Sheng; Zhao, Jijun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Ice and ice clathrate are not only omnipresent across polar regions of Earth or under terrestrial oceans but also ubiquitous in the solar system such as on comets, asteroids, or icy moons of the giant planets. Depending on the surrounding environment (temperature and pressure), ice alone exhibits an exceptionally rich and complicated phase diagram with 17 known crystalline polymorphs. Water molecules also form clathrate compounds with inclusion of guest molecules, such as cubic structure I (s-I), cubic structure II (s-II), hexagonal structure H (s-H), tetragonal structure T (s-T), and tetragonal structure K (s-K). Recently, guest-free clathrate structure II (s-II), also known as ice XVI located in the negative-pressure region of the phase diagram of water, is synthesized in the laboratory and motivates scientists to reexamine other ice clathrates with low density. Using extensive Monte Carlo packing algorithm and dispersion-corrected density functional theory optimization, we predict a crystalline clathrate of cubic structure III (s-III) composed of two large icosihexahedral cavities (8(6)6(8)4(12)) and six small decahedral cavities (8(2)4(8)) per unit cell, which is dynamically stable by itself and can be fully stabilized by encapsulating an appropriate guest molecule in the large cavity. A new phase diagram of water ice with TIP4P/2005 (four-point transferable intermolecular potential/2005) model potential is constructed by considering a variety of candidate phases. The guest-free s-III clathrate with ultralow density overtakes s-II and s-H phases and emerges as the most stable ice polymorph in the pressure region below -5834 bar at 0 K and below -3411 bar at 300 K.

  18. Metallicity dependence of turbulent pressure and macroturbulence in stellar envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassitelli, L.; Fossati, L.; Langer, N.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Castro, N.; Sanyal, D.

    2016-08-01

    Macroturbulence, introduced as a fudge to reproduce the width and shape of stellar absorption lines, reflects gas motions in stellar atmospheres. While in cool stars, it is thought to be caused by convection zones immediately beneath the stellar surface, the origin of macroturbulence in hot stars is still under discussion. Recent works established a correlation between the turbulent-to-total pressure ratio inside the envelope of stellar models and the macroturbulent velocities observed in corresponding Galactic stars. To probe this connection further, we evaluated the turbulent pressure that arises in the envelope convective zones of stellar models in the mass range 1-125 M⊙ based on the mixing-length theory and computed for metallicities of the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud. We find that the turbulent pressure contributions in models with these metallicities located in the hot high-luminosity part of the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram is lower than in similar models with solar metallicity, whereas the turbulent pressure in low-metallicity models populating the cool part of the HR-diagram is not reduced. Based on our models, we find that the currently available observations of hot massive stars in the Magellanic Clouds appear to support a connection between macroturbulence and the turbulent pressure in stellar envelopes. Multidimensional simulations of sub-surface convection zones and a larger number of high-quality observations are necessary to test this idea more rigorously.

  19. Two modes of interfacial pattern formation by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet-ITO interactions under positive and negative polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhijie; Liu, Dingxin; Xu, Dehui; Cai, Haifeng; Xia, Wenjie; Wang, Bingchuan; Li, Qiaosong; Kong, Michael G.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we report the observation of an interfacial pattern formation on the ITO surface by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet-ITO interactions. By changing the voltage polarity of positive and negative pulses, the interfacial phenomenon displays two different pattern modes, i.e. a double ring pattern with a combination of homogeneous and filamentous modes as well as a single ring pattern with a homogeneous mode. The reasons may mainly be attributed to the spread of a radially outward traveling surface ionization wave that would cause electric field distributions and charge accumulations on the ITO surface. The spatial-temporal distribution of \\text{N}2+≤ft({{B}2}{\\sum}\\text{u}+\\right) , He(3s3S), and O(3p5P) emissions are diagnosed to better understand the formation mechanism and the differences of plasma jet patterns under positive and negative polarities. Results show that the distribution of \\text{N}2+≤ft({{B}2}{\\sum}\\text{u}+\\right) emission is the main contributor for generating the filament structure in a double ring pattern for positive polarity, the homogeneous mode pattern mainly depends on the distribution of O(3p5P) emission for positive and negative polarity. Additionally, in order to further systematically understand the behaviors of plasma jet patterns, some parametric results, such as behaviors versus pulse peak voltage, dielectric material, pulse repetition rate, and flow rate are investigated. Some interesting phenomena and additional insights for the plasma jet pattern are found with different parametric conditions. This study might help to better understand effects of plasma jets in interaction with surfaces, or its application in the medical sector.

  20. Metallicity dependence of turbulent pressure and macroturbulence in stellar envelopes

    CERN Document Server

    Grassitelli, Luca; Langer, Norbert; Simon-Diaz, Sergio; Castro, Norberto; Sanyal, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    Macroturbulence, introduced as a fudge to reproduce the width and shape of stellar absorption lines, reflects gas motions in stellar atmospheres. While in cool stars, it is thought to be caused by convection zones immediately beneath the stellar surface, the origin of macroturbulence in hot stars is still under discussion. Recent works established a correlation between the turbulent-to-total pressure ratio inside the envelope of stellar models and the macroturbulent velocities observed in corresponding Galactic stars. To probe this connection further, we evaluated the turbulent pressure that arises in the envelope convective zones of stellar models in the mass range 1-125 Msun based on the mixing-length theory and computed for metallicities of the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud. We find that the turbulent pressure contributions in models with these metallicities located in the hot high-luminosity part of the Hertzsprung-Russel (HR) diagram is lower than in similar models with solar metallicity, whereas the ...

  1. Neuroactive steroids, negative affect, and nicotine dependence severity in male smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Christine E; Trost, William T; Shampine, Lawrence; Behm, Frederique M; Giordano, Louis A; Massing, Mark W; Rose, Jed E

    2006-06-01

    Nicotine administration alters neuroactive steroids in rodent models, and serum levels of the neuroactive steroid DHEAS (dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) appear to be higher in smokers. These molecules may be relevant to tobacco addiction and affective symptoms. This study aims to investigate DHEAS, allopregnanolone, pregnenolone, and other steroids in male smokers to determine potential associations with nicotine dependence severity and negative affect. Allopregnanolone and pregnenolone serum levels were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, while DHEAS and other steroid levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 28 male smokers. Correlational analyses were performed to determine potential associations with rating measures, including the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), the addiction subscale of the Ikard Smoking Motivation Questionnaire (ISMQ), the craving item on the Reasons to Smoke (RTS) Questionnaire, and the negative affect and craving subscales of the Shiffman-Jarvik Withdrawal Questionnaire. DHEAS levels were inversely correlated with the negative affect subscale of the Shiffman-Jarvik Withdrawal Questionnaire (r=-0.60, p=0.002) and the RTS craving item (r=-0.43, p=0.03), and tended to be inversely correlated with the FTND scores (r=-0.38, p=0.067) and the ISMQ addiction subscale (r=-0.38, p=0.059), adjusting for age. Allopregnanolone levels were positively correlated with cotinine levels (r=0.57, p=0.006); pregnenolone levels tended to be positively correlated with cotinine levels (r=0.40, p=0.066). DHEAS levels were inversely correlated with negative affect and craving measures, and may predict nicotine dependence severity. Allopregnanolone levels were positively correlated with cotinine levels, suggesting that this neuroactive steroid may be upregulated in smokers. Neuroactive steroids may represent novel smoking cessation agents.

  2. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  3. Pressure dependence of BaNi2As2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Filip [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Tuscon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We report results from resistivity measurements of BaNi{sub 2}As{sub 2} up to 27.4 kbar of pressure. We find the structural transition at 130 K is broadened slightly with increasing pressure. There is also minimal influence on the superconducting transition, where the resistive onset increases from 2 to 3 K, but the temperature at which zero resistance is obtained is unchanged up to 27.4 kbar. This behavior is in contrast to that observed in the Fe-based systems as well as in LaNiPO and LaNiAsO.

  4. Pressure dependence of X-rays produced by an LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal at low pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanamoto, Katsumi, E-mail: hana@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Kawabe, Atsushi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kataoka, Takahiro; Okada, Mari; Yamaoka, Kiyonori [Graduate School of Health Sciences, Okayama University, 5-1 Shikata-cho, 2-chome, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2012-03-21

    The energy spectra of X-rays produced by an LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal have been measured at pressures of 5-50 Pa. The energy spectra showed that the amount of X-rays increased exponentially and the endpoint energy of the spectra increased linearly with the decrease of pressure at pressures of 10-25 Pa. A maximum endpoint energy of about 22 keV was obtained using an LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal with 0.5 mm thickness at the pressure of 10 Pa. The maximum energy produced by the present experimental setup was estimated assuming that the LiTaO{sub 3} single crystal forms a parallel-plate capacitor. The estimated energy reasonably agreed with the energy obtained. The pressure dependence of the endpoint energy was discussed in relation to the breakdown potential at low pressures.

  5. Coagulation changes during lower body negative pressure and blood loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helmond, Noud; Johnson, Blair D; Curry, Timothy B; Cap, Andrew P; Convertino, Victor A; Joyner, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that markers of coagulation activation are greater during lower body negative pressure (LBNP) than those obtained during blood loss (BL). We assessed coagulation using both standard clinical tests and thrombelastography (TEG) in 12 men who performed a LBNP and BL protocol in a randomized order. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, -15, -30, and -45 mmHg of suction. BL included 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of blood removal (up to 1,000 ml total). Arterial blood draws were performed at baseline and after the last stage of each protocol. We found that LBNP to -45 mmHg is a greater central hypovolemic stimulus versus BL; therefore, the coagulation markers were plotted against central venous pressure (CVP) to obtain stimulus-response relationships using the linear regression line slopes for both protocols. Paired t-tests were used to determine whether the slopes of these regression lines fell on similar trajectories for each protocol. Mean regression line slopes for coagulation markers versus CVP fell on similar trajectories during both protocols, except for TEG α° angle (-0.42 ± 0.96 during LBNP vs. -2.41 ± 1.13°/mmHg during BL; P coagulation was accelerated as evidenced by shortened R-times (LBNP, 9.9 ± 2.4 to 6.2 ± 1.1; BL, 8.7 ± 1.3 to 6.4 ± 0.4 min; both P coagulation markers observed during BL.

  6. Standing Without Gravity: the Use of Lower Body Negative Pressure for Research and Reconditioning in Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Campbell, M.R.; Stenger, M.B.; Lee, S.M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Weightlessness during spaceflight causes cephalad redistribution of intravascular and extravascular fluid, provoking cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system adaptations. The resulting functional state is appropriate for weightlessness but can result in orthostatic hypotension and intolerance during and after return to a persistent acceleration or gravitational environment. Lower body negative pressure (LBNP) applies subambient air pressure to the legs and lower abdomen inside a volume sealed at the waist, and decompression by 40-50 mmHg reverses the spaceflight-induced cephalad shift. LBNP has been used both to test the state of cardiovascular system during spaceflight and as a countermeasure by all space-faring nations. Two configurations have thus far been used in spaceflight since the first LBNP flew on the first Soviet Salyut station in 1971. The Soviet and Russian configuration, used in four Salyut stations, the Mir space station and the Russian segment of the International Space Station, has no saddle to support the body so during decompression the feet press against the bottom of the collapsible chamber which shortens and applies force against the feet proportional to the decompression level. Thus, activation of the skeletal musculature partially counteracts vascular and venous pooling in the enclosed body segments, stimulating the orthostatic compensatory mechanisms as they would be standing on Earth. In the American configuration, used aboard Skylab and the Space Shuttle, a saddle supported the astronaut so the feet did not contact the bottom of the chamber, and vascular engorgement was not countered by muscular contraction. This minimized skeletal muscle involvement, unmasked vascular compensatory mechanisms for research purposes, and allowed measurements of changes in leg volume and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Both variants have demonstrated research and therapeutic value in appropriately designed protocols. LBNP continues to be used for

  7. Time-dependent permeation of carbon dioxide through a polyimide membrane above the plasticization pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessling, M.; Huisman, I.; Boomgaard, van den Th.; Smolders, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The time-dependent permeation behavior of a glassy polyimide is studied above and below the plasticization pressure with carbon dioxide as the permeating gas. The work particularly focuses on the quantification of the slow increase in permeability at feed pressures above the plasticization pressure.

  8. Does negative-pressure wound therapy influence subjacent bacterial growth? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Graeme E; Murphy, George R F; Nanchahal, Jagdeep

    2017-08-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy is a ubiquitous wound management resource. The influence of NPWT on the bacterial bioburden of the subjacent wound remains unclear. We sought to examine the evidence. MEDLINE, Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched for articles quantitatively evaluating bacterial load under NPWT. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria including 4 randomised controlled trials, 8 clinical series and 12 experimental studies. Twenty studies evaluated conventional NPWT, while 4 evaluated infiltration-based NPWT. While 8 studies using conventional NPWT failed to demonstrate an observable effect on bacterial load, 7 studies reported that NPWT was inherently bacteriostatic and 5 others reported species selectivity with suppression of non-fermentative gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB), including Pseudomonas spp. Simultaneously, there was some evidence of enhanced proliferation of gram-positive cocci where the niche was cleared of NFGNB. Two of the 4 studies using infiltration-based NPWT also reported selectively impaired proliferation of Pseudomonas spp. The assumption that NPWT suppresses bacterial proliferation is oversimplified. There is evidence that NPWT exhibits species selectivity, suppressing the proliferation of NFGNB. However, this may depopulate the niche for exploitation by gram-positive cocci. This, in turn, has implications for the use of NPWT where highly virulent strains of gram-positive cocci have been isolated and the duration of NPWT therapy and frequency of dressing changes. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emotional bias of sleep-dependent processing shifts from negative to positive with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bethany J; Schultz, Kurt S; Adams, Sydney; Baran, Bengi; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2016-09-01

    Age-related memory decline has been proposed to result partially from impairments in memory consolidation over sleep. However, such decline may reflect a shift toward selective processing of positive information with age rather than impaired sleep-related mechanisms. In the present study, young and older adults viewed negative and neutral pictures or positive and neutral pictures and underwent a recognition test after sleep or wake. Subjective emotional reactivity and affect were also measured. Compared with waking, sleep preserved valence ratings and memory for positive but not negative pictures in older adults and negative but not positive pictures in young adults. In older adults, memory for positive pictures was associated with slow wave sleep. Furthermore, slow wave sleep predicted positive affect in older adults but was inversely related to positive affect in young adults. These relationships were strongest for older adults with high memory for positive pictures and young adults with high memory for negative pictures. Collectively, these results indicate preserved but selective sleep-dependent memory processing with healthy aging that may be biased to enhance emotional well-being.

  10. Effect of interband interactions on the pressure dependence on transition temperature of MgB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuu, Okechukwu A.; Abah, Obinna

    2015-12-01

    A two-band BCS model with interactions, both phonon and non-phonon induced interactions, were employed to investigate the pressure dependence on superconducting transition temperature of two-band superconductor. We derived the transition temperature and its pressure dependence within Bogoliubov--Valatin formalism for magnesium diboride superconductor. We examined the influence of interband interactions on transition temperature at varying pressure and analyzed the relevance of this calculation in magnesium diboride, MgB2.

  11. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  12. Negative pressure wound therapy for soft tissue injuries around the foot and ankle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Jong-Keon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate the results of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with open wounds in the foot and ankle region. Materials and methods Using a NPWT device, 16 patients were prospectively treated for soft tissue injuries around the foot and ankle. Mean patient age was 32.8 years (range, 3–67 years. All patients had suffered an acute trauma, due to a traffic accident, a fall, or a crush injury, and all had wounds with underlying tendon or bone exposure. Necrotic tissues were debrided before applying NPWT. Dressings were changed every 3 or 4 days and treatment was continued for 18.4 days on average (range, 11–29 days. Results Exposed tendons and bone were successfully covered with healthy granulation tissue in all cases except one. The sizes of soft tissue defects reduced from 56.4 cm2 to 42.9 cm2 after NPWT (mean decrease of 24%. In 15 of the 16 cases, coverage with granulation tissue was achieved and followed by a skin graft. A free flap was needed to cover exposed bone and tendon in one case. No major complication occurred that was directly attributable to treatment. In terms of minor complications, two patients suffered scar contracture of grafted skin. Conclusion NPWT was found to facilitate the rapid formation of healthy granulation tissue on open wounds in the foot and ankle region, and thus, to shorten healing time and minimize secondary soft tissue defect coverage procedures.

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy technologies for chronic wound care in the home setting: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Susan M; Valle, M Frances; Wilson, Lisa M; Lazarus, Gerald; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Robinson, Karen A

    2015-01-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is increasing in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. We conducted a systematic review on the efficacy and safety of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds in the home setting. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, up to June 2014. Two independent reviewers screened search results. Seven studies met our criteria for inclusion. Six of the studies compared NPWT devices to other wound care methods and one study compared two different NPWT technologies. Data were limited by variability in the types of comparator groups, methodological limitations, and poor reporting of outcomes. We were unable to draw conclusions about the efficacy or safety of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds in the home setting due to the insufficient evidence. Consensus is needed on the methods of conducting and reporting wound care research so that future studies are able inform decisions about the use of NPWT in the home environment for chronic wounds.

  14. Recurrent sternal infection following treatment with negative pressure wound therapy and titanium transverse plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Geneviève; Costache, Victor; Houde, Chanel; Cloutier, Daniel; Montalin, Livia; Voisine, Pierre; Baillot, Richard

    2010-04-01

    To provide a definition for recurrent sternal infection (RSI), analyse the risk factors and describe the management of this complication following treatment of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) with horizontal titanium sternal osteosynthesis and coverage with pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps. Between 2002 and 2007, 10665 patients were submitted to open-heart surgery (OHS) in our institution, of whom 149 (1.4%) developed a DSWI. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) followed by sternal osteosynthesis with musculocutaneous coverage was used in 92 (61.7%) patients. A retrospective review was done using a prospectively maintained database to identify risk factors for recurrent infection in this group of patients. Of the 92 patients who underwent sternal osteosynthesis, nine (9.8%) developed recurrent sternal infection requiring hardware removal. Univariate analysis showed that preoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) status (33.3% vs 6.1%; p=0.03) and prolonged intubation time in ICU (44.4% vs 14.6%; pMRSA preoperative status as a significant predictor of RSI and/or persistent infection. Chest-wall integrity in patients with RSI can be maintained after hardware removal, even after only a few weeks following initial plating. Copyright (c) 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Pelvic blood pooling of men and women during lower body negative pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D D; Montgomery, L D

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate possible gender differences in the hemodynamic responses of the lower body during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). In this study, 17 women (mean age = 56 yrs) and 15 men (mean age = 55 yrs) underwent a 15 min exposure to -50 mm Hg LBNP. A Beckman (BR-100) Impedance Plethysmograph was used to measure each subject's leg and pelvic blood flow and pooling during the LBNP test. The women had an 83% greater increase in blood volume in the pelvic region than men as a result of the LBNP exposure. Women and men had similar increases in leg blood volume as a result of the 15 min exposure to -50 mm Hg. There was no significant gender difference in the decreased amount of blood flow to the leg or pelvic regions by the end of -50 mm Hg LBNP. These results demonstrate that women have greater blood pooling in the pelvic region compared to men when exposed to -50 mm Hg LBNP. These results should be considered when designing life-support equipment for men and women pilots and astronauts, especially the designing of anti-G and Space Shuttle re-entry garments.

  16. Management of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Marco; Izzo, Valentina; Vainieri, Erika; Giurato, Laura; Ruotolo, Valeria; Uccioli, Luigi

    2015-05-18

    Diabetic foot (DF) is a common complication of diabetes and the first cause of hospital admission in diabetic patients. In recent years several guidelines have been proposed to reinforce the the management of DF with a notable increase in diabetes knowledge and an overall reduction of amputations. Significant improvements have been reached in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and nowadays clinicians have several advanced medications to apply for the best local therapy. Among these, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a useful adjunct in the management of chronic and complex wounds to promote healing and wound bed preparation for surgical procedures such as skin grafts and flap surgery. NPWT has shown remarkable results although its mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this paper, we offer a complete overview of this medication and its implication in the clinical setting. We have examined literature related to NPWT concerning human, animal and in vitro studies, and we have summarized why, when and how we can use NPWT to treat DFUs. Further we have associated our clinical experience to scientific evidence in the field of diabetic foot to identify a defined strategy that could guide clinician in the use of NPWT approaching to DFUs.

  17. Dayside magnetospheric ULF wave frequency modulated by a solar wind dynamic pressure negative impulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X. C.; Shi, Q. Q.; Zong, Q.-G.; Tian, A. M.; Nowada, M.; Sun, W. J.; Zhao, H. Y.; Hudson, M. K.; Wang, H. Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Pu, Z. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) waves play an important role in the transport of the solar wind energy to the magnetosphere. In this paper, we present a ULF wave event in the dayside magnetosphere which shows a sudden decrease in frequency from 3.1 to 2.3 mHz around 0756 UT on 11 January 2010, when a solar wind dynamic pressure drop (from ˜5 to ˜2 nPa) was observed simultaneously. The wave exits globally. The phase differences between electric and magnetic fields indicate that the compressional mode wave is standing before and after the wave frequency decrease. This result suggests that the ULF wave should be associated with a cavity mode and the frequency decrease might be induced by the change of the cavity size. A theoretical calculation was made to estimate the cavity mode frequency. The calculated wave frequency before/after the negative impulse is 3.8/2.6 mHz, which is consistent with the observations.

  18. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy precipitated by negative pressure pulmonary oedema following total thyroidectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Bharathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 'Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM' or 'stress cardiomyopathy' is a reversible cardiomyopathy that is precipitated by intense emotional or physical stress. This syndrome is characterised by symptoms mimicking acute coronary syndrome with transient systolic dysfunction associated with regional wall motion abnormalities, which extend beyond a single coronary vascular bed in the absence of obstructive coronary vascular disease. The presentation of TCM and myocardial infarction is similar with sudden onset of chest pain, breathlessness as well as abnormalities in both the electrocardiogram and cardiac enzymes. It is difficult to differentiate between the two until cardiac catheterisation establishes the diagnosis. We report a case of TCM in a post-menopausal female, precipitated by negative pressure pulmonary oedema following total thyroidectomy in whom timely cardiac catheterisation established the diagnosis and influenced the management. Heightened awareness of this unique cardiomyopathy is essential to have a high index of suspicion in at-risk population for the prompt diagnosis of stress-related cardiomyopathy syndromes occurring in the perioperative period.

  19. Use of a risk assessment method to improve the safety of negative pressure wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelong, Anne-Sophie; Martelli, Nicolas; Bonan, Brigitte; Prognon, Patrice; Pineau, Judith

    2014-06-01

    To conduct a risk analysis of the negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) care process and to improve the safety of NPWT, a working group of nurses, hospital pharmacists, physicians and hospital managers performed a risk analysis for the process of NPWT care. The failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) method was used for this analysis. Failure modes and their consequences were defined and classified as a function of their criticality to identify priority actions for improvement. By contrast to classical FMECA, the criticality index (CI) of each consequence was calculated by multiplying occurrence, severity and detection scores. We identified 13 failure modes, leading to 20 different consequences. The CI of consequences was initially 712, falling to 357 after corrective measures were implemented. The major improvements proposed included the establishment of 6-monthly training cycles for nurses, physicians and surgeons and the introduction of computerised prescription for NPWT. The FMECA method also made it possible to prioritise actions as a function of the criticality ranking of consequences and was easily understood and used by the working group. This study is, to our knowledge, the first to use the FMECA method to improve the safety of NPWT.

  20. Bronchial fistula closure with negative pressure wound therapy: a feasible and cost-effective treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Rodrigo Barboza; Müller, Bruno Francisco; Cipriano, Federico Enrique Garcia; Coltro, Pedro Soler; Farina, Jayme Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of bronchial fistula (BF) after pulmonary lobectomy is a challenge. Often, patients require long hospital stay, have recurrent empyema and pneumonia, are susceptible to sepsis, often need broad-spectrum antibiotics, as well as various surgical approaches. With the advent and growing evidence of the benefits of negative pressure therapy (NPT), its use in some patients with BF has been reported with encouraging results concerning its feasibility and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the application of NPT as a resource for BF treatment and comparatively analyze the overall cost of treatment. RESUMO O tratamento de fístula brônquica (FB) após lobectomia pulmonar é um desafio. Muitas vezes, o paciente demanda longo tempo de internação, apresenta recidivas de empiema e pneumonia, pode evoluir para sepse, frequentemente necessita de antibioticoterapia de amplo espectro, bem como de várias abordagens cirúrgicas. Com o advento e acúmulo de evidências dos benefícios da terapia por pressão negativa (TPN), seu uso em alguns pacientes com FB tem sido relatado com resultados animadores relativos à sua viabilidade e ao seu custo-efetividade. O objetivo deste estudo foi demonstrar a aplicação de TPN como recurso para tratamento da FB e analisar comparativamente o custo global do seu tratamento.

  1. Evidence for Negative Effects of Elevated Intra-Abdominal Pressure on Pulmonary Mechanics and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Davarcı

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the effects of pneumoperitoneum on lung mechanics, end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2, arterial blood gases (ABG, and oxidative stress markers in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC by using lung-protective ventilation strategy. Materials and Methods. Forty-six patients undergoing LC and abdominal wall hernia (AWH surgery were assigned into 2 groups. Measurements and blood samples were obtained before, during pneumoperitoneum, and at the end of surgery. BALF samples were obtained after anesthesia induction and at the end of surgery. Results. Peak inspiratory pressure, ETCO2, and pCO2 values at the 30th minute were significantly increased, while there was a significant decrease in dynamic lung compliance, pH, and pO2 values in LC group. In BALF samples, total oxidant status (TOS, arylesterase, paraoxonase, and malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased; the glutathione peroxidase levels were significantly decreased in LC group. The serum levels of TOS and paraoxonase were significantly higher at the end of surgery in LC group. In addition, arylesterase level in the 30th minute was increased compared to baseline. Serum paraoxonase level at the end of surgery was significantly increased when compared to AWH group. Conclusions. Our study showed negative effects of pneumoperitoneum in both lung and systemic levels despite lung-protective ventilation strategy.

  2. Complementary Effects of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy and Pulsed Radiofrequency Energy on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Kao, Huang-Kai; Dong, Ziqing; Jiang, Zhaohua; Guo, Lifei

    2017-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy and pulsed radiofrequency energy are two clinical modalities used to treat soft-tissue wounds. They are purported to affect healing differently. The aim of this experimental study was to contrast the two modalities at a mechanistic level and to investigate whether their combined therapy could achieve additive and complementary effects on wound healing. Full-thickness dorsal cutaneous wounds of diabetic, db/db, mice were treated with either negative-pressure wound therapy, pulsed radiofrequency energy, or combined therapies. Macroscopic healing kinetics were examined. Epidermal regeneration (proliferation rate and length of reepithelialization) and neovascularization (blood vessel density) were investigated. Messenger RNA levels indicative of angiogenic (basic fibroblast growth factor), profibrotic (transforming growth factor-β), epidermal proliferative (keratinocyte growth factor), and extracellular matrix remodeling (collagen 1) processes were measured in wound tissues. All three treatment groups displayed faster wound healing. The negative-pressure wound therapy/pulsed radiofrequency energy combined therapy led to significantly faster healing than either the negative-pressure wound therapy or pulsed radiofrequency energy therapy alone. Epidermal regeneration and neovascularization were enhanced in all three groups. The two negative-pressure wound therapy groups (alone and combined with pulsed radiofrequency energy) demonstrated more significant increases in expression of all assayed growth factors than the pulsed radiofrequency energy group. Furthermore, the combined therapy exhibited a more profound elevation in collagen 1 expression than either of the two therapies alone. Combining the negative-pressure wound therapy and pulsed radiofrequency energy modalities can achieve additive benefits in cutaneous healing, and the two therapies can be easily used together to complement each other in clinical wound treatments.

  3. Competing mechanism driving diverse pressure dependence of thermal conductivity of X Te (X =Hg ,Cd , and Zn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Tao; Hu, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Effectively engineering the lattice thermal conductivity of materials is a key interest of the current thermal science community. Pressure or compressive strain is one of the most worthwhile processes to modify the thermal transport property of materials, due to its robust tunability and flexibility of realization. While it is well documented in the literature that the application of hydrostatic pressure normally increases the thermal conductivity of bulk materials, little work has been performed on abnormal pressure-dependent thermal conductivity and the governing mechanism has not been fully understood yet. In this paper, taking bulk telluride systems X Te (X =Hg ,Cd ,Zn ) as examples, we show, by combining first-principle calculation and the phonon Boltzmann transport equation, that the thermal conductivity presents diverse pressure dependence although they belong to the same group. The thermal conductivity of ZnTe is independent of pressure, while abnormal negative pressure dependence of thermal conductivity is observed in HgTe. As for CdTe, the trend falls in between HgTe and ZnTe and relies largely on the temperature. By comparing the key contributors of the lattice thermal conductivity, we find that the diverse pressure dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity is governed by the competition between the enhancement of group velocity of longitudinal acoustic and optic modes and the reduction of phonon relaxation time of transverse acoustic modes, with both effects being fully quantified by our calculation. Comparison with traditional bulk systems such as silicon further underpins the governing mechanism. The correlation between the diverse thermal transport phenomena and the nature of the atomic bonding is also qualitatively established. These findings are expected to deepen our understanding of manipulating phonon transport of bulk materials via simple compressive strain and are also helpful for related applications, such as optimizing thermoelectric

  4. Dependency of hydromechanical properties of monzonitic granite on confining pressure and fluid pressure under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huanling; Xu, Weiya; Lui, Zaobao; Chao, Zhiming; Meng, Qingxiang

    2016-05-01

    Monzonitic granite is a low-permeability rock. Monzonitic granite formations are ideal for underground storage of oil due to their low permeability and high mechanical strength. In this study, a series of coupled hydromechanical triaxial tests are carried out using monzonitic granite specimens. The influence of confining and fluid pressures on stress, strain, and permeability is investigated. Failure characteristics under different confining and fluid pressures are discussed based on the analysis of macro fracture planes and micro scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The test results show that the change of permeability with stress and strain reflects the deformation stages of compaction, compression, crack propagation, coalesce, and failure of cracks. Due to the low porosity, the change of permeability is small in the initial phases of compaction and compression, whereas there is a significant increase in permeability when new cracks start to develop and coalesce. Confining pressures have a significant impact on the strength and permeability, particularly the crack damage stress of the rock. Compared with confining pressure, the effect of fluid pressure on rock strength and crack damage stress is small. For the monzonitic granite specimens tested, changing the confining pressure results in different failure modes, whereas the fluid pressure has a relatively small effect on the failure modes.

  5. Temperature dependence of bag pressure from quasiparticle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, N.; Singh, C. P.

    2001-03-01

    A quasiparticle model with effective thermal gluon and quark masses is used to derive a temperature /T- and baryon chemical potential /μ-dependent bag constant /B(μ,T). Consequences of such a bag constant are obtained on the equation of state (EOS) for a deconfined quark-gluon plasma (QGP).

  6. Association Between Depressive Symptoms and Negative Dependent Life Events from Late Childhood to Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel P.; Whisman, Mark A.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.; Rhee, Soo Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The association between stressful life events and depression has been consistently supported in the literature; however, studies of the developmental trajectories of these constructs and the nature of their association over time are limited. We examined trajectories of depressive symptoms and negative dependent life events and the associations between these constructs in a sample of 916 youth assessed annually from age 9 to 16, using latent growth curve modeling. Youth depressive symptoms, as rated by youth, parents, and teachers, decreased from late childhood into adolescence, whereas rates of youth-rated life events did not change significantly over time. Initial levels of depressive symptoms were positively associated with initial levels of life events. Furthermore, after controlling for the initial association between the two constructs, increases in depressive symptoms (as assessed by parents and youth) were positively associated with increases in life events over time. The study builds on prior research by focusing specifically on negative dependent life events, examining results across multiple informants, and employing latent growth curve modeling to evaluate associations between trajectories of life events and depressive symptoms in a longitudinal adolescent sample. Additional studies employing latent growth modeling to examine the changes in this association during adolescence are needed. PMID:22592931

  7. Expression of HIF-1{alpha} in irradiated tissue is altered by topical negative-pressure therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, A.; Stange, S.; Labanaris, A.; Horch, R.E. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Plastic and Hand Surgery; Dimmler, A. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Sauer, R.; Grabenbauer, G. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2007-03-15

    Background and Purpose: Despite the enormous therapeutic potential of modern radiotherapy, common side effects such as radiation-induced wound healing disorders remain a well-known clinical phenomenon. Topical negative pressure therapy (TNP) is a novel tool to alleviate intraoperative, percutaneous irradiation or brachytherapy. Since TNP has been shown to positively influence the perfusion of chronic, poorly vascularized wounds, the authors applied this therapeutic method to irradiated wounds and investigated the effect on tissue oxygenation in irradiated tissue in five patients. Material and Methods: With informed patients' consent, samples prior to and 4 and 8 days after continuous TNP with -125 mmHg were obtained during routine wound debridements. Granulation tissue was stained with hematoxylin-eosin, and additionally with CD31, HIF-1{alpha} (hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}), and D2-40 to detect blood vessels, measure indirect signs of hypoxia, and lymph vessel distribution within the pre- and post-TNP samples. Results: In this first series of experiments, a positive influence of TNP onto tissue oxygenation in radiation-induced wounds could be demonstrated. TNP led to a significant decrease of 53% HIF-1{alpha}-positive cell nuclei. At the same time, a slight reduction of CD31-stained capillaries was seen in comparison to samples before TNP. Immunostaining with D2-40 revealed an increased number of lymphatic vessels with distended lumina and an alteration of the parallel orientation within the post-TNP samples. Conclusion: This study is, to the authors' knowledge, the first report on a novel previously not described histological marker to demonstrate the effects of TNP on HIF-1{alpha} expression as an indirect marker of tissue oxygenation in irradiated wounds, as demonstrated by a reduction of HIF-1{alpha} concentration after TNP. Since this observation may be of significant value to develop possible new strategies to treat radiation-induced tissue

  8. Bilayered negative-pressure wound therapy preventing leg incision morbidity in coronary artery bypass graft patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongchao; Song, Zhigang; Xu, Zhiyun; Ye, Xiaofei; Xue, Chunyu; Li, Junhui; Bi, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Backgrounds: The harvesting of great saphenous veins for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients may result in significant complications, including lymphorrhagia, lymphoedema, incision infection, wound dehiscence, and skin flap necrosis. We investigated the function of a self-designed bilayered negative pressure wound therapy (b-NPWT) for reducing the above-mentioned complications using a clinical randomized controlled trial. Methods: A single-center, pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted. From December 2013 to March 2014, a total of 72 coronary heart disease patients (48 men and 24 women) received CABG therapy, with great saphenous veins were selected as grafts. Patients were equally randomized into a treatment and a control group. After the harvesting of the great saphenous veins and direct closure of the wound with sutures, b-NPWT was used for the thigh incision in the treatment group for 5 days (treatment thigh). Traditional surgical pads were applied to both the shank incisions of the treatment group patients (treatment shank) and the entire incisions of the control group (control thigh, control shank). Postoperative complications were recorded and statistically analyzed based on outcomes of thigh treatment, shank treatment, thigh control, and shank control groups. Results: The incidence rates of early complications, such as lymphorrhagia, lymphoedema, infection, wound dehiscence, and skin flap necrosis, of the vascular donor site in the thigh treatment group was significantly lower than those in the 3 other groups. Conclusions: The self-designed b-NPWT can effectively reduce postoperative complications, such as lymphedema, incision infection, wound dehiscence, and skin flap necrosis, in CABG patients who underwent great saphenous veins harvesting. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov. The unique registration number is NCT02010996. PMID:28099357

  9. Treatment of stump complications after above-knee amputation using negative-pressure wound therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Srđan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The stump wound complications after above-knee amputation lead to other problems, such as prolonged rehabilitation, delayed prosthetic restoration, the increase in total treatment cost and high mortality rates. Objective. To evaluate the safety and outcomes of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT using Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VACR therapy in patients with stump complication after above-knee amputation (AKA. Methods. From January 2011 to July 2014, AKA was performed in 137 patients at the University Cardiovascular Clinic. Nineteen (12.4% of these patients (mean age 69.3 Ѓ} 9.2 years were treated with NPWT. The following variables were recorded: wound healing and hospitalization time, rate of NPWT treatment failure, and mortality. Results. AKA was performed in 17 (89.5% patients after the vascular or endovascular procedures had been exhausted, while urgent AKA was performed in two (10.5% patients due to uncontrolled infection. The time before NPWT application was 3.1 Ѓ} 1.9 days and the duration of the NPWT use ranged from 15 to 54 days (mean 27.95 Ѓ} 12.1 days. During NPWT treatment, operative debridement was performed in 12 patients. All the patients were kept on culture-directed intravenous antibiotics. The average hospital length of stay was 34.7 days (range 21-77 days. There were four (20.9% failures during the treatment which required secondary amputation. During the treatment, one (5.3% patient died due to multi-organ failure after 27 days. Conclusions. The use of NPWT therapy in the treatment of AKA stump complication is a safe and effective procedure associated with low risk and positive outcome in terms of wound healing time and further complications.

  10. Cost-Utility Analysis: Sartorius Flap versus Negative Pressure Therapy for Infected Vascular Groin Graft Managment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Macarios, David; Griffin, Leah; Kosowski, Tomasz; Pyfer, Bryan J; Offodile, Anaeze C; Driscoll, Daniel; Maddali, Sirish; Attwood, John

    2015-11-01

    Sartorius flap coverage and adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) have been described in managing infected vascular groin grafts with varying cost and clinical success. We performed a cost-utility analysis comparing sartorius flap with NPWT in managing an infected vascular groin graft. A literature review compiling outcomes for sartorius flap and NPWT interventions was conducted from peer-reviewed journals in MEDLINE (PubMed) and EMBASE. Utility scores were derived from expert opinion and used to estimate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Medicare current procedure terminology and diagnosis-related groups codes were used to assess the costs for successful graft salvage with the associated complications. Incremental cost-effectiveness was assessed at $50,000/QALY, and both univariate and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess robustness of the conclusions. Thirty-two studies were used pooling 384 patients (234 sartorius flaps and 150 NPWT). NPWT had better clinical outcomes (86.7% success rate, 0.9% minor complication rate, and 13.3% major complication rate) than sartorius flap (81.6% success rate, 8.0% minor complication rate, and 18.4% major complication rate). NPWT was less costly ($12,366 versus $23,516) and slightly more effective (12.06 QALY versus 12.05 QALY) compared with sartorius flap. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the base case findings; NPWT was either cost-effective at $50,000/QALY or dominated sartorius flap in 81.6% of all probabilistic sensitivity analyses. In our cost-utility analysis, use of adjunctive NPWT, along with debridement and antibiotic treatment, for managing infected vascular groin graft wounds was found to be a more cost-effective option when compared with sartorius flaps.

  11. Dominant negative Ras attenuates pathological ventricular remodeling in pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Rapti, Kleopatra; Mehel, Hind; Zhang, Shihong; Dhandapany, Perundurai S.; Liang, Lifan; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Bobe, Regis; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Adnot, Serge; Lebeche, Djamel; Hajjar, Roger J.; Lipskaia, Larissa; Chemaly, Elie R.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of the oncogene Ras in cardiac hypertrophy is well appreciated. The hypertrophic effects of the constitutively active mutant Ras-Val12 are revealed by clinical syndromes due to the Ras mutations and experimental studies. We examined the possible anti-hypertrophic effect of Ras inhibition in vitro using rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (NRCM) and in vivo in the setting of pressure-overload left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (POH) in rats. Ras functions were modulated via adenovirus directed gene transfer of active mutant Ras-Val12 or dominant negative mutant N17-DN-Ras (DN-Ras). Ras-Val12 expression in vitro activates NFAT resulting in pro-hypertrophic and cardio-toxic effects on NRCM beating and Z-line organization. In contrast, the DN-Ras was antihypertrophic on NRCM, inhibited NFAT and exerted cardio-protective effects attested by preserved NRCM beating and Z line structure. Additional experiments with silencing H-Ras gene strategy corroborated the antihypertrophic effects of siRNA-H-Ras on NRCM. In vivo, with the POH model, both Ras mutants were associated with similar hypertrophy two weeks after simultaneous induction of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer. However, LV diameters were higher and LV fractional shortening lower in the Ras-Val12 group compared to control and DN-Ras. Moreover, DN-Ras reduced the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes in vivo, and decreased the expression of markers of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy. In isolated adult cardiomyocytes after 2 weeks of POH and Ras-mutant gene transfer, DN-Ras improved sarcomere shortening and calcium transients compared to Ras-Val12. Overall, DN-Ras promotes a more physiological form of hypertrophy, suggesting an interesting therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26260012

  12. Effect of Pressure dependent demand on pipe network analysis: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MINAKSHI SHRIVASTAVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Water distribution network is most important part of world’s infrastructure. In the present work, analysis for proposed site of school of planning and architecture, Bhopal is done by using demand based analysis and the design is further analyzed for pressure dependent demand. Detailed study of variation of threshold pressure with power function is carried out .Complete site is divided into two zones having two separate water tank for supply and the analysis is done by varying threshold pressure and power function in case of pressure dependent demand by using commercial pipe network analysis software.

  13. Pressure Dependence of the Magnetization in the Ferromagnetic Superconductor UGe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleiderer, C.; Huxley, A. D.

    2002-09-01

    We report measurements of the pressure dependence of the low-temperature magnetization that show that the two pressure induced magnetic transitions in UGe2 are of first order. Further, the pressure dependence of the uniform susceptibility relative to the superconducting transition is not as expected if the latter is driven by the proximity to a ferromagnetic quantum critical point. Our data instead suggest that the superconducting pairing could be associated with a sharp spike in the electronic density of states that is also responsible for the lower pressure magnetic transition.

  14. Cardiovascular and hormonal responses to bicycle exercise during lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde-Petersen, F.; Suzuki, M.; Christensen, N. J.

    The purpose was to combine bicycle exercise and LBNP as a model to investigate the mechanisms regulating circulation during gravitatiobal stresses. METHODS: Cardiac Output (CO) by acetylene-, argon-, oxygen rebreathing; Heart Rate (HR) from ECG; Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) by arm cuff; Plasma Nor-Epinephrine (NE), Epinephrine (E), and Lactate (HLa) by isotope and enzymatic techniques respectively. Total Peripheral Resistance (TPR)=MAP/CO and stroke volume (SV)=CO/HR. Six subjects exercised at 180-200 Watts in the upright position on a mechanically braked computer controlled small bicycle ergometer placed in a LBNP box. The above parameters were measured at rest and at 5 and 9 min of exercise without and with LBNP at -30 or -40 mmHg (depending on LBNP tolerance). RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: In the face of an increased sympathetic nervous activity (Ne+E, TPR, and HR increased) during exercise in LBNP, there was a decrease in CO and SV indicating that the venous return was insufficient. However, HLa was unchanged demonstrating that the blood flow to the working muscles did not suffer.

  15. Evaluation of a Decision-Making Curriculum for Teaching Adolescents with Disabilities to Resist Negative Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemka, Ishita; Hickson, Linda; Mallory, Sarah B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the impact of a decision-making curriculum (PEER-DM) on the social peer relationship knowledge and self-protective decision-making skills of adolescents with disabilities in hypothetical situations involving negative peer pressure. A randomized design was used to assign students with disabilities from…

  16. Evaluation of a Decision-Making Curriculum for Teaching Adolescents with Disabilities to Resist Negative Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemka, Ishita; Hickson, Linda; Mallory, Sarah B.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the impact of a decision-making curriculum (PEER-DM) on the social peer relationship knowledge and self-protective decision-making skills of adolescents with disabilities in hypothetical situations involving negative peer pressure. A randomized design was used to assign students with disabilities from…

  17. Gender-dependent negative correlation of peripheral E2 estradiol levels with ventricular diastolic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Bo; Zhao, Lili; FaweiHE, Fawei

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study to investigate the correlation of the peripheral concentrations of one representative estrogen, E2 estradiol, with various indicators reflecting different aspects of cardiac structures and functions. A total of 84 typical patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and 77 healthy subjects were enrolled. Venous blood samples were taken to test E2 estradiol contents. Echocardiographic imaging was performed to record various indices of cardiac structures and functions. Concentrations of peripheral E2 estradiol were decreased in female HCM patients, compared to female normal controls; after medical treatment, peripheral E2 estradiol levels were elevated, nearly to normal levels. Peripheral E2 estradiol concentrations were negatively correlated with LAV (r2=0.5078, Pnegatively correlated with ventricular diastolic functions and this correlation was gender-dependent. Our study could provide clues to explore the molecular mechanisms of HCM, and clinic evidence for the diagnosis and prognostic management of HCM patients, as well as medical intervening for HCM.

  18. Negative density dependence of seed dispersal and seedling recruitment in a neotropical palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Patrick A; Visser, Marco D; Joseph Wright, S; Rutten, Gemma; Muller-Landau, Helene C

    2014-09-01

    Negative density dependence (NDD) of recruitment is pervasive in tropical tree species. We tested the hypotheses that seed dispersal is NDD, due to intraspecific competition for dispersers, and that this contributes to NDD of recruitment. We compared dispersal in the palm Attalea butyracea across a wide range of population density on Barro Colorado Island in Panama and assessed its consequences for seed distributions. We found that frugivore visitation, seed removal and dispersal distance all declined with population density of A. butyracea, demonstrating NDD of seed dispersal due to competition for dispersers. Furthermore, as population density increased, the distances of seeds from the nearest adult decreased, conspecific seed crowding increased and seedling recruitment success decreased, all patterns expected under poorer dispersal. Unexpectedly, however, our analyses showed that NDD of dispersal did not contribute substantially to these changes in the quality of the seed distribution; patterns with population density were dominated by effects due solely to increasing adult and seed density.

  19. An NF-Y-dependent switch of positive and negative histone methyl marks on CCAAT promoters.

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    Giacomo Donati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone tails have a plethora of different post-translational modifications, which are located differently in "open" and "closed" parts of genomes. H3K4me3/H3K79me2 and H4K20me3 are among the histone marks associated with the early establishment of active and inactive chromatin, respectively. One of the most widespread promoter elements is the CCAAT box, bound by the NF-Y trimer. Two of NF-Y subunits have an H2A-H2B-like structure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established the causal relationship between NF-Y binding and positioning of methyl marks, by ChIP analysis of mouse and human cells infected with a dominant negative NF-YA: a parallel decrease in NF-Y binding, H3K4me3, H3K79me2 and transcription was observed in promoters that are dependent upon NF-Y. On the contrary, changes in the levels of H3K9-14ac were more subtle. Components of the H3K4 methylating MLL complex are not recruited in the absence of NF-Y. As for repressed promoters, NF-Y removal leads to a decrease in the H4K20me3 mark and deposition of H3K4me3. CONCLUSIONS: Two relevant findings are reported: (i NF-Y gains access to its genomic locations independently from the presence of methyl histone marks, either positive or negative; (ii NF-Y binding has profound positive or negative consequences on the deposition of histone methyl marks. Therefore NF-Y is a fundamental switch at the heart of decision between gene activation and repression in CCAAT regulated genes.

  20. Cost analysis of Topical Negative Pressure (TNP) Therapy for traumatic acquired wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolios, Leila; Kolios, Georg; Beyersdorff, Marius; Dumont, Clemens; Stromps, Jan; Freytag, Sebastian; Stuermer, Klaus

    2010-06-15

    Extended traumatic wounds require extended reconstructive operations and are accompanied by long hospitalizations and risks of infection, thrombosis and flap loss. In particular, the frequently used Topical Negative Pressure (TNP) Therapy is regarded as cost-intensive. The costs of TNP in the context of traumatic wounds is analyzed using the method of health economic evaluation. All patients (n=67: 45 male, 22 female; average age 54 y) with traumatically acquired wounds being treated with TNP at the university hospital of Goettingen in the period 01/01/2005-31/12/2007 comprise the basis for this analysis. The concept of activity-based costing based on clinical pathways according to InEK (National Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System) systematic calculations was chosen for cost accounting. In addition, a special module system adaptable for individual courses of disease was developed. The treated wounds were located on a lower extremity in 83.7% of cases (n=56) and on an upper extremity in 16.3% of cases (n=11). The average time of hospitalization of the patients was 54 days. Twenty-five patients (37.31%) exceeded the "maximum length of stay" of their associated DRG (Diagnosis Related Groups). The total PCCL (patient clinical complexity level = patient severity score) of 2.99 reflects the seriousness of disease. For the treatment of the 67 patients, total costs were $1,729,922.32 (1,249,176.91 euro). The cost calculation showed a financial deficit of $-210,932.50 (-152,314.36 euro). Within the entire treatment costs of $218,848.07 (158,030.19 euro), 12.65% per case were created by TNP with material costs of $102,528.74 (74,036 euro), representing 5.92% of entire costs. The cost of TNP per patient averaged $3,266.39 (2,358.66 euro). The main portion of the costs was not - as is often expected - due to high material costs of TNP but instead to long-term treatments. Because of their complexity, the cases are insufficiently represented in the lump

  1. Cost analysis of Topical Negative Pressure (TNP Therapy for traumatic acquired wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freytag, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended traumatic wounds require extended reconstructive operations and are accompanied by long hospitalizations and risks of infection, thrombosis and flap loss. In particular, the frequently used Topical Negative Pressure (TNP Therapy is regarded as cost-intensive. The costs of TNP in the context of traumatic wounds is analyzed using the method of health economic evaluation.All patients (n=67: 45 male, 22 female; average age 54 y with traumatically acquired wounds being treated with TNP at the university hospital of Goettingen in the period 01/01/2005–31/12/2007 comprise the basis for this analysis. The concept of activity-based costing based on clinical pathways according to InEK (National Institute for the Hospital Remuneration System systematic calculations was chosen for cost accounting. In addition, a special module system adaptable for individual courses of disease was developed. The treated wounds were located on a lower extremity in 83.7% of cases (n=56 and on an upper extremity in 16.3% of cases (n=11. The average time of hospitalization of the patients was 54 days. Twenty-five patients (37.31% exceeded the „maximum length of stay“ of their associated DRG (Diagnosis Related Groups. The total PCCL (patient clinical complexity level = patient severity score of 2.99 reflects the seriousness of disease. For the treatment of the 67 patients, total costs were $1,729,922.32 (1,249,176.91 €. The cost calculation showed a financial deficit of $–210,932.50 (–152,314.36 €. Within the entire treatment costs of $218,848.07 (158,030.19 €, 12.65% per case were created by TNP with material costs of $102,528.74 (74,036 €, representing 5.92% of entire costs. The cost of TNP per patient averaged $3,266.39 (2,358.66 €. The main portion of the costs was not – as is often expected – due to high material costs of TNP but instead to long-term treatments. Because of their complexity, the cases are insufficiently represented in the

  2. Circulating ghrelin was negatively correlated with pulmonary arterial pressure in atrial septal defect patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhao-feng; ZHOU Da-xin; PAN Wen-zhi; ZHANG Lei; GE Jun-bo

    2013-01-01

    Background Ghrelin was found to attenuate the magnitude of pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling in rats.The objective of this study was to explore the fasting plasma ghrelin level and the relationships between ghrelin and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) in atrial septal defect (ASD) patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).Methods Fasting plasma ghrelin,obestatin,and insulin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in ASD patients with or without PAH according to the manufacturer's instructions.Insulin resistance was calculated by the homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) approach,calculated as fasting insulin (microunits/ml)× fasting blood glucose (mmol/L)/22.5.Comparisons between the parameters of patients with PAH and those of patients with normal PAP were performed with an unpaired Student's t test.The relationships between ghrelin and various clinical parameters were examined by bivariate correlations and multiple regression analysis.Results We found that the fasting plasma ghrelin level and the ratio of ghrelin to obestatin were significantly lower in the PAH group compared with the control group ((582.4±12.8) pg/ml vs.(1045.2±95.5) pg/ml,P <0.05 and 30.5±4.9 vs.70.0±9.7,P <0.01).The fasting plasma obestatin level was higher in the PAH group compared with the control group,but the difference between them was not significant ((23.2±3.1) pg/ml vs.(16.3±1.6) pg/ml,P >0.05).In a multiple regression model analysis,only mean PAP was an independent predictor of ghrelin and the ratio of ghrelin to obestatin (standardized coefficient=0.737,P <0.001 and standardized coefficient=-0.588,P=0.006,respectively).Conclusion Ghrelin is negatively correlated with mean PAP and this suggests that circulating ghrelin might predict the severity of pulmonary hypertension in ASD patients with PAH.

  3. Plant-soil feedbacks promote negative frequency dependence in the coexistence of two aridland grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y Anny; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2016-07-27

    Understanding the mechanisms of species coexistence is key to predicting patterns of species diversity. Historically, the ecological paradigm has been that species coexist by partitioning resources: as a species increases in abundance, self-limitation kicks in, because species-specific resources decline. However, determining coexistence mechanisms has been a particular puzzle for sedentary organisms with high overlap in their resource requirements, such as plants. Recent evidence suggests that plant-associated microbes could generate the stabilizing self-limitation (negative frequency dependence) that is required for species coexistence. Here, we test the key assumption that plant-microbe feedbacks cause such self-limitation. We used competition experiments and modelling to evaluate how two common groups of soil microbes (rhizospheric microbes and biological soil crusts) influenced the self-limitation of two competing desert grass species. Negative feedbacks between the dominant plant competitor and its rhizospheric microbes magnified self-limitation, whereas beneficial interactions between both plant species and biological soil crusts partly counteracted this stabilizing effect. Plant-microbe interactions have received relatively little attention as drivers of vegetation dynamics in dry land ecosystems. Our results suggest that microbial mechanisms can contribute to patterns of plant coexistence in arid grasslands.

  4. Negative and anomalous T-dependent magnetization trend in CoCr2O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamran, M.; Nadeem, K.; Mumtaz, M.

    2017-10-01

    We studied the temperature dependent magnetic properties of cobalt chromite (CoCr2O4) nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction revealed the cubic spinel structure of the nanoparticles and average crystallite size was about 42 nm. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of single phase spinel structure. ZFC/FC curves revealed a paramagnetic (PM) to ferromagnetic (FiM) transition at TC = 100 K with conical spiral state at TS = 27 K and lock-in state at TL = 13 K. Negative magnetization is observed in the ZFC curve under 50 Oe applied field, which gets suppressed upon the application of higher field. The TC was shifted towards higher temperature with the application of higher field, while TS and TL remain unaffected. M-H loops showed FiM behavior below 100 K and nearly PM at TC = 100 K. Below 75 K, an abnormal decrease in MS is observed down to 5 K, which may be due to presence of stiffed/strong conical spin spiral and lock in states at low temperatures. Modified Kneller's law showed a good fit for temperature dependent Hc at higher temperature and deviated at low temperature (Nanoparticles showed slow spin relaxation in both ZFC and FC protocols at 5 K, which signifies the presence of spin-glass like behavior at low temperatures. Both curves were fitted with stretched exponential law and the value of β lies in the spin-glass regime. In summary, CoCr2O4 nanoparticles showed anomalous decrease of MS with decreasing temperature, negative magnetization at low field and rather stiffed/strong conical spin spiral and lock-in states in combination with spin-glass behavior at the low temperatures.

  5. Effect of Pressure Dependent Viscosity on Couple Stress Squeeze Film Lubrication between Rough Parallel Plates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naduvinamani, Neminath Bujappa; Apparao, Siddangouda; Gundayya, Hiremath Ayyappa; Biradar, Shivraj Nagshetty

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a theoretical study of the effect of pressure dependent viscosity on couple stress squeeze film lubrication between rough parallel plates is analyzed on the basis of Barus experimental results...

  6. Investigation of the pressure dependence of the Gibbs potential for polymer blends by means of SANS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssen, S.; Schwahn, D.; Springer, T.;

    1995-01-01

    The temperature and pressure dependence of the Flory-Huggins parameter was determined for several polymer blends from the SANS structure factor S(Q --> 0) for pressures less than or equal to 1.2 kbar. It can be split into an enthalpic and an entropic part. Furthermore, the radius of gyration...

  7. A simple way to model the pressure dependency of rock velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tongcheng

    2016-04-01

    Modeling the pressure dependency of rock velocity is important for interpreting and comparing the seismic and earthquake data from different depths. This study develops a multicomponent differential effective medium model for the elastic properties of porous rocks with two types of pores in the grain background without mixing order. The developed model is applied to modeling the pressure dependent elastic velocity of porous rocks by incorporating the variation of stiff and compliant porosity as a function of pressure. The pressure dependent stiff and compliant porosity were inverted from the measured total porosity under pressure using a dual porosity model, and the unknown constant stiff and compliant pore aspect ratios were inverted by best fitting the modeled velocity to the measured data. Application of the approach to a low porosity granite and a medium porosity sandstone sample showed that the pressure dependency of rock velocity can be satisfactorily modeled by the developed model using the pressure dependent stiff and compliant porosity and carefully estimated stiff and compliant pore aspect ratio values.

  8. Changes in subcutaneous blood flow during locally applied negative pressure to the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, K; Henriksen, O

    1983-01-01

    The effect of locally applied subatmospheric pressure on subcutaneous blood flow was studied in 12 healthy subjects. Blood flow was measured on the forearm by the local 133Xe wash-out technique. Air suction between 10 mmHg and 250 mmHg was applied to the skin. Subatmospheric pressure of 20 mmHg c...

  9. Use of dynamic CT in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with comparison of positive and negative pressure ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helm, Emma; Babyn, Paul [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Talakoub, Omid; Alirezaie, Javad [Ryerson University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Toronto, ON (Canada); Grasso, Francesco; Engelberts, Doreen; Kavanagh, Brian P. [Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, Departments of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine and the Program in Pulmonary and Experimental Medicine, Toronto (Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Negative pressure ventilation via an external device ('iron lung') has the potential to provide better oxygenation with reduced barotrauma in patients with ARDS. This study was designed to see if oxygenation differences between positive and negative ventilation could be explained by CT. Six anaesthetized rabbits had ARDS induced by repeated saline lavage. Rabbits were ventilated with positive pressure ventilation (PPV) and negative pressure ventilation (NPV) in turn. Dynamic CT images were acquired over the respiratory cycle. A computer-aided method was used to segment the lung and calculate the range of CT densities within each slice. Volumes of ventilated lung and atelectatic lung were measured over the respiratory cycle. NPV was associated with an increased percentage of ventilated lung and decreased percentage of atelectatic lung. The most significant differences in ventilation and atelectasis were seen at mid-inspiration and mid-expiration (ventilated lung NPV=61%, ventilated lung PPV=47%, p<0.001; atelectatic lung NPV=10%, atelectatic lung PPV 19%, p<0.001). Aeration differences were not significant at end-inspiration. Dynamic CT can show differences in lung aeration between positive and negative ventilation in ARDS. These differences would not be appreciated if only static breath-hold CT was used. (orig.)

  10. Selective modulation of cellular voltage dependent calcium channels by hyperbaric pressure - a suggested HPNS partial mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eAviner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Professional deep sea divers experience motor and cognitive impairment, known as High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS, when exposed to pressures of 100 msw (1.1MPa and above, considered to be the result of synaptic transmission alteration. Previous studies have indicated modulation of presynaptic Ca2+ currents at high pressure. We directly measured for the first time pressure effects on the currents of voltage dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Pressure selectivity augmented the current in CaV1.2 and depressed it in CaV3.2 channels. Pressure application also affected the channels' kinetics, such as ƮRise, ƮDecay. Pressure modulation of VDCCs seems to play an important role in generation of HPNS signs and symptoms.

  11. Gap state charge induced spin-dependent negative differential resistance in tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Zhang, X.-G.; Han, X. F.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate through first-principles calculation a new spin-dependent negative differential resistance (NDR) mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) with cubic cation disordered crystals (CCDC) AlO x or Mg1-x Al x O as barrier materials. The CCDC is a class of insulators whose band gap can be changed by cation doping. The gap becomes arched in an ultrathin layer due to the space charge formed from metal-induced gap states. With an appropriate combination of an arched gap and a bias voltage, NDR can be produced in either spin channel. This mechanism is applicable to 2D and 3D ultrathin junctions with a sufficiently small band gap that forms a large space charge. It provides a new way of controlling the spin-dependent transport in spintronic devices by an electric field. A generalized Simmons formula for tunneling current through junction with an arched gap is derived to show the general conditions under which ultrathin junctions may exhibit NDR.

  12. Energy-dependent motion of TonB in the Gram-negative bacterial inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lorne D; Zhou, Yongyao; Smallwood, Chuck R; Lill, Yoriko; Ritchie, Ken; Yip, Wai Tak; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2013-07-09

    Gram-negative bacteria acquire iron with TonB-dependent uptake systems. The TonB-ExbBD inner membrane complex is hypothesized to transfer energy to outer membrane (OM) iron transporters. Fluorescence microscopic characterization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TonB hybrid proteins revealed an unexpected, restricted localization of TonB in the cell envelope. Fluorescence polarization measurements demonstrated motion of TonB in living cells, which likely was rotation. By determining the anisotropy of GFP-TonB in the absence and presence of inhibitors, we saw the dependence of its motion on electrochemical force and on the actions of ExbBD. We observed higher anisotropy for GFP-TonB in energy-depleted cells and lower values in bacteria lacking ExbBD. However, the metabolic inhibitors did not change the anisotropy of GFP-TonB in ΔexbBD cells. These findings demonstrate that TonB undergoes energized motion in the bacterial cell envelope and that ExbBD couples this activity to the electrochemical gradient. The results portray TonB as an energized entity in a regular array underlying the OM bilayer, which promotes metal uptake through OM transporters by a rotational mechanism.

  13. Marburgvirus Hijacks Nrf2-Dependent Pathway by Targeting Nrf2-Negative Regulator Keap1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Page

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Marburg virus (MARV has a high fatality rate in humans, causing hemorrhagic fever characterized by massive viral replication and dysregulated inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that VP24 of MARV binds Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1, a negative regulator of nuclear transcription factor erythroid-derived 2 (Nrf2. Binding of VP24 to Keap1 Kelch domain releases Nrf2 from Keap1-mediated inhibition promoting persistent activation of a panoply of cytoprotective genes implicated in cellular responses to oxidative stress and regulation of inflammatory responses. Increased expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was demonstrated both during MARV infection and upon ectopic expression of MARV VP24. We also show that Nrf2-deficient mice can control MARV infection when compared to lethal infection in wild-type animals, indicating that Nrf2 is critical for MARV infection. We conclude that VP24-driven activation of the Nrf2-dependent pathway is likely to contribute to dysregulation of host antiviral inflammatory responses and that it ensures survival of MARV-infected cells despite these responses.

  14. Comparative study of the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation during negative pressure wound therapy in laparostomy using the V.A.C. abdominal dressing and the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Ingemansson, Richard

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to compare the changes in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal wall, wound contraction and fluid evacuation, using the established V.A.C. abdominal dressing (VAC dressing) and a new abdominal dressing, the ABThera open abdomen negative pressure therapy system (ABThera dressing), in negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Midline incisions were made in 12 pigs that were subjected to treatment with NPWT using the VAC or ABThera dressing. The microvascular blood flow in the intestinal wall was measured before and after the application of topical negative pressures of −50, −75 and −125mmHg using laser Doppler velocimetry. Wound contraction and fluid evacuation were also measured. Baseline blood flow was defined as 100% in all settings. The blood flow was significantly reduced to 64·6±6·7% (P blood flow was significantly reduced to 39·6±6·7% (P blood flow could be observed between the two groups. The ABThera system afforded significantly better fluid evacuation from the wound, better drainage of the abdomen and better wound contraction than the VAC dressing.

  15. Dependency of blood pressure upon cardiac filling in patients with severe postural hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Haedersdal, C; Stokholm, K H

    1994-01-01

    Autonomic denervation of the vascular bed results theoretically in a stronger dependency of blood pressure upon intravascular volume, and the study described aimed at an investigation of the relation between cardiac filling and arterial blood pressure in patients with severe postural hypotension...... by vasoconstriction. The reduction in cardiac output resulted from reductions in left ventricular end-diastolic volumes with unchanged left ventricular ejection fractions and only moderate increments in heart rate. The study was demonstrated that blood pressure is strongly dependent upon cardiac filling in severe...

  16. Nonlinear pressure dependence of TN in almost multiferroic EuTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guguchia, Z.; Caslin, K.; Kremer, R. K.; Keller, H.; Shengelaya, A.; Maisuradze, A.; Bettis, J. L., Jr.; Köhler, J.; Bussmann-Holder, A.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    2013-09-01

    The antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase transition temperature TN of EuTiO3 has been studied as a function of pressure p. The data reveal a nonlinear dependence of TN on p with TN increasing with increasing pressure. The exchange interactions exhibit an analogous dependence on p as TN (if the absolute value of the nearest neighbor interaction is considered) and there is evidence that the AFM transition is robust with increasing pressure. The corresponding Weiss temperature ΘW remains anomalous since it always exhibits positive values. The data are analyzed within the Bloch power law model and provide excellent agreement with experiment.

  17. On the helical pipe flow with a pressure-dependent viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Pažanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the flow of incompressible fluid with a pressure-dependent viscosity through a pipe with helical shape. The viscosity-pressure relation is defined by the Barus law. The thickness of the pipe and the helix step are assumed to be of the same order and considered as the small parameter. After transforming the starting problem, we compute the asymptotic solution using curvilinear coordinates and standard perturbation technique. The solution is provided in the explicit form clearly showing the influence of viscosity-pressure dependence and pipe's geometry on the effective flow.

  18. Pressure Dependence of the Charge-Density-Wave Gap in Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.; /Zurich, ETH; Arcangeletti, E.; Perucchi, A.; Baldassarre, L.; Postorino, P.; Lupi, S.; /Rome U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH

    2009-12-14

    We investigate the pressure dependence of the optical properties of CeTe{sub 3}, which exhibits an incommensurate charge-density-wave (CDW) state already at 300 K. Our data are collected in the mid-infrared spectral range at room temperature and at pressures between 0 and 9 GPa. The energy for the single particle excitation across the CDW gap decreases upon increasing the applied pressure, similarly to the chemical pressure by rare-earth substitution. The broadening of the bands upon lattice compression removes the perfect nesting condition of the Fermi surface and therefore diminishes the impact of the CDW transition on the electronic properties of RTe{sub 3}.

  19. Pressure dependence of the refractive index in wurtzite and rocksalt indium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, R. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Científiques (CSIC), Lluís Solé i Sabarís s.n., 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); MALTA-Consolider Team, Departament de Física Aplicada, ICMUV, Universitat de València, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Segura, A. [MALTA-Consolider Team, Departament de Física Aplicada, ICMUV, Universitat de València, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Ibáñez, J., E-mail: jibanez@ictja.csic.es; Artús, L. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Científiques (CSIC), Lluís Solé i Sabarís s.n., 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We have performed high-pressure Fourier transform infrared reflectance measurements on a freestanding InN thin film to determine the refractive index of wurtzite InN and its high-pressure rocksalt phase as a function of hydrostatic pressure. From a fit to the experimental refractive-index curves including the effect of the high-energy optical gaps, phonons, free carriers, and the direct (fundamental) band-gap in the case of wurtzite InN, we obtain pressure coefficients for the low-frequency (electronic) dielectric constant ε{sub ∞}. Negative pressure coefficients of −8.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} and −14.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} are obtained for the wurtzite and rocksalt phases, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the electronic band structure and the compressibility of both phases.

  20. Clenched fist injury complicated by septic arthritis and osteomyelitis treated with negative pressure wound therapy: One case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslav Kilian

    2016-01-01

    We reported a 30 years old man who suffered a bite wound of the right hand in a fight.Two days after the injury,he was admitted in emergency because of stab wound above the head of the third metacarpal bone.He presented the swelling,redness,pain and fever.Primary revision confirmed only partial lesion of the extensor apparatus.During the following days,we recorded a deterioration of local findings and magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the third metacarpophalangeal joint.The wound was then revised several times using negative pressure wound therapy in combination with intravenous antibiotics.After resolution of clinical and laboratory findings,the wound was finally closed by delayed primary suture.Clenched fist injury is a medical emergency that requires immediate surgical revision.We treated clenched fist injury with the development of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis with negative pressure wound therapy and obtained good outcomes.

  1. Successful closure of an open-window thoracostomy wound by negative-pressure wound therapy: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Sumiko; Sado, Tetsu; Sakurada, Akira; Okada, Yoshinori; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy is a newly developed, noninvasive technique to manage a wide variety of wounds. This novel therapy was successfully used to heal the wound after open-window thoracostomy without surgical closure. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of a painful mass on the right side of her chest. Radiological findings revealed an abscess on the right chest wall that had ruptured into the right lung and caused empyema. Antibiotic therapy did not yield sufficient improvement. Open-window thoracostomy was performed to achieve a sterile pleural space, and negative-pressure wound therapy was then applied. The pleural space was reduced, and the patient was discharged home with self-administered wound care. The wound healed completely in 5 months without any need for surgical closure.

  2. Postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema following repetitive laryngospasm even after reversal of neuromuscular blockade by sugammadex: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Min Hyun; Cho, Hyun Oh; Park, Soon Eun

    2017-02-01

    Laryngospasm, an occlusion of the glottis, can occur at any time during anesthesia, and is associated with serious perioperative complications such as hypoxia, hypercabia, aspiration, bronchospasm, arrhythmia, prolonged recovery, cardiac collapse, and eventually catastrophic death. Importantly, postoperative negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) is a rare, but well described life-threatening complication related to acute and chronic upper airway obstruction. Sugammadex well known for affirmatively reducing the postoperative pulmonary complications associated with residual neuromuscular blockade may have an indirect role in triggering the negative intrathoracic pressure by raising a rapid and efficacious respiratory muscle strength in acute upper airway obstruction. Herein, we report a case of postoperative NPPE following repetitive laryngospasm even after reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade using sugammadex.

  3. Negative-pressure wound therapy and early pedicle flap reconstruction of the chest wall after epirubicin extravasation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Marios; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Bednarek, Marzena; Arafkas, Mohamed; Holschneider, Philipp; Hübner, Gunnar

    2017-05-15

    Accidental extravasation is a serious iatrogenic injury among patients receiving anthracycline-containing chemotherapy. The aim of this work is to present a combination therapy for chest wall reconstruction following epirubicin extravasation. Herein, we report a 68-year-old woman with massive soft tissue necrosis of the anterolateral chest wall after epirubicin extravasation from a port implanted in the subclavicular area. The necrotic tissue was resected, the port was removed, and negative-pressure wound therapy was applied. Three weeks later, a latissimus dorsi pedicle flap was successfully used to cover the defect. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a strategy comprising the combination of negative-pressure wound therapy and a latissimus pedicle flap for reconstruction of the chest wall after soft tissue necrosis following epirubicin extravasation.

  4. The economic benefits of negative pressure wound therapy in community-based wound care in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Caroline; Davis, Lynn; Henderson, Valerie; Searle, Richard

    2012-10-01

    The human and economic costs of wounds are of major concern within today's National Health Service. Advances in wound care technology have been shown to be beneficial both in healing and in relation to patient quality of life. Negative pressure has often been associated with high-cost care and restricted to use in the secondary care setting. There is growing use of negative pressure within the community, and this has the potential to benefit the patient and the service by providing quality care in the patient's home setting. Three community sites were chosen to monitor their use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) over a period of 2 years, and this paper presents some of the key findings of this work. The data generated has been used to help target resources and prevent misuse of therapy. Cost per patient episode has been calculated, and this can be compared to similar costs in secondary care, showing significant savings if patients are discharged earlier from secondary care. There is also an increased demand for more patients with complex wounds to be cared for in the community, and in the future, it is likely that community initiated NPWT may become more common. Early analysis of the data showed that the average cost of dressing complex wounds would be significantly less than using traditional dressings, where increased nursing visits could increase costs. There is a compelling argument for more negative pressure to be used and initiated in the community, based not only on improved quality of life for patients but also on the economic benefits of the therapy.

  5. Numerical simulation of magnetospheric ULF waves excited by positive and negative impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The sources of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in the magnetosphere are generally believed to be either the external solar wind perturbations or the internal plasma instabilities. When a sudden impulse of the solar wind dynamic pressure impinges on the magnetopause, ULF waves might be excited and thus the solar wind energy is transported into the earth’s magnetosphere. In this paper, we study the ULF waves excited by different kinds of sudden solar wind pressure impulses through an MHD simulation. We primarily focus on the responses of the earth’s magnetosphere to positive/negative impulses of solar wind dynamic pressure, and positive-negative impulse pairs. The simulation results show that the ULF waves excited by positive and negative impulse have the same amplitude and frequency, with 180° difference in phase, if the amplitude and durations of the input impulses are the same. In addition, it is found that field line resonances (FLRs) occur at certain L-shell regions of the earth’s magneto-sphere after the impact of different positive-negative impulse pairs, which appear to be related to the duration of the impulses and the time interval between the sequential impulses. Another result is that the energy from the solar wind could be transported deeper into the inner magnetosphere by an impulse pair than by a single pulse impact. The results presented in this paper could help us to better understand how energy is transported from solar wind to the earth’s magnetosphere via ULF waves. Also, these results provide some new clues to understanding of how energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere response to different kinds of solar wind pressure impulse impacts including inter-planetary shocks.

  6. The role of photoionization in negative corona discharge: The influences of temperature, humidity, and air pressure on a corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H. Y.; Lu, B. X.; Wang, M.; Guo, Q. F.; Feng, Q. K.

    2017-10-01

    The swarm parameters of the negative corona discharge are improved to calculate the discharge model under different environmental conditions. The effects of temperature, humidity, and air pressure are studied using a conventional needle-to-plane configuration in air. The electron density, electric field, electron generation rate, and photoelectron generation rate are discussed in this paper. The role of photoionization under these conditions is also studied by numerical simulation. The photoelectrons generated in weak ionization region are proved to be dominant.

  7. Evaluation of a Decision-Making Curriculum for Teaching Adolescents with Disabilities to Resist Negative Peer Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemka, Ishita; Hickson, Linda; Mallory, Sarah B

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the impact of a decision-making curriculum (PEER-DM) on the social peer relationship knowledge and self-protective decision-making skills of adolescents with disabilities in hypothetical situations involving negative peer pressure. A randomized design was used to assign students with disabilities from self-contained special education classes to an intervention group (n = 22) or a wait-list control group (n = 20). ANCOVA analyses, using pretest scores as covariates, indicated that students who were trained on PEER-DM had significantly higher effective decision-making action and correct risk perception scores, relative to participants in the control group. This study provides supporting evidence that PEER-DM is a promising intervention for students with disabilities, including those with identified autism spectrum disorders, during transition years to help them develop a better understanding of positive and negative peer relationships and learn systematic decision-making skills for improved handling of social situations in the school and community, especially situations involving negative peer pressure. The study adds credence to using systematic, strategy-based decision making interventions designed to address the cognitive, emotional and motivational processes underlying adolescent decision making in sensitive interpersonal situations involving peer pressure. The study points to the lack of preparedness to handle situations of negative peer pressure as a serious social and health risk for adolescents with disabilities that deserves urgent and concerted attention in transition services programming. Implications for future curriculum-development efforts and replication of treatment findings are discussed. Future research examining disability-specific patterns of decision-making in peer situations and comparisons with typically developing populations is recommended.

  8. EURAMET.M.P-S9: comparison in the negative gauge pressure range -950 to 0 hPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxholm, S.; Otal, P.; AltintaS, A.; Bermanec, L. G.; Durgut, Y.; Hanrahan, R.; Kocas, I.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Pražák, D.; Sandu, I.; Åetina, J.; Spohr, I.; Steindl, D.; Tammik, K.; Testa, N.

    2016-01-01

    A comparison in the negative gauge pressure range was arranged in the period 2011 - 2012. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this comparison: BEV (Austria), CMI (Czech Republic), DANIAmet-FORCE (Denmark), EIM (Greece), HMI/FSB-LPM (Croatia), INM (Romania), IPQ (Portugal), LNE (France), MCCAA (Malta), METROSERT (Estonia), MIKES (Finland), MIRS/IMT/LMT (Slovenia), NSAI (Ireland) and UME (Turkey). The project was divided into two loops: Loop1, piloted by MIKES, and Loop2, piloted by LNE. The results of the two loops are reported separately: Loop1 results are presented in this paper. The transfer standard was Beamex MC5 no. 25516865 with internal pressure module INT1C, resolution 0.01 hPa. The nominal pressure range of the INT1C is -1000 hPa to +1000 hPa. The nominal pressure points for the comparison were 0 hPa, -200 hPa, -400 hPa, -600 hPa, -800 hPa and -950 hPa. The reference values and their uncertainties as well as the difference uncertainty between the laboratory results and the reference values were determined from the measurement data by Monte Carlo simulations. Stability uncertainty of the transfer standard was included in the final difference uncertainty. Degrees of equivalences and mutual equivalences between the laboratories were calculated. Each laboratory reported results for all twelve measurement points, which means that there were 168 reported values in total. Some 163 of the 168 values (97 %) agree with the reference values within the expanded uncertainties, with a coverage factor k = 2. Among the laboratories, four different methods were used to determine negative gauge pressure. It is concluded that special attention must be paid to the measurements and methods when measuring negative gauge pressures. There might be a need for a technical guide or a workshop that provides information about details and practices related to the measurements of negative gauge pressure, as well as differences between the different methods. The comparison is

  9. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  10. [Diagnostic potential of the lower-body negative pressure test in medical monitoring during extended space flights].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslferova, I V; Turchaninova, V F; Golubchikova, Z A; Krivolapov, V V; Khorosheva, E G

    2007-01-01

    To put into service the diagnostic and prognostic capabilities of the lower body negative pressure test (LBNP) during extended space flights, cardiovascular reactions associated with various levels of test tolerance were analyzed and compared. The article gives account of 60 tests performed by 44 cosmonauts 33 to 53 years of age during 59- to 415-d flights. In 36 tests tolerance was good and in 24 - satisfactory. Medical evaluation was fulfilled using GaMMa-1M, an onboard multifunctional medical monitoring system. Dynamics of ECG, blood pressure, stroke and minute volumes, pulse filling, and vertebral-basilar tone exhibited some specific traits that mirrored LBNP tolerance. Established were diagnostically implicative values in the course of pressure drop. Evidence was obtained that during the test and ensuing data analysis consideration should be given as to the span of changes of each parameter, so the time of their initiation, and dynamics.

  11. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  12. MEK-dependent IL-8 induction regulates the invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeongmin; Jeon, Myeongjin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) serves as a prognostic marker for breast cancer, and its expression level correlates with metastatic breast cancer and poor prognosis. Here, we investigated the levels of IL-8 expression in a variety of breast cancer cells and the regulatory mechanism of IL-8 in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Our results showed that IL-8 expression correlated positively with overall survival in basal-type breast cancer patients. The levels of IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion were significantly increased in TNBC cells compared with non-TNBC cells. In addition, the invasiveness of the TNBC cells was dramatically increased by IL-8 treatment and then augmented invasion-related proteins such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 or MMP-9. We observed that elevated IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion were suppressed by a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, UO126. In contrast, the overexpression of constitutively active MEK significantly increased the level of IL-8 mRNA expression in BT474 non-TNBC cells. Finally, we investigated the effect of UO126 on the tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Our results showed that anchorage-independent growth, cell invasion, and cell migration were also decreased by UO126 in TNBC cells. As such, we demonstrated that IL-8 expression is regulated through MEK/ERK-dependent pathways in TNBC cells. A diversity of MEK blockers, including UO126, may be promising for treating TNBC patients.

  13. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiefeng Piao

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  14. Negative density dependence regulates two tree species at later life stage in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Tiefeng; Chun, Jung Hwa; Yang, Hee Moon; Cheon, Kwangil

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tree survival is influenced by negative density dependence (NDD) and differences among species in shade tolerance could enhance coexistence via resource partitioning, but it is still unclear how NDD affects tree species with different shade-tolerance guilds at later life stages. In this study, we analyzed the spatial patterns for trees with dbh (diameter at breast height) ≥2 cm using the pair-correlation g(r) function to test for NDD in a temperate forest in South Korea after removing the effects of habitat heterogeneity. The analyses were implemented for the most abundant shade-tolerant (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and shade-intolerant (Quercus serrata) species. We found NDD existed for both species at later life stages. We also found Quercus serrata experienced greater NDD compared with Chamaecyparis obtusa. This study indicates that NDD regulates the two abundant tree species at later life stages and it is important to consider variation in species' shade tolerance in NDD study.

  15. Lower within-community variance of negative density dependence increases forest diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Miranda

    Full Text Available Local abundance of adult trees impedes growth of conspecific seedlings through host-specific enemies, a mechanism first proposed by Janzen and Connell to explain plant diversity in forests. While several studies suggest the importance of this mechanism, there is still little information of how the variance of negative density dependence (NDD affects diversity of forest communities. With computer simulations, we analyzed the impact of strength and variance of NDD within tree communities on species diversity. We show that stronger NDD leads to higher species diversity. Furthermore, lower range of strengths of NDD within a community increases species richness and decreases variance of species abundances. Our results show that, beyond the average strength of NDD, the variance of NDD is also crucially important to explain species diversity. This can explain the dissimilarity of biodiversity between tropical and temperate forest: highly diverse forests could have lower NDD variance. This report suggests that natural enemies and the variety of the magnitude of their effects can contribute to the maintenance of biodiversity.

  16. Lower within-community variance of negative density dependence increases forest diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, António; Carvalho, Luís M; Dionisio, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Local abundance of adult trees impedes growth of conspecific seedlings through host-specific enemies, a mechanism first proposed by Janzen and Connell to explain plant diversity in forests. While several studies suggest the importance of this mechanism, there is still little information of how the variance of negative density dependence (NDD) affects diversity of forest communities. With computer simulations, we analyzed the impact of strength and variance of NDD within tree communities on species diversity. We show that stronger NDD leads to higher species diversity. Furthermore, lower range of strengths of NDD within a community increases species richness and decreases variance of species abundances. Our results show that, beyond the average strength of NDD, the variance of NDD is also crucially important to explain species diversity. This can explain the dissimilarity of biodiversity between tropical and temperate forest: highly diverse forests could have lower NDD variance. This report suggests that natural enemies and the variety of the magnitude of their effects can contribute to the maintenance of biodiversity.

  17. Application of intermittent negative pressure on the lower extremity and its effect on macro- and microcirculation in the foot of healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Øyvind H; Høiseth, Lars Øivind; Mathiesen, Iacob; Jørgensen, Jørgen J; Weedon-Fekjær, Harald; Hisdal, Jonny

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent negative pressure (INP) applied to the lower leg and foot may increase peripheral circulation. However, it is not clear how different patterns of INP affect macro- and microcirculation in the foot. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the effect of different patterns of negative pressure on foot perfusion in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that short periods with INP would elicit an increase in foot perfusion compared to no negative pressure. In 23 healthy volunteers, we continuously recorded blood flow velocity in a distal foot artery, skin blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure during application of different patterns of negative pressure (-40 mmHg) to the lower leg. Each participant had their right leg inside an airtight chamber connected to an INP generator. After a baseline period at atmospheric pressure, we applied four different 120 sec sequences with either constant negative pressure or different INP patterns, in a randomized order. The results showed corresponding fluctuations in blood flow velocity and skin blood flow throughout the INP sequences. Blood flow velocity reached a maximum at 4 sec after the onset of negative pressure (average 44% increase above baseline, P negative pressure, average blood flow velocity, skin blood flow, and skin temperature decreased (P < 0.001). In conclusion, we observed increased foot perfusion in healthy volunteers after the application of INP on the lower limb.

  18. Brillouin-scattering determination of the acoustic properties and their pressure dependence for three polymeric elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lewis L.; Orler, E. Bruce; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Ahart, Muhtar; Hemley, Russell J.

    2007-09-01

    The acoustic properties of three polymer elastomers, a cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) (Sylgard® 184), a cross-linked terpolymer poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate-vinyl alcohol), and a segmented thermoplastic poly(ester urethane) copolymer (Estane® 5703), have been measured from ambient pressure to approximately 12GPa by using Brillouin scattering in high-pressure diamond anvil cells. The Brillouin-scattering technique is a powerful tool for aiding in the determination of equations of state for a variety of materials, but to date has not been applied to polymers at pressures exceeding a few kilobars. For the three elastomers, both transverse and longitudinal acoustic modes were observed, though the transverse modes were observed only at elevated pressures (>0.7GPa) in all cases. From the Brillouin frequency shifts, longitudinal and transverse sound speeds were calculated, as were the C11 and C12 elastic constants, bulk, shear, and Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratios, and their respective pressure dependencies. P-V isotherms were then constructed, and fit to several empirical/semiempirical equations of state to extract the isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for each material. Finally, the lack of shear waves observed for any polymer at ambient pressure, and the pressure dependency of their appearance is discussed with regard to instrumental and material considerations.

  19. Validation of Lower Body Negative Pressure as an Experimental Model of Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    CAT (EPI/NE) Research ELISA, Rocky Mountain Diag- nostics]. The ELISA measurements were made on a Thermo Labsys- tems plate reader (iEMS Reader MF...conscious mammals . Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 260: H305–H318, 1991. 54. Siegel HW, Downing SE. Contributions of coronary perfusion pressure

  20. Oxygen partial pressure dependence of surface space charge formation in donor-doped SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrä, Michael; Dvořák, Filip; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Nemšák, Slavomír; Matolín, Vladimír; Schneider, Claus M.; Dittmann, Regina; Gunkel, Felix; Mueller, David N.; Waser, Rainer

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the electronic surface structure of donor-doped strontium titanate. Homoepitaxial 0.5 wt. % donor-doped SrTiO3 thin films were analyzed by in situ near ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at a temperature of 770 K and oxygen pressures up to 5 mbar. Upon exposure to an oxygen atmosphere at elevated temperatures, we observed a rigid binding energy shift of up to 0.6 eV towards lower binding energies with respect to vacuum conditions for all SrTiO3 core level peaks and the valence band maximum with increasing oxygen pressure. The rigid shift is attributed to a relative shift of the Fermi energy towards the valence band concomitant with a negative charge accumulation at the surface, resulting in a compensating electron depletion layer in the near surface region. Charge trapping effects solely based on carbon contaminants are unlikely due to their irreversible desorption under the given experimental conditions. In addition, simple reoxygenation of oxygen vacancies can be ruled out as the high niobium dopant concentration dominates the electronic properties of the material. Instead, the negative surface charge may be provided by the formation of cation vacancies or the formation of charged oxygen adsorbates at the surface. Our results clearly indicate a pO2-dependent surface space charge formation in donor-doped SrTiO3 in oxidizing conditions.

  1. Pertactin negative Bordetella pertussis demonstrates higher fitness under vaccine selection pressure in a mixed infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarchi, Azadeh; Octavia, Sophie; Luu, Laurence Don Wai; Tay, Chin Yen; Sintchenko, Vitali; Wood, Nicholas; Marshall, Helen; McIntyre, Peter; Lan, Ruiting

    2015-11-17

    Whooping cough or pertussis is a highly infectious respiratory disease in humans caused by Bordetella pertussis. The use of acellular vaccines (ACV) has been associated with the recent resurgence of pertussis in developed countries including Australia despite high vaccination coverage where B. pertussis strains that do not express pertactin (Prn), a key antigenic component of the ACV, have emerged and become prevalent. In this study, we used an in vivo competition assay in mice immunised with ACV and in naïve (control) mice to compare the proportion of colonisation with recent clinical Prn positive and Prn negative B. pertussis strains from Australia. The Prn negative strain colonised the respiratory tract more effectively than the Prn positive strain in immunised mice, out-competing the Prn positive strain by day 3 of infection. However, in control mice, the Prn positive strain out-competed the Prn negative strain. Our findings of greater ability of Prn negative strains to colonise ACV-immunised mice are consistent with reports of selective advantage for these strains in ACV-immunised humans.

  2. Pressure dependent isotopic fractionation in the photolysis of formaldehyde-d2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, E.J.K.; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Johnson, Matthew Stanley

    2014-01-01

    with altitude in the atmosphere. The mechanism and the extent of this pressure dependency is, however, not adequately described. In the present work D2CO and H2CO were photolyzed in a static reaction chamber at bath gas pressures of 50, 200, 400, 600 and 1000 mbar; these experiments compliment and extend our......The isotope effects in formaldehyde photolysis are the key link between the δD of methane emissions and the δD of atmospheric in situ hydrogen production. A few recent studies have suggested that a pressure dependence in the isotopic fractionation can partly explain enrichment of deuterium...... with results from previous studies. Similarly to what was previously shown for k(H2CO)/k(HDCO), the isotope effect decreased as pressure decreased. In addition, a model was constructed using RRKM theory to calculate the lifetime of excited formaldehyde on the S0 surface, to investigate its...

  3. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial lubrication flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd M.

    2017-02-01

    The surface shear rheology of many insoluble surfactants depends strongly on the surface pressure (or concentration) of that surfactant. Here we highlight the dramatic consequences that surface-pressure-dependent surface viscosities have on interfacially dominant flows, by considering lubrication-style geometries within high Boussinesq (Bo) number flows. As with three-dimensional lubrication, high-Bo surfactant flows through thin gaps give high surface pressures, which in turn increase the local surface viscosity, further amplifying lubrication stresses and surface pressures. Despite their strong nonlinearity, the governing equations are separable, so that results from two-dimensional Newtonian lubrication analyses may be immediately adapted to treat surfactant monolayers with a general functional form of ηs(Π ) . Three paradigmatic systems are analyzed to reveal qualitatively new features: a maximum, self-limiting value for surfactant fluxes and particle migration velocities appears for Π -thickening surfactants, and kinematic reversibility is broken for the journal bearing and for suspensions more generally.

  4. Simulation of the steady-state transport of radon from soil into houses with basements under constant negative pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Oliveira Loureiro, C.

    1987-05-01

    A theoretical model was developed to simulate this phenomenon, under some specific assumptions. The model simulates: the generation and decay of radon within the soil; its transport throughout the soil due to diffusion and convection induced by the pressure disturbance applied at a crack in the basement; its entrance into the house through the crack; and the resultant indoor radon concentration. The most important assumptions adopted in the model were: a steady-state condition; a house with a basement; a geometrically well-defined crack at the wall-floor joint in the basement; and a constant negative pressure applied at the crack in relation to the outside atmospheric pressure. Two three-dimensional finite-difference computer programs were written to solve the mathematical equations of the model. The first program, called PRESSU, was used to calculate: the pressure distribution within the soil as a result of the applied disturbance pressure at the crack; and the resultant velocity distribution of the soil gas throughout the soil matrix. The second program, called MASTRA, was used to: solve the radon mass-transport equation, and to calculate the concentration distribution of radon in the soil gas within the whole soil; and to calculate the entry rate of radon through the crack into the basement, and the final indoor radon concentration. A parametric sensitivity analysis performed on the model, revealed several features of the mechanisms involved in the transport of radon into the house. 84 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  5. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli E.coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure $P$ and temperature $T$. E.coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400atm) and temperature ($23-40^{\\circ}$C). For $T>30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time of E.coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibit a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250-400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. For $T<30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time shows an anomalous dependence on pressure -- first decreases with increasing pressure and then increases upon further increase of pressure. The sharp change in division time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. Coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic changes in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing press...

  6. Two Types of Pressure Dependence of Residual Resistivity in Doped Kondo Insulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Yi-Zhe; LI Zheng-Zhong; XIAO Ming-Wen; XU Wang; XU Xiao-Hua

    2004-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the residual resistivity of the doped electron-type and hole-type Kondo insulators (KIs) are calculated within the framework of the slave-boson mean-field theory and the coherent potential approximation. It is shown that as the pressure increases, the resistivity increases and decreases for the dilute doping electron-type and hole-type KIs, respectively. These results are qualitatively in agreement with the experiments.

  7. Asymptotic Modeling of the Thin Film Flow with a Pressure-Dependent Viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Marušić-Paloka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the lubrication process with incompressible fluid taking into account the dependence of the viscosity on the pressure. Assuming that the viscosity-pressure relation is given by the well-known Barus law, we derive an effective model using asymptotic analysis with respect to the film thickness. The key idea is to conveniently transform the governing system and then apply two-scale expansion technique.

  8. Proneness to worry is negatively associated with blood pressure and baroreflex sensitivity: further evidence of the blood pressure emotional dampening hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Luis Carlos; Vila, Jaime; Reyes del Paso, Gustavo A

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes differences in blood pressure (BP) and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in relation to trait worry. 36 high worry and 21 low worry females were selected from scores on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Cardiovascular parameters were obtained during rest, a self-induced worry period, and defense reflex to intense auditory stimulation. Low worry participants exhibited greater BP during baseline and greater BRS both during baseline and the self-induced worry period than high worry participants. During the defense reflex, low worries present a greater increase in BP. It is concluded that low proneness to worry is associated with greater BP and BRS. Increases in BP during aversive stimulation activated a negative feedback mechanism to inhibit distress and emotional reactivity to negative stimulation. These results support the BP-emotional dampening hypothesis and suggest that the baroreflex can be a relevant mechanism in mediating this effect.

  9. On the mental representation of negative numbers: context-dependent SNARC effects with comparative judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaki, Samuel; Petrusic, William M

    2005-10-01

    In one condition, positive and negative number pairs were compared in separate blocks of trials. In another condition, the positive and the negative number pairs were intermixed. In the intermixed condition, comparisons involving negative numbers were faster with the left hand than with the right, and comparisons were faster with the right hand than with the left hand with the positive numbers; that is, a spatial numerical association of response codes (SNARC) effect was obtained, in which the mental number line was extended leftward with the negative numbers. On the other hand, in the blocked condition, a reverse SNARC effect was obtained with the negative numbers; that is, negative number pairs have the same underlying spatial representation as the positive numbers in this context. Nongraded semantic congruity effects, obtained in both the blocked and the intermixed conditions, are consistent with the idea that magnitude information is extracted prior to the generation of discrete semantic codes.

  10. Chain-length-dependent intermolecular packing in polyphenylenes: a high pressure study

    CERN Document Server

    Heimel, G; Oehzelt, M; Hummer, K; Koppelhuber-Bitschnau, B; Porsch, F; Ambrosch-Draxl, C; Resel, R

    2003-01-01

    We report on pressure-induced structural changes in crystalline oligo(para-phenylenes) containing two to six phenyl rings. The results are discussed with particular emphasis put on the implications these changes in intermolecular distances and molecular arrangement have on important bulk properties of this class of materials, such as optical response and charge transport. We performed energy dispersive x-ray diffraction in a systematic study on polycrystalline powders of biphenyl, para-terphenyl, p-quaterphenyl, p-quinquephenyl and p-sexiphenyl under hydrostatic pressure up to 60 kbar. Revisiting the crystal structures at ambient conditions reveals details in the packing principle. A linear relationship between the density at ambient conditions and the number of phenyl rings is found. High pressure data not only yields pressure-dependent lattice parameters and hints towards pressure-induced changes in the molecular arrangement but also allows for an analysis of the equations of state of these substances as a ...

  11. PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENT DEFLAGRATION RATE MEASUREMENTS OF LLM-105 AND TATB BASED EXPLOSIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N; Koerner, J; Lorenz, K T; Maienschein, J L

    2009-11-10

    The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105 and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. Two different formulations of LLM-105 and three formulations of TATB were studied and results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate and become erratic. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

  12. Effect of cadmium or magnesium on calcium-dependent central function that reduces blood pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutoo, D.; Akiyama, K. [Univ. of Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. of Medical Sci.

    2000-03-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of cadmium or magnesium on central calcium-dependent blood pressure regulation was investigated. The systolic blood pressure of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR; male, 13 weeks of age) decreased following i.c.v. administration of cadmium chloride (20 nmol/rat), and increased following i.c.v. administration of magnesium chloride (20, 600, and 1200 nmol/rat). The hypotensive effect of cadmium was suppressed by i.c.v. administration of W-7 (a calmodulin antagonist, 30 {mu}g/rat). Taking into consideration these results with our previous reports, it is suggested that cadmium binds to the calcium-binding sites of calmodulin and activates calcium/calmodulin-dependent enzymes in a disorderly manner, whereas magnesium does not. Therefore, cadmium increases dopamine synthesis in the brain via a calmodulin-dependent system, and the resultant increase in dopamine levels inhibits sympathetic nerve activity and reduces blood pressure in SHR. (orig.)

  13. Experimental verification of the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser intensity at pulsed irradiation of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasyuk, I. K.; Semenov, A. Yu; Stuchebryukhov, I. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments for verification of a functional dependence of the ablation pressure on the irradiated surface of a target upon the laser intensity in a range from 1.2 to 350 TW/cm2 have been carried out. For that, at some intensities of the laser irradiation, time intervals between the laser pulse maximum and the moment of the shock-wave front arrival to the rear surface of the target were measured, which are dependent on the ablation pressure. Two schemes of the measurements were used. At the first scheme, at higher laser intensities, the front arrival moment is determined via an electron-optical camera when the rear surface begins glowing. At the second scheme, the front arrival moment is recorded when a probe laser pulse changes the character of the reflection by the rear surface of the irradiated target. Results of measurements are in agreement with the ablation pressure dependence upon the laser pulse intensity within 20%.

  14. A theory of time-dependent compaction by fracturing and pressure solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2016-04-01

    Porous rocks under compressional stress conditions are subject to compaction creep. A previous micromechanical model, dealing with (partially) water-filled carbonates was able to predict strain rates of the compaction at macroscopic level by combining microscopic fracturing and pressure solution at microscopic level and using a statistical upscaling. Building on this model we investigated the time-dependence of the pressure solution and the overall compaction and created a new theory of compaction by developing a statistical theory of time-dependence of pressure solution. Long-term creep experiments on carbonate samples were used to test the model which was able to predict the rate of compaction and its time-dependence in largely different effective stress, temperature and fluid chemistry conditions.

  15. Water and Solutions at Negative Pressure: Raman Spectroscopic Study to -80 Megapascals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. L.; Durben, D. J.; Wolf, G. H.; Angell, C. A.

    1990-08-01

    Microscopic inclusions of aqueous fluids trapped in interstices in quartz and other crystals provide novel systems for the deliberate study of liquids under tension. Liquids under tension should differ in interesting ways from those at ambient pressure or compressed liquids because attractive, rather than repulsive, forces should dominate their behavior. Static tensions in excess of 100 megapascals (~1000 atmospheres) have been obtained reproducibly. Video-recorded observations of the final liquid rupture process, coupled with extrapolations of data at positive pressure, suggest that the homogeneous vapor nucleation point was reached in two of the cases studied. Raman spectra of the fluids at -80 megapascals show that an isothermal volume stretch of ~5 percent by volume has only a weak effect on the spectral features and is similar to the effect of isobaric heating.

  16. Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity During Intense Lower Body Negative Pressure to Presyncope in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-24

    Task Force of the European Society of Cardiology and the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology, 1996). As diastolic arterial pressure... dogs . Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 274, H1099–H1105. Preiss G & Polosa C (1974). Patterns of sympathetic neuron activity associated with Mayer waves...Society of Cardiology and the North American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology (1996). Heart rate variability: standards of measurement

  17. Mode I Fracture Toughness of Rock - Intrinsic Property or Pressure-Dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckhert, F.; Brenne, S.; Molenda, M.; Alber, M.

    2016-12-01

    The mode I fracture toughness of rock is usually regarded as an intrinsic material parameter independent of pressure. However, most fracture toughness laboratory tests are conducted only at ambient pressure. To investigate fracture toughness of rock under elevated pressures, sleeve fracturing laboratory experiments were conducted with various rock types and a new numerical method was developed for the evaluation of these experiments. The sleeve fracturing experiments involve rock cores with central axial boreholes that are placed in a Hoek triaxial pressure cell to apply an isostatic confining pressure. A polymere tube is pressurized inside these hollow rock cylinders until they fail by tensile fracturing. Numerical simulations incorporating fracture mechanical models are used to obtain a relation between tensile fracture propagation and injection pressure. These simulations indicate that the magnitude of the injection pressure at specimen failure is only depending on the fracture toughness of the tested material, the specimen dimensions and the magnitude of external loading. The latter two are known parameters in the experiments. Thus, the fracture toughness can be calculated from the injection pressure recorded at specimen breakdown. All specimens had a borehole diameter to outer diameter ratio of about 1:10 with outer diameters of 40 and 62 mm. The length of the specimens was about two times the diameter. Maximum external loading was 7.5 MPa corresponding to maximum injection pressures at specimen breakdown of about 100 MPa. The sample set tested in this work includes Permian and Carboniferous sandstones, Jurassic limestones, Triassic marble, Permian volcanic rocks and Devonian slate from Central Europe. The fracture toughness values determined from the sleeve fracturing experiments without confinement using the new numerical method were found to be in good agreement with those from Chevron bend testing according to the ISRM suggested methods. At elevated

  18. Blood flow response in small intestinal loops at different depths during negative pressure wound therapy of the open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Hlebowicz, Joanna

    2013-08-01

    High closure rates of the open abdomen have been reported following negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). However, the method has occasionally been associated with increased development of intestinal fistulae. We have previously shown that the application of NPWT to the open abdomen causes a decrease in microvascular blood flow in the small intestinal loop and the omentum adjacent to the visceral protective layer of the dressing. In this study we investigate whether the negative pressure affects only small intestinal loops lying directly below the dressing or if it also affects small intestinal loops that are not in direct contact with the dressing. Six pigs underwent midline incision and application of NPWT to the open abdomen. The microvascular blood flow was measured in four intestinal loops at different depths from the visceral protective layer, at two different locations: beneath the dressing and at the anterior abdominal wall, before and after the application of NPWT of -50, -70, -100, -120, -150 and -170 mmHg, using laser Doppler velocimetry. Negative pressures between -50 and -170 mmHg caused a significant decrease in the microvascular blood flow in the intestinal loops in direct contact with the visceral protective layer. A slight, but significant, decrease in blood flow was also seen in the intestinal loops lying beneath these loops. The decrease in microvascular blood flow increased with the amount of negative pressure applied. No difference in blood flow was seen in the intestinal loops lying deeper in the abdominal cavity. A decrease in blood flow was seen in the upper two intestinal loops located apically and anteriorly, but not in the lower two, indicating that this is a local effect and that pressure decreases with distance from the source. A long-term decrease in blood flow in the intestinal wall may induce ischaemia and secondary necrosis in the intestinal wall, which could promote the development of intestinal fistulae. We believe that NPWT of

  19. Embodied Semantics 150 Years After Broca: Context-Dependent Negation in Novelistic Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatole Pierre Fuksas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study capitalizes on recent advances in neurophysiology concerning the involvement of the sensory-motor system in language recognition and understanding during reading and listening so as to explain the various roles played by negation in novelistic descriptions since the medieval origins of the genre. Textual evidence from a famous medieval verse novel, Chrétien de Troyes’ Chevalier de la Charrette, demonstrates that negation does not simply complicate the processing of a given description. Indeed, negative descriptions can be completely understood only if fully integrated in a complex context which entails the conceptual representation of the negated state of affairs.

  20. A resprouter herb reduces negative density-dependent effects among neighboring seeders after fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raventós, José; Wiegand, Thorsten; Maestre, Fernando T.; de Luis, Martín

    2012-01-01

    Plant communities are often composed of species belonging to different functional groups, but relatively few studies to date have explicitly linked their spatial structure to the outcome of the interaction among them. We investigated if mortality of seeder species during their establishment after fire is influenced by the proximity of the resprouter herb Brachypodium retusum. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean shrubland (00°39' W; 38°43' N), 40 km northwest of Alicante (Spain) with Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus, Helianthemum marifolium, and Ononis fruticosa as dominant obligate seeder species and a herbaceous layer is dominated by the resprouter B. retusum. We followed the fate of mapped seedlings and the biomass of B. retusum one, two, three and nine years after an experimental fire. We used point pattern analyses to evaluate the spatial pattern of mortality of seeder species at these years in relation to the biomass of B. retusum. We hypothesize that B. retusum may initially have a positive impact on seeder survival. We implemented this hypothesis as a point process model that maintains the overall number of dead seeder plants, but seeder survival varied proportionally to the biomass of B. retusum in its neighborhood. We then contrasted this hypothesis with a previous analysis based on a random mortality hypothesis. Our data were consistent with the hypothesis that proximity of B. retusum reduced the mortality of seeder plants at their establishment phase (i.e., 2 yrs after fire). However, we found no evidence that B. retusum influenced seeder mortality when plants grow to maturity. We also found that, under the more stressful conditions (fire + erosion scenario), B. retusum had a lower impact on the performance of seeder species. Our results suggest that B. retusum may reduce negative density-dependent effects among neighboring seeder plants during the first years after fire.

  1. Negative pressure for diabetic foot:Evaluation based on calcitonin gene-related peptide in the limb skin of dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Ling; Jun Yi; Ling Wang; Mofan Ning

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Very good therapeutic effect has been obtained for limb negative pressure in treating limb ischemic diseases.But its mechanism in treating diabetic foot needs further investigation.OBJECTIVE:To observe the changes of calcitonin gene related peptide(CGRP)in sensory nerve fiber of skin of dogs with diabetic foot before and after limb negative pressure treatment,and make a comparison with normal dogs,then analyze the mechanism of limb negative pressure in treating diabetic foot.DESIGN:A randomized controlled animal experiment.SETTING:Third Department of General Surgery,Xijing Hospital,Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS:Fifteen healthy hybrid dogs,of either gender,weighing 12-18 kg,were provided by Animal Room,Xijing Hospital of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.After being numbered,the involved dogs were randomly assigned into 3 groups:treatment group,model group and normal control group,5 dogs each.Limb negative pressure therapeutic machine(self-made);Anti-CGRP serum (primary antibody,Watpa Company,England);rabbit anti-BigG(second antibody),ABC compound solution,DAB reagent,glucose oxidase reagent,Tdxon-X100 solution(Sigma company,USA),ammonium nickelous sulfate reagent(Xi'an Chemical Reagent Factory),neutral gum-solution(import,Shanghai Reagent Co.,Ltd.);Leitz1400 sliding freezing microtome(Leitz Company,Germany);Leica 1800 cryostat microtome(Leica Company,Germany);Quantimet570 image analyzer(Leica Company,Germany).METHODS:This experiment was carried out in the Animal Room,Xijing Hospital,Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from October 2005 to June 2006.①After the dogs in the treatment and model groups were anesthetized,their pancreatic tissues were removed completely and animal models of type I diabetes mellitus were developed.All the femoral artery branches including deep femoral artery were ligated and cut off.A helical wire was inserted into the distal femoral artery cavity for narrowing

  2. Experimental investigation of dynamic effects in capillary pressure: Grain size dependency and upscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Roach, Geremy; O'Carroll, Denis M.; Newson, Timothy A.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2010-08-01

    The macroscopic flow equations used to predict two-phase flow typically utilizes a capillary pressure-saturation relationship determined under equilibrium conditions. Theoretical reasoning, experimental evidence, and numerical modeling results have indicated that when one fluid phase replaces another fluid, this relationship may not be unique but may depend on the rate at which the phase saturations change in response to changes in phase pressures. This nonuniqueness likely depends on a variety of factors including soil-fluid properties and possibly physical scale. To quantify this dependency experimentally, direct measurements of equilibrium and dynamic capillary pressure-saturation relationships were developed for two Ottawa sands with different grain sizes using a 20 cm long column. A number of replicate air-water experiments were conducted to facilitate statistical comparison of capillary pressure-saturation relationships. Water and air pressures and phase saturations were measured at three different vertical locations in the sand column under different desaturation rates (1) to measure local capillary pressure-saturation relationships (static and dynamic); (2) to quantify the dynamic coefficient τ, a measure of the magnitude of observed dynamic effects, as a function of water saturation for different grain sizes and desaturation rates; (3) to investigate the importance of grain size on measured dynamic effects; and (4) to assess the importance of sample scale on the magnitude of dynamic effects in capillary pressure. A comparison of the static and dynamic Pc-Sw relationships showed that at a given water saturation, capillary pressure measured under transient water drainage conditions is statistically larger than capillary pressure measured under equilibrium or static conditions, consistent with thermodynamic theory. The dynamic coefficient τ, used in the expression relating the static and dynamic capillary pressures to the desaturation rate was dependant on

  3. Comparing concurrence and negativity in time-dependent ionic-phononic system with fifteen dimensional density matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermez, Rasim

    2016-10-01

    It is solved a time-dependent Hamiltonian using a unitary transformation method which Λ(t) type is used to engineer a cascade Ξ scheme interaction between the vibrational phonons and trapped three-level ion. Quantum entanglement is characterized by comparing concurrence and negativity of the time-dependent ionic-phononic system. In this quantum system, we obtain that the amount of concurrence can be tuned between 0 and 0.99 while the amount of negativity changes between 0 and 0.49.

  4. Topical negative pressure therapy Recent experience of the department of plastic surgery at Ibn Sina University Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoughit Echchaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe topical negative pressure therapy (TNP is a non-invasive method to treat chronic and acute wounds locally, using a continuous or intermittent negative pressure.The objective of this study is to present the first experience of this type of treatment used in clinical cases in our department. By presenting these cases, we highlight indication and efficiency of this new technique applied in relatively complicated situations, at the same time it also allows a significant improvement in treating injuries and chronic wounds.Materials and methodsIn this study, we present the recent experience of the Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery of the University Hospital Center of Avicenne in Rabat. This therapy was used for the first time this year (in 2014, in three young patients who presented with chronic wounds associated with local and general factors that are unfavorable for the healing process.ResultsIn all three of our cases we obtained highly satisfactory clinical results.TNP allows wounds to bud in a shorter time, as well as a fast healing by second intention due to controlled wound healing or split-skin graft without using flaps. This enables to decrease the margin of error, the time and the number of dressing replacements, and to reduce the length of hospital stay.ConclusionThis is an expensive and specific equipment. However, the cost-benefit ratio analysis shows that it is an essential method that should be part of our therapeutic strategies.Keywords: loss of substance, negative pressure, budding, healing.  

  5. Association of the PDYN gene with alcohol dependence and the propensity to drink in negative emotional states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpyak, Victor M; Winham, Stacey J; Preuss, Ulrich W; Zill, Peter; Cunningham, Julie M; Walker, Denise L; Lewis, Kriste A; Geske, Jennifer R; Colby, Colin L; Abulseoud, Osama A; Hall-Flavin, Daniel K; Loukianova, Larissa L; Schneekloth, Terry D; Frye, Mark A; Bazov, Igor; Heit, John A; Bakalkin, Georgy; Mrazek, David A; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonists induce dysphoric and pro-depressive effects and variations in the KOR (OPRK1) and prodynorphin (PDYN) genes have been shown to be associated with alcohol dependence. We genotyped 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PDYN and OPRK1 genes in 816 alcohol-dependent subjects and investigated their association with: (1) negative craving measured by a subscale of the Inventory of Drug Taking Situations; (2) a self-reported history of depression; (3) the intensity of depressive symptoms measured by the Beck Depression Inventory-II. In addition, 13 of the 23 PDYN and OPRK1 SNPs, which were previously genotyped in a set of 1248 controls, were used to evaluate association with alcohol dependence. SNP and haplotype tests of association were performed. Analysis of a haplotype spanning the PDYN gene (rs6045784, rs910080, rs2235751, rs2281285) revealed significant association with alcohol dependence (p = 0.00079) and with negative craving (p = 0.0499). A candidate haplotype containing the PDYN rs2281285-rs1997794 SNPs that was previously associated with alcohol dependence was also associated with negative craving (p = 0.024) and alcohol dependence (p = 0.0008) in this study. A trend for association between depression severity and PDYN variation was detected. No associations of OPRK1 gene variation with alcohol dependence or other studied phenotypes were found. These findings support the hypothesis that sequence variation in the PDYN gene contributes to both alcohol dependence and the induction of negative craving in alcohol-dependent subjects.

  6. Attitudes towards alcohol dependence and affected individuals: persistence of negative stereotypes and illness beliefs between 1990 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomerus, Georg; Matschinger, Herbert; Angermeyer, Matthias C

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is among the most severely stigmatized mental disorders. We examine whether negative stereotypes and illness beliefs related to alcohol dependence have changed between 1990 and 2011. We used data from two population surveys with identical methodology that were conducted among German citizens aged ≥18 years, living in the 'old' German states. They were conducted in 1990 and 2011, respectively. In random subsamples (1990: n = 1,022, and 2011: n = 1,167), identical questions elicited agreement with statements regarding alcohol dependence, particularly with regard to the illness definition of alcohol dependence and blame. Overall, agreement with negative stereotypes did not change in the course of 2 decades. About 55% of the respondents agreed that alcohol dependence is an illness like any other, >40% stated that it was a weakness of character and 30% endorsed that those affected are themselves to blame for their problems. It is apparent that promoting an illness concept of alcohol dependence has not been an easy solution to the problem of stigma. We discuss how the normative functions of alcohol dependence stigma might have prevented a reduction of negative stereotypes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Increase in vagal activity during hypotensive lower-body negative pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander-Jensen, K; Mehlsen, J; Stadeager, C

    1988-01-01

    volunteers before and after atropine administration. LBNP of 55 mmHg initially resulted in an increase in HR from 55 +/- 4 to 90 +/- 5 beats/min and decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) from 94 +/- 4 to 81 +/- 5 mmHg, in central venous pressure from 7 +/- 1 to -3 +/- 1 mmHg, and in cardiac output from 6.......1 +/- 0.5 to 3.7 +/- 0.11/min. Concomitantly, epinephrine and norepinephrine levels increased. After 8.2 +/- 2.3 min of LBNP, the MAP had decreased to 41 +/- 7 mmHg and HR had decreased to 57 +/- 3 beats/min. Vasopressin increased from 1.2 +/- 0.3 to 137 +/- 45 pg/ml and renin activity increased from 1.......45 +/- 4.0 to 3.80 +/- 1.0 ng.ml-1.h-1 with no further changes in epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. A tardy rise in pancreatic polypeptide indicated increased vagal activity. After atropine. LBNP also caused an initial increase in HR, which, however, remained elevated...

  8. A DC electrophoresis method for determining electrophoretic mobility through the pressure driven negation of electro osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Pascal; Pennathur, Sumita

    2016-11-01

    Characterization of the electrophoretic mobility and zeta potential of micro and nanoparticles is important for assessing properties such as stability, charge and size. In electrophoretic techniques for such characterization, the bulk fluid motion due to the interaction between the fluid and the charged surface must be accounted for. Unlike current industrial systems which rely on DLS and oscillating potentials to mitigate electroosmotic flow (EOF), we propose a simple alternative electrophoretic method for optically determining electrophoretic mobility using a DC electric fields. Specifically, we create a system where an adverse pressure gradient counters EOF, and design the geometry of the channel so that the flow profile of the pressure driven flow matches that of the EOF in large regions of the channel (ie. where we observe particle flow). Our specific COMSOL-optimized geometry is two large cross sectional areas adjacent to a central, high aspect ratio channel. We show that this effectively removes EOF from a large region of the channel and allows for the accurate optical characterization of electrophoretic particle mobility, no matter the wall charge or particle size.

  9. Negative pressure model for surface foaming of collagen and other biopolymer films by KrF laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazare, S [Laboratoire de Physicochimie Moleculaire (LPCM), UMR 5803 du CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351 cours de la Liberation, F-33405 Talence (France); Tokarev, V N [Laboratoire de Physicochimie Moleculaire (LPCM), UMR 5803 du CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 351 cours de la Liberation, F-33405 Talence (France); Sionkowska, A [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Chemistry, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Wisniewski, M [Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Chemistry, Gagarin 7, 87-100 Torun (Poland)

    2007-04-15

    A single KrF laser pulse of energy larger than 0.5 J/cm{sup 2} is enough to create a microfoam layer on the surface of a collagen film and other related biopolymers. This is a new result that can be of interest for many new applications. The target material is excited in the radiation absorption depth of {approx}17 {mu}m and expands into a foam layer whose new surface is {approx}5 {mu}m above the original one. The estimated surface transient temperature of {approx}83deg. C at threshold fluence does not account satisfactorily for this fast foaming process but consideration of the bipolar pressure variation {approx}{+-}200 bar, i.e. laser induced acoustic wave suggests that a cold homogeneous boiling is induced by the tensile part of the pressure wave in the laser excited volume. The classical nucleation theory predicts a spontaneous dense and homogeneous bubble formation when the pressure is negative in the inviscid liquid. These results constitute new examples of laser induced fast expulsion of liquid due to the hydrodynamic pressure wave which can also be considered as resulting from the surface acceleration/deceleration sequence.

  10. Perforated second trimester appendicitis with abdominal compartment syndrome managed with negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnock, Adam R; Fleischer, Brian P; Carney, Martin J; Vanderlan, Wesley B

    2016-06-14

    Abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) is a known complication of laparotomy; however, the literature is lacking in regards to treatment of this entity in pregnant patients. We present a case of acute perforated appendicitis in a second trimester primagravida, complicated by gangrenous necrosis of the contiguous bowel with subsequent development of ACS and intra-abdominal sepsis. This was treated with a novel approach, using non-commercial negative pressure wound therapy and open abdomen technique. Gestational integrity was preserved and the patient went on to experience a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery. At 5 years post-delivery the patient has had no surgical complications and her baby has met all developmental milestones.

  11. Airtight negative pressure dust-control technology and application of transpersite in the coal conveyer belt system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yun-dong; JIA Hui-yan; ZHANG Da-ming

    2008-01-01

    Presented a new coal dust control program that was airtight negative pressure dust-control technology at the transpersite,combining with analysis with the movement of air currents and numerical simulation of gas-solid flow at the transpersite,and proved the mechanism of precipitation and proliferation for coal dust-controlt in theory.The technology has made good economic results at the Heidaigou Clean Plant,not only dust concentration control within 10 mg/m3 to the work site,but also substantial energy savings and cost savings.

  12. Application of a Silicone Sheet in Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy to Treat an Abdominal Wall Defect after Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin Su

    2017-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is an aggressive soft-tissue infection involving the deep fascia and is characterized by extensive deterioration of the surrounding tissue. Immediate diagnosis and intensive treatment, including debridement and systemic antibiotics, represent the most important factors influencing the survival of NF patients. In this report, we present a case of NF in the abdomen due to an infection caused by a perforated small bowel after abdominal liposuction. It was successfully treated using negative-pressure wound therapy, in which a silicone sheet functioned as a barrier between the sponge and internal organs to protect the small bowel. PMID:28194352

  13. The use of negative pressure therapy and hyaluronic acid for the management of post-traumatic lower limb injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Emanuele; Maruccia, Michele; Sorvillo, Valentina; Parisi, Paola; Palumbo, Francesca; Onesti, Maria Giuseppina

    2013-10-01

    Management of severe limb trauma continues to challenge surgeons. Suitable treatment should be individualised for each patient, taking into consideration not only the wound extremity but also the associated injuries, age and socioeconomic status of the patient with the goal to recover function and to improve patient quality of life. The aim of this report is to present a severe degloving multiplane lower limb injury case in which a conservative treatment of the wound was performed with negative pressure therapy and dermal substitute, avoiding amputation and restoring limb function.

  14. Pressure dependence of the deuterium isotope effect in the photolysis of formaldehyde by ultraviolet light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. K. Nilsson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pressure dependence of the relative photolysis rate of HCHO vs. HCDO has been investigated for the first time, using a photochemical reactor at the University of Copenhagen. The dissociation of HCHO vs. HCDO using a UVA lamp was measured at total bath gas pressures of 50, 200, 400, 600 and 1030 mbar. The products of formaldehyde photodissociation are either H2 + CO (molecular channel or HCO + H (radical channel, and a photolysis lamp was chosen to emit light at wavelengths that greatly favor the molecular channel. The isotope effect in the dissociation, kHCHO/kHCDO, was found to depend strongly on pressure, varying from 1.1 + 0.15/−0.1 at 50 mbar to 1.75±0.10 at 1030 mbar. The results can be corrected for radical channel contribution to yield the kinetic isotope effect for the molecular channel; i.e. the KIE in the production of molecular hydrogen. This is done and the results at 1030 mbar are discussed in relation to previous studies at ambient pressure. In the atmosphere the relative importance of the two product channels changes with altitude as a result of changes in pressure and actinic flux. The study demonstrates that the δD of photochemical hydrogen produced from formaldehyde will increase substantially as pressure decreases.

  15. Evidence-based recommendations for negative pressure wound therapy: treatment variables (pressure levels, wound filler and contact layer)--steps towards an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke-Sorensen, H; Malmsjo, M; Rome, P; Hudson, D; Krug, E; Berg, L; Bruhin, A; Caravaggi, C; Chariker, M; Depoorter, M; Dowsett, C; Dunn, R; Duteille, F; Ferreira, F; Francos Martínez, J M; Grudzien, G; Ichioka, S; Ingemansson, R; Jeffery, S; Lee, C; Vig, S; Runkel, N; Martin, R; Smith, J

    2011-09-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and the impact of NPWT on bacterial bioburden. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence and drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) classification system. In general, there is relatively weak evidence on which to base recommendations for any one NPWT treatment variable over another. Overall, 14 recommendations were developed: five for the choice of wound filler and wound contact layer, four for choice of pressure setting and five for use of NPWT in infected wounds. With respect to bioburden, evidence suggests that reduction of bacteria in wounds is not a major mode of action of NPWT.

  16. Energy dependence of negatively charged pion production in proton-proton interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)663936; Dominik, Wojciech; Gaździck, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents inclusive spectra of the negatively charged pions produced in inelastic proton-proton interactions measured at five beam momenta: 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c. The measurements were conducted in the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN using a system of five Time Projection Chambers. The negatively charged pion spectra were calculated based on the negatively charged hadron spectra. Contribution of hadrons other than the primary pions was removed using EPOS simulations. The results were corrected for effects related to detection, acceptance, reconstruction efficiency and the analysis technique. Two-dimensional spectra were derived as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum or transverse mass. The spectra were parametrised by widths of the rapidity distributions, inverse slope parameters of the transverse mass distributions, mean transverse masses and the total pion multiplicities. The negatively charged pion spectra in proton-proton interactions belong to a broad NA61/SHINE programme of se...

  17. Pressure and temperature dependence of the chlorine NQR in caesium and sodium chlorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K P; Suresh, K S; Raghavendra Rao, C; Ramakrishna, J

    2008-06-01

    The (35)Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) frequencies (nu(Q)) in caesium and sodium chlorates were measured as a function of temperature, from 77 to 300 K at different pressures up to 5.1 kbar, and the data were analysed to estimate the volume dependence of the electric field gradient (EFG), torsional frequency and also the contributions to the NQR frequency from static and dynamic effects. The variation of spin-lattice relaxation time with pressure at different temperatures was studied in the case of sodium chlorate and at room temperature in case of caesium chlorate. The pressure dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T(1)) suggests that the relaxation is mainly due to the torsional motions.

  18. Anisotropy and pressure dependence of the upper critical field of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikin, I.; Huxley, A.; Braithwaite, D.; Brison, J. P.; Watanabe, S.; Miyake, K.; Flouquet, J.

    2001-12-01

    The temperature and pressure dependence of the upper critical field, Hc2, of the ferromagnetic superconductor UGe2 is reported for fields applied along all three crystallographic axes. For fields parallel to the easy magnetic a axis, the relationship between an unusual reentrant behavior of Hc2 and a field-induced transition associated with a change in the electronic density of states is reviewed. For transverse field directions a significant evolution in the behavior of Hc2 with pressure is found. As the pressure is decreased the dependence of Hc2 on temperature for fields along the crystal's c axis acquires a positive curvature that extends from the critical temperature, Tc, down to almost the lowest temperature measured (Tc/10) where Hc2 exceeds the usual weak coupling paramagnetic and orbital limits.

  19. Pressure Dependence of the Critical Fluctuations in the Singlet-Ground-State System, Pr3TI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, Jørgen; Nielsen, Mourits; Buyers, W. J. L

    1979-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the magnetization and of the critical fluctuations in a polycrystalline sample of Pr3Tl have been studied by neutron scattering. Above Tc the quasielastic intensity is better reproduced by a theory In which the excitons are strongly damped by the conduction electrons th...

  20. Current-pressure dependencies of dc magnetron discharge in inert gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, A. O.; Mankelevich, Yu A.; Pal, A. F.; Ryabinkin, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    The current-pressure (I-P) characteristics of dc magnetron discharge in inert gases (Ar, Kr and Xe) for various constant discharge voltages were measured. Under certain conditions on I-P characteristic, the nonmonotonic region of local maximum followed by a minimum is observed. It is found that increasing mass of the working gas ions results in a shift of the local maximum to lower pressures. The spatial distribution of ions in the plasma was studied by optical emission spectroscopy. Transformation of the discharge spatial structure with pressure was observed. A qualitative model of the observed trends is presented. It takes into account the pressure dependence of the discharge spatial structure, the capturing of secondary electrons by the cathode and charge exchange effects.

  1. Indoor/outdoor connections exemplified by processes that depend on an organic compound's saturation vapor pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor environments are profitably viewed as parts of a whole connected through various physical and chemical interactions. This paper examines four phenomena that share a dependence on vapor pressure-the extent to which an organic compound in the gas phase sorbs on airborne particles......'s saturation vapor pressure correlates in a linear fashion with the logarithms of equilibrium coefficients characteristic of each of these four phenomena. Since, to a rough approximation, the log of an organic compound's vapor pressure scales with its molecular weight, molecular weight can be used to make...... first estimates of the above processes. For typical indoor conditions, only larger compounds with lower-saturation vapor pressures (e.g., tetracosane, pentacosane, or di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) have airborne particle concentrations comparable to or larger than gas phase concentrations. Regardless...

  2. Pressure and temperature dependences of the acoustic behaviors of biocompatible silk studied by using Brillouin spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung Wan; Ryeom, Junho; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Chan Hum; Park, Jaehoon; Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo

    2016-07-01

    The elastic properties of a biocompatible silk film were investigated under temperature and pressure variations by using Brillouin spectroscopy. The Brillouin frequency shift decreased monotonically upon heating and showed a sudden change at the glass transition temperature. The existence of water molecules in the film increased the longitudinal modulus by approximately 10% and induced a relaxation peak in the hypersonic damping at ~60 ◦ C. The pressure dependences of the sound velocities of the longitudinal and the transverse acoustic modes and the refractive index were determined for the first time at pressures up to ~15.5 GPa. All these properties increased upon compression; these changes indicated that the free volume in the silk film collapsed at a pressure of about 3 GPa.

  3. Pressure dependent deuterium fractionation in the formation of molecular hydrogen in formaldehyde photolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Andersen, Vibeke Friis; Skov, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    the channels has been estimated using available values for the absorption 10 cross section and quantum yield. As a result of the change in pressure with altitude the isotope effect for production of molecular hydrogen is found to change from a value of kH/kD=1.8±0.2 at the surface to unity at 50 km....... The relative importance of the two product channels changes with altitude as a result of changes in both pressure and actinic flux. The study concludes that the D of photochemical hydrogen produced in 15 situ will increase substantially with altitude.......The pressure dependence of the relative photolysis rates of HCHO and HCDO has been investigated using a new photochemical reactor at the University of Copenhagen. The relative photolysis rate of HCHO vs. HCDO under UVA lamp irradiation was mea- 5 sured at total pressures of 50, 200, 400, 600...

  4. Neutron depolarization imaging of the hydrostatic pressure dependence of inhomogeneous ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, M.; Neubauer, A.; Böni, P.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of fragile and potentially inhomogeneous forms of ferromagnetic order under extreme conditions, such as low temperatures and high pressures, is of central interest for areas such as geophysics, correlated electron systems, as well as the optimization of materials synthesis for applications where particular material properties are required. We report neutron depolarization imaging measurements on the weak ferromagnet Ni3Al under pressures up to 10 kbar using a Cu:Be clamp cell. Using a polychromatic neutron beam with wavelengths λ ≥ 4 Å in combination with 3He neutron spin filter cells as polarizer and analyzer, we were able to track differences of the pressure response in inhomogeneous samples by virtue of high resolution neutron depolarization imaging. This provides spatially resolved and non-destructive access to the pressure dependence of the magnetic properties of inhomogeneous ferromagnetic materials.

  5. Pressure Dependence of the Ginzburg-Landau Parameter in Superconducting YB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabáni, S.; Orendáč, Mat.; Kušnír, J.; Gažo, E.; Pristáš, G.; Mori, T.; Flachbart, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present measurements of the superconducting critical temperature T_c , the upper critical field H_{c2} and the third critical field H_{c3} as a function of pressure in BCS type-II superconductor YB6 (T_c = 7.5 K, H_{c2}(0) = 270 mT and H_{c3}(0) = 450 mT at ambient pressure) up to 3 GPa. Magnetic susceptibility measurements down to 2 K have shown a negative pressure effect on T_c as well as on H_{c2} with slopes dT_c/dp = -0.531 K/GPa (d ln T_c/{dp} = -7.1 %/GPa) and dH_{c2}(0)/dp = -37 mT/GPa (d ln H_{c2}/{dp} = -14 %/GPa) , respectively. Parallel magnetoresistance measurements evidenced nearly the same slopes of d ln T_c/{dp} = -5.9 %/GPa (d ln H_{c3}/{dp} = -11 %/GPa) in the equal pressure range. From these results, the estimated pressure effect on the coherence length dξ (0)/{dp} = 2.05 nm/GPa together with the supposed zero pressure effect on the magnetic penetration depth (dλ (0)/{dp} ≈ 0 ) implies that the Ginzburg-Landau parameter κ (0) = {λ }(0)/{ξ }(0) decreases with pressure as dκ (0)/d{p} = -0.31/GPa. According to this decrease, a transition from type-II to type-I superconductor should be observed in YB6 at a critical pressure p_c ≈ 10 GPa.

  6. Understanding spatial distributions : Negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, Allert I; MacCurdy, Robert B; Chan, Ying-Chi; Penning, Emma; Gabrielson, Rich M; Cluderay, John; Spaulding, Eric L; Dekinga, Anne; Holthuijsen, Sander; ten Horn, Job; Brugge, Maarten; van Gils, Jan A; Winkler, David W; Piersma, Theunis

    2016-01-01

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The 'functional response' couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases asymptotic

  7. Understanding spatial distributions: negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, A.I.; MacCurdy, R.B.; Chan, Y.-C; Penning, E.; Gabrielson, R.M.; Cluderay, J.; Spaulding, E.L.; Dekinga, A.; Holthuijsen, S.; Ten Horn, J.; Brugge, M.; van Gils, J.A.; Winkler, D.W.; Piersma, T.

    2016-01-01

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The ‘functional response’ couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases asymptotic

  8. Attractivity in a Delayed Three-species Ratio-dependent Predator-prey System without Dominating Instantaneous Negative Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Xu; Lan-sun Chen; M.A.J. Chaplain

    2003-01-01

    A delayed three-species ratio-dependent predator-prey food-chain model without dominating instantaneous negative feedback is investigated. It is shown that the system is permanent under some appropriate conditions, and sufficient conditions are derived for the global attractivity of the positive equilibrium of the system.

  9. Understanding spatial distributions: negative density-dependence in prey causes predators to trade-off prey quantity with quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijleveld, A.I.; MacCurdy, R.B.; Chan, Y.-C; Penning, E.; Gabrielson, R.M.; Cluderay, J.; Spaulding, E.L.; Dekinga, A.; Holthuijsen, S.; Ten Horn, J.; Brugge, M.; van Gils, J.A.; Winkler, D.W.; Piersma, T.

    2016-01-01

    Negative density-dependence is generally studied within a single trophic level, thereby neglecting its effect on higher trophic levels. The ‘functional response’ couples a predator's intake rate to prey density. Most widespread is a type II functional response, where intake rate increases

  10. Evaluation of closed incision management with negative pressure wound therapy (CIM): hematoma/seroma and involvement of the lymphatic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpadi, Deepak V; Cunningham, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this porcine study was to evaluate the effect of closed incision management with negative pressure wound therapy (CIM) on hematoma/seroma formation, fluid removal into the CIM canister, and involvement of the lymphatic system. In each swine (n = 8), two sets of ventral contralateral subcutaneous dead spaces with overlying sutured incisions were created. Stable isotope-labeled nanospheres were introduced into each subcutaneous dead space. Each contralateral incision was assigned to CIM (continuous -125 mmHg negative pressure) and control (semipermeable film dressing), respectively. Following 4 days of therapy, hematoma/seroma was weighed, total fluid volume in canisters was measured, five pre-identified lymph nodes were harvested, and five key organs were biopsied. There was 25 ± 8 g (standard error [SE]) (63%) less hematoma/seroma in CIM sites compared to control sites (p = 0.002), without any fluid collection in the CIM canister. In lymph nodes, there were ∼60 μg (∼50%) more 30- and 50-nm nanospheres from CIM sites than from control sites (p = 0.04 and 0.05, respectively). There was significantly greater nanosphere incidence from CIM sites than from control sites in lungs, liver, and spleen (p CIM significantly decreased hematoma/seroma levels without fluid collection in the canister, which may be explained by increased lymph clearance.

  11. Autologous Epidermal Grafting Using a Novel Negative Pressure Epidermal Harvesting System in a Case of Stable Vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunavukkarasu, Vanathi; Navaneetha Krishnan, Paru Priyadarshini; Danasekaran, Nithya Gayathri Devi; Rajendrabose, Ratnavel

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common pigmentary disorder of the skin with a great amount of social stigma attached to it. Though various medical modalities are available for the treatment of stable vitiligo, surgical modality remains the treatment of choice for stable and localized vitiligo. The surgical options range from simple punch grafting to the recent epidermal harvesting methods using a negative pressure unit. Although successful use of multiple methods of epidermal grafting has been reported, most of them are cumbersome and time-consuming. The new automated epidermal harvesting system now commercially available involves a tool that applies both heat and suction concurrently to normal skin to induce epidermal micrografts. Hence it serves as a safe, quick and cost-effective method without anesthesia, with a very minimal downtime for healing and requires an optimal expertise. The duration of repigmentation seems to be faster and more uniform compared to other procedures. We would like to share our experience with the negative pressure epidermal harvesting method in a patient with stable vitiligo. PMID:28003945

  12. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation and Dwell Time Used to Treat Infected Orthopedic Implants: A 4-patient Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmers, Robert; Brekelmans, Wouter; Leijnen, Michiel; van der Burg, Boudewijn; Ritchie, Ewan

    2016-09-01

    Infection following orthopedic implants for bone fixation or joint replacement is always serious and may require removal of the osteosynthetic material. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of complex wounds, including infected wounds with osteosynthetic material. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the outcomes of 4 patients (1 man, 3 women; age range 49 to 71 years) with a postoperative wound infection (POWI) following fracture repair and internal fixation. All patients were at high risk for surgical complications, including infections. Standard infection treatments (antibiotics) had been unsuccessful. Based on the available literature, a NPWTi-d protocol was developed. Following surgical debridement, wounds were instilled with polyhexanide biguanide with a set dwell time of 15 minutes, followed by continuous NPWTi-d of -125 mm Hg for 4 hours. The system was changed every 3 to 4 days until sufficient granulation tissue was evident and negative pressure without instillation could be used. Systemic antibiotics were continued in all patients. Granulation tissue was found to be sufficient in 12 to 35 days in the 4 cases, no recurrence of infection was noted, and the osteosynthesis material remained in place. No adverse events were observed. Research is needed to compare the safety and effectiveness of this adjunct treatment in the management of challenging wounds to other patient and wound management approaches.

  13. Role of phonons in negative thermal expansion and high pressure phase transitions in β-eucryptite: An ab-initio lattice dynamics and inelastic neutron scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baltej; Gupta, Mayanak Kumar; Mittal, Ranjan; Zbiri, Mohamed; Rols, Stephane; Patwe, Sadequa Jahedkhan; Achary, Srungarpu Nagabhusan; Schober, Helmut; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar; Chaplot, Samrath Lal

    2017-02-01

    β-Eucryptite (LiAlSiO4) shows anisotropic thermal expansion as well as one-dimensional super-ionic conductivity. We have performed the lattice dynamical calculations using ab-initio density functional theory along with inelastic neutron scattering measurements. The anisotropic stress dependence of the phonon spectrum is calculated to obtain the thermal expansion behavior along various axes. The calculations show that the Grüneisen parameters of the low-energy phonon modes around 10 meV have large negative values and govern the negative thermal expansion behavior at low temperatures along both the "a"- and "c"-axes. On the other hand, anisotropic elasticity along with anisotropic positive values of the Grüneisen parameters of the high-energy modes in the range 30-70 meV are responsible for the thermal expansion at high temperatures, which is positive in the a-b plane and negative along the c-axis. The analysis of the polarization vectors of the phonon modes sheds light on the mechanism of the anomalous thermal expansion behavior. The softening of a Γ-point mode at about 2 GPa may be related to the high-pressure phase transition.

  14. Effect of Negative Pressure on Proliferation, Virulence Factor Secretion, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence-Regulated Gene Expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effect of negative pressure conditions induced by NPWT on P. aeruginosa. Methods. P. aeruginosa was cultured in a Luria–Bertani medium at negative pressure of −125 mmHg for 24 h in the experimental group and at atmospheric pressure in the control group. The diameters of the colonies of P. aeruginosa were measured after 24 h. ELISA kit, orcinol method, and elastin-Congo red assay were used to quantify the virulence factors. Biofilm formation was observed by staining with Alexa Fluor® 647 conjugate of concanavalin A (Con A. Virulence-regulated genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results. As compared with the control group, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited by negative pressure. The colony size under negative pressure was significantly smaller in the experimental group than that in the controls (p<0.01. Besides, reductions in the total amount of virulence factors were observed in the negative pressure group, including exotoxin A, rhamnolipid, and elastase. RT-PCR results revealed a significant inhibition in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes. Conclusion. Negative pressure could significantly inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa. It led to a decrease in the virulence factor secretion, biofilm formation, and a reduction in the expression level of virulence-regulated genes.

  15. Acetone photolysis at 248 nm revisited: pressure dependence of the CO and CO2 quantum yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somnitz, H; Ufer, T; Zellner, R

    2009-10-14

    Pressure dependent CO and CO2 quantum yields in the laser pulse photolysis of acetone at 248 nm and T = 298 K have been measured directly using quantitative infrared diode laser absorption. The experiments cover the pressure range from 50 to 900 mbar. It is found that the quantum yields show a significant dependence on total pressure, with Phi(CO) decreasing from around 0.5 at 20 mbar to approximately 0.3 at 900 mbar. The corresponding CO2 yields as observed when O2 exists in the reaction mixture, exhibit exactly the opposite behaviour. For the sum of both a value of 1.05(-0.05)(+0.02) independent of pressure is obtained, showing that the sum of (Phi(CO) + Phi(CO2)) is a measure for the primary quantum yield in the photolysis of acetone. In addition, CO quantum yields and corresponding pressure dependences were measured in experiments using different bath gases including He, Ar, Kr, SF6, and O2 as third body colliders. The theoretical framework in which we discuss these data is based on our previous findings that the pressure dependence of the CO yield is a consequence of a stepwise fragmentation mechanism during which acetone decomposes initially into methyl and a vibrationally 'hot' acetyl radical, with the latter being able to decompose promptly into methyl plus CO. The pressure dependence of the CO yield then originates from the second step and is modelled quantitatively via statistical dynamical calculations using a combination of RRKM theory with a time-dependent master equation (ME) approach. From a comparison of experiment with theory the amount of excess energy in the vibrationally hot acetyl radicals (E* approximately 65 kJ mol(-1)) as well as the characteristic collision parameters for interaction of acetyl with the different bath gases were derived. Values of 90, 280, 310, 545, 550 and 1800 cm(-1) for the average energy transferred per downward collision for the bath gases He, Ar, Kr, O2, N2, and SF6, respectively, are obtained. The calculations also

  16. Managing Disasters Using Pressure Dependent Demand Analysis – Case Study of Shirpur Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Mulay

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Water is the most essential component for sustaining lives of humans and other living creatures. Supplying potable water with adequate residual pressure is a fundamental responsibility of city administration, which they do during normal conditions. But sometimes, abnormal conditions are formed resulting pressure deficient conditions during the daily operations of water distribution networks. These are caused due to common occurrences such as pump failure, pipe bursts, and isolation of major pipes from the system for planned maintenance work and excessive firefighting demands. Total water stop conditions may arise, when the major source supplying water to the city fails in natural disaster such as floods, Tsunami, earthquake or manmade disaster such as terrorist attack. Unlike the pipe failure, longer time is required for restoring water in case of source failure condition. In such situations, the quantity of water is generally decreased and the water distribution systems (WDS may not be able to satisfy all consumers’ demands. In this context, the assumption that all demands are fully satisfied regardless of the pressure in the system becomes unreasonable. A realistic behavior of the network performance can only be attained by considering demands to be pressure dependent. This paper aims to describe how pressure dependent demand analysis is useful for the simulation of disaster scenario due to source failure of the Shirpur town. The simulation of failure scenario is carried out using WaterGEMs software. The paper also aims to prepare the action plans for the recovery of water supply in such crisis conditions.

  17. Dynamic Acousto-Elasticity: Pressure and Frequency Dependences in Berea Sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, J. V.; Pimienta, L.; Latour, S.; Fortin, J.; Schubnel, A.; Johnson, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Nonlinear elasticity is studied at the laboratory scale with the goal of understanding observations at earth scales, for instance during strong ground motion, tidal forcing and earthquake slip processes. Here we report frequency and pressure dependences on elasticity when applying dynamic acousto-elasticity (DAE) of rock samples, analogous to quasi-static acousto-elasticity. DAE allows one to obtain the elastic behavior over the entire dynamic cycle, detailing the full nonlinear behavior under tension and compression, including hysteresis and memory effects. We perform DAE on a sample of Berea sandstone subject to 0.5MPa uniaxial load, with sinusoidal oscillating strain amplitudes ranging from 10-6 to 10-5 and at frequencies from 0.1 to 260Hz. In addition, the confining pressure is increased stepwise from 0 to 30MPa. We compare results to previous measurements made at lower (mHz) and higher (kHz) frequencies. Nonlinear elastic parameters corresponding to conditioning effects, third order elastic constants and fourth order elastic constants are quantitatively compared over the pressure and frequency ranges. We observe that the decrease in modulus due to conditioning increases with frequency, suggesting a frequency and/or strain-rate dependence that should be included in nonlinear elastic models of rocks. In agreement with previous measurements, nonlinear elastic effects also decrease with confining pressure, suggesting that nonlinear elastic sources such as micro-cracks, soft bonds and dislocations are turned off as the pressure increases.

  18. Impact of chemical peeling combined with negative pressure on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S J; Kang, I J; Shin, M K; Jeong, K H; Baek, J H; Koh, J S; Lee, S J

    2016-10-01

    In vivo changes in skin barrier function after chemical peeling with alpha hydroxyacids (AHAs) have been previously reported. However, the additional effects of physical treatment with chemical agents on skin barrier function have not been adequately studied. This study measured the degree of acute skin damage and the time required for skin barrier repair using non-invasive bioengineering methods in vivo with human skin to investigate the additional effect of a 4% AHA chemical jet accelerated at supersonic velocities. Thirteen female subjects (average age: 29.54 ± 4.86 years) participated in this study. The faces of the subjects were divided into half according to the block randomization design and were then assigned to receive AHA peeling alone or AHA peeling combined with pneumatic pressure on each side of the face. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin colour and skin blood flow were evaluated at baseline and at 30 min, 2, 5 and 7 days after treatment. The TEWL and skin blood flow were significantly increased after 30 min in chemodermabrasion compared with chemical peeling alone (P skin blood flow recovered to baseline after 2 days, and TEWL was significantly decreased at 7 days compared with chemical peeling alone (P skin barriers, but it is estimated that it can enhance the skin barrier function after 7 days compared to the use of a chemical agent alone. In addition, chemodermabrasion has a more effective impact in the dermis and relatively preserves the skin barrier. © 2016 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  19. Flows of Carreau fluid with pressure dependent viscosity in a variable porous medium: Application of polymer melt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Y. Malik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work concerns the pressure dependent viscosity in Carreau fluid through porous medium. Four different combinations of pressure dependent viscosity and pressure dependent porous medium parameters are considered for two types of flow situations namely (i Poiseuille flow and (ii Couette flow. The solutions of non-linear equations have been evaluated numerically by Shooting method along with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg method. The physical features of pertinent parameters have been discussed through graphs.

  20. Pressure-dependent surface viscosity and its surprising consequences in interfacial flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikantan, Harishankar; Squires, Todd

    2016-11-01

    The surface shear viscosity of a surfactant monolayer almost always depends strongly on surface pressure, and this oft-ignored rheological feature significantly alters fluid flow and dynamics of particles on the interface. In order to illustrate the qualitatively new phenomena that arise out of pressure-dependent rheology, we focus here on a series of analytically tractable yet paradigmatic examples of lubrication geometries. Thin-gap flows naturally amplify pressure changes, and thus exemplify the effects of pressure-dependent viscosity. We show that much of the mathematical machinery from Newtonian lubrication analyses can be modified in a relatively straightforward manner in such systems. Our analysis reveals novel features such as a self-limiting flux when a surfactant is pumped through a narrow channel, a maximum approach velocity in squeeze flows due to divergent inter-particle forces, and forces perpendicular to the direction of motion that breaks symmetries associated with Newtonian analogs. We discuss the broader implications of these phenomena, especially with regard to interfacial suspension mechanics for which these lubrication geometries provide a convenient limit.

  1. Low pressure and high power rf sources for negative hydrogen ions for fusion applications (ITER neutral beam injection).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Kraus, W; Falter, H D; Berger, M; Christ-Koch, S; Fröschle, M; Gutser, R; Heinemann, B; Martens, C; McNeely, P; Riedl, R; Speth, E; Wünderlich, D

    2008-02-01

    The international fusion experiment ITER requires for the plasma heating and current drive a neutral beam injection system based on negative hydrogen ion sources at 0.3 Pa. The ion source must deliver a current of 40 A D(-) for up to 1 h with an accelerated current density of 200 Am/(2) and a ratio of coextracted electrons to ions below 1. The extraction area is 0.2 m(2) from an aperture array with an envelope of 1.5 x 0.6 m(2). A high power rf-driven negative ion source has been successfully developed at the Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at three test facilities in parallel. Current densities of 330 and 230 Am/(2) have been achieved for hydrogen and deuterium, respectively, at a pressure of 0.3 Pa and an electron/ion ratio below 1 for a small extraction area (0.007 m(2)) and short pulses (ITER source but without extraction system, is intended to demonstrate the size scaling and plasma homogeneity of rf ion sources. The source operates routinely now. First results on plasma homogeneity obtained from optical emission spectroscopy and Langmuir probes are very promising. Based on the success of the IPP development program, the high power rf-driven negative ion source has been chosen recently for the ITER beam systems in the ITER design review process.

  2. DC negative corona discharge in atmospheric pressure helium: transition from the corona to the ‘normal’ glow regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Nusair; Antao, Dion S.; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2014-06-01

    Direct current (dc) negative corona discharges in atmospheric pressure helium are simulated via detailed numerical modeling. Simulations are conducted to characterize the discharges in atmospheric helium for a pin plate electrode configuration. A self-consistent two-dimensional hybrid model is developed to simulate the discharges and the model predictions are validated with experimental measurements. The discharge model considered consists of momentum and energy conservation equations for a multi-component (electrons, ions, excited species and neutrals) gas mixture, conservation equations for each component of the mixture and state relations. A drift-diffusion approximation for the electron and the ion fluxes is used. A model for the external circuit driving the discharge is also considered and solved along with the discharge model. Many of the key features of a negative corona discharge, namely non-linear current-voltage characteristics, spatially flat cathode current density and glow-like discharge in the high current regime are displayed in the predictions. A transition to the ‘normal’ glow discharge from the corona discharge regime is also observed. The transition is identified from the calculated current-voltage characteristic curve and is characterized by the radial growth of the negative glow and the engulfment of the cathode wire.

  3. Salt-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in Dahl salt-sensitive rats is dependent on elevated blood pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Mu, J.J.; Liu, F.Q.; Ren, K.Y.; Xiao, H.Y. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Cardiovascular Department, Xi' an, China, Cardiovascular Department, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi' an, China, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi' an (China); Yang, Z. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Department of Pathology, Xi' an, China, Department of Pathology, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Yuan, Z.Y. [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Medical College, First Affiliated Hospital, Cardiovascular Department, Xi' an, China, Cardiovascular Department, First Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Xi' an, China, Key Laboratory of Environment and Genes Related to Diseases, Ministry of Education, Xi' an (China)

    2014-03-03

    Dietary salt intake has been linked to hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence has indicated that salt-sensitive individuals on high salt intake are more likely to develop renal fibrosis. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) participates in the development and progression of renal fibrosis in humans and animals. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of a high-salt diet on EMT in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. Twenty-four male SS and consomic SS-13{sup BN} rats were randomized to a normal diet or a high-salt diet. After 4 weeks, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and albuminuria were analyzed, and renal fibrosis was histopathologically evaluated. Tubular EMT was evaluated using immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR with E-cadherin and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). After 4 weeks, SBP and albuminuria were significantly increased in the SS high-salt group compared with the normal diet group. Dietary salt intake induced renal fibrosis and tubular EMT as identified by reduced expression of E-cadherin and enhanced expression of α-SMA in SS rats. Both blood pressure and renal interstitial fibrosis were negatively correlated with E-cadherin but positively correlated with α-SMA. Salt intake induced tubular EMT and renal injury in SS rats, and this relationship might depend on the increase in blood pressure.

  4. Pressure Dependence of Molar Volume near the Melting Point in Benzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The pressure dependence of the molar volume was at constant temperatures close to the melting point in benzene. The molar volume of benzene was calculated using experimental data for the thermal expansivity for constant temperatures of 25℃, 28.5℃, 40℃, and 51℃ at various pressures for both the solid and liquid phases. The predictions are in good agreement with the observed volumes in both the solid and liquid phases of benzene. The predicted values of the molar volume for a constant temperature of 28.5℃ in the liquid phase of benzene agree well with experimental data in the literature.

  5. Pressure dependence of acoustic anomalies of polydimethylsiloxane studied by Brillouin spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Seonhyeop [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Jae-Hyeon, E-mail: hwangko@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jaehoon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Gangwondo 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Young Ho; Kim, Kwang Joo [4-2-2, Agency for Defense Development, P.O. Box 35, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    The acoustic properties of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer was investigated as a function of pressure by using a multi-pass Fabry–Perot interferometer and a diamond anvil cell. Pressure dependence of the sound velocity, the Brillouin linewidth, and the refractive index was determined up to ~8.7 GPa. Acoustic properties exhibited a crossover behavior at approximately 1 GPa, which was attributed to the complete collapse of the free volume content in this polymer. The refractive index increased from 1.46 at ambient condition to ~1.63 at 8.67 GPa, which reflected the corresponding increase in density.

  6. New Developments in Nickel-Hydrogen Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Cell and Battery Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Dwight B.; Fox, Chris L.; Miller, Lee E.

    1997-01-01

    THe Dependent Pressure Vessel (DPV) Nickel-Hydrogen (NiH2) design is being developed as an advanced battery for military and commercial, aerospace and terrestrial applications. The DPV cell design offers high specific energy and energy density as well as reduced cost, while retaining the established Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) technology flight heritage and database. This advanced DPV design also offers a more efficient mechanical, electrical and thermal cell and battery configuration and a reduced part count. The DPV battery design promotes compact, minimum volume packaging and weight efficiency, and delivers cost and weight savings with minimal design risk.

  7. Negative Compatibility or Object Updating? A Cautionary Tale of Mask-Dependent Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleras, Alejandro; Enns, James T.

    2004-01-01

    The negative compatibility effect (NCE) is the surprising result that visual targets that follow a brief prime stimulus and a mask can be identified more rapidly when they are opposite rather than identical to the prime. In a recent article in this journal, S. T. Klapp and L. B. Hinkley (2002) proposed that this reflected a competition between…

  8. Age Differences in Negative Emotional Responses to Daily Stressors Depend on Time since Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stacey B.; Ram, Nilam; Smyth, Joshua M.; Almeida, David M.; Sliwinski, Martin J.

    2017-01-01

    Research on age differences in the experience of negative emotional states have produced inconsistent results, particularly when emotion is examined in the context of daily stress. Strength and vulnerability integration (SAVI; Charles, 2010) theory postulates that age differences in emotional states are contingent upon whether a stressor occurred,…

  9. Fluidic origami with embedded pressure dependent multi-stability: a plant inspired innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K W

    2015-10-06

    Inspired by the impulsive movements in plants, this research investigates the physics of a novel fluidic origami concept for its pressure-dependent multi-stability. In this innovation, fluid-filled tubular cells are synthesized by integrating different Miura-Ori sheets into a three-dimensional topological system, where the internal pressures are strategically controlled similar to the motor cells in plants. Fluidic origami incorporates two crucial physiological features observed in nature: one is distributed, pressurized cellular organization, and the other is embedded multi-stability. For a single fluidic origami cell, two stable folding configurations can coexist due to the nonlinear relationships among folding, crease material deformation and internal volume change. When multiple origami cells are integrated, additional multi-stability characteristics could occur via the interactions between pressurized cells. Changes in the fluid pressure can tailor the existence and shapes of these stable folding configurations. As a result, fluidic origami can switch between being mono-stable, bistable and multi-stable with pressure control, and provide a rapid 'snap-through' type of shape change based on the similar principles as in plants. The outcomes of this research could lead to the development of new adaptive materials or structures, and provide insights for future plant physiology studies at the cellular level.

  10. Pressure dependent tailored attributes of silicon nanoneedles grown by VHF plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Yasir Hussein; Sakrani, Samsudi Bin; Rohani, Md Supar

    2016-06-01

    Gold (Au) catalysts assisted well-aligned silicon nanoneedles (SiNNs) are synthesized using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF-PECVD) method. The tailored morphology and the optical reflectance of such NNs are inspected as a function of varying reactor pressure (200-800 mTorr). FESEM images revealed the growth of high density SiNNs with diameter ranging from 45 to 600 nm and length as much as 5.66 ± 0.2 μm. Overall morphology of these NNs are found to be highly sensitive to the pressure variation, where appreciably aligned thinner NNs are achieved at 600 mTorr pressure. The presence of globule at the NNs tip authenticated their VLS mechanism mediated growth. The reactor pressure sensitivity of the aspect ratio, lattice parameters, Raman modes, and reflectance are demonstrated. XRD patterns manifested SiNNs cubic crystalline phase with preferred orientation along direction. The occurrence of NNs high crystallinity is further supported by the Raman and HRTEM data. The reflectance of SiNNs grown at 600 mTorr exhibited remarkable reduction (˜6.3%) than those obtained at other pressures. This reactor pressure dependent significant modification in the physical properties of synthesized SiNNs may be prospective for the development of optoelectronics.

  11. Interesting pressure dependence of power factor in BiTeI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, San-Dong; Wang, Jian-Li

    2016-06-01

    We investigate pressure dependence of electronic structures and thermoelectric properties in BiTeI by using a modified Becke and Johnson exchange potential. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) effects are also included due to giant Rashba splitting. Thermoelectric properties are illuminated through solving Boltzmann transport equations within the constant scattering time approximation. The calculated energy band gap of 0.36 eV agrees well with the experimental value of 0.38 eV. As the pressure increases, the energy band gap first decreases, and then increases. The Rashba energy has the opposite trend with the energy band gap. SOC has obvious detrimental influence on the power factor in both n-type and p-type doping. For low doping concentration, the power factor has the same trend with the energy band gap with increasing pressure, but shows a monotonic changing trend in high doping. It is found that the pressure can induce a significantly enhanced power factor in high n-type doping, which can be understood as pressure leading to two-dimensional-like density of states in the conduction bands. These results suggest that BiTeI may be a potential candidate for efficient thermoelectricity in n-type doping by pressure, turning an ordinary insulator into a topological insulator.

  12. Fluidic origami with embedded pressure dependent multi-stability: a plant inspired innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the impulsive movements in plants, this research investigates the physics of a novel fluidic origami concept for its pressure-dependent multi-stability. In this innovation, fluid-filled tubular cells are synthesized by integrating different Miura-Ori sheets into a three-dimensional topological system, where the internal pressures are strategically controlled similar to the motor cells in plants. Fluidic origami incorporates two crucial physiological features observed in nature: one is distributed, pressurized cellular organization, and the other is embedded multi-stability. For a single fluidic origami cell, two stable folding configurations can coexist due to the nonlinear relationships among folding, crease material deformation and internal volume change. When multiple origami cells are integrated, additional multi-stability characteristics could occur via the interactions between pressurized cells. Changes in the fluid pressure can tailor the existence and shapes of these stable folding configurations. As a result, fluidic origami can switch between being mono-stable, bistable and multi-stable with pressure control, and provide a rapid ‘snap-through’ type of shape change based on the similar principles as in plants. The outcomes of this research could lead to the development of new adaptive materials or structures, and provide insights for future plant physiology studies at the cellular level. PMID:26400197

  13. Negative-Pressure Cavitation Extraction of Four Main Vinca Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Yuangang Zu; Xiaorui Guo; Yujie Fu; Meng Luo; Wei Wang; Liuqing Yang; Fansong Mu

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, an improved method termed negative-pressure cavitation extraction (NPCE) followed by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was developed for the extraction and quantification of vindoline (VDL), catharanthine (CTR), vincristine (VCR) and vinblastine (VLB) from Catharanthus roseus leaves. The optimized method employed 60-mesh particles, 80% ethanol, a negative pressure of −0.075 MPa, a solid to liquid ratio of 1:20, 30 min of ...

  14. Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking, and Risk-Taking Behaviors among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Heroin Dependent Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koosha Paydary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to compare impulsivity and risky decision making among HIV-positive and negative heroin dependent persons. Methods. We compared different dimensions of impulsivity and risky decision making in two groups of 60 HIV-positive and 60 HIV-negative male heroin dependent persons. Each group was comprised of equal numbers of current (treatment seeker and former (abstinent heroin addicts. Data collection tools included Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART, Iowa Gambling Task (IGT, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS, and Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS. Results. In SSS, comprised of four subscales including thrill and adventure seeking (TAS, experience seeking (ES, disinhibition (DIS, and boredom susceptibility (BS, there was a borderline difference in DIS (P=0.08 as HIV-positive group scored higher than HIV-negative group. Also, ES and total score were significantly higher among HIV-positive patients. In BART, HIV-positive subjects scored higher in risk taking than HIV-negative subjects as reflected in higher Average Number of puffs in Successful Balloons (ANSB. In BIS, HIV-positive group scored significantly higher in cognitive impulsivity (CI (P=0.03 and nonplanning impulsivity (NPI (P=0.05 in comparison to HIV-negative group. Also, current heroin addicts scored significantly higher in NPI compared to former addict HIV-negative participants (P=0.015. IGT did not show any significant difference between groups. Conclusion. Higher levels of impulsivity and risk taking behaviors among HIV-positive heroin addicts will increase serious concerns regarding HIV transmission from this group to other opiate dependents and healthy people.

  15. Experimental evidence for negative turgor pressure in small leaf cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L versus large cells of Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et W.C. Cheng. 2. Höfler diagrams below the volume of zero turgor and the theoretical implication for pressure-volume curves of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongmei; Li, Junhui; Ding, Yiting; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-03-01

    The physiological advantages of negative turgor pressure, Pt , in leaf cells are water saving and homeostasis of reactants. This paper advances methods for detecting the occurrence of negative Pt in leaves. Biomechanical models of pressure-volume (PV) curves predict that negative Pt does not change the linearity of PV curve plots of inverse balance pressure, PB , versus relative water loss, but it does predict changes in either the y-intercept or the x-intercept of the plots depending on where cell collapse occurs in the PB domain because of negative Pt . PV curve analysis of Robinia leaves revealed a shift in the x-intercept (x-axis is relative water loss) of PV curves, caused by negative Pt of palisade cells. The low x-intercept of the PV curve was explained by the non-collapse of palisade cells in Robinia in the PB domain. Non-collapse means that Pt smoothly falls from positive to negative values with decreasing cell volume without a dramatic change in slope. The magnitude of negative turgor in non-collapsing living cells was as low as -1.3 MPa and the relative volume of the non-collapsing cell equaled 58% of the total leaf cell volume. This study adds to the growing evidence for negative Pt . © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF PRESSURE-DEPENDENT VISCOSITY ON THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF SUPER-EARTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamenkovic, Vlada; Noack, Lena; Spohn, Tilman [Institute of Planetology, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Breuer, Doris, E-mail: Vlada.Stamenkovic@dlr.de, E-mail: Lena.Noack@dlr.de, E-mail: Doris.Breuer@dlr.de, E-mail: Tilman.Spohn@dlr.de [Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center DLR, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-20

    We study the thermal evolution of super-Earths with a one-dimensional (1D) parameterized convection model that has been adopted to account for a strong pressure dependence of the viscosity. A comparison with a 2D spherical convection model shows that the derived parameterization satisfactorily represents the main characteristics of the thermal evolution of massive rocky planets. We find that the pressure dependence of the viscosity strongly influences the thermal evolution of super-Earths-resulting in a highly sluggish convection regime in the lower mantles of those planets. Depending on the effective activation volume and for cooler initial conditions, we observe with growing planetary mass even the formation of a conductive lid above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a so-called CMB-lid. For initially molten planets our results suggest no CMB-lids but instead a hot lower mantle and core as well as sluggish lower mantle convection. This implies that the initial interior temperatures, especially in the lower mantle, become crucial for the thermal evolution-the thermostat effect suggested to regulate the interior temperatures in terrestrial planets does not work for massive planets if the viscosity is strongly pressure dependent. The sluggish convection and the potential formation of the CMB-lid reduce the convective vigor throughout the mantle, thereby affecting convective stresses, lithospheric thicknesses, and heat fluxes. The pressure dependence of the viscosity may therefore also strongly affect the propensity of plate tectonics, volcanic activity, and the generation of a magnetic field of super-Earths.

  17. Radiation pressure cross sections and optical forces over negative refractive index spherical particles by ordinary Bessel beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2011-08-01

    When impinged by an arbitrary laser beam, lossless and homogeneous negative refractive index (NRI) spherical particles refract and reflect light in an unusual way, giving rise to different scattered and internal fields when compared to their equivalent positive refractive index particles. In the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory, the scattered fields are dependent upon the Mie scattering coefficients, whose values must reflect the metamaterial behavior of an NRI scatterer, thus leading to new optical properties such as force and torque. In this way, this work is devoted to the analysis of both radial and longitudinal optical forces exerted on lossless and simple NRI particles by zero-order Bessel beams, revealing how the force profiles are changed whenever the refractive index becomes negative.

  18. Distribution assessment comparing continuous and periodic wound instillation in conjunction with negative pressure wound therapy using an agar-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycerz, Anthony M; Slack, Paul; McNulty, Amy K

    2013-04-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is a widely accepted and effective treatment for various wound types, including complex wounds. Negative pressure with instillation was initially used as a gravity-fed system whereby reticulated, open-cell foam in the wound bed was periodically exposed to cycles of soaking with instillation solution followed by NPWT. Recent publications have alluded to positive outcomes with continuous instillation, where fluid is delivered simultaneously with negative pressure. To evaluate the distribution of instillation solutions to wound beds in conjunction with negative pressure, agar-based models were developed and exposed to coloured instillation solutions to identify exposure intensity via agar staining. This model allowed comparison of continuous- versus periodic-instillation therapy with negative pressure. Continuous instillation at a rate of 30 cc/hour with negative pressure showed isolated exposure of instillation fluid to wound beds in agar wound models with and without undermining and tunnelling. In contrast, periodic instillation illustrated uniform exposure of the additive to the entire wound bed including undermined and tunnel areas, with increased staining with each instillation cycle. These findings suggest that periodic instillation facilitates more uniform exposure throughout the wound, including tunnels and undermining, to instillation solutions, thereby providing therapy consistent with the clinician-ordered treatment.

  19. Negative density-dependent emigration of males in an increasing red deer population

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leif Egil Loe; Atle Mysterud; Vebjørn Veiberg; Rolf Langvatn

    2009-01-01

    ...), possibly caused by increasing saturation of deer in areas surrounding the marking sites. Our study highlights that pattern of density dependence in dispersal rates may differ markedly between sexes in highly polygynous species...

  20. Polaron physics and crossover transition in magnetite probed by pressure-dependent infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebad-Allah, J; Baldassarre, L; Sing, M; Claessen, R; Brabers, V A M; Kuntscher, C A

    2013-01-23

    The optical properties of magnetite at room temperature were studied by infrared reflectivity measurements as a function of pressure up to 8 GPa. The optical conductivity spectrum consists of a Drude term, two sharp phonon modes, a far-infrared band at around 600 cm(-1) and a pronounced mid-infrared absorption band. With increasing pressure both absorption bands shift to lower frequencies and the phonon modes harden in a linear fashion. Based on the shape of the MIR band, the temperature dependence of the dc transport data, and the occurrence of the far-infrared band in the optical conductivity spectrum, the polaronic coupling strength in magnetite at room temperature should be classified as intermediate. For the lower energy phonon mode an abrupt increase of the linear pressure coefficient occurs at around 6 GPa, which could be attributed to minor alterations of the charge distribution among the different Fe sites.

  1. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  2. Are the Negative Effects of Divorce on Well-Being Dependent on Marital Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmijn, Matthijs; Monden, Christiaan W. S.

    2006-01-01

    We test the so-called escape hypothesis, which argues that for people from a poor marriage, a divorce has a less negative or even a positive effect on well-being. In an analysis of two waves of the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 4,526), we find only limited evidence. When people divorce from a dissatisfactory or unfair marriage,…

  3. Time-dependent post-imperative negative variation indicates adaptation and problem solving in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Peter; Brecht, Ines-Beatrice; Niederberger, Uwe; Kowalski, Jens; Schröder, Dietmar; Thome, Johannes; Meyer, Wolfgang; Wallasch, Thomas-Martin; Hilgendorf, Inken; Gerber, Wolf-Dieter

    2012-10-01

    According to the Seligman theory of learned helplessness, depression is caused by a repetitive experience of loss of control resulting in internal, stable and global attributional styles for negative events. In depressed patients and healthy controls experiencing such events, an increased amplitude of the post-imperative negative variation (PINV) has been described. The aim of the study was to investigate a possible correlation between migraine, depression, learned helplessness and PINV. 24 patients suffering from migraine without aura and 24 healthy controls were exposed to a situation of loss of control whilst the contingent negative variation (CNV) from C3, C4 and Cz were recorded. Before conducting the experiment, the subjects were asked to answer the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and the German attributional style questionnaire (GASQ). Amplitudes of total CNV, early and late component and PINV were calculated in eight blocks of four recordings each. The results confirm findings of a pronounced PINV in situations of loss of control, though high amplitudes were not correlated with low values in the GASQ and therefore with learned helplessness. High PINV in migraine patients correlated with high scores in the BDI and the list of the complaints questionnaire. However, this was not the case in healthy controls. In this experimental situation, PINV in migraine patients can be interpreted as an expectancy potential in order to avoid failure and helplessness.

  4. Experimental evidence for negative turgor pressure in small leaf cells of Robinia pseudoacacia L versus large cells of Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et W.C.Cheng. 1. Evidence from pressure-volume curve analysis of dead tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongmei; Pan, Shaoan; Ding, Yiting; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-03-01

    This paper provides a mini-review of evidence for negative turgor pressure in leaf cells starting with experimental evidence in the late 1950s and ending with biomechanical models published in 2014. In the present study, biomechanical models were used to predict how negative turgor pressure might be manifested in dead tissue, and experiments were conducted to test the predictions. The main findings were as follows: (i) Tissues killed by heating to 60 or 80 °C or by freezing in liquid nitrogen all became equally leaky to cell sap solutes and all seemed to pass freely through the cell walls. (ii) Once cell sap solutes could freely pass the cell walls, the shape of pressure-volume curves was dramatically altered between living and dead cells. (iii) Pressure-volume curves of dead tissue seem to measure negative turgor defined as negative when inside minus outside pressure is negative. (iv) Robinia pseudoacacia leaves with small palisade cells had more negative turgor than Metasequoia glyptostroboides with large cells. (v) The absolute difference in negative turgor between R. pseudoacacia and M. glyptostroboides approached as much as 1.0 MPa in some cases. The differences in the manifestation of negative turgor in living versus dead tissue are discussed. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Negative blood oxygenation level dependent homunculus and somatotopic information in primary motor cortex and supplementary motor area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeharia, Noa; Hertz, Uri; Flash, Tamar; Amedi, Amir

    2012-11-06

    A crucial attribute in movement encoding is an adequate balance between suppression of unwanted muscles and activation of required ones. We studied movement encoding across the primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor area (SMA) by inspecting the positive and negative blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in these regions. Using periodic and event-related experiments incorporating the bilateral/axial movements of 20 body parts, we report detailed mototopic imaging maps in M1 and SMA. These maps were obtained using phase-locked analysis. In addition to the positive BOLD, significant negative BOLD was detected in M1 but not in the SMA. The negative BOLD spatial pattern was neither located at the ipsilateral somatotopic location nor randomly distributed. Rather, it was organized somatotopically across the entire homunculus and inversely to the positive BOLD, creating a negative BOLD homunculus. The neuronal source of negative BOLD is unclear. M1 provides a unique system to test whether the origin of negative BOLD is neuronal, because different arteries supply blood to different regions in the homunculus, ruling out blood-stealing explanations. Finally, multivoxel pattern analysis showed that positive BOLD in M1 and SMA and negative BOLD in M1 contain somatotopic information, enabling prediction of the moving body part from inside and outside its somatotopic location. We suggest that the neuronal processes underlying negative BOLD participate in somatotopic encoding in M1 but not in the SMA. This dissociation may emerge because of differences in the activity of these motor areas associated with movement suppression.

  6. Frequency, pressure, and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Jacques; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Fortin, Jérôme; Schubnel, Alexandre; Marone, Chris; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static (f→0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2-3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1f appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. These findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.

  7. Energy density dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency in atmospheric pressure microwave plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano-city, Nagano (Japan); Sawada, K. [Shinshu University, Nagano-city, Nagano (Japan); Tanaka, Y. [Kanazawa University, Kakuma-cho, Kanzawa-city, Ishikawa (Japan); Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K. [National Insitute for Fusion Science, Toki-city, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The recovery of tritium in nuclear fusion plants is a key issue for safety. So far, the oxidation procedure using an atmospheric pressure plasma is expected to be part of the recovery method. In this study, in order to clarify the mechanism of hydrogen oxidation by plasma chemistry, we have investigated the dependence of hydrogen combustion efficiency on gas flow rate and input power in the atmospheric pressure microwave plasma. It has been found that the combustion efficiency depends on energy density of absorbed microwave power. Hence, the energy density is considered as a key parameter for combustion processes. Also neutral gas temperatures inside and outside the plasma were measured by an optical emission spectroscopy method and thermocouple. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature in the plasma is much higher than the outside temperature of plasma. The high neutral gas temperature may affect the combustion reaction. (authors)

  8. Phagocytosis of gram-negative bacteria by a unique CD14-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, D E; Kline, L; Soldau, K; Lee, J D; Pugin, J; Tobias, P S; Ulevitch, R J

    1997-12-01

    THP-1-derived cell lines were stably transfected with constructs encoding glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored or transmembrane forms of human CD14. CD14 expression was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of serum (heat-inactivated)-opsonized Escherichia coli (opEc). Both the GPI-anchored and transmembrane forms of CD14 supported phagocytosis of opEc equally well. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) played a role in CD14-dependent phagocytosis as evidenced by inhibition of CD14-dependent phagocytosis of opEc with anti-LBP monoclonal antibody (mAb) and by enhanced phagocytosis of E. coli opsonized with purified LBP. CD14-dependent phagocytosis was inhibited by a phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase inhibitor (wortmannin) and a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor (tyrphostin 23) but not a protein kinase C inhibitor (bisindolyl-maleimide) or a divalent cation chelator (ethylenediaminetetraacetate). Anti-LBP mAb 18G4 and anti-CD14 mAb 18E12 were used to differentiate between the pathways involved in CD14-dependent phagocytosis and CD14-dependent cell activation. F(ab')2 fragments of 18G4, a mAb to LBP that does not block cell activation, inhibited ingestion of opEc by THP1-wtCD14 cells. 18E12 (an anti-CD14 mAb that does not block LPS binding to CD14 but does inhibit CD14-dependent cell activation) did not inhibit phagocytosis of LBP-opEc by THP1-wtCD14 cells. Furthermore, CD14-dependent phagocytosis was not inhibited by anti-CD18 (CR3 and CR4 beta-chain) or anti-Fcgamma receptor mAb.

  9. Membrane integrity of Campylobacter jejuni subjected to high pressure is pH-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerasle, M.; Guillou, S.; Simonin, H.; Laroche, M.; de Lamballerie, M.; Federighi, M.

    2012-03-01

    Our study focuses on a foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter, which is responsible for the most frequent bacterial enteritis worldwide. Membrane integrity of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168 cells treated at high pressure (300 MPa, 20°C, 10 min) at pH 7.0 and pH 5.6 was measured by fluorescence spectroscopy of propidium iodide (PI) uptake. The percentage of membrane-damaged cells by high pressure, in which PI is allowed to penetrate, was determined using two calibration methods based on the PI fluorescence signal obtained with cells killed either by a heat treatment (80°C for 15 min) or by a pressure treatment (400 MPa, 20°C, 10 min). Both calibrations were shown to be statistically different (P<0.05), particularly at acidic pH, suggesting that a difference in the penetration of PI into bacterial cells might depend on the mode of cell inactivation. These results corroborate the fact that the mechanism of microbial inactivation by high pressure is pH-dependent.

  10. Measurement of the pressure dependence of air fluorescence emission induced by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Ave, M; Buonomo, B; Busca, N; Cazon, L; Chemerisov, S D; Conde, M E; Crowell, R A; Di Carlo, P; Di Giulio, C; Doubrava, M; Esposito, A; Facal, P; Franchini, F J; Horandel, J; Hrabovsky, M; Iarlori, M; Kasprzyk, T E; Keilhauer, B; Klages, H; Kleifges, M; Kuhlmann, S; Mazzitelli, G; Nozka, L; Obermeier, A; Palatka, M; Petrera, S; Privitera, P; Rídky, J; Rizi, V; Rodríguez, G; Salamida, F; Schovanek, P; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Ulrich, A; Yusof, Z M; Vacek, V; Valente, P; Verzi, V; Waldenmaier, T

    2007-01-01

    The fluorescence detection of ultra high energy (> 10^18 eV) cosmic rays requires a detailed knowledge of the fluorescence light emission from nitrogen molecules, which are excited by the cosmic ray shower particles along their path in the atmosphere. We have made a precise measurement of the fluorescence light spectrum excited by MeV electrons in dry air. We measured the relative intensities of 34 fluorescence bands in the wavelength range from 284 to 429 nm with a high resolution spectrograph. The pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum was also measured from a few hPa up to atmospheric pressure. Relative intensities and collisional quenching reference pressures for bands due to transitions from a common upper level were found in agreement with theoretical expectations. The presence of argon in air was found to have a negligible effect on the fluorescence yield. We estimated that the systematic uncertainty on the cosmic ray shower energy due to the pressure dependence of the fluorescence spectrum i...

  11. Simulation of the Steady-State Transport of Radon from Oil intoHouses with Basements under Constant Negative Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Oliveira Loureiro, Celso [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Normal conditions in a house can produce negative pressures as high as 20 Pa relative to the outside. This underpressure, which is a maximum at the base of the house (the basement, for instance), can induce a flow of soil gas into the house, through cracks or any other openings in the understructure of the building. Radon (Rn-222), which is produced in the soil and mixed in the soil gas, can then be transported into the house through a complex combination of molecular diffusion and forced convection. In many of the cases where high levels of indoor radon concentrations have been observed in houses, the soil gas has been concluded to be the main source.

  12. Factors influencing treatment success of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with postoperative infections after Osteosynthetic fracture fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Hansen, Stephanie; Six-Merker, Julia

    2017-01-01

    3 (OR 10.2 [CI 1.88-55.28]). Wounds were less likely to heal in conjunction with high CRP blood levels (>20 mg/l) at the time of discharge (OR 3.6 [95% CI 1.31-10.08]) or following a change of the infecting bacterial species under therapy (OR 3.2 [95% CI, 1.13-8.99]). CONCLUSIONS: These results......BACKGROUND: Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is being increasingly used to treat postoperative infections after osteosynthetic fracture fixation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of epidemiological and microbiological parameters on outcome. METHODS: Infections...... logistic regression models based on data from 106 patients. RESULTS: Staged wound lavage in combination with NPWT allowed implant preservation in 44% and led to successful healing in 73% of patients. Fermentation characteristics, load and behavior after gram staining revealed no statistically significant...

  13. Gas-temperature-dependent generation of cryoplasma jet under atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Yuri; Choi, Jai Hyuk; Tomai, Takaaki; Terashima, Kazuo

    2008-09-01

    Plasma with a gas temperature below room temperature is not yet fully understood although it is expected to be an attractive tool for applications to material processing. In the present work, gas-temperature-dependent generation of a cryoplasma jet was studied. So far, we have generated a helium cryoplasma jet (296-5K) under atmospheric pressure. At gas temperatures below 20K, the helium excimer, He2, was observed clearly from by optical emission spectroscopy.

  14. Properties of Atmospheric Pressure Ar Plasma Jet Depending on Treated Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prysiazhnyi, Vadym; Ricci Castro, Alonso H.; Kostov, Konstantin G.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in argon was utilized to modify surfaces of glass, acrylic, and PTFE dielectrics. This paper describes the influence of the dielectric substrate on operation and properties of plasma. Two modes of operation (each of those have two patterns) were described. The transition from one mode to another, values of the dissipated power, and spreading of plasma over the dielectric surfaces strongly depended on the substrate material. Additionally, three methods of plasma spreading estimation were presented and discussed.

  15. Reduced defense of central blood volume during acute lower body negative pressure-induced hypovolemic circulatory stress in aging women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Marcus; Länne, Toste

    2012-06-01

    Elderly humans are more vulnerable to trauma and hemorrhage than young and elderly men and respond with decreased defense of central blood volume during acute experimental hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP). However, these defense mechanisms have not been evaluated in elderly women. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of compensatory responses to defend central blood volume during experimental hypovolemia in elderly and young women. Cardiovascular responses in 34 women, 12 elderly (66 ± 1 years) and 22 young women (23 ± 0.4 years), were studied during experimental hypovolemia induced by LBNP of 11 to 44 mmHg. Air plethysmography was used to assess the capacitance response (redistribution of peripheral venous blood to the central circulation) as well as net capillary fluid transfer from tissue to blood in the arm. Lower body negative pressure seemed to create comparable hypovolemia measured as total calf volume increase in elderly and young women. Heart rate increased less in elderly women (LBNP of 44 mmHg: 20 ± 2 vs. 37 ± 4%; P < 0.01) but with similar (%) increase in forearm vascular resistance. Mobilization of capacitance blood from the peripheral circulation was both slower and decreased by ∼60% in elderly women (P < 0.001), and net capillary fluid absorption from surrounding tissues was reduced by ∼40% (P < 0.01, LBNP of 44 mmHg). Elderly women responded with less increase in heart rate but with equal forearm vascular resistance (%) response during LBNP. Furthermore, the compensatory capacitance response was both slower and substantially decreased, and net capillary fluid absorption considerably reduced, collectively indicating less efficiency to defend central blood volume in elderly than in young women.

  16. Direct Measurement of the Pressure Dependence of the Glass Transition Temperature: A Comparison of Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, William, III; Ransom, Timothy; Cooper, James, III

    2013-03-01

    Two methods for the direct measurement of the pressure dependence of the glass-transition temperature Tg are presented and compared. These methods involve the use of the diamond anvil cell (DAC), and hence, enable the ability to measure Tg(P) to record high pressures of several GPa. Such studies are increasingly relevant as new methods have pushed other high-pressure experimental investigations of glass-forming systems into the same pressure regime. Both methods use careful ruby fluorescence measurements in the DAC as temperature is increased from the glass (TTg) . Method 1 observes the disappearance of pressure gradients as the viscous liquid region is entered, whereas method 2 involves observation of slope changes in the P-T curve during temperature ramps. Such slope changes are associated with the significant change in the volume expansion coefficient between the highly viscous, metastable, supercooled liquid state and the solid glassy state. In most cases, the two methods yield good agreement in the Tg(P) curve. Data will be presented for more than one glass-forming system, including the intermediate strength glass-forming system glycerol and the fragile glass former salol. We acknowledge support from the NSF under DMR-0552944

  17. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Emma J.; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S.; Lavrentieva, Nina N.

    2017-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H216O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H2- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number J up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300-2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for J ‧ J ″ -dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution (Δ ν ˜ = 0.01cm-1) pressure broadened cross sections for a fixed range of temperatures and pressures between 300 and 2000 K and 0.001-10 bar. An interpolation procedure which can be used to determine cross sections at intermediate temperature and pressure is described. Pressure broadening parameters and cross sections are presented in new ExoMol format.

  18. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  19. Negative dependence of surface magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy on film thickness in Co33Fe67 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Lai; Cui, Ming-Qi; Yang, Dong-Liang; Dong, Jun-Cai; Xu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) on the surface of Fe33Co67 alloy film is extracted from x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) experiments. The result indicates that the surface MAE value is negatively correlated with thickness. Through spectrum calculations and analysis, we find that besides the thickness effect, another principal possible cause may be the shape anisotropy resulting from the presence of interface roughness. These two factors lead to different electron structures on the fermi surface with different exchange fields, which produces different spin-orbit interaction anisotropies. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11075176 and 11375131).

  20. A Pressure-dependent Model for the Regulation of Lipoprotein Lipase by Apolipoprotein C-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Nathan L; Larsson, Mikael; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Small, Donald M

    2015-07-17

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is the co-factor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at the surface of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerol, which increases local surface pressure as surface area decreases and amphipathic products transiently accumulate at the lipoprotein surface. To understand how apoC-II adapts to these pressure changes, we characterized the behavior of apoC-II at multiple lipid/water interfaces. ApoC-II adsorption to a triacylglycerol/water interface resulted in large increases in surface pressure. ApoC-II was exchangeable at this interface and desorbed on interfacial compressions. These compressions increase surface pressure and mimic the action of LPL. Analysis of gradual compressions showed that apoC-II undergoes a two-step desorption, which indicates that lipid-bound apoC-II can exhibit at least two conformations. We characterized apoC-II at phospholipid/triacylglycerol/water interfaces, which more closely mimic lipoprotein surfaces. ApoC-II had a large exclusion pressure, similar to that of apoC-I and apoC-III. However, apoC-II desorbed at retention pressures higher than those seen with the other apoCs. This suggests that it is unlikely that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit LPL via displacement of apoC-II from the lipoprotein surface. Upon rapid compressions and re-expansions, re-adsorption of apoC-II increased pressure by lower amounts than its initial adsorption. This indicates that apoC-II removed phospholipid from the interface upon desorption. These results suggest that apoC-II regulates the activity of LPL in a pressure-dependent manner. ApoC-II is provided as a component of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and is the co-factor for LPL as pressure increases. Above its retention pressure, apoC-II desorbs and removes phospholipid. This triggers release of LPL from lipoproteins.

  1. A Pressure-dependent Model for the Regulation of Lipoprotein Lipase by Apolipoprotein C-II*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Nathan L.; Larsson, Mikael; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Small, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) is the co-factor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) at the surface of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. LPL hydrolyzes triacylglycerol, which increases local surface pressure as surface area decreases and amphipathic products transiently accumulate at the lipoprotein surface. To understand how apoC-II adapts to these pressure changes, we characterized the behavior of apoC-II at multiple lipid/water interfaces. ApoC-II adsorption to a triacylglycerol/water interface resulted in large increases in surface pressure. ApoC-II was exchangeable at this interface and desorbed on interfacial compressions. These compressions increase surface pressure and mimic the action of LPL. Analysis of gradual compressions showed that apoC-II undergoes a two-step desorption, which indicates that lipid-bound apoC-II can exhibit at least two conformations. We characterized apoC-II at phospholipid/triacylglycerol/water interfaces, which more closely mimic lipoprotein surfaces. ApoC-II had a large exclusion pressure, similar to that of apoC-I and apoC-III. However, apoC-II desorbed at retention pressures higher than those seen with the other apoCs. This suggests that it is unlikely that apoC-I and apoC-III inhibit LPL via displacement of apoC-II from the lipoprotein surface. Upon rapid compressions and re-expansions, re-adsorption of apoC-II increased pressure by lower amounts than its initial adsorption. This indicates that apoC-II removed phospholipid from the interface upon desorption. These results suggest that apoC-II regulates the activity of LPL in a pressure-dependent manner. ApoC-II is provided as a component of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins and is the co-factor for LPL as pressure increases. Above its retention pressure, apoC-II desorbs and removes phospholipid. This triggers release of LPL from lipoproteins. PMID:26026161

  2. The effect of blood volume loss on cardiovascular response to lower body negative pressure using a mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, E. H.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.; Fortney, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Different mathematical models of varying complexity have been proposed in recent years to study the cardiovascular (CV) system. However, only a few of them specifically address the response to lower body negative pressure (LBNP), a stress that can be applied in weightlessness to predict changes in orthostatic tolerance. Also, the simulated results produced by these models agree only partially with experimental observations. In contrast, the model proposed by Melchior et al., and modified by Karam et al. is a simple representation of the CV system capable of accurately reproducing observed LBNP responses up to presyncopal levels. There are significant changes in LBNP response due to a loss of blood volume and other alterations that occur in weightlessness and related one-g conditions such as bedrest. A few days of bedrest can cause up to 15% blood volume loss (BVL), with consequent decreases in both stroke volume and cardiac output, and increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and total peripheral resistance. These changes are more pronounced at higher levels of LBNP. This paper presents the results of a simulation study using our CV model to examine the effect of BVL on LBNP response.

  3. The effect of blood volume loss on cardiovascular response to lower body negative pressure using a mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, E. H.; Srinivasan, R. S.; Charles, J. B.; Fortney, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    Different mathematical models of varying complexity have been proposed in recent years to study the cardiovascular (CV) system. However, only a few of them specifically address the response to lower body negative pressure (LBNP), a stress that can be applied in weightlessness to predict changes in orthostatic tolerance. Also, the simulated results produced by these models agree only partially with experimental observations. In contrast, the model proposed by Melchior et al., and modified by Karam et al. is a simple representation of the CV system capable of accurately reproducing observed LBNP responses up to presyncopal levels. There are significant changes in LBNP response due to a loss of blood volume and other alterations that occur in weightlessness and related one-g conditions such as bedrest. A few days of bedrest can cause up to 15% blood volume loss (BVL), with consequent decreases in both stroke volume and cardiac output, and increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and total peripheral resistance. These changes are more pronounced at higher levels of LBNP. This paper presents the results of a simulation study using our CV model to examine the effect of BVL on LBNP response.

  4. Pulmonary rehabilitation coupled with negative pressure ventilation decreases decline in lung function, hospitalizations, and medical cost in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Chou, Pai-Chien; Joa, Wen-Ching; Chen, Li-Fei; Sheng, Te-Fang; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Yang, Lan-Yan; Pan, Yu-Bin; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Wang, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Han-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) brings benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Negative pressure ventilation (NPV) increases ventilation and decreases hyperinflation as well as breathing work in COPD. We evaluated the long-term effects of a hospital-based PR program coupled with NPV support in patients with COPD on clinical outcomes. One hundred twenty-nine patients with COPD were followed up for more than 5 years, with the NPV group (n = 63) receiving the support of NPV (20–30 cm H2O delivery pressure for 60 min) and unsupervised home exercise program of 20 to 30 min daily walk, while the control group (n = 6) only received unsupervised home exercise program. Pulmonary function tests and 6 min walk tests (6MWT) were performed every 3 to 6 months. Emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalization with medical costs were recorded. A significant time-by-group interaction in the yearly decline of forced expiratory volume in 1 s in the control group analyzed by mixed-model repeated-measure analysis was found (P = 0.048). The 6MWT distance of the NPV group was significantly increased during the first 4 years, with the interaction of time and group (P = 0.003), the time alone (P = 0.014), and the quadratic time (P lung function, exacerbations, and hospitalization rates, and improved walking distance and medical costs in patients with COPD during a 5-year observation PMID:27741132

  5. The Bagautdinov dressing method: negative pressure wound therapy in a patient with an allergy to acrylate adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, David A; Wirth, Garrett A; Evans, Gregory Rd; Carmean, Melissa; Gordon, Ian L

    2017-02-01

    Current embodiments of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) create a hermetically sealed chamber at the surface of the body using polyurethane foam connected to a vacuum pump, which is then covered by a flexible adhesive drape. Commercially available NPWT systems routinely use flexible polyethylene films that have a sticky side, coated with the same acrylate adhesives used in other medical devices such as ECG leads and grounding pads. Severe reactions to the acrylate adhesives in these other devices, although uncommon, have been reported. We describe the case of a 63-year-old woman with an intractable leg ulcer resulting from external-beam radiotherapy (XRT). Treatment with a standard commercial NPWT system induced severe inflammation of the skin in direct contact with drape adhesive. We successfully administered prolonged, outpatient NPWT to the patient using an alternative method (first described by Bagautdinov in 1986), using plain polyethylene film and petrolatum. The necessary hermetic seal is achieved by smearing the skin with petrolatum before applying the polyethylene film and activating the vacuum pump. The Bagautdinov method is a practical solution to the problem of adapting NPWT to patients with contact sensitivity or skin tears related to the adhesive compounds in the flexible drapes. Its use of a circumferential elastic wrap to maintain constant pressure on the seal probably limits the Bagautdinov technique to the extremities. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Concomitant septic arthritis and tophaceous gout of the knee managed with intermittent closed joint irrigation combined with negative pressure therapy: a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V N, Panicker; J K, Turner; M J, Chehade

    2014-01-01

    Tophaceous gout complicated by septic arthritis presents a management dilemma which can often require multiple surgical debridements. There is little published in the literature regarding treatment of these concomitant conditions. We postulate that biofilm may play a role increasing the difficulty of sterilising a tophaceous joint. The use of topical negative pressure therapy that targets biofilm has been well established for a range of wounds. A new device that incorporates both intermittent negative pressure therapy and wound irrigation was introduced in 2012. This case report describes the use of this topical negative device with the instillation option in the management of severe septic arthritis with concomitant gout and suggests directions for further research.

  7. Dependence of Boiling Histotripsy Treatment Efficiency on HIFU Frequency and Focal Pressure Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Haider, Yasser A; Maxwell, Adam D; Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R; Khokhlova, Vera A

    2017-09-01

    Boiling histotripsy (BH) is a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-based method of mechanical tissue fractionation that utilizes millisecond-long bursts of HIFU shock waves to cause boiling at the focus in milliseconds. The subsequent interaction of the incoming shocks with the vapor bubble mechanically lyses surrounding tissue and cells. The acoustic parameter space for BH has been investigated previously and an inverse dependence between the HIFU frequency and the dimensions of a BH lesion has been observed. The primary goal of the present study was to investigate in more detail the ablation rate and reliability of BH in the frequency range relevant to treatment of deep abdominal tissue targets (1-2 MHz). The second goal was to investigate the effect of focal peak pressure levels and shock amplitude on BH lesion formation, given a constant duty factor, a constant ratio of the pulse duration to the time to reach boiling and a constant number of BH pulses. A custom-built 12-element sector array HIFU transducer with F-number = 1.05 was used in all experiments. BH pulses at 5 different frequencies (1, 1.2, 1.5, 1.7 and 1.9 MHz) were delivered to optically transparent polyacrylamide gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine liver and myocardium tissue to observe cavitation and boiling bubble activity with high-speed photography and B-mode ultrasound imaging, correspondingly. In gel phantoms, a cavitation bubble cloud was shown to form prefocally and to shield the focus in all exposures at 1 and 1.2 MHz and in the highest amplitude exposures at 1.5-1.7 MHz; shielding was not observed at 1.9 MHz. In ex vivo tissue, this shielding effect was observed in 25% of exposures when peak negative in situ pressure exceeded 10.2 MPa at 1 MHz and 14.5 MPa at 1.5 MHz. When shielding occurred, the exposures resulted in mild tissue disruption in the prefocal region, but not liquefaction. The dimensions of liquefied lesions followed the inverse proportionality trend with

  8. The effect of negative pressure wound therapy with antibacterial dressings or antiseptics on an in vitro wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiasek, J; Domig, K J; Djedovic, G; Babeluk, R; Assadian, O

    2017-05-02

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial bioburden in experimental in vitro wounds during the application of conventional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), with and without antimicrobial dressings (polyhexanide, silver), against NPWT instillation of octenidine. Experimental wounds produced in an in vitro porcine wound model were homogenously contaminated with bacterial suspension and treated with NPWT and different options. Group A: non-antimicrobial polyurethane foam dressing; group B: antimicrobial polyurethane foam dressing containing silver; group C: antimicrobial gauze dressing containing polyhexanide; group D: non-antimicrobial polyurethane foam dressing intermittently irrigated with octenidine; group E: negative control (non-antimicrobial polyurethane foam dressing without NPWT). Standard biopsies were harvested after 24 and 28 hours. This study demonstrated that the use of NPWT with intermitted instillation of octenidine (group D) or application of silver-based polyurethane foam dressings (group B) is significantly superior against Staphylococcus aureus colonisation in experimental wounds compared with non-antimicrobial polyurethane foam dressing (group A) after 48 hours. Surprisingly, the polyhexanide-based dressing (group C) used in this model showed no statistical significant effect compared with the control group (group E) after 24 or 48 hours of treatment. Both intermitted instillation of octenidine and silver-based dressings in standard NPWT were significantly superior compared with non-antimicrobial polyurethane foam dressings or PHMB coated gauze dressing after 48 hours.

  9. Dependence of CO2-Brine Interfacial Tension on Aquifer Pressure, Temperature and Water Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachu, S.; Bennion, B.

    2007-12-01

    Carbon dioxide storage in deep saline aquifers is a climate-change mitigation strategy that has significant potential in the short-to-medium term. The displacement of formation water by CO2 (drainage) and of CO2 by invading aquifer brine (imbibition) depend on the interfacial tension (IFT) of the CO2-brine system. To provide needed data, an extensive laboratory program was conducted for the measurement of the interfacial tension between CO2 and water or brine covering the ranges of 2 to 27 MPa pressure, 20°C to 125°C temperature, and 0 to 334,000 mg/l water salinity. The laboratory experiments were conducted using the pendant drop method combined with the Laplace solution for the profile of the brine drop in the CO2-rich environment. The analysis of the resulting set of 294 IFT measurements reveals that: 1) for conditions of constant temperature and water salinity, IFT decreases steeply with increasing pressure in the range PPc, with an asymptotic trend towards a constant value for high pressures; 2) for the same conditions of constant pressure and temperature, IFT increases with increasing water salinity, reflecting decreasing CO2 solubility in brine as salinity increases; 3) the dependence of IFT on temperature is more complex, depending on the CO2 phase. For TTc, with an asymptotic trend towards a constant value for high temperatures. These results indicate that, in the case of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers, the formation water displacement by injected CO2 during the injection phase of CO2 storage and the CO2 displacement by invading brine during the CO2 migration phase depend on the in-situ conditions of pressure, temperature and water salinity through the effects that these primary variables have on the IFT between CO2 and aquifer brine. Since the IFT of CO2-brine systems affects relative permeability and capillary pressure, it is essential that the in-situ conditions and their effect of secondary variables are properly taken into account when

  10. Nitric oxide synthase-dependent immune response against gram negative bacteria in a crustacean, Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ramos, Tania; Carpio, Yamila; Bolívar, Jorge; Gómez, Leonardo; Estrada, Mario Pablo; Pendón, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived radical generated by nitric oxide synthases (NOS). NO is involved in a variety of functions in invertebrates, including host defense. In previous studies, we isolated and sequenced for the first time the NOS gene from hemocytes of Panulirus argus, demonstrating the inducibility of this enzyme by lipopolysaccharide in vitro e in vivo. Hyperimmune serum was obtained from rabbits immunized with a P. argus -NOS fragment of 31 kDa produced in Escherichia coli, which specifically detected the recombinant polypeptide and the endogenous NOS from lobster hemocytes by western blotting and immunofluorescence. In the present work, we demonstrate that the hyperimmune serum obtained against P. argus NOS also recognizes Litopenaeus vannamei NOS in hemocytes by western blotting and immunofluorescence. Our data also show that while the hemolymph of L. vannamei has a strong antibacterial activity against the Gram negative bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, the administration of the anti NOS serum reduce the natural bacterial clearance. These results strongly suggest that NOS is required for the shrimp immune defense toward Gram negative bacteria. Therefore, the monitoring of induction of NOS could be an important tool for testing immunity in shrimp farming.

  11. Models of Aire-dependent gene regulation for thymic negative selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina eDanso-Abeam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE gene lead to Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Syndrome type 1 (APS1, characterized by the development of multi-organ autoimmune damage. The mechanism by which defects in AIRE result in autoimmunity has been the subject of intense scrutiny. At the cellular level, the working model explains most of the clinical and immunological characteristics of APS1, with AIRE driving the expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs in the epithelial cells of the thymic medulla. This TRA expression results in effective negative selection of TRA-reactive thymocytes, preventing autoimmune disease. At the molecular level, the mechanism by which AIRE initiates TRA expression in the thymic medulla remains unclear. Multiple different models for the molecular mechanism have been proposed, ranging from classical transcriptional activity, to random induction of gene expression, to epigenetic tag recognition effect, to altered cell biology. In this review, we evaluate each of these models and discuss their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  12. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo, E-mail: pompeo.volpe@unipd.it

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  13. Experimental evaluation of the pressure and temperature dependence of ion-induced nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Muhammad Miftahul; Suhendi, Asep; Ogi, Takashi; Iskandar, Ferry; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2010-09-28

    An experimental system for the study of ion-induced nucleation in a SO(2)/H(2)O/N(2) gas mixture was developed, employing a soft x-ray at different pressure and temperature levels. The difficulties associated with these experiments included the changes in physical properties of the gas mixture when temperature and pressure were varied. Changes in the relative humidity (RH) as a function of pressure and temperature also had a significant effect on the different behaviors of the mobility distributions of particles. In order to accomplish reliable measurement and minimize uncertainties, an integrated on-line control system was utilized. As the pressure decreased in a range of 500-980 hPa, the peak concentration of both ions and nanometer-sized particles decreased, which suggests that higher pressure tended to enhance the growth of particles nucleated by ion-induced nucleation. Moreover, the modal diameters of the measured particle size distributions showed a systematic shift to larger sizes with increasing pressure. However, in the temperature range of 5-20 °C, temperature increases had no significant effects on the mobility distribution of particles. The effects of residence time, RH (7%-70%), and SO(2) concentration (0.08-6.7 ppm) on ion-induced nucleation were also systematically investigated. The results show that the nucleation and growth were significantly dependent on the residence time, RH, and SO(2) concentration, which is in agreement with both a previous model and previous observations. This research will be inevitable for a better understanding of the role of ions in an atmospheric nucleation mechanism.

  14. A simple model of cerebral blood flow dependence on arterial blood pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Gersten, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that the dependence of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) on mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) can be described with a simple model having the following assumptions. Below certain MABP (denoted as MABP1) there are no autoregulatory or feedback mechanisms influencing CBF. Between MABP1 and MABP2 (MABP at which breakthrough accurs) there is a linear (on MABP) dependent feedback with a sloap depending very much on the individual considered. The classical autoregulation model with a plateau in between MABP1 and MABP2 is a particular case of this model. The model describes well the experiments performed on dogs (Harper 1966), for which the individual feedback sloap parameter varied to great extent, indicating the importance of mesurments on individuals against averaged mesurments (or measurments on diffent individuals) which superficially support the classical autoregulation. New effect of decreased CBF, while increasing MABP, was observed.

  15. Pressure dependence of magnetic properties in Fe-Mn-B amorphous alloys: evidence for inhomogeneous ferromagnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, L F; Kemény, T; Bednarčík, J; Kamarád, J; Arnold, Z; Konôpková, Z; Liermann, H-P

    2013-08-28

    The pressure dependence of the saturation magnetization and Curie temperature was studied in melt-spun Fe60Mn20B20, Fe56Mn24B20 and Fe75B25 amorphous alloys up to 0.9 GPa, corresponding to volume changes up to 0.45%. In addition, in situ high-pressure (up to 40 GPa) x-ray diffraction was performed to determine the compressibility of the latter two alloys. Both the Curie temperature TC (at atmospheric pressure TC = 201 ± 3 and 159 ± 3 K) and the low-temperature saturation magnetization M5 K,5 T decrease remarkably with increasing pressure: dTC/dp =- 31 ± 0.5 and -32 ± 5 K GPa(-1) and dlnM5 K,5 T/dp =- 0.15 ± 0.02 and -0.13 ± 0.03 GPa(-1) for xMn = 20 and 24 at.%, respectively. Compared to dlnM5 K,5 T/dp =- 0.016 ± 0.003 GPa(-1) measured for Fe75B25, the pressure dependence of M5 K,5 T is one order of magnitude larger in the ternary alloys. The bulk moduli for the Fe56Mn24B20 and Fe75B25 glasses were measured to be 152 GPa and 173 GPa, respectively. These data are also compared with the pressure dependence of the hyperfine field and theoretical calculations of the saturation moment for Fe-B alloys reported in the literature. The results were interpreted within an inhomogeneous itinerant-electron model of ferromagnetism.

  16. Disproportional decrease in office blood pressure compared with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure with antihypertensive treatment: dependency on pretreatment blood pressure levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Roland E; Schmidt, Stephanie T; Riemer, Thomas; Dechend, Ralf; Hagedorn, Ina; Senges, Jochen; Messerli, Franz H; Zeymer, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    The long-term relationship between 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and office BP in patients on therapy is not well documented. From a registry we included all patients in whom antihypertensive therapy needed to be uptitrated. Drug treatment included the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker or drugs not blocking the renin-angiotensin system, alone or on top of an existing drug regimen. In all patients, office BP and 24-hour ABP were obtained at baseline and after 1 year with validated devices. In the study population of 2722 patients, there was a good correlation between the change in office BP and 24-hour ABP (systolic: r=0.39; PABP in a 1:1 fashion, for example, a decrease of 10, 20, and 30 mm Hg corresponded to a decrease of ≈7.2, 10.5, and 13.9 mm Hg in systolic ABP, respectively. The disproportionally greater decrease in systolic office BP compared with ABP was dependent on the level of the pretreatment BP, which was consistently higher for office BP than ABP. The white coat effect (difference between office BP and ABP) was on average 10/5 mm Hg lower 1 year after intensifying treatment and the magnitude of that was also dependent on pretreatment BP. There was a disproportionally greater decrease in systolic office BP than in ABP, which for both office BP and ABP seemed to depend on the pretreatment BP level.

  17. Pressure Transient Behavior of Horizontal Well with Time-Dependent Fracture Conductivity in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihong Feng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a discussion on the pressure transient response of multistage fractured horizontal well in tight oil reservoirs. Based on Green’s function, a semianalytical model is put forward to obtain the behavior. Our proposed model accounts for fluid flow in four contiguous regions of the tight formation by using pressure continuity and mass conservation. The time-dependent conductivity of hydraulic fractures, which is ignored in previous models but highlighted by recent experiments, is also taken into account in our proposed model. We also include the effect of pressure drop along a horizontal wellbore. We substantiate the validity of our model and analyze the different flow regimes, as well as the effects of initial conductivity, fracture distribution, and geometry on the pressure transient behavior. Our results suggest that the decrease of fracture conductivity has a tremendous effect on the well performance. Finally, we compare our model results with the field data from a multistage fractured horizontal well in Jimsar sag, Xinjiang oilfield, and a good agreement is obtained.

  18. Pressure-dependent fragilities for piping components: Pilot study on Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley, D.A.; Nakaki, D.K.; Hadidi-Tamjed, H. (ABB Impell Corp., Mission Viejo, CA (USA)); Kipp, T.R. (EQE, Inc., Costa Mesa, CA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The capacities of four, low-pressure fluid systems to withstand pressures and temperatures above the design levels were established for the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station. The results will be used in evaluating the probability of plant damage from Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accidents (ISLOCA) as part of the probabilistic risk assessment of the Davis-Besse nuclear power station undertaken by EG G Idaho, Inc. Included in this evaluation are the tanks, heat exchangers, filters, pumps, valves, and flanged connections for each system. The probabilities of failure, as a function of internal pressure, are evaluated as well as the variabilities associated with them. Leak rates or leak areas are estimated for the controlling modes of failure. The pressure capacities for the pipes and vessels are evaluated using limit-state analyses for the various failure modes considered. The capacities are dependent on several factors, including the material properties, modeling assumptions, and the postulated failure criteria. The failure modes for gasketed-flange connections, valves, and pumps do not lend themselves to evaluation by conventional structural mechanics techniques and evaluation must rely primarily on the results from ongoing gasket research test programs and available vendor information and test data. 21 refs., 7 figs., 52 tabs.

  19. Pressure-dependent optical investigations of Fabre salts in the charge-ordered state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshenko, Ievgen; Herter, Melina; Beyer, Rebeca; Pustogow, Andrej; Dressel, Martin

    2017-03-01

    In a comprehensive infrared study, the molecular vibrational features of (TMTTF)2SbF6, (TMTTF)2AsF6 and (TMTTF)2PF6 single crystals have been measured down to temperatures as low as 7 K by applying hydrostatic pressure up to 11 kbar. We follow the charge disproportionation below the critical temperatures T CO as pressure increases, and determine the critical pressure values p CO at which the charge-ordered phase is suppressed. The coexistence of the spin-Peierls phase with charge order is explored at low temperatures, and the competition of these two phases is observed. Based on our measurements we construct a generic phase diagram of the Fabre salts with centrosymmetric anions. The pressure-dependent anion and methyl-group dynamics in these quasi-one-dimensional charge transfer compounds yields information about the interplay of the organic molecules in the stacks and the anions, and how this interaction varies upon the transition to the charge-ordered state.

  20. Urocortin3 mediates somatostatin-dependent negative feedback control of insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Donaldson, Cynthia J; Cáceres, Elena; Hunter, Anna E; Cowing-Zitron, Christopher; Pound, Lynley D; Adams, Michael W; Zembrzycki, Andreas; Grove, Kevin L; Huising, Mark O

    2015-07-01

    The peptide hormone urocortin3 (Ucn3) is abundantly expressed by mature beta cells, yet its physiological role is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Ucn3 is stored and co-released with insulin and potentiates glucose-stimulated somatostatin secretion via cognate receptors on delta cells. Further, we found that islets lacking endogenous Ucn3 have fewer delta cells, reduced somatostatin content, impaired somatostatin secretion, and exaggerated insulin release, and that these defects are rectified by treatment with synthetic Ucn3 in vitro. Our observations indicate that the paracrine actions of Ucn3 activate a negative feedback loop that promotes somatostatin release to ensure the timely reduction of insulin secretion upon normalization of plasma glucose. Moreover, Ucn3 is markedly depleted from beta cells in mouse and macaque models of diabetes and in human diabetic islets. This suggests that Ucn3 is a key contributor to stable glycemic control, whose reduction during diabetes aggravates glycemic volatility and contributes to the pathophysiology of this disease.

  1. Photoluminescence study of LiNbO3:Cr3+; W4+ at high pressure. Pressure dependence of spectroscopic parameters and local structure of Cr3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Alejo, M. A.; Rodríguez, F.; Barreda-Argüeso, J. A.; Camarillo, I.; Flores J., C.; Murrieta S., H.; Hernández A., J. M.; Jaque, F.; Camarillo, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the photoluminescence properties of congruent codoped LiNbO3:Cr3+; W4+, crystals have been systematically investigated by performing photoluminescence studies at room temperature in the 0-280 kbar pressure range. In particular, we focus on the influence that hydrostatic pressure has on the 2E→ 4A2 (R-lines) transitions of Cr3+. It has been observed that the pressure dependence of the spectral position of the R-lines associated with both Cr3+ centres β and γ shows a bilinear behaviour with an abrupt slope change near 210 kbar. This change is related to the existence of a pressure-induced structural phase transition in the LiNbO3 host. The analysis of experimental results provides the Racah parameters B and C and the crystal field parameter 10Dq and their pressure and volume, through the crystal field theory and equation of state, dependences.

  2. Pressure dependence of the Cu magnetic order in RBa2Cu3O6+x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, J. W.; Li, W.-H.; Trevino, S. F.; Fisk, Z.

    1989-09-01

    Neutron-diffraction measurements have been carried out as a function of hydrostatic pressure to study the magnetic order of the Cu spins in NdBa2Cu3O6.35 and NdBa2Cu3O6.1. In the high-temperature phase, where the Cu planes order antiferromagnetically, we find that the Néel temperature TN1 is very strongly dependent on pressure, increasing at the rate of ~23 K/kbar. We attribute this phenomenal sensitivity to the two-dimensional-like behavior of this magnetic system. In the low-temperature phase, which is associated with magnetic ordering of the chains, only a small change in the ordering temperature TN2 is observed.

  3. Pressure dependent elastic constants of alpha and gamma cyclotrimethylene trinitramine: A quantum mechanical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, DeCarlos E., E-mail: decarlos.e.taylor.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    The elastic constants of the α and γ polymorphs of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) have been computed using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT). The DFT results validate the values obtained in several experiments using ultrasonic and impulsive stimulated thermal scattering techniques and disagree with those obtained using Brillouin scattering which, in general, exceed the other experimental and theoretical results. Compressibility diagrams at zero pressure are presented for the ab, ac, and bc crystallographic planes, and the anisotropic linear compressibility within the ac plane of α-RDX at 0 GPa, observed using ultrasonic and impulsive stimulated thermal scattering measurements, is verified using DFT. The pressure dependence of the elastic constants of α-RDX (0–4 GPa) and γ-RDX (4–8 GPa) is also presented.

  4. A numerical study of fluids with pressure dependent viscosity flowing through a rigid porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nakshatrala, K B

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider modifications to Darcy's equation wherein the drag coefficient is a function of pressure, which is a realistic model for technological applications like enhanced oil recovery and geological carbon sequestration. We first outline the approximations behind Darcy's equation and the modifications that we propose to Darcy's equation, and derive the governing equations through a systematic approach using mixture theory. We then propose a stabilized mixed finite element formulation for the modified Darcy's equation. To solve the resulting nonlinear equations we present a solution procedure based on the consistent Newton-Raphson method. We solve representative test problems to illustrate the performance of the proposed stabilized formulation. One of the objectives of this paper is also to show that the dependence of viscosity on the pressure can have a significant effect both on the qualitative and quantitative nature of the solution.

  5. Goddard rattler-jamming mechanism for quantifying pressure dependence of elastic moduli of grain packs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pride, Steven R.; Berryman, James G.

    2009-01-05

    An analysis is presented to show how it is possible for unconsolidated granular packings to obey overall non-Hertzian pressure dependence due to the imperfect and random spatial arrangements of the grains in these packs. With imperfect arrangement, some gaps that remain between grains can be closed by strains applied to the grain packing. As these gaps are closed, former rattler grains become jammed and new stress-bearing contacts are created that increase the elastic stiffness of the packing. By allowing for such a mechanism, detailed analytical expressions are obtained for increases in bulk modulus of a random packing of grains with increasing stress and strain. Only isotropic stress and strain are considered in this analysis. The model is shown to give a favorable fit to laboratory data on variations in bulk modulus due to variations in applied pressure for bead packs.

  6. Pressure-dependent kinetics of initial reactions in iso-octane pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, HongBo; Gong, ChunMing; Li, ZeRong; Li, XiangYuan

    2015-05-07

    This study focuses on the studies of the main pressure-dependent reaction types of iso-octane (iso-C8H18) pyrolysis, including initial C-C bond fission of iso-octane, isomerization, and β-scission reactions of the alkyl radicals produced by the C-C bond fission of iso-octane. For the C-C bond fission of iso-octane, the minimum energy potentials are calculated at the CASPT2(2e,2o)/6-31+G(d,p)//CAS(2e,2o)/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. For the isomerization and the β-scission reactions of the alkyl radicals, the optimization of the geometries and the vibrational frequencies of the reactants, transition states, and products are performed at the B3LYP/CBSB7 level, and their single point energies are calculated by using the composite CBS-QB3 method. Variable reaction coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) is used for the high-pressure limit rate constant calculation and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/master equation (RRKM/ME) is used to calculate the pressure-dependent rate constants of these channels with pressure varying from 0.01-100 atm. The rate constants obtained in this work are in good agreement with those available from literatures. We have updated the rate constants and thermodynamic parameters for species involved in these reactions into a current chemical kinetic mechanism and also have improved the concentration profiles of main products such as C3H6 and C4H6 in the shock tube pyrolysis of iso-octane. The results of this study provide insight into the pyrolysis of iso-octane and will be helpful in the future development of branched paraffin kinetic mechanisms.

  7. SREBP-2 negatively regulates FXR-dependent transcription of FGF19 in human intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Masaaki; Hata, Tatsuya; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2014-01-10

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor that positively regulates transcription of target genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. In the present study, we have investigated a possible involvement of SREBP-2 in human intestinal expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)19, which is an endocrine hormone involved in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism. Overexpression of constitutively active SREBP-2 decreased FGF19 mRNA levels in human colon-derived LS174T cells. In reporter assays, active SREBP-2 overexpression suppressed GW4064/FXR-mediated increase in reporter activities in regions containing the IR-1 motif (+848 to +5200) in the FGF19 gene. The suppressive effect disappeared in reporter activities in the region containing the IR-1 motif when the mutation was introduced into the IR-1 motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, binding of the FXR/retinoid X receptor α heterodimer to the IR-1 motif was attenuated by adding active SREBP-2, but SREBP-2 binding to the IR-1 motif was not observed. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, specific binding of FXR to the IR-1-containing region of the FGF19 gene (+3214 to +3404) was increased in LS174T cells by treatment with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. Specific binding of SREBP-2 to FXR was observed in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays. These results suggest that SREBP-2 negatively regulates the FXR-mediated transcriptional activation of the FGF19 gene in human intestinal cells.

  8. Influence of lower body negative pressure release on soleus H reflex, respiratory sensations and reflexes in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashima; Raj, Hans; Gupta, Uday A; Srivastava, Niraj

    2010-09-30

    Using a physiological model of acutely increasing venous return into the lungs, i.e. by applying and then releasing lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to mimic the natural stimulus of juxtapulmonary capillary (J) or pulmonary C fibre receptors, produced an immediate and significant reduction in the amplitude of the Hoffman (H) reflex by 81±4% (P=0.001) in a majority of subjects 70% (n=5). Accompanying this was a notable change in the respiratory pattern with tidal volume (V(T)) increasing in all subjects from (mean) 0.462±.038 to 0.777±.061l/min (P=0.001) and the respiratory rate (F(R)) in 40% from 14±1 to 24±0.8 breaths/min. A feeling of pressure in throat, upper chest was reported by all and a shortness of breath-by 70% of the subjects. These were similar in nature to the respiratory sensations felt with threshold doses of intravenous lobeline, a well-established chemical stimulant of J receptors. All effects lasted for 15-20s and within a minute the parameters resumed their earlier control values. In animals, respiratory augmentation and locomotion inhibition are well-established reflexes of J receptors - this simultaneous though transitory reduction in H reflex amplitude reflecting change in the excitability of the motoneurone pool and appearance of respiratory effects, is the first demonstration in human subjects of the two reflexes appearing in response to a sudden increase in pulmonary blood flow that mimics the natural stimulus of these receptors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RESTING SYMPATHETIC BAROREFLEX SENSITIVITY IN SUBJECTS WITH LOW AND HIGH TOLERANCE TO CENTRAL HYPOVOLEMIA INDUCED BY LOWER BODY NEGATIVE PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eHinojosa-Laborde

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Central hypovolemia elicited by orthostasis or hemorrhage triggers sympathetically-mediated baroreflex responses to maintain organ perfusion; these reflexes are less sensitive in patients with orthostatic intolerance, and during conditions of severe blood loss, may result in cardiovascular collapse (decompensatory or circulatory shock. The ability to tolerate central hypovolemia is variable and physiological factors contributing to tolerance are emerging. We tested the hypothesis that resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS are attenuated in male and female subjects who have low tolerance (LT to central hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP. MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP were recorded in 47 human subjects who subsequently underwent LBNP to tolerance (onset of presyncopal symptoms. LT subjects experienced presyncopal symptoms prior to completing LBNP of -60 mm Hg, and subjects with high tolerance (HT experienced presyncopal symptoms after completing LBNP after -60 mmHg. Contrary to our hypothesis, resting MSNA burst incidence was not different between LT and HT subjects, and was not related to time to presyncope. BRS was assessed as the slope of the relationship between spontaneous fluctuations in DAP and MSNA during 5 min of supine rest. MSNA burst incidence/DAP correlations were greater than or equal to 0.5 in 37 subjects (LT: n= 9; HT: n=28, and BRS was not different between LT and HT (-1.8 ± 0.3 vs. -2.2 ± 0.2 bursts•(100 beats-1•mmHg-1, p=0.29. We conclude that tolerance to central hypovolemia is not related to either resting MSNA or sympathetic BRS.

  10. In-flight Assessment of Lower Body Negative Pressure as a Countermeasure for Post-flight Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J. B.; Stenger, M. B.; Phillips, T. R.; Arzeno, N. M.; Lee, S. M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated the efficacy of combining fluid loading with sustained lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to reverse orthostatic intolerance associated with weightlessness during and immediately after Space Shuttle missions. Methods. Shuttle astronauts (n=13) underwent 4 hours of LBNP at -30 mm(Hg) and ingested water and salt ( soak treatment) during flight in two complementary studies. In the first study (n=8), pre-flight heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) responses to an LBNP ramp (5-min stages of -10 mm(Hg) steps to -50 mm(Hg) were compared to responses in-flight one and two days after LBNP soak treatment. In the second study (n=5), the soak was performed 24 hr before landing, and post-flight stand test results of soak subjects were compared with those of an untreated cohort (n=7). In both studies, the soak was scheduled late in the mission and was preceded by LBNP ramp tests at approximately 3-day intervals to document the in-flight loss of orthostatic tolerance. Results. Increased HR and decreased BP responses to LBNP were evident early in-flight. In-flight, one day after LBNP soak, HR and BP responses to LBNP were not different from pre-flight, but the effect was absent the second day after treatment. Post-flight there were no between-group differences in HR and BP responses to standing, but all 5 treatment subjects completed the 5-minute stand test whereas 2 of 7 untreated cohort subjects did not. Discussion. Exaggerated HR and BP responses to LBNP were evident within the first few days of space flight, extending results from Skylab. The combined LBNP and fluid ingestion countermeasure restored in-flight LBNP HR and BP responses to pre-flight levels and provided protection of post-landing orthostatic function. Unfortunately, any benefits of the combined countermeasure were offset by the complexity of its implementation, making it inappropriate for routine application during Shuttle flights.

  11. Origin of diderm (Gram-negative) bacteria: antibiotic selection pressure rather than endosymbiosis likely led to the evolution of bacterial cells with two membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2011-08-01

    The prokaryotic organisms can be divided into two main groups depending upon whether their cell envelopes contain one membrane (monoderms) or two membranes (diderms). It is important to understand how these and other variations that are observed in the cell envelopes of prokaryotic organisms have originated. In 2009, James Lake proposed that cells with two membranes (primarily Gram-negative bacteria) originated from an ancient endosymbiotic event involving an Actinobacteria and a Clostridia (Lake 2009). However, this Perspective argues that this proposal is based on a number of incorrect assumptions and the data presented in support of this model are also of questionable nature. Thus, there is no reliable evidence to support the endosymbiotic origin of double membrane bacteria. In contrast, many observations suggest that antibiotic selection pressure was an important selective force in prokaryotic evolution and that it likely played a central role in the evolution of diderm (Gram-negative) bacteria. Some bacterial phyla, such as Deinococcus-Thermus, which lack lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and yet contain some characteristics of the diderm bacteria, are postulated as evolutionary intermediates (simple diderms) in the transition between the monoderm bacterial taxa and the bacterial groups that have the archetypal LPS-containing outer cell membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria. It is possible to distinguish the two stages in the evolution of diderm-LPS cells (viz. monoderm bacteria → simple diderms lacking LPS → LPS containing archetypal diderm bacteria) by means of conserved inserts in the Hsp70 and Hsp60 proteins. The insert in the Hsp60 protein also distinguishes the traditional Gram-negative diderm bacterial phyla from atypical taxa of diderm bacteria (viz. Negativicutes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes and Elusimicrobia). The Gram-negative bacterial phyla with an LPS-diderm cell envelope, as defined by the presence of the Hsp60 insert, are indicated to form a

  12. Analysis of time-dependent change of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase activity and its relationship with apparent negative cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Y; Sasayama, T; Muneyuki, E; Yoshida, M

    1995-10-10

    Except for the case of gradual activation of EF1 (F1-ATPase from Escherichia coli) caused by the dissociation of the epsilon subunit [Laget, P. P. and Smith, J. B. (1979) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 197, 83-89], EF1 has long been thought not to show a time-dependent change in activity [Senior, A.E. et al. (1992) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 297, 340-344]. Here, we report the time-dependent inactivation and activation of EF1, which are apparently similar to those of mitochondrial F1-ATPases [Vasilyeva, E.A. et al. (1982) Biochem. J. 202, 15-23]. Analysis of these changes as a function of ATP concentrations in relation to negative cooperativity revealed that the initial inactivation phase was attributable to the decrease in the Vmax associated with the low Km (around 10 microM), and the following activation, probably due to the dissociation of the epsilon subunit, corresponded to the increase in the Vmax associated with the high Km (in the order of 100 microM). Thus, the time-dependent change in EF1 activity is closely related to the apparent negative cooperativity (multiple Km values) of ATP hydrolysis.

  13. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  14. Patterns in new dimensionless quantities containing melting temperature, and their dependence on pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. WALZER

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships existing between melting temperature and other
    macroscopic physical quantities are investigated. A new dimensionless
    quantity Q(1 not containing the Grtineisen parameter proves to be suited for serving in future studies as a tool for the determination of the melting temperature in the outer core of the Earth. The pressure dependence of more general dimensionless quantities Q„ is determined analytically and, for the chemical elements, numerically, too. The patterns of various interesting dimensionless quantities are shown in the Periodic Table and compared.

  15. Size dependence of cubic to trigonal structural distortion in silver micro- and nanocrystals under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Qixum [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Yusheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zin, Zhijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Zhongwu [CORNELL UNIV; Skrabalak, Sara E [INDIANA UNIV; Xia, Younan [WASHINGTON UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Silver micro- and nanocrystals with sizes of {approx}2--3.5 {mu}m and {approx}50--100 nm were uniaxially compressed under nonhydrostatic pressures (strong deviatoric stress) up to {approx}30 GPa at room temperature in a symmetric diamond-anvil cell and studied in situ using angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A cubic to trigonal structural distortion along a 3-fold rotational axis was discovered by careful and comprehensive analysis of the apparent lattice parameter and full width at half-maximum, which are strongly dependent upon the Miller index and crystal size.

  16. Uniaxial pressure dependencies of the phase transitions in GdMnO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, J.; Meier, D.; Berggold, K.; Hemberger, J.; Balbashov, A.; Mydosh, J. A.; Lorenz, T.

    2007-03-01

    GdMnO3 shows an incommensurate antiferromagnetic order below ≃42 K, transforms into a canted A-type antiferromagnet below ≃20 K, and for finite magnetic fields along the b-axis ferroelectric order occurs below ≃12 K. From high-resolution thermal expansion measurements along all three principal axes, we determine the uniaxial pressure dependencies of the various transition temperatures and discuss their correlation to changes of the magnetic exchange couplings in RMnO3(R=La,…,Dy).

  17. A model for the pressure dependence of diffusion in condensed matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal Kapoor; Rashmi Kumari; Narasingh Dass; Rajendra Kumar

    2006-09-01

    In the present paper, a model has been used to develop a simple relation to study the pressure dependence of self-diffusion in solids and liquids that has two adjustable parameters. The computation done in each substance is found to be in very good agreement with the experimental data. It is interesting to note that the present relation is also capable of giving the activation volume in solids and liquids. The activation volume computed in the solids is found to be in very good agreement with the data available.

  18. Observational evidence that positive and negative AGN feedback depends on galaxy mass and jet power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Wilner, D.; Elvis, M.; Page, M. J.; Trichas, M.; Smith, D. J. B.

    2017-10-01

    Several studies support the existence of a link between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) and star formation activity. Radio jets have been argued to be an ideal mechanism for direct interaction between the AGN and the host galaxy. A drawback of previous surveys of AGN is that they are fundamentally limited by the degeneracy between redshift and luminosity in flux-density limited samples. To overcome this limitation, we present far-infrared Herschel observations of 74 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), 72 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 27 radio galaxies (RGs), selected at 0.9 correlation with the bolometric luminosity for all AGN sub-samples, (2) the RLQs show an SFR excess of about a factor of 1.4 compared to the RQQs, matched in terms of black hole mass and bolometric luminosity, suggesting that either positive radio-jet feedback or radio AGN triggering is linked to star formation triggering, and (3) RGs have lower SFRs by a factor of 2.5 than the RLQ sub-sample with the same BH mass and bolometric luminosity. We suggest that there is some jet power threshold at which radio-jet feedback switches from enhancing star formation (by compressing gas) to suppressing it (by ejecting gas). This threshold depends on both galaxy mass and jet power.

  19. Homemade-device-induced negative pressure promotes wound healing more efficiently than VSD-induced positive pressure by regulating inflammation, proliferation and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyan; Hu, Feng; Tang, Jintian; Tang, Shijie; Xia, Kun; Wu, Song; Yin, Chaoqi; Wang, Shaohua; He, Quanyong; Xie, Huiqing; Zhou, Jianda

    2017-04-01

    Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) is an effective technique used to promote wound healing. However, recent studies have shown that it exerts positive pressure (PP) rather than negative pressure (NP) on skin. In this study, we created a homemade device that could maintain NP on the wound, and compared the therapeutic effects of VSD-induced PP to those of our homemade device which induced NP on wound healing. The NP induced by our device required less time for wound healing and decreased the wound area more efficiently than the PP induced by VSD. NP and PP both promoted the inflammatory response by upregulating neutrophil infiltration and interleukin (IL)‑1β expression, and downregulating IL‑10 expression. Higher levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and lower levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were observed in the wound tissue treated with NP compared to the wound tissue exposed to PP. Proliferation in the wound tissue exposed to NP on day 10 was significantly higher than that in wound tissue exposed to PP. NP generated more fibroblasts, keratinized stratified epithelium, and less epithelia with stemness than PP. The levels of ccollagen Ⅰ and Ⅲ were both decreased in both the NP and PP groups. NP induced a statistically significant increase in the expression of fibronectin (FN) on days 3 and 10 compared to PP. Furthermore, the level of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑13 increased in the NP group, but decreased in the PP group on day 3. NP also induced a decrease in the levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)‑1 and TIMP‑2 during the early stages of wound healing, which was significantly different from the increasing effect of PP on TIMP‑1 and TIMP‑2 levels at the corresponding time points. On the whole, our data indicate that our homemade device which induced NP, was more efficient than VSD‑induced PP on wound healing by

  20. Homemade-device-induced negative pressure promotes wound healing more efficiently than VSD-induced positive pressure by regulating inflammation, proliferation and remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyan; Hu, Feng; Tang, Jintian; Tang, Shijie; Xia, Kun; Wu, Song; Yin, Chaoqi; Wang, Shaohua; He, Quanyong; Xie, Huiqing; Zhou, Jianda

    2017-01-01

    Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) is an effective technique used to promote wound healing. However, recent studies have shown that it exerts positive pressure (PP) rather than negative pressure (NP) on skin. In this study, we created a homemade device that could maintain NP on the wound, and compared the therapeutic effects of VSD-induced PP to those of our home-made device which induced NP on wound healing. The NP induced by our device required less time for wound healing and decreased the wound area more efficiently than the PP induced by VSD. NP and PP both promoted the inflammatory response by upregulating neutrophil infiltration and interleukin (IL)-1β expression, and downregulating IL-10 expression. Higher levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and lower levels of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were observed in the wound tissue treated with NP compared to the wound tissue exposed to PP. Proliferation in the wound tissue exposed to NP on day 10 was significantly higher than that in wound tissue exposed to PP. NP generated more fibroblasts, keratinized stratified epithelium, and less epithelia with stemness than PP. The levels of ccollagen I and III were both decreased in both the NP and PP groups. NP induced a statistically significant increase in the expression of fibronectin (FN) on days 3 and 10 compared to PP. Furthermore, the level of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 increased in the NP group, but decreased in the PP group on day 3. NP also induced a decrease in the levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 during the early stages of wound healing, which was significantly different from the increasing effect of PP on TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 levels at the corresponding time points. On the whole, our data indicate that our homemade device which induced NP, was more efficient than VSD-induced PP on wound healing by regulating inflammation, secretion

  1. A context-specific role for retinoblastoma protein-dependent negative growth control in suppressing mammary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Francis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to respond to anti-growth signals is critical to maintain tissue homeostasis and loss of this negative growth control safeguard is considered a hallmark of cancer. Negative growth regulation generally occurs during the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, yet the redundancy and complexity among components of this regulatory network has made it difficult to discern how negative growth cues protect cells from aberrant proliferation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The retinoblastoma protein (pRB acts as the final barrier to prevent cells from entering into the cell cycle. By introducing subtle changes in the endogenous mouse Rb1 gene (Rb1(ΔL, we have previously shown that interactions at the LXCXE binding cleft are necessary for the proper response to anti-growth signals such as DNA damage and TGF-β, with minimal effects on overall development. This disrupts the balance of pro- and anti-growth signals in mammary epithelium of Rb1(ΔL/ΔL mice. Here we show that Rb1(ΔL/ΔL mice are more prone to mammary tumors in the Wap-p53(R172H transgenic background indicating that negative growth regulation is important for tumor suppression in these mice. In contrast, the same defect in anti-growth control has no impact on Neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our work demonstrates that negative growth control by pRB acts as a crucial barrier against oncogenic transformation. Strikingly, our data also reveals that this tumor suppressive effect is context-dependent.

  2. A rigid barrier between the heart and sternum protects the heart and lungs against rupture during negative pressure wound therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malmsjö Malin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Right ventricular heart rupture is a devastating complication associated with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in cardiac surgery. The use of a rigid barrier has been suggested to offer protection against this lethal complication, by preventing the heart from being drawn up and damaged by the sharp edges of the sternum. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a rigid barrier protects the heart and lungs against injury during NPWT. Methods Sixteen pigs underwent median sternotomy followed by NPWT at -120 mmHg for 24 hours, in the absence (eight pigs or presence (eight pigs of a rigid plastic disc between the heart and the sternal edges. The macroscopic appearance of the heart and lungs was inspected after 12 and 24 hours of NPWT. Results After 24 hours of NPWT at -120 mmHg the area of epicardial petechial bleeding was 11.90 ± 1.10 cm2 when no protective disc was used, and 1.15 ± 0.19 cm2 when using the disc (p Conclusion Inserting a rigid barrier between the heart and the sternum edges offers protection against heart rupture and lung injury during NPWT.

  3. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Anderson, Vinah; Webster, Joan; Sneddon, Anne; Thalib, Lukman; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-09-30

    Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS) and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing) and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus(®) dressing). All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38-1.68); for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34-2.79). A sample size of 784 (392 per group) would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  4. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  5. Pressure ulcer as a reservoir of multiresistant Gram-negative bacilli: risk factors for colonization and development of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Iolanda A; Brito, Cristiane S; Filho, Augusto Diogo; Filho, Paulo P Gontijo; Ribas, Rosineide M

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors that predispose patients who are hospitalized with pressure ulcers (PUs) colonized by Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) to develop bacteremia. In addition, we also detected main phenotypes of resistance in infected and uninfected PUs. A prospective cohort study was conducted at the Clinical Hospital of the Federal University of Uberlândia including patients with Stage II or greater PUs, colonized or not with GNB, from August 2009 to July 2010. Infected ulcers were defined based on clinical signs and on positive evaluation of smears of wound material translated by a ratio of polymorphonuclear cells to epithelial cells ≥2:1, after Giemsa staining. A total of 60 patients with Stage II PUs were included. Of these 83.3% had PUs colonized and/or infected. The frequency of polymicrobial colonization was 74%. Enterobacteriaceae and GNB non-fermenting bacteria were the most frequent isolates of PUs with 44.0% of multiresistant isolates. Among patients who had infected PUs, six developed bacteremia by the same microorganism with a 100% mortality rate. In addition, PUs in hospitalized patients were major reservoir of multiresistant GNB, also a high-risk population for the development of bacteremia with high mortality rates. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Virulence analysis of Staphylococcus aureus in a rabbit model of infected full-thickness wound under negative pressure wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daohong; Li, Zhirui; Wang, Guoqi; Li, Tongtong; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus in a controlled animal study using the standard sterile gauze and negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), including activation of agr, gene expression and production of virulence foctors and depth of bacterial invasion. The tissue specimens were harvested on days 0 (6 h after bacterial inoculation), 2, 4, 6, and 8 at the center of wound beds. Laser scanning confocal microscopy was performed to obtain bioluminescent images which were used to measure the depth of bacterial invasion. The agrA expression of S.aureus and the transcription and production of virulence factors including Eap, Spa and α-toxin were significantly different. The bacterial invasion depth was significantly less with effect of NPWT. The markedly different activation of quorum sensing systems that enable cell-to-cell communication and regulation of numerous colonization and virulence factors result in distinct gene expression and pathogenicity over time in different microenvironment. Thus, the agr system represents a fundamental regulatory paradigm that can encompass different adaptive strategies and accommodate horizontally acquired virulence determinants.

  7. Psychomotor performance during a 28 day head-down tilt with and without lower body negative pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traon, A. Pavy-le; de Feneyrols, A. Rous; Cornac, A.; Abdeseelam, R.; N'uygen, D.; Lazerges, M.; Güell, A.; Bes, A.

    Several factors may affect psychomotor performance in space: sensory-motor changes, sleep disturbances, psychological modifications induced by the social isolation and confinement. However, psychomotor performance is difficult to assess. A battery of standardized and computerized tests, so-called "Automated Portable Test System" (APTS) was devised to ascertain the cognitive, perceptive and motor abilities and their possible fluctuations according to environmental effects. Antiorthostatic bedrest, often used to simulate weightlessness, (particularly cardiovascular modifications) also constitutes a situation of social confinement and isolation. During two bedrest experiments (with head-down tilt of -6°) of 28 days each, we intended to assess psychomotor performance of 6 males so as to determine whether: —on the one hand, it could be altered by remaining in decubitus; —on the other, the Lower Body Negative Pressure sessions, designed to prevent orthostatic intolerance back on Earth, could improve the performance. To accomplish this, part of the APTS tests as well as an automated perceptive attention test were performed. No downgrading of psychomotor performance was observed. On the contrary, the tasks were more accurately performed over time. In order to assess the experimental conditions on the acquisition phase, the learning curves were modelled. A beneficial effect of the LBNP sessions on simple tests involving the visual-motor coordination and attention faculties can only be regarded as a mere trend. Methods used in this experiment are also discussed.

  8. The Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Latissimus Dorsi Flap Donor Site Seroma Prevention: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apichai Angspatt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Donor site seroma is the most common complication after latissimus dorsi (LD flap harvest. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT in preventing donor site seroma formation after the harvest of an LD flap for breast reconstruction. Methods In this prospective matched-pair study, 40 patients in whom an LD flap was harvested for breast reconstruction were enrolled. NPWT was used in 20 patients, and in a control group composed of another 20 patients, the conventional donor site dressing technique was used. Information was collected regarding postoperative complications, the incidence of seroma, total drainage volume, the number of percutaneous seroma aspirations, and the volume aspirated. Results In the NPWT group, the incidence of seroma formation after drain removal was significantly lower than in the control group (15% vs. 70%; odds ratio=0.07; relative risk, 0.24. Both the mean percutaneous aspirated volume (P=0.004 and the number of percutaneous aspirations (P=0.001 were also significantly lower in the NPWT group. There were no significant differences in the total drainage volume or the duration of wound drainage between the NPWT dressing group and the control group (P>0.05. Conclusions This study showed that NPWT is a promising tool for reducing the incidence of seroma formation after removing the drain at the donor site after LD flap harvesting. It is a simple and safe technique.

  9. Heat stress evaluation of two-layer chemical demilitarization ensembles with a full face negative pressure respirator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Oclla Michele; Guerrina, Ryan; Ashley, Candi D; Bernard, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress effects of three protective clothing ensembles: (1) protective apron over cloth coveralls including full face negative pressure respirator (APRON); (2) the apron over cloth coveralls with respirator plus protective pants (APRON+PANTS); and (3) protective coveralls over cloth coveralls with respirator (PROTECTIVE COVERALLS). In addition, there was a no-respirator ensemble (PROTECTIVE COVERALLS-noR), and WORK CLOTHES as a reference ensemble. Four acclimatized male participants completed a full set of five trials, and two of the participants repeated the full set. The progressive heat stress protocol was used to find the critical WBGT (WBGTcrit) and apparent total evaporative resistance (Re,T,a) at the upper limit of thermal equilibrium. The results (WBGTcrit [°C-WBGT] and Re,T,a [kPa m(2) W(-1)]) were WORK CLOTHES (35.5, 0.0115), APRON (31.6, 0.0179), APRON+PANTS (27.7, 0.0244), PROTECTIVE COVERALLS (25.9, 0.0290), and PROTECTIVE COVERALLS-noR (26.2, 0.0296). There were significant differences among the ensembles. Supporting previous studies, there was little evidence to suggest that the respirator contributed to heat stress.

  10. Negative pressure pulmonary edema:a case report%负压性肺水肿一例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丹; 江玮; 徐雯; 张扣兴

    2016-01-01

    负压性肺水肿是临床上少见的非心源性肺水肿。该文报道了在全身麻醉复苏过程中出现的1例急性肺水肿患者。该患者为25岁男性,因腰1、2椎体压缩性骨折行全身麻醉下手术,麻醉苏醒拔除气管导管后10 min,患者突发脉搏血氧饱和度(SpO2)下降,呼吸急促,立即予气管插管接呼吸机辅助通气,气管导管内可吸出大量粉红色泡沫痰,后转入 ICU 继续抢救,予气管插管接呼吸机行 PEEP 以及对症支持治疗,患者 SpO2上升,气管内粉红色泡沫痰减少,病情明显好转并顺利脱离呼吸机转至普通病房继续治疗。该例诊治过程提示,全身麻醉复苏过程中出现急性肺水肿,需高度怀疑负压性肺水肿,气管插管接呼吸机行 PEEP 是纠正低氧血症、减轻肺水肿的有效治疗措施。%Negative pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE)is a rare non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema in clinical practice.In this article,we reported one patient with acute pulmonary edema during the recovery of general anesthesia.The male patient,aged 25 years,underwent surgery under general anesthesia for the lum-bar L1 -L2 vertebral compression fracture.At 1 0 min after endotracheal extubation,the patient suddenly presen-ted with SpO2 decline and shortness of breath.He immediately received endotracheal intubation and connected to the ventilator.A high quantity of pinkish serous secretion was noted in the endotracheal tube.Then he was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU)and received mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP).After corresponding treatment,he had an increasing level of SpO2 and a decreased amount of pinkish serous secretion.After relevant symptoms were alleviated,he was extubated and transferred to gener-al ward for further treatment.The diagnosis and treatment of this case prompted that the possibility of negative-pressure pulmonary edema should be highly suspected if acute

  11. How bacterial cell division might cheat turgor pressure - a unified mechanism of septal division in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Harold P

    2017-08-01

    An important question for bacterial cell division is how the invaginating septum can overcome the turgor force generated by the high osmolarity of the cytoplasm. I suggest that it may not need to. Several studies in Gram-negative bacteria have shown that the periplasm is isoosmolar with the cytoplasm. Indirect evidence suggests that this is also true for Gram-positive bacteria. In this case the invagination of the septum takes place within the uniformly high osmotic pressure environment, and does not have to fight turgor pressure. A related question is how the V-shaped constriction of Gram-negative bacteria relates to the plate-like septum of Gram-positive bacteria. I collected evidence that Gram-negative bacteria have a latent capability of forming plate-like septa, and present a model in which septal division is the basic mechanism in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Final report on EURAMET.M.P-S12 — Bilateral supplementary comparison of the national pressure standards of CMI and INRIM in the range 300 Pa to 15 kPa of negative gauge pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajícek, Zdenek; Bergoglio, Mercede; Pražák, Dominik; Pasqualin, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a EURAMET bilateral supplementary comparison between Czech CMI and Italian INRIM in low negative gauge pressure in gas (nitrogen), denoted as EURAMET.M.P-S12. The digital non-rotating pressure balance FPG8601 manufactured by Fluke/DH-Instruments, USA is normally used for gauge and absolute pressures in the range from 1 Pa to 15 kPa, but with some modifications it can be used also for the negative gauge pressures in the same range. During the preparation of the visit of INRIM at CMI for the last comparison within the framework of EURAMET.M.P-K4.2010, it was agreed to also perform an additional comparison in the range from 300 Pa to 15 kPa of negative gauge pressure. The measurements were performed in October 2012. Both institutes successfully proved their equivalence in all the tested points in the range from 300 Pa to 15 kPa of negative gauge pressure in a comparison that had, so far, been unique. . Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. Optical Properties Dependence with Gas Pressure in AlN Films Deposited by Pulsed Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J A; Riascos, H [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnologica de Pereira, Grupo plasma Laser y Aplicaciones A.A 097 (Colombia); Caicedo, J C [Grupo pelIculas delgadas, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Cabrera, G; Yate, L, E-mail: jcaicedoangulo@gmail.com [Department de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)

    2011-01-01

    AlN films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using an Nd: YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm). The films were deposited in a nitrogen atmosphere as working gas; the target was an aluminum high purity (99.99%). The films were deposited with a laser fluence of 7 J/cm2 for 10 minutes on silicon (100) substrates. The substrate temperature was 300 deg. C and the working pressure was varied from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr. The thickness measured by profilometer was 150 nm for all films. The crystallinity was observed via XRD pattern, the morphology and composition of the films were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), respectively. The optical reflectance spectra and color coordinates of the films were obtained by optical spectral reflectometry technique in the range of 400 cm-1- 900 cm-1 by an Ocean Optics 2000 spectrophotometer. In this work, a clear dependence of the reflectance, dominant wavelength and color purity was found in terms of the applied pressure to the AlN films. A reduction in reflectance of about 55% when the pressure was increased from 3 mtorr to 11 mtorr was observed. This paper deals with the formation of AlN thin films as promising materials for the integration of SAW devices on Si substrates due to their good piezoelectric properties and the possibility of deposition at low temperature compatible with the manufacturing of Si integrated circuits.

  14. The relation between mid-plane pressure and molecular hydrogen in galaxies: Environmental dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, Robert; Gnedin, Nickolay Y

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the primary component of the reservoirs of cold, dense gas that fuel star formation in our galaxy. While the H2 abundance is ultimately regulated by physical processes operating on small scales in the interstellar medium (ISM), observations have revealed a tight correlation between the ratio of molecular to atomic hydrogen in nearby spiral galaxies and the pressure in the mid-plane of their disks. This empirical relation has been used to predict H2 abundances in galaxies with potentially very different ISM conditions, such as metal-deficient galaxies at high redshifts. Here, we test the validity of this approach by studying the dependence of the pressure -- H2 relation on environmental parameters of the ISM. To this end, we follow the formation and destruction of H2 explicitly in a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies with different ISM parameters. We find that a pressure -- H2 relation arises naturally in our simulations for a variety of dust-to-gas ratios or strengths o...

  15. 浅谈负压罐引水装置的设计和应用%Design and application of the negative pressure tank water diversion device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张群涛

    2015-01-01

    The negative pressure tank is a kind of water equipment, through the analysis of the working principle of the vacuum tank, put forward the design key points of negative pressure tank, to solve practical problems in engineering.%负压罐是一种水泵引水设备,通过对负压罐工作原理的分析,提出负压罐的设计要点,解决工程实际中出现的问题。

  16. Mild Adrenal Steroidogenic Defects and ACTH-Dependent Aldosterone Secretion in High Blood Pressure: Preliminary Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Martin Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Adrenal glands play a major role in the control of blood pressure and mild defects of steroidogenesis and/or inappropriate control of mineralocorticoid production have been reported in high blood pressure (HBP. Patients and Methods. We used a specific protocol for the evaluation of 100 consecutive patients with inappropriate or recent onset HBP. Specific methods were used to confirm HBP and to diagnose secondary forms of HBP. In addition we tested adrenal steroidogenesis with the common cosyntropin test, modified to include the simultaneous measurement of renin and aldosterone besides 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP and 11-deoxycortisol (S. Results. Secondary forms of HBP were diagnosed in 32 patients, including 14 patients with primary hyperaldosteronism (PA (14% and 10 patients with pheochromocytoma (10%. Mild defects of the 21-hydroxylase (21OHD and 11-hydroxylase (11OHD enzymes were common (42%. ACTH-dependent aldosterone secretion was found in most patients (54% and characteristically in those with mild defects of adrenal steroidogenesis (>60%, PA (>75%, and otherwise in patients with apparent essential HBP (EHBP (32%. Discussion. Mild defects of adrenal steroidogenesis are common in patients with HBP, occurring in almost half of the patients. In those patients as well as in patients with apparent EHBP, aldosterone secretion is commonly dependent on ACTH.

  17. Microevolution of S-allele frequencies in wild cherry populations: respective impacts of negative frequency dependent selection and genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, Solenn; Klein, Etienne K; Oddou-Muratorio, Sylvie; Musch, Brigitte; Mariette, Stéphanie

    2012-02-01

    Negative frequency dependent selection (NFDS) is supposed to be the main force controlling allele evolution at the gametophytic self-incompatibility locus (S-locus) in strictly outcrossing species. Genetic drift also influences S-allele evolution. In perennial sessile organisms, evolution of allelic frequencies over two generations is mainly shaped by individual fecundities and spatial processes. Using wild cherry populations between two successive generations, we tested whether S-alleles evolved following NFDS qualitative and quantitative predictions. We showed that allelic variation was negatively correlated with parental allelic frequency as expected under NFDS. However, NFDS predictions in finite population failed to predict more than half S-allele quantitative evolution. We developed a spatially explicit mating model that included the S-locus. We studied the effects of self-incompatibility and local drift within populations due to pollen dispersal in spatially distributed individuals, and variation in male fecundity on male mating success and allelic frequency evolution. Male mating success was negatively related to male allelic frequency as expected under NFDS. Spatial genetic structure combined with self-incompatibility resulted in higher effective pollen dispersal. Limited pollen dispersal in structured distributions of individuals and genotypes and unequal pollen production significantly contributed to S-allele frequency evolution by creating local drift effects strong enough to counteract the NFDS effect on some alleles.

  18. Negative density dependence is stronger in resource-rich environments and diversifies communities when stronger for common but not rare species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaManna, Joseph A; Walton, Maranda L; Turner, Benjamin L; Myers, Jonathan A

    2016-06-01

    Conspecific negative density dependence is thought to maintain diversity by limiting abundances of common species. Yet the extent to which this mechanism can explain patterns of species diversity across environmental gradients is largely unknown. We examined density-dependent recruitment of seedlings and saplings and changes in local species diversity across a soil-resource gradient for 38 woody-plant species in a temperate forest. At both life stages, the strength of negative density dependence increased with resource availability, becoming relatively stronger for rare species during seedling recruitment, but stronger for common species during sapling recruitment. Moreover, negative density dependence appeared to reduce diversity when stronger for rare than common species, but increase diversity when stronger for common species. Our results suggest that negative density dependence is stronger in resource-rich environments and can either decrease or maintain diversity depending on its relative strength among common and rare species.

  19. Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA for rapid distinction between unique sequence positive and negative marker chromosomes in prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamers Guus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC are extra structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified with conventional chromosome banding techniques. These marker chromosomes may cause an abnormal phenotype or be harmless depending on different factors such as genetic content, chromosomal origin and level of mosaicism. When a sSMC is found during prenatal diagnosis, the main question is whether the sSMC contains euchromatin since in most cases this will lead to phenotypic abnormalities. We present the use of Multiplex Ligation Dependent probe Amplification (MLPA for rapid distinction between non-euchromatic and euchromatic sSMC. Results 29 well-defined sSMC found during prenatal diagnosis were retrospectively investigated with MLPA with the SALSA MLPA centromere kits P181 and P182 as well as with the SALSA MLPA telomere kits P036B and P070 (MRC Holland BV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. All unique-sequence positive sSMC were correctly identified with MLPA, whereas the unique-sequence negative sSMC had normal MLPA results. Conclusions Although different techniques exist for identification of sSMC, we show that MLPA is a valuable adjunctive tool for rapidly distinguishing between unique-sequence positive and negative sSMC. In case of positive MLPA results, genetic microarray analysis or, if not available, targeted FISH can be applied for further identification and determination of the exact breakpoints, which is important for prediction of the fetal phenotype. In case of a negative MLPA result, which means that the sSMC most probably does not contain genes, the parents can already be reassured and parental karyotyping can be initiated to assess the heritability. In the mean time, FISH techniques are needed for determination of the chromosomal origin.

  20. Asymptotic Analysis of the Curved-Pipe Flow with a Pressure-Dependent Viscosity Satisfying Barus Law

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pazanin, Igor

    2015-01-01

    .... The goal of this paper is to study the flow of incompressible fluid with a pressure-dependent viscosity through a curved pipe with an arbitrary central curve and constant circular cross section...

  1. The Effects of Negative Pressure by External Tissue Expansion Device on Epithelial Cell Proliferation, Neo-Vascularization and Hair Growth in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Hui-Yi; Liu, Jia-Wei; Brey, Eric M; Cheng, Ming-Huei

    2016-01-01

    While pre-treating a fat transplant recipient site with negative pressure has shown promise for increasing the fat survival rate, the underlying mechanisms have not been investigated, partly due to challenges related to immobilization of vacuum domes on large animal subjects. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of negative pressure treatment by External Tissue Expansion Device (ETED) on fat grating recipient sites in a porcine model. The ETED was designed to provide negative pressure on the dorsum of swine. Pressure treatment (-70 mmHg) was applied for 1 or 3 hours every other day for 10 and 20 treatments. The treated areas (3.5 cm in diameter) were harvested and examined for histological changes, vessel density, cell proliferation (Ki67) and growth factor expression (FGF-1, VEGF and PDGB-bb). The application of the ETED increased epidermis thickness even after 1-hour treatments repeated 10 times. The results of Ki67 analysis suggested that the increasing thickness was due to cell proliferation in the epidermis. There was a more than two-fold increase in the vessel density, indicating that the ETED promotes vascularization. Unexpectedly, the treatment also increased the number of hair follicles. Negative pressure provided by the ETED increases the thickness of epidermis section of tissue, cell proliferation and vessel density. The porcine model provides a better representation of the effect of the ETED on skin tissue compared to small animal models and provides an environment for studying the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of negative pressure treatment.

  2. Potential Danger of Pre-Pump Clamping on Negative Pressure-Associated Gaseous Microemboli Generation During Extracorporeal Life Support--An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shigang; Chin, Brian J; Gentile, Frank; Kunselman, Allen R; Palanzo, David; Ündar, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between revolution speed of a conventional centrifugal pump and negative pressure at the inlet of the pump by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump, and to verify whether negative pressure leads to gaseous microemboli (GME) production in a simulated adult extracorporeal life support (ECLS) system. The experimental circuit, including a Maquet Rotaflow centrifugal pump and a Medos Hilite 7000 LT polymethyl-pentene membrane oxygenator, was primed with packed red blood cells (hematocrit 35%). Negative pressure was created in the circuit by clamping the tubing upstream of the pump for 10 s, and then releasing the clamp. An emboli detection and classification quantifier was used to record GME volume and count at pre-oxygenator and post-oxygenator sites, and pressure and flow rate data were collected using a custom-based data acquisition system. All trials were conducted at 36°C at revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm (500 rpm increment). The flow rates were 1092.5-4708.4 mL/min at the revolution speeds of 2000-4000 rpm. Higher revolution speed generated higher negative pressure at the pre-pump site when clamping the tubing upstream of the pump (-108.3 ± 0.1 to -462.0 ± 0.5 mm Hg at 2000-4000 rpm). Moreover, higher negative pressure was associated with a larger number and volume of GME at pre-oxygenator site after de-clamp (GME count 10,573 ± 271 at pre-oxygenator site at 4000 rpm). The results showed that there was a potential danger of delivering GME to the patient when clamping pre-pump tubing during ECLS using a centrifugal pump. Our results warrant further clinical studies to investigate this phenomenon.

  3. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the elderly athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetta, F; Franzoni, F; Plantinga, Y; Ghiadoni, L; Rossi, M; Prattichizzo, F; Carpi, A; Taddei, S; Santoro, G

    2006-09-01

    Regular exercise is a key component of cardiovascular risk prevention strategies, because it is associated with a variety of beneficial metabolic and vascular effects that reduce mortality and the incidence of cardiovascular adverse events. Endothelium plays an important role in the local regulation of vascular tone and structure, mainly by nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and action. Aim of the present study was to evaluate in elderly athletes the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial blood pressure (BP) and on endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery. The study population included 30 male subjects (mean age 65.6+/-5.6 years), who had practiced endurance running at a competitive level for at least 40 years, and 28 age- and sex-matched subjects (mean age 64.5+/-4.5 years) with sedentary lifestyle and free of cardiovascular disease. Athletes and control subjects underwent standard 12-lead ECG, clinic BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and endothelium-dependent FMD and endothelium-independent response to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), 400 microg, in the brachial artery by high-resolution ultrasonography. Systolic clinic and ambulatory 24-h BP were significantly lower in the athletes, than in the controls (Pathletes (Pathletes also had a lower 24-h, day-time and night-time heart rate (HR) (Pathletes (Pathletes showed higher FMD than elderly sedentary subjects (Pphysical activity can counteract the age-related endothelial dysfunction that characterizes sedentary aging, preserving the capacity of the endothelium-dependent vasodilation and reduces BP values improving arterial pressure control.

  4. Elimination Measures of the Negative Pressure in Pump Station System%泵站系统管路负压的消除措施分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石建杰; 邱象玉; 康军强

    2016-01-01

    An instantaneous negative pressure zone will form when the pumps start, stop and power outages during the accident. It is a key factor for pumping systems water hammer of cavities collapsing with dramatic changes in the air pressure of the negative pressure zone. In addition, air valve and air pressure tank are set which is an effective measures to solve the water hammer of cavities collapsing by pump station negative pressure. In this paper, the stage II project in Niger was taken. The simulation was used for pumping water hammer by Hammer software. The influences of three protective measures on piping system negative pressure were compared such as air valve, air pressure tank and air pressure tank with air vale. The results show that the measure to set air vale and air pressure tank can effectively reduce or even eliminate the pipe negative pressure. Finally, the water hammer of cavities collapsing can be prevented. So, it is an effective measure to hammer protection of pump station system.%泵站系统水泵启动、停机及事故断电过程中,管道局部高点位置会形成瞬时负压区,而负压区空气压力的剧烈变化是泵站系统断流弥合水锤形成的关键因素,在相应位置设置排气阀和气压罐是解决泵站负压引起的断流弥合水锤问题的有效措施。以尼日尔二期工程为例,基于Hammer软件,对泵站系统水锤进行了数值模拟计算。通过计算,比较了设置排气阀、气压罐以及气压罐和排气阀结合三种防护措施对管路系统负压的影响。结果表明,设置排气阀及气压罐措施能有效降低甚至消除管道负压,从而可预防断流弥合水锤的发生,是泵站系统水锤防护的有效措施。

  5. RELATIONSHIP AMONG EVAPORATION FLUX OF GROUNDWATER, DEPTH OF WATER TABLE AND NEGATIVE PRESSURE HEAD IN BARE SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Evaporation of ground water is a part of moisture circulation in the field.And it is a main natural form in which water transmits from the ground water to the soil water and atmosphere water.According to the simulated experiments, we study the relationship among the evaporation, depth of groundwater table and negative pressure.By theoretical analysis of the experimental results, the main conclusions are drawn as follows.There are two abrupt points in every Q-H curve.The locations of the abrupt points are separately in step with the height of top of the capillary fringe and the height of maximal capillary rise in the soil section.When the depth of ground water table H is small, the evaporation flux of ground water is large.While the depth of water table exceeds the maximal capillary rise of media in vadose zone, the capillary rise breaks up and evaporation flux of groundwater is small.The water content ratio in ground surface tends to be zero and the surface of soil tends to be drought.These conclusions show that the maximal capillary rise of media in vadose zone is an important value in regulating rational depth of ground water to reduce the evaporation of ground water and to increase effective quantity of water resources.In the meantime, these conclusions are of important theoretical and practical significance to reduce the evaporation of ground water, to prevent and cure the salinization of soil, and to make full use of and protect water resources in the northern plains in China.

  6. Ultra pressure liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry determination of twelve halobenzoquinones at ng/L levels in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongfu; Wang, Wei; Qian, Yichao; Boyd, Jessica M; Zhao, Yuli; Li, Xing-Fang

    2013-05-01

    We report here the characterization of twelve halobenzoquinones (HBQs) using electrospray ionization (ESI) high resolution quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The high resolution negative ESI spectra of the twelve HBQs formed two parent ions, [M + H(+) + 2e(-)], and the radical M(-•). The intensities of these two parent ions are dependent on their chemical structures and on instrumental parameters such as the source temperature and flow rate. The characteristic ions of the HBQs were used to develop an ultra pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. At the UPLC flow rate (400 μL/min) and under the optimized ESI conditions, eleven HBQs showed the stable and abundant transitions [M + H(+) + 2e(-)] → X(-) (X(-) representing Cl(-), Br(-), or I(-)), while dibromo-dimethyl-benzoquinone (DBDMBQ) showed only the transition of M(-•) → Br(-). The UPLC efficiently separates all HBQs including some HBQ isomers, while the MS/MS offers exquisite limits of detection (LODs) at subng/mL levels for all HBQs except DBDMBQ. Combined with solid phase extraction (SPE), the method LOD is down to ng/L. The results from analysis of authentic samples demonstrated that the SPE-UPLC-MS/MS method is reliable, fast, and sensitive for the identification and quantification of the twelve HBQs in drinking water.

  7. A statistical derivation of the density of state function for a negative pressure matter with equation of state $p=-\\rho$

    CERN Document Server

    Momeni, D

    2009-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is deriving Density of states $g(\\epsilon)$ (degeneracy function) per volume for an EOS $p=-\\rho$. Using a local quantum statistics that acquaintance from quantum field theory in curved spacetime, we write a simple expression for grand canonical thermodynamic potential density for a given Bose field which is coupled non minimally to gravity in a curved spacetime with no boundary (or equivalently with equilibrium at non zero temperature $ T=1/\\beta$). This assumption implies a static metric, and our analysis may not be also applied to an expanding FRW universe in which case all the thermodynamical properties of system such as temperature and chemical potential are time dependent functions and can be regard as quantities for an disequilibrium system. We concluded that thermodynamical quantities such as pressure and energy density are simple functions of Temperature, fugacity, curvature and mass of Bosons. Also we found that the corresponding entropy is negative.As we note that this a...

  8. Driving force for indentation cracking in glass: composition, pressure and temperature dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Tanguy

    2015-03-28

    The occurrence of damage at the surface of glass parts caused by sharp contact loading is a major issue for glass makers, suppliers and end-users. Yet, it is still a poorly understood problem from the viewpoints both of glass science and solid mechanics. Different microcracking patterns are observed at indentation sites depending on the glass composition and indentation cracks may form during both the loading and the unloading stages. Besides, we do not know much about the fracture toughness of glass and its composition dependence, so that setting a criterion for crack initiation and predicting the extent of the damage yet remain out of reach. In this study, by comparison of the behaviour of glasses from very different chemical systems and by identifying experimentally the individual contributions of the different rheological processes leading to the formation of the imprint--namely elasticity, densification and shear flow--we obtain a fairly straightforward prediction of the type and extent of the microcracks which will most likely form, depending on the physical properties of the glass. Finally, some guidelines to reduce the driving force for microcracking are proposed in the light of the effects of composition, temperature and pressure, and the areas for further research are briefly discussed.

  9. A volume pulsed corona formed during nanosecond pulsed periodic discharge of negative polarity in narrow gaps with airflow at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu. S.; Puresev, N. I.; Filippov, V. G.

    2014-06-01

    A volume mode of spatially homogeneous nanosecond pulsed-periodic corona discharge of negative polarity has been obtained using an edge-to-edge electrode geometry in narrow gaps with airflow at atmospheric pressure and natural humidity. The parameters of discharge are estimated, and a factor limiting the power deposited in discharge is determined.

  10. A compare between myocardial topical negative pressure levels of -25 mmHg and -50 mmHg in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Paulsson, Per; Mokhtari, Arash

    2008-01-01

    Topical negative pressure (TNP), widely used in wound therapy, is known to stimulate wound edge blood flow, granulation tissue formation, angiogenesis, and revascularization. We have previously shown that application of a TNP of -50 mmHg to the myocardium significantly increases microvascular blood...

  11. Investigation of negative bias temperature instability dependence on fin width of silicon-on-insulator-fin-based field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Chadwin D., E-mail: chadwin.young@utdallas.edu; Wang, Zhe [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W. Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Neugroschel, Arnost [Department of Electrical and Computer Enginering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Majumdar, Kausik; Matthews, Ken; Hobbs, Chris [SEMATECH, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The fin width dependence of negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) of double-gate, fin-based p-type Field Effect Transistors (FinFETs) fabricated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers was investigated. The NBTI degradation increased as the fin width narrowed. To investigate this phenomenon, simulations of pre-stress conditions were employed to determine any differences in gate oxide field, fin band bending, and electric field profile as a function of the fin width. The simulation results were similar at a given gate stress bias, regardless of the fin width, although the threshold voltage was found to increase with decreasing fin width. Thus, the NBTI fin width dependence could not be explained from the pre-stress conditions. Different physics-based degradation models were evaluated using specific fin-based device structures with different biasing schemes to ascertain an appropriate model that best explains the measured NBTI dependence. A plausible cause is an accumulation of electrons that tunnel from the gate during stress into the floating SOI fin body. As the fin narrows, the sidewall device channel moves in closer proximity to the stored electrons, thereby inducing more band bending at the fin/dielectric interface, resulting in a higher electric field and hole concentration in this region during stress, which leads to more degradation. The data obtained in this work provide direct experimental proof of the effect of electron accumulation on the threshold voltage stability in FinFETs.

  12. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  13. Analysis of a Regularized Bingham Model with Pressure-Dependent Yield Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouja, Nazek; Roquet, Nicolas; Cazacliu, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this article is to provide some essential results for the solution of a regularized viscoplastic frictional flow model adapted from the extensive mathematical analysis of the Bingham model. The Bingham model is a standard for the description of viscoplastic flows and it is widely used in many application areas. However, wet granular viscoplastic flows necessitate the introduction of additional non-linearities and coupling between velocity and stress fields. This article proposes a step toward a frictional coupling, characterized by a dependence of the yield stress to the pressure field. A regularized version of this viscoplastic frictional model is analysed in the framework of stationary flows. Existence, uniqueness and regularity are investigated, as well as finite-dimensional and algorithmic approximations. It is shown that the model can be solved and approximated as far as a frictional parameter is small enough. Getting similar results for the non-regularized model remains an issue. Numerical investigations are postponed to further works.

  14. Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) for pressure-dependent inelasticity in granular rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ashari, Shiva Esna; Cusatis, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the formulation, calibration, and validation of a Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) for the simulation of the pressure-dependent inelastic response of granular rocks. LDPM is formulated in the framework of discrete mechanics and it simulates the heterogeneous deformation of cemented granular systems by means of discrete compatibility/equilibrium equations defined at the grain scale. A numerical strategy is proposed to generate a realistic microstructure based on the actual grain size distribution of a sandstone and the capabilities of the method are illustrated with reference to the particular case of Bleurswiller sandstone, i.e. a granular rock that has been extensively studied at the laboratory scale. LDPM micromechanical parameters are calibrated based on evidences from triaxial experiments, such as hydrostatic compression, brittle failure at low confinement and plastic behavior at high confinement. Results show that LDPM allows exploring the effect of fine-scale heterogeneity on...

  15. Pressure-dependent water absorption cross sections for exoplanets and other atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, Emma J; Yurchenko, Sergei N; Tennyson, Jonathan; Dudaryonok, Anna S; Lavrentieva, Nina N

    2016-01-01

    Many atmospheres (cool stars, brown dwarfs, giant planets, extrasolar planets) are predominately composed of molecular hydrogen and helium. H$_2{}^{16}$O is one of the best measured molecules in extrasolar planetary atmospheres to date and a major compound in the atmospheres of brown-dwarfs and oxygen-rich cool stars, yet the scope of experimental and theoretical studies on the pressure broadening of water vapour lines by collision with hydrogen and helium remains limited. Theoretical H$_2$- and He-broadening parameters of water vapour lines (rotational quantum number $J$ up to 50) are obtained for temperatures in the range 300 - 2000 K. Two approaches for calculation of line widths were used: (i) the averaged energy difference method and (ii) the empirical expression for $J$\\p $J$\\pp-dependence. Voigt profiles based on these widths and the BT2 line list are used to generate high resolution ($\\Delta \\tilde{\

  16. Human cerebral venous outflow pathway depends on posture and central venous pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gisolf, J; van Lieshout, J J; van Heusden, K

    2004-01-01

    and central venous pressure (CVP) on the distribution of cerebral outflow over the internal jugular veins and the vertebral plexus, using a mathematical model. Input to the model was a data set of beat-to-beat cerebral blood flow velocity and CVP measurements in 10 healthy subjects, during baseline rest...... and a Valsalva manoeuvre in the supine and standing position. The model, consisting of 2 jugular veins, each a chain of 10 units containing nonlinear resistances and capacitors, and a vertebral plexus containing a resistance, showed blood flow mainly through the internal jugular veins in the supine position...... and during a Valsalva manoeuvre in both body positions, correlate highly with model simulation of the jugular cross-sectional area (R(2) = 0.97). The results suggest that the cerebral venous flow distribution depends on posture and CVP: in supine humans the internal jugular veins are the primary pathway...

  17. The dependence of the sporicidal effects on the power and pressure of RF-generated plasma processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Klaus S; Nordby, Bolette; Grün, Reinar

    2005-07-01

    The sporicidal effect of 20 different radio-frequency plasma processes produced by combining five different gas mixtures [O(2), Ar/H(2) (50/50%), Ar/H(2) (5/95%), O(2)/H(2) (50/50%), O(2)/H(2) (95/5%)] with four power/pressure settings were tested. Sporicidal effects of oxygen-containing plasmas were dependent on power at low pressure settings but not at high pressure settings. In the absence of oxygen no power dependency was observed at either high or low pressure settings. Survivor curves obtained with the use of nonoxygen plasmas typically had a tailing tendency. Only a mixture-optimized Ar/H(2) (15/85%) plasma process was not encumbered by tailing, and produced a decimal reduction time (D value) below 2 min for Bacillus stearothermophilus spores. Scanning electron microscopy showed that a CF(4)/O(2) plasma did more damage to the substrate than the 15/85% Ar/H(2) plasma. The present results indicate that UV irradiation inactivation is swift and power and pressure independent. Additionally, it is produced at low energy. However, it is not complete. Inactivation through etching is highly power and pressure dependent; finally, inactivation by photodesorption is moderately power and pressure dependent. A sterilization process relying on this mechanism is very advantageous because it combines a highly sporicidal effect with low substrate damage.

  18. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibition on circadian blood pressure during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufiun, Abu; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Mori, Hirohito; Nakano, Daisuke; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Ohmori, Koji; Masaki, Tsutomu; Kohno, Masakazu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2015-04-01

    A growing body of evidence has indicated that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors have antihypertensive effects. Here, we aim to examine the effect of vildagliptin, a DPP-4-specific inhibitor, on blood pressure and its circadian-dipping pattern during the development of salt-dependent hypertension in Dahl salt-sensitive (DSS) rats. DSS rats were treated with a high-salt diet (8% NaCl) plus vehicle or vildagliptin (3 or 10 mg kg(-1) twice daily by oral gavage) for 7 days. Blood pressure was measured by the telemetry system. High-salt diet for 7 days significantly increased the mean arterial pressure (MAP), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and were also associated with an extreme dipping pattern of blood pressure in DSS rats. Treatment with vildagliptin dose-dependently decreased plasma DPP-4 activity, increased plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels and attenuated the development of salt-induced hypertension. Furthermore, vildagliptin significantly increased urine sodium excretion and normalized the dipping pattern of blood pressure. In contrast, intracerebroventricular infusion of vildagliptin (50, 500 or 2500 μg) did not alter MAP and heart rate in DSS rats. These data suggest that salt-dependent hypertension initially develops with an extreme blood pressure dipping pattern. The DPP-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin, may elicit beneficial antihypertensive effects, including the improvement of abnormal circadian blood pressure pattern, by enhancing urinary sodium excretion.

  19. Microalbuminuria in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus relates to nocturnal systolic blood pressure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, T H

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Microalbuminuria predicts early mortality in non-insulin-dependent-diabetes mellitus patients (NIDDM). Our objective in the present study was to compare and assess the relationship between 24-hour, day and nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) in microalbuminuric and normoalbuminuric NIDDM and in normal control subjects. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the present cross-sectional study, 24 hour ambulatory BP (daytime BP and nocturnal BP) and HbA1c were compared in microalbuminuric (n = 10) and nonmicroalbuminuric NIDDM patients (n = 10) and in nondiabetic controls (n = 9). None of the patients were taking antihypertensive agents. RESULTS: In the microlbuminuric group, whereas 24 hour and daytime systolic BP differed significantly from control values (P < 0.025 and P < 0.05 respectively), there was no difference between diabetic groups. However, nocturnal systolic BP in the microalbuminuric group was significantly higher than in the normoalbuminuric diabetic patients (139 vs. 125) (P < 0.05) and a significant difference was also found between the NIDDM patients and the control group (139, 125 vs. 114) (P < 0.025). In multiple regression analysis, only nocturnal systolic BP showed a significant relationship with UAE (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that the higher nocturnal systolic blood pressure seen in our microalbuminuric NIDDM patients may contribute to the increased morbidity in this group.

  20. Kinetic criteria of glass formation and the pressure dependence of the glass transition temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2012-02-21

    An overview on different attempts of formulation of kinetic criteria of glass formation is given. It is analyzed which of the characteristic time scales-time of observation, time of relaxation, and time of change of external parameters-have to be employed to appropriately develop such criteria. Based on this analysis, a general model-independent kinetic criterion for glass formation is formulated. As a first consequence, it is shown that it is not-as often claimed-the Deborah number which governs glass formation. Based on this general kinetic criterion for glass formation, general expressions for the dependence of the glass transition temperature on pressure (and vice versa) are obtained being essentially ratios of the partial derivatives of the appropriate relaxation times with respect to pressure and temperature, respectively. Employing, as examples, further two different (free volume and entropy based) models for the description of viscous flow and relaxation, respectively, relations similar but, in general, not identical to the classical Ehrenfest relations describing second-order equilibrium phase transitions are obtained. In this way, it can be explained why one of the Ehrenfest's relations is usually fulfilled in glass transition and the other not and why the Prigogine-Defay ratio in glass transition is not equal to one as this is the case with Ehrenfest's ratio in second-order equilibrium phase transitions. © 2012 American Institute of Physics