WorldWideScience

Sample records for negative bias temperature

  1. Transformation of Holes Emission Paths under Negative Bias Temperature Stress in Deeply Scaled pMOSFETs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Liao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine the impact of negative bias temperature (NBT stress on the fluctuations in ID and IG for deeply scaled pMOSFETs and find that the relative high NBT stress triggers IG-RTN and ID-step. Through the analysis of the field dependence of emission constant and the carrier separation measurement, it is found that under the relative high NBT stress some traps keep charged state for very long time, as observing step-like behaviors in ID, while other traps emit charged holes to the gate side through TAT process, which originate both ID-step and ID-RTN.

  2. Study on the drain bias effect on negative bias temperature instability degradation of an ultra-short p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Rong, Cao; Xiao-Hua, Ma; Yue, Hao; Shi-Gang, Hu

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of drain bias on ultra-short p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (PMOSFET) degradation during negative bias temperature (NBT) stress. When a relatively large gate voltage is applied, the degradation magnitude is much more than the drain voltage which is the same as the gate voltage supplied, and the time exponent gets larger than that of the NBT instability (NBTI). With decreasing drain voltage, the degradation magnitude and the time exponent all get smaller. At some values of the drain voltage, the degradation magnitude is even smaller than that of NBTI, and when the drain voltage gets small enough, the exhibition of degradation becomes very similar to the NBTI degradation. When a relatively large drain voltage is applied, with decreasing gate voltage, the degradation magnitude gets smaller. However, the time exponent becomes larger. With the help of electric field simulation, this paper concludes that the degradation magnitude is determined by the vertical electric field of the oxide, the amount of hot holes generated by the strong channel lateral electric field at the gate/drain overlap region, and the time exponent is mainly controlled by localized damage caused by the lateral electric field of the oxide in the gate/drain overlap region where hot carriers are produced. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  3. Investigating degradation behaviors induced by mobile Cu ions under high temperature negative bias stress in a-InGaZnO thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiao-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang; Liao, Po-Yung; Chen, Bo-Wei; Tsao, Yu-Ching; Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Yang, Yi-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Fu; Yang, Chung-I.; Hung, Yu-Ju; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Zhang, Sheng-Dong; Lin, Sung-Chun; Yeh, Cheng-Yen

    2017-09-01

    This letter investigates the effect of negative bias temperature stress (NBTS) on amorphous InGaZnO4 thin film transistors with copper electrodes. After 2000 s of NBTS, an abnormal subthreshold swing and on-current (Ion) degradation is observed. The recovery of the Id-Vg curve after either annealing or positive bias temperature stress suggests that there are some native mobile copper ions in the active layer. Both the existence of copper and the degradation mechanism can be confirmed by AC stress with different frequencies and by transmission electron microscope energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis.

  4. Revisited study of fluorine implantation impact on negative bias temperature instability for input/output device of automotive micro controller unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Keiichi; Tsuda, Shibun; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Ogasawara, Makoto; Aono, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the effect of fluorine implanted in the polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) gate and source/drain (S/D) region on negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) improvement. It is found that there is a trade-off implantation energy dependence of NBTI between fluorine in the poly-Si gate and that in the S/D region. Fluorine implanted in the poly-Si gate contributes to NBTI improvement under low energy implantation. On the other hand, NBTI is improved by fluorine implanted in the S/D region under high energy. We propose that the two-step implantation process with high and low energy is the optimum condition for NBTI improvement.

  5. Evaluation of mirror full adder circuit reliability performance due to negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) effects based on different defect mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaari, I. B.; Zainudin, M. F.; Saini, M. S. A.; Hussin, H.; Halim, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    Negative bias temperature instability (NBTI) is an aging effect that can cause the threshold voltage to be shifted hence reduce the drain current. This will subsequently leads to main aging effect in sub-micron CMOS circuits. The NBTI defect mechanisms consist of interface trap generation and hole trapping effect. The main objective of this work was to study the impact of NBTI effect on the circuit performance based on different defect mechanisms. The percentage of how the performance affected in terms of delay by different defect mechanisms will be evaluated based on mirror full adder circuit. To study the reliability issues on circuit, model cards based on 45nm, 65nm and 90nm Predictive Technology Model (PTM) have been used along with the MOSRA model. The impact of NBTI on this circuit were evaluated based on the performance of the circuit which is the propagation delay. To understand the effect of different defect mechanism, analysis at the device level was conducted where the threshold voltage shift of the p-MOSFETs were evaluated. It is shown that the delay degradation will increase with the increasing of the temperature.

  6. Influence of Design and Process Parameters of 32-nm Advanced-Process High- k p-MOSFETs on Negative-Bias Temperature Instability and Study of Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimin, A. F. Muhammad; Radzi, A. A. Mohd; Sazali, N. A. F.; Hatta, S. F. Wan Muhamad; Soin, N.; Hussin, H.

    2017-10-01

    Negative-bias temperature instability (NBTI) has become a prominent factor limiting scaling of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. This work presents a comprehensive simulation study on the effects of critical design parameters of 32-nm advanced-process high- k p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors on NBTI. The NBTI mechanism and defects were explored for various geometric and process design parameters over a wide range of values. The NBTI simulation method applied in this work follows the on-the-fly method to capture the mechanisms of fast and slow traps. This work illustrates the dependence of the threshold voltage ( V th) degradation on the stress oxide field and stress temperature as well as investigation of the Arrhenius plot for the devices. The temperature insensitivity during short stress time of 1 ms indicates absence of generated defects and presence of preexisting defects. It is also observed that significant defects are generated in the gate stack subsequent to NBTI. The slope obtained from the V th degradation analysis at 1 ks and 375°C shows that changing the SiO2 interfacial layer thickness affects the V th degradation by 96.16% more than changing the HfO2 thickness and by 80.67% more than changing the metal gate thickness. It is also found that the NBTI effect depends on process design considerations, specifically the boron concentration in the highly doped drain, the metal gate work function, and the halo doping concentration; it was observed that higher boron dose and high metal work function may lead to higher V th degradation. However, the halo doping concentration in the advanced 32-nm structure has an insignificant effect on NBTI.

  7. Propranolol reduces implicit negative racial bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbeck, Sylvia; Kahane, Guy; McTavish, Sarah; Savulescu, Julian; Cowen, Philip J; Hewstone, Miles

    2012-08-01

    Implicit negative attitudes towards other races are important in certain kinds of prejudicial social behaviour. Emotional mechanisms are thought to be involved in mediating implicit "outgroup" bias but there is little evidence concerning the underlying neurobiology. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of noradrenergic mechanisms in the generation of implicit racial attitudes. Healthy volunteers (n = 36) of white ethnic origin, received a single oral dose of the β-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (40 mg), in a randomised, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled, design. Participants completed an explicit measure of prejudice and the racial implicit association test (IAT), 1-2 h after propranolol administration. Relative to placebo, propranolol significantly lowered heart rate and abolished implicit racial bias, without affecting the measure of explicit racial prejudice. Propranolol did not affect subjective mood. Our results indicate that β-adrenoceptors play a role in the expression of implicit racial attitudes suggesting that noradrenaline-related emotional mechanisms may mediate negative racial bias. Our findings may also have practical importance given that propranolol is a widely used drug. However, further studies will be needed to examine whether a similar effect can be demonstrated in the course of clinical treatment.

  8. Bias temperature instability for devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to one of the more challenging reliability issues plaguing modern semiconductor technologies, negative bias temperature instability.  Readers will benefit from state-of-the art coverage of research in topics such as time dependent defect spectroscopy, anomalous defect behavior, stochastic modeling with additional metastable states, multiphonon theory, compact modeling with RC ladders and implications on device reliability and lifetime.  ·         Enables readers to understand and model negative bias temperature instability, with an emphasis on dynamics; ·         Includes coverage of DC vs. AC stress, duty factor dependence and bias dependence; ·         Explains time dependent defect spectroscopy, as a measurement method that operates on nanoscale MOSFETs; ·         Introduces new defect model for metastable defect states, nonradiative multiphonon theory and stochastic behavior.

  9. Body image related negative interpretation bias in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Timo; Anderle, Alisa; Schmidt, Hagen; Febry, Stephanie; Wünsch-Leiteritz, Wally; Leiteritz, Andreas; Friederich, Hans-Christoph

    2018-03-14

    A distorted body image and pronounced body dissatisfaction are hallmarks of anorexia nervosa (AN) that typically result in dietary restraint and compensatory behaviours. Cognitive biases such as negative interpretation bias are considered key maintaining factors of these maladaptive cognitions and behaviours. However, little attention has been paid to empirical tests whether negative interpretation bias exists in AN and to what degree it is associated with symptom severity. Participants in the present study were 40 women with AN and 40 healthy women with no history of an eating disorder. Body-related negative interpretation bias (i.e., a tendency to interpret ambiguous information about the own body in a negative way) was measured by a Scrambled Sentences Task. Patients with AN showed a stronger body-related negative interpretation bias than healthy controls. Within both groups, negative interpretation bias correlated strongly and positively with AN symptom severity and these effects were not moderated by levels of depressive symptoms. The findings support the idea that biased interpretation of body-related information is associated with the specific psychopathology of AN. Targeted, computerised interventions (e.g. interpretation bias modification) may help to alter these dysfunctional cognitive schemas that lie at the heart of AN. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Negatively-biased credulity and the cultural evolution of beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Daniel M T; Pisor, Anne C; Navarrete, Carlos David

    2014-01-01

    The functions of cultural beliefs are often opaque to those who hold them. Accordingly, to benefit from cultural evolution's ability to solve complex adaptive problems, learners must be credulous. However, credulity entails costs, including susceptibility to exploitation, and effort wasted due to false beliefs. One determinant of the optimal level of credulity is the ratio between the costs of two types of errors: erroneous incredulity (failing to believe information that is true) and erroneous credulity (believing information that is false). This ratio can be expected to be asymmetric when information concerns hazards, as the costs of erroneous incredulity will, on average, exceed the costs of erroneous credulity; no equivalent asymmetry characterizes information concerning benefits. Natural selection can therefore be expected to have crafted learners' minds so as to be more credulous toward information concerning hazards. This negatively-biased credulity extends general negativity bias, the adaptive tendency for negative events to be more salient than positive events. Together, these biases constitute attractors that should shape cultural evolution via the aggregated effects of learners' differential retention and transmission of information. In two studies in the U.S., we demonstrate the existence of negatively-biased credulity, and show that it is most pronounced in those who believe the world to be dangerous, individuals who may constitute important nodes in cultural transmission networks. We then document the predicted imbalance in cultural content using a sample of urban legends collected from the Internet and a sample of supernatural beliefs obtained from ethnographies of a representative collection of the world's cultures, showing that beliefs about hazards predominate in both.

  11. Negatively-Biased Credulity and the Cultural Evolution of Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, Daniel M. T.; Pisor, Anne C.; Navarrete, Carlos David

    2014-01-01

    The functions of cultural beliefs are often opaque to those who hold them. Accordingly, to benefit from cultural evolution’s ability to solve complex adaptive problems, learners must be credulous. However, credulity entails costs, including susceptibility to exploitation, and effort wasted due to false beliefs. One determinant of the optimal level of credulity is the ratio between the costs of two types of errors: erroneous incredulity (failing to believe information that is true) and erroneous credulity (believing information that is false). This ratio can be expected to be asymmetric when information concerns hazards, as the costs of erroneous incredulity will, on average, exceed the costs of erroneous credulity; no equivalent asymmetry characterizes information concerning benefits. Natural selection can therefore be expected to have crafted learners’ minds so as to be more credulous toward information concerning hazards. This negatively-biased credulity extends general negativity bias, the adaptive tendency for negative events to be more salient than positive events. Together, these biases constitute attractors that should shape cultural evolution via the aggregated effects of learners’ differential retention and transmission of information. In two studies in the U.S., we demonstrate the existence of negatively-biased credulity, and show that it is most pronounced in those who believe the world to be dangerous, individuals who may constitute important nodes in cultural transmission networks. We then document the predicted imbalance in cultural content using a sample of urban legends collected from the Internet and a sample of supernatural beliefs obtained from ethnographies of a representative collection of the world’s cultures, showing that beliefs about hazards predominate in both. PMID:24736596

  12. Early attentional bias for negative words when competition is induced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Chou; Li, Shuo-Heng; Yeh, Su-Ling

    2016-05-01

    Previous research (Zeelenberg, Wagenmakers, & Rotteveel, 2006) revealed that emotionally meaningful words were identified significantly better than neutral words, with no difference between positive and negative words. Since in that study only a single target word was displayed at a time, we hypothesized that the equivalent performances for positive and negative words were due to a lack of competition. To test this, in our Experiment 1, we replicated Zeelenberg and colleagues' finding, using emotion-laden Chinese words and the identical data-limited method, which measured the accuracy of a briefly shown target. We then introduced competition in Experiment 2 by simultaneously presenting two words during the target frame, and found evidence for an early attentional bias to negative words. In Experiment 3, we confirmed that the bias in Experiment 2 was not due to the inevitable repetition of stimuli. Taken together, these results support our hypothesis that, in the presence of competition, negative words receive attentional priority and consequently have enhanced perceptual representations.

  13. Effects of substrate bias voltage on plasma parameters in temperature control using a grid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, K.H.; Hong, J.I.; You, S.J.; Chang, H.Y.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the effects of substrate bias voltage on plasma parameters in temperature control using a grid system in inductively coupled plasma. Electron temperature can be controlled from 2.5 eV to 0.5 eV at 1 mTorr Ar plasma using grid bias voltage, and the electron temperature is a strong function of substrate bias voltage. The main control parameter determining the electron temperature is the potential difference between grid-biased voltage and the plasma potential in the temperature controlled region (Δφ II,g ). When substrate bias voltage is negative, plasma parameters do not vary with substrate bias voltage due to constant Δφ II,g

  14. Understanding the surface temperature cold bias in CMIP5 AGCMs over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaolei; Liu, Yimin; Wu, Guoxiong

    2017-12-01

    The temperature biases of 28 CMIP5 AGCMs are evaluated over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) for the period 1979-2005. The results demonstrate that the majority of CMIP5 models underestimate annual and seasonal mean surface 2-m air temperatures ( T as) over the TP. In addition, the ensemble of the 28 AGCMs and half of the individual models underestimate annual mean skin temperatures ( T s) over the TP. The cold biases are larger in T as than in T s, and are larger over the western TP. By decomposing the T s bias using the surface energy budget equation, we investigate the contributions to the cold surface temperature bias on the TP from various factors, including the surface albedo-induced bias, surface cloud radiative forcing, clear-sky shortwave radiation, clear-sky downward longwave radiation, surface sensible heat flux, latent heat flux, and heat storage. The results show a suite of physically interlinked processes contributing to the cold surface temperature bias. Strong negative surface albedo-induced bias associated with excessive snow cover and the surface heat fluxes are highly anticorrelated, and the cancelling out of these two terms leads to a relatively weak contribution to the cold bias. Smaller surface turbulent fluxes lead to colder lower-tropospheric temperature and lower water vapor content, which in turn cause negative clear-sky downward longwave radiation and cold bias. The results suggest that improvements in the parameterization of the area of snow cover, as well as the boundary layer, and hence surface turbulent fluxes, may help to reduce the cold bias over the TP in the models.

  15. Electrical breakdown in thin oxides during bias-temperature ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.; Riewe, Leonard Charles; Winokur, Peter S.; Sexton, Frederick W.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical breakdown in thin oxides is assessed by a new bias-temperature ramp technique. No significant effect of radiation exposure on breakdown is observed for high quality thermal and nitrided oxides, up to 20 Mrad(SiO 2 )

  16. The association between ruminative thinking and negative interpretation bias in social anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badra, M.; Schulze, L.; Becker, E.S.; Vrijsen, J.N.; Renneberg, B.; Zetsche, U.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive models propose that both, negative interpretations of ambiguous social situations and ruminative thoughts about social events contribute to the maintenance of social anxiety disorder. It has further been postulated that ruminative thoughts fuel biased negative interpretations, however,

  17. Expressive Suppression Tendencies, Projection Bias in Memory of Negative Emotions, and Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Valerie T; Overall, Nickola C; Madden, Helen; Low, Rachel S T

    2018-02-01

    The current research extends prior research linking negative emotions and emotion regulation tendencies to memory by investigating whether (a) naturally occurring negative emotions during routine weekly life are associated with more negatively biased memories of prior emotional experiences-a bias called projection; (b) tendencies to regulate emotions via expressive suppression are associated with greater projection bias in memory of negative emotions; and (c) greater projection bias in memory is associated with poorer future well-being. Participants (N = 308) completed a questionnaire assessing their general tendencies to engage in expressive suppression. Then, every week for 7 weeks, participants reported on (a) the negative emotions they experienced across the current week (e.g., "This week, I felt 'sad'"), (b) their memories of the negative emotions they experienced the prior week (e.g., "Last week, I felt 'sad'"), and (c) their well-being. First, participants demonstrated significant projection bias in memory: Greater negative emotions in a given week were associated with remembering emotions in the prior week more negatively than those prior emotions were originally reported. Second, projection bias in memory of negative emotions was greater for individuals who reported greater tendencies to regulate emotions via expressive suppression. Third, greater projection bias in memory of negative emotions was associated with reductions in well-being across weeks. These 3 novel findings indicate that (a) current negative emotions bias memory of past emotions, (b) this memory bias is magnified for people who habitually use expressive suppression to regulate emotions, and (c) this memory bias may undermine well-being over time. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Current Bias Induced Negative Magneto-Resistance in Superconducting Tantalum Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun-Gyu; Kim, Eunseong

    2014-03-01

    Negative Magneto-Resistance (MR) of 2D superconducting thin films has received attentions because the decreasing resistance with increasing magnetic field cannot be simply understood by conventional superconductivity. This behavior was ascribed to localized bosons, indicating the existence of a Bose insulator (BI) phase. We found negative MR within a range of dc current bias in tantalum thin films, whereas no negative MR appears without bias. We measured Rxx and Rxy simultaneously as functions of current bias and magnetic field and construct the phase diagram at T =0 limit. We found that the DC biased negative MR in Ta thin film shows substantially different characteristics from those of reported no biased negative MR. We also found that the induced BI can be understood by the vortex instability state. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the National Research Foundation of Korea through the Creative Research Initiatives.

  19. Quantum Heat Engine and Negative Boltzmann Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jing-Yi; Quan, Hai-Tao

    2017-09-01

    To clarify the ambiguity on negative Boltzmann temperature in literature, we study the Carnot and the Otto cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at the negative Boltzmann temperature based on a canonical ensemble description. The work extraction, entropy production and the efficiency of these cycles are explored. Conditions for constructing and properties of these thermodynamic cycles are elucidated. We find that the apparent “violation” of the second law of thermodynamics in these cycles are due to the fact that the traditional definition of thermodynamic efficiency is inappropriate in this situation. When properly understanding the efficiency and the adiabatic processes, in which the system crosses over “absolute ZERO” in a limit sense, the Carnot cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at a negative Boltzmann temperature can be understood straightforwardly, and it contradicts neither the second nor the third law of thermodynamics. Hence, negative Boltzmann temperature is a consistent concept in thermodynamics. We use a two-level system and an Ising spin system to illustrate our central results. Support from the National Science Foundation of China under Grants Nos. 11375012, 11534002, and The Recruitment Program of Global Youth Experts of China

  20. Quantum Heat Engine and Negative Boltzmann Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Jing-Yi; Quan Hai-Tao

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the ambiguity on negative Boltzmann temperature in literature, we study the Carnot and the Otto cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at the negative Boltzmann temperature based on a canonical ensemble description. The work extraction, entropy production and the efficiency of these cycles are explored. Conditions for constructing and properties of these thermodynamic cycles are elucidated. We find that the apparent “violation” of the second law of thermodynamics in these cycles are due to the fact that the traditional definition of thermodynamic efficiency is inappropriate in this situation. When properly understanding the efficiency and the adiabatic processes, in which the system crosses over “absolute ZERO” in a limit sense, the Carnot cycle with one of the heat reservoirs at a negative Boltzmann temperature can be understood straightforwardly, and it contradicts neither the second nor the third law of thermodynamics. Hence, negative Boltzmann temperature is a consistent concept in thermodynamics. We use a two-level system and an Ising spin system to illustrate our central results. (paper)

  1. ADHD symptoms in healthy adults are associated with stressful life events and negative memory bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijsen, Janna N; Tendolkar, Indira; Onnink, Marten; Hoogman, Martine; Schene, Aart H; Fernández, Guillén; van Oostrom, Iris; Franke, Barbara

    2017-10-28

    Stressful life events, especially Childhood Trauma, predict ADHD symptoms. Childhood Trauma and negatively biased memory are risk factors for affective disorders. The association of life events and bias with ADHD symptoms may inform about the etiology of ADHD. Memory bias was tested using a computer task in N = 675 healthy adults. Life events and ADHD symptoms were assessed using questionnaires. The mediation of the association between life events and ADHD symptoms by memory bias was examined. We explored the roles of different types of life events and of ADHD symptom clusters. Life events and memory bias were associated with overall ADHD symptoms as well as inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity symptom clusters. Memory bias mediated the association of Lifetime Life Events, specifically Childhood Trauma, with ADHD symptoms. Negatively biased memory may be a cognitive marker of the effects of Childhood Trauma on the development and/or persistence of ADHD symptoms.

  2. Associations among negative parenting, attention bias to anger, and social anxiety among youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Lauren D; Oppenheimer, Caroline W; Hankin, Benjamin L

    2014-02-01

    Theories of affective learning suggest that early experiences contribute to emotional disorders by influencing the development of processing biases for negative emotional stimuli. Although studies have shown that physically abused children preferentially attend to angry faces, it is unclear whether youth exposed to more typical aspects of negative parenting exhibit the same type of bias. The current studies extend previous research by linking observed negative parenting styles (e.g., authoritarian) and behaviors (e.g., criticism and negative affect) to attention bias for angry faces in both a psychiatrically enriched (ages 11-17 years; N = 60) and a general community (ages 9-15 years; N = 75) sample of youth. In addition, the association between observed negative parenting (e.g., authoritarian style and negative affect) and youth social anxiety was mediated by attention bias for angry faces in the general community sample. Overall, findings provide preliminary support for theories of affective learning and risk for psychopathology among youth.

  3. Association between mean and interannual equatorial Indian Ocean subsurface temperature bias in a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, G.; Chowdary, Jasti S.; Gnanaseelan, C.; Prasad, K. V. S. R.; Karmakar, Ananya; Parekh, Anant

    2018-03-01

    In the present study the association between mean and interannual subsurface temperature bias over the equatorial Indian Ocean (EIO) is investigated during boreal summer (June through September; JJAS) in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) hindcast. Anomalously high subsurface warm bias (greater than 3 °C) over the eastern EIO (EEIO) region is noted in CFSv2 during summer, which is higher compared to other parts of the tropical Indian Ocean. Prominent eastward current bias in the upper 100 m over the EIO region induced by anomalous westerly winds is primarily responsible for subsurface temperature bias. The eastward currents transport warm water to the EEIO and is pushed down to subsurface due to downwelling. Thus biases in both horizontal and vertical currents over the EIO region support subsurface warm bias. The evolution of systematic subsurface warm bias in the model shows strong interannual variability. These maximum subsurface warming episodes over the EEIO are mainly associated with La Niña like forcing. Strong convergence of low level winds over the EEIO and Maritime continent enhanced the westerly wind bias over the EIO during maximum warming years. This low level convergence of wind is induced by the bias in the gradient in the mean sea level pressure with positive bias over western EIO and negative bias over EEIO and parts of western Pacific. Consequently, changes in the atmospheric circulation associated with La Niña like conditions affected the ocean dynamics by modulating the current bias thereby enhancing the subsurface warm bias over the EEIO. It is identified that EEIO subsurface warming is stronger when La Niña co-occurred with negative Indian Ocean Dipole events as compared to La Niña only years in the model. Ocean general circulation model (OGCM) experiments forced with CFSv2 winds clearly support our hypothesis that ocean dynamics influenced by westerly winds bias is primarily

  4. Music-induced mood modulates the strength of emotional negativity bias: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Yuan, Jiajin; Huang, He; Chen, Changming; Li, Hong

    2008-11-14

    The present study investigated the effect of music-elicited moods on the subsequent affective processing through a music-primed valence categorization task. Event-related potentials were recorded for positive and negative emotional pictures that were primed by happy or sad music excerpts. The reaction time data revealed longer reaction times (RTs) for pictures following negative versus positive music pieces, irrespective of the valence of the picture. Additionally, positive pictures elicited faster response latencies than negative pictures, irrespective of the valence of the musical prime. Moreover, the main effect of picture valence, and the music by picture valence interaction effect were both significant for P2 amplitudes and for the averaged amplitudes at 500-700ms interval. Negative pictures elicited smaller P2 amplitudes than positive pictures, and the amplitude differences between negative and positive pictures were larger with negative musical primes than with positive musical primes. Similarly, compared to positive pictures, negative pictures elicited more negative deflections during the 500-700ms interval across prime types. The amplitude differences between negative and positive pictures were again larger under negative versus positive music primes at this interval. Therefore, the present study observed a clear emotional negativity bias during either prime condition, and extended the previous findings by showing increased strength of the negative bias under negative mood primes. This suggests that the neural sensitivity of the brain to negative stimuli varies with individuals' mood states, and this bias is particularly intensified by negative mood states.

  5. Amygdala to hippocampal volume ratio is associated with negative memory bias in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, L.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Franke, B.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Tendolkar, I.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Negative memory bias is thought to be one of the main cognitive risk and maintenance factors for depression, but its neural substrates are largely unknown. Here, we studied whether memory bias is related to amygdala and hippocampal volume, two structures that are critical for emotional

  6. Emergence of Negative Capacitance in Multidomain Ferroelectric-Paraelectric Nanocapacitors at Finite Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Shusuke; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Han, Seungwu

    2016-01-13

    The emergence of negative capacitance in an ultrathin ferroelectric/paraelectric bilayer capacitor under electrical bias is examined using first-principles simulation. An antiferroelectric-like behavior is predicted, and negative capacitance is shown to emerge when the monodomain state becomes stable after bias application. The polydomain-monodomain transition is also shown to be a source of capacitance enhancement. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Attachment insecurity, biased perceptions of romantic partners' negative emotions, and hostile relationship behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overall, Nickola C; Fletcher, Garth J O; Simpson, Jeffry A; Fillo, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    In the current research, we tested the extent to which attachment insecurity produces inaccurate and biased perceptions of intimate partners' emotions and whether more negative perceptions of partners' emotions elicit the damaging behavior often associated with attachment insecurity. Perceptions of partners' emotions as well as partners' actual emotions were assessed multiple times in couples' conflict discussions (Study 1) and daily during a 3-week period in 2 independent samples (Study 2). Using partners' reports of their own emotional experiences as the accuracy benchmark, we simultaneously tested whether attachment insecurity was associated with the degree to which individuals (a) accurately detected shifts in their partners' negative emotions (tracking accuracy), and (b) perceived their partners were feeling more negative relationship-related emotions than they actually experienced (directional bias). Highly avoidant perceivers were equally accurate at tracking their partners' changing emotions compared to less avoidant individuals (tracking accuracy), but they overestimated the intensity of their partners' negative emotions to a greater extent than less avoidant individuals (directional bias). In addition, more negative perceptions of partners' emotions triggered more hostile and defensive behavior in highly avoidant perceivers both during conflict discussions (Study 1) and in daily life (Study 2). In contrast, attachment anxiety was not associated with tracking accuracy, directional bias, or hostile reactions to perceptions of their partners' negative emotions. These findings demonstrate the importance of assessing biased perceptions in actual relationship interactions and reveal that biased perceptions play an important role in activating the defenses of avoidantly attached people. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Emotion regulation in broadly defined anorexia nervosa: association with negative affective memory bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Amy; Wade, Tracey D

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical models in anorexia nervosa (AN) implicate difficulties with emotion regulation as a maintaining factor. To date little is known about how different factors might maintain these difficulties. Forty eight women were recruited, 24 receiving treatment for AN (called broadly defined AN) and 24 healthy controls. Self-report measures of difficulties with emotion regulation and current depression were used in addition to computerized tasks which provided measures of social attentional bias and anger-threat bias, as well negative affective memory and recognition bias. Compared to controls, women with AN had significantly higher levels of difficulties with emotion regulation, depression, and negative affective memory bias, as well as lower bias for anger-threat. Simultaneous examination of the two variables that met pre-conditions for mediation of the relationship between group membership and difficulties with emotion regulation (anger-threat bias and negative affective memory) indicated negative affective memory bias to be a mediator, accounting for around one-third of the total effect a diagnosis of AN has on difficulties with emotion regulation. The association of these variables with AN may indicate shared risk factors with depression, and the variety of therapeutic approaches found to be effective with depression may be useful to further incorporate into treatments for AN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bias changing molecule–lead couple and inducing low bias negative differential resistance for electrons acceptor predicted by first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Y.; Fang, J.H.; Zhong, C.G.; Dong, Z.C.; Zhao, Z.Y.; Zhou, P.X.; Yao, K.L.

    2015-01-01

    A first-principles study of the transport properties of 3,13-dimercaptononacene–6,21-dione molecule sandwiched between two gold leads is reported. The strong effect of negative differential resistance with large peak-to-valley ratio of 710% is present under low bias. We found that bias can change molecule–lead couple and induce low bias negative differential resistance for electrons acceptor, which may promise the potential applications in molecular devices with low-power dissipation in the future. - Highlights: • Acceptor is constructed to negative differential resistor (NDR). • NDR effect is present under low bias. • Bias change molecule–lead couple and induce NDR effect

  10. Performance-based interpretation bias in clinically anxious youths: relationships with attention, anxiety, and negative cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenman, Michelle; Amir, Nader; Weersing, V Robin

    2014-09-01

    This preliminary investigation sought to examine basic interpretive biases, as assessed via performance-based means, in the context of anxious symptomatology, attention, and negative cognition in children and adolescents. At a single assessment, 26 youths diagnosed with primary separation anxiety, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder completed performance-based assessments of interpretation and attention. Youths and parents also completed diagnostic interviews and youths completed a measure of negative self-statements. Components of interpretation (threat-valence judgments and speed of responding) were examined, and interpretation was explored as a correlate of youth anxiety, attention bias, and negative self-statements. Results found percentage of negative interpretations endorsed as the strongest predictor of anxiety symptoms; this index was also correlated with attention bias. Slower rejection of benign interpretations was also associated with youth-reported negative self-statements.This initial investigation provides support for a relationship between interpretation bias and anxiety and preliminary evidence for a relationship between attention and interpretation biases. Continued research dismantling the stages of basic cognition within the chain of information processing may provide a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying anxiety disorders in youths and lead to continued development and refinement of cognitive interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Attentional bias to negative affect moderates negative affect's relationship with smoking abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Paul E; Waters, Andrew J; Lam, Cho; Correa-Fernandez, Virmarie; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Cinciripini, Paul M; Wetter, David W

    2016-08-01

    To examine whether initial orienting (IO) and inability to disengage (ITD) attention from negative affective stimuli moderate the association of negative affect with smoking abstinence during a quit attempt. Data were from a longitudinal cohort study of smoking cessation (N = 424). A negative affect modified Stroop task was administered 1 week before and on quit day to measure IO and ITD. Ecological Momentary Assessments were used to create negative affect intercepts and linear slopes for the week before quitting and on quit day. Quit day and long-term abstinence measures were collected. Continuation ratio logit model analyses found significant interactions for prequit negative affect slope with prequit ITD, odds ratio (OR) = 0.738 (0.57, 0.96), p = .02, and for quit day negative affect intercept with quit day ITD, OR = 0.62 (0.41, 950), p = .03, predicting abstinence. The Prequit Negative Affect Intercept × Prequit IO interaction predicting quit day abstinence was significant, OR = 1.42 (1.06, 1.90), p = .02, as was the Quit Day Negative Affect Slope × Quit Day IO interaction predicting long-term abstinence, OR = 1.45 (1.02, 2.08), p = .04. The hypothesis that the association of negative affect with smoking abstinence would be moderated by ITD was generally supported. Among individuals with high ITD, negative affect was inversely related to abstinence, but unrelated to abstinence among individuals with lower levels of ITD. Unexpectedly, among individuals with low IO, negative affect was inversely related to abstinence, but unrelated to abstinence among individuals with higher levels of ITD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Attentional Bias to Negative Affect Moderates Negative Affect’s Relationship with Smoking Abstinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Paul E.; Waters, Andrew J.; Lam, Cho; Correa-Fernandez, Virmarie; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin; Cinciripini, Paul M.; Wetter, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether initial orienting (IO) and inability to disengage attention (ITD) from negative affective stimuli moderate the association of negative affect with smoking abstinence during a quit attempt. Methods Data were from a longitudinal cohort study of smoking cessation (N=424). A negative affect modified Stroop was administered one week before and on quit day to measure IO and ITD. Ecological Momentary Assessments were used to create negative affect intercepts and linear slopes for the week before quitting and on quit day. Quit day and long-term abstinence measures were collected. Results Continuation ratio (CR) logit model analyses found significant interactions of pre-quit negative affect slope with pre-quit ITD [OR = .738(.57, .96), p= .02] and quit day negative affect intercept with quit day ITD [OR = .62(.41, 950), p= .03] predicting abstinence. The interaction of pre-quit negative affect intercept and pre-quit IO predicting quit day abstinence was significant [OR = 1.42(1.06, 1.90), p= .02], as was the interaction of quit day negative affect slope and quit day IO predicting long-term abstinence [OR = 1.45(1.02, 2.08), p= .04]. Conclusions The hypothesis that the association of negative affect with smoking abstinence would be moderated by ITD was generally supported. Among individuals with high ITD, negative affect was inversely related to abstinence, but unrelated to abstinence among individuals with lower levels of ITD. Unexpectedly, among individuals with low IO negative affect was inversely related to abstinence, but unrelated to abstinence among individuals with higher levels of ITD. PMID:27505211

  13. Sound Absorption of a 2DOF Resonant Liner with Negative Bias Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, K. K.; Cataldi, P.; Gaeta, R. J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes an experimental study conducted to determine the effect of negative bias flow on the sound absorption of a two degree-of-freedom liner. The backwall for the liner was designed to act as a double-Helmholtz resonator so as to act as a hard wall at all frequencies except at its resonant frequencies. The effect of bias flow is investigated for a buried septum porosity of 2% and 19.5% for bias flow orifice Mach numbers up to 0.311. The bias flow appears to modify the resistance and reactance of the backwall alone at lower frequencies up to about 2 kHz, with marginal effects at higher frequencies. Absorption coefficients close to unity are achieved for a frequency range of 500 - 4000 Hz for the overall liner for a septum porosity of 2% and orifice Mach number of 0.128. Insertion loss tests performed in a flow duct facility for grazing flow Mach numbers up to 0.2 and septum Mach numbers up to 0.15 showed that negative bias flow can increase insertion loss by as much as 10 dB at frequencies in the range of 500 D 1400 Hz compared to no grazing flow. The effectiveness of the negative bias flow is diminished as the grazing flow velocity is increased.

  14. The influence of negative urgency, attentional bias, and emotional dimensions on palatable food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kendra Davis; Fischer, Sarah; Smith, Gregory T; Miller, Joshua D

    2016-05-01

    We tested a theoretical model concerning the role of attentional bias and negative affect in food consumption that offers important advances. We hypothesized that the effects of negative affect manipulations on food consumption vary as a function of trait levels of negative urgency (NU; tendency to act impulsively when distressed), and attentional bias and that the roles of emotional arousal and negative emotional valence differ and should be studied separately. 190 undergraduate women were randomly assigned to either an anger or neutral mood condition. Women in both conditions completed the Food Stroop, in which the presentation of food and neutral words were counterbalanced. After the task, participants were given the opportunity to eat mandarin oranges and/or chocolate candy while the experimenter was out of the room. The type and quantity of food consumed was counted after the participant departed. As hypothesized, the roles of emotional arousal and valence differed and the effect of the induced emotion was moderated by NU. Women high in NU who experienced emotional arousal were more likely to eat candy and consumed more candy than other women. Emotional valence had no effect on candy consumption. Neither increases in emotional arousal or emotional valence influenced attentional bias to food cues. Attentional bias was also unrelated to food consumption. The impact of negative mood inductions on palatable food consumption appears to operate through emotional arousal and not negative emotional valence, and it may operate primarily for women high in NU. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Attention and memory bias to facial emotions underlying negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seon-Kyeong; Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Cho, Yang Seok; Choi, Kee-Hong

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed bias in selective attention to facial emotions in negative symptoms of schizophrenia and its influence on subsequent memory for facial emotions. Thirty people with schizophrenia who had high and low levels of negative symptoms (n = 15, respectively) and 21 healthy controls completed a visual probe detection task investigating selective attention bias (happy, sad, and angry faces randomly presented for 50, 500, or 1000 ms). A yes/no incidental facial memory task was then completed. Attention bias scores and recognition errors were calculated. Those with high negative symptoms exhibited reduced attention to emotional faces relative to neutral faces; those with low negative symptoms showed the opposite pattern when faces were presented for 500 ms regardless of the valence. Compared to healthy controls, those with high negative symptoms made more errors for happy faces in the memory task. Reduced attention to emotional faces in the probe detection task was significantly associated with less pleasure and motivation and more recognition errors for happy faces in schizophrenia group only. Attention bias away from emotional information relatively early in the attentional process and associated diminished positive memory may relate to pathological mechanisms for negative symptoms.

  16. Evaluation of Life Events in Major Depression: Assessing Negative Emotional Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girz, Laura; Driver-Linn, Erin; Miller, Gregory A; Deldin, Patricia J

    2017-05-01

    Overly negative appraisals of negative life events characterize depression but patterns of emotion bias associated with life events in depression are not well understood. The goal of this paper is to determine under which situations emotional responses are stronger than expected given life events and which emotions are biased. Depressed (n = 16) and non-depressed (n = 14) participants (mean age = 41.4 years) wrote about negative life events involving their own actions and inactions, and rated the current emotion elicited by those events. They also rated emotions elicited by someone else's actions and inactions. These ratings were compared with evaluations provided by a second, 'benchmark' group of non-depressed individuals (n = 20) in order to assess the magnitude and direction of possible biased emotional reactions in the two groups. Participants with depression reported greater anger and disgust than expected in response to both actions and inactions, whereas they reported greater guilt, shame, sadness, responsibility and fear than expected in response to inactions. Relative to non-depressed and benchmark participants, depressed participants were overly negative in the evaluation of their own life events, but not the life events of others. A standardized method for establishing emotional bias reveals a pattern of overly negative emotion only in depressed individuals' self-evaluations, and in particular with respect to anger and disgust, lending support to claims that major depressives' evaluations represent negative emotional bias and to clinical interventions that address this bias. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Theoretical analysis of a biased photonic crystal fiber infiltrated with a negative dielectric anisotropy liquid crystal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weirich, Johannes; Wei, Lei; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the PBG mode of a biased Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) infiltrated with a Liquid Crystal (LC) with negative dielectric anisotropy. We analyse the voltage induced change of the transmission spectrum, dispersion and losses and compare them to the experimental values.......We simulate the PBG mode of a biased Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) infiltrated with a Liquid Crystal (LC) with negative dielectric anisotropy. We analyse the voltage induced change of the transmission spectrum, dispersion and losses and compare them to the experimental values....

  18. Stereotype threat engenders neural attentional bias toward negative feedback to undermine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Chad E; Leitner, Jordan B

    2014-10-01

    Stereotype threat, a situational pressure individuals experience when they fear confirming a negative group stereotype, engenders a cascade of physiological stress responses, negative appraisals, and performance monitoring processes that tax working memory resources necessary for optimal performance. Less is known, however, about how stereotype threat biases attentional processing in response to performance feedback, and how such attentional biases may undermine performance. Women received feedback on math problems in stereotype threatening compared to stereotype-neutral contexts while continuous EEG activity was recorded. Findings revealed that stereotype threatened women elicited larger midline P100 ERPs, increased phase locking between anterior cingulate cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (two regions integral for attentional processes), and increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback compared to positive feedback and women in stereotype-neutral contexts. Increased power in left fusiform gyrus in response to negative feedback predicted underperformance on the math task among stereotype threatened women only. Women in stereotype-neutral contexts exhibited the opposite trend. Findings suggest that in stereotype threatening contexts, neural networks integral for attention and working memory are biased toward negative, stereotype confirming feedback at very early speeds of information processing. This bias, in turn, plays a role in undermining performance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Negativity bias in attitude learning: a possible indicator of vulnerability to emotional disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, Natalie J; Fazio, Russell H; Vasey, Michael W

    2007-06-01

    Negativity biases, i.e., tendencies for negative features and interpretations to predominate over positive, are known to play a role in the etiology and maintenance of emotional disorders. Both depression and anxiety have been associated with such negative cognitive styles. Recently, Fazio, R.H., Eiser, J.R., and Shook, N.J. [(2004). Attitude formation through exploration: Valence asymmetries. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 87, 293-311] have observed similar valence asymmetries in the domain of attitude formation and generalization. The present research examined the possibility that the extent to which individuals display a learning bias in attitude formation is related to negative cognitive style and emotional disorder symptoms. Participants played a computer game that required learning whether novel stimuli produced positive or negative outcomes. Poorer learning was associated with more negative cognitive style, greater depression, and a tendency toward greater anxiety. Interestingly, these relations were most evident with respect to the learning of the positive stimuli, suggesting that an under-appreciation of positive objects and events may underlie vulnerability to emotional disorders. The potential value of various indices of negativity bias that can be assessed when examining attitude formation and generalization is discussed.

  20. The role of negativity bias in political judgment: a cultural neuroscience perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Narun; Cheon, Bobby K; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-06-01

    Hibbing et al. provide a comprehensive overview of how being susceptible to heightened sensitivity to threat may lead to conservative ideologies. Yet, an emerging literature in social and cultural neuroscience shows the importance of genetic and cultural factors on negativity biases. Promising avenues for future investigation may include examining the bidirectional relationship of conservatism across multiple levels of analysis.

  1. Associations among Negative Parenting, Attention Bias to Anger, and Social Anxiety among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, Lauren D.; Oppenheimer, Caroline W.; Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Theories of affective learning suggest that early experiences contribute to emotional disorders by influencing the development of processing biases for negative emotional stimuli. Although studies have shown that physically abused children preferentially attend to angry faces, it is unclear whether youth exposed to more typical aspects of negative…

  2. Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Voltage-controlled spintronics is of particular importance to continue progress in information technology through reduced power consumption, enhanced processing speed, integration density, and functionality in comparison with present day CMOS electronics. Almost all existing and prototypical solid-state spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism, enabling spin-selective transmission or scattering of electrons. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is a key challenge to better spintronics. Currently, most attempts to electrically control magnetism focus on potentially large magnetoelectric effects of multiferroics. We report on our interest in magnetoelectric Cr 2 O3 (chromia). Robust isothermal electric control of exchange bias is achieved at room temperature in perpendicular anisotropic Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd exchange bias heterostructures. This discovery promises significant implications for potential spintronics. From the perspective of basic science, our finding serves as macroscopic evidence for roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable equilibrium boundary magnetization in magnetoelectric antiferromagnets. The latter evolves at chromia (0001) surfaces and interfaces when chromia is in one of its two degenerate antiferromagnetic single domain states selected via magnetoelectric annealing. Theoretical insight into the boundary magnetization and its role in electrically controlled exchange bias is gained from first-principles calculations and general symmetry arguments. Measurements of spin-resolved ultraviolet photoemission, magnetometry at Cr 2 O3 (0001) surfaces, and detailed investigations of the unique exchange bias properties of Cr 2 O3 (0001)/CoPd including its electric controllability provide macroscopically averaged information about the boundary magnetization of chromia. Laterally resolved X-ray PEEM and temperature dependent MFM reveal detailed microscopic information of the chromia

  3. Is there a negative interpretation bias in depressed patients? An affective startle modulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käse, Mirjam; Dresler, Thomas; Andreatta, Marta; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Wolff, Babette; Kittel-Schneider, Sarah; Polak, Thomas; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Mühlberger, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Scientists proposed that patients with depression favour negative interpretations when appraising ambiguity. As self-report measures seem prone to response bias, implicit measures of emotional valence should be additionally used. A total of 16 patients with depression and 19 controls underwent an acoustic imagery task comprising neutral and negative words, as well as ambiguous words that could be understood either way. Affective startle modulation and direct interrogation were used to assess implicit and explicit emotional valence, respectively. We expected a negative bias for ambiguous words in the patient group, resulting in augmented startle magnitudes and preference for negative interpretations of the ambiguous words in the interrogation. Surprisingly, both groups preferred neutral interpretations and showed augmented startle magnitudes to ambiguous words. Furthermore, both groups displayed an emotional startle potentiation for negative words. In summary, our results do not confirm a negative interpretation bias or a blunted emotional response in patients with major depression. The mismatch between self-report and affective startle reaction to ambiguous targets might reflect defensive mobilization or attention effects. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Negative evaluation bias for positive self-referential information in borderline personality disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina Winter

    Full Text Available Previous research has suggested that patients meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD display altered self-related information processing. However, experimental studies on dysfunctional self-referential information processing in BPD are rare. In this study, BPD patients (N = 30 and healthy control participants (N = 30 judged positive, neutral, and negative words in terms of emotional valence. Referential processing was manipulated by a preceding self-referential pronoun, an other-referential pronoun, or no referential context. Subsequently, patients and participants completed a free recall and recognition task. BPD patients judged positive and neutral words as more negative than healthy control participants when the words had self-reference or no reference. In BPD patients, these biases were significantly correlated with self-reported attributional style, particularly for negative events, but unrelated to measures of depressive mood. However, BPD patients did not differ from healthy control participants in a subsequent free recall task and a recognition task. Our findings point to a negative evaluation bias for positive, self-referential information in BPD. This bias did not affect the storage of information in memory, but may be related to self-attributions of negative events in everyday life in BPD.

  5. The Influence of Logger Bias on Reported Temperature Trends: Implications for Temperature Monitoring Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, I.; Fryer, R. J.; Bacon, P. J.; Stirling, D.

    2015-12-01

    There has been increasing interest in river temperature monitoring and research in recent years. This has been driven by factors including a greater awareness of the importance of river temperature for freshwater ecology, the potential for detrimental extremes under climate change and the availability of increasingly affordable dataloggers. A number of studies have attempted to collate and analyse pre-existing long-term (decadal) datasets to assess for evidence of temporal trends. These studies require considerable care given the magnitude of temporal trends (often 25 years. The bias of temperature measurements made by different dataloggers (two makes and five models) was determined through cross-calibration against a reference datalogger. Long-term trends in stream temperature metrics (daily mean, max, min) were characterised using Generalised Additive Mixed Models (GAMM). Models were fitted to (1) the raw data and (2) data corrected for logger bias. Significant non-linear temporal trends were observed in the raw data. These trends were accentuated when corrected for logger bias. Given the potential to accentuate or remove long-term trends, it is suggested that robust internal and external calibration and quality control procedures should be established for new temperature networks. Such approaches are capable of removing logger bias and improving accuracy by an order of magnitude over manufacturer stated values.

  6. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kätsyri, Jari; Kinnunen, Teemu; Kusumoto, Kenta; Oittinen, Pirkko; Ravaja, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

  7. Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jari Kätsyri

    Full Text Available Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

  8. Negative magnetization and the tunable exchange bias field in LaCr{sub 0.8}Mn{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bora, Tribedi; Ravi, S., E-mail: sravi@iitg.ernet.in

    2014-05-01

    Manganese substituted Lanthanum chromite LaCr{sub 0.8}Mn{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} exhibits negative magnetization with decrease in temperature under the field cooled (FC) condition for the applied field H≤2000 Oe. The maximum magnetic compensation temperature, (T{sub comp}) was 147 K. A reentrant positive magnetization was observed at T≤50 K due to low temperature transition. The negative magnetization is explained by considering the paramagnetic moment of Mn ions under the influence of negative internal field. Measurement of magnetic hysteresis loops under FC condition shows the presence of exchange bias field at Ttemperature and cooling field. - Highlights: • Substitution of 20 at% of Mn in the Cr site of antiferromagnetic LaCrO{sub 3} leads to an interesting phenomenon of magnetization reversal (negative magnetization) with the maximum magnetic compensation (M=0) temperature, and T{sub comp} =147 K. In addition to that the sample exhibits tunable exchange bias phenomenon at Ttemperature transition at around 50 K along with a reentrant positive magnetization is also observed. • The observed negative magnetization is explained by considering the paramagnetic moment of doped Mn ions under the influence of negative internal field. • The magnitude of exchange bias field is found to increase with decrease in cooling field. The origin of exchange bias field is explained in terms of anisotropic exchange interaction between the canted ferromagnetic component of Cr{sup 3+} ions and the paramagnetic component of Mn{sup 3+} ions under the negative internal field.

  9. The effect of positive and negative memory bias on anxiety and depression symptoms among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Samuel M Y; Cheng, Joseph; Dai, Darren Wai Tong; Tam, Titian; Hui, Otilia

    2018-02-28

    To examine the interaction effect of anxiety and depression on the intentional forgetting of positive and negative valence words. One hundred fifty-five grade 7 to grade 10 students participated in the study. The item-method directed forgetting paradigm was used to examine the intentional forgetting of positive-valence, negative-valence, and neutral-valence words. Negative-valence words were recognized better than either positive-valence or neutral-valence words. The results revealed an anxiety main effect (p = .01, LLCI = -.09, and ULCI = -.01) and a depression main effect (p = .04, LLCI = .00, and ULCI = .24). The anxiety score was negative, whereas the depression score was positively related to the directed forgetting of negative-valence words. Regression-based moderation analysis revealed a significant anxiety × depression interaction effect on the directed forgetting of positive-valence words (p = .02, LLCI = .00, and ULCI = .01). Greater anxiety was associated with more directed forgetting of positive-valance words only among participants with high depression scores. With negative-valence words, the anxiety × depression interaction effect was not significant (p = .15, LLCI = - .00, and ULCI = .01). Therapeutic strategies to increase positive memory bias may reduce anxiety symptoms only among those with high depression scores. Interventions to reduce negative memory bias may reduce anxiety symptoms irrespective of levels of depression. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The association between ruminative thinking and negative interpretation bias in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badra, Marcel; Schulze, Lars; Becker, Eni S; Vrijsen, Janna Nonja; Renneberg, Babette; Zetsche, Ulrike

    2017-09-01

    Cognitive models propose that both, negative interpretations of ambiguous social situations and ruminative thoughts about social events contribute to the maintenance of social anxiety disorder. It has further been postulated that ruminative thoughts fuel biased negative interpretations, however, evidence is rare. The present study used a multi-method approach to assess ruminative processing following a social interaction (post-event processing by self-report questionnaire and social rumination by experience sampling method) and negative interpretation bias (via two separate tasks) in a student sample (n = 51) screened for high (HSA) and low social anxiety (LSA). Results support the hypothesis that group differences in negative interpretations of ambiguous social situations in HSAs vs. LSAs are mediated by higher levels of post-event processing assessed in the questionnaire. Exploratory analyses highlight the potential role of comorbid depressive symptoms. The current findings help to advance the understanding of the association between two cognitive processes involved in social anxiety and stress the importance of ruminative post-event processing.

  11. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We attribute this to charge trapping/detrapping and charge migration within the gate dielectric. We emphasize the fundamental difference between trapping/detrapping events occurring at the semiconductor/dielectric interface and those occurring at gate/dielectric interface, and show that charge migration is essential to explain the first anomaly. We model charge migration in terms of the non-instantaneous polarization density. The second type of anomaly is negative VTH shift under high positive bias stress, with logarithmic evolution in time. This can be argued as electron-donating reactions involving H2O molecules or derived species, with a reaction rate exponentially accelerated by positive gate bias and exponentially decreased by the number of reactions already occurred.

  12. Separation from the dam causes negative judgement bias in dairy calves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolnei R Daros

    Full Text Available Negative emotional states in humans are associated with a negative (pessimistic response bias towards ambiguous cues in judgement tasks. Every mammalian young is eventually weaned; this period of increasing nutritional and social independence from the dam is associated with a pronounced behavioural response, especially when weaning is abrupt as commonly occurs in farm animals. The aim of the current study was to test the effect of separation from the cow on the responses of dairy calves in a judgement task. Thirteen Holstein calves were reared with their dams and trained to discriminate between red and white colours displayed on a computer monitor. These colours predicted reward or punishment outcomes using a go/no-go task. A reward was provided when calves approached the white screen and calves were punished with a timeout when they approached the red screen. Calves were then tested with non-reinforced ambiguous probes (screen colours intermediate to the two training colours. "GO" responses to these probes averaged (± SE 72±3.6% before separation but declined to 62±3.6% after separation from the dam. This bias was similar to that shown by calves experiencing pain in the hours after hot-iron dehorning. These results provide the first evidence of a pessimistic judgement bias in animals following maternal separation and are indicative of low mood.

  13. TECHNOLOGY OF ERECTION OF PRECAST FRAME BUILDINGS AT NEGATIVE TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afanas'ev Aleksandr Alekseevich

    2012-07-01

    The author has also analyzed the technology of grouting of precast structure joints at negative temperatures in the event of pre-heating of structural elements to be connected and the heating of the concrete mix with heating wires. The author has identified the range of rational heating modes for structural joints on the basis of the parameters of negative temperatures.

  14. Urban heat island bias in Italian air temperature series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, M.; Nanni, T. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Bologna (Italy). Ist. di Scienze dell' Atmosfera e dell' Oceano; Mangianti, F. [Ufficio Centrale di Ecologia Agraria, Rome (Italy); Maugeri, M. [Istituto di Fisica Generale Applicata, Milan (Italy)

    2000-08-01

    A new data set of Italian monthly minimum and maximum temperature series for the period 1865-1996 has recently been set up and analysed for trend within the project Reconstruction of the climate of the past in the Mediterranean area of the National research Council (CNR). The project allowed the completion and updating of the 'Ufficio Centrale di Ecologia Agraria' (UCEA) secular series data-set that was set up in the 70's. Although the data were tested for homogeneity and sometimes homogenised, the presence of some urban series may cause urban heat islands to partially affect the observed trends. In this framework the aim of this paper is the analysis of the effects of this possible bias in the period 1951-1996 in regional average series calculated for two different geographic areas: Northern and Central-Southern Italy. The analysis is performed comparing using the UCEA-CNR data-set with the same series calculated using the Italian Air Force data-set that includes only rural and airport stations.

  15. Hostile Attributional Bias, Negative Emotional Responding, and Aggression in Adults: Moderating Effects of Gender and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Coccaro, Emil F.; Jacobson, Kristen C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined the main effects of hostile attributional bias (HAB) and negative emotional responding on a variety of aggressive behaviors in adults, including general aggression, physical aggression, relational aggression, and verbal aggression. Effects of both externalizing (anger) and internalizing (embarrassment/upset) negative emotions were considered. In addition, the moderating roles of gender and impulsivity on the effects of HAB and negative emotional responding were explored. Multilevel models were fitted to data from 2,749 adult twins aged 20–55 from the PennTwins cohort. HAB was positively associated with all four forms of aggression. There was also a significant interaction between impulsivity and HAB for general aggression. Specifically, the relationship between HAB and general aggression was only significant for individuals with average or above-average levels of impulsivity. Negative emotional responding was also found to predict all measures of aggression, although in different ways. Anger was positively associated with all forms of aggression, whereas embarrassment/upset predicted decreased levels of general, physical, and verbal aggression but increased levels of relational aggression. The associations between negative emotional responding and aggression were generally stronger for males than females. The current study provides evidence for the utility of HAB and negative emotional responding as predictors of adult aggression and further suggests that gender and impulsivity may moderate their links with aggression. PMID:24833604

  16. Bias temperature stress induced hydrogen depassivation from Al2O3/InGaAs interface defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kechao; Droopad, Ravi; McIntyre, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the reliability of Al2O3/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor gate stacks by investigating the effect of bias temperature stress on the charge trap density at the Al2O3/InGaAs interface and in the bulk oxide. Under extended negative biasing at 100 °C, the gate stacks display a notable increase in the interface trap density (Dit), but little change in the border trap density. This phenomenon is more prominent for samples exposed to a H2/N2 forming gas anneal (FGA) than for the as-deposited samples. Negative gate bias applied during 100 °C thermal stress negates the FGA-induced passivation of interface states and causes convergence of the Dit of the post-FGA and as-deposited gate stacks with increasing biasing time. This appears to be caused by hydrogen depassivation of interface traps under bias temperature stress, which is further supported by an observed hydrogen isotope effect when comparing the rate of Dit increase after annealing in hydrogenated versus deuterated forming gas. A N2 anneal control experiment also indicates that the stability of the interface trap density of post-FGA Al2O3/InGaAs gate stacks is more strongly influenced by the behavior of hydrogen at the interface than by the thermal treatment effect of the anneal.

  17. Perspective: the negativity bias, medical education, and the culture of academic medicine: why culture change is hard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haizlip, Julie; May, Natalie; Schorling, John; Williams, Anne; Plews-Ogan, Margaret

    2012-09-01

    Despite ongoing efforts to improve working conditions, address well-being of faculty and students, and promote professionalism, many still feel the culture of academic medicine is problematic. Depression and burnout persist among physicians and trainees. The authors propose that culture change is so challenging in part because of an evolutionary construct known as the negativity bias that is reinforced serially in medical education. The negativity bias drives people to attend to and be more greatly affected by the negative aspects of experience. Some common teaching methods such as simulations, pimping, and instruction in clinical reasoning inadvertently reinforce the negativity bias and thereby enhance physicians' focus on the negative. Here, the authors examine the concept of negativity bias in the context of academic medicine, arguing that culture is affected by serially emphasizing the inherent bias to recognize and remember the negative. They explore the potential role of practices rooted in positive psychology as powerful tools to counteract the negativity bias and aid in achieving desired culture change.

  18. Exposure reduces negative bias in self-rated performance in public speaking fearful participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Joyce; Niles, Andrea N; Craske, Michelle G

    2017-03-01

    Individuals with public speaking anxiety (PSA) under-rate their performance compared to objective observers. The present study examined whether exposure reduces the discrepancy between self and observer performance ratings and improved observer-rated performance in individuals with PSA. PSA participants gave a speech in front of a small audience and rated their performance using a questionnaire before and after completing repeated exposures to public speaking. Non-anxious control participants gave a speech and completed the questionnaire one time only. Objective observers watched videos of the speeches and rated performance using the same questionnaire. PSA participants underrated their performance to a greater degree than did controls prior to exposure, but also performed significantly more poorly than did controls when rated objectively. Bias significantly decreased and objective-rated performance significantly increased following completion of exposure in PSA participants, and on one performance measure, anxious participants no longer showed a greater discrepancy between self and observer performance ratings compared to controls. The study employed non-clinical student sample, but the results should be replicated in clinical anxiety samples. These findings indicate that exposure alone significantly reduces negative performance bias among PSA individuals, but additional exposure or additional interventions may be necessary to fully correct bias and performance deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preliminary Validation of a New Measure of Negative Response Bias: The Temporal Memory Sequence Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedish, Omer; Kivilis, Naama; Hoofien, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The Temporal Memory Sequence Test (TMST) is a new measure of negative response bias (NRB) that was developed to enrich the forced-choice paradigm. The TMST does not resemble the common structure of forced-choice tests and is presented as a temporal recall memory test. The validation sample consisted of 81 participants: 21 healthy control participants, 20 coached simulators, and 40 patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). The TMST had high reliability and significantly high positive correlations with the Test of Memory Malingering and Word Memory Test effort scales. Moreover, the TMST effort scales exhibited high negative correlations with the Glasgow Coma Scale, thus validating the previously reported association between probable malingering and mild traumatic brain injury. A suggested cutoff score yielded acceptable classification rates in the ABI group as well as in the simulator and control groups. The TMST appears to be a promising measure of NRB detection, with respectable rates of reliability and construct and criterion validity.

  20. Temperature Dependence of Faraday Effect-Induced Bias Error in a Fiber Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuyou; Liu, Pan; Guang, Xingxing; Xu, Zhenlong; Guan, Lianwu; Li, Guangchun

    2017-09-07

    Improving the performance of interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG) in harsh environments, such as magnetic field and temperature field variation, is necessary for its practical applications. This paper presents an investigation of Faraday effect-induced bias error of IFOG under varying temperature. Jones matrix method is utilized to formulize the temperature dependence of Faraday effect-induced bias error. Theoretical results show that the Faraday effect-induced bias error changes with the temperature in the non-skeleton polarization maintaining (PM) fiber coil. This phenomenon is caused by the temperature dependence of linear birefringence and Verdet constant of PM fiber. Particularly, Faraday effect-induced bias errors of two polarizations always have opposite signs that can be compensated optically regardless of the changes of the temperature. Two experiments with a 1000 m non-skeleton PM fiber coil are performed, and the experimental results support these theoretical predictions. This study is promising for improving the bias stability of IFOG.

  1. Effect of negative bias on TiAlSiN coating deposited on nitrided Zircaloy-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Zhou; Zhendong, Feng; Xiangfang, Fan; Yanhong, Liu; Huanlin, Li

    2018-01-01

    TiAlSiN coatings were deposited on the nitrided Zircaloy-4 by multi-arc ion plating at -100 V, -200 V and -300 V. In this study, the high temperature oxidation behavior of coatings was tested by a box-type resistance furnace in air for 3 h at 800 °C; the macro-morphology of coatings was observed and analyzed by a zoom-stereo microscope; the micro-morphology of coatings was analyzed by a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the chemical elements of samples were analyzed by an energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS); the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate was measured by an automatic scratch tester; and the phases of coatings were analyzed by an X-ray diffractometer(XRD). Results show that the coating deposited at -100 V shows better high temperature oxidation resistance behavior, at the same time, Al elements contained in the coating is of the highest amount, meanwhile, the adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate is the highest, which is 33N. As the bias increases, high temperature oxidation resistance behavior of the coating weakens first and then increases, the amount of large particles on the surface of the coating increases first and then decreases whereas the density of the coating decreases first and then increases, and adhesion strength of the coating to the substrate increases first and then weakens. The coating's quality is relatively poor when the bias is -200 V.

  2. First-impression bias effects on mismatch negativity to auditory spatial deviants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Kaitlin; Provost, Alexander; Todd, Juanita

    2018-04-01

    Internal models of regularities in the world serve to facilitate perception as redundant input can be predicted and neural resources conserved for that which is new or unexpected. In the auditory system, this is reflected in an evoked potential component known as mismatch negativity (MMN). MMN is elicited by the violation of an established regularity to signal the inaccuracy of the current model and direct resources to the unexpected event. Prevailing accounts suggest that MMN amplitude will increase with stability in regularity; however, observations of first-impression bias contradict stability effects. If tones rotate probabilities as a rare deviant (p = .125) and common standard (p = .875), MMN elicited to the initial deviant tone reaches maximal amplitude faster than MMN to the first standard when later encountered as deviant-a differential pattern that persists throughout rotations. Sensory inference is therefore biased by longer-term contextual information beyond local probability statistics. Using the same multicontext sequence structure, we examined whether this bias generalizes to MMN elicited by spatial sound cues using monaural sounds (n = 19, right first deviant and n = 22, left first deviant) and binaural sounds (n = 19, right first deviant). The characteristic differential modulation of MMN to the two tones was observed in two of three groups, providing partial support for the generalization of first-impression bias to spatially deviant sounds. We discuss possible explanations for its absence when the initial deviant was delivered monaurally to the right ear. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  3. Measurement research on magnetic properties of electrical sheet steel under different temperature, harmonic and dc bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezhi Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The iron core of large power transformer is mainly composed of electrical sheet steel, which is easily affected by temperature, harmonic, and DC bias. Therefore, it is necessary to measure the magnetic properties of electrical sheet steel under different temperature, harmonic and DC Bias. This paper presents the experiment measurement system for the 30ZH120 electrical steel sheet. The B-H magnetization curve, permeability, and loss curve under different temperature, different harmonic, and different DC bias are given, respectively. The simulation of transformer is carried out by using measuring result under DC bias. The presented research provides a reference for optimizing the design of power transformer.

  4. Annealing temperature dependence of exchange bias in BiFeO3/CoFe bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T.; Naganuma, H.; Wang, W. X.; Ando, Y.; Han, X. F.

    2012-04-01

    BiFeO3/CoFe bilayers with different BiFeO3 (BFO) crystalities were fabricated by chemical solution deposition and sputtering method. Exchange bias has been successfully induced in these bilayers by post-annealing. The annealing temperature dependence of exchange bias as well as coercivity was investigated. Two kinds of annealing temperature dependence behaviors were observed. It is found that, similar to the conventional antiferromagnet/ferromagnet system, the temperature dependence of exchange bias is dominated by direct interface coupling, and the crystality of BFO has no profound effect on exchange bias.

  5. Implications of the negative capacitance observed at forward bias in nanocomposite and polycrystalline solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Seró, Ivan; Bisquert, Juan; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Zoppi, Guillaume; Durose, Ken; Proskuryakov, Yuri; Oja, Ilona; Belaidi, Abdelhak; Dittrich, Thomas; Tena-Zaera, Ramón; Katty, Abou; Lévy-Clément, Claude; Barrioz, Vincent; Irvine, Stuart J C

    2006-04-01

    Four different types of solar cells prepared in different laboratories have been characterized by impedance spectroscopy (IS): thin-film CdS/CdTe devices, an extremely thin absorber (eta) solar cell made with microporous TiO2/In(OH)xSy/PbS/PEDOT, an eta-solar cell of nanowire ZnO/CdSe/CuSCN, and a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) with Spiro-OMeTAD as the transparent hole conductor. A negative capacitance behavior has been observed in all of them at high forward bias, independent of material type (organic and inorganic), configuration, and geometry of the cells studied. The experiments suggest a universality of the underlying phenomenon giving rise to this effect in a broad range of solar cell devices. An equivalent circuit model is suggested to explain the impedance and capacitance spectra, with an inductive recombination pathway that is activated at forward bias. The deleterious effect of negative capacitance on the device performance is discussed, by comparison of the results obtained for a conventional monocrystalline Si solar cell showing the positive chemical capacitance expected in the ideal IS model of a solar cell.

  6. Silicon photomultiplier's gain stabilization by bias correction for compensation of the temperature fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorosz, P.; Baszczyk, M.; Glab, S.; Kucewicz, W.; Mik, L.; Sapor, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gain of the silicon photomultiplier is strongly dependent on the value of bias voltage and temperature. This paper proposes a method for gain stabilization just by compensation of temperature fluctuations by bias correction. It has been confirmed that this approach gives good results and the gain can be kept very stable

  7. Mindfulness Trait Predicts Neurophysiological Reactivity Associated with Negativity Bias: An ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerissa S. P. Ho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the relationship of mindfulness trait with the early and late stages of affective processing, by examining the two corresponding ERP components, P2 and LPP, collected from twenty-two male Chinese participants with a wide range of meditation experiences. Multiple regression analyses was performed on the mindfulness scores, as measured by CAMS-R, with the subjective affective ratings and ERP data collected during an emotion processing task. The results showed that increased mindfulness scores predicted increased valence ratings of negative stimuli (less negative, as well as increased P2 amplitudes at the frontocentral location for positive compared to negative stimuli. Based on these findings, a plausible mechanism of mindfulness in reducing negativity bias was discussed. Moreover, our results replicated previous findings on the age-related increase of P2 amplitudes at the frontal sites for positive compared to neutral stimuli. Since the locations at which P2 amplitudes were found as associated with age and mindfulness differed, as did the emotional contents of the stimuli being compared, indicating that the effect of age did not confound our findings on mindfulness and the two factors might operate on early affective processing from distinct sources and mechanisms.

  8. Experimental observation of negative capacitance in ferroelectrics at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Daniel J R; Ponon, Nikhil K; Kwa, Kelvin S K; Zou, Bin; Petrov, Peter K; Wang, Tianle; Alford, Neil M; O'Neill, Anthony

    2014-07-09

    Effective negative capacitance has been postulated in ferroelectrics because there is a hysteresis in plots of polarization-electric field. Compelling experimental evidence of effective negative capacitance is presented here at room temperature in engineered devices, where it is stabilized by the presence of a paraelectric material. In future integrated circuits, the incorporation of such negative capacitance into MOSFET gate stacks would reduce the subthreshold slope, enabling low power operation and reduced self-heating.

  9. Treatment with escitalopram improves the attentional bias toward negative facial expressions in patients with major depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenhe; Cao, Suxia; Li, Hengfen; Li, Youhui

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesized that treatment with escitalopram would improve cognitive bias and contribute to the recovery process for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Many previous studies have established that patients with MDD tend to pay selective attention to negative stimuli. The assessment of the level of cognitive bias is regarded as a crucial dimension of treatment outcomes for MDD. To our knowledge, no prior studies have been reported on the effects of treatment with escitalopram on attentional bias in MDD, employing a dot probe task of facial expression. We studied 25 patients with MDD and 25 controls, and used a dot probe task of facial expression to measure cognitive bias. The patients' psychopathologies were rated using the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment with escitalopram. All participants performed the facial expression dot probe task. The results revealed that the 8 week escitalopram treatment decreased the HAMD scores. The patients with MDD at baseline exhibited an attentional bias towards negative faces, however, no significant bias toward either negative or happy faces were observed in the controls. After the 8 week escitalopram treatment, no significant bias toward negative faces was observed in the patient group. In conclusion, patients with MDD pay more attention to negative facial expressions, and treatment with escitalopram improves this attentional bias toward negative facial expressions. This is the first study, to our knowledge, on the effects of treatment with escitalopram on attentional bias in patients with MDD that has employed a dot probe task of facial expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effort, reward and self-reported mental health: a simulation study on negative affectivity bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wild Pascal

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present article, we propose an alternative method for dealing with negative affectivity (NA biases in research, while investigating the association between a deleterious psychosocial environment at work and poor mental health. First, we investigated how strong NA must be to cause an observed correlation between the independent and dependent variables. Second, we subjectively assessed whether NA can have a large enough impact on a large enough number of subjects to invalidate the observed correlations between dependent and independent variables. Methods We simulated 10,000 populations of 300 subjects each, using the marginal distribution of workers in an actual population that had answered the Siegrist's questionnaire on effort and reward imbalance (ERI and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. Results The results of the present study suggested that simulated NA has a minimal effect on the mean scores for effort and reward. However, the correlations between the effort and reward imbalance (ERI ratio and the GHQ score might be important, even in simulated populations with a limited NA. Conclusions When investigating the relationship between the ERI ratio and the GHQ score, we suggest the following rules for the interpretation of the results: correlations with an explained variance of 5% and below should be considered with caution; correlations with an explained variance between 5% and 10% may result from NA, although this effect does not seem likely; and correlations with an explained variance of 10% and above are not likely to be the result of NA biases.

  11. Effort, reward and self-reported mental health: a simulation study on negative affectivity bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In the present article, we propose an alternative method for dealing with negative affectivity (NA) biases in research, while investigating the association between a deleterious psychosocial environment at work and poor mental health. First, we investigated how strong NA must be to cause an observed correlation between the independent and dependent variables. Second, we subjectively assessed whether NA can have a large enough impact on a large enough number of subjects to invalidate the observed correlations between dependent and independent variables. Methods We simulated 10,000 populations of 300 subjects each, using the marginal distribution of workers in an actual population that had answered the Siegrist's questionnaire on effort and reward imbalance (ERI) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ). Results The results of the present study suggested that simulated NA has a minimal effect on the mean scores for effort and reward. However, the correlations between the effort and reward imbalance (ERI) ratio and the GHQ score might be important, even in simulated populations with a limited NA. Conclusions When investigating the relationship between the ERI ratio and the GHQ score, we suggest the following rules for the interpretation of the results: correlations with an explained variance of 5% and below should be considered with caution; correlations with an explained variance between 5% and 10% may result from NA, although this effect does not seem likely; and correlations with an explained variance of 10% and above are not likely to be the result of NA biases. PMID:21864350

  12. Negative attention bias and processing deficits during the cognitive reappraisal of unpleasant emotions in HIV+ women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Roger C; Tartar, Jaime L; Widmayer, Susan; Rosselli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in emotional processing may be attributed to HIV disease or comorbid psychiatric disorders. Electrocortical markers of emotional attention, i.e., amplitude of the P2 and late positive potential (LPP), were compared between 26 HIV+ women and 25 healthy controls during an emotional regulation paradigm. HIV+ women showed early attention bias to negative stimuli indexed by greater P2 amplitude. In contrast, compared with the passive viewing of unpleasant images, HIV+ women demonstrated attenuation of the early and late LPP during positive reappraisal. This interaction remained significant after adjusting for individual differences in apathy, anxiety, and depression. Post hoc analyses implicated time since HIV diagnosis with LPP attenuation during positive reappraisal. Advancing HIV disease may disrupt neural generators associated with the cognitive reappraisal of emotions independent of psychiatric function.

  13. Effects of perceived school well-being and negative emotionality on students' attentional bias for academic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrimin, Sara; Moscardino, Ughetta; Altoè, Gianmarco; Mason, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    Previous research indicates that children can display different attention allocation patterns in response to threat. However, data are lacking on the possible existence of an attentional bias in response to academic stressors, and whether variables related to school well-being (SWB) and students' individual characteristics may influence such attentional patterns. We aimed to investigate whether students show an attentional bias for school-related stressors. We sought to identify groups of students who differ in their perceived SWB, and to test whether they display different attention allocation patterns. We also examined whether negative emotionality moderates the expected association between students' SWB and attentional bias. Eighth-grade students completed a dot-probe detection task to register attentional patterns towards or away from an academic threatening word. SWB in terms of school anxiety, school-based stress, and perceived class climate was also assessed via self-reports. In addition, participants reported on their negative emotionality. The results indicated that students showed an attentional bias towards words describing academic stressors. Cluster analyses allowed the identification of two groups of students with high versus low SWB. Regression analysis indicated that those with low SWB were more likely to show a greater bias and that negative emotionality moderated this relationship. Specifically, within the context of low SWB, students with high negative emotionality were more prone to biased attention towards school-related stressors compared with students with low negative emotionality. The present data indicate a perceptual bias for the detection of academic threats. Within the school practice, teachers should promote SWB and devote specific attention to students with high negative emotionality to reduce a biased allocation of attention in response to school-related stressors. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  14. Multiple-Point Temperature Gradient Algorithm for Ring Laser Gyroscope Bias Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To further improve ring laser gyroscope (RLG bias stability, a multiple-point temperature gradient algorithm is proposed for RLG bias compensation in this paper. Based on the multiple-point temperature measurement system, a complete thermo-image of the RLG block is developed. Combined with the multiple-point temperature gradients between different points of the RLG block, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to tune the support vector machine (SVM parameters, and an optimized design for selecting the thermometer locations is also discussed. The experimental results validate the superiority of the introduced method and enhance the precision and generalizability in the RLG bias compensation model.

  15. Extracting Response Style Bias From Measures of Positive and Negative Affect in Aging Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stefan

    2017-12-15

    This study investigated the role of response style biases in the assessment of positive and negative affect in aging research; it addressed whether response styles (a) are associated with age-related changes in cognitive abilities, (b) lead to distorted conclusions about age differences in affect, and (c) reduce the convergent and predictive validity of affect measures in relation to health outcomes. A multidimensional item response theory model was used to extract response styles from affect ratings provided by respondents to the psychosocial questionnaire (n = 6,295; aged 50-100 years) in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). The likelihood of extreme response styles (disproportionate use of "not at all" and "very much" response categories) increased significantly with age, and this effect was mediated by age-related decreases in HRS cognitive test scores. Removing response styles from affect measures did not alter age patterns in positive and negative affect; however, it consistently enhanced the convergent validity (relationships with concurrent depression and mental health problems) and predictive validity (prospective relationships with hospital visits, physical illness onset) of the affect measures. The results support the importance of detecting and controlling response styles when studying self-reported affect in aging research. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Is applicable thermodynamics of negative temperature for living organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2017-11-01

    During organismal development the moment of sexual maturity can be characterizes by nearly maximum basal metabolic rate and body mass. Once the living organism reaches extreme values of the mass and the basal metabolic rate, it reaches near equilibrium thermodynamic steady state physiological level with maximum organismal complexity. Such thermodynamic systems that reach equilibrium steady state level at maximum mass-energy characteristics can be regarded from the prospective of thermodynamics of negative temperature. In these systems the increase of the internal and free energy is accompanied with decrease of the entropy. In our study we show the possibility the living organisms to regard as thermodynamic system with negative temperature

  17. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... on Si (100) substrate. Deposition at higher substrate temperature causes the film to react with Si forming silicides at the film/Si substrate interface. Ti film undergoes a microstructural transition from hexagonal plate-like to round-shaped grains as the substrate temperature was raised from 300 to 50 °C during film deposition ...

  18. Skin Temperature Analysis and Bias Correction in a Coupled Land-Atmosphere Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Radakovich, Jon D.; daSilva, Arlindo; Todling, Ricardo; Verter, Frances

    2006-01-01

    In an initial investigation, remotely sensed surface temperature is assimilated into a coupled atmosphere/land global data assimilation system, with explicit accounting for biases in the model state. In this scheme, an incremental bias correction term is introduced in the model's surface energy budget. In its simplest form, the algorithm estimates and corrects a constant time mean bias for each gridpoint; additional benefits are attained with a refined version of the algorithm which allows for a correction of the mean diurnal cycle. The method is validated against the assimilated observations, as well as independent near-surface air temperature observations. In many regions, not accounting for the diurnal cycle of bias caused degradation of the diurnal amplitude of background model air temperature. Energy fluxes collected through the Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) are used to more closely inspect the surface energy budget. In general, sensible heat flux is improved with the surface temperature assimilation, and two stations show a reduction of bias by as much as 30 Wm(sup -2) Rondonia station in Amazonia, the Bowen ratio changes direction in an improvement related to the temperature assimilation. However, at many stations the monthly latent heat flux bias is slightly increased. These results show the impact of univariate assimilation of surface temperature observations on the surface energy budget, and suggest the need for multivariate land data assimilation. The results also show the need for independent validation data, especially flux stations in varied climate regimes.

  19. Poor sleep quality is associated with a negative cognitive bias and decreased sustained attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobin, Christina M; Banks, Jonathan B; Fins, Ana I; Tartar, Jaime L

    2015-10-01

    Poor sleep quality has been demonstrated to diminish cognitive performance, impair psychosocial functioning and alter the perception of stress. At present, however, there is little understanding of how sleep quality affects emotion processing. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent to which sleep quality, measured through the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, influences affective symptoms as well as the interaction between stress and performance on an emotional memory test and sustained attention task. To that end, 154 undergraduate students (mean age: 21.27 years, standard deviation = 4.03) completed a series of measures, including the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, the Sustained Attention to Response Task, an emotion picture recognition task and affective symptom questionnaires following either a control or physical stress manipulation, the cold pressor test. As sleep quality and psychosocial functioning differ among chronotypes, we also included chronotype and time of day as variables of interest to ensure that the effects of sleep quality on the emotional and non-emotional tasks were not attributed to these related factors. We found that poor sleep quality is related to greater depressive symptoms, anxiety and mood disturbances. While an overall relationship between global Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index score and emotion and attention measures was not supported, poor sleep quality, as an independent component, was associated with better memory for negative stimuli and a deficit in sustained attention to non-emotional stimuli. Importantly, these effects were not sensitive to stress, chronotype or time of day. Combined, these results suggest that individuals with poor sleep quality show an increase in affective symptomatology as well as a negative cognitive bias with a concomitant decrease in sustained attention to non-emotional stimuli. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. On bias of kinetic temperature measurements in complex plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, M.; Moseev, D.; Salewski, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic temperature in complex plasmas is often measured using particle tracking velocimetry. Here, we introduce a criterion which minimizes the probability of faulty tracking of particles with normally distributed random displacements in consecutive frames. Faulty particle tracking results i...

  1. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Bias HAST System Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Kent B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Furrer, III, Clint T [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandoval, Paul Anthony [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garrett, Stephen E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pfeifer, Nathaniel Bryant [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    High-reliability components for high-consequence systems require detailed testing of operation after having undergone highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) under unusual conditions of high-temperature and humidity. This paper describes the design and operation of a system called "Wormwood" that is a highly multiplexed temperature measurement system that is designed to operate under HAST conditions to allow measurement of the temperature as a function of time and position in a HAST chamber. HAST chambers have single-point temperature measurements that can be traceable to NIST standards. The objective of these "Wormwood" measurements is to verify the uniformity and stability of the remaining volume of the HAST chamber with respect to the single traceable standard.

  2. Negative Bias in the Perception and Memory of Emotional Information in Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Gomez-Gallego; Juan, Gomez-Garcia

    2017-05-01

    There is some controversy about the ability of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) to experience and remember emotional stimuli. This study aims to assess the emotional experience of patients with AD and the existence of emotional enhancement of memory. We also investigated the influence of affective state on these processes. Sixty pictures from the International Affective Picture System were administered to 106 participants (72 patients with AD and 54 controls). Participants performed immediate free recall and recognition tasks. Positive and Negative Affect Schedule was used to assess the participants' current affect. Patients identified the valence of unpleasant pictures better than of others pictures and experienced them as more arousing. Patients and controls recalled and recognized higher number of emotional pictures than of neutral ones. Patients discriminated better the unpleasant pictures. A mood congruent effect was observed on emotional experience but not on memory. Positive affect was associated with better immediate recall and with a more liberal response bias. Patients with AD can identify the emotional content of the stimuli, especially of the unpleasant ones, and the emotional enhancement of memory is preserved. Affective state does not explain the differences in the processing and memory of emotional items between patients and controls.

  3. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.W.; Nathan, A.; Barquinha, P.; Pereira, L.; Fortunato, E.; Martins, R.; Cobb, B.

    2016-01-01

    Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH) in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We

  4. Making Astrology Scientific with Negative Absolute Temperature and Holography

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, Rodney

    2016-01-01

    This article was written after reading Astronomy magazine's column "Strange Universe" by Bob Berman. Toeing the traditional line of his fellow astronomers, he claims astrology is just a bit of fun, and that it has no scientific support. If we only focus on today's science, he's spot on - it has no support. But I refer to some science involving holograms and negative absolute temperatures to show that astrology would have scientific support in a new science based on cosmic unification, it w...

  5. Temperature effects in exchange-biased planar Hall sensors for bioapplications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Dalslet, Bjarke Thomas; Freitas, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of exchange biased planar Hall effect sensors is investigated between T = −10 and 70 °C. It is shown that a single domain model describes the system well and that the temperature coefficient of the low-field sensitivity at T = 25 °C is 0.32%/°C. A procedure for temperat...

  6. Negativity bias and instability in spontaneous and deliberate evaluations of others: The role of borderline personality features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier Mongeon, Félix; Gagnon, Jean

    2017-10-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that borderline personality (BP) features are characterized by a negativity bias and instability in spontaneous and deliberate evaluations of others. Undergraduate women (N = 204) watched two movie clips depicting either positive or negative conjugal interactions. Spontaneous and deliberate evaluations of the male character were assessed after each clip with an Evaluative Priming Task and a self-report measure, respectively. Participants with high BP features showed unstable spontaneous evaluations. Results revealed a non-significant trend toward more negative spontaneous evaluations after the negative clip and less positive and more negative deliberate evaluations after watching the positive clip first relative to participants with low BP features. These results provide preliminary evidence that impression formation in borderline personality may be characterized by negative and unstable evaluations that are shaped at least in part at earlier processing stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Systematic Bias of Ingestible Core Temperature Sensors Requires a Correction by Linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Hunt

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate measure of core body temperature is critical for monitoring individuals, groups and teams undertaking physical activity in situations of high heat stress or prolonged cold exposure. This study examined the range in systematic bias of ingestible temperature sensors compared to a certified and traceable reference thermometer. A total of 119 ingestible temperature sensors were immersed in a circulated water bath at five water temperatures (TEMP A: 35.12 ± 0.60°C, TEMP B: 37.33 ± 0.56°C, TEMP C: 39.48 ± 0.73°C, TEMP D: 41.58 ± 0.97°C, and TEMP E: 43.47 ± 1.07°C along with a certified traceable reference thermometer. Thirteen sensors (10.9% demonstrated a systematic bias > ±0.1°C, of which 4 (3.3% were > ± 0.5°C. Limits of agreement (95% indicated that systematic bias would likely fall in the range of −0.14 to 0.26°C, highlighting that it is possible for temperatures measured between sensors to differ by more than 0.4°C. The proportion of sensors with systematic bias > ±0.1°C (10.9% confirms that ingestible temperature sensors require correction to ensure their accuracy. An individualized linear correction achieved a mean systematic bias of 0.00°C, and limits of agreement (95% to 0.00–0.00°C, with 100% of sensors achieving ±0.1°C accuracy. Alternatively, a generalized linear function (Corrected Temperature (°C = 1.00375 × Sensor Temperature (°C − 0.205549, produced as the average slope and intercept of a sub-set of 51 sensors and excluding sensors with accuracy outside ±0.5°C, reduced the systematic bias to < ±0.1°C in 98.4% of the remaining sensors (n = 64. In conclusion, these data show that using an uncalibrated ingestible temperature sensor may provide inaccurate data that still appears to be statistically, physiologically, and clinically meaningful. Correction of sensor temperature to a reference thermometer by linear function eliminates this systematic bias (individualized functions or ensures

  8. Magnetic properties of Co-N films deposited by ECR nitrogen/argon plasma with DC negative-biased Co target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Zhang, Y.C.; Yang, K.; Liu, H.X.; Zhu, X.D., E-mail: xdzhu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhou, H.Y.

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • A new method of synthesizing Co-N films containing Co{sub 4}N phase. • Tunable magnetic properties achieved in ECR plasma CVD. • The change of magnetic properties is related to atoms mobility on substrate and the concentration of active species in plasma vapor. - Abstract: By introducing DC negative-biased Co target in the Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) nitrogen/argon plasma, the Co-N films containing Co{sub 4}N phase were synthesized on Si(100) substrate. Effects of processing parameters on magnetic properties of the films are investigated. It is found that magnetic properties of Co-N films vary with N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio, substrate temperature, and target biasing voltage. The saturation magnetization M{sub s} decreased by increasing the N{sub 2}/Ar gas flow ratio or decreasing target biasing voltage, while the coercive field H{sub c} increased, which is ascribed to the variation of relative concentration for N or Co active species in plasma vapor. The magnetic properties present complex dependency with growth temperature, which is related to the atom mobility on the substrate affected by the growth temperature. This study exhibits a potential of ECR plasma chemical vapor deposition to synthesize the interstitial compounds and tune magnetic properties of films.

  9. What happened to Popperian falsification? Publishing neutral and negative findings : Moving away from biased publication practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Witteloostuijn, Arjen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – Current publication practices in the scholarly (International) Business and Management community are overwhelmingly anti-Popperian, which fundamentally frustrates the production of scientific progress. This is the result of at least five related biases: the verification, novelty, normal

  10. Men's hostile sexism and biased perceptions of intimate partners: fostering dissatisfaction and negative behavior in close relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Matthew D; Overall, Nickola C

    2013-12-01

    Hostile sexism (HS) expresses attitudes that characterize women who challenge men's power as manipulative and subversive. Does endorsing HS negatively bias perceptions of women's behavior and, in turn, create animosity within intimate relationships? Committed heterosexual couples reported on their own behavior and perceptions of their partner's behavior five times across a year (Study 1) and daily for 3 weeks (Study 2). Men who more strongly endorsed HS perceived their partner's behavior as more negative than was justified by their partner's reports. Furthermore, more negative perceptions of the partner's behavior mediated the links between men's HS and feeling more manipulated by their partners, behaving more negatively toward their partners, and lower relationship quality. This indicates that men who endorse HS behave more negatively toward intimate partners and experience lower relationship satisfaction because their antagonistic attitudes toward women in general permeate the way they perceive those partners.

  11. Bias to CMB lensing reconstruction from temperature anisotropies due to large-scale galaxy motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Simone; Hill, J. Colin

    2018-01-01

    Gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is expected to be amongst the most powerful cosmological tools for ongoing and upcoming CMB experiments. In this work, we investigate a bias to CMB lensing reconstruction from temperature anisotropies due to the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect, that is, the Doppler shift of CMB photons induced by Compton scattering off moving electrons. The kSZ signal yields biases due to both its own intrinsic non-Gaussianity and its nonzero cross-correlation with the CMB lensing field (and other fields that trace the large-scale structure). This kSZ-induced bias affects both the CMB lensing autopower spectrum and its cross-correlation with low-redshift tracers. Furthermore, it cannot be removed by multifrequency foreground separation techniques because the kSZ effect preserves the blackbody spectrum of the CMB. While statistically negligible for current data sets, we show that it will be important for upcoming surveys, and failure to account for it can lead to large biases in constraints on neutrino masses or the properties of dark energy. For a stage 4 CMB experiment, the bias can be as large as ≈15 % or 12% in cross-correlation with LSST galaxy lensing convergence or galaxy overdensity maps, respectively, when the maximum temperature multipole used in the reconstruction is ℓmax=4000 , and about half of that when ℓmax=3000 . Similarly, we find that the CMB lensing autopower spectrum can be biased by up to several percent. These biases are many times larger than the expected statistical errors. We validate our analytical predictions with cosmological simulations and present the first complete estimate of secondary-induced CMB lensing biases. The predicted bias is sensitive to the small-scale gas distribution, which is affected by pressure and feedback mechanisms, thus making removal via "bias-hardened" estimators challenging. Reducing ℓmax can significantly mitigate the bias at the cost of a decrease

  12. On the determination of biases in satellite-derived temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Praful P.; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Schmidlin, Francis J.; Gordley, Larry L.; Burton, John C.

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons are presented between Nimbus 7 LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) mapped temperatures and both Datasonde and sphere in situ rocketsonde temperature measurements. With this approach up to 666 LIMS/Datasonde pairs were obtained for various pressure levels to look for small biases in LIMS temperatures as a function of altitude, latitude and season. Between 10-1 hPa LIMS and Datasonde agree everywhere to better than +/- 2 K with the exception of a warm bias of about 3 K at 2 hPa at high latitudes. However, LIMS is colder than the Datasonde by about 4 K at 0.4 hPa and by about 8-10 K at 0.1 hPa. When compared with the more accurate sphere temperatures the bias at 0.1 hPa is reduced by nearly one-half. These results indicate that the LIMS zonal mean constituent profiles are nearly free of temperature bias, except perhaps at 0.1 hPa.

  13. Conductance distributions of one-dimensional disordered wires at finite temperature and bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foieri, Federico; Sánchez, María José; Arrachea, Liliana; Gopar, Victor A.

    2006-10-01

    We calculate the distribution of the conductance G in a one-dimensional disordered wire at finite temperature T and bias voltage V in an independent-electron picture and assuming full coherent transport. At high enough temperature and bias voltage, where several resonances of the system contribute to the conductance, the distribution P(G(T,V)) can be represented with good accuracy by autoconvolutions of the distribution of the conductance at zero temperature and zero bias voltage. The number of convolutions depends on T and V . In the regime of very low T and V , where only one resonance is relevant to G(T,V) , the conductance distribution is analyzed by a resonant tunneling conductance model. Strong effects of finite T and V on the conductance distribution are observed and well described by our theoretical analysis, as we verify by performing a number of numerical simulations of a one-dimensional disordered wire at different temperatures, voltages, and lengths of the wire. Analytical estimates for the first moments of P(G(T,V)) at high temperature and bias voltage are also provided.

  14. Stuck in the past: negative bias, explanatory style, temporal order, and evaluative perspectives in life narratives of clinically depressed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermas, Tilmann; Ott, Lisa-M; Schubert, Merve; Schneider, Beatrix; Pate, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This study attempted to replicate negative bias and depressive explanatory style in depression using life narratives. The two central aspects of narrative, temporal succession and evaluation, were also explored. These aspects were tested for the first time using entire life narratives of 17 depressed inpatients and non-depressed controls matched for sex and educational level. Negative bias and depressive explanatory style were replicated as typical for the depressed group. Life narratives of depressed patients also deviated more from a linear temporal order and compared less frequently the past with the present. Contrary to expectations, the depressed did not differ in the overall frequency of evaluations. However, they used more past than present evaluations and more experience-near evaluations than cognitive evaluations, suggesting that they are more immersed in past experiences. It is concluded that negative bias and depressive explanatory style can be found also in a naturalistic narrative measure, and that depression affects the two major aspects of narrative. It is argued that life narratives, as measures close to everyday clinical practice and as the most encompassing form of self-representation, should complement more experimental procedures in the study of cognitive and communicative processes in psychopathology. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The origin of anomalous peak and negative capacitance in the forward bias capacitance-voltage characteristics of Au/PVA/n-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altındal, Şemsettin; Uslu, Habibe

    2011-04-01

    The frequency dependence of capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/ω-V) characteristics of the Au/polyvinyl alcohol (Ni, Zn-doped)/n-Si Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) was investigated in the frequency range of 3 kHz-3 MHz at room temperature by considering series resistance (Rs) and interface states (Nss) effects. The C-V and G/ω-V characteristics confirm that the Rs and Nss are important parameters that strongly influence the electrical parameters of SBDs. The C-V plots show an intersection point (˜2.9 V) at low frequencies (f ≤ 30 kHz) and then take negative values, which is known as negative capacitance (NC) behavior. The negativity of the C increases with the decreasing frequency in the forward bias voltage region, and this decrement in the NC corresponds to the increment in the conductance. Also, the forward bias C-V plots show an anomalous peak in the voltage range of 1.55-1.9 V depending on the frequency such that the anomalous peaks shift toward positive voltage values with the increasing frequency. The effect of Rs on the C is found appreciable at high frequencies. In addition, the values of Nss and Rs are found to decrease with the increasing frequency.

  16. Relaxation to Negative Temperatures in Double Domain Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Yusuke; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2018-02-01

    The engineering of quantum systems and their environments has led to our ability now to design composite or complex systems with the properties one desires. In fact, this allows us to couple two or more distinct systems to the same environment where potentially unusual behavior and dynamics can be exhibited. In this Letter we investigate the relaxation of two giant spins or collective spin ensembles individually coupled to the same reservoir. We find that, depending on the configuration of the two individual spin ensembles, the steady state of the composite system does not necessarily reach the ground state of the individual systems, unlike what one would expect for independent environments. Further, when the size of one individual spin ensemble is much larger than the second, collective relaxation can drive the second system to an excited steady state even when it starts in the ground state; that is, the second spin ensemble relaxes towards a negative-temperature steady state.

  17. Thermophysical Property Estimation by Transient Experiments: The Effect of a Biased Initial Temperature Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Scarpa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of thermophysical properties of materials in dynamic experiments can be conveniently performed by the inverse solution of the associated heat conduction problem (IHCP. The inverse technique demands the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution within the material. As only a limited number of temperature sensors (or no sensor at all are arranged inside the test specimen, the knowledge of the initial temperature distribution is affected by some uncertainty. This uncertainty, together with other possible sources of bias in the experimental procedure, will propagate in the estimation process and the accuracy of the reconstructed thermophysical property values could deteriorate. In this work the effect on the estimated thermophysical properties due to errors in the initial temperature distribution is investigated along with a practical method to quantify this effect. Furthermore, a technique for compensating this kind of bias is proposed. The method consists in including the initial temperature distribution among the unknown functions to be estimated. In this way the effect of the initial bias is removed and the accuracy of the identified thermophysical property values is highly improved.

  18. Monte Carlo Sampling of Negative-temperature Plasma States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Krommes; Sharadini Rath

    2002-07-19

    A Monte Carlo procedure is used to generate N-particle configurations compatible with two-temperature canonical equilibria in two dimensions, with particular attention to nonlinear plasma gyrokinetics. An unusual feature of the problem is the importance of a nontrivial probability density function R0(PHI), the probability of realizing a set {Phi} of Fourier amplitudes associated with an ensemble of uniformly distributed, independent particles. This quantity arises because the equilibrium distribution is specified in terms of {Phi}, whereas the sampling procedure naturally produces particles states gamma; {Phi} and gamma are related via a gyrokinetic Poisson equation, highly nonlinear in its dependence on gamma. Expansion and asymptotic methods are used to calculate R0(PHI) analytically; excellent agreement is found between the large-N asymptotic result and a direct numerical calculation. The algorithm is tested by successfully generating a variety of states of both positive and negative temperature, including ones in which either the longest- or shortest-wavelength modes are excited to relatively very large amplitudes.

  19. Confronting the surface temperature cold bias in AGCMs over the Tibetan Plateau and improving climate simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G. X.; Liu, Y.; Bao, Q.; Chen, X.; Li, J.

    2017-12-01

    One of the mid-term progresses of the NSFC- Key Research Program "Land-air Coupling over the Tibetan Plateau and Its Climate Impact " is presented. The elevated heating in summer and cooling in winter of the Tibetan Plateau significantly regulate the seasonal change of the atmospheric circulation and exert remarkable impacts on world climate. Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of the Phase-5 Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) models underestimate annual and seasonal mean surface air temperatures (Ta) over the Tibetan Plateau (TP). In addition, more than half of the models underestimate annual and seasonal mean surface temperatures (Ts) over the TP. These cold biases are larger over the western TP. By decomposing the Ts bias using the surface energy budget equation, it was demonstrated that this TP's cold bias can be attributed to various factors, in which the stronger bias in surface albedo (a-) and the weaker bias in clear-sky downward Longwave radiation (DLR) play the most significant roles. Since a- and DLR are respectively affected by snow coverage fraction at the ground surface and water vapor content in the atmosphere, these results then imply that the cold bias over the TP is caused by too large snow coverage fraction and too less water vapor content over the TP in the models. The FAMIL AGCM model developed at LASG also suffers from the similar cold bias over the TP. By introducing the 3D- Radiative Transfer Parameterization Over Mountains/Snow (Liou, 2013) into the model, the total solar radiation reaching the ground surface is increased during the daytime, resulting in more snowmelt and less snow coverage. Accordingly, surface albedo is decreased on the sunny side of the mountains, and the surface cold bias over mountain areas is decreased. It is shown that the improvement is sensitive to the model resolution: increased the horizontal resolution of Community Land Model version 4.0 (CLM 4.0) from nearly 200km (1.9o×2.5o) to

  20. How Do Politicians Attribute Bureaucratic Responsibility for Performance? Negativity Bias and Interest Group Advocacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Poul A.; Moynihan, Donald P.

    2017-01-01

    Voters reward or punish politicians by deeming them responsible for positive and negative outcomes, but how, in turn, do politicians attribute responsibility to those who actually deliver public services? Inattention to this question renders incomplete current perspectives on democratic processes...

  1. Comparison of spatial interpolation methods for gridded bias removal in surface temperature forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyedeh Atefeh; Azadi, Majid; Rahmani, Morteza

    2017-08-01

    All numerical weather prediction (NWP) models inherently have substantial biases, especially in the forecast of near-surface weather variables. Statistical methods can be used to remove the systematic error based on historical bias data at observation stations. However, many end users of weather forecasts need bias corrected forecasts at locations that scarcely have any historical bias data. To circumvent this limitation, the bias of surface temperature forecasts on a regular grid covering Iran is removed, by using the information available at observation stations in the vicinity of any given grid point. To this end, the running mean error method is first used to correct the forecasts at observation stations, then four interpolation methods including inverse distance squared weighting with constant lapse rate (IDSW-CLR), Kriging with constant lapse rate (Kriging-CLR), gradient inverse distance squared with linear lapse rate (GIDS-LR), and gradient inverse distance squared with lapse rate determined by classification and regression tree (GIDS-CART), are employed to interpolate the bias corrected forecasts at neighboring observation stations to any given location. The results show that all four interpolation methods used do reduce the model error significantly, but Kriging-CLR has better performance than the other methods. For Kriging-CLR, root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) were decreased by 26% and 29%, respectively, as compared to the raw forecasts. It is found also, that after applying any of the proposed methods, unlike the raw forecasts, the bias corrected forecasts do not show spatial or temporal dependency.

  2. Bias from industry trial funding? A framework, a suggested approach, and a negative result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Jodie; Derry, Sheena; McQuay, Henry J; Moore, R Andrew

    2006-04-01

    Bias from funding sources of trials would threaten their validity. Meta-analyses of high quality acute pain and migraine trials were used to explore the hypothesis that industry funding of clinical trials produced more favourable results than non-profit sponsorship. Analyses were planned to evaluate whether industry-sponsored trials had different results from trials funded by academic or other non-profit sources, but of 176 trials, only two were supported by non-profit sources, while 31 provided no statement of support. An alternative method is proposed within industry-sponsored trials, looking at conflicting industry interests for the same drug, used either as test or comparator treatment. Fifty-three trials used an analgesic as test and 90 as comparator, allowing comparisons to be made for aspirin 600/650 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, paracetamol (acetaminophen) 1000 mg, rofecoxib 50 mg and sumatriptan 50 and 100 mg. Only for sumatriptan 50 and 100 mg, with the outcome of headache response at 2 h, was there any significant difference between the drug used as a test or as a comparator. The direction was for higher (worse) NNTs with sumatriptan as comparator. Investigating potential industry bias through the funding source of trials is unlikely to be adequate because of a dearth of trials funded by non-profit organisations. We propose a method based on potential conflict of interest within industry-sponsored trials. Using this method, established clinical trial results in acute pain and migraine appear to be unbiased.

  3. Comparative study of ITO and TiN fabricated by low-temperature RF biased sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Daniel K., E-mail: daniel.simon@namlab.com; Schenk, Tony; Dirnstorfer, Ingo; Fengler, Franz P. G.; Jordan, Paul M.; Krause, Andreas [NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Tröger, David [Westsächsische Hochschule Zwickau, Fachgruppe Nanotechnologie, Dr.-Friedrichs-Ring 2a, 08056 Zwickau (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [NaMLab gGmbH, Nöthnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden, Germany and TU Dresden, Institut für Halbleiter- und Mikrosystemtechnik (IHM), 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Radio frequency (RF) biasing induced by a second plasma source at the substrate is applied to low-temperature sputtering processes for indium tin oxide (ITO) and titanium nitride (TiN) thin films. Investigations on crystal structure and surface morphology show that RF-biased substrate plasma processes result in a changed growth regime with different grain sizes and orientations than those produced by processes without a substrate bias. The influence of the RF bias is shown comparatively for reactive RF-sputtered ITO and reactive direct-current-sputtered TiN. The ITO layers exhibit an improved electrical resistivity of 0.5 mΩ cm and an optical absorption coefficient of 0.5 × 10{sup 4 }cm{sup −1} without substrate heating. Room-temperature sputtered TiN layers are deposited that possess a resistivity (0.1 mΩ cm) of 3 orders of magnitude lower than, and a density (5.4 g/cm{sup 3}) up to 45% greater than, those obtained from layers grown using the standard process without a substrate plasma.

  4. A PET reconstruction formulation that enforces non-negativity in projection space for bias reduction in Y-90 imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hongki; Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2018-02-01

    Most existing PET image reconstruction methods impose a nonnegativity constraint in the image domain that is natural physically, but can lead to biased reconstructions. This bias is particularly problematic for Y-90 PET because of the low probability positron production and high random coincidence fraction. This paper investigates a new PET reconstruction formulation that enforces nonnegativity of the projections instead of the voxel values. This formulation allows some negative voxel values, thereby potentially reducing bias. Unlike the previously reported NEG-ML approach that modifies the Poisson log-likelihood to allow negative values, the new formulation retains the classical Poisson statistical model. To relax the non-negativity constraint embedded in the standard methods for PET reconstruction, we used an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM). Because choice of ADMM parameters can greatly influence convergence rate, we applied an automatic parameter selection method to improve the convergence speed. We investigated the methods using lung to liver slices of XCAT phantom. We simulated low true coincidence count-rates with high random fractions corresponding to the typical values from patient imaging in Y-90 microsphere radioembolization. We compared our new methods with standard reconstruction algorithms and NEG-ML and a regularized version thereof. Both our new method and NEG-ML allow more accurate quantification in all volumes of interest while yielding lower noise than the standard method. The performance of NEG-ML can degrade when its user-defined parameter is tuned poorly, while the proposed algorithm is robust to any count level without requiring parameter tuning.

  5. Biases of the MET Temperature and Relative Humidity Sensor (HMP45) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrouac, Jenni [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Theisen, Adam [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Quality (DQ) Office was alerted to a potential bias in the surface meteorological instrumentation (MET) temperature when compared with a nearby Mesonet station. This led to an investigation into this problem that was expanded to include many of the other extended facilities (EF) and both the temperature and relative humidity (RH) variables. For this study, the Mesonet was used as the standard reference due to results that showed an increased accuracy in high-humidity environments along with the fact that the Mesonet had previous documented a problem with the HMP45C sensors. Some differences between the sites were taken into account during the analysis: 1. ARM MET sensors were upgraded from an HMP35 to an HMP45 throughout 2007 2. Mesonet switched to aspirated shields in 2009 – To mitigate the differences between aspirated and non-aspirated measurements, data were only analyzed when the wind speed was higher than 3 m/s. This reduced the uncertainty for the non-aspirated measurements from 1.51 ºC to 0.4 ºC. 3. ARM MET is mounted 0.5m higher than the Mesonet station (2.0m versus 1.5m) – This is assumed to have a negligible effect on the differences. 4. Sites were not co-located – For some locations, the distances between sites were as much as 45 km. As part of the investigation into the differences, the Mesonet had reported that the HMP45 sensors had a low-temperature bias in high-humidity environments. This was verified at two different sites where the ARM measurements were compared with the Mesonet measurements. The Mesonet provided redundant temperature measurements from two different sensors at each site. These measurements compared fairly well, while the ARM sensor showed a bias overnight when the humidities were higher. After reviewing the yearly average differences in the data and analyzing the RH data during fog events when we assume it should be

  6. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  7. Looking at the sunny side of life: age-related change in an event-related potential measure of the negativity bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisley, Michael A; Wood, Stacey; Burrows, Christina L

    2007-09-01

    Studies of the negativity bias have demonstrated that negative information has a stronger influence than positive information in a wide range of cognitive domains. At odds with this literature is extensive work now documenting emotional and motivational shifts that result in a positivity effect in older adults. It remains unclear, however, whether this age-related positivity effect results from increases in processing of positive information or from decreases in processing of negative information. Also unknown is the specific time course of development from a negative bias to an apparently positive one. The present study was designed to investigate the negativity bias across the life span using an event-related potential measure of responding to emotionally valenced images. The results suggest that neural reactivity to negative images declines linearly with age, but responding to positive images is surprisingly age invariant across most of the adult life span.

  8. Origin of the improved stability under negative gate-bias illumination stress in various sputtering power fabricated ZnSnO TFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuan-Xin; Li, Jun; Fu, Yi-Zhou; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Jiang, Xue-Yin; Zhang, Zhi-Lin

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we report the influence of ZnSnO channel layer sputtering power in the stability of ZnSnO TFTs under negative gate-bias illumination stress (NBIS). The origin of threshold voltage shift results from combined effect of two factors between the little defect-induced trap densities originated from oxygen vacancies and better channel-insulator interface. The kinetic energy of the ions at a proper rf sputtering power is responsible for less defect-induced trap density and better channel-insulator interface. Therefore, the ZnSnO TFT fabricated at 75 W sputtering power shows a better NBIS stability. In addition, the trap density is extracted by temperature-dependent field-effect measurements and it is consistent with the change of stability under NBIS and thermal stress.

  9. Mitigation of Temperature Induced Single Event Crosstalk Noise by Applying Adaptive Forward Body Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Pankaj

    Soft Errors due to Single Event (SE) Transients is one of the important reliability issues, which is becoming very prominent in advanced technology and in space applications. Increasing coupling effects among interconnects, on the other hand, can cause SE Transients to contaminate electronically unrelated circuit paths, which in turn can increase circuit sensitivity to radiation. Coupling capacitance increases due to reducing distances between interconnect lines making crosstalk noise more important. On the other hand, chips now experience higher temperatures due to environmental factors and high performance of chips. High-performance VLSI circuits consume more power and hence experience higher temperature due to high utilization factor. The increased temperature affects both interconnect resistance and driving strength of interconnect buffers. This work shows that thermal effects increase the amount of crosstalk noise observed on the victim line at nominal supply voltages. With thermally induced crosstalk contribution, total crosstalk noise may exceed the noise margin of the subsequent gate causing a wrong value to be propagated. The crosstalk prevention measures taken such as victim driver sizing may not be sufficient if thermal effects are not properly considered. This work aims to provide a mitigation method for thermally induced crosstalk noise using adaptive forward body bias. At high temperature, drain current reduces, and adaptive body biasing makes the CMOS recover the lost the drain current. A temperature sensor is proposed here to generate a necessary voltage at the CMOS body. A good temperature sensitivity is achieved with the tiny sensors that keep constant driving strength. Interconnect is modeled in using 10-pi modeling and 45nm technology was use for this simulation. Our proposed method mitigates 90% of temperature induced crosstalk contribution.

  10. Effect of temperature and bias voltage on the conductance distribution of 1D-disordered wires with dirty contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foieri, Federico [Departamento de Fisica, Pabellon I, Ciudad Universitaria (1428) Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. E-mail: ffoieri@df.uba.ar; Jose Sanchez, Maria [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (8400) Bariloche (Argentina); Arrachea, Liliana [Instituto de Biocomputacion y Fisica de Sistemas Complejos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Corona de Aragon 42 (50009) Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12 (50009) Zaragoza (Spain); Gopar, Victor [Instituto de Biocomputacion y Fisica de Sistemas Complejos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Corona de Aragon 42 (50009) Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-09-01

    We compute the distribution of the conductance P(G(T,V)) of a one-dimensional (1D) disordered wire non-perfectly coupled to leads (dirty contacts) at finite temperature T and bias voltage V. At regimes of temperatures and/or bias voltages larger than the mean level spacing, we show that the conductance distribution can be accurately represented by a finite number of convolutions of the distribution p(g{sub c}) of the conductance g{sub c} at zero temperature and zero bias voltage.

  11. Effect of temperature and bias voltage on the conductance distribution of 1D-disordered wires with dirty contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foieri, Federico; José Sánchez, María; Arrachea, Liliana; Gopar, Victor

    2007-09-01

    We compute the distribution of the conductance P(G(T,V)) of a one-dimensional (1D) disordered wire non-perfectly coupled to leads (dirty contacts) at finite temperature T and bias voltage V. At regimes of temperatures and/or bias voltages larger than the mean level spacing, we show that the conductance distribution can be accurately represented by a finite number of convolutions of the distribution p(gc) of the conductance gc at zero temperature and zero bias voltage.

  12. Statistical methods to correct for verification bias in diagnostic studies are inadequate when there are few false negatives: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers Andrew J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common feature of diagnostic research is that results for a diagnostic gold standard are available primarily for patients who are positive for the test under investigation. Data from such studies are subject to what has been termed "verification bias". We evaluated statistical methods for verification bias correction when there are few false negatives. Methods A simulation study was conducted of a screening study subject to verification bias. We compared estimates of the area-under-the-curve (AUC corrected for verification bias varying both the rate and mechanism of verification. Results In a single simulated data set, varying false negatives from 0 to 4 led to verification bias corrected AUCs ranging from 0.550 to 0.852. Excess variation associated with low numbers of false negatives was confirmed in simulation studies and by analyses of published studies that incorporated verification bias correction. The 2.5th – 97.5th centile range constituted as much as 60% of the possible range of AUCs for some simulations. Conclusion Screening programs are designed such that there are few false negatives. Standard statistical methods for verification bias correction are inadequate in this circumstance.

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome and symptom severity: evidence of negative attention bias, diminished vigour, and autonomic dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristy; Wright, Bradley J; Kent, Stephen

    2014-07-01

    To determine if cognitive processing, and subjective and physiological responses to stress and relaxation differed between an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) group and control group. How these variables relate to the severity of IBS symptoms was also determined. Twenty-one IBS participants and 20 controls provided cognitive (attention and processing), subjective (perceived stress and vigour), and physiological (heart rate, blood pressure, and skin conductance) data during a relaxation and stress phase. Logistic regression analyses determined which variables are related to the IBS group and hierarchical linear regression assessed how the variables are related to the severity of IBS symptoms. Subjective and cognitive factors (drowsiness at baseline, total vigour, and reduced Stroop colour-naming accuracy for negative words) are significantly related to IBS, χ2 (3, N=41)=23.67, pself-schema, as well as perceived low vigour were important in categorising IBS. Low subjective vigour and reduced physiological reactivity to both relaxation and stress conditions were associated with IBS severity, suggestive of illness-related allostatic load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. All in Its Proper Time: Monitoring the Emergence of a Memory Bias for Novel, Arousing-Negative Words in Individuals with High and Low Trait Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Annuschka Salima; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Keuper, Katharina; Junghöfer, Markus; Laeger, Inga; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The well-established memory bias for arousing-negative stimuli seems to be enhanced in high trait-anxious persons and persons suffering from anxiety disorders. We monitored the emergence and development of such a bias during and after learning, in high and low trait anxious participants. A word-learning paradigm was applied, consisting of spoken pseudowords paired either with arousing-negative or neutral pictures. Learning performance during training evidenced a short-lived advantage for arousing-negative associated words, which was not present at the end of training. Cued recall and valence ratings revealed a memory bias for pseudowords that had been paired with arousing-negative pictures, immediately after learning and two weeks later. This held even for items that were not explicitly remembered. High anxious individuals evidenced a stronger memory bias in the cued-recall test, and their ratings were also more negative overall compared to low anxious persons. Both effects were evident, even when explicit recall was controlled for. Regarding the memory bias in anxiety prone persons, explicit memory seems to play a more crucial role than implicit memory. The study stresses the need for several time points of bias measurement during the course of learning and retrieval, as well as the employment of different measures for learning success. PMID:24887093

  15. All in its proper time: monitoring the emergence of a memory bias for novel, arousing-negative words in individuals with high and low trait anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annuschka Salima Eden

    Full Text Available The well-established memory bias for arousing-negative stimuli seems to be enhanced in high trait-anxious persons and persons suffering from anxiety disorders. We monitored the emergence and development of such a bias during and after learning, in high and low trait anxious participants. A word-learning paradigm was applied, consisting of spoken pseudowords paired either with arousing-negative or neutral pictures. Learning performance during training evidenced a short-lived advantage for arousing-negative associated words, which was not present at the end of training. Cued recall and valence ratings revealed a memory bias for pseudowords that had been paired with arousing-negative pictures, immediately after learning and two weeks later. This held even for items that were not explicitly remembered. High anxious individuals evidenced a stronger memory bias in the cued-recall test, and their ratings were also more negative overall compared to low anxious persons. Both effects were evident, even when explicit recall was controlled for. Regarding the memory bias in anxiety prone persons, explicit memory seems to play a more crucial role than implicit memory. The study stresses the need for several time points of bias measurement during the course of learning and retrieval, as well as the employment of different measures for learning success.

  16. H2O adsorption on amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors under negative bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianwen; Liao, Po-Yung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chiang, Hsiao-Cheng; Chen, Bo-Wei; Chien, Yu-Chieh; Lin, Dong; Ren, Jinhua; Fu, Ruofan; Qu, Mingyue; Pi, Shubin; Han, Yanbing; Kang, Haoqing; Zhang, Qun

    2017-08-01

    Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors on flexible substrates were prepared to investigate H2O adsorption under negative bias stress (NBS). Shorter channel lengths induce a more seriously deteriorated NBS stability due to the stronger electric field near the source or drain electrode. With increasing channel width, the NBS instability increases to a peak and then slightly decreases. Integrated Systems Engineering Technology Computer-aided Design (ISE-TCAD) simulation confirms that the electric field near the source/drain in the etch-stop layer is relatively dense, especially near the channel edges. The electric field direction is also confirmed to have significant effects on the H2O adsorption process.

  17. Zero field entanglement in dipolar coupling spin system at negative temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Furman, Gregory B.; Meerovich, Victor M.; Sokolovsky, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    A dipolar coupled spin system can achieve internal thermodynamic equilibrium states at negative absolute temperature. We study analytically and numerically the temperature dependence of the concurrence in a dipolar coupled spin-1/2 system in both non-zero and zero fields and show that, at negative temperatures, entangled states can exist even in zero magnetic field.

  18. Reassessing changes in diurnal temperature range: A new data set and characterization of data biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, P. W.; Menne, M. J.; Williams, C. N.; Rennie, J. J.; Lawrimore, J. H.; Vose, R. S.; Peterson, T. C.; Durre, I.; Davy, R.; Esau, I.; Klein-Tank, A. M. G.; Merlone, A.

    2016-05-01

    It has been a decade since changes in diurnal temperature range (DTR) globally have been assessed in a stand-alone data analysis. The present study takes advantage of substantively improved basic data holdings arising from the International Surface Temperature Initiative's databank effort and applies the National Centers for Environmental Information's automated pairwise homogeneity assessment algorithm to reassess DTR records. It is found that breakpoints are more prevalent in DTR than other temperature elements and that the resulting adjustments have a broader distribution. This strongly implies that there is an overarching tendency, across the global meteorological networks, for nonclimatic artifacts to impart either random or anticorrelated rather than correlated biases in maximum and minimum temperature series. Future homogenization efforts would likely benefit from simultaneous consideration of DTR and maximum and minimum temperatures, in addition to average temperatures. Estimates of change in DTR are relatively insensitive to whether adjustments are calculated directly or inferred from adjustments returned for the maximum and minimum temperature series. The homogenized series exhibit a reduction in DTR since the midtwentieth century globally (-0.044 K/decade). Adjustments serve to approximately halve the long-term global reduction in DTR in the basic "raw" data. Most of the estimated DTR reduction occurred over 1960-1980. In several regions DTR has apparently increased over 1979-2012, while globally it has exhibited very little change (-0.016 K/decade). Estimated changes in DTR are an order of magnitude smaller than in maximum and minimum temperatures, which have both been increasing rapidly on multidecadal timescales (0.186 K/decade and 0.236 K/decade, respectively, since the midtwentieth century).

  19. Negative thermal expansion of lithium aluminosilicate ceramics at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Moreno, Olga; Fernandez, Adolfo; Khainakov, Sergei; Torrecillas, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Five lithium aluminosilicate compositions of the LAS system have been synthesized and sintered. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the sintered samples has been studied down to cryogenic conditions. The data presented here under cryogenic conditions will be of value in the future design of new composite materials with very low thermal expansion values. The variation in thermal expansion properties with composition and sintering temperature was studied and is discussed in relation to composition and crystal structure.

  20. Individuals with clinically significant insomnia symptoms are characterised by a negative sleep-related expectancy bias: Results from a cognitive-experimental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtauld, Hannah; Notebaert, Lies; Milkins, Bronwyn; Kyle, Simon D; Clarke, Patrick J F

    2017-08-01

    Cognitive models of insomnia consistently suggest that negative expectations regarding the consequences of poor sleep contribute to the maintenance of insomnia. To date, however, no research has sought to determine whether insomnia is indeed characterised by such a negative sleep-related expectancy bias, using objective cognitive assessment tasks which are more immune to response biases than questionnaire assessments. Therefore, the current study employed a reaction-time task assessing biased expectations among a group with clinically significant insomnia symptoms (n = 30) and a low insomnia symptoms group (n = 40). The task involved the presentation of scenarios describing the consequences of poor sleep, and non-sleep related activities, which could be resolved in a benign or a negative manner. The results demonstrated that the high insomnia symptoms group were disproportionately fast to resolve sleep-related scenarios in line with negative outcomes, as compared to benign outcomes, relative to the low insomnia symptoms group. The two groups did not differ in their pattern of resolving non-sleep related scenarios. This pattern of findings is entirely consistent with a sleep-specific expectancy bias operating in individuals with clinically significant insomnia symptoms, and highlights the potential of cognitive-experimental assessment tasks to objectively index patterns of biased cognition in insomnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of hole self-trapping by polarons on transport and negative bias illumination stress in amorphous-IGZO

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jamblinne de Meux, A.; Pourtois, G.; Genoe, J.; Heremans, P.

    2018-04-01

    The effects of hole injection in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) are analyzed by means of first-principles calculations. The injection of holes in the valence band tail states leads to their capture as a polaron, with high self-trapping energies (from 0.44 to 1.15 eV). Once formed, they mediate the formation of peroxides and remain localized close to the hole injection source due to the presence of a large diffusion energy barrier (of at least 0.6 eV). Their diffusion mechanism can be mediated by the presence of hydrogen. The capture of these holes is correlated with the low off-current observed for a-IGZO transistors, as well as with the difficulty to obtain a p-type conductivity. The results further support the formation of peroxides as being the root cause of Negative Bias Illumination Stress (NBIS). The strong self-trapping substantially reduces the injection of holes from the contact and limits the creation of peroxides from a direct hole injection. In the presence of light, the concentration of holes substantially rises and mediates the creation of peroxides, responsible for NBIS.

  2. Correcting negatively biased refractivity below ducts in GNSS radio occultation: an optimal estimation approach towards improving planetary boundary layer (PBL) characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Nung; de la Torre Juárez, Manuel; Ao, Chi O.; Xie, Feiqin

    2017-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) measurements are promising in sensing the vertical structure of the Earth's planetary boundary layer (PBL). However, large refractivity changes near the top of PBL can cause ducting and lead to a negative bias in the retrieved refractivity within the PBL (below ˜ 2 km). To remove the bias, a reconstruction method with assumption of linear structure inside the ducting layer models has been proposed by Xie et al. (2006). While the negative bias can be reduced drastically as demonstrated in the simulation, the lack of high-quality surface refractivity constraint makes its application to real RO data difficult. In this paper, we use the widely available precipitable water (PW) satellite observation as the external constraint for the bias correction. A new framework is proposed to incorporate optimization into the RO reconstruction retrievals in the presence of ducting conditions. The new method uses optimal estimation to select the best refractivity solution whose PW and PBL height best match the externally retrieved PW and the known a priori states, respectively. The near-coincident PW retrievals from AMSR-E microwave radiometer instruments are used as an external observational constraint. This new reconstruction method is tested on both the simulated GNSS-RO profiles and the actual GNSS-RO data. Our results show that the proposed method can greatly reduce the negative refractivity bias when compared to the traditional Abel inversion.

  3. Room temperature exchange bias in multiferroic BiFeO3 nano- and microcrystals with antiferromagnetic core and two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnetic shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Wang, Shou Yu; Liu, Wei Fang; Xu, Xun Ling; Li, Xiu; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Ju; Li, De Jun

    2017-05-01

    Exchange bias (EB) of multiferroics presents many potential opportunities for magnetic devices. However, instead of using low-temperature field cooling in the hysteresis loop measurement, which usually shows an effective approach to obtain obvious EB phenomenon, there are few room temperature EB. In this article, extensive studies on room temperature EB without field cooling were observed in BiFeO3 nano- and microcrystals. Moreover, with increasing size the hysteresis loops shift from horizontal negative exchange bias (NEB) to positive exchange bias (PEB). In order to explain the tunable EB behaviors with size dependence, a phenomenological qualitative model based on the framework of antiferromagnetic (AFM) core-two-dimensional diluted antiferromagnet in a field (2D-DAFF) shell structure was proposed. The training effect (TE) ascertained the validity of model and the presence of unstable magnetic structure using Binek's model. Experimental results show that the tunable EB effect can be explained by the competition of ferromagnetic (FM) exchange coupling and AFM exchange coupling interaction between AFM core and 2D-DAFF shell. Additionally, the local distortion of lattice fringes was observed in hexagonal-shaped BiFeO3 nanocrystals with well-dispersed behavior. The electrical conduction properties agreed well with the space charge-limited conduction mechanism.

  4. Reversible and irreversible temperature-induced changes in exchange-biased planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, G.; Lundtoft, N.C.; Østerberg, F.W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes of planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors upon exposure to temperatures between 25° C and 90°C. From analyses of the sensor response vs. magnetic fields we extract the exchange bias field Hex, the uniaxial anisotropy field HK and the anisotropic...... magnetoresistance (AMR) of the exchange biased thin film at a given temperature and by comparing measurements carried out at elevated temperatures T with measurements carried out at 25° C after exposure to T, we can separate the reversible from the irreversible changes of the sensor. The results are not only...... relevant for sensor applications but also demonstrate the method as a useful tool for characterizing exchange-biased thin films....

  5. Positive and negative exchange bias effects from magnetization reversal in Ho{sup 3+} doped YFe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, L.R., E-mail: shiliran1127@126.com [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Wei, C.X.; Wang, Z.; Ju, L.; Xu, T.S.; Li, T.X.; Yan, X.W. [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Xia, Z.C. [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The dual magnetization reversal is observed in Y{sub 1−x}Ho{sub x}Fe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. • The EB field transforms from negative to positive and then to negative. • A large exchange bias effect induced by Ho{sup 3+} doping is obtained in Y{sub 1−x}Ho{sub x}Fe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The polycrystalline ceramics of Y{sub 1−x}Ho{sub x}Fe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.05 and 0.1) are synthesized by a sol-gel method. The magnetization reversal and exchange bias effect are investigated in single phase bulk Y{sub 1−x}Ho{sub x}Fe{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. Magnetic Ho{sup 3+} ion as a dopant is introduced into the system to confirm the influence of A-site ion on the magnetic interactions. The dual reversal of exchange bias field for x = 0.05 is observed, and its characteristic temperatures are corresponding to the compensation temperatures of magnetization reversal. The exchange bias field of x = 0.1 is found to be ∼10.03 kOe at 4 K, revealing a large value compared with that of x = 0. A schematic diagram based on the competition between the single ion anisotropy and Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction, and the antiparallel coupling between the Ho{sup 3+} moments and the canted Cr{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 3+} moments, is used to understand the dual reversal phenomenon of magnetization and exchange bias effect.

  6. A proposed correction of a systematic bias in early instrumental temperature series in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, R.; Jones, P. D.; Hiebl, J.; Frank, D.; Brunetti, M.; Maugeri, M.

    2009-04-01

    The instrumental period in climatology usually is regarded to have started shortly after the mid 19th century. Respective benchmarks are the starting point of the global mean temperature timeseries in the 1850s or the founding of many of the national meteorological services in the following 2 to 3 decades. But there is a considerable and valuable amount of measured climate data decades to a century earlier. The added value of having another century of directly measured climate information is great, particularly as these data bridge the pre-anthropogenic to anthropogenic forcing eras. But the demands on these early instrumental data in terms of their comparability with modern data are increasingly difficult to fulfil progressively back in time. Decreasing network density makes mathematical homogeneity testing and adjusting less reliable and the equipment as well as the measuring and data processing philosophy were in some aspects rather different to the recent one. The proposed contribution shows one of these "early instrumental" (EI) problems and proposes a solution for a region which may be regarded the richest in EI-data globally. Instrumental temperature recording in the Greater Alpine Region (GAR, 4-19°E, 43-49°N) began in the year 1760. Prior to the 1850-1870 period, after which screens of different types protected the instruments, thermometers were insufficiently sheltered from direct sunlight so were normally placed on north-facing walls or windows. It is likely that temperatures recorded in the summer half of the year were biased warm and those in the winter half biased cold, with the summer effect dominating. Because the changeover to screens often occurred at similar times, it has been difficult to determine the scale of the problem through relative homogeneity testing, as all neighbour sites were likely to be similarly affected. This study uses simultaneous measurements taken for eight recent years at the old and modern site at Kremsmünster, Austria

  7. Bias Correction for Assimilation of Retrieved AIRS Profiles of Temperature and Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakenship, Clay; Zavodsky, Bradley; Blackwell, William

    2014-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral radiometer aboard NASA's Aqua satellite designed to measure atmospheric profiles of temperature and humidity. AIRS retrievals are assimilated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over the North Pacific for some cases involving "atmospheric rivers". These events bring a large flux of water vapor to the west coast of North America and often lead to extreme precipitation in the coastal mountain ranges. An advantage of assimilating retrievals rather than radiances is that information in partly cloudy fields of view can be used. Two different Level 2 AIRS retrieval products are compared: the Version 6 AIRS Science Team standard retrievals and a neural net retrieval from MIT. Before assimilation, a bias correction is applied to adjust each layer of retrieved temperature and humidity so the layer mean values agree with a short-term model climatology. WRF runs assimilating each of the products are compared against each other and against a control run with no assimilation. Forecasts are against ERA reanalyses.

  8. Magnetoresistance and negative differential resistance in Ni/graphene/Ni vertical heterostructures driven by finite bias voltage: a first-principles study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saha, Kamal K.; Blom, Anders; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2012-01-01

    “pessimistic” magnetoresistance of 100% for n≥5 junctions at zero bias voltage Vb→0 persists up to Vb≃0.4 V, which makes such devices promising for spin-torque-based device applications. In addition, for parallel orientations of the Ni magnetizations, the n=5 junction exhibits a pronounced negative...

  9. Temperature and frequency dependence of negative differential capacitance in a planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Xichang; Xu, Jintong; Li, Chao; Qiao, Hui; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetector was prepared by ion implantation. •A novel negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect is observed in the photodetector. •The NDC effect is due to the carrier confinement of the deep level centers formed by ion implantation. -- Abstract: In this work, back-illuminated planar GaN-based p-i-n photodetectors were fabricated by Si implantation into GaN-based p-i-n structure grown by metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The dark current density of the photodetector is 1.03 nA/cm 2 under zero bias. The unbiased responsivity is 0.122 A/W at 360 nm, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 42%. Temperature and frequency dependence of capacitance versus voltage characteristics of the photodetectors are also investigated respectively. A novel negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect observed in the photodetector at room temperature under the frequency of 120 kHz or at low temperature under relative high frequency (such as 200 kHz). The NDC effect becomes much more obvious with the temperature or frequency decreased. This novel phenomenon is mainly due to the carrier confinement of the deep level centers in the detector, which mainly include lattice defects formed by high dose ion implantation and subsequent annealing

  10. Effects of consecutive irradiation and bias temperature stress in p-channel power vertical double-diffused metal oxide semiconductor transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidović, Vojkan; Danković, Danijel; Ilić, Aleksandar; Manić, Ivica; Golubović, Snežana; Djorić-Veljković, Snežana; Prijić, Zoran; Prijić, Aneta; Stojadinović, Ninoslav

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the effects of consecutive irradiation and negative bias temperature (NBT) stress in p-channel power vertical double-diffused MOS (VDMOS) transistors are presented in this paper. The investigation was performed in order to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the effects of specific kind of stress in devices previously subjected to the other kind of stress. In addition, it may help in assessing the behaviour of devices subjected to simultaneous irradiation and NBT stressing. It is shown that irradiation of previously NBT stressed devices leads to additional build-up of oxide trapped charge and interface traps, while NBT stress effects in previously irradiated devices depend on gate bias applied during irradiation and on the total dose received. In the cases of low-dose irradiation or irradiation without gate bias, the subsequent NBT stress leads to slight further device degradation. On the other hand, in the cases of devices previously irradiated to high doses or with gate bias applied during irradiation, NBT stress may have a positive role, as it actually anneals a part of radiation-induced degradation.

  11. Ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of temperature and altimeter data with bias correction and application to seasonal prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Keppenne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available To compensate for a poorly known geoid, satellite altimeter data is usually analyzed in terms of anomalies from the time mean record. When such anomalies are assimilated into an ocean model, the bias between the climatologies of the model and data is problematic. An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF is modified to account for the presence of a forecast-model bias and applied to the assimilation of TOPEX/Poseidon (T/P altimeter data. The online bias correction (OBC algorithm uses the same ensemble of model state vectors to estimate biased-error and unbiased-error covariance matrices. Covariance localization is used but the bias covariances have different localization scales from the unbiased-error covariances, thereby accounting for the fact that the bias in a global ocean model could have much larger spatial scales than the random error.The method is applied to a 27-layer version of the Poseidon global ocean general circulation model with about 30-million state variables. Experiments in which T/P altimeter anomalies are assimilated show that the OBC reduces the RMS observation minus forecast difference for sea-surface height (SSH over a similar EnKF run in which OBC is not used. Independent in situ temperature observations show that the temperature field is also improved. When the T/P data and in situ temperature data are assimilated in the same run and the configuration of the ensemble at the end of the run is used to initialize the ocean component of the GMAO coupled forecast model, seasonal SSH hindcasts made with the coupled model are generally better than those initialized with optimal interpolation of temperature observations without altimeter data. The analysis of the corresponding sea-surface temperature hindcasts is not as conclusive.

  12. Implication of Negative Temperature in the Inner Horizon of Reissner-Nordström Black Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuant Tiandho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reconsiders the properties of Hawking radiation in the inner horizon of a Reissner-Nordström black hole. Through the correlation between temperature and surface gravity, it is concluded that the temperature of the inner horizon is always negative and that of the outer horizon is always positive. Since negative temperature is hotter than any positive temperature, it is predicted that particle radiation from the inner horizon will move toward the outer horizon. However, unlike temperature, entropy in both horizons remains positive. Following the definition of negative temperature in the inner horizon, it is assured that the entropy of a black hole within a closed system can never decrease. By analyzing the conditions of an extremal black hole, the third law of black hole thermodynamics can be extended to multi-horizon black holes.

  13. Internet-Based Attention Bias Modification for Social Anxiety: A Randomised Controlled Comparison of Training towards Negative and Training Towards Positive Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Johanna; Leek, Linda; Matson, Lisa; Holmes, Emily A.; Browning, Michael; MacLeod, Colin; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2013-01-01

    Biases in attention processes are thought to play a crucial role in the aetiology and maintenance of Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). The goal of the present study was to examine the efficacy of a programme intended to train attention towards positive cues and a programme intended to train attention towards negative cues. In a randomised, controlled, double-blind design, the impact of these two training conditions on both selective attention and social anxiety were compared to that of a control training condition. A modified dot probe task was used, and delivered via the internet. A total of 129 individuals, diagnosed with SAD, were randomly assigned to one of these three conditions and took part in a 14-day programme with daily training/control sessions. Participants in all three groups did not on average display an attentional bias prior to the training. Critically, results on change in attention bias implied that significantly differential change in selective attention to threat was not detected in the three conditions. However, symptoms of social anxiety reduced significantly from pre- to follow-up-assessment in all three conditions (dwithin  = 0.63–1.24), with the procedure intended to train attention towards threat cues producing, relative to the control condition, a significantly greater reduction of social fears. There were no significant differences in social anxiety outcome between the training condition intended to induce attentional bias towards positive cues and the control condition. To our knowledge, this is the first RCT where a condition intended to induce attention bias to negative cues yielded greater emotional benefits than a control condition. Intriguingly, changes in symptoms are unlikely to be by the mechanism of change in attention processes since there was no change detected in bias per se. Implications of this finding for future research on attention bias modification in social anxiety are discussed. Trial Registration Clinical

  14. Brief learning induces a memory bias for arousing-negative words: an fMRI study in high and low trait anxious persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Annuschka S.; Dehmelt, Vera; Bischoff, Matthias; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Kugel, Harald; Keuper, Kati; Zwanzger, Peter; Dobel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Persons suffering from anxiety disorders display facilitated processing of arousing and negative stimuli, such as negative words. This memory bias is reflected in better recall and increased amygdala activity in response to such stimuli. However, individual learning histories were not considered in most studies, a concern that we meet here. Thirty-four female persons (half with high-, half with low trait anxiety) participated in a criterion-based associative word-learning paradigm, in which neutral pseudowords were paired with aversive or neutral pictures, which should lead to a valence change for the negatively paired pseudowords. After learning, pseudowords were tested with fMRI to investigate differential brain activation of the amygdala evoked by the newly acquired valence. Explicit and implicit memory was assessed directly after training and in three follow-ups at 4-day intervals. The behavioral results demonstrate that associative word-learning leads to an explicit (but no implicit) memory bias for negatively linked pseudowords, relative to neutral ones, which confirms earlier studies. Bilateral amygdala activation underlines the behavioral effect: Higher trait anxiety is correlated with stronger amygdala activation for negatively linked pseudowords than for neutrally linked ones. Most interestingly, this effect is also present for negatively paired pseudowords that participants could not remember well. Moreover, neutrally paired pseudowords evoked higher amygdala reactivity than completely novel ones in highly anxious persons, which can be taken as evidence for generalization. These findings demonstrate that few word-learning trials generate a memory bias for emotional stimuli, indexed both behaviorally and neurophysiologically. Importantly, the typical memory bias for emotional stimuli and the generalization to neutral ones is larger in high anxious persons. PMID:26347689

  15. Brief learning induces a memory bias for arousing-negative words: An fMRI study in high and low trait anxious persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annuschka Salima Eden

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Persons suffering from anxiety disorders display facilitated processing of arousing and negative stimuli, such as negative words. This memory bias is reflected in better recall and increased amygdala activity in response to such stimuli. However, individual learning histories were not considered in most studies, a concern that we meet here. Thirty-four female persons (half with high-, half with low trait anxiety participated in a criterion-based associative word-learning paradigm, in which neutral pseudowords were paired with aversive or neutral pictures, which should lead to a valence change for the negatively paired pseudowords. After learning, pseudowords were tested with fMRI to investigate differential brain activation of the amygdala evoked by the newly acquired valence. Explicit and implicit memory was assessed directly after training and in three follow-ups at four-day intervals. The behavioral results demonstrate that associative word-learning leads to an explicit (but no implicit memory bias for negatively linked pseudowords, relative to neutral ones, which confirms earlier studies. Bilateral amygdala activation underlines the behavioral effect: Higher trait anxiety is correlated with stronger amygdala activation for negatively linked pseudowords than for neutrally linked ones. Most interestingly, this effect is also present for negatively paired pseudowords that participants could not remember well. Moreover, neutrally paired pseudowords evoked higher amygdala reactivity than completely novel ones in highly anxious persons, which can be taken as evidence for generalization. These findings demonstrate that few word-learning trials generate a memory bias for emotional stimuli, indexed both behaviorally and neurophysiologically. Importantly, the typical memory bias for emotional stimuli and the generalization to neutral ones is larger in high anxious persons.

  16. REGULAR ISSUE PAPER What happened to Popperian falsification? Publishing neutral and negative findings : Moving away from biased publication practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteloostuijn, Arjen Van

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - Current publication practices in the scholarly (International) Business and Management community are overwhelmingly anti-Popperian, which fundamentally frustrates the production of scientific progress. This is the result of at least five related biases: the verification, novelty, normal

  17. Bias in the Global Mean Temperature Estimated from Sampling a Greenhouse Warming Pattern with the Current Surface Observing Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Roland A.; Meehl, Gerald A.

    1993-12-01

    Theoretical and modeling studies suggest that increasing greenhouse gases will cause the global mean temperature to rise a few degrees centigrade during the next century. Current global coupled GCMs have shown a distinct pattern of warming associated with this global mean rise. It is important to know how well our observing network will be able to capture the global mean temperature rise associated with this pattern if it occurs. The authors consider if a sampling bias exist as a result of the spatial distribution of observations as they are now located (1950-1979) when detecting a pattern of temperature change that should be typical of a warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2. The observations prove adequate to estimate the globally averaged temperature change associated with the pattern of CO2 warming from a general circulation model with a bias whose absolute value is generally less than 2%.

  18. Reversible and irreversible temperature-induced changes in exchange-biased planar Hall effect bridge (PHEB) magnetic field sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, G.; Lundtoft, N.C.; Østerberg, F.W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the changes of planar Hall effect bridge magnetic field sensors upon exposure to temperatures between 25° C and 90°C. From analyses of the sensor response vs. magnetic fields we extract the exchange bias field Hex, the uniaxial anisotropy field HK and the anisotropic magnetoresista...

  19. Temperature dependence magnetic properties and exchange bias effect in CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles embedded in NiO matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Kashif [Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Physics Department, International Islamic University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Physics Department, University of Gujrat, Gujrat (Pakistan); Sarfraz, A.K., E-mail: sarfraz.ak1@gmail.com [Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Physics Department, International Islamic University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Physics Department, University of Gujrat, Gujrat (Pakistan); Ali, Atif; Mumtaz, A.; Hasanain, S.K. [Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Physics Department, International Islamic University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Physics Department, University of Gujrat, Gujrat (Pakistan)

    2014-11-15

    The effect of temperature on the magnetic properties of CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/NiO nanocomposites of (1−x) NiO/xCuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.5) has been investigated. The (1−x)NiO/xCuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.5) nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation route and their crystallographic structure was confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The average crystallite sizes of the nanoparticles as determined from the XRD were found to lie in the range of 20–31 nm. Magnetic characterization including coercivity and magnetization were measured with effect of particle size and temperature. During magnetic measurement it is observed that the hysteresis loop displaces along negative field axis with exchange bias field (H{sub EB}) about 75 Oe at 5 K and vanish at 150 K which is irreversible temperature T{sub irr}. The temperature dependence of coercively follows Kneller's law while the saturation magnetization followed Bloch's law with exponent α=3/2. - Highlights: • Synthesis of (1−x)NiO/xCuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x=0.5) nanoparticles by co-precipitation route. • Magnetic characterization with particle size and temperature variation. • Exchange bias effect: monotonic decrease in exchange field with temperature. • Temperature dependence of coercivity follows Kneller's law. • Temperature dependence of saturation magnetization follows Bloch's law.

  20. Negative temperature coefficient of the action of DDT in a sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercken, J. van den; Akkermans, L.M.A.

    1972-01-01

    DDT induced repetitive spontaneuos activity inthe afferent nerve fibers of the lateral-line organ of the clawed toad, Xenopus laevis. The action of DDT increased markedly with lowered temperature. This temperature-effect was easily reversible. The results demonstrate that DDT has a definite negative

  1. Cognitive Bias Modification Using Mental Imagery for Depression: Developing a Novel Computerized Intervention to Change Negative Thinking Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tamara J; Blackwell, Simon E; Harmer, Catherine J; Davison, Phil; Holmes, Emily A

    2012-03-01

    Why do some people see their glass as half-empty rather than half-full or even imagine that the glass will be filled in the future? Experimental methods can illuminate how individual differences in information processing style can profoundly impact mood or even result in disorders such as depression. A computerized cognitive bias modification intervention targeting interpretation bias in depression via positive mental imagery (CBM-I) was evaluated by investigating its impact on mental health and cognitive bias compared with a control condition. Twenty-six depressed individuals completed either positive imagery-focussed CBM-I or a control condition daily at home over one week. Outcome measures were collected pre-treatment and post-treatment and at two-week follow-up. Individuals in the positive condition demonstrated significant improvements from pre-treatment to post-treatment in depressive symptoms, cognitive bias and intrusive symptoms compared with the control condition. Improvements in depressive symptoms at two-week follow-up were at trend level. The results of this first controlled comparison of positive imagery-focussed CBM-I for depression further support the clinical potential of CBM-I and the development of a novel computerized treatment that could help patients imagine a more positive future. Broader implications concern the modification of individual differences in personality variables via their interaction with key information processing targets. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Exchange bias beyond the superparamagnetic blocking temperature of the antiferromagnet in a Ni-NiO nanoparticulate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Aparna; De Toro, J. A.; Amaral, V. S.; Muniz, P.; Riveiro, J. M.; Ferreira, J. M. F.

    2014-02-01

    We report magnetic and exchange bias studies on Ni-NiO nanoparticulate systems synthesized by a two-step process, namely, chemical reduction of a Ni salt followed by air annealing of the dried precipitate in the temperature range 400-550 °C. Size of Ni and NiO crystallites as estimated from X-ray diffraction line broadening ranges between 10.5-13.5 nm and 2.3-4 nm, respectively. The magneto-thermal plots (M-T) of these bi-magnetic samples show a well developed peak in the vicinity of 130 K. This has been identified as the superparamagnetic blocking temperature "TB" of NiO. Interestingly, all samples exhibit exchange bias even above their respective NiO blocking temperatures, right up to 300 K, the maximum temperature of measurement. This is in contrast to previous reports since exchange bias requires the antiferromagnetic NiO to have a stable direction of its moment in order to pin the ferromagnet (Ni) magnetization, whereas such stability is unlikely above TB since the NiO is superparamagnetic, its moment flipping under thermal activation. Our observation is elucidated by taking into account the core-shell morphology of the Ni-NiO nanoparticles whereby clustering of some of these nanoparticles connects their NiO shells to form extended continuous regions of NiO, which because of their large size remain blocked at T > TB, with thermally stable spins capable of pinning the Ni cores and giving rise to exchange bias. The investigated samples may thus be envisaged as being constituted of both isolated core-shell Ni-NiO nanoparticles as well as clustered ones, with TB denoting the blocking temperature of the NiO shell of the isolated particles.

  3. Negatively-marked MCQ assessments that reward partial knowledge do not introduce gender bias yet increase student performance and satisfaction and reduce anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Elizabeth Bond

    Full Text Available Multiple-choice question (MCQ examinations are increasingly used as the assessment method of theoretical knowledge in large class-size modules in many life science degrees. MCQ-tests can be used to objectively measure factual knowledge, ability and high-level learning outcomes, but may also introduce gender bias in performance dependent on topic, instruction, scoring and difficulty. The 'Single Answer' (SA test is often used in which students choose one correct answer, in which they are unable to demonstrate partial knowledge. Negatively marking eliminates the chance element of guessing but may be considered unfair. Elimination testing (ET is an alternative form of MCQ, which discriminates between all levels of knowledge, while rewarding demonstration of partial knowledge. Comparisons of performance and gender bias in negatively marked SA and ET tests have not yet been performed in the life sciences. Our results show that life science students were significantly advantaged by answering the MCQ test in elimination format compared to single answer format under negative marking conditions by rewarding partial knowledge of topics. Importantly, we found no significant difference in performance between genders in either cohort for either MCQ test under negative marking conditions. Surveys showed that students generally preferred ET-style MCQ testing over SA-style testing. Students reported feeling more relaxed taking ET MCQ and more stressed when sitting SA tests, while disagreeing with being distracted by thinking about best tactics for scoring high. Students agreed ET testing improved their critical thinking skills. We conclude that appropriately-designed MCQ tests do not systematically discriminate between genders. We recommend careful consideration in choosing the type of MCQ test, and propose to apply negative scoring conditions to each test type to avoid the introduction of gender bias. The student experience could be improved through the

  4. Negatively-marked MCQ assessments that reward partial knowledge do not introduce gender bias yet increase student performance and satisfaction and reduce anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, A Elizabeth; Bodger, Owen; Skibinski, David O F; Jones, D Hugh; Restall, Colin J; Dudley, Edward; van Keulen, Geertje

    2013-01-01

    Multiple-choice question (MCQ) examinations are increasingly used as the assessment method of theoretical knowledge in large class-size modules in many life science degrees. MCQ-tests can be used to objectively measure factual knowledge, ability and high-level learning outcomes, but may also introduce gender bias in performance dependent on topic, instruction, scoring and difficulty. The 'Single Answer' (SA) test is often used in which students choose one correct answer, in which they are unable to demonstrate partial knowledge. Negatively marking eliminates the chance element of guessing but may be considered unfair. Elimination testing (ET) is an alternative form of MCQ, which discriminates between all levels of knowledge, while rewarding demonstration of partial knowledge. Comparisons of performance and gender bias in negatively marked SA and ET tests have not yet been performed in the life sciences. Our results show that life science students were significantly advantaged by answering the MCQ test in elimination format compared to single answer format under negative marking conditions by rewarding partial knowledge of topics. Importantly, we found no significant difference in performance between genders in either cohort for either MCQ test under negative marking conditions. Surveys showed that students generally preferred ET-style MCQ testing over SA-style testing. Students reported feeling more relaxed taking ET MCQ and more stressed when sitting SA tests, while disagreeing with being distracted by thinking about best tactics for scoring high. Students agreed ET testing improved their critical thinking skills. We conclude that appropriately-designed MCQ tests do not systematically discriminate between genders. We recommend careful consideration in choosing the type of MCQ test, and propose to apply negative scoring conditions to each test type to avoid the introduction of gender bias. The student experience could be improved through the incorporation of the

  5. Negative effects of low developmental temperatures on aphid predation by Orius majusculus (Heteroptera Anthocoridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadottir, Frida; Toft, Soren; Sigsgaard, Lene

    2017-01-01

    results rejected the positive acclimation hypothesis. At all test temperatures predation capacity was highest for females that had developed at 20 °C and lowest for those that had developed at 12 °C. Thus, development at low temperatures had a detrimental effect on predatory performance (negative...... apple aphids (Dysaphis plantaginea) of females from each of these treatments was tested at the same temperatures (12, 16 and 20 °C). Additionally, we tested the effects of low temperature treatment only during the last nymphal instar, to examine if shorter treatments would have the same effects. Our...... acclimation effect) at both high and low temperatures, and the effect was larger the longer the treatment. Mortality of the nymphs was also increased at lower temperatures. Thus, no enhanced biocontrol efficiency or production benefits were gained from low temperature treatment of O. majusculus, neither...

  6. Temperature-dependent capacitance-voltage biasing of the highly tunable TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasrawi, A.F., E-mail: aqasrawi@atilim.edu.tr [Group of Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Atilim University, 06836 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Physics, Arab-American University, Jenin, West Bank, Palestine (Country Unknown); Gasanly, N.M. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    The temperature effects on the capacitance-voltage characteristics as well as the room temperature capacitance-frequency characteristics of TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals are investigated. A very wide range of linearly varying tunable capacitance from 6.0 {mu}F to 60 pF was recorded. The capacitance-voltage characteristics, being recorded in the temperature range of 290-380 K, revealed a linear increase in the build in voltage associated with exponential decrease in the density of non-compensated ionized carriers with increasing temperature. The high temperature (up to 380 K) biasing ability, the linear tunability and the high dielectric constant values ({approx}10{sup 3}) make the TlGaTe{sub 2} crystals applicable in microelectronic components.

  7. Bias Correction for Retrieval of Atmospheric Parameters from the Microwave Humidity and Temperature Sounder Onboard the Fengyun-3C Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiurui He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The microwave humidity and temperature sounder (MWHTS on the Fengyun (FY-3C satellite measures the outgoing radiance from the Earth’s surface and atmospheric constituents. MWHTS, which makes measurements in the isolated oxygen absorption line near 118 GHz and the vicinity of the strong water vapor absorption line around 183 GHz, can provide fine vertical distribution structures of both atmospheric humidity and temperature. However, in order to obtain the accurate soundings of humidity and temperature by physical retrieval methods, the bias between the observed and simulated radiance calculated by the radiative transfer model from the background or first guess profiles must be corrected. In this study, two bias correction methods are developed through the correlation analysis between MWHTS measurements and air mass identified by the first guess profiles of the physical inversion; one is the linear regression correction (LRC, and the other is the neural network correction (NNC, representing the linear and nonlinear relationships between MWHTS measurements and air mass, respectively. The correction methods have been applied to MWHTS observed brightness temperatures over the geographic area (180° W–180° E, 60° S–60° N. The corrected results are evaluated by the probability density function of the differences between corrected observations and simulated values and the root mean square errors (RMSE with respect to simulated observations. The numerical results show that the NNC method has better performance, especially in MWHTS Channels 1 and 7–9, whose peak weight function heights are close to the surface. In order to assess the effects of bias correction methods proposed in this study on the retrieval accuracy, a one-dimensional variational system was built and applied to the MWHTS brightness temperatures to estimate the atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. The retrieval results also show that NNC has better performance. An

  8. Assessing the Regional/Diurnal Bias between Satellite Retrievals and GEOS-5/MERRA Model Estimates of Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarino, B. R.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Minnis, P.; Bedka, K. M.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric models rely on high-accuracy, high-resolution initial radiometric and surface conditions for better short-term meteorological forecasts, as well as improved evaluation of global climate models. Continuous remote sensing of the Earth's energy budget, as conducted by the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, allows for near-realtime evaluation of cloud and surface radiation properties. It is unfortunately common for there to be bias between atmospheric/surface radiation models and Earth-observations. For example, satellite-observed surface skin temperature (Ts), an important parameter for characterizing the energy exchange at the ground/water-atmosphere interface, can be biased due to atmospheric adjustment assumptions and anisotropy effects. Similarly, models are potentially biased by errors in initial conditions and regional forcing assumptions, which can be mitigated through assimilation with true measurements. As such, when frequent, broad-coverage, and accurate retrievals of satellite Ts are available, important insights into model estimates of Ts can be gained. The Satellite ClOud and Radiation Property retrieval System (SatCORPS) employs a single-channel thermal-infrared method to produce anisotropy-corrected Ts over clear-sky land and ocean surfaces from data taken by geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellite imagers. Regional and diurnal changes in model land surface temperature (LST) performance can be assessed owing to the somewhat continuous measurements of the LST offered by GEO satellites - measurements which are accurate to within 0.2 K. A seasonal, hourly comparison of satellite-observed LST with the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5) and the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) LST estimates is conducted to reveal regional and diurnal biases. This assessment is an important first step for evaluating the effectiveness of Ts assimilation, as well for determining the

  9. Current Sharing inside a High Power IGBT Module at the Negative Temperature Coefficient Operating Region

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084596; Papastergiou, Konstantinos; Bongiorno, M; Thiringer, T

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates the current sharing effect of a high power Soft Punch Through IGBT module in the Negative Temperature Coefficient region. The unbalanced current sharing between two of the substrates is demonstrated for different current and temperature levels and its impact on the thermal stressing of the device is evaluated. The results indicate that the current asymmetry does not lead to a significant thermal stressing unbalance between the substrates.

  10. Room temperature exchange bias in BiFeO3 / Co-Fe bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Sterwerf, Christian; Meinert, Markus; Arenholz, Elke; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Reiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Thin highly epitaxial BiFeO$_3$ films were prepared on SrTiO$_3$ (100) substrates by reactive magnetron co-sputtering. Detailed MOKE measurements on BiFeO$_3$/Co-Fe bilayers were performed to investigate the exchange bias as a function of the films thicknesses and Co-Fe stoichiometries. We found a maximum exchange bias of H$_{\\mathrm{eb}}$=92 Oe and a coercive field of H$_{\\mathrm{c}}$=89 Oe for a 12.5 nm thick BiFeO$_3$ film with a 2 nm thick Co layer. The unidirectional anisotropy is clearl...

  11. Perception of Verbal and Nonverbal Emotional Signals in Women With Borderline Personality Disorder: Evidence of a Negative Bias and an Increased Reliance on Nonverbal Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Carolin; Derstroff, Stephanie; Jacob, Heike; Wolf-Arehult, Martina; Wekenmann, Stefanie; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2017-04-01

    Studies conducted in patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) have documented a variety of anomalies concerning patients' abilities to interpret emotional signals. Attempting to clarify the bases of these anomalies, the current literature draws attention to a possible role of dysfunctional expectations, such as the expectation of social rejection. Dysfunctional expectations, however, may not only bias social interpretations, but may also focus attention on social cues most important in conveying emotional messages, such as nonverbal signals. To explore these assumptions, 30 female BPD patients were tasked to judge the valence of emotional states conveyed by combinations of verbal and nonverbal emotional cues. Compared to controls, BPD patients exhibited a negative bias in their interpretations and relied more on available nonverbal cues. Shifts in the relative importance of nonverbal cues appeared to be rooted mainly in a reduced reliance on positive verbal cues presumably deemed less credible by BPD patients.

  12. Room-temperature negative capacitance in a ferroelectric-dielectric superlattice heterostructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gao, W.; Khan, A.; Martí, Xavier; Nelson, C.; Serrao, C.; Ravichandran, J.; Ramesh, R.; Salahuddin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 10 (2014), s. 5814-5819 ISSN 1530-6984 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : room-temperature negative capacitance * ferroelectrics * superlattice * epitaxial strain Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 13.592, year: 2014

  13. Entanglement negativity and sudden death in the toric code at finite temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, O.; Castelnovo, C.

    2018-04-01

    We study the fate of quantum correlations at finite temperature in the two-dimensional toric code using the logarithmic entanglement negativity. We are able to obtain exact results that give us insight into how thermal excitations affect quantum entanglement. The toric code has two types of elementary excitations (defects) costing different energies. We show that an O (1 ) density of the lower energy defect is required to degrade the zero-temperature entanglement between two subsystems in contact with one another. However, one type of excitation alone is not sufficient to kill all quantum correlations, and an O (1 ) density of the higher energy defect is required to cause the so-called sudden death of the negativity. Interestingly, if the energy cost of one of the excitations is taken to infinity, quantum correlations survive up to arbitrarily high temperatures, a feature that is likely shared with other quantum spin liquids and frustrated systems in general, when projected down to their low-energy states. We demonstrate this behavior both for small subsystems, where we can prove that the negativity is a necessary and sufficient condition for separability, as well as for extended subsystems, where it is only a necessary condition. We further observe that the negativity per boundary degree of freedom at a given temperature increases (parametrically) with the size of the boundary, and that quantum correlations between subsystems with extended boundaries are more robust to thermal fluctuations.

  14. Three-dimensional modeling of a negative ion source with a magnetic filter: impact of biasing the plasma electrode on the plasma asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fubiani, G.; Boeuf, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    The effect on the plasma characteristics of biasing positively the plasma electrode (PE) in negative ion sources with a magnetic filter is analysed using a 3D particle-in-cell model with Monte-Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC). We specialize to the one driver (i.e. one inductively coupled radio-frequency discharge) BATMAN negative ion source and the 4-drivers (large volume) ELISE device. Both are ITER prototype high power tandem-type negative ion sources developed for the neutral beam injector (NBI) system. The plasma is generated in the driver and diffuses inside the second chamber which is magnetized. Asymmetric plasma profiles originate from the formation of an electric field transverse to the electron current flowing through the magnetic filter (Hall effect). The model shows that the importance of the asymmetry increases with the PE bias potential, i.e. with the electron flow from the driver to the extraction region and depends on the shape of the magnetic filter field. We find that although the plasma density and potential profiles may be more or less asymmetric depending on the filter field configuration, the electron current to the plasma grid is always strongly asymmetric.

  15. Functional diversity of catch mitigates negative effects of temperature variability on fisheries yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Laura E; Miller, Steve J; Peavey, Lindsey E; Bradley, Darcy; Gentry, Rebecca R; Startz, Richard; Gaines, Steven D; Lester, Sarah E

    2016-08-17

    Temperature variation within a year can impact biological processes driving population abundances. The implications for the ecosystem services these populations provide, including food production from marine fisheries, are poorly understood. Whether and how temperature variability impacts fishery yields may depend on the number of harvested species and differences in their responses to varying temperatures. Drawing from previous theoretical and empirical studies, we predict that greater temperature variability within years will reduce yields, but harvesting a larger number of species, especially a more functionally diverse set, will decrease this impact. Using a global marine fisheries dataset, we find that within-year temperature variability reduces yields, but current levels of functional diversity (FD) of targeted species, measured using traits related to species' responses to temperature, largely offset this effect. Globally, high FD of catch could avoid annual losses in yield of 6.8% relative to projections if FD were degraded to the lowest level observed in the data. By contrast, species richness in the catch and in the ecosystem did not provide a similar mitigating effect. This work provides novel empirical evidence that short-term temperature variability can negatively impact the provisioning of ecosystem services, but that FD can buffer these negative impacts. © 2016 The Author(s).

  16. Looking at food in sad mood: do attention biases lead emotional eaters into overeating after a negative mood induction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthmann, Jessica; Renner, Fritz; Roefs, Anne; Huibers, Marcus J H; Plumanns, Lana; Krott, Nora; Jansen, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Emotional eating is associated with overeating and the development of obesity. Yet, empirical evidence for individual (trait) differences in emotional eating and cognitive mechanisms that contribute to eating during sad mood remain equivocal. The aim of this study was to test if attention bias for food moderates the effect of self-reported emotional eating during sad mood (vs neutral mood) on actual food intake. It was expected that emotional eating is predictive of elevated attention for food and higher food intake after an experimentally induced sad mood and that attentional maintenance on food predicts food intake during a sad versus a neutral mood. Participants (N = 85) were randomly assigned to one of the two experimental mood induction conditions (sad/neutral). Attentional biases for high caloric foods were measured by eye tracking during a visual probe task with pictorial food and neutral stimuli. Self-reported emotional eating was assessed with the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and ad libitum food intake was tested by a disguised food offer. Hierarchical multivariate regression modeling showed that self-reported emotional eating did not account for changes in attention allocation for food or food intake in either condition. Yet, attention maintenance on food cues was significantly related to increased intake specifically in the neutral condition, but not in the sad mood condition. The current findings show that self-reported emotional eating (based on the DEBQ) might not validly predict who overeats when sad, at least not in a laboratory setting with healthy women. Results further suggest that attention maintenance on food relates to eating motivation when in a neutral affective state, and might therefore be a cognitive mechanism contributing to increased food intake in general, but maybe not during sad mood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Creativity, Psychopathology, and Emotion Processing: A Liberal Response Bias for Remembering Negative Information Is Associated with Higher Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drus, Marina; Kozbelt, Aaron; Hughes, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    To what extent do more creative people process emotional information differently than less creative people? This study examined the role of emotion processing in creativity and its implications for the creativity-psychopathology association. A total of 117 participants performed a memory recognition task for negative, positive, and neutral words;…

  18. Bias or reality? : negative perceptions of ambiguous social cues, social performance and physical arousal in socially anxious youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miers, Anne Claire

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with the negative perceptions of socially anxious youth in three different cognitive domains: (a) interpretation of ambiguous social situations, (b) self-evaluation of social skills and nervous behaviors, and (c) perception of physical arousal during social situations. It also

  19. RESEARCHES REGARDING USE OF TEXTILE MATERIALS FOR THERMAL INSULATION AT NEGATIVE TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOSUB Andrei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Using thermal insulation in negative temperature acts to reduce heat flow to the cooled space or to objects that have a temperature below ambient temperature. To achieve economic operation of the space to be cooled insulation thickness and quality is an important factor. In this article we want to compare three products used in thermal insulation at negative temperatures: expanded polystyrene, non-woven and wool coats. The materials will be tested with a mechanical vapor compression refrigerator capable of producing temperatures in the range +4 .. -35 ° C, managed by a programmer Dixel capable of recording values between +40. .. -60 °C. Refrigeration insulation enclosure was made with 100 mm expanded polystyrene. On one side of the enclosure will be a cut of 250 * 250 mm, chosen in a central position where the material will be introduced to be tested. The dimensions of the samples are 250 * 250 * 60 mm. To check the insulation properties of materials it will be used a temperature logger capable of recording with two probes temperatures between +125...-40° C. One of the probes will be inserted inside the refrigerator and the second probe will be positioned to the outside of the test material adhered to an aluminum plate, in order to read a average temperature. The difference in thickness of the insulation shall be filled with non-woven material. Hardening the assembly will be made using a 6 mm thick OSB board. The materials will be tested in an identical ambient temperature and humidity.

  20. Room-temperature negative capacitance in a ferroelectric-dielectric superlattice heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Weiwei; Khan, Asif; Marti, Xavi; Nelson, Chris; Serrao, Claudy; Ravichandran, Jayakanth; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Salahuddin, Sayeef

    2014-10-08

    We demonstrate room-temperature negative capacitance in a ferroelectric-dielectric superlattice heterostructure. In epitaxially grown superlattice of ferroelectric BSTO (Ba0.8Sr0.2TiO3) and dielectric LAO (LaAlO3), capacitance was found to be larger compared to the constituent LAO (dielectric) capacitance. This enhancement of capacitance in a series combination of two capacitors indicates that the ferroelectric was stabilized in a state of negative capacitance. Negative capacitance was observed for superlattices grown on three different substrates (SrTiO3 (001), DyScO3 (110), and GdScO3 (110)) covering a large range of substrate strain. This demonstrates the robustness of the effect as well as potential for controlling the negative capacitance effect using epitaxial strain. Room-temperature demonstration of negative capacitance is an important step toward lowering the subthreshold swing in a transistor below the intrinsic thermodynamic limit of 60 mV/decade and thereby improving energy efficiency.

  1. Correcting urban bias in large-scale temperature records in China, 1980-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Tett, S. F. B.; Yan, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Trends in urban fraction around meteorological station were used to quantify the relationship between urban growth and local urban warming rate in temperature records in China. Urban warming rates were estimated by comparing observed temperature trends with those derived from ERA-Interim reanalysis data. With urban expansion surrounding observing stations, daily minimum temperatures were enhanced, and daily maximum temperatures were slightly reduced. On average, a change in urban fraction from 0% to 100% induces additional warming in daily minimum temperature of +1.7 ± 0.3°C; daily maximum temperature changes due to urbanization are -0.4 ± 0.2°C. Based on this, the regional area-weighted average trend of urban-related warming in daily minimum (mean) temperature in eastern China was estimated to be +0.042 ± 0.007 (+0.017 ± 0.003)°C decade-1, representing about 9% (4%) of overall warming trend and reducing the diurnal temperature range by -0.05°C decade-1. No significant relationship was found between background temperature anomalies and the strength of urban warming.

  2. Negative magnetoresistance of pitch-based carbon fibers Temperature and pressure dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The negative transverse magnetoresistance of high-modulus pitch-based carbon fibers has been measured over the temperature range 1.3-4.2 K at ambient pressure and at 4.2 K under hydrostatic pressure up to 16 kbar. At low fields (less than 0.5 torr) the magnitude of the magnetoresistance increases markedly as the temperature is lowered from 4.2 K to 1.3 K, in disagreement with Bright's theoretical model, and decreases with pressure at the rate -0.6 percent/kbar.

  3. Consistent negative response of US crops to high temperatures in observations and crop models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauberger, Bernhard; Archontoulis, Sotirios; Arneth, Almut; Balkovic, Juraj; Ciais, Philippe; Deryng, Delphine; Elliott, Joshua; Folberth, Christian; Khabarov, Nikolay; Müller, Christoph; Pugh, Thomas A. M.; Rolinski, Susanne; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Schmid, Erwin; Wang, Xuhui; Schlenker, Wolfram; Frieler, Katja

    2017-04-01

    High temperatures are detrimental to crop yields and could lead to global warming-driven reductions in agricultural productivity. To assess future threats, the majority of studies used process-based crop models, but their ability to represent effects of high temperature has been questioned. Here we show that an ensemble of nine crop models reproduces the observed average temperature responses of US maize, soybean and wheat yields. Each day above 30°C diminishes maize and soybean yields by up to 6% under rainfed conditions. Declines observed in irrigated areas, or simulated assuming full irrigation, are weak. This supports the hypothesis that water stress induced by high temperatures causes the decline. For wheat a negative response to high temperature is neither observed nor simulated under historical conditions, since critical temperatures are rarely exceeded during the growing season. In the future, yields are modelled to decline for all three crops at temperatures above 30°C. Elevated CO2 can only weakly reduce these yield losses, in contrast to irrigation.

  4. Potential negative effects of perspective-taking efforts in the context of close relationships: increased bias and reduced satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorauer, Jacquie D; Sucharyna, Tamara A

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments demonstrated that trying to appreciate a close other's unique point of view (imagine-other perspective taking) increases the extent to which individuals overestimate their own transparency to the close other, that is, how many of their values, preferences, traits, and feelings are readily apparent to him or her. Trying to be objective and pay careful attention to cues from a close other, which inhibits perspective taking, instead had the opposite effect. Mediation analyses suggested that increased focus on the self as an object of evaluation contributed to the positive effect of imagine-other perspective taking on perceived transparency, and decreased focus on the self as an object of evaluation contributed to the negative effect of trying to be objective on these judgments. These effects on perceived transparency had important implications for relationship well-being: Enhanced perceived transparency of negative feelings prompted by imagine-other perspective taking during a back-and-forth exchange with a romantic partner led to systematic discrepancies between individuals' own and their partner's experience of the exchange and reduced relationship satisfaction; trying to be objective instead reduced perceived transparency and thereby increased satisfaction. Notably, initial closeness with another person enhanced rather than tempered the egocentric effects of perspective taking. Taken together, these results suggest that positive motivations to nurture a close relationship and be sensitive to a loved one might sometimes be better channeled toward paying closer attention to his or her behavior than toward perspective taking.

  5. Effect of Upper-Cycle Temperature on the Load-Biased, Strain-Temperature Response of NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II; Noebe, Ronald; Bigelow, Glen; Qiu, Shipeng; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garg, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in shape memory alloy based actuators has increased as the primary benefits of these solid-state devices have become more apparent. However, much is still unknown about the characteristic behavior of these materials when used in actuator applications. Recently we have shown that the maximum temperature reached during thermal cycling under isobaric conditions could significantly affect the observed mechanical response of NiTi (55 wt% Ni), especially the amount of transformation strain available for actuation and thus work output. The investigation we report here extends that original work to ascertain whether further increases in the upper-cycle temperature would produce additional changes in the work output of the material, which has a stress-free austenite finish temperature of 113 C, and to determine the optimum cyclic conditions. Thus, isobaric, thermal-cycle experiments were conducted on the aforementioned alloy at various stresses from 50-300 MPa using upper-cycle temperatures of 165, 200, 230, 260, 290, 320 and 350 C. The data indicated that the amount of applied stress influenced the transformation strain, as would be expected. However, the maximum temperature reached during the thermal excursion also plays an equally significant role in determining the transformation strain, with the maximum transformation strain observed during thermal cycling to 290 C. In situ neutron diffraction at stress and temperature showed that the differences in transformation strain were mostly related to changes in martensite texture when cycling to different upper-cycle temperatures. Hence, understanding this effect is important to optimizing the operation of SMA-based actuators and could lead to new methods for processing and training shape memory alloys for optimal performance.

  6. Re-emerging ocean temperature anomalies in late-2010 associated with a repeat negative NAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taws, Sarah L.; Marsh, Robert; Wells, Neil C.; Hirschi, Joël

    2011-10-01

    Northern Europe was influenced by consecutive episodes of extreme winter weather at the start and end of the 2010 calendar year. A tripole pattern in North Atlantic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs), associated with an exceptionally negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), characterized both winter periods. This pattern was largely absent at the surface during the 2010 summer season; however equivalent sub-surface temperature anomalies were preserved within the seasonal thermocline throughout the year. Here, we present evidence for the re-emergence of late-winter 2009/10 SSTAs during the following early winter season of 2010/11. The observed re-emergence contributes toward the winter-to-winter persistence of the anomalous tripole pattern. Considering the active influence of the oceans upon leading modes of atmospheric circulation over seasonal timescales, associated with the memory of large-scale sea surface temperature anomaly patterns, the re-emergence of remnant temperature anomalies may have also contributed toward the persistence of a negative winter NAO, and the recurrence of extreme wintry conditions over the initial 2010/11 winter season.

  7. Thermoacoustic and thermoreflectance imaging of biased integrated circuits: Voltage and temperature maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Rosales, E.; Cedeño, E. [Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute, University of Campinas - Unicamp, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Legaria 694, Colonia Irrigación, CP 11500, México, DF (Mexico); Hernandez-Wong, J. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Legaria 694, Colonia Irrigación, CP 11500, México, DF (Mexico); CONACYT, México, DF, México (Mexico); Rojas-Trigos, J. B.; Marin, E. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Legaria 694, Colonia Irrigación, CP 11500, México, DF (Mexico); Gandra, F. C. G.; Mansanares, A. M., E-mail: manoel@ifi.unicamp.br [Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute, University of Campinas - Unicamp, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-25

    In this work a combined thermoacoustic and thermoreflectance set-up was designed for imaging biased microelectronic circuits. In particular, it was used with polycrystalline silicon resistive tracks grown on a monocrystalline Si substrate mounted on a test chip. Thermoreflectance images, obtained by scanning a probe laser beam on the sample surface, clearly show the regions periodically heated by Joule effect, which are associated to the electric current distribution in the circuit. The thermoacoustic signal, detected by a pyroelectric/piezoelectric sensor beneath the chip, also discloses the Joule contribution of the whole sample. However, additional information emerges when a non-modulated laser beam is focused on the sample surface in a raster scan mode allowing imaging of the sample. The distribution of this supplementary signal is related to the voltage distribution along the circuit.

  8. Effects of vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation on copper penetration into low-k dielectrics under bias-temperature stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; Xue, P.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); King, S. W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Nishi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    The effects of vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation on copper penetration into non-porous low-k dielectrics under bias-temperature stress (BTS) were investigated. By employing x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth-profile measurements on both as-deposited and VUV-irradiated SiCOH/Cu stacks, it was found that under the same BTS conditions, the diffusion depth of Cu into the VUV-irradiated SiCOH is higher than that of as-deposited SiCOH. On the other hand, under the same temperature-annealing stress (TS) without electric bias, the Cu distribution profiles in the VUV-irradiated SiCOH were same with that for the as-deposited SiCOH. The experiments suggest that in as-deposited SiCOH, the diffused Cu exists primarily in the atomic state, while in VUV-irradiated SiCOH, the diffused Cu is oxidized by the hydroxyl ions (OH{sup −}) generated from VUV irradiation and exists in the ionic state. The mechanisms for metal diffusion and ion injection in VUV irradiated low-k dielectrics are discussed.

  9. Temperature-dependent bias-stress-induced electrical instability of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hui-Min; Yu, Guang; Lu, Hai; Wu, Chen-Fei; Tang, Lan-Feng; Zhou, Dong; Ren, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Liao; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-07-01

    The time and temperature dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias stress (PBS) and the following recovery process are investigated in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. It is found that the time dependence of threshold voltage shift can be well described by a stretched exponential equation in which the time constant τ is found to be temperature dependent. Based on Arrhenius plots, an average effective energy barrier Eτstress = 0.72 eV for the PBS process and an average effective energy barrier Eτrecovery = 0.58 eV for the recovery process are extracted respectively. A charge trapping/detrapping model is used to explain the threshold voltage shift in both the PBS and the recovery process. The influence of gate bias stress on transistor performance is one of the most critical issues for practical device development. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB301900 and 2011CB922100) and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China

  10. High-ion temperature experiments with negative-ion-based NBI in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeiri, Y.; Morita, S.; Tsumori, K.; Ikeda, K.; Oka, Y.; Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Goto, M.; Miyazawa, J.; Masuzaki, S.; Ashikawa, N.; Yokoyama, M.; Narihara, K.; Yamada, I.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Inagaki, S.; Tanaka, K.; Peterson, B.J.; Ida, K.; Kaneko, O.; Komori, A.; Murakami, S.

    2005-01-01

    High-Z plasmas have been produced with Ar- and/or Ne-gas fuelling to increase the ion temperature in the LHD plasmas heated with the high-energy negative-ion-based NBI. Although the electron heating is dominant in the high-energy NBI heating, the direct ion heating power is much enhanced effectively in low-density plasmas due to both an increase in the beam absorption (ionisation) power and a reduction of the ion density in the high-Z plasmas. Intensive Ne- and/or Ar-glow discharge cleaning works well to suppress dilution of the high-Z plasmas with the wall-absorbed hydrogen. As a result, the ion temperature increases with an increase in the ion heating power normalized by the ion density, and reaches 10 keV. An increase in the ion temperature is also observed with an addition of the centrally focused ECRH to the low-density and high-Z NBI plasma, suggesting improvement of the ion transport. The results obtained in the high-Z plasma experiments with the high-energy NBI heating indicate that an increase in the direct ion heating power and improvement of the ion transport are essential to the ion temperature rise, and that a high-ion temperature would be obtained as well in hydrogen plasmas with low-energy positive-NBI heating which is planed in near future in LHD. (author)

  11. Ideal Gas with a Varying (Negative Absolute) Temperature: an Alternative to Dark Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhajit; Mondal, Anindita; Corda, Christian

    2018-02-01

    The present work is an attempt to investigate whether the evolutionary history of the Universe from the offset of inflation can be described by assuming the cosmic fluid to be an ideal gas with a specific gas constant but a varying negative absolute temperature (NAT). The motivation of this work is to search for an alternative to the "exotic" and "supernatural" dark energy (DE). In fact, the NAT works as an "effective quintessence" and there is need to deal neither with exotic matter like DE nor with modified gravity theories. For the sake of completeness, we release some clarifications on NATs in Section 3 of the paper.

  12. Acclimation to higher VPD and temperature minimized negative effects on assimilation and grain yield of wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashid, Muhammad Adil; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Adapting to climate change and minimizing its negative impact on crop production requires detailed understanding of the direct and indirect effects of different climate variables (i.e. temperature, VPD). We investigated the direct (via heat stress) and indirect effects (through increased VPD......) of high temperature on growth, physiology and yield of two wheat cultivars (Taifun and Vinjett) at two watering levels; well-watered: WW (100% evapotranspiration (ET)) and drought stress: DS (50% of WW ET). Three climate treatments were applied for five days, starting at one week after anthesis......-use efficiency (WUEp) by 24–64% over HH during stress but whole-plant WUE at final harvest was not affected. HD reduced grainfilling duration (3 days), resulted in relatively lower green leaf area (GLA) after the stress and showed a tendency of lower net assimilation rate during the stress compared to HH...

  13. Negative effects of temperature and atmospheric depositions on the seed viability of common juniper (Juniperus communis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruwez, R; De Frenne, P; De Schrijver, A; Leroux, O; Vangansbeke, P; Verheyen, K

    2014-02-01

    Environmental change is increasingly impacting ecosystems worldwide. However, our knowledge about the interacting effects of various drivers of global change on sexual reproduction of plants, one of their key mechanisms to cope with change, is limited. This study examines populations of poorly regenerating and threatened common juniper (Juniperus communis) to determine the influence of four drivers of global change (rising temperatures, nitrogen deposition, potentially acidifying deposition and altering precipitation patterns) on two key developmental phases during sexual reproduction, gametogenesis and fertilization (seed phase two, SP2) and embryo development (seed phase three, SP3), and on the ripening time of seeds. In 42 populations throughout the distribution range of common juniper in Europe, 11,943 seeds of two developmental phases were sampled. Seed viability was determined using seed dissection and related to accumulated temperature (expressed as growing degree-days), nitrogen and potentially acidifying deposition (nitrogen plus sulfur), and precipitation data. Precipitation had no influence on the viability of the seeds or on the ripening time. Increasing temperatures had a negative impact on the viability of SP2 and SP3 seeds and decreased the ripening time. Potentially acidifying depositions negatively influenced SP3 seed viability, while enhanced nitrogen deposition led to lower ripening times. Higher temperatures and atmospheric deposition affected SP3 seeds more than SP2 seeds. However, this is possibly a delayed effect as juniper seeds develop practically independently, due to the absence of vascular communication with the parent plant from shortly after fertilization. It is proposed that the failure of natural regeneration in many European juniper populations might be attributed to climate warming as well as enhanced atmospheric deposition of nitrogen and sulfur.

  14. Room temperature negative differential resistance in terahertz quantum cascade laser structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albo, Asaf, E-mail: asafalbo@gmail.com; Hu, Qing [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Reno, John L. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1303, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1303 (United States)

    2016-08-22

    The mechanisms that limit the temperature performance of GaAs/Al{sub 0.15}GaAs-based terahertz quantum cascade lasers (THz-QCLs) have been identified as thermally activated LO-phonon scattering and leakage of charge carriers into the continuum. Consequently, the combination of highly diagonal optical transition and higher barriers should significantly reduce the adverse effects of both mechanisms and lead to improved temperature performance. Here, we study the temperature performance of highly diagonal THz-QCLs with high barriers. Our analysis uncovers an additional leakage channel which is the thermal excitation of carriers into bounded higher energy levels, rather than the escape into the continuum. Based on this understanding, we have designed a structure with an increased intersubband spacing between the upper lasing level and excited states in a highly diagonal THz-QCL, which exhibits negative differential resistance even at room temperature. This result is a strong evidence for the effective suppression of the aforementioned leakage channel.

  15. Fundamentals of bias temperature instability in MOS transistors characterization methods, process and materials impact, DC and AC modeling

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims to cover different aspects of Bias Temperature Instability (BTI). BTI remains as an important reliability concern for CMOS transistors and circuits. Development of BTI resilient technology relies on utilizing artefact-free stress and measurement methods and suitable physics-based models for accurate determination of degradation at end-of-life, and understanding the gate insulator process impact on BTI. This book discusses different ultra-fast characterization techniques for recovery artefact free BTI measurements. It also covers different direct measurements techniques to access pre-existing and newly generated gate insulator traps responsible for BTI. The book provides a consistent physical framework for NBTI and PBTI respectively for p- and n- channel MOSFETs, consisting of trap generation and trapping. A physics-based compact model is presented to estimate measured BTI degradation in planar Si MOSFETs having differently processed SiON and HKMG gate insulators, in planar SiGe MOSFETs and also...

  16. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  17. Non-stationary Bias Correction of Monthly CMIP5 Temperature Projections over China using a Residual-based Bagging Tree Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Lee, C.

    2017-12-01

    The biases in the Global Circulation Models (GCMs) are crucial for understanding future climate changes. Currently, most bias correction methodologies suffer from the assumption that model bias is stationary. This paper provides a non-stationary bias correction model, termed Residual-based Bagging Tree (RBT) model, to reduce simulation biases and to quantify the contributions of single models. Specifically, the proposed model estimates the residuals between individual models and observations, and takes the differences between observations and the ensemble mean into consideration during the model training process. A case study is conducted for 10 major river basins in Mainland China during different seasons. Results show that the proposed model is capable of providing accurate and stable predictions while including the non-stationarities into the modeling framework. Significant reductions in both bias and root mean squared error are achieved with the proposed RBT model, especially for the central and western parts of China. The proposed RBT model has consistently better performance in reducing biases when compared to the raw ensemble mean, the ensemble mean with simple additive bias correction, and the single best model for different seasons. Furthermore, the contribution of each single GCM in reducing the overall bias is quantified. The single model importance varies between 3.1% and 7.2%. For different future scenarios (RCP 2.6, RCP 4.5, and RCP 8.5), the results from RBT model suggest temperature increases of 1.44 ºC, 2.59 ºC, and 4.71 ºC by the end of the century, respectively, when compared to the average temperature during 1970 - 1999.

  18. New England observed and predicted July maximum negative stream/river temperature daily rate of change points

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The shapefile contains points with associated observed and predicted July stream/river temperature maximum negative daily rate of change in New England based on a...

  19. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Zhao, S. F.; Yuan, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te) observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions) satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than -0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere), which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne-Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple parameters helps to

  20. Negative attentional bias for positive recovery-related words as a predictor of treatment success among individuals with an alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettie, Hannah C; Hogan, Lee M; Cox, W Miles

    2018-04-03

    This study assessed relationships between clients' attentional bias (AB) for different types of stimuli and their treatment outcomes. Alcohol AB during detoxification has previously been shown to predict relapse, but further research was needed to clarify this relationship. The current study determined whether AB for recovery-related words would also predict treatment outcome. Participants were 45 clients undergoing alcohol detoxification, and a control group of 36 staff members. They rated words for personal relevance in four categories (alcohol-related, neutral, positive change-related, and negative change-related). Participants completed an individualized Stroop task containing their chosen words. They were also assessed on readiness-to-change, difficulties with emotion regulation, drinking problems, anxiety, and depression. Clients were interviewed at a three-month follow-up to determine their treatment outcome. As predicted, questionnaire measures did not predict clients' treatment outcome (p > .05). A logistic regression model indicated that the best predictor of treatment outcome was AB for positive change-related words (p = .048), with successful individuals having less AB for these words than for the other word categories. Although this finding was unexpected, it was supported by significant relationships between positive change-related interference scores and continuous measures of drinking at follow-up [i.e. number of units drunk (p = .039) and number of drinking days (p = .018)]. The results suggest that positive change-related words are a better predictor of treatment outcome than are either alcohol-related words or negative change-related words. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of negative substrate bias voltage on the structure and properties of CrN films deposited by modulated pulsed power (MPP) magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, J; Sproul, W D; Moore, J J; Wu, Z L; Lee, S L

    2011-01-01

    As a variation of high power pulsed magnetron sputtering technique, modulated pulsed power (MPP) magnetron sputtering has shown the capability of maintaining a good deposition rate while achieving a high degree of ionization of the sputtered material with low ion energies. It is critical to usefully utilize the negative substrate bias voltage (V b ) to attract these ions towards the substrate to enhance the ion bombardment on growing films by controlling the kinetic energy and the behaviours of ions and electrons arriving on growing films. In this study, CrN thin films have been deposited by MPP in a closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system at different V b varied from 0 to -150 V. The peak and mean substrate ion current densities were measured during the depositions as a function of V b . The films were annealed at 450 deg. C in Ar for 1 hr in an effort to release the defects and residual stress in the as-deposited films. The structure and properties of as-deposited and annealed films were characterized by electron probe micro-analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and ball-on-disc wear test. An increase in the Cr/N ratio of the film was observed as the V b was increased negatively to above -70 V, which resulted in the formation of the hexagonal Cr 2 N film at V b = -150 V. A preferred (3 1 1) texture was observed in the CrN films deposited as V b increased from -50 V to -100 V. The residual stress of the films increased as the V b was increased from 0 to -100 V and then decreased with further increasing the V b . The increase in the V b led to grain refinement and an increase in the hardness of the films, but the wear resistance of the films decreased rapidly as the V b was increased to -150 V.

  2. Evaluation of plasma-induced damage and bias temperature instability depending on type of antenna layer using current-starved ring oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Ryo; Furuta, Jun; Kobayashi, Kazutoshi

    2018-04-01

    Plasma-induced damage (PID) and bias temperature instability (BTI) are inevitable reliability issues that degrade the performance of transistors. In this study, PID and BTI, depending on the type of antenna layer, are evaluated in current-starved ring oscillators (ROs) to separate degradations in PMOS and NMOS transistors in a 65 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) process. Oscillation frequencies of ROs fluctuate with the performance of MOSFET switches between power/ground rails and virtual power/ground nodes. The initial frequencies of ROs with PMOS switches having antennas on upper layers decrease. However, those with NMOS switches become higher than those without PID because high-k dielectrics are damaged by positive charges. The degradation induced by negative BTI (NBTI) in PMOS is 1.5 times larger than that induced by positive BTI (PBTI) in NMOS. However, both NBTI- and PBTI-induced degradations are the same among different antenna layers. The frequency fluctuation caused by PID is converted to threshold voltage shifts by circuit simulations. Threshold voltages shift by 8.4 and 11% owing to PID in PMOS and NMOS transistors, respectively.

  3. Analysis of the enhanced negative correlation between electron density and electron temperature related to earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Shen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric perturbations in plasma parameters have been observed before large earthquakes, but the correlation between different parameters has been less studied in previous research. The present study is focused on the relationship between electron density (Ne and temperature (Te observed by the DEMETER (Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions satellite during local nighttime, in which a positive correlation has been revealed near the equator and a weak correlation at mid- and low latitudes over both hemispheres. Based on this normal background analysis, the negative correlation with the lowest percent in all Ne and Te points is studied before and after large earthquakes at mid- and low latitudes. The multiparameter observations exhibited typical synchronous disturbances before the Chile M8.8 earthquake in 2010 and the Pu'er M6.4 in 2007, and Te varied inversely with Ne over the epicentral areas. Moreover, statistical analysis has been done by selecting the orbits at a distance of 1000 km and ±7 days before and after the global earthquakes. Enhanced negative correlation coefficients lower than −0.5 between Ne and Te are found in 42% of points to be connected with earthquakes. The correlation median values at different seismic levels show a clear decrease with earthquakes larger than 7. Finally, the electric-field-coupling model is discussed; furthermore, a digital simulation has been carried out by SAMI2 (Sami2 is Another Model of the Ionosphere, which illustrates that the external electric field in the ionosphere can strengthen the negative correlation in Ne and Te at a lower latitude relative to the disturbed source due to the effects of the geomagnetic field. Although seismic activity is not the only source to cause the inverse Ne–Te variations, the present results demonstrate one possibly useful tool in seismo-electromagnetic anomaly differentiation, and a comprehensive analysis with multiple

  4. Effects of roughness and temperature on low-energy hydrogen positive and negative ion reflection from silicon and carbon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, N; Kato, S; Miyamoto, T; Nishiura, M; Tsumori, K; Matsumoto, Y; Kenmotsu, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Wada, M; Yamaoka, H

    2014-02-01

    Angle-resolved energy distribution functions of positive and negative hydrogen ions produced from a rough-finished Si surface under 1 keV proton irradiation have been measured. The corresponding distribution from a crystalline surface and a carbon surface are also measured for comparison. Intensities of positive and negative ions from the rough-finished Si are substantially smaller than those from crystalline Si. The angular distributions of these species are broader for rough surface than the crystalline surface. No significant temperature dependence for positive and negative ion intensities is observed for all samples in the temperature range from 300 to 400 K.

  5. Is negative self-referent bias an endophenotype for depression? An fMRI study of emotional self-referent words in twins at high vs. low risk of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K W; Larsen, J E; Harmer, C J

    2018-01-01

    . Functional MRI yielded no differences between high-risk and low-risk twins in retrieval-specific neural activity for positive or negative words or during the recognition of negative versus positive words within the hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. CONCLUSIONS: The subtle display of negative recall bias......BACKGROUND: Negative cognitive bias and aberrant neural processing of self-referent emotional words seem to be trait-marks of depression. However, it is unclear whether these neurocognitive changes are present in unaffected first-degree relatives and constitute an illness endophenotype. METHODS......-up cohort study. Participants performed a self-referent emotional word categorisation task and free word recall task followed by a recognition task during fMRI. Participants also completed questionnaires assessing mood, personality traits and coping strategies. RESULTS: High-risk and low-risk twins (age...

  6. Programming Arduino to Control Bias Voltages to Temperature-Depedndent Gamma-ray Detectors aboard TRYAD Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevons, C. E.; Jenke, P.; Briggs, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are sub-millisecond gamma-ray flashes that are correlated with lightning have been observed with numerous satellites since their discovery in the early 1990s. Although substantial research has been conducted on TGFs, puzzling questions regarding their origin are still left unanswered. Consequently, the Terrestrial RaYs Analysis and Detection (TRYAD) mission is designed to solve many issues about TGFs by measuring the beam profile and orientation of TGFs in low Earth orbit. This project consists of sending two CubeSats into low-Earth orbit where they will independently sample TGF beams. Both of the TRYAD CubeSats will contain a gamma-ray detector composed of lead doped plastic scintillator coupled to silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays. The gain readings of the SiPMs vary with temperature and the bias voltage must be corrected to compensate. Using an Arduino micro-controller, circuitry and software was developed to control the gain in response to the resistance of a thermistor. I will present the difficulties involved with this project along with our solutions.

  7. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-01-01

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure

  8. Sub-kT/q Subthreshold-Slope Using Negative Capacitance in Low-Temperature Polycrystalline-Silicon Thin-Film Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyo; Jang, Gil Su; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Seok, Ki Hwan; Chae, Hee Jae; Lee, Sol Kyu; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-04-21

    Realizing a low-temperature polycrystalline-silicon (LTPS) thin-film transistor (TFT) with sub-kT/q subthreshold slope (SS) is significantly important to the development of next generation active-matrix organic-light emitting diode displays. This is the first time a sub-kT/q SS (31.44 mV/dec) incorporated with a LTPS-TFT with polycrystalline-Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT)/ZrTiO4 (ZTO) gate dielectrics has been demonstrated. The sub-kT/q SS was observed in the weak inversion region at -0.5 V showing ultra-low operating voltage with the highest mobility (250.5 cm(2)/Vsec) reported so far. In addition, the reliability of DC negative bias stress, hot carrier stress and self-heating stress in LTPS-TFT with negative capacitance was investigated for the first time. It was found that the self-heating stress showed accelerated SS degradation due to the PZT Curie temperature.

  9. Effect of negative substrate bias voltage on the structure and properties of CrN films deposited by modulated pulsed power (MPP) magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J; Sproul, W D; Moore, J J; Wu, Z L [Advanced Coatings and Surface Engineering Laboratory (ACSEL), Metallurgical and Materials Engineering department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Lee, S L, E-mail: jlin@mines.edu [US Army ARDEC Benet Labs, Watervliet, NY 12189 (United States)

    2011-10-26

    As a variation of high power pulsed magnetron sputtering technique, modulated pulsed power (MPP) magnetron sputtering has shown the capability of maintaining a good deposition rate while achieving a high degree of ionization of the sputtered material with low ion energies. It is critical to usefully utilize the negative substrate bias voltage (V{sub b}) to attract these ions towards the substrate to enhance the ion bombardment on growing films by controlling the kinetic energy and the behaviours of ions and electrons arriving on growing films. In this study, CrN thin films have been deposited by MPP in a closed field unbalanced magnetron sputtering system at different V{sub b} varied from 0 to -150 V. The peak and mean substrate ion current densities were measured during the depositions as a function of V{sub b}. The films were annealed at 450 deg. C in Ar for 1 hr in an effort to release the defects and residual stress in the as-deposited films. The structure and properties of as-deposited and annealed films were characterized by electron probe micro-analysis, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nanoindentation, and ball-on-disc wear test. An increase in the Cr/N ratio of the film was observed as the V{sub b} was increased negatively to above -70 V, which resulted in the formation of the hexagonal Cr{sub 2}N film at V{sub b} = -150 V. A preferred (3 1 1) texture was observed in the CrN films deposited as V{sub b} increased from -50 V to -100 V. The residual stress of the films increased as the V{sub b} was increased from 0 to -100 V and then decreased with further increasing the V{sub b}. The increase in the V{sub b} led to grain refinement and an increase in the hardness of the films, but the wear resistance of the films decreased rapidly as the V{sub b} was increased to -150 V.

  10. Reliability characterization of SiON and MGHK MOSFETs using flicker noise and its correlation with the bias temperature instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samnakay, Rameez; Balandin, Alexander A.; Srinivasan, Purushothaman

    2017-09-01

    Bias temperature instability (BTI) is one of the critical device degradation mechanisms in poly-Si/SiON and metal gate/high-k complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technologies. Using the pre- and post-BTI flicker noise measurements, we investigated the bulk trap density, Nt, in both of these technologies. The low-frequency noise spectra were predominantly of 1/fγ type with γ < 1 for NMOS and ∼1 for PMOS. For SiON based technologies, the lower VTH degradation due to PBTI was noticed while considerable VTH degradation was observed for NBTI in both SiON and MGHK technologies. Both MGHK and SiON pFETs show a clear increase in the effective volume trap density, Nt, after NBTI. The increase in Nt in MGHK n-MOSFETs during PBTI is markedly higher than that in MGHK p-MOSFETs during NBTI. From 2012-2016 he was a Research Assistant with the Nano-Device Laboratory at the University of California - Riverside, as well as a member of the Quality and Reliability engineering team at Globalfoundries, Inc. during the summer of 2014. He has currently authored or co-authored 10 journal publications and numerous conference presentations. His current research interests include 1/f noise in high-k dielectrics and fabricated 2D van der Waal thin-film devices Mr. Samnakay's awards and honors include the Dean's Distinguished Fellowship Award (University of California-Riverside) and induction into the IEEE-HKN honors society. He also serves as a reviewer for 6 journals including Applied Physics Letters, Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Nanotechnology journals.

  11. Temperature dependence of the resonance peaks in the elastic scattering of fast negative charged particles in monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, N.P.; Kovalev, G.V.

    1980-01-01

    Temperature dependence of angular distributions of fast negatively charged particles scattered in the monocrystal is considered. The consideration is carried out in the first order of the perturbation theory. An expression for the total cross section of the scattering with account of discreteness and thermal oscillations is obtained. It is shown that small-angle coherent processes described by the averaged potential in reality can realized in the case extremely high temperatures [ru

  12. Using Data Mining Techniques to Investigate Relationships between Observed Aircraft Temperature and Relative Humidity Data for Numerical Weather Prediction Model Bias Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCracken, R. F.; Collard, A.

    2016-12-01

    There has been a known issue for the past 40+ years that certain types of commercial aircraft temperature sensors will report temperatures lower due to evaporative cooling effects if the sensor is too wet due to flying through cumulus clouds. Over the years, Aircraft Instrumentation manuals and several studies have investigated this issue and have found that the temperature sensor measures report temperatures that are closer to the web bulb temperature instead of actual temperature, a 1-3°C temperature difference. Most studies are experimental field campaigns, since there are very few moisture observations that are collocated with temperature observations to test and correct for this issue. This issue has begun to be investigated for purposes of bias correction for the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system/Global Forecast System (GFS) models. NOAA/Environmental Modeling Center (EMC) has received several new aircraft datasets, such as the Water Vapor Sensing System (WVSS) and Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) data, which will provide the opportunity to investigate collocated temperature and moisture observations. Initial standard correlation analysis shows moderate correlations between high values of specific humidity and temperature. To investigate further relationships, a data mining algorithm will be utilized. A decision tree utilizing the C4.5 algorithm was generated to illustrate the relationships between temperature, moisture, height and winds. Results from this data mining study will be presented.

  13. Measurements of temperature characteristics and estimation of terahertz negative differential conductance in resonant-tunneling-diode oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, M.; Suzuki, S.; Fukuma, T.

    2017-11-01

    The temperature dependences of output power, oscillation frequency, and current-voltage curve are measured for resonant-tunneling-diode terahertz (THz) oscillators. The output power largely changes with temperature owing to the change in Ohmic loss. In contrast to the output power, the oscillation frequency and current-voltage curve are almost insensitive to temperature. The measured temperature dependence of output power is compared with the theoretical calculation including the negative differential conductance (NDC) as a fitting parameter assumed to be independent of temperature. Very good agreement was obtained between the measurement and calculation, and the NDC in the THz frequency region is estimated. The results show that the absolute values of NDC in the THz region significantly decrease relative to that at DC, and increases with increasing frequency in the measured frequency range.

  14. Measurements of temperature characteristics and estimation of terahertz negative differential conductance in resonant-tunneling-diode oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Asada

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependences of output power, oscillation frequency, and current-voltage curve are measured for resonant-tunneling-diode terahertz (THz oscillators. The output power largely changes with temperature owing to the change in Ohmic loss. In contrast to the output power, the oscillation frequency and current-voltage curve are almost insensitive to temperature. The measured temperature dependence of output power is compared with the theoretical calculation including the negative differential conductance (NDC as a fitting parameter assumed to be independent of temperature. Very good agreement was obtained between the measurement and calculation, and the NDC in the THz frequency region is estimated. The results show that the absolute values of NDC in the THz region significantly decrease relative to that at DC, and increases with increasing frequency in the measured frequency range.

  15. Photosynthetic temperature responses of tree species in Rwanda: evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in montane rainforest climax species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vårhammar, Angelica; Wallin, Göran; McLean, Christopher M; Dusenge, Mirindi Eric; Medlyn, Belinda E; Hasper, Thomas B; Nsabimana, Donat; Uddling, Johan

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of photosynthetic metabolism to temperature has been identified as a key uncertainty for projecting the magnitude of the terrestrial feedback on future climate change. While temperature responses of photosynthetic capacities have been comparatively well investigated in temperate species, the responses of tropical tree species remain unexplored. We compared the responses of seedlings of native cold-adapted tropical montane rainforest tree species with those of exotic warm-adapted plantation species, all growing in an intermediate temperature common garden in Rwanda. Leaf gas exchange responses to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) at different temperatures (20-40°C) were used to assess the temperature responses of biochemical photosynthetic capacities. Analyses revealed a lower optimum temperature for photosynthetic electron transport rates than for Rubisco carboxylation rates, along with lower electron transport optima in the native cold-adapted than in the exotic warm-adapted species. The photosynthetic optimum temperatures were generally exceeded by daytime peak leaf temperatures, in particular in the native montane rainforest climax species. This study thus provides evidence of pronounced negative effects of high temperature in tropical trees and indicates high susceptibility of montane rainforest climax species to future global warming. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  16. Is negative self-referent bias an endophenotype for depression? An fMRI study of emotional self-referent words in twins at high vs. low risk of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, K W; Larsen, J E; Harmer, C J; Siebner, H R; Kessing, L V; Macoveanu, J; Vinberg, M

    2018-01-15

    Negative cognitive bias and aberrant neural processing of self-referent emotional words seem to be trait-marks of depression. However, it is unclear whether these neurocognitive changes are present in unaffected first-degree relatives and constitute an illness endophenotype. Fifty-three healthy, never-depressed monozygotic or dizygotic twins with a co-twin history of depression (high-risk group: n = 26) or no first-degree family history of depression (low-risk group: n = 27) underwent neurocognitive testing and functional magnetic imaging (fMRI) as part of a follow-up cohort study. Participants performed a self-referent emotional word categorisation task and free word recall task followed by a recognition task during fMRI. Participants also completed questionnaires assessing mood, personality traits and coping strategies. High-risk and low-risk twins (age, mean ± SD: 40 ± 11) were well-balanced for demographic variables, mood, coping and neuroticism. High-risk twins showed lower accuracy during self-referent categorisation of emotional words independent of valence and more false recollections of negative words than low-risk twins during free recall. Functional MRI yielded no differences between high-risk and low-risk twins in retrieval-specific neural activity for positive or negative words or during the recognition of negative versus positive words within the hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. The subtle display of negative recall bias is consistent with the hypothesis that self-referent negative memory bias is an endophenotype for depression. High-risk twins' lower categorisation accuracy adds to the evidence for valence-independent cognitive deficits in individuals at familial risk for depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Negative effects of low developmental temperatures on aphid predation by Orius majusculus (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgadóttir, Friða; Toft, Søren; Sigsgaard, Lene

    2017-01-01

    apple aphids (Dysaphis plantaginea) of females from each of these treatments was tested at the same temperatures (12, 16 and 20 °C). Additionally, we tested the effects of low temperature treatment only during the last nymphal instar, to examine if shorter treatments would have the same effects. Our...

  18. Sensitivity of the atmospheric water cycle to corrections of the sea surface temperature bias over southern Africa in a regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Torsten; Haensler, Andreas; Jacob, Daniela

    2017-12-01

    Regional climate models (RCMs) have been used to dynamically downscale global climate projections at high spatial and temporal resolution in order to analyse the atmospheric water cycle. In southern Africa, precipitation pattern were strongly affected by the moisture transport from the southeast Atlantic and southwest Indian Ocean and, consequently, by their sea surface temperatures (SSTs). However, global ocean models often have deficiencies in resolving regional to local scale ocean currents, e.g. in ocean areas offshore the South African continent. By downscaling global climate projections using RCMs, the biased SSTs from the global forcing data were introduced to the RCMs and affected the results of regional climate projections. In this work, the impact of the SST bias correction on precipitation, evaporation and moisture transport were analysed over southern Africa. For this analysis, several experiments were conducted with the regional climate model REMO using corrected and uncorrected SSTs. In these experiments, a global MPI-ESM-LR historical simulation was downscaled with the regional climate model REMO to a high spatial resolution of 50 × 50 km2 and of 25 × 25 km2 for southern Africa using a double-nesting method. The results showed a distinct impact of the corrected SST on the moisture transport, the meridional vertical circulation and on the precipitation pattern in southern Africa. Furthermore, it was found that the experiment with the corrected SST led to a reduction of the wet bias over southern Africa and to a better agreement with observations as without SST bias corrections.

  19. Assessing the sensitivity of the hydroxyl radical to model biases in composition and temperature using a single-column photochemical model for Lauder, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Comí, Laura; Morgenstern, Olaf; Zeng, Guang; Masters, Sarah L.; Querel, Richard R.; Nedoluha, Gerald E.

    2016-11-01

    We assess the major factors contributing to local biases in the hydroxyl radical (OH) as simulated by a global chemistry-climate model, using a single-column photochemical model (SCM) analysis. The SCM has been constructed to represent atmospheric chemistry at Lauder, New Zealand, which is representative of the background atmosphere of the Southern Hemisphere (SH) mid-latitudes. We use long-term observations of variables essential to tropospheric OH chemistry, i.e. ozone (O3), water vapour (H2O), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), and temperature, and assess how using these measurements affect OH calculated in the SCM, relative to a reference simulation only using modelled fields. The analysis spans 1994 to 2010. Results show that OH responds approximately linearly to correcting biases in O3, H2O, CO, CH4, and temperature. The biggest impact on OH is due to correcting an overestimation by approximately 20 to 60 % of H2O, using radiosonde observations. Correcting this moist bias leads to a reduction of OH by around 5 to 35 %. This is followed by correcting predominantly overestimated O3. In the troposphere, the model biases are mostly in the range of -10 to 30 %. The impact of changing O3 on OH is due to two pathways; the OH responses to both are of similar magnitude but different seasonality: correcting in situ tropospheric ozone leads to changes in OH in the range -14 to 4 %, whereas correcting the photolysis rate of O3 in accordance with overhead column ozone changes leads to increases of OH of 8 to 16 %. The OH sensitivities to correcting CH4, CO, and temperature biases are all minor effects. The work demonstrates the feasibility of quantitatively assessing OH sensitivity to biases in longer-lived species, which can help explain differences in simulated OH between global chemistry models and relative to observations. In addition to clear-sky simulations, we have performed idealized sensitivity simulations to assess the impact of clouds (ice and liquid

  20. Enhanced thermal stability and mechanical properties of nitrogen deficient titanium aluminum nitride (Ti0.54Al0.46Ny) thin films by tuning the applied negative bias voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamba, K. M.; Schramm, I. C.; Johansson Jõesaar, M. P.; Ghanbaja, J.; Pierson, J. F.; Mücklich, F.; Odén, M.

    2017-08-01

    Aspects on the phase stability and mechanical properties of nitrogen deficient (Ti0.54Al0.46)Ny alloys were investigated. Solid solution alloys of (Ti,Al)N were grown by cathodic arc deposition. The kinetic energy of the impinging ions was altered by varying the substrate bias voltage from -30 V to -80 V. Films deposited with a high bias value of -80 V showed larger lattice parameter, finer columnar structure, and higher compressive residual stress resulting in higher hardness than films biased at -30 V when comparing their as-deposited states. At elevated temperatures, the presence of nitrogen vacancies and point defects (anti-sites and self-interstitials generated by the ion-bombardment during coating deposition) in (Ti0.54Al0.46)N0.87 influence the driving force for phase separation. Highly biased nitrogen deficient films have point defects with higher stability during annealing, which cause a delay of the release of the stored lattice strain energy and then accelerates the decomposition tendencies to thermodynamically stable c-TiN and w-AlN. Low biased nitrogen deficient films have retarded phase transformation to w-AlN, which results in the prolongment of age hardening effect up to 1100 °C, i.e., the highest reported temperature for Ti-Al-N material system. Our study points out the role of vacancies and point defects in engineering thin films with enhanced thermal stability and mechanical properties for high temperature hard coating applications.

  1. Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Sendhil Mullainathan; Andrei Shleifer

    2002-01-01

    There are two different types of media bias. One bias, which we refer to as ideology, reflects a news outlet's desire to affect reader opinions in a particular direction. The second bias, which we refer to as spin, reflects the outlet's attempt to simply create a memorable story. We examine competition among media outlets in the presence of these biases. Whereas competition can eliminate the effect of ideological bias, it actually exaggerates the incentive to spin stories.

  2. Temperature-moisture biases in ECMWF analyses based on clear sky longwave simulations constrained by SSMI and MSU measurements and comparisons to ERBE estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju

    1994-01-01

    Clear sky longwave radiation fluxes for the summer of 1988 and winter of 1989 have been simulated with a radiative transfer model that includes detailed treatment of atmospheric gas absorption. The input data to the model are humidity and temperature profiles from European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses and surface temperature measurements from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. To reduce the inherent uncertainties in humidity profiles, the ECMWF moisture fields have been adjusted, based on the climatological relationship between the moisture profile and total precipitable water (PW), so that the ECMWF PW is equal to that derived from Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) data. SSMI and ECMWF PW patterns are generally similar, but significant differences in magnitude are found in the low latitudes, particularly over the subtropical oceans in the Southern Hemisphere. At the same time the tropospheric brightness temperature (T(sub B)) at 53.74 GHz has been computed using a microwave transfer model with ECMWF temperature and humidity fields as inputs. The comparison of computed T(sub B) with the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) channel 2 T(sub B) revealed differences larger than 1.5 K over most of the oceans, suggesting that the ECMWF model atmosphere has a cold bias. Maximum biases greater than 3 K are found in low latitudes. After removing the bias from the ECMWF temperature field, a new set of temperature profiles yielding brightness temperature equal to MSU channel 2 T(sub B) has been obtained. Simulation results clearly demonstrate that inclusion of satellite estimates of PW and T(sub B) enhances the accuracy of the clear sky LW flux simulation, substantially reducing the differences from Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) estimates. Global averages indicate that the model-derived top-of-atmosphere (TOA) clear sky fluxes from the adjusted moisture and temperature profiles are in very good agreement with

  3. Low Temperature Studies of the Excited-State Structure of Negatively Charged Nitrogen-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalov, A.; Jacques, V.; Kaiser, F.; Siyushev, P.; Neumann, P.; Rogers, L. J.; McMurtrie, R. L.; Manson, N. B.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, J.

    2009-05-01

    We report a study of the E3 excited-state structure of single negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond, combining resonant excitation at cryogenic temperatures and optically detected magnetic resonance. A theoretical model is developed and shows excellent agreement with experimental observations. In addition, we show that the two orbital branches associated with the E3 excited state are averaged when operating at room temperature. This study leads to an improved physical understanding of the NV defect electronic structure, which is invaluable for the development of diamond-based quantum information processing.

  4. Direct and indirect influences of fate control belief, gambling expectancy bias, and self-efficacy on problem gambling and negative mood among Chinese college students: a multiple mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Wu, Anise M S

    2010-12-01

    A multiple mediation model was proposed to integrate core concepts of the social axioms framework and the social cognitive theory in order to understand gambling behavior. It was hypothesized that the influence of general fate control belief on problem gambling and negative mood would be mediated by gambling-specific beliefs. Data from 773 Chinese college recreational gamblers were collected. The bootstrapping procedure was used to test the multiple mediation hypotheses. Significant indirect effects of fate control belief on problem gambling and negative mood through two gambling-specific mediators were found. Gambling expectancy bias was a more salient mediator than gambling self-efficacy. Fate control belief was also found to have a significant direct effect on negative mood. In general, a high level of general fate control belief was related to greater gambling expectancy bias and lower self-efficacy in resisting gambling, which were in turn related to problem gambling and negative mood. Limitations and implications of the study were discussed.

  5. Positive or Negative? Urbanization-Induced Variations in Diurnal Skin-Surface Temperature Range Detected Using Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fan; Zhan, Wenfeng; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Kaicun; Chen, Jing M.; Liu, Yongxue; Lai, Jiameng; Ju, Weimin

    2017-12-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important indicator for assessing the local climate change due to urbanization. Studies that focused on surface air temperature (SAT) have reported decreased DTRSAT in urban areas. However, this urbanization-induced effect becomes more complex with regard to land skin-surface temperature (LST), which is highly localized and extremely sensitive to land surface properties. We thus investigated the urban-rural DTRLST difference (ΔDTRLST) over 354 cities across China using satellite-retrieved LSTs within 2008-2013. Our major findings include the following: (1) urban areas experience increased (decreased) DTRLST compared with rural areas on the annual average for the majority of cities located in southern (northern) China; (2) the ΔDTRLST is mostly positive in warm months but negative in cold months. It generally becomes more positive from January to August and becomes more negative afterward; and (3) the ΔDTRLST is positively related to the daytime surface urban heat island intensity; it is yet negatively correlated with the urban-rural difference in vegetation abundance. We consider these insights valuable for in-depth understanding urban thermal environment and will likely help improve urban planning.

  6. Elongated Hypocotyl 5-Homolog (HYH Negatively Regulates Expression of the Ambient Temperature-Responsive MicroRNA Gene MIR169

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phanu T. Serivichyaswat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis microRNA169 (miR169 is an ambient temperature-responsive microRNA that plays an important role in stress responses and the floral transition. However, the transcription factors that regulate the expression of MIR169 have remained unknown. In this study, we show that Elongated Hypocotyl 5-Homolog (HYH directly binds to the promoter of MIR169a and negatively regulates its expression. Absolute quantification identified MIR169a as the major locus producing miR169. GUS reporter assays revealed that the deletion of a 498-bp fragment (–1,505 to –1,007, relative to the major transcriptional start site of MIR169a abolished its ambient temperature-responsive expression. DNA-affinity chromatography followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis identified transcription factor HYH as a trans-acting factor that binds to the 498-bp promoter fragment of pri-miR169a. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation–quantitative PCR demonstrated that the HYH.2 protein, a predominant isoform of HYH, directly associated with a G-box-like motif in the 498-bp fragment of pri-miR169a. Higher enrichment of HYH.2 protein on the promoter region of MIR169a was seen at 23°C, consistent with the presence of more HYH.2 protein in the cell at the temperature. Transcript levels of pri-miR169a increased in hyh mutants and decreased in transgenic plants overexpressing HYH. Consistent with the negative regulation of MIR169a by HYH, the diurnal levels of HYH mRNA and pri-miR169a showed opposite patterns. Taken together, our results suggest that HYH is a transcription factor that binds to a G-box-like motif in the MIR169a promoter and negatively regulates ambient temperature-responsive expression of MIR169a at higher temperatures in Arabidopsis.

  7. In-transit temperature extremes could have negative effects on ladybird (Coleomegilla maculata) hatch rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    The shipment of mass-produced natural enemies for augmentative release is a standard procedure used by the biological control industry. Yet there has been insufficient research on the effects of temperature change, experienced during shipment, on the quality of predators as they arrive at release si...

  8. Magnetic ordering temperature of nanocrystalline Gd: enhancement of magnetic interactions via hydrogenation-induced "negative" pressure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, Evgeniya; Khmelevskyi, S.; Politova, G.; Kaminskaya, T.; Drulis, H.; Tereshina, I. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, Mar (2016), 1-7, č. článku 22553. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03593S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ferromagnetism * gadolinium * Curie temperature Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  9. Room temperature large self-biased magnetoelectric effect in non-lead based piezoelectric and magnetostrictive (0−3) particulate composite system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Mukesh; Prakash, Chandra; Chatterjee, Ratnamala

    2017-01-01

    In this work, room temperature magnetoelectric properties of (0−3) particulate composites of non lead based piezoelectric BNTKNNLTS [0.97(Bi 0.5 Na 0.5 TiO 3 )–0.03(K 0.47 Na 0.47 Li 0.06 Nb 0.74 Sb 0.06 Ta 0.2 O 3 ) and magnetostrictive CZFMO (Co 0.6 Zn 0.4 Fe 1.7 Mn 0.3 O 4 ) are presented. Composite samples of (1-x)(BNTKNNLTS)-x(CZFMO) , with x=0.1 and 0.5, are synthesized by solid state reaction route. X-ray diffraction confirms the single phase formation of parent phases and the presence of two phases in the composites. Similar sintering conditions of the two individual components lead to optimal ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in the composites. A large self-biased magnetoelectric (ME) coupling ~74 mV/cm.Oe for the sample with x=0.1 (measured in longitudinally magnetized-transversely polarized configuration) is observed at room temperature. - Highlights: • Modified BNT-CFO based (0−3) particulate composites have been synthesized. • Similar sintering conditions of two components lead to optimal multiferroicity. • A large self-biased ME coupling ~74 mV/cm. Oe is obtained at room temperature.

  10. Exploring the negative temperature coefficient behavior of acetaldehyde based on detailed intermediate measurements in a jet-stirred reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Tao

    2018-03-20

    Acetaldehyde is an observed emission species and a key intermediate produced during the combustion and low-temperature oxidation of fossil and bio-derived fuels. Investigations into the low-temperature oxidation chemistry of acetaldehyde are essential to develop a better core mechanism and to better understand auto-ignition and cool flame phenomena. Here, the oxidation of acetaldehyde was studied at low-temperatures (528–946 K) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) with the corrected residence time of 2.7 s at 700 Torr. This work describes a detailed set of experimental results that capture the negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior in the low-temperature oxidation of acetaldehyde. The mole fractions of 28 species were measured as functions of the temperature by employing a vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular-beam mass spectrometer. To explain the observed NTC behavior, an updated mechanism was proposed, which well reproduces the concentration profiles of many observed peroxide intermediates. The kinetic analysis based on the updated mechanism reveals that the NTC behavior of acetaldehyde oxidation is caused by the competition between the O-addition to and the decomposition of the CHCO radical.

  11. Neural Correlates of Biased Responses: The Negative Method Effect in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Is Associated with Right Amygdala Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Kong, Feng; Huang, Lijie; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Self-esteem is a widely studied construct in psychology that is typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). However, a series of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that a simple and widely used unidimensional factor model does not provide an adequate explanation of RSES responses due to method effects. To identify the neural correlates of the method effect, we sought to determine whether and how method effects were associated with the RSES and investigate the neural basis of these effects. Two hundred and eighty Chinese college students (130 males; mean age = 22.64 years) completed the RSES and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Behaviorally, method effects were linked to both positively and negatively worded items in the RSES. Neurally, the right amygdala volume negatively correlated with the negative method factor, while the hippocampal volume positively correlated with the general self-esteem factor in the RSES. The neural dissociation between the general self-esteem factor and negative method factor suggests that there are different neural mechanisms underlying them. The amygdala is involved in modulating negative affectivity; therefore, the current study sheds light on the nature of method effects that are related to self-report with a mix of positively and negatively worded items. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evidence-informed recommendations to reduce dissemination bias in clinical research: conclusions from the OPEN (Overcome failure to Publish nEgative fiNdings) project based on an international consensus meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerpohl, Joerg J; Schell, Lisa K; Bassler, Dirk; Gallus, Silvano; Kleijnen, Jos; Kulig, Michael; La Vecchia, Carlo; Marušić, Ana; Ravaud, Philippe; Reis, Andreas; Schmucker, Christine; Strech, Daniel; Urrútia, Gerard; Wager, Elizabeth; Antes, Gerd

    2015-05-05

    reduce it, the problem of dissemination bias has not been resolved. Tailored recommendations based on a comprehensive approach will hopefully help increase transparency in biomedical research by overcoming the failure to disseminate negative findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Comparison of Different Sample Preparation Protocols Reveals Lysis Buffer-Specific Extraction Biases in Gram-Negative Bacteria and Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatter, Timo; Ahrné, Erik; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-11-06

    We evaluated different in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation strategies for absolute protein quantification. Label-free quantification (LFQ) was employed to compare different sample preparation strategies in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK), and organismal-specific differences in general performance and enrichment of specific protein classes were noted. The original FASP protocol globally enriched for most proteins in the bacterial sample, whereas the sodium deoxycholate in-solution strategy was more efficient with HEK cells. Although detergents were found to be highly suited for global proteome analysis, higher intensities were obtained for high-abundant nucleic acid-associated protein complexes, like the ribosome and histone proteins, using guanidine hydrochloride. Importantly, we show for the first time that the observable total proteome mass of a sample strongly depends on the sample preparation protocol, with some protocols resulting in a significant underestimation of protein mass due to incomplete protein extraction of biased protein groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that some of the observed abundance biases can be overcome by incorporating a nuclease treatment step or, alternatively, a correction factor for complementary sample preparation approaches.

  14. The Negative Relationship between Reasoning and Religiosity Is Underpinned by a Bias for Intuitive Responses Specifically When Intuition and Logic Are in Conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Daws

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that religiosity correlates inversely with intelligence. A prominent hypothesis states that this correlation reflects behavioral biases toward intuitive problem solving, which causes errors when intuition conflicts with reasoning. We tested predictions of this hypothesis by analyzing data from two large-scale Internet-cohort studies (combined N = 63,235. We report that atheists surpass religious individuals in terms of reasoning but not working-memory performance. The religiosity effect is robust across sociodemographic factors including age, education and country of origin. It varies significantly across religions and this co-occurs with substantial cross-group differences in religious dogmatism. Critically, the religiosity effect is strongest for tasks that explicitly manipulate conflict; more specifically, atheists outperform the most dogmatic religious group by a substantial margin (0.6 standard deviations during a color-word conflict task but not during a challenging matrix-reasoning task. These results support the hypothesis that behavioral biases rather than impaired general intelligence underlie the religiosity effect.

  15. Changes in body core temperatures and heat balance after an abrupt release of lower body negative pressure in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Minoru; Shido, Osamu

    1994-03-01

    Changes in body core temperature ( T cor) and heat balance after an abrupt release of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were investigated in 5 volunteers under the following conditions: (1) an ambient temperature ( T a) of 20 °C or (2) 35 °C, and (3) T a of 25 °C with a leg skin temperature of 30°C or (4) 35°C. The leg skin temperature was controlled with water perfusion devices wound around the legs. Rectal ( T re), tympanic ( T ty) and esophageal ( T es) temperatures, skin temperatures (7 sites) and oxygen consumption were measured. The intensity of LBNP was adjusted so that the amount of blood pooled in the legs was the same under all conditions. When a thermal balance was attained during LBNP, application of LBNP was suddenly halted. The skin temperatures increased significantly after the release of LBNP under all conditions, while oxygen consumption hardly changed. The release of LBNP caused significant falls in T cor s under conditions (1) and (3), but lowered T cor s very slightly under conditions (2) and (4). The changes in T es were always more rapid and greater than those of T ty and T re. The falls in T ty and T re appeared to be explained by changes in heat balance, whereas the sharp drop of T es could not be explained especially during the first 8 min after the release of LBNP. The results suggest that a fall in T cor after a release of LBNP is attributed to an increase in heat loss due to reflexive skin vasodilation and is dependent on the temperature of venous blood returning from the lower body. It is presumed that T es may not be an appropriate indicator for T cor when venous return changes rapidly.

  16. Estimating the stability of electrical conductivity of filled polymers under the influence of negative temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakova, N. N.; Ushakov, V. Ya.

    2017-12-01

    One of the key problems in modern materials technology is synthesis of materials for electrotechnical devices capable of operating under severe conditions. Electrical and power engineering, in particular, demands for electrically conductive composite materials operating at high and low temperatures, various mechanical loads, electric fields, etc. Chaotic arrangement of electrically conductive component in the matrix and its structural and geometrical inhomogeneity can increase the local electric and thermal energy flux densities up to critical values even when their average values remain moderate. Elastomers filled with technical carbon being a promising component for electrotechnical devices was chosen as an object of study.

  17. Tunable exchange bias effect in magnetic Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe0.9Ti0.1O3 nanoparticles at temperatures up to 250K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basith, M. A.; Khan, F. A.; Ahmmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    that the strength of the exchange bias effect is tunable by the field cooling. The HEB values are also found to be dependent on the temperature. This magnetically tunable exchange bias obtained at temperatures up to 250K in Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe0.9Ti0.1O3 nanoparticles may be worthwhile for potential applications.......The exchange bias (EB) effect has been observed in magnetic Bi0.9Gd0.1Fe0.9Ti0.1O3 nanoparticles.The influence of magnetic field cooling on the exchange bias effect has also been investigated. The magnitude of the exchange bias field (HEB) increases with the cooling magnetic field, showing...

  18. Strong room-temperature negative transconductance in an axial Si/Ge hetero-nanowire tunneling field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Le, Son T.; Hou, Xiaoxiao; Zaslavsky, A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Picraux, S. T.

    2014-08-01

    We report on room-temperature negative transconductance (NTC) in axial Si/Ge hetero-nanowire tunneling field-effect transistors. The NTC produces a current peak-to-valley ratio >45, a high value for a Si-based device. We characterize the NTC over a range of gate VG and drain VD voltages, finding that NTC persists down to VD = -50 mV. The physical mechanism responsible for the NTC is the VG-induced depletion in the p-Ge section that eventually reduces the maximum electric field that triggers the tunneling ID, as confirmed via three-dimensional (3D) technology computer-aided design simulations.

  19. A negative reactivity feedback driven by induced buoyancy after a temperature transient in lead-cooled fast reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Arias

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Consideration is given to the possibility to use changes in buoyancy as a negative reactivity feedback mechanism during temperature transients in heavy liquid metal fast reactors. It is shown that by the proper use of heavy pellets in the fuel elements, fuel rods could be endowed with a passive self-ejection mechanism and then with a negative feedback. A first estimate of the feasibility of the mechanism is calculated by using a simplified geometry and model. If in addition, a neutron poison pellet is introduced at the bottom of the fuel, then when the fuel element is displaced upward by buoyancy force, the reactivity will be reduced not only by disassembly of the core but also by introducing the neutron poison from the bottom. The use of induced buoyancy opens up the possibility of introducing greater amounts of actinides into the core, as well as providing a palliative solution to the problem of positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficients that could be featured by the heavy liquid metal fast reactors.

  20. Room temperature large self-biased magnetoelectric effect in non-lead based piezoelectric and magnetostrictive (0−3) particulate composite system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Mukesh [Magnetics & Advanced Ceramics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016 India (India); Prakash, Chandra [Solid State Physics Laboratory Timarpur, Delhi-110054 India (India); Chatterjee, Ratnamala, E-mail: rmala@physics.iitd.ac.in [Magnetics & Advanced Ceramics Laboratory, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016 India (India)

    2017-05-01

    In this work, room temperature magnetoelectric properties of (0−3) particulate composites of non lead based piezoelectric BNTKNNLTS [0.97(Bi{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3})–0.03(K{sub 0.47}Na{sub 0.47}Li{sub 0.06}Nb{sub 0.74}Sb{sub 0.06}Ta{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}) and magnetostrictive CZFMO (Co{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 1.7}Mn{sub 0.3}O{sub 4}) are presented. Composite samples of (1-x)(BNTKNNLTS)-x(CZFMO){sub ,} with x=0.1 and 0.5, are synthesized by solid state reaction route. X-ray diffraction confirms the single phase formation of parent phases and the presence of two phases in the composites. Similar sintering conditions of the two individual components lead to optimal ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties in the composites. A large self-biased magnetoelectric (ME) coupling ~74 mV/cm.Oe for the sample with x=0.1 (measured in longitudinally magnetized-transversely polarized configuration) is observed at room temperature. - Highlights: • Modified BNT-CFO based (0−3) particulate composites have been synthesized. • Similar sintering conditions of two components lead to optimal multiferroicity. • A large self-biased ME coupling ~74 mV/cm. Oe is obtained at room temperature.

  1. Assessing the extent of non-stationary biases in GCMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Jannatun; Johnson, Fiona; Sharma, Ashish

    2017-06-01

    General circulation models (GCMs) are the main tools for estimating changes in the climate for the future. The imperfect representation of climate models introduces biases in the simulations that need to be corrected prior to their use for impact assessments. Bias correction methods generally assume that the bias calculated over the historical period does not change and can be applied to the future. This study investigates this assumption by considering the extent and nature of bias non-stationarity using 20th century precipitation and temperature simulations from six CMIP5 GCMs across Australia. Four statistics (mean, standard deviation, 10th and 90th quantiles) in monthly and seasonal biases are obtained for three different time window lengths (10, 25 and 33 years) to examine the properties of bias over time. This approach is repeated for two different phases of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), which is known to have strong influences on the Australian climate. It is found that bias non-stationarity at decadal timescales is indeed an issue over some of Australia for some GCMs. When considering interdecadal variability there are significant difference in the bias between positive and negative phases of the IPO. Regional analyses confirmed these findings with the largest differences seen on the east coast of Australia, where IPO impacts tend to be the strongest. The nature of the bias non-stationarity found in this study suggests that it will be difficult to modify existing bias correction approaches to account for non-stationary biases. A more practical approach for impact assessments that use bias correction maybe to use a selection of GCMs where the assumption of bias non-stationarity holds.

  2. Cognitive bias modification for interpretation with and without prior repetitive negative thinking to reduce worry and rumination in generalised anxiety disorder and depression: protocol for a multisession experimental study with an active control condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahé, Charlotte; Mathews, Andrew; Whyte, Jessica; Hirsch, Colette R

    2016-12-16

    Worry and rumination are two forms of repetitive thinking characterised by their negative content and apparently uncontrollable nature. Although worry and rumination share common features and have been conceptualised as part of a transdiagnostic repetitive negative thinking (RNT) process, it remains unclear whether they share the same underlying cognitive mechanisms. This multisession experimental study investigates the tendency to make negative interpretations regarding ambiguous information as a cognitive mechanism underlying RNT. We compare multisession cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I) with an active control condition to examine whether repeatedly training positive interpretations reduces worry and rumination in individuals with generalised anxiety disorder or depression, respectively. Further, we examine the potential modulatory effects of engaging in RNT immediately prior to CBM-I. A community sample of individuals meeting diagnostic criteria for either generalised anxiety disorder (n=60) or current major depressive episode (n=60) will be randomly allocated to CBM-I with prior RNT, CBM-I without prior RNT (ie, standard CBM-I), or an active control (no resolution of ambiguity) condition. All conditions receive a 3-week internet-based intervention consisting of one initial session at the first study visit and nine home-based sessions of CBM-I training (or active control). We will assess and compare the effects of CBM-I with and without prior RNT on 'near-transfer' measures of interpretation bias closely related to the training as well as 'far-transfer' outcomes related to RNT and emotional distress. Impact on questionnaire measures will additionally be assessed at 1-month follow-up. Multigroup analyses will be conducted to assess the impact of CBM-I on near-transfer and far-transfer outcome measures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Biases in the diurnal temperature range in Central Europe in an ensemble of regional climate models and their possible causes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselý, Jan; Plavcová, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 6 (2012), s. 1275-1286 ISSN 0930-7575 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/10/2265 Grant - others:ENSEMBLES: EU-FP6(XE) 505539 Program:FP6 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Regional climate models * ENSEMBLES * Diurnal temperature range * Atmospheric circulation * Cloud cover * Central Europe Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.231, year: 2012 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00382-011-1200-4

  4. The electron trap parameter extraction-based investigation of the relationship between charge trapping and activation energy in IGZO TFTs under positive bias temperature stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jihyun; Choi, Sungju; Kang, Hara; Kim, Jae-Young; Ko, Daehyun; Ahn, Geumho; Jung, Haesun; Choi, Sung-Jin; Myong Kim, Dong; Kim, Dae Hwan

    2018-02-01

    Experimental extraction of the electron trap parameters which are associated with charge trapping into gate insulators under the positive bias temperature stress (PBTS) is proposed and demonstrated for the first time in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors. This was done by combining the PBTS/recovery time-evolution of the experimentally decomposed threshold voltage shift (ΔVT) and the technology computer-aided design (TCAD)-based charge trapping simulation. The extracted parameters were the trap density (NOT) = 2.6 × 1018 cm-3, the trap energy level (ΔET) = 0.6 eV, and the capture cross section (σ0) = 3 × 10-19 cm2. Furthermore, based on the established TCAD framework, the relationship between the electron trap parameters and the activation energy (Ea) is comprehensively investigated. It is found that Ea increases with an increase in σ0, whereas Ea is independent of NOT. In addition, as ΔET increases, Ea decreases in the electron trapping-dominant regime (low ΔET) and increases again in the Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission/hopping-dominant regime (high ΔET). Moreover, our results suggest that the cross-over ΔET point originates from the complicated temperature-dependent competition between the capture rate and the emission rate. The PBTS bias dependence of the relationship between Ea and ΔET suggests that the electric field dependence of the PF emission-based electron hopping is stronger than that of the thermionic field emission-based electron trapping.

  5. Exchange bias in sputtered FeNi/FeMn systems: Effect of short low-temperature heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, Peter, E-mail: peter.savin@urfu.ru [Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Laboratory of Magnetic Sensors, Ural Federal University, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Guzmán, Jorge [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lepalovskij, Vladimir [Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Laboratory of Magnetic Sensors, Ural Federal University, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Svalov, Andrey; Kurlyandskaya, Galina [Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Laboratory of Magnetic Sensors, Ural Federal University, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Departamento de Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad del País Vasco (UPV/EHU), 48940 Leioa, Vizcaya (Spain); Asenjo, Agustina [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vas’kovskiy, Vladimir [Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Laboratory of Magnetic Sensors, Ural Federal University, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Vazquez, Manuel [Department of Magnetism and Magnetic Nanomaterials, Laboratory of Magnetic Sensors, Ural Federal University, 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid-CSIC, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    Short (5 min) post-deposition thermal treatments under magnetic field at low temperature (up to 200 °C) performed in exchange-coupled FeNi(40 nm)/FeMn(20 nm) bilayer thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are shown to be effective to significantly modify their exchange field (from around 40 Oe down to 27 Oe) between FeNi and FeMn layers. A similar exchange field decrease was observed for the first deposited FeNi layer of the FeNi(40 nm)/FeMn(20 nm)/FeNi(40 nm) trilayer films after the same thermal treatments. The exchange field value for the second FeNi layer was not substantially changed. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicates that such a heat treatment has no effect on the grain size and crystalline texture of the films, while atomic force microscope studies reveal an increase of the surface roughness after the treatment which is more noticeable in the case of the trilayer film. Analysis of the experimental results leads us to conclude that the variations of the exchange field after heat treatment are likely caused by a modification of interfacial roughness and/or interfacial magnetic structure, but unlikely by the changes in the microstructure and/or changes of composition of the antiferromagnetic FeMn layer. - Highlights: • FeNi/FeMn bilayers and FeNi/FeMn/FeNi trilayers were prepared by magnetron sputtering. • Post-deposition heat treatments at the temperatures below 200 °C during 5 min were made. • Annealing reduces the exchange field for the first FeNi layer in trilayers. • The exchange field value for the second FeNi layer was not substantially changed. • Exchange field changes are most likely caused by a modification of interface roughness.

  6. Expectancy bias mediates the link between social anxiety and memory bias for social evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caouette, Justin D; Ruiz, Sarah K; Lee, Clinton C; Anbari, Zainab; Schriber, Roberta A; Guyer, Amanda E

    2015-01-01

    Social anxiety (SA) involves a multitude of cognitive symptoms related to fear of evaluation, including expectancy and memory biases. We examined whether memory biases are influenced by expectancy biases for social feedback in SA. We hypothesised that, faced with a socially evaluative event, people with higher SA would show a negative expectancy bias for future feedback. Furthermore, we predicted that memory bias for feedback in SA would be mediated by expectancy bias. Ninety-four undergraduate students (55 women, mean age = 19.76 years) underwent a two-visit task that measured expectations about (Visit 1) and memory of (Visit 2) feedback from unknown peers. Results showed that higher levels of SA were associated with negative expectancy bias. An indirect relationship was found between SA and memory bias that was mediated by expectancy bias. The results suggest that expectancy biases are in the causal path from SA to negative memory biases for social evaluation.

  7. Negative Thermal Expansion over a Wide Temperature Range in Fe-Doped MnNiGe Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenjun; Sun, Ying; Liu, Yufei; Shi, Kewen; Lu, Huiqing; Song, Ping; Wang, Lei; Han, Huimin; Yuan, Xiuliang; Wang, Cong

    2018-01-01

    Fe-doped MnNiGe alloys were successfully synthesized by solid-state reaction. Giant negative thermal expansion (NTE) behaviors with the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of -285.23 × 10 -6 K -1 (192-305 K) and -1167.09 × 10 -6 K -1 (246-305 K) have been obtained in Mn 0.90 Fe 0.10 NiGe and MnNi 0.90 Fe 0.10 Ge, respectively. Furthermore, these materials were combined with Cu in order to control the NTE properties. The results indicate that the absolute value of CTE gradually decreases with increasing Cu contents. In Mn 0.92 Fe 0.08 NiGe/ x %Cu, the CTE gradually changes from -64.92 × 10 -6 K -1 (125-274 K) to -4.73 × 10 -6 K -1 (173-229 K) with increasing value of x from 15 to 70. The magnetic measurements reveal that the NTE behaviors in this work are strongly correlated with the process of the magnetic phase transition and the introduction of Fe atoms could also change the spiral anti-ferromagnetic (s-AFM) state into ferromagnetic (FM) state at low temperature. Our study launches a new candidate for controlling thermal expansion properties of metal matrix materials which could have potential application in variable temperature environment.

  8. Negative Thermal Expansion over a Wide Temperature Range in Fe-Doped MnNiGe Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fe-doped MnNiGe alloys were successfully synthesized by solid-state reaction. Giant negative thermal expansion (NTE behaviors with the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE of −285.23 × 10−6 K−1 (192–305 K and −1167.09 × 10−6 K−1 (246–305 K have been obtained in Mn0.90Fe0.10NiGe and MnNi0.90Fe0.10Ge, respectively. Furthermore, these materials were combined with Cu in order to control the NTE properties. The results indicate that the absolute value of CTE gradually decreases with increasing Cu contents. In Mn0.92Fe0.08NiGe/x%Cu, the CTE gradually changes from −64.92 × 10−6 K−1 (125–274 K to −4.73 × 10−6 K−1 (173–229 K with increasing value of x from 15 to 70. The magnetic measurements reveal that the NTE behaviors in this work are strongly correlated with the process of the magnetic phase transition and the introduction of Fe atoms could also change the spiral anti-ferromagnetic (s-AFM state into ferromagnetic (FM state at low temperature. Our study launches a new candidate for controlling thermal expansion properties of metal matrix materials which could have potential application in variable temperature environment.

  9. Number of lymph nodes removed in sentinel lymph node-negative breast cancer patients is significantly related to patient age and tumor size: a new source of bias in morbidity assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Elisa Rush; Patil, Sujata; Stempel, Michelle; Morrow, Monica; Cody, Hiram S

    2010-04-15

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy has been well-established for axillary lymph node staging for patients with breast cancer. For lymph node-negative patients, planned "backup" axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) is rarely indicated. Among patients with negative SLNs, the authors observed variation by tumor size and patient age in the total number of lymph nodes removed (SLNs plus non-SLNs). They hypothesized that this variation is an unrecognized source of bias for studies examining the morbidity of SLN biopsy. Retrospective review of this institution's SLN database identified 4103 SLN biopsy procedures between 1997 and 2004 in which SLN biopsy was performed for prophylactic mastectomy, ductal carcinoma in situ, or T1 to T2 invasive cancers, and the SLNs were benign. The mean number of SLNs, non-SLNs, and total lymph nodes for all tumor sizes was 2.8, 1.5, and 4.3, respectively, and increased with tumor size (more lymph nodes were removed for T2 than for T1 tumors: 6.3 vs 4.3; P 50 years (4.6 lymph nodes vs 4.2 lymph nodes; P = .006). In approximately 8% of patients (322 of 4103 patients), >or=10 lymph nodes were removed. The morbidity of SLN biopsy is less than that of ALND, but for pN0 patients, the total number of lymph nodes removed increased with tumor size and younger patient age. This variation is a previously unrecognized source of bias for studies that examine the morbidity of SLN biopsy. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  10. THE EFFECT OF PRESSURE, BIAS VOLTAGE AND ANNEALING TEMPERATURE ON N₂ AND N₂+SiH₄ DOPED WC/C DC MAGNETRON SPUTTERED LAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hornak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide (WC/C layers are often researched due to their outstanding mechanical and tribological properties. Here, optimized indented hardness (HIT, indentation modulus (EIT and coefficient of friction (COF values were measured to study the effect of pressure and bias voltage on WC/C layers, deposited on Si by DC magnetron spluttering. Maximal values of HIT=37.2±4.8 GPa, EIT=447±28 GPa and COF=0.64±0.09 were obtained. Additionally, the effect of temperature on optimized layers deposited with and without N₂ and N₂+SiH₄ annealed at 200 °C, 500 °C and 800 °C, were also investigated. The values of HIT, EIT and COF and, observed morphology and structural composition of these contaminated and non-contaminated WC/C layers were evaluated. It was found that layer degradation occurred at different rates depending on the temperature and gas mixture used during the annealing and deposition process, respectively.

  11. Journal bias or author bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ian

    2016-01-01

    I read with interest the comment by Mark Wilson in the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics regarding bias and conflicts of interest in medical journals. Wilson targets one journal (the New England Journal of Medicine: NEJM) and one particular "scandal" to make his point that journals' decisions on publication are biased by commercial conflicts of interest (CoIs). It is interesting that he chooses the NEJM which, by his own admission, had one of the strictest CoI policies and had published widely on this topic. The feeling is that if the NEJM can be guilty, they can all be guilty.

  12. UV irradiation analysis of complementation between, and replication of, RNA-negative temperature-sensitivie mutants of Newcastle disease virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeples, M.E.; Bratt, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    Random uv irradiation-induced lesions destroy the infectivity of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) by blocking downstream transcription from the single viral promoter. The nucleocapsid-associated polypeptides most likely to be involved in RNA synthesis are located at the extreme ends of the genome: NP and P are promoter proximal genes, and L is the most distal gene. We attempted to order the two temperature-sensitive (ts) RNA-negative (RNA-) mutant groups of NDV by determining the uv target sizes for the complementing abilities of mutants A1 and E1. After uv irradiation, E1 was unable to complement A1, a result compatible with the A mutation lying in the L gene. In contrast, after uv irradiation A1 was able to complement E1 for both virus production and viral protein synthesis, with a target size most consistent with the E mutation lying in the P gene. UV-irradiated virus was unable to replicate as indicated by its absence in the yields of multiply infected cells, either as infectious virus or as particles with complementing activity. After irradiation, ts mutant B1ΔP, with a non-ts mutation affecting the electrophoretic mobility of the P protein, complemented E1 in a manner similar to A1, but it did not amplify the expression of ΔP in infected cells. This too is consistent with irradiated virus being unable to replicate despite the presence of the components needed for replication of E1. At high uv doses, A1 was able to complement E1 in a different, uv-resistant manner, probably by direct donation of input polypeptides. Multiplicity reactivation has previously been observed at high-multiplicity infection by uv-irradiated paramyxoviruses. In this case, virions which are noninfectious because they lack a protein component may be activated by a protein from irradiated virions

  13. Referee Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Dohmen, Thomas; Sauermann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This paper surveys the empirical literature on the behavior of referees in professional football and other sports. Referees are typically appointed by a principal to be impartial, especially when unbiased referee judgment is vital for the accomplishment of the principal's objective. Answering whether referees make biased decisions and understanding the causes that lead referees to digress from their principal duty of impartiality is therefore fundamental from a theoretical point of view. At t...

  14. Characterization of negative bias-illumination-stress stability for transparent top-gate In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors with variations in the incorporated oxygen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong-Ah; Park, Min-Ji; Lee, Won-Ho; Yoon, Sung-Min

    2015-12-01

    We fabricated fully transparent top-gate In-Ga-Zn-O (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) while varying the oxygen partial pressure (PO2) during IGZO sputtering deposition and characterized the negative-bias-illumination stress (NBIS) stabilities of these devices before and after a post-annealing process. When the PO2 was chosen to be 2% and the device was annealed in oxygen ambient conditions at 200 °C, the field-effect mobility in the saturation region, subthreshold swing, and on/off current ratio were obtained to be approximately 15.3 cm2 V-1 s-1, 0.14 V/dec, and 8.7 × 109, respectively. Conversely, the TFT did not show the transfer characteristics when the PO2 was chosen to be 0% and no annealing process was performed. The shifts in the turn-on voltages (ΔVon) under the NBIS conditions with red, green, and blue lights were investigated for the fabricated IGZO TFTs. The ΔVon followed the stretched-exponential relationship and was found to be closely related to the concentration of oxygen vacancies and oxygen-related defects in the IGZO channel and at the interfaces. The NBIS stabilities were improved by increasing the PO2 and performing the annealing process in oxygen ambient conditions.

  15. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R.; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account. PMID:27736913

  16. Temperature Increase Negatively Affects the Fatty Acid Bioconversion Capacity of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Fed a Linseed Oil-Based Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellery, Julie; Geay, Florian; Tocher, Douglas R; Kestemont, Patrick; Debier, Cathy; Rollin, Xavier; Larondelle, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet. Fish were fed two diets formulated with fish oil (FO) or linseed oil (LO) as only added lipid source at the optimal water temperature of 15°C or at the increased water temperature of 19°C for 60 days. We observed that a temperature increase close to the upper limit of the species temperature tolerance range negatively affected the feed efficiency of rainbow trout fed LO despite a higher feed intake. The negative impact of increased water temperature on fatty acid bioconversion capacity appeared also to be quite clear considering the reduced expression of fatty acid desaturase 2 in liver and intestine and the reduced Δ6 desaturase enzymatic activity in intestinal microsomes. The present results also highlighted a negative impact of increased temperature on the apparent in vivo enzymatic activity of Δ5 and Δ6 desaturases of fish fed LO. Interestingly, this last parameter appeared less affected than those mentioned above. This study highlights that the increased temperature that rainbow trout may face due to global warming could reduce their fatty acid bioconversion capacity. The unavoidable replacement of finite fish oil by more sustainable, readily available and economically viable alternative lipid sources in aquaculture feeds should take this undeniable environmental issue on aquaculture productivity into account.

  17. Temperature activated tunnelling processes in aSe/pSi heterojunction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and capacitance – voltage (C-V) measurements are compared with the two tunneling processes purposed by Riben – Feucht and Matsuura et al. At high temperature (>140k), the forward bias is T ... negative bias due to whole injection into the interface coming from the pSi. Keywords: Temperature, Tunneling, Resistivity, ...

  18. Gender bias in academic recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abramo, Giovanni; D’Angelo, Ciriaco Andrea; Rosati, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that women are underrepresented in the academic systems of many countries. Gender discrimination is one of the factors that could contribute to this phenomenon. This study considers a recent national academic recruitment campaign in Italy, examining whether women are subject...... to more or less bias than men. The findings show that no gender-related differences occur among the candidates who benefit from positive bias, while among those candidates affected by negative bias, the incidence of women is lower than that of men. Among the factors that determine success in a competition...

  19. Low soil moisture during hot periods drives apparent negative temperature sensitivity of soil respiration in a dryland ecosystem: A multi-model comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Colin; Reed, Sasha C.

    2016-01-01

    Arid and semiarid ecosystems (drylands) may dominate the trajectory of biosphere-to-atmosphere carbon (C) flux over the coming century. Accordingly, understanding dryland CO2 efflux controls is important for understanding C cycling at the global-scale: key unknowns regarding how temperature and moisture interact to regulate dryland C cycling remain. Further, the patchiness of dryland vegetation can create ‘islands of fertility’, with spatially heterogeneous rates of soil respiration (Rs). At our study site in southeastern Utah, USA we added or removed litter (0 to 650% of control) in paired plots that were either associated with a shrub or with interspaces between vascular plants. We measured Rs, soil temperature, and water content (θ) on eight sampling dates between October 2013 and November 2014. Rs was highest following monsoon rains in late summer when soil temperature was ~30°C. During mid-summer, Rs was low, associated with high soil temperatures (>40°C), resulting in an apparent negative temperature sensitivity of Rs at high temperatures, and positive temperature sensitivity at low-moderate temperatures. We used Bayesian statistical methods to compare multiple competing models capturing a wide range of hypothesized relationships between temperature, moisture, and Rs. The best fit model indicates apparent negative temperature sensitivity of soil respiration at high temperatures reflects the control of soil moisture – not high temperatures – in limiting Rs. The modeled Q10 ranged from 2.7 at 5°C to 1.4 at 45°C. Litter addition had no effect on temperature sensitivity or reference respiration (Rref = Rs at 20°C and optimum moisture) beneath shrubs, and little effect on Rref in interspaces, yet Rref was 1.5 times higher beneath shrubs than in interspaces. Together, these results suggest reduced Rs often observed at high temperatures in drylands is dominated by the control of moisture, and that variable litter inputs – at least over the short

  20. Room temperature magnetic ordering, enhanced magnetization and exchange bias of GdMnO3 nanoparticles in (GdMnO3)0.70(CoFe2O4)0.30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, A.; Mahapatra, A.S.; Mallick, A.; Chakrabarti, P.K.

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles of GdMnO 3 (GMO) are prepared by sol-gel method. To enhance the magnetic property and also to obtain the magnetic ordering at room temperature (RT), nanoparticles of GMO are incorporated in the matrix of CoFe 2 O 4 (CFO). Desired crystallographic phases of CFO, GMO and GMO-CFO are confirmed by analyzing X-ray diffractrograms (XRD) using Rietveld method. The average size of nanoparticles and their distribution, crystallographic phase, nanocrystallinity etc. are studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Magnetic hysteresis loops (M-H) of GMO-CFO under zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) conditions are observed at different temperatures down to 5 K. Magnetization vs. temperature (M-T) under ZFC and FC conditions are also recorded. Interestingly, exchange bias (EB) is found at low temperature which suggests the encapsulation of the ferromagnetic (FM) nanoparticles of GMO by the ferrimagnetic nanoparticles of CFO below ~100 K. Enhanced magnetization, EB effect and RT magnetic ordering of GMO-CFO would be interesting for both theoretical and experimental investigations. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of GdMnO 3 are incorporated in the matrix of CoFe 2 O 4 . • RT magnetic ordering of GMO nanoparticles in GMO-CFO is observed. • Magnetic property of GMO-CFO is highly enhanced compared to GMO. • Exchange bias is found in GMO-CFO at low temperature.

  1. Ion temperature profiles in front of a negative planar electrode studied by a one-dimensional two-fluid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovačič, J.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma-wall transition is studied by a one-dimensional steady state two-fluid model. Continuity and momentum exchange equations are used for the electrons, while the continuity, momentum exchange, and energy transport equation are used for the ions. Electrons are assumed to be isothermal. The closure of ion equations is made by the assumption that the heat flux is zero. The model equations are solved for potential, ion and electron density, and velocity and ion temperature as independent variables. The model includes coulomb collisions between ions and electrons and charge exchange collisions between ions and neutral atoms of the same species and same mass. The neutral atoms are assumed to be essentially at rest. The model is solved for finite ratio ɛ = /λ D L between the Debye length and λD and ionization length L in the pre-sheath and in the sheath at the same time. Charge exchange collisions heat the ions in the sheath and the pre-sheath. Even a small increase of the frequency of charge exchange collisions causes a substantial increase of ion temperature. Coulomb collisions have negligible effect on ion temperature in the pre-sheath, while in the sheath they cause a small cooling of ions. The increase of ɛ causes the increase of ion temperature. From the ion density and temperature profiles, the polytropic function κ is calculated according to its definition given by Kuhn et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 013503 (2006)]. The obtained profiles of κ indicate that the ion flow is isothermal only in a relatively narrow region in the pre-sheath, while close to the sheath edge and in the sheath it is closer to adiabatic. The ion sound velocity is space dependent and exhibits a maximum. This maximum indicates the location of the sheath edge only in the limit ɛ → 0 .

  2. Photoconductivity of biased graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Marcus

    2013-03-01

    The origin of photosensitivity of graphene devices has been attributed to either thermoelectric, photovoltaic, or bolometric effects. Here we report on the intrinsic photoresponse of electrically biased, but otherwise homogeneous single-layer graphene. In this simple, yet unstudied experimental condition, the photocurrent shows polarity reversal, as it alternates between two of these effects while sweeping the electronic potential. Near the Dirac point, the photovoltaic effect dominates, and the photocurrent adds to the transport current. Away from the Dirac point, the bolometric effect dominates, and reduces the transport current. Magnitude and polarity of the photocurrent allow us to infer the hot carrier and phonon temperatures under light illumination. The electron temperature is found to be an order of magnitude higher than the phonon temperature, shedding light on energy loss pathways other than via intrinsic graphene phonons. (M. Freitag et al., Nature Photonics, accepted for publication (2012).)

  3. Elevated temperatures and long drought periods have a negative impact on survival and fitness of strongylid third stage larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp-Lawitzke, Friederike; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2016-04-01

    In grazing cattle, infections with gastrointestinal nematodes pose some of the most important health threats and subclinical infections result in considerable production losses. While there is little doubt that climate change will affect grazing ruminants directly, mean temperature increases of ∼ 3°C and longer drought stress periods in summer may also influence the free-living stages of parasitic nematodes. Hostile climatic conditions reduce the number of L3s on pasture and therefore the refugium, which is expected to result in a higher selection pressure, accelerating development of resistance against anthelmintic drugs. The aim of the current experiments was to investigate the effects of drought stress and different temperature/humidity ranges over time on the survival and fitness of Cooperia oncophora L3s and their distribution in grass and soil under controlled conditions using a climate chamber. Grass containers inoculated with L3s were analysed after 1-6weeks using descriptive statistics as well as linear models. A large proportion of L3s was recovered from soil where fitness was also better preserved than on grass. Numbers and fitness of recovered L3s declined with duration in the climate chamber under both temperature profiles. However, the results of the linear models confirmed that higher temperatures (20-33°C versus 17-22.6°C) significantly impaired survival, distribution and fitness of L3s. Application of drought stress, known as another important factor, had a surprisingly smaller impact than its duration or higher temperatures. The climate chamber enabled exclusion of confounding factors and therefore accurate interpretation of the investigated climatic aspects. The obtained results highlight the relative importance of those factors, and will help to design better models for the population dynamics of L3s on pasture in the future. Additionally, the outcomes of these investigations may offer explanations regarding interdependencies of development

  4. Bias against research on gender bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cislak, Aleksandra; Formanowicz, Magdalena; Saguy, Tamar

    2018-01-01

    The bias against women in academia is a documented phenomenon that has had detrimental consequences, not only for women, but also for the quality of science. First, gender bias in academia affects female scientists, resulting in their underrepresentation in academic institutions, particularly in higher ranks. The second type of gender bias in science relates to some findings applying only to male participants, which produces biased knowledge. Here, we identify a third potentially powerful source of gender bias in academia: the bias against research on gender bias. In a bibliometric investigation covering a broad range of social sciences, we analyzed published articles on gender bias and race bias and established that articles on gender bias are funded less often and published in journals with a lower Impact Factor than articles on comparable instances of social discrimination. This result suggests the possibility of an underappreciation of the phenomenon of gender bias and related research within the academic community. Addressing this meta-bias is crucial for the further examination of gender inequality, which severely affects many women across the world.

  5. Nitrogen Addition Exacerbates the Negative Effects of Low Temperature Stress on Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Moss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-Yang Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Global environmental changes are leading to an increase in localized abnormally low temperatures and increasing nitrogen (N deposition is a phenomenon recognized worldwide. Both low temperature stress (LTS and excess N induce oxidative stress in plants, and excess N also reduces their resistance to LTS. Mosses are primitive plants that are generally more sensitive to alterations in environmental factors than vascular species. To study the combined effects of N deposition and LTS on carbon (C and N metabolism in moss, two moss species, Pogonatum cirratum subsp. fuscatum, and Hypnum plumaeforme, exposed to various concentrations of nitrate (KNO3 or ammonium (NH4Cl, were treated with or without LTS. C/N metabolism indices were then monitored, both immediately after the stress and after a short recovery period (10 days. LTS decreased the photosystem II (PSII performance index and inhibited non-cyclic photophosphorylation, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase, and glutamine synthetase activities, indicating damage to PSII and reductions in C/N assimilation in these mosses. LTS did not affect cyclic photophosphorylation, sucrose synthase, sucrose-phosphate synthase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting a certain level of energy and C skeleton generation were maintained in the mosses to combat LTS; however, LTS inhibited the activity of glycolate oxidase. As predicted, N supply increased the sensitivity of the mosses to LTS, resulting in greater damage to PSII and a sharper decrease in C/N assimilation. After the recovery period, the performance of PSII and C/N metabolism, which were inhibited by LTS increased significantly, and were generally higher than those of control samples not exposed to LTS, suggesting overcompensation effects; however, N application reduced the extent of compensation effects. Both C and N metabolism exhibited stronger compensation effects in H. plumaeforme than in P. cirratum subsp. fuscatum. The

  6. Ocean Acidification and Increased Temperature Have Both Positive and Negative Effects on Early Ontogenetic Traits of a Rocky Shore Keystone Predator Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manríquez, Patricio H.; Jara, María Elisa; Seguel, Mylene E.; Torres, Rodrigo; Alarcon, Emilio; Lee, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming is expected to have significant effects on several traits of marine organisms. The gastropod Concholepas concholepas is a rocky shore keystone predator characteristic of the south-eastern Pacific coast of South America and an important natural resource exploited by small-scale artisanal fishermen along the coast of Chile and Peru. In this study, we used small juveniles of C. concholepas collected from the rocky intertidal habitats of southern Chile (39°S) to evaluate under laboratory conditions the potential consequences of projected near-future levels of ocean acidification and warming for important early ontogenetic traits. The individuals were exposed long-term (5.8 months) to contrasting pCO2 (ca. 500 and 1400 μatm) and temperature (15 and 19°C) levels. After this period we compared body growth traits, dislodgement resistance, predator-escape response, self-righting and metabolic rates. With respect to these traits there was no evidence of a synergistic interaction between pCO2 and temperature. Shell growth was negatively affected by high pCO2 levels only at 15°C. High pCO2 levels also had a negative effect on the predator-escape response. Conversely, dislodgement resistance and self-righting were positively affected by high pCO2 levels at both temperatures. High tenacity and fast self-righting would reduce predation risk in nature and might compensate for the negative effects of high pCO2 levels on other important defensive traits such as shell size and escape behaviour. We conclude that climate change might produce in C. concholepas positive and negative effects in physiology and behaviour. In fact, some of the behavioural responses might be a consequence of physiological effects, such as changes in chemosensory capacity (e.g. predator-escape response) or secretion of adhesive mucous (e.g. dislodgement resistance). Moreover, we conclude that positive behavioural responses may assist in the adaptation

  7. Ocean Acidification and Increased Temperature Have Both Positive and Negative Effects on Early Ontogenetic Traits of a Rocky Shore Keystone Predator Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio H Manríquez

    Full Text Available The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming is expected to have significant effects on several traits of marine organisms. The gastropod Concholepas concholepas is a rocky shore keystone predator characteristic of the south-eastern Pacific coast of South America and an important natural resource exploited by small-scale artisanal fishermen along the coast of Chile and Peru. In this study, we used small juveniles of C. concholepas collected from the rocky intertidal habitats of southern Chile (39 °S to evaluate under laboratory conditions the potential consequences of projected near-future levels of ocean acidification and warming for important early ontogenetic traits. The individuals were exposed long-term (5.8 months to contrasting pCO2 (ca. 500 and 1400 μatm and temperature (15 and 19 °C levels. After this period we compared body growth traits, dislodgement resistance, predator-escape response, self-righting and metabolic rates. With respect to these traits there was no evidence of a synergistic interaction between pCO2 and temperature. Shell growth was negatively affected by high pCO2 levels only at 15 °C. High pCO2 levels also had a negative effect on the predator-escape response. Conversely, dislodgement resistance and self-righting were positively affected by high pCO2 levels at both temperatures. High tenacity and fast self-righting would reduce predation risk in nature and might compensate for the negative effects of high pCO2 levels on other important defensive traits such as shell size and escape behaviour. We conclude that climate change might produce in C. concholepas positive and negative effects in physiology and behaviour. In fact, some of the behavioural responses might be a consequence of physiological effects, such as changes in chemosensory capacity (e.g. predator-escape response or secretion of adhesive mucous (e.g. dislodgement resistance. Moreover, we conclude that positive behavioural responses may assist

  8. Ocean Acidification and Increased Temperature Have Both Positive and Negative Effects on Early Ontogenetic Traits of a Rocky Shore Keystone Predator Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manríquez, Patricio H; Jara, María Elisa; Seguel, Mylene E; Torres, Rodrigo; Alarcon, Emilio; Lee, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    The combined effect of ocean acidification and warming is expected to have significant effects on several traits of marine organisms. The gastropod Concholepas concholepas is a rocky shore keystone predator characteristic of the south-eastern Pacific coast of South America and an important natural resource exploited by small-scale artisanal fishermen along the coast of Chile and Peru. In this study, we used small juveniles of C. concholepas collected from the rocky intertidal habitats of southern Chile (39 °S) to evaluate under laboratory conditions the potential consequences of projected near-future levels of ocean acidification and warming for important early ontogenetic traits. The individuals were exposed long-term (5.8 months) to contrasting pCO2 (ca. 500 and 1400 μatm) and temperature (15 and 19 °C) levels. After this period we compared body growth traits, dislodgement resistance, predator-escape response, self-righting and metabolic rates. With respect to these traits there was no evidence of a synergistic interaction between pCO2 and temperature. Shell growth was negatively affected by high pCO2 levels only at 15 °C. High pCO2 levels also had a negative effect on the predator-escape response. Conversely, dislodgement resistance and self-righting were positively affected by high pCO2 levels at both temperatures. High tenacity and fast self-righting would reduce predation risk in nature and might compensate for the negative effects of high pCO2 levels on other important defensive traits such as shell size and escape behaviour. We conclude that climate change might produce in C. concholepas positive and negative effects in physiology and behaviour. In fact, some of the behavioural responses might be a consequence of physiological effects, such as changes in chemosensory capacity (e.g. predator-escape response) or secretion of adhesive mucous (e.g. dislodgement resistance). Moreover, we conclude that positive behavioural responses may assist in the

  9. Theory of photostructural changes in glasses with negative-U centers: dependencies of steady-state photodarkening on gap-light intensity and frequency, pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, M.I.

    2004-01-01

    A theory is presented of a mechanism for the photostructural changes observed in semiconducting glasses. The theory takes into account that in these materials negative-U centers are the basic charge carriers, and gap-light generated excited states of such centers are accompanied by metastable 'defects' in the original structure, which can be identified as the photostructural changes. The theory gives rise to a consistent interpretation, and some predictions, of dependencies of the steady-state photodarkening on gap-light intensity and frequency, pressure and temperature

  10. Pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation alleviates the negative effects of postanthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrates remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiao; Cai, Jian; Liu, Fulai

    2012-01-01

    had much higher starch content, and caused less modified B-type starch granule size indicators than the CH plants. Our results indicated that, compared with the non-acclimated plants, the pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation effectively enhanced carbohydrate remobilization from stems to grains......The potential role of pre-anthesis high temperature acclimation in alleviating the negative effects of post-anthesis heat stress on stem stored carbohydrate remobilization and grain starch accumulation in wheat was investigated. The treatments included no heat-stress (CC), heat stress at pre......-anthesis only (HC), heat at post-anthesis only (CH), and heat stress at both stages (HH). Post-anthesis heat stress decreased grain starch content, reduced the content of fructans and depressed activities of related synthesis enzymes of sucrose:sucrose fructosyltransferase and fructan...

  11. Negative thermal expansion up to 1000 C of ZrTiO4-Al2TiO5 ceramics for high-temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.J.; Kim, H.C.; Han, I.S.; Aneziris, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    High temperature structural ceramics based on Al 2 TiO 5 -ZrTiO 4 (ZAT) having excellent thermal-shock-resistance were synthesized by a reaction sintering. The ZAT ceramics sintered at 1600 C had a negative thermal expansions up to 1000 C and a much lower thermal expansion coefficient (0.3 ∝ 1.3 x 10 -6 /K) than that of polycrystalline Al 2 TiO 5 (1.5 x 10 -6 /K). These low thermal expansion are apparently due to a combination of microcracking caused by the large thermal expansion anisotropy of the crystal axes of the Al 2 TiO 5 phase. The microstructural degradation of the composites after various thermal treatment for high temperature applications were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultrasonic and dilatometer. (orig.)

  12. Negative impacts of high temperatures on growth of black spruce forests intensify with the anticipated climate warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardin, Martin P; Hogg, Edward H; Bernier, Pierre Y; Kurz, Werner A; Guo, Xiao Jing; Cyr, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    An increasing number of studies conclude that water limitations and heat stress may hinder the capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) trees, a dominant species of Canada's boreal forests, to grow and assimilate atmospheric carbon. However, there is currently no scientific consensus on the future of these forests over the next century in the context of widespread climate warming. The large spatial extent of black spruce forests across the Canadian boreal forest and associated variability in climate, demography, and site conditions pose challenges for projecting future climate change responses. Here we provide an evaluation of the impacts of climate warming and drying, as well as increasing [CO2 ], on the aboveground productivity of black spruce forests across Canada south of 60°N for the period 1971 to 2100. We use a new extensive network of tree-ring data obtained from Canada's National Forest Inventory, spatially explicit simulations of net primary productivity (NPP) and its drivers, and multivariate statistical modeling. We found that soil water availability is a significant driver of black spruce interannual variability in productivity across broad areas of the western to eastern Canadian boreal forest. Interannual variability in productivity was also found to be driven by autotrophic respiration in the warmest regions. In most regions, the impacts of soil water availability and respiration on interannual variability in productivity occurred during the phase of carbohydrate accumulation the year preceding tree-ring formation. Results from projections suggest an increase in the importance of soil water availability and respiration as limiting factors on NPP over the next century due to warming, but this response may vary to the extent that other factors such as carbon dioxide fertilization, and respiration acclimation to high temperature, contribute to dampening these limitations. © 2015 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. Reproduced with

  13. Assessing attentional biases with stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Robyn; Menzies, Ross; Packman, Ann; O'Brian, Sue; Jones, Mark; Onslow, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Many adults who stutter presenting for speech treatment experience social anxiety disorder. The presence of mental health disorders in adults who stutter has been implicated in a failure to maintain speech treatment benefits. Contemporary theories of social anxiety disorder propose that the condition is maintained by negative cognitions and information processing biases. Consistent with cognitive theories, the probe detection task has shown that social anxiety is associated with an attentional bias to avoid social information. This information processing bias is suggested to be involved in maintaining anxiety. Evidence is emerging for information processing biases being involved with stuttering. This study investigated information processing in adults who stutter using the probe detection task. Information processing biases have been implicated in anxiety maintenance in social anxiety disorder and therefore may have implications for the assessment and treatment of stuttering. It was hypothesized that stuttering participants compared with control participants would display an attentional bias to avoid attending to social information. Twenty-three adults who stutter and 23 controls completed a probe detection task in which they were presented with pairs of photographs: a face displaying an emotional expression-positive, negative or neutral-and an everyday household object. All participants were subjected to a mild social threat induction being told they would speak to a small group of people on completion of the task. The stuttering group scored significantly higher than controls for trait anxiety, but did not differ from controls on measures of social anxiety. Non-socially anxious adults who stutter did not display an attentional bias to avoid looking at photographs of faces relative to everyday objects. Higher scores on trait anxiety were positively correlated with attention towards photographs of negative faces. Attentional biases as assessed by the probe

  14. Omens of coupled model biases in the CMIP5 AMIP simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Găinuşă-Bogdan, Alina; Hourdin, Frédéric; Traore, Abdoul Khadre; Braconnot, Pascale

    2018-02-01

    Despite decades of efforts and improvements in the representation of processes as well as in model resolution, current global climate models still suffer from a set of important, systematic biases in sea surface temperature (SST), not much different from the previous generation of climate models. Many studies have looked at errors in the wind field, cloud representation or oceanic upwelling in coupled models to explain the SST errors. In this paper we highlight the relationship between latent heat flux (LH) biases in forced atmospheric simulations and the SST biases models develop in coupled mode, at the scale of the entire intertropical domain. By analyzing 22 pairs of forced atmospheric and coupled ocean-atmosphere simulations from the CMIP5 database, we show a systematic, negative correlation between the spatial patterns of these two biases. This link between forced and coupled bias patterns is also confirmed by two sets of dedicated sensitivity experiments with the IPSL-CM5A-LR model. The analysis of the sources of the atmospheric LH bias pattern reveals that the near-surface wind speed bias dominates the zonal structure of the LH bias and that the near-surface relative humidity dominates the east-west contrasts.

  15. Silver nanoparticle formation in thin oxide layer on silicon by silver-negative-ion implantation for Coulomb blockade at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Hiroshi; Arai, Nobutoshi; Matsumoto, Takuya; Ueno, Kazuya; Gotoh, Yasuhito; Adachi, Kouichiro; Kotaki, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Junzo

    2004-01-01

    Formation of silver nanoparticles formed by silver negative-ion implantation in a thin SiO 2 layer and its I-V characteristics were investigated for development single electron devices. In order to obtain effective Coulomb blockade phenomenon at room temperature, the isolated metal nanoparticles should be in very small size and be formed in a thin insulator layer such as gate oxide on the silicon substrate. Therefore, conditions of a fine particles size, high particle density and narrow distribution should be controlled at their formation without any electrical breakdown of the thin insulator layer. We have used a negative-ion implantation technique with an advantage of 'charge-up free' for insulators, with which no breakdown of thin oxide layer on Si was obtained. In the I-V characteristics with Au electrode, the current steps were observed with a voltage interval of about 0.12 V. From the step voltage the corresponded capacitance was calculated to be 0.7 aF. In one nanoparticle system, this value of capacitance could be given by a nanoparticle of about 3 nm in diameter. This consideration is consistent to the measured particle size in the cross-sectional TEM observation. Therefore, the observed I-V characteristics with steps are considered to be Coulomb staircase by the Ag nanoparticles

  16. Simulated building energy demand biases resulting from the use of representative weather stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Voisin, Nathalie; Taylor, Z. Todd; Xie, Yulong; Kraucunas, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Numerical building models are typically forced with weather data from a limited number of “representative cities” or weather stations representing different climate regions. The use of representative weather stations reduces computational costs, but often fails to capture spatial heterogeneity in weather that may be important for simulations aimed at understanding how building stocks respond to a changing climate. We quantify the potential reduction in bias from using an increasing number of weather stations over the western U.S. The approach is based on deriving temperature and load time series using incrementally more weather stations, ranging from 8 to roughly 150, to capture weather across different seasons. Using 8 stations, one from each climate zone, across the western U.S. results in an average absolute summertime temperature bias of 7.2°F with respect to a spatially-resolved gridded dataset. The mean absolute bias drops to 2.8°F using all available weather stations. Temperature biases of this magnitude could translate to absolute summertime mean simulated load biases as high as 13.8%, a significant error for capacity expansion planners who may use these types of simulations. Increasing the size of the domain over which biases are calculated reduces their magnitude as positive and negative biases may cancel out. Using 8 representative weather stations can lead to a 20-40% overestimation of peak building loads during both summer and winter. Using weather stations close to population centers reduces both mean and peak load biases. This approach could be used by others designing aggregate building simulations to understand the sensitivity to their choice of weather stations used to drive the models.

  17. temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Polt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In-situ X-ray diffraction was applied to isotactic polypropylene with a high volume fraction of α-phase (α-iPP while it has been compressed at temperatures below and above its glass transition temperature Tg. The diffraction patterns were evaluated by the Multi-reflection X-ray Profile Analysis (MXPA method, revealing microstructural parameters such as the density of dislocations and the size of coherently scattering domains (CSD-size. A significant difference in the development of the dislocation density was found compared to compression at temperatures above Tg, pointing at a different plastic deformation mechanism at these temperatures. Based on the individual evolutions of the dislocation density and CSD-size observed as a function of compressive strain, suggestions for the deformation mechanisms occurring below and above Tg are made.

  18. Benefits of being biased!

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Keywords. codon bias; alcohol dehydrogenase; Darwinian fitness; Drosophila melanogaster. RESEARCH COMMENTARY. Benefits of being biased! SUTIRTH DEY*. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary & Organismal Biology Unit,. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,. Jakkur P.O. Box 6436 ...

  19. When bias and insecurity promote accuracy: mean-level bias and tracking accuracy in couples' conflict discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overall, Nickola C; Fletcher, Garth J O; Kenny, David A

    2012-05-01

    Heterosexual couples (N = 57) discussed features about each other they wanted to change. During a review of their recorded discussions, for each 30 s of interaction, perceivers provided judgments of their partner's regard, and partners reported their actual regard for the perceiver. The authors simultaneously assessed the extent to which perceivers' over- or underestimated their partner's regard (mean-level bias) and tracked their partner's changing regard across the discussion (tracking accuracy). Perceivers on average tended to underestimate their partner's regard (negative mean-level bias) but exhibited substantial tracking accuracy. Bias and accuracy were related; perceivers that were more negatively biased more accurately tracked changes in their partner's regard. Women who were more insecure about their partner's continued regard demonstrated more negative mean-level bias and greater tracking accuracy, whereas more secure women demonstrated more positive bias and lower accuracy. The results indicate that bias and accuracy are shaped by context-relevant goals and motives.

  20. Properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited by rf reactive magnetron sputtering on biased substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nezar, Sawsen, E-mail: snezar@cdta.dz [Equipe Plasma & Applications, Division des Milieux Ionisés et Lasers, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout 1956, Baba Hassen, Alger (Algeria); Laboratoire des phénomènes de transfert, génie chimique, Faculté de Génie des procèdes, USTHB, BP 32 El-alia, Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Saoula, Nadia [Equipe Plasma & Applications, Division des Milieux Ionisés et Lasers, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout 1956, Baba Hassen, Alger (Algeria); Sali, Samira [Centre de Recherche en Technologie des Semi-conducteurs pour l’Energétique (CRTSE Algiers) (Algeria); Faiz, Mohammed; Mekki, Mogtaba [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Laoufi, Nadia Aïcha [Laboratoire des phénomènes de transfert, génie chimique, Faculté de Génie des procèdes, USTHB, BP 32 El-alia, Bab Ezzouar, Alger (Algeria); Tabet, Nouar [Qatar Environment and Energy Research Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Doha (Qatar)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} thin films were deposited on negatively biased substrates by rf magnetron sputtering technique. • The bias favors the formation of TiO{sub 2} crystalline phase. • The roughness of the films increases and the grain size decreases as the bias voltage is varied between (0 and −100 V). • XPS reveals the presence of adsorbed humidity of the surface and Ti{sup 4+} oxidation state in the as prepared samples. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} thin films are of paramount importance due to their pervasive applications. In contrast to previous published works where the substrate was heated at high temperatures to obtain TiO{sub 2} crystalline phase, we show in this study that it is possible to deposit crystalline TiO{sub 2} thin films on biased and unbiased substrate at room temperature using reactive rf magnetron sputtering. The bias voltage was varied from 0 V to −100 V. The deposited films were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The average crystallite size was estimated using x-ray diffraction. The results showed that the application of negative bias affects the surface roughness of the films and favors the formation of the rutile phase. The root mean square roughness (R{sub rms}), the average grain size and the optical band gap of the films decreased as the substrate bias voltage was varied from 0 to −100 V. The UV–visible transmittance spectra showed that the films were transparent in the visible range and absorb strongly in the UV range. This study shows that biasing the substrate could be a promising and effective alternative to deposit TiO{sub 2} crystallized thin films of engineered properties at room temperature.

  1. Cognitive bias measurement and social anxiety disorder: Correlating self-report data and attentional bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Miloff

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social anxiety disorder (SAD and attentional bias are theoretically connected in cognitive behavioral therapeutic models. In fact, there is an emerging field focusing on modifying attentional bias as a stand-alone treatment. However, it is unclear to what degree these attentional biases are present before commencing treatment. The purpose of this study was to measure pre-treatment attentional bias in 153 participants diagnosed with SAD using a home-based Internet version of the dot-probe paradigm. Results showed no significant correlation for attentional bias (towards or away from negative words or faces and the self-rated version of the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR. However, two positive correlations were found for the secondary measures Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9. These indicated that those with elevated levels of anxiety and depression had a higher bias towards negative faces in neutral–negative and positive–negative valence combinations, respectively. The unreliability of the dot-probe paradigm and home-based Internet delivery are discussed to explain the lack of correlations between LSAS-SR and attentional bias. Changes to the dot-probe task are suggested that could improve reliability.

  2. Effect of Ni, Fe and Mn in different proportions on microstructure and pollutant-catalyzed properties of Ni-Fe-Mn-O negative temperature coefficient ceramic nanocompositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yonglin, E-mail: leiyonglin@163.com [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Lin, Xiaoyan, E-mail: linxy@swust.edu.cn [Engineering Research Center of Biomass Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China); Liao, Huiwei, E-mail: liaohw@swust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010 (China)

    2017-06-15

    The effect of Ni, Fe and Mn in different proportions on microstructure and pollutant-catalyzed properties of Ni-Fe-Mn-O negative temperature coefficient ceramic nanocompositions was studied. Structural and physical characterization of all the samples was carried out by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) method, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermogravimetric (TG). The results revealed that the interplanar spacing decreased with increasing Fe content, the grain size decreased with increasing Ni content, the substitution of Ni{sup 2+} in the tetrahedral sites by Fe{sup 2+} increased with increasing Fe content. And increase of iron could improve Ni-Fe-Mn-O high temperature stability. The low-temperature thermal removal efficiencies of 30 mg/L methyl orange solution for NiFeMnO{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4,} Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} and Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2.1}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} systems were 83.8%, 75.2%, 78.5% and 60.3% at 2400 min, respectively. And the microwave combining with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal efficiencies of 30 mg/L methyl orange solution for NiFeMnO{sub 4}, Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.9}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4,} Ni{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 1.8}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} and Ni{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 2.1}Mn{sub 0.6}O{sub 4} systems were 96.5%,93.8%, 98.7% and 98% at 6.0 min, respectively. These results indicated that the Ni-Fe-Mn-O ceramics with appropriate increase of iron were useful for industrial applications on degrading organic pollute. - Highlights: • The relationship of composition and catalytic properties of Ni-Fe-Mn-O was proposed. • The interplanar spacing decreased with increasing Fe content. • The grain size decreased with increasing Ni content. • The substitution of Ni{sup 2+} in the tetrahedral site by Fe{sup 2+} with increasing Fe content.

  3. Variable-bias coin tossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colbeck, Roger; Kent, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Alice is a charismatic quantum cryptographer who believes her parties are unmissable; Bob is a (relatively) glamorous string theorist who believes he is an indispensable guest. To prevent possibly traumatic collisions of self-perception and reality, their social code requires that decisions about invitation or acceptance be made via a cryptographically secure variable-bias coin toss (VBCT). This generates a shared random bit by the toss of a coin whose bias is secretly chosen, within a stipulated range, by one of the parties; the other party learns only the random bit. Thus one party can secretly influence the outcome, while both can save face by blaming any negative decisions on bad luck. We describe here some cryptographic VBCT protocols whose security is guaranteed by quantum theory and the impossibility of superluminal signaling, setting our results in the context of a general discussion of secure two-party computation. We also briefly discuss other cryptographic applications of VBCT

  4. CPI Bias in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Chung

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the CPI bias in Korea by employing the approach of Engel’s Law as suggested by Hamilton (2001. This paper is the first attempt to estimate the bias using Korean panel data, Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS. Following Hamilton’s model with non­linear specification correction, our estimation result shows that the cumulative CPI bias over the sample period (2000-2005 was 0.7 percent annually. This CPI bias implies that about 21 percent of the inflation rate during the period can be attributed to the bias. In light of purchasing power parity, we provide an interpretation of the estimated bias.

  5. Bias in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  6. On commercial media bias

    OpenAIRE

    Germano, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    Within the spokes model of Chen and Riordan (2007) that allows for non-localized competition among arbitrary numbers of media outlets, we quantify the effect of concentration of ownership on quality and bias of media content. A main result shows that too few commercial outlets, or better, too few separate owners of commercial outlets can lead to substantial bias in equilibrium. Increasing the number of outlets (commercial and non-commercial) tends to bring down this bias; but the strongest ef...

  7. When negation is not negation

    OpenAIRE

    Milicevic, Nataša

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I will discuss the formation of different types of yes/no questions in Serbian (examples in (1)), focusing on the syntactically and semantically puzzling example (1d), which involves the negative auxiliary inversion. Although there is a negative marker on the fronted auxiliary, the construction does not involve sentential negation. This coincides with the fact that the negative quantifying NPIs cannot be licensed. The question formation and sentential negation have similar synta...

  8. A Screen-Peck Task for Investigating Cognitive Bias in Laying Hens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Deakin

    Full Text Available Affect-induced cognitive judgement biases occur in both humans and animals. Animals in a more negative affective state tend to interpret ambiguous cues more negatively than animals in a more positive state and vice versa. Investigating animals' responses to ambiguous cues can therefore be used as a proxy measure of affective state. We investigated laying hens' responses to ambiguous stimuli using a novel cognitive bias task. In the 'screen-peck' task, hens were trained to peck a high/low saturation orange circle presented on a computer screen (positive cue-P to obtain a mealworm reward, and to not peck when the oppositely saturated orange circle was presented (negative cue-N to avoid a one second air puff. Ambiguous cues were orange circles of intermediate saturation between the P and N cue (near-positive-NP; middle-M; near-negative-NN, and were unrewarded. Cue pecking showed a clear generalisation curve from P through NP, M, NN to N suggesting that hens were able to associate colour saturation with reward or punishment, and could discriminate between stimuli that were more or less similar to learnt cues. Across six test sessions, there was no evidence for extinction of pecking responses to ambiguous cues. We manipulated affective state by changing temperature during testing to either ~20°C or ~29°C in a repeated measures cross-over design. Hens have been shown to prefer temperatures in the higher range and hence we assumed that exposure to the higher temperature would induce a relatively positive affective state. Hens tested under warmer conditions were significantly more likely to peck the M probe than those tested at cooler temperatures suggesting that increased temperature in the ranges tested here may have some positive effect on hens, inducing a positive cognitive bias.

  9. Temperature suppression of STM-induced desorption of hydrogen on Si(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Nakayama, T.

    1999-01-01

    The temperature dependence of hydrogen (H) desorption from Si(100) H-terminated surfaces by a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is reported for negative sample bias. It is found that the STM induced H desorption rate (R) decreases several orders of magnitude when the substrate temperature...... Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  10. Stimulus-driven attention, threat bias, and sad bias in youth with a history of an anxiety disorder or depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Chad M.; Hudziak, James J.; Gaffrey, Michael S.; Barch, Deanna M.; Luby, Joan L.

    2015-01-01

    Attention biases towards threatening and sad stimuli are associated with pediatric anxiety and depression, respectively. The basic cognitive mechanisms associated with attention biases in youth, however, remain unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that threat bias (selective attention for threatening versus neutral stimuli) but not sad bias relies on stimulus-driven attention. We collected measures of stimulus-driven attention, threat bias, sad bias, and current clinical symptoms in youth with a history of an anxiety disorder and/or depression (ANX/DEP; n=40) as well as healthy controls (HC; n=33). Stimulus-driven attention was measured with a non-emotional spatial orienting task, while threat bias and sad bias were measured at a short time interval (150 ms) with a spatial orienting task using emotional faces and at a longer time interval (500 ms) using a dot-probe task. In ANX/DEP but not HC, early attention bias towards threat was negatively correlated with later attention bias to threat, suggesting that early threat vigilance was associated with later threat avoidance. Across all subjects, stimulus-driven orienting was not correlated with early threat bias but was negatively correlated with later threat bias, indicating that rapid stimulus-driven orienting is linked to later threat avoidance. No parallel relationships were detected for sad bias. Current symptoms of depression but not anxiety were related to decreased stimulus-driven attention. Together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that threat bias but not sad bias relies on stimulus-driven attention. These results inform the design of attention bias modification programs that aim to reverse threat biases and reduce symptoms associated with pediatric anxiety and depression. PMID:25702927

  11. Simulating publication bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paldam, Martin

    are made by data variation, while the model is the same. It appears that SR0 generates narrow funnels much at odds with observed funnels, while the other four funnels look more realistic. SR1 to SR4 give the mean a substantial bias that confirms the prior causing the bias. The FAT-PET MRA works well...

  12. Biases in categorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    On what grounds can we conclude that an act of categorization is biased? In this chapter, it is contended that in the absence of objective norms of what categories actually are, biases in categorization can only be specified in relation to theoretical understandings of categorization. Therefore, the

  13. Negative thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, G D; Bruno, J A O; Barron, T H K; Allan, N L

    2005-01-01

    There has been substantial renewed interest in negative thermal expansion following the discovery that cubic ZrW 2 O 8 contracts over a temperature range in excess of 1000 K. Substances of many different kinds show negative thermal expansion, especially at low temperatures. In this article we review the underlying thermodynamics, emphasizing the roles of thermal stress and elasticity. We also discuss vibrational and non-vibrational mechanisms operating on the atomic scale that are responsible for negative expansion, both isotropic and anisotropic, in a wide range of materials. (topical review)

  14. Medical journal peer review: process and bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Scientific peer review is pivotal in health care research in that it facilitates the evaluation of findings for competence, significance, and originality by qualified experts. While the origins of peer review can be traced to the societies of the eighteenth century, it became an institutionalized part of the scholarly process in the latter half of the twentieth century. This was a response to the growth of research and greater subject specialization. With the current increase in the number of specialty journals, the peer review process continues to evolve to meet the needs of patients, clinicians, and policy makers. The peer review process itself faces challenges. Unblinded peer review might suffer from positive or negative bias towards certain authors, specialties, and institutions. Peer review can also suffer when editors and/or reviewers might be unable to understand the contents of the submitted manuscript. This can result in an inability to detect major flaws, or revelations of major flaws after acceptance of publication by the editors. Other concerns include potentially long delays in publication and challenges uncovering plagiarism, duplication, corruption and scientific misconduct. Conversely, a multitude of these challenges have led to claims of scientific misconduct and an erosion of faith. These challenges have invited criticism of the peer review process itself. However, despite its imperfections, the peer review process enjoys widespread support in the scientific community. Peer review bias is one of the major focuses of today's scientific assessment of the literature. Various types of peer review bias include content-based bias, confirmation bias, bias due to conservatism, bias against interdisciplinary research, publication bias, and the bias of conflicts of interest. Consequently, peer review would benefit from various changes and improvements with appropriate training of reviewers to provide quality reviews to maintain the quality and integrity of

  15. Influence of temperature on the photodegradation process using Ag-doped TiO2 nanostructures: Negative impact with the nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakata, Nasser A.M.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    2013-01-01

    temperature is 25 °C. The observed strange effect of the temperature in case of the nanofibrous morphology indicates instant degradation of the dye molecules in the active zones surrounding the nanofibers. Therefore, the increase of temperature results in increase the kinetic energy of the dye molecules so...

  16. Influence of temperature on the photodegradation process using Ag-doped TiO2nanostructures: Negative impact with the nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barakata, Nasser A.M.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmad; Chronakis, Ioannis S.

    temperature is 25 °C. The observed strange effect of the temperature in case of the nanofibrous morphology indicates instant degradation of the dye molecules in the active zones surrounding the nanofibers. Therefore, the increase of temperature results in increase the kinetic energy of the dye molecules so...

  17. Autobiographical memory bias in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Julie; de Bree, June; Bryant, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    In social anxiety the psychological self is closely related to the feared stimulus. Socially anxious individuals are, by definition, concerned about how the self is perceived and evaluated by others. As autobiographical memory is strongly related to views of the self it follows that biases in autobiographical memory play an important role in social anxiety. In the present study high (n = 19) and low (n = 29) socially anxious individuals were compared on autobiographical memory bias, current goals, and self-discrepancy. Individuals high in social anxiety showed a bias towards recalling more negative and more social anxiety-related autobiographical memories, reported more current goals related to overcoming social anxiety, and showed larger self-discrepancies. The pattern of results is largely in line with earlier research in individuals with PTSD and complicated grief. This suggests that the relation between autobiographical memory bias and the self is a potentially valuable trans-diagnostic factor.

  18. Workplace ageism: discovering hidden bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Sanna; Johnston, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Research largely shows no performance differences between older and younger employees, or that older workers even outperform younger employees, yet negative attitudes towards older workers can underpin discrimination. Unfortunately, traditional "explicit" techniques for assessing attitudes (i.e., self-report measures) have serious drawbacks. Therefore, using an approach that is novel to organizational contexts, the authors supplemented explicit with implicit (indirect) measures of attitudes towards older workers, and examined the malleability of both. This research consists of two studies. The authors measured self-report (explicit) attitudes towards older and younger workers with a survey, and implicit attitudes with a reaction-time-based measure of implicit associations. In addition, to test whether attitudes were malleable, the authors measured attitudes before and after a mental imagery intervention, where the authors asked participants in the experimental group to imagine respected and valued older workers from their surroundings. Negative, stable implicit attitudes towards older workers emerged in two studies. Conversely, explicit attitudes showed no age bias and were more susceptible to change intervention, such that attitudes became more positive towards older workers following the experimental manipulation. This research demonstrates the unconscious nature of bias against older workers, and highlights the utility of implicit attitude measures in the context of the workplace. In the current era of aging workforce and skill shortages, implicit measures may be necessary to illuminate hidden workplace ageism.

  19. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-01-01

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas

  20. Biased Allocation of Faces to Social Categories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dotsch, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Knippenberg, A.F.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Three studies show that social categorization is biased at the level of category allocation. In all studies, participants categorized faces. In Studies 1 and 2, participants overallocated faces with criminal features-a stereotypical negative trait-to the stigmatized Moroccan category, especially if

  1. Countering Gender Bias in the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Discusses gender bias created by media favoring males in science, mathematics, and technology and how female academic achievement and attitudes are effected negatively. Introduces an inquiry-based activity using media clippings in which students analyze the images in mass media and discuss their ideas on those images. (YDS)

  2. Group rationale, collective sense : Beyond intergroup bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spears, Russell

    In this paper, I contest the view of the group as a source of bias and irrationality, especially prevalent within social psychology. I argue that this negative evaluation often arises by applying inappropriate standards, relating to the wrong level of analysis (often the individual level). Second,

  3. Heuristics: The good, the bad, and the biased. What value can bias have for decision makers?

    OpenAIRE

    Curley, Lee J.; Murray, Jennifer.; MacLean, Rory.

    2017-01-01

    This discussion paper will look at heuristics (rule of thumb techniques for decision making), (Tversky & Kahneman, 1974) and their potential value. Typically, heuristics have been viewed negatively (Gigerenzer & Goldstein, 1996), with research suggesting that heuristics bias how individuals think, which may create sub-optimal performance (Tversky & Kahneman, 1974). However, researchers, such as Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996), have highlighted that a bias in decision making may not necessaril...

  4. Harassment, Bias, and Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welliver, Paul W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses a new principle which has been added to the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Code of Professional Ethics regarding discrimination, harassment, and bias. An example is presented which illustrates a violation of a professional colleague's rights. (LRW)

  5. Biases in casino betting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sundali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine two departures of individual perceptions of randomness from probability theory: the hot hand and the gambler's fallacy, and their respective opposites. This paper's first contribution is to use data from the field (individuals playing roulette in a casino to demonstrate the existence and impact of these biases that have been previously documented in the lab. Decisions in the field are consistent with biased beliefs, although we observe significant individual heterogeneity in the population. A second contribution is to separately identify these biases within a given individual, then to examine their within-person correlation. We find a positive and significant correlation across individuals between hot hand and gambler's fallacy biases, suggesting a common (root cause of the two related errors. We speculate as to the source of this correlation (locus of control, and suggest future research which could test this speculation.

  6. Bias aware Kalman filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drecourt, J.-P.; Madsen, H.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews two different approaches that have been proposed to tackle the problems of model bias with the Kalman filter: the use of a colored noise model and the implementation of a separate bias filter. Both filters are implemented with and without feedback of the bias into the model state...... are illustrated on a simple one-dimensional groundwater problem. The results show that the presented filters outperform the standard Kalman filter and that the implementations with bias feedback work in more general conditions than the implementations without feedback. 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved........ The colored noise filter formulation is extended to correct both time correlated and uncorrelated model error components. A more stable version of the separate filter without feedback is presented. The filters are implemented in an ensemble framework using Latin hypercube sampling. The techniques...

  7. Gender-Biased Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ruth Palombo

    2001-01-01

    Looks at how gender shapes the way humans learn from biological and sociological perspectives. Indicates that teachers interact more frequently with males and that trainers should try to overcome gender bias. Suggests that discrimination persists in adult education. (JOW)

  8. Negative ... concord?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannakidou, A

    The main claim of this paper is that a general theory of negative concord (NC) should allow for the possibility of NC involving scoping of a universal quantifier above negation. I propose that Greek NC instantiates this option. Greek n-words will be analyzed as polarity sensitive universal

  9. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Anil V. Mishra; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  10. On the urban heat island effect dependence on temperature trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camilloni, I.; Barros, V.

    1997-01-01

    For US, Argentine and Australian cities, yearly mean urban to rural temperature differences (ΔT u-r ) and rural temperatures (T r ) are negatively correlated in almost every case, suggesting that urban heat island intensity depends, among other parameters on the temperature itself. This negative correlation is related to the fact that interannual variability of temperature is generally lower in urban environments than in rural areas. This seems to hold true at low frequencies leading to opposite trends in the two variables. Hence, urban stations are prone to have lower trends in absolute value than rural ones. Therefore, regional data sets including records from urban locations, in addition to urban growth bias may have a second type of urban bias associated with temperature trends. A bulk estimate of this second urban bias trend for the contiguous United States during 1901-1984 indicates that it could be of the same order as the urban growth bias and of opposite sign. If these results could be extended to global data, it could be expected that the spurious influence of urban growth on global temperature trends during warming periods will be offset by the diminishing of the urban heat island intensity. 36 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Empirical analyses of the factors affecting confirmation bias and the effects of confirmation bias on software developer/tester performance

    OpenAIRE

    Calikli, Gul; Bener, Ayse

    2010-01-01

    Background: During all levels of software testing, the goal should be to fail the code. However, software developers and testers are more likely to choose positive tests rather than negative ones due to the phenomenon called confirmation bias. Confirmation bias is defined as the tendency of people to verify their hypotheses rather than refuting them. In the literature, there are theories about the possible effects of confirmation bias on software development and testing. Due to the tendency t...

  12. Bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance in three-segment Frenkel–Kontorova lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Ya-li; Lu, Shi-cai; Hu, Cai-tian; Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    By coupling three nonlinear 1D lattice segments, we demonstrate a thermal insulator model, where the system acts like an insulator for large temperature bias and a conductor for very small temperature bias. We numerically investigate the parameter range of the thermal insulator and find that the nonlinear response (the role of on-site potential), the weakly coupling interaction between each segment, and the small system size collectively contribute to the appearance of bidirectional negative differential thermal resistance (BNDTR). The corresponding exhibition of BNDTR can be explained in terms of effective phonon-band shifts. Our results can provide a new perspective for understanding the microscopic mechanism of negative differential thermal resistance and also would be conducive to further developments in designing and fabricating thermal devices and functional materials. (paper)

  13. Measuring Agricultural Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    The measurement issue is the key issue in the literature on trade policy-induced agri-cultural price incentive bias. This paper introduces a general equilibrium effective rate of protection (GE-ERP) measure, which extends and generalizes earlier partial equilibrium nominal protection measures....... For the 15 sample countries, the results indicate that the agricultural price incentive bias, which was generally perceived to exist during the 1980s, was largely eliminated during the 1990s. The results also demonstrate that general equilibrium effects and country-specific characteristics - including trade...... shares and intersectoral linkages - are crucial for determining the sign and magnitude of trade policy bias. The GE-ERP measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on agricultural price incentives. A Monte Carlo procedure confirms that the results are robust...

  14. Magnetic compensation-induced sign reversal of exchange bias in a multi-glass perovskite SmFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Chandan; Nayak, Ajaya K.; Nicklas, Michael; Sundaresan, A.

    2017-10-01

    We report an unusual sign reversal of exchange bias (EB) across a magnetic compensation point in an orthorhombic perovskite SmFeO3. A conventional negative EB with a positive vertical magnetization shift is observed below a cluster-glass freezing temperature (Tg ˜ 150 K). Upon further lowering of the temperature, the EB disappears at the magnetic compensation point before reversing its sign to a positive exchange bias below 4 K. The EB effect originates from an interfacial exchange interaction within a cluster glass phase, whereas its sign reversal arises from the reversal of the direction of the net magnetic moment as a result of dominance of Sm3+ over Fe3+ below the compensation temperature. The existence of a multi-glass state is demonstrated by ac-susceptibility and electrical permittivity measurements. A phenomenological model is presented to understand the EB effect and its sign reversal across the compensation point.

  15. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. Nothing a hot bath won't cure: infection rates of amphibian chytrid fungus correlate negatively with water temperature under natural field settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Forrest

    Full Text Available Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis, from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10-50°C, including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75-100% in water 30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications.There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them--Sylvia Plath, "The Bell Jar" (1963.

  17. Obesity Stigma and Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruh, Sharon M; Nadglowski, Joe; Hall, Heather R; Davis, Sara L; Crook, Errol D; Zlomke, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are escalating in epidemic proportions in the United States. Individuals with overweight and obesity are often reluctant to seek medical help, not only for weight reduction but also for any health issue because of perceived provider discrimination. Providers who are biased against individuals with obesity can hinder our nation's effort to effectively fight the obesity epidemic. By addressing weight bias in the provider setting, individuals affected by obesity may be more likely to engage in a meaningful and productive discussion of weight. Providers need to be the go-to source for obesity-focused information on new and emerging treatments.

  18. Measuring agricultural policy bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henning Tarp; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate that the agricul......Measurement is a key issue in the literature on price incentive bias induced by trade policy. We introduce a general equilibrium measure of the relative effective rate of protection, which generalizes earlier protection measures. For our fifteen sample countries, results indicate...... protection measure is therefore uniquely suited to capture the full impact of trade policies on relative agricultural price incentives....

  19. Constructing Bias: Conceptualization Breaks the Link Between Implicit Bias and Fear of Black Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kent M; Lindquist, Kristen A; Payne, B Keith

    2017-07-06

    Negative affect toward outgroup members has long been known to predict discriminatory behavior. However, psychological constructionist theories of emotion suggest that negative affect may not always reflect antipathy for outgroup members. Rather, the subjective experience depends on how negative affect is conceptualized as specific discrete emotions (e.g., fear vs. sympathy). Our current research integrates theories of implicit bias with psychological constructionist theories of emotion to understand the implications of negative affect toward outgroup members. Across 3 studies, we find evidence that conceptualization of negative affect toward Black Americans as sympathy, rather than fear, mitigates the relationship between negative affect and fear of Black Americans on self-report and perceptual measures, and reduces racial bias on a psychophysiological measure. These studies provide evidence that conceptualization of negative affect can shape reactions to outgroup members. We discuss the implications of these findings and ground them in theories of implicit bias, social cognition, and affective science. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Cognitive biases can affect moral intuitions about cognitive enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucius eCaviola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research into cognitive biases that impair human judgment has mostly been applied to the area of economic decision-making. Ethical decision-making has been comparatively neglected. Since ethical decisions often involve very high individual as well as collective stakes, analyzing how cognitive biases affect them can be expected to yield important results. In this theoretical article, we consider the ethical debate about cognitive enhancement (CE and suggest a number of cognitive biases that are likely to affect moral intuitions and judgments about CE: status quo bias, loss aversion, risk aversion, omission bias, scope insensitivity, nature bias, and optimistic bias. We find that there are more well-documented biases that are likely to cause irrational aversion to CE than biases in the opposite direction. This suggests that common attitudes about CE are predominantly negatively biased. Within this new perspective, we hope that subsequent research will be able to elaborate this hypothesis and develop effective de-biasing techniques that can help increase the rationality of the public CE debate and thus improve our ethical decision-making.

  1. Bridging exchange bias effect in NiO and Ni(core)@NiO(shell) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi-Montes, Natalia, E-mail: nataliarin@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain); Gorria, Pedro [Departamento de Física & IUTA, EPI, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33203 Gijón (Spain); Martínez-Blanco, David [Servicios Científico-Técnicos, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33006 Oviedo (Spain); Fuertes, Antonio B. [Instituto Nacional del Carbón, CSIC, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain); Fernández Barquín, Luis [CITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Puente-Orench, Inés [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza and Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Blanco, Jesús A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    Among all bi-magnetic core(transition metal)@shell(transition metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs), Ni@NiO ones show an onset temperature for the exchange bias (EB) effect far below the Néel temperature of bulk antiferromagnetic NiO. In this framework, the role played by the magnetism of NiO at the nanoscale is investigated by comparing the microstructure and magnetic properties of NiO and Ni@NiO NPs. With the aim of bridging the two systems, the diameter of the NiO NPs (~4 nm) is chosen to be comparable to the shell thickness of Ni@NiO ones (~2 nm). The EB effect in Ni@NiO NPs is attributed to the exchange coupling between the core and the shell, with an interfacial exchange energy of ΔE~0.06 erg cm{sup −2}, thus comparable to previous reports on Ni/NiO interfaces both in thin film and NP morphologies. In contrast, the EB detected in NiO NPs is explained in a picture where uncompensated spins located on a magnetically disordered surface shell are exchange coupled to the antiferromagnetic core. In all the studied NPs, the variation of the EB field as a function of temperature is described according to a negative exponential law with a similar decay constant, yielding a vanishing EB effect around T~40–50 K. In addition, the onset temperature for the EB effect in both NiO and Ni@NiO NPs seems to follow a universal dependence with the NiO crystallite size. - Highlights: • Comparison of the exchange bias effect in NiO and Ni(core)@NiO(shell) nanoparticles. • Universal temperature dependence of the exchange bias effect. • Suggested similar physical origin of the effect in both systems. • Size and crystallinity of the NiO shell hold the key for exchange bias properties.

  2. Thermodynamics of negative absolute pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukacs, B.; Martinas, K.

    1984-03-01

    The authors show that the possibility of negative absolute pressure can be incorporated into the axiomatic thermodynamics, analogously to the negative absolute temperature. There are examples for such systems (GUT, QCD) processing negative absolute pressure in such domains where it can be expected from thermodynamical considerations. (author)

  3. Imagine the bright side of life: A randomized controlled trial of two types of interpretation bias modification procedure targeting adolescent anxiety and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, E L; de Hullu, E.; Burnett Heyes, S.; Blackwell, S.E.; Wiers, R.W.; Salemink, E.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Anxiety and depression are highly prevalent during adolescence and characterized by negative interpretation biases. Cognitive bias modification of interpretations (CBM-I) may reduce such biases and improve emotional functioning. However, as findings have been mixed and the traditional

  4. Persistent negative temperature response of mesophyll conductance in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) leaves under both high and low vapour pressure deficits: a role for abscisic acid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Changpeng; Ethier, Gilbert; Pepin, Steeve; Dubé, Pascal; Desjardins, Yves; Gosselin, André

    2017-09-01

    The temperature dependence of mesophyll conductance (g m ) was measured in well-watered red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) plants acclimated to leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit (VPDL) daytime differentials of contrasting amplitude, keeping a fixed diurnal leaf temperature (T leaf ) rise from 20 to 35 °C. Contrary to the great majority of g m temperature responses published to date, we found a pronounced reduction of g m with increasing T leaf irrespective of leaf chamber O 2 level and diurnal VPDL regime. Leaf hydraulic conductance was greatly enhanced during the warmer afternoon periods under both low (0.75 to 1.5 kPa) and high (0.75 to 3.5 kPa) diurnal VPDL regimes, unlike stomatal conductance (g s ), which decreased in the afternoon. Consequently, the leaf water status remained largely isohydric throughout the day, and therefore cannot be evoked to explain the diurnal decrease of g m . However, the concerted diurnal reductions of g m and g s were well correlated with increases in leaf abscisic acid (ABA) content, thus suggesting that ABA can induce a significant depression of g m under favourable leaf water status. Our results challenge the view that the temperature dependence of g m can be explained solely from dynamic leaf anatomical adjustments and/or from the known thermodynamic properties of aqueous solutions and lipid membranes.​. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Recognition bias and the physical attractiveness stereotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Jean-Christophe; Rasmussen, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have found a recognition bias for information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype (PAS), in which participants believe that they remember that attractive individuals have positive qualities and that unattractive individuals have negative qualities, regardless of what information actually occurred. The purpose of this research was to examine whether recognition bias for PAS congruent information is replicable and invariant across a variety of conditions (i.e. generalizable). The effects of nine different moderator variables were examined in two experiments. With a few exceptions, the effect of PAS congruence on recognition bias was independent of the moderator variables. The results suggest that the tendency to believe that one remembers information consistent with the physical attractiveness stereotype is a robust phenomenon. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2012 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  6. Estimating Production Potentials: Expert Bias in Applied Decision Making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, L.J.; Burggraf, L.K.; Reece, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate how workers predict manufacturing production potentials given positively and negatively framed information. Findings indicate the existence of a bias toward positive information and suggest that this bias may be reduced with experience but is never the less maintained. Experts err in the same way non experts do in differentially processing negative and positive information. Additionally, both experts and non experts tend to overestimate production potentials in a positive direction. The authors propose that these biases should be addressed with further research including cross domain analyses and consideration in training, workplace design, and human performance modeling

  7. The distinct effects of internalizing weight bias: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Rebecca L; Puhl, Rebecca M

    2016-06-01

    Both experiencing and internalizing weight bias are associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes, but internalization may be a more potent predictor of these outcomes. The current study aimed to differentiate between causal effects of experiencing versus internalizing weight bias on emotional responses and psychological well-being. Adults with overweight/obesity (N=260) completed an online experiment in which they were randomly assigned to focus on either the experience or internalization of weight bias, and completed measures of affect, self-esteem, and body dissatisfaction. Results indicated that the Internalization condition led to more negative affect, less positive affect, and lower self-esteem than the Experience condition. The Internalization condition also led to heightened body dissatisfaction among men, but not women. These findings suggest that weight bias internalization may be a stronger predictor of poor mental and physical health than experiences alone, and carry implications for developing weight bias interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating vulnerability to eating disorders: biases in emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, A; Harmer, C J; Cooper, M J

    2010-04-01

    Biases in emotional processing and cognitions about the self are thought to play a role in the maintenance of eating disorders (EDs). However, little is known about whether these difficulties exist pre-morbidly and how they might contribute to risk. Female dieters (n=82) completed a battery of tasks designed to assess the processing of social cues (facial emotion recognition), cognitions about the self [Self-Schema Processing Task (SSPT)] and ED-specific cognitions about eating, weight and shape (emotional Stroop). The 26-item Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26; Garner et al. 1982) was used to assess subclinical ED symptoms; this was used as an index of vulnerability within this at-risk group. Regression analyses showed that biases in the processing of both neutral and angry faces were predictive of our measure of vulnerability (EAT-26). In the self-schema task, biases in the processing of negative self descriptors previously found to be common in EDs predicted vulnerability. Biases in the processing of shape-related words on the Stroop task were also predictive; however, these biases were more important in dieters who also displayed biases in the self-schema task. We were also able to demonstrate that these biases are specific and separable from more general negative biases that could be attributed to depressive symptoms. These results suggest that specific biases in the processing of social cues, cognitions about the self, and also about eating, weight and shape information, may be important in understanding risk and preventing relapse in EDs.

  9. Positioning of Weight Bias: Moving towards Social Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nutter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Weight bias is a form of stigma with detrimental effects on the health and wellness of individuals with large bodies. Researchers from various disciplines have recognized weight bias as an important topic for public health and for professional practice. To date, researchers from various areas have approached weight bias from independent perspectives and from differing theoretical orientations. In this paper, we examined the similarities and differences between three perspectives (i.e., weight-centric, non-weight-centric (health-centric, and health at every size used to understand weight bias and approach weight bias research with regard to (a language about people with large bodies, (b theoretical position, (c identified consequences of weight bias, and (d identified influences on weight-based social inequity. We suggest that, despite differences, each perspective acknowledges the negative influences that position weight as being within individual control and the negative consequences of weight bias. We call for recognition and discussion of weight bias as a social justice issue in order to change the discourse and professional practices extended towards individuals with large bodies. We advocate for an emphasis on social justice as a uniting framework for interdisciplinary research on weight bias.

  10. Positioning of Weight Bias: Moving towards Social Justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutter, Sarah; Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Alberga, Angela S; Arthur, Nancy; Kassan, Anusha; Lund, Darren E; Sesma-Vazquez, Monica; Williams, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Weight bias is a form of stigma with detrimental effects on the health and wellness of individuals with large bodies. Researchers from various disciplines have recognized weight bias as an important topic for public health and for professional practice. To date, researchers from various areas have approached weight bias from independent perspectives and from differing theoretical orientations. In this paper, we examined the similarities and differences between three perspectives (i.e., weight-centric, non-weight-centric (health-centric), and health at every size) used to understand weight bias and approach weight bias research with regard to (a) language about people with large bodies, (b) theoretical position, (c) identified consequences of weight bias, and (d) identified influences on weight-based social inequity. We suggest that, despite differences, each perspective acknowledges the negative influences that position weight as being within individual control and the negative consequences of weight bias. We call for recognition and discussion of weight bias as a social justice issue in order to change the discourse and professional practices extended towards individuals with large bodies. We advocate for an emphasis on social justice as a uniting framework for interdisciplinary research on weight bias.

  11. Training-induced inversion of spontaneous exchange bias field on La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufaiçal, L., E-mail: lbufaical@ufg.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Finkler, R.; Coutrim, L.T. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Pagliuso, P.G. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Grossi, C.; Stavale, F.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bittar, E.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6} exhibits spontaneous exchange bias effect at low temperature. • For successive hysteresis cycles it inverts the shift sign from negative to positive. • For a field cooled hysteresis cycle, the exchange bias effect greatly enhances. • Our results are compared to those of the analogue compound La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}. - Abstract: In this work we report the synthesis and structural, electronic and magnetic properties of La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6} double-perovskite. This is a re-entrant spin cluster material which exhibits a non-negligible negative exchange bias effect when it is cooled in zero magnetic field from an unmagnetized state down to low temperature. X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and magnetometry results indicate mixed valence state at Co site, leading to competing magnetic phases and uncompensated spins at the magnetic interfaces. We compare the results for this Ca-doped material with those reported for the resemblant compound La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}, and discuss the much smaller spontaneous exchange bias effect observed for the former in terms of its structural and magnetic particularities. For La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}, when successive magnetization loops are carried, the spontaneous exchange bias field inverts its sign from negative to positive from the first to the second measurement. We discuss this behavior based on the disorder at the magnetic interfaces, related to the presence of a glassy phase. This compound also exhibits a large conventional exchange bias, for which there is no sign inversion of the exchange bias field for consecutive cycles.

  12. Increased [CO2] does not compensate for negative effects on yield caused by higher temperature and [O3] in Brassica napus L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenck, Georg; van der Linden, Leon Gareth; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2011-01-01

    The projected changes of atmospheric composition and associated climatic parameters will challenge the agricultural production in ways, which existing crop populations have not previously experienced. Therefore, understanding the responsiveness to changes of multiple environmental parameters....... The evaluation of cultivar differences in productivity under elevated [CO2] in combination with increased temperatures and [O3] is necessary to derive at a realistic prediction for the future food and biomass production and for the selection of cultivars providing an adaptation potential to environmental change...... are relevant for predictions of the future production, as they mimic the multidimensional environmental changes that are expected within this century. All treatments were given the same amount of water, which mimicked future limited water availability e.g. in treatments with elevated temperature. The biomass...

  13. Room temperature magnetic ordering, enhanced magnetization and exchange bias of GdMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles in (GdMnO{sub 3}){sub 0.70}(CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 0.30}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitra, A.; Mahapatra, A.S.; Mallick, A.; Chakrabarti, P.K., E-mail: pabitra_c@hotmail.com

    2017-02-15

    Nanoparticles of GdMnO{sub 3} (GMO) are prepared by sol-gel method. To enhance the magnetic property and also to obtain the magnetic ordering at room temperature (RT), nanoparticles of GMO are incorporated in the matrix of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (CFO). Desired crystallographic phases of CFO, GMO and GMO-CFO are confirmed by analyzing X-ray diffractrograms (XRD) using Rietveld method. The average size of nanoparticles and their distribution, crystallographic phase, nanocrystallinity etc. are studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Magnetic hysteresis loops (M-H) of GMO-CFO under zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) conditions are observed at different temperatures down to 5 K. Magnetization vs. temperature (M-T) under ZFC and FC conditions are also recorded. Interestingly, exchange bias (EB) is found at low temperature which suggests the encapsulation of the ferromagnetic (FM) nanoparticles of GMO by the ferrimagnetic nanoparticles of CFO below ~100 K. Enhanced magnetization, EB effect and RT magnetic ordering of GMO-CFO would be interesting for both theoretical and experimental investigations. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of GdMnO{sub 3} are incorporated in the matrix of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. • RT magnetic ordering of GMO nanoparticles in GMO-CFO is observed. • Magnetic property of GMO-CFO is highly enhanced compared to GMO. • Exchange bias is found in GMO-CFO at low temperature.

  14. Exchange bias in UO.sub.2./sub./Fe.sub.3./sub.O.sub.4./sub. thin films above the Néel temperature of UO.sub.2./sub

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, Evgeniya; Bao, Z.; Havela, L.; Daniš, S.; Kuebel, C.; Gouder, T.; Caciuffo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 12 (2014), "122405-1"-"122405-5" ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-25866P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : exchange bias effect * uranium dioxide * magnetite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.302, year: 2014

  15. Attention Bias Modification for Major Depressive Disorder: Effects on Attention Bias, Resting State Connectivity, and Symptom Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Clasen, Peter C.; Enock, Philip M.; Schnyer, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories of depression posit that selective attention for negative information contributes to the maintenance of depression. The current study experimentally tested this idea by randomly assigning adults with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) to four weeks of computer-based attention bias modification designed to reduce negative attention bias or four weeks of placebo attention training. Findings indicate that compared to placebo training, attention bias modification reduced negative attention bias and increased resting-state connectivity within a neural circuit (i.e., middle frontal gyrus and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex) that supports control over emotional information. Further, pre- to post-training change in negative attention bias was significantly correlated with depression symptom change only in the active training condition. Exploratory analyses indicated that pre- to post-training changes in resting state connectivity within a circuit associated with sustained attention to visual information (i.e., precuenus and middle frontal gyrus) contributed to symptom improvement in the placebo condition. Importantly, depression symptoms did not change differentially between the training groups—overall, a 40% decrease in symptoms was observed across attention training conditions. Findings suggest that negative attention bias is associated with the maintenance of depression; however, general attentional control may also maintain depression symptoms, as evidenced by resting state connectivity and depression symptom improvement in the placebo training condition. PMID:25894440

  16. Causes of the large warm bias in the Angola-Benguela Frontal Zone in the Norwegian Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koseki, Shunya; Keenlyside, Noel; Demissie, Teferi; Toniazzo, Thomas; Counillon, Francois; Bethke, Ingo; Ilicak, Mehmet; Shen, Mao-Lin

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated the causes of the sea surface temperature (SST) bias in the Angola-Benguela Frontal Zone (ABFZ) of the southeastern Atlantic Ocean simulated by the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). Similar to other coupled-models, NorESM has a warm SST bias in the ABFZ of up to 8 °C in the annual mean. Our analysis of NorESM reveals that a cyclonic surface wind bias over the ABFZ drives a locally excessively strong southward (0.05 m/s (relative to observation)) Angola Current displacing the ABFZ southward. A series of uncoupled stand-alone atmosphere and ocean model simulations are performed to investigate the cause of the coupled model bias. The stand-alone atmosphere model driven with observed SST exhibits a similar cyclonic surface circulation bias; while the stand-alone ocean model forced with the reanalysis data produces a warm SST in the ABFZ with a magnitude approximately half of that in the coupled NorESM simulation. An additional uncoupled sensitivity experiment shows that the atmospheric model's local negative surface wind curl generates anomalously strong Angola Current at the ocean surface. Consequently, this contributes to the warm SST bias in the ABFZ by 2 °C (compared to the reanalysis forced simulation). There is no evidence that local air-sea feedbacks among wind stress curl, SST, and sea level pressure (SLP) affect the ABFZ SST bias. Turbulent surface heat flux differences between coupled and uncoupled experiments explain the remaining 2 °C warm SST bias in NorESM. Ocean circulation, upwelling and turbulent heat flux errors all modulate the intensity and the seasonality of the ABFZ errors.

  17. Analysis of bias effects on the total ionizing dose response in a 180 nm technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhangli; Hu Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhengxuan; Shao Hua; Chen Ming; Bi Dawei; Ning Bingxu; Zou Shichang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of gamma ray irradiation on the shallow trench isolation (STI) leakage current in a 180 nm technology are investigated. The radiation response is strongly influenced by the bias modes, gate bias during irradiation, substrate bias during irradiation and operating substrate bias after irradiation. We found that the worst case occurs under the ON bias condition for the ON, OFF and PASS bias mode. A positive gate bias during irradiation significantly enhances the STI leakage current, indicating the electric field influence on the charge buildup process during radiation. Also, a negative substrate bias during irradiation enhances the STI leakage current. However a negative operating substrate bias effectively suppresses the STI leakage current, and can be used to eliminate the leakage current produced by the charge trapped in the deep STI oxide. Appropriate substrate bias should be introduced to alleviate the total ionizing dose (TID) response, and lead to acceptable threshold voltage shift and subthreshold hump effect. Depending on the simulation results, we believe that the electric field distribution in the STI oxide is the key parameter influencing bias effects on the radiation response of transistor. - Highlights: → ON bias is the worst bias condition for the ON, PASS and OFF bias modes. → Larger gate bias during irradiation leads to more pronounced characteristic degradation. → TID induced STI leakage can be suppressed by negative operating substrate bias voltage. → Negative substrate bias during irradiation leads to larger increase of off-state leakage. → Electric field in the STI oxide greatly influences the device's radiation effect.

  18. Test Bias and the Elimination of Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of test bias are discussed: content bias, atmosphere bias, and use bias. Use bias is considered the most important. Tests reflect the bias in society, and eliminating test bias means eliminating racism and sexism in society. A six-stage model to eliminate racism and sexism is presented. (Author)

  19. A systematic review of context bias in invasion biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Robert J; King, Joshua R; Tarsa, Charlene; Haas, Brian; Henderson, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    The language that scientists use to frame biological invasions may reveal inherent bias-including how data are interpreted. A frequent critique of invasion biology is the use of value-laden language that may indicate context bias. Here we use a systematic study of language and interpretation in papers drawn from invasion biology to evaluate whether there is a link between the framing of papers and the interpretation of results. We also examine any trends in context bias in biological invasion research. We examined 651 peer-reviewed invasive species competition studies and implemented a rigorous systematic review to examine bias in the presentation and interpretation of native and invasive competition in invasion biology. We predicted that bias in the presentation of invasive species is increasing, as suggested by several authors, and that bias against invasive species would result in misinterpreting their competitive dominance in correlational observational studies compared to causative experimental studies. We indeed found evidence of bias in the presentation and interpretation of invasive species research; authors often introduced research with invasive species in a negative context and study results were interpreted against invasive species more in correlational studies. However, we also found a distinct decrease in those biases since the mid-2000s. Given that there have been several waves of criticism from scientists both inside and outside invasion biology, our evidence suggests that the subdiscipline has somewhat self-corrected apparent biases.

  20. Interpretation bias towards vague faces in individuals with paranoid personality disorder traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Doustkam

    2017-10-01

     Conclusion: Individuals with paranoid personality traits have more biases than normal individuals in terms of interpreting vague faces. The results of this study indicated the importance of attention to cognitive biases among individuals with paranoid personality traits or paranoid personality disorder because such biases can significantly influence behavioral patterns in individuals, and consequently degrade their functioning. Also, bias towards the processing of negative signs appears to be the most important cognitive element is involved in interpersonal relationships.

  1. X-ray reflectivity study of bias graded diamond like carbon film ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings were deposited on silicon substrates by microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma CVD process using plasma of Ar and CH4 gases under the influence of negative d.c. self bias generated on the substrates by application of RF (13.56 MHz) power. The negative bias voltage ...

  2. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Marine; Carl, Tatiana; Surguladze, Simon; Guillen, Catherine; Gaillard, Philippe; Belzung, Catherine; El-Hage, Wissam; Atanasova, Boriana

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE), and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale), an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors), and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant), facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions), and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant). In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  3. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE, and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. METHODS: We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale, an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors, and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. RESULTS: MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant, facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions, and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant. In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  4. The effect of GCM biases on global runoff simulations of a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Lamprini V.; Koutroulis, Aristeidis G.; Grillakis, Manolis G.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2017-09-01

    Global climate model (GCM) outputs feature systematic biases that render them unsuitable for direct use by impact models, especially for hydrological studies. To deal with this issue, many bias correction techniques have been developed to adjust the modelled variables against observations, focusing mainly on precipitation and temperature. However, most state-of-the-art hydrological models require more forcing variables, in addition to precipitation and temperature, such as radiation, humidity, air pressure, and wind speed. The biases in these additional variables can hinder hydrological simulations, but the effect of the bias of each variable is unexplored. Here we examine the effect of GCM biases on historical runoff simulations for each forcing variable individually, using the JULES land surface model set up at the global scale. Based on the quantified effect, we assess which variables should be included in bias correction procedures. To this end, a partial correction bias assessment experiment is conducted, to test the effect of the biases of six climate variables from a set of three GCMs. The effect of the bias of each climate variable individually is quantified by comparing the changes in simulated runoff that correspond to the bias of each tested variable. A methodology for the classification of the effect of biases in four effect categories (ECs), based on the magnitude and sensitivity of runoff changes, is developed and applied. Our results show that, while globally the largest changes in modelled runoff are caused by precipitation and temperature biases, there are regions where runoff is substantially affected by and/or more sensitive to radiation and humidity. Global maps of bias ECs reveal the regions mostly affected by the bias of each variable. Based on our findings, for global-scale applications, bias correction of radiation and humidity, in addition to that of precipitation and temperature, is advised. Finer spatial-scale information is also provided

  5. A Friendly Turn: Advertising Bias in the News Media

    OpenAIRE

    Ruenzi, Stefan; Focke, Florens; Niessen-Ruenzi, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates whether newspapers report more favorably about advertising corporate clients than about other firms. Our identification strategy based on high-dimensional fixed effects and high frequency advertising data shows that advertising leads to more positive press coverage. This advertising bias in reporting is found among local and national newspapers. Further results show that advertising bias manifests particularly in less negative reporting after bad news events such as ne...

  6. EEG biofeedback improves attentional bias in high trait anxiety individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Sijuan; Lin, Guiping; Sun, Peng; Wang, Tinghuai

    2013-01-01

    Background Emotion-related attentional bias is implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback can obviously improve the anxiety disorders and reduce stress level, and can also enhance attention performance in healthy subjects. The present study examined the effects and mechanisms of EEG biofeedback training on the attentional bias of high trait anxiety (HTA) individuals toward negative stimuli. Results Event-related potentials were rec...

  7. Phonon excitation and instabilities in biased graphene nanoconstrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Lu, Jing Tao; Hedegård, Per

    2013-01-01

    We investigate how a high current density perturbs the phonons in a biased graphene nanoconstriction coupled to semi-infinite electrodes. The coupling to electrode phonons, electrode electrons under bias, Joule heating, and current-induced forces is evaluated using first principles density...... to the presence of negatively damped phonons driven by the current. The effects may limit the stability and capacity of graphene nanoconstrictions to carry high currents....

  8. Reversal of exchange bias in nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prados, C; Pina, E; Hernando, A; Montone, A

    2002-01-01

    The sign of the exchange bias in field cooled nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic bilayers (Co-O and Ni-O/permalloy) is reversed at temperatures approaching the antiferromagnetic (AFM) blocking temperature. A similar phenomenon is observed after magnetic training processes at similar temperatures. These effects can be explained assuming that the boundaries of nanocrystalline grains in AFM layers exhibit lower transition temperatures than grain cores

  9. Tax Evasion, Information Reporting, and the Regressive Bias Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boserup, Simon Halphen; Pinje, Jori Veng

    2013-01-01

    Models of rational tax evasion and optimal enforcement invariably predict a regressive bias in the effective tax system, which reduces redistribution in the economy. Using Danish administrative data, we show that a calibrated structural model of this type replicates moments and correlations of tax...... evasion and audit probabilities once we account for information reporting in the tax compliance game. When conditioning on information reporting, we find that both reduced-form evidence and simulations exhibit the predicted regressive bias. However, in the overall economy, this bias is negated by the tax...

  10. Bias modification training can alter approach bias and chocolate consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Sophie E; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that bias modification training has potential to reduce cognitive biases for attractive targets and affect health behaviours. The present study investigated whether cognitive bias modification training could be applied to reduce approach bias for chocolate and affect subsequent chocolate consumption. A sample of 120 women (18-27 years) were randomly assigned to an approach-chocolate condition or avoid-chocolate condition, in which they were trained to approach or avoid pictorial chocolate stimuli, respectively. Training had the predicted effect on approach bias, such that participants trained to approach chocolate demonstrated an increased approach bias to chocolate stimuli whereas participants trained to avoid such stimuli showed a reduced bias. Further, participants trained to avoid chocolate ate significantly less of a chocolate muffin in a subsequent taste test than participants trained to approach chocolate. Theoretically, results provide support for the dual process model's conceptualisation of consumption as being driven by implicit processes such as approach bias. In practice, approach bias modification may be a useful component of interventions designed to curb the consumption of unhealthy foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Do horses with poor welfare show `pessimistic' cognitive biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, S.; Fureix, C.; Rowberry, R.; Bateson, M.; Hausberger, M.

    2017-02-01

    This field study tested the hypothesis that domestic horses living under putatively challenging-to-welfare conditions (for example involving social, spatial, feeding constraints) would present signs of poor welfare and co-occurring pessimistic judgement biases. Our subjects were 34 horses who had been housed for over 3 years in either restricted riding school situations ( e.g. kept in single boxes, with limited roughage, ridden by inexperienced riders; N = 25) or under more naturalistic conditions ( e.g. access to free-range, kept in stable social groups, leisure riding; N = 9). The horses' welfare was assessed by recording health-related, behavioural and postural indicators. Additionally, after learning a location task to discriminate a bucket containing either edible food (`positive' location) or unpalatable food (`negative' location), the horses were presented with a bucket located near the positive position, near the negative position and halfway between the positive and negative positions to assess their judgement biases. The riding school horses displayed the highest levels of behavioural and health-related problems and a pessimistic judgment bias, whereas the horses living under more naturalistic conditions displayed indications of good welfare and an optimistic bias. Moreover, pessimistic bias data strongly correlated with poor welfare data. This suggests that a lowered mood impacts a non-human species' perception of its environment and highlights cognitive biases as an appropriate tool to assess the impact of chronic living conditions on horse welfare.

  12. Edge biasing in the WEGA stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lischtschenko, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The WEGA stellarator is used to confine low temperature, overdense (densities exceeding the cut-off density of the heating wave) plasmas by magnetic fields in the range of B=50-500 mT. Microwave heating systems are used to ignite gas discharges using hydrogen, helium, neon or argon as working gases. The produced plasmas have been analyzed using Langmuir and emissive probes, a single-channel interferometer and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy. For a typical argon discharge in the low field operation, B=56 mT, the maximum electron density is n e ∝10 18 m -3 with temperatures in the range of T=4-12 eV. The plasma parameters are determined by using Langmuir probes and are cross-checked with interferometry. It is demonstrated within this work that the joint use of emissive probes and ultra-high resolution Doppler spectroscopy allows a precise measurement of the radial electric field. The focus of this work is on demonstrating the ability to modify the existing radial electric field in a plasma by using the biasing probe. This work commences with a basic approach and first establishes the diagnostic tools in a well-known discharge. Then the perturbation caused by the biasing probe is assessed. Following the characterization of the unperturbed plasmas, plasma states altered by the operation of the energized biasing probe are characterized. During biasing the plasma two different stable plasma states have been found. The two observed plasma states differ in plasma parameter profiles, such as density, temperature, electric field and confined energy. (orig.)

  13. Implicit bias in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    We all harbour subconscious expectations about people based on their apparent membership of groups, such as gender, ethnicity or age. Research shows that these expectations can lead us to undervalue some people's contributions, inhibiting their success and thus negatively impacting our entire field.

  14. The effect of self-esteem on the maintenance of negative mood

    OpenAIRE

    西川, 純代; 中條, 和光; 鈴木, 伸一

    2003-01-01

    Negative mood is associated with negative attentional bias. Reacent research suggested that this attentional bias enhances the encoding of negative information, so negative mood is maintained. Furthermore, people who have high self-esteem may have high motivation to recover from negative mood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of self-esteem on the maintenance of negative mood that induces by the mood induction method. Participants were thirty undergraduate students, who...

  15. Seeing ghosts: Negative body evaluation predicts overestimation of negative social feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleva, J.M.; Lange, W.G.; Jansen, A.T.M.; Martijn, C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigated whether negative body evaluation predicts women's overestimation of negative social feedback related to their own body (i.e., covariation bias). Sixty-five female university students completed a computer task where photos of their own body, of a control woman's body,

  16. EEG biofeedback improves attentional bias in high trait anxiety individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Zhao, Yan; Chen, Sijuan; Lin, Guiping; Sun, Peng; Wang, Tinghuai

    2013-10-07

    Emotion-related attentional bias is implicated in the aetiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders. Electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback can obviously improve the anxiety disorders and reduce stress level, and can also enhance attention performance in healthy subjects. The present study examined the effects and mechanisms of EEG biofeedback training on the attentional bias of high trait anxiety (HTA) individuals toward negative stimuli. Event-related potentials were recorded while HTA (n=24) and nonanxious (n=21) individuals performed the color-word emotional Stroop task. During the emotional Stroop task, HTA participants showed longer reaction times and P300 latencies induced by negative words, compared to nonanxious participants.The EEG biofeedback significantly decreased the trait anxiety inventory score and reaction time in naming the color of negative words in the HTA group. P300 latencies evoked by negative stimuli in the EEG biofeedback group were significantly reduced after the alpha training, while no significant changes were observed in the sham biofeedback group after the intervention. The prolonged P300 latency is associated with attentional bias to negative stimuli in the HTA group. EEG biofeedback training demonstrated a significant improvement of negative emotional attentional bias in HTA individuals, which may be due to the normalization of P300 latency.

  17. Magnetization reversal and tunable exchange bias in GdCr{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0−0.50)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Bibhuti B.; Ravi, S., E-mail: sravi@iitg.ernet.in

    2017-05-01

    Single phase samples of GdCr{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0−0.50) were prepared and their magnetic properties were studied by measuring temperature and field variations of magnetization. The Neel temperature, T{sub N} is found to decrease from T{sub N}=174 K for x=0 to 91 K for x=0.50. The magnetization reversal persists upto 5 at% of Mn substitution with a magnetic compensation temperature, T{sub comp} of 136 K and 139 K for x=0 and 0.05 respectively. However, spin reorientation induced magnetization reversal emerges for x=0.40 and 0.50 samples around 30 K. Tunable positive and negative exchange bias fields in the range of −1.0 kOe to +1.6 kOe have been observed. The origin of magnetization reversal and exchange bias field is explained in terms of antiparallel alignment of canted ferromagnetic component of Cr{sup 3+} ions and the paramagnetic moments of Gd{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 3+} ions under the influence of negative internal field due to antiferromagnetically ordered Cr{sup 3+} ions. - Highlights: • Magnetization reversal and bipolar switching in Mn substituted GdCrO{sub 3} • Tunable exchange bias field in the range of −1.0 kOe to +1.6 kOe. • Low temperature spin reorientation transition is observed.

  18. Biasing vector network analyzers using variable frequency and amplitude signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, J. E.; Zagorodnii, V.; Hutchison, A.; Celinski, Z.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of a test setup designed to provide a variable frequency biasing signal to a vector network analyzer (VNA). The test setup is currently used for the testing of liquid crystal (LC) based devices in the microwave region. The use of an AC bias for LC based devices minimizes the negative effects associated with ionic impurities in the media encountered with DC biasing. The test setup utilizes bias tees on the VNA test station to inject the bias signal. The square wave biasing signal is variable from 0.5 to 36.0 V peak-to-peak (VPP) with a frequency range of DC to 10 kHz. The test setup protects the VNA from transient processes, voltage spikes, and high-frequency leakage. Additionally, the signals to the VNA are fused to ½ amp and clipped to a maximum of 36 VPP based on bias tee limitations. This setup allows us to measure S-parameters as a function of both the voltage and the frequency of the applied bias signal.

  19. CULTURAL BIAS IN LANGUAGE TESTING

    OpenAIRE

    Patrisius Istiarto Djiwandono

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: An issue that has recently been gaining more attention in the domain of language testing is item bias. Defined as the characteristic of an item which causes learners of the same abilities but of different social groups to perform differently, the bias can be present as gender, ethnic, religious, social class, or cultural bias. The paper brings up a discussion in this area of concern by starting off from the concept of culture. It then explains what cultural bias is, how it manifests...

  20. Bias in clinical intervention research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2006-01-01

    Research on bias in clinical trials may help identify some of the reasons why investigators sometimes reach the wrong conclusions about intervention effects. Several quality components for the assessment of bias control have been suggested, but although they seem intrinsically valid, empirical...... evidence is needed to evaluate their effects on the extent and direction of bias. This narrative review summarizes the findings of methodological studies on the influence of bias in clinical trials. A number of methodological studies suggest that lack of adequate randomization in published trial reports...

  1. Information environment, behavioral biases, and home bias in analysts’ recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Taouss, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Can information environment of a firm explain home bias in analysts’ recommendations? Can the extent of agency problems explain optimism difference between foreign and local analysts? This paper answers these questions by documenting the effect of information environment on home bias in analysts’...

  2. Influence of SST biases on future climate change projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashfaq, Moetasim [Stanford University, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Purdue University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, Christopher B. [Stanford University, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Purdue University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Diffenbaugh, Noah S. [Stanford University, Department of Environmental Earth System Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Purdue University, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Stanford University, Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-04-15

    We use a quantile-based bias correction technique and a multi-member ensemble of the atmospheric component of NCAR CCSM3 (CAM3) simulations to investigate the influence of sea surface temperature (SST) biases on future climate change projections. The simulations, which cover 1977-1999 in the historical period and 2077-2099 in the future (A1B) period, use the CCSM3-generated SSTs as prescribed boundary conditions. Bias correction is applied to the monthly time-series of SSTs so that the simulated changes in SST mean and variability are preserved. Our comparison of CAM3 simulations with and without SST correction shows that the SST biases affect the precipitation distribution in CAM3 over many regions by introducing errors in atmospheric moisture content and upper-level (lower-level) divergence (convergence). Also, bias correction leads to significantly different precipitation and surface temperature changes over many oceanic and terrestrial regions (predominantly in the tropics) in response to the future anthropogenic increases in greenhouse forcing. The differences in the precipitation response from SST bias correction occur both in the mean and the percent change, and are independent of the ocean-atmosphere coupling. Many of these differences are comparable to or larger than the spread of future precipitation changes across the CMIP3 ensemble. Such biases can affect the simulated terrestrial feedbacks and thermohaline circulations in coupled climate model integrations through changes in the hydrological cycle and ocean salinity. Moreover, biases in CCSM3-generated SSTs are generally similar to the biases in CMIP3 ensemble mean SSTs, suggesting that other GCMs may display a similar sensitivity of projected climate change to SST errors. These results help to quantify the influence of climate model biases on the simulated climate change, and therefore should inform the effort to further develop approaches for reliable climate change projection. (orig.)

  3. Role of the antiferromagnetic bulk spins in exchange bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Ivan K. [Center for Advanced Nanoscience and Physics Department, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Morales, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.morales@ehu.es [Department of Chemical-Physics & BCMaterials, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Batlle, Xavier [Departament Física Fonamental and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, c/ Martí i Franqués s/n, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nowak, Ulrich [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, 78464 Konstanz (Germany); Güntherodt, Gernot [Physics Institute (IIA), RWTH Aachen University, Campus RWTH-Melaten, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    This “Critical Focused Issue” presents a brief review of experiments and models which describe the origin of exchange bias in epitaxial or textured ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers. Evidence is presented which clearly indicates that inner, uncompensated, pinned moments in the bulk of the antiferromagnet (AFM) play a very important role in setting the magnitude of the exchange bias. A critical evaluation of the extensive literature in the field indicates that it is useful to think of this bulk, pinned uncompensated moments as a new type of a ferromagnet which has a low total moment, an ordering temperature given by the AFM Néel temperature, with parallel aligned moments randomly distributed on the regular AFM lattice. - Highlights: • We address the role of bulk antiferromagnetic spins in the exchange bias phenomenon. • Significant experiments on how bulk AFM spins determine exchange bias are highlighted. • We explain the model that accounts for experimental results.

  4. Mapping domain disorder in exchange-biased magnetic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrows, C.H.; Ali, M.; Hindmarch, A.T.; Dekadjevi, D.T.; Hickey, B.J.; Langridge, S.; Foster, S.

    2002-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy occurs at the interface between an antiferromagnetic (AF) layer and a ferromagnetic layer, and results in a ferromagnet hysteresis loop displaced along the field axis. We have performed off-specular neutron reflectometry in order to characterize the domain structure in Co layers that are exchange biased by FeMn. This allows us to determine the domain direction distributions and lateral magnetic correlation lengths for the Co layers as a function of field with the exchange bias in two different thermally prepared states: high field cooled and zero field cooled. We find that a reversing exchange-biased layer is characterized by a very short (submicron) magnetic lengthscale, indicating domains much smaller than those in the ferromagnet after ac demagnetization at temperatures above the blocking temperature. This indicates that the bias is not spatially uniform across the entire interface, underlining the complexity of the AF spin structure

  5. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, LG.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules are discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to hot molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules (electron affinity), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies

  6. Visual search attentional bias modification reduced social phobia in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Voogd, E L; Wiers, R W; Prins, P J M; Salemink, E

    2014-06-01

    An attentional bias for negative information plays an important role in the development and maintenance of (social) anxiety and depression, which are highly prevalent in adolescence. Attention Bias Modification (ABM) might be an interesting tool in the prevention of emotional disorders. The current study investigated whether visual search ABM might affect attentional bias and emotional functioning in adolescents. A visual search task was used as a training paradigm; participants (n = 16 adolescents, aged 13-16) had to repeatedly identify the only smiling face in a 4 × 4 matrix of negative emotional faces, while participants in the control condition (n = 16) were randomly allocated to one of three placebo training versions. An assessment version of the task was developed to directly test whether attentional bias changed due to the training. Self-reported anxiety and depressive symptoms and self-esteem were measured pre- and post-training. After two sessions of training, the ABM group showed a significant decrease in attentional bias for negative information and self-reported social phobia, while the control group did not. There were no effects of training on depressive mood or self-esteem. No correlation between attentional bias and social phobia was found, which raises questions about the validity of the attentional bias assessment task. Also, the small sample size precludes strong conclusions. Visual search ABM might be beneficial in changing attentional bias and social phobia in adolescents, but further research with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth of oxide exchange bias layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiken, A.; Michel, R.P.

    1998-07-21

    An oxide (NiO, CoO, NiCoO) antiferromagnetic exchange bias layer produced by ion beam sputtering of an oxide target in pure argon (Ar) sputtering gas, with no oxygen gas introduced into the system. Antiferromagnetic oxide layers are used, for example, in magnetoresistive readback heads to shift the hysteresis loops of ferromagnetic films away from the zero field axis. For example, NiO exchange bias layers have been fabricated using ion beam sputtering of an NiO target using Ar ions, with the substrate temperature at 200 C, the ion beam voltage at 1000V and the beam current at 20 mA, with a deposition rate of about 0.2 {angstrom}/sec. The resulting NiO film was amorphous. 4 figs.

  8. Development of All Oxide Exchange Bias Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, David; Pei, Yonghang; Dao, Nam; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart

    2009-03-01

    Multiferroic materials exhibit multiply states of order which are often coupled. Bizmuth Ferrite (BFO3) is a room temperature antiferromagnetic, ferroelectric materials, where electrical control of magnetism and vice versa has been established. Combining BFO3 with ferromagnetic oxides such as Magnetite (Fe3O4) or Lanthanum Strontium Manganate (L.7S.3MO) could yield interesting system with electrically controllable exchange bias. We have used a novel deposition tool employing two pulsed electron beam sources (PEBS) to deposit epitaxial layers of BFO3, LSMO, and Fe3O4 onto STO, LAO, and MgO substrates. We are in the process of making bilayers of these materials and examining the quality and influence of the oxide interface on the development and system control of the exchange bias.

  9. Heuristic Biases in Mathematical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Matthew; Simpson, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the dual process account of reasoning, and explain the role of heuristic biases in human thought. Concentrating on the so-called matching bias effect, we describe a piece of research that indicates a correlation between success at advanced level mathematics and an ability to override innate and misleading…

  10. Effects of verbal information on fear-related reasoning biases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muris, Peter; Rassin, Eric; Mayer, Birgit; Smeets, Guus; Huijding, Jorg; Remmerswaal, Daniëlle; Field, Andy

    2009-03-01

    The present study made an attempt to induce fear-related reasoning biases by providing children with negative information about a novel stimulus. For this purpose, non-clinical children aged 9-12 years (N=318) were shown a picture of an unknown animal for which they received either negative, ambiguous, positive, or no information. Then children completed a series of tests for measuring various types of reasoning biases (i.e., confirmation bias and covariation bias) in relation to this animal. Results indicated that children in the negative and, to a lesser extent, the ambiguous information groups displayed higher scores on tests of fear-related reasoning biases than children in the positive and no information groups. Altogether, these results support the idea that learning via negatively tinted information plays a role in the development of fear-related cognitive distortions in youths.

  11. Large-scale galaxy bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Donghui; Desjacques, Vincent; Schmidt, Fabian

    2018-01-01

    Here, we briefly introduce the key results of the recent review (arXiv:1611.09787), whose abstract is as following. This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a detailed derivation of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which include the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in its general form, which elucidates the physical meaning of the bias parameters, and a detailed description of the connection between bias parameters and galaxy (or halo) statistics. We then review the excursion set formalism and peak theory which provide predictions for the values of the bias parameters. In the remainder of the review, we consider the generalizations of galaxy bias required in the presence of various types of cosmological physics that go beyond pressureless matter with adiabatic, Gaussian initial conditions: primordial non-Gaussianity, massive neutrinos, baryon-CDM isocurvature perturbations, dark energy, and modified gravity. Finally, we discuss how the description of galaxy bias in the galaxies' rest frame is related to clustering statistics measured from the observed angular positions and redshifts in actual galaxy catalogs.

  12. Large-scale galaxy bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjacques, Vincent; Jeong, Donghui; Schmidt, Fabian

    2018-02-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of galaxy bias, that is, the statistical relation between the distribution of galaxies and matter. We focus on large scales where cosmic density fields are quasi-linear. On these scales, the clustering of galaxies can be described by a perturbative bias expansion, and the complicated physics of galaxy formation is absorbed by a finite set of coefficients of the expansion, called bias parameters. The review begins with a detailed derivation of this very important result, which forms the basis of the rigorous perturbative description of galaxy clustering, under the assumptions of General Relativity and Gaussian, adiabatic initial conditions. Key components of the bias expansion are all leading local gravitational observables, which include the matter density but also tidal fields and their time derivatives. We hence expand the definition of local bias to encompass all these contributions. This derivation is followed by a presentation of the peak-background split in its general form, which elucidates the physical meaning of the bias parameters, and a detailed description of the connection between bias parameters and galaxy statistics. We then review the excursion-set formalism and peak theory which provide predictions for the values of the bias parameters. In the remainder of the review, we consider the generalizations of galaxy bias required in the presence of various types of cosmological physics that go beyond pressureless matter with adiabatic, Gaussian initial conditions: primordial non-Gaussianity, massive neutrinos, baryon-CDM isocurvature perturbations, dark energy, and modified gravity. Finally, we discuss how the description of galaxy bias in the galaxies' rest frame is related to clustering statistics measured from the observed angular positions and redshifts in actual galaxy catalogs.

  13. Effects of bias voltage on the properties of ITO films prepared on polymer substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jaehyeong; Jung, Hakkee; Lim, Donggun; Yang, Keajoon; Song, Woochang; Yi, Junsin

    2005-01-01

    The ITO (indium tin oxide) thin films were deposited on acryl, glass, PET, and poly-carbonate substrates by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The bias voltage was changed from -20 to -80 V. As the bias voltage increased, the deposition rate of ITO films decreased regardless of substrate types. The roughness of the films on PET increased with the bias voltage. The study demonstrated that the bias improved the electrical and optical properties of ITO films regardless of substrate types. The lowest electrical resistivity of 5.5x10 -4 no. OMEGAno. -cm and visible transmittance of about 80% were achieved by applying a negative bias of -60 V

  14. Effects of Cognitive Bias Modification Training via Smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranming Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Negative cognitive biases have been linked to anxiety and mood problems. Accumulated data from laboratory studies show that positive and negative interpretation styles with accompanying changes in mood can be induced through cognitive bias modification (CBM paradigms. Despite the therapeutic potential of positive training effects, few studies have explored training paradigms administered via smartphones. The current study aimed to compare the effectiveness of three different types of training programmes (cognitive bias modification-attention, CBM-A; cognitive bias modification-interpretation, CBM-I; attention and interpretation modification, AIM administered via smart-phones by using a control condition (CC.Methods:Seventy-six undergraduate participants with high social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS ≥ 30 were randomly assigned to four groups: CBM-A (n = 20, CBM-I (n = 20, AIM (n = 16, and CC (n = 20.Results: The results showed that the effects of CBM training, CBM-I training, or AIM training vs. CC for attention yielded no significant differences in dot-probe attention bias scores. The CBM-I group showed significantly less threat interpretation and more benign interpretation than the CC group on interpretation bias scores.Conclusions: The present results supported the feasibility of delivering CBM-I via smartphones, but the effectiveness of CBM-A and AIM training via smartphones was limited.

  15. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L Kalla

    Full Text Available The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens' access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit "crowd-sourced" information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world's most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit's survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active.

  16. Editorial Bias in Crowd-Sourced Political Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalla, Joshua L; Aronow, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The Internet has dramatically expanded citizens' access to and ability to engage with political information. On many websites, any user can contribute and edit "crowd-sourced" information about important political figures. One of the most prominent examples of crowd-sourced information on the Internet is Wikipedia, a free and open encyclopedia created and edited entirely by users, and one of the world's most accessed websites. While previous studies of crowd-sourced information platforms have found them to be accurate, few have considered biases in what kinds of information are included. We report the results of four randomized field experiments that sought to explore what biases exist in the political articles of this collaborative website. By randomly assigning factually true but either positive or negative and cited or uncited information to the Wikipedia pages of U.S. senators, we uncover substantial evidence of an editorial bias toward positivity on Wikipedia: Negative facts are 36% more likely to be removed by Wikipedia editors than positive facts within 12 hours and 29% more likely within 3 days. Although citations substantially increase an edit's survival time, the editorial bias toward positivity is not eliminated by inclusion of a citation. We replicate this study on the Wikipedia pages of deceased as well as recently retired but living senators and find no evidence of an editorial bias in either. Our results demonstrate that crowd-sourced information is subject to an editorial bias that favors the politically active.

  17. Individuals With OCD Lack Unrealistic Optimism Bias in Threat Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetsche, Ulrike; Rief, Winfried; Exner, Cornelia

    2015-07-01

    Overestimating the occurrence of threatening events has been highlighted as a central cognitive factor in the maintenance of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The present study examined the different facets of this cognitive bias, its underlying mechanisms, and its specificity to OCD. For this purpose, threat estimation, probabilistic classification learning (PCL) and psychopathological measures were assessed in 23 participants with OCD, 30 participants with social phobia, and 31 healthy controls. Whereas healthy participants showed an optimistic expectation bias regarding positive and negative future events, OCD participants lacked such a bias. This lack of an optimistic expectation bias was not specific to OCD. Compared to healthy controls, OCD participants overestimated their personal risk for experiencing negative events, but did not differ from controls in their risk estimation regarding other people. Finally, OCD participants' biases in the prediction of checking-related events were associated with their impairments in learning probabilistic cue-outcome associations in a disorder-relevant context. In sum, the present results add to a growing body of research demonstrating that cognitive biases in OCD are context-dependent. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Confirmation biases in selective exposure to political online information : Source bias vs. content bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerwick, Axel; Johnson, Benjamin K.; Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    The present work examines the role of source vs. content cues for the confirmation bias, in which recipients spend more time with content aligning with preexisting attitudes. In addition to testing how both source and content cues facilitate this biased pattern of selective exposure, the study

  19. Time-course of attention to negative stimuli: negative affectivity, anxiety, or dysphoria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlberg, Katherine A; Revelle, William; Mineka, Susan

    2012-10-01

    Although biased attention to emotional stimuli is considered a vulnerability factor for anxiety and dysphoria, research has infrequently related such attentional biases to dimensional models of vulnerability for anxiety and mood disorders. In two studies (Study 1, n = 64; Study 2, n = 168), we evaluate the differential associations of general negative affectivity, anxiety, and dysphoria with biases in selective attention among nonclinical participants selected to vary in both anxiety and dysphoria. Across both studies, preferential processing of angry faces at a 300-ms exposure duration was associated with a general tendency to experience a range of negative affect, rather than being specific to symptoms of either anxiety or dysphoria. In the second study, we found evidence of a suppressor relationship between anxiety and dysphoria in the prediction of delayed attentional biases (1,000 ms) for sad faces. In particular, dysphoria was specifically associated with biased attention toward sad cues, but only after statistically accounting for anxiety; by contrast, anxiety was specifically associated with attentional avoidance of sad cues, but only after statistically accounting for dysphoria. These results suggest that the specificity of relationships between components of negative affectivity and attention to emotional stimuli varies as a function of the time course at which attentional biases are assessed, highlighting the importance of evaluating both anxiety and dysphoria in research on attentional processing of emotional stimuli.

  20. Sign reversal of magnetization and tunable exchange bias field in NdCr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.05–0.2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bora, Tribedi; Ravi, S., E-mail: sravi@iitg.ernet.in

    2015-07-15

    Magnetization reversal and tunable exchange bias behavior are observed in NdCr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} compounds for x=0.05–0.20. The magnetic compensation temperature (T{sub comp}) is found to increase with increase in Fe concentration and its maximum value is 198 K for x=0.15 sample. The observed magnetization reversal is explained by considering the competition between the weak ferromagnetic component of Cr{sup 3+} ions and the paramagnetic moments of Nd{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions under the influence of negative internal magnetic field. The exchange anisotropy between the above two components of magnetic moments give rise to tunable positive and negative exchange bias fields. The sign reversal of exchange bias field also coincides with T{sub comp}. Bipolar switching of magnetization is demonstrated at Tbias in Nd(Cr,Fe)O system. • Paramagnetic and canted ferromagnetic moments give rise to magnetization reversal. • Mechanism of tunable positive and negative exchange bias fields is discussed.

  1. The Development of Body Image and Weight Bias in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, S J; Damiano, S R

    2017-01-01

    Negative body image attitudes are related to the onset of disordered eating, poor self-esteem, general mental health problems, and obesity. In this chapter, we will review the nature of body image attitudes in girls and boys in early (approximately 3-7 years old) and later childhood (approximately 8-11 years old). The body image attitudes explored in this chapter include body image attitudes related to the self, with a focus on body dissatisfaction, and body image attitudes related to others, with a focus on weight bias. Issues of measurement of body image and weight bias will first be explored. In light of measurement considerations, the prevalence and predictors of body dissatisfaction and related concerns, and weight bias will be examined. The chapter will conclude with a review of promising directions in the prevention of body dissatisfaction and weight bias in children. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Weight bias against women in a university acceptance scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Monk, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This study examined weight bias against women in a hypothetical university acceptance scenario. One-hundred-and-ninety-eight volunteers from the community in Britain completed a weight bias measure in which they were asked to select the woman they were most and least likely to select for a place at university from an array of figures varying in body size. Participants also completed the Anti-Fat Attitudes Survey, the Short-Form of the Fat Phobia Scale, the Attitudes Toward Obese Persons Scale, and the Beliefs About Obese Persons Scale. Results showed that participants were biased against both obese (> 30 kg/m(2)) and emaciated (antipathy toward fat persons and more negative attitudes toward obese persons. These results provide evidence that the general public hold biased beliefs about access to higher educational opportunities as a function of the body size of applicants.

  3. On the Borders of Harmful and Helpful Beauty Biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Agthe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research with European Caucasian samples demonstrates that attractiveness-based biases in social evaluation depend on the constellation of the sex of the evaluator and the sex of the target: Whereas people generally show positive biases toward attractive opposite-sex persons, they show less positive or even negative biases toward attractive same-sex persons. By examining these biases both within and between different ethnicities, the current studies provide new evidence for both the generalizability and the specificity of these attractiveness-based social perception biases. Examining within-ethnicity effects, Study 1 is the first to demonstrate that samples from diverse ethnic backgrounds parallel the finding of European Caucasian samples: The advantageous or adverse effects of attractiveness depend on the gender constellation of the evaluator and the evaluated person. Examining between-ethnicity effects, Study 2 found that these attractiveness-based biases emerge almost exclusively toward targets of the evaluator’s own ethnic background; these biases were reduced or eliminated for cross-ethnicity evaluations and interaction intentions. We discuss these findings in light of evolutionary principles and reflect on potential interactions between culture and evolved cognitive mechanisms.

  4. Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emmanuelle R; Moritz, Steffen; Schwannauer, Matthias; Wiseman, Zoe; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Scott, Jan; Beck, Aaron T; Donaldson, Catherine; Hagen, Roger; Ross, Kerry; Veckenstedt, Ruth; Ison, Rebecca; Williams, Sally; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Garety, Philippa A

    2014-03-01

    The Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis (CBQp) was developed to capture 5 cognitive distortions (jumping to conclusions, intentionalising, catastrophising, emotional reasoning, and dichotomous thinking), which are considered important for the pathogenesis of psychosis. Vignettes were adapted from the Cognitive Style Test (CST),(1) relating to "Anomalous Perceptions" and "Threatening Events" themes. Scale structure, reliability, and validity were investigated in a psychosis group, and CBQp scores were compared with those of depressed and healthy control samples. The CBQp showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The 5 biases were not independent, with a 2-related factor scale providing the best fit. This structure suggests that the CBQp assesses a general thinking bias rather than distinct cognitive errors, while Anomalous Perception and Threatening Events theme scores can be used separately. Total CBQp scores showed good convergent validity with the CST, but individual biases were not related to existing tasks purporting to assess similar reasoning biases. Psychotic and depressed populations scored higher than healthy controls, and symptomatic psychosis patients scored higher than their nonsymptomatic counterparts, with modest relationships between CBQp scores and symptom severity once emotional disorders were partialled out. Anomalous Perception theme and Intentionalising bias scores showed some specificity to psychosis. Overall, the CBQp has good psychometric properties, although it is likely that it measures a different construct to existing tasks, tentatively suggested to represent a bias of interpretation rather than reasoning, judgment or decision-making processes. It is a potentially useful tool in both research and clinical arenas.

  5. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  6. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  7. Reversal magnetization, spin reorientation, and exchange bias in YCr O3 doped with praseodymium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, A.; Escamilla, R.; Escudero, R.; Morales, F.; Verdín, E.

    2018-01-01

    Crystal structure, thermal properties, and magnetic properties were studied systematically in Y1 -xP rxCr O3 with 0.0 ≤x ≤0.3 compositions. Magnetic susceptibility and specific-heat measurements show an increase in the antiferromagnetic transition temperature (TN) as Pr is substituted in the Y sites and notable magnetic features are observed below TN. Strong coupling between magnetic and crystalline parameters is observed in a small range of Pr compositions. A small perturbation in the lattice parameters by a Pr ion is sufficient to induce a spin-reorientation transition followed by magnetization reversal to finally induce the exchange-bias effect. The spin-reorientation temperature (TSR) is increased from 35 to 149 K for 0.025 ≤x ≤0.1 compositions. It is found that the Cr spin sublattice rotates continuously from TSR to a new spin configuration at lower temperature. In addition, magnetization reversal is observed at T*˜35 K for x =0.05 up to T*˜63 K for x =0.20 composition. The M -H curves show a negative exchange-bias effect induced by Pr ions, which are observed below 100 K and are more intense at 5 K. At 10 K, the magnetic contribution of the specific heat as well as the ZFC magnetization show the rise of a peak with increasing Pr content. The magnetic anomaly could be associated with the freezing of the Pr magnetic moment randomly distributed at the 4 c crystallographic site. A clear correspondence between spin reorientation, magnetization reversal, and exchange-bias anisotropy with the tilting and octahedral distortion is also discussed.

  8. Automation bias: empirical results assessing influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Kate; Roudsari, Abdul; Wyatt, Jeremy C

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the rate of automation bias - the propensity of people to over rely on automated advice and the factors associated with it. Tested factors were attitudinal - trust and confidence, non-attitudinal - decision support experience and clinical experience, and environmental - task difficulty. The paradigm of simulated decision support advice within a prescribing context was used. The study employed within participant before-after design, whereby 26 UK NHS General Practitioners were shown 20 hypothetical prescribing scenarios with prevalidated correct and incorrect answers - advice was incorrect in 6 scenarios. They were asked to prescribe for each case, followed by being shown simulated advice. Participants were then asked whether they wished to change their prescription, and the post-advice prescription was recorded. Rate of overall decision switching was captured. Automation bias was measured by negative consultations - correct to incorrect prescription switching. Participants changed prescriptions in 22.5% of scenarios. The pre-advice accuracy rate of the clinicians was 50.38%, which improved to 58.27% post-advice. The CDSS improved the decision accuracy in 13.1% of prescribing cases. The rate of automation bias, as measured by decision switches from correct pre-advice, to incorrect post-advice was 5.2% of all cases - a net improvement of 8%. More immediate factors such as trust in the specific CDSS, decision confidence, and task difficulty influenced rate of decision switching. Lower clinical experience was associated with more decision switching. Age, DSS experience and trust in CDSS generally were not significantly associated with decision switching. This study adds to the literature surrounding automation bias in terms of its potential frequency and influencing factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Online visual search attentional bias modification for adolescents with heightened anxiety and depressive symptoms : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Voogd, E.L.; Wiers, R.W.; Salemink, E.

    Anxiety and depression, which are highly prevalent in adolescence, are both characterized by a negative attentional bias. As Attentional Bias Modification (ABM) can reduce such a bias, and might also affect emotional reactivity, it could be a promising early intervention. However, a growing number

  10. Heuristics and bias in homeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souter, K

    2006-10-01

    The practice of Homeopathy ought to be strictly logical. In the Organon Samuel Hahnemann gives the impression that the unprejudiced observer should be able to follow an algorithmic route to the simillimum in every case. Judgement and Decision Research, however, indicates that when people grapple with complex systems like homeopathy they are more likely to use heuristics or empirical rules to help them reach a solution. Thus Hahnemann's concept of the unprejudiced observer is virtually impossible to attain. There is inevitable bias in both case-taking and remedy selection. Understanding the types of bias may enable the practitioner to reduce his/her own bias.

  11. Attention bias modification reduces neural correlates of response monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brady D; Jackson, Felicia; Amir, Nader; Hajcak, Greg

    2017-10-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is an electrophysiological response to errors. Individual differences in the ERN have been posited to reflect sensitivity to threat and linked with risk for anxiety disorders. Attention bias modification is a promising computerized intervention that has been shown to decrease threat biases and anxiety symptoms. In the present study, we examined the impact of a single session of attention bias modification, relative to a control task, on the neural correlates of response monitoring, including the ERN, correct response negativity (CRN), and their difference (i.e., the ERN - CRN or ΔERN). The final sample included 60 participants who first completed a flanker task to elicit the ERN and CRN, and were then randomly assigned to attention bias modification (n=30) or a control task (n=30). After completing the attention bias modification or control task, participants completed the same flanker task to again elicit the ERN and CRN. Among participants who completed attention bias modification training, the ERN, CRN, and ΔERN decreased from the pre- to post-training assessment. In contrast, in participants who completed the control task, the CRN, ERN, and ΔERN did not differ between the pre- and post-training assessment. The presents study suggests that a single session of attention bias modification reduces neural correlates of response monitoring, including error-related brain activity. These results also support attention bias modification as a potential mechanistic-based intervention for the prevention and treatment of anxiety pathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Social influence bias: a randomized experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchnik, Lev; Aral, Sinan; Taylor, Sean J

    2013-08-09

    Our society is increasingly relying on the digitized, aggregated opinions of others to make decisions. We therefore designed and analyzed a large-scale randomized experiment on a social news aggregation Web site to investigate whether knowledge of such aggregates distorts decision-making. Prior ratings created significant bias in individual rating behavior, and positive and negative social influences created asymmetric herding effects. Whereas negative social influence inspired users to correct manipulated ratings, positive social influence increased the likelihood of positive ratings by 32% and created accumulating positive herding that increased final ratings by 25% on average. This positive herding was topic-dependent and affected by whether individuals were viewing the opinions of friends or enemies. A mixture of changing opinion and greater turnout under both manipulations together with a natural tendency to up-vote on the site combined to create the herding effects. Such findings will help interpret collective judgment accurately and avoid social influence bias in collective intelligence in the future.

  13. Optical properties of bias-induced CH sub 4 -H sub 2 plasma for diamond film deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X D; Zhou, H Y; Wen, X H; Li, D

    2002-01-01

    Methane (CH sub 4) and hydrogen (H sub 2) reactive gas mixture has been in situ investigated in a hot filament diamond chemical vapor deposition reactor with a negatively variable biasing voltage applied to the hot filament with respect to the substrate using infrared absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It is found that CH sub 4 converts increasingly to C sub 2 H sub 2 upon raising the filament temperature in a pure thermal activation state, no optical emission of species is observed. Upon bias application, both CH sub 4 and C sub 2 H sub 2 in infrared (IR) absorption intensity decrease with increasing bias current, even the IR absorption intensity of C sub 2 H sub 2 decreases more rapidly than that of CH sub 4. Meanwhile, the clear emission lines indexed to H, CH, and CH sup + appear in the optical emission spectrum obtained, showing that a large amount of excited radicals are produced in the gas phase after applying bias. It is believed that the further generation of activated radical...

  14. Negative magnetic relaxation in superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoperov E.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It was observed that the trapped magnetic moment of HTS tablets or annuli increases in time (negative relaxation if they are not completely magnetized by a pulsed magnetic field. It is shown, in the framework of the Bean critical-state model, that the radial temperature gradient appearing in tablets or annuli during a pulsed field magnetization can explain the negative magnetic relaxation in the superconductor.

  15. Diagnostic Bias and Conduct Disorder: Improving Culturally Sensitive Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizock, Lauren; Harkins, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Disproportionately high rates of Conduct Disorder are diagnosed in African American and Latino youth of color. Diagnostic bias contributes to overdiagnosis of Conduct Disorder in these adolescents of color. Following a diagnosis of Conduct Disorder, adolescents of color face poorer outcomes than their White counterparts. These negative outcomes…

  16. Large negative differential resistance in graphene nanoribbon superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, P.; Chen, C. H.; Hsu, S. A.; Hsueh, W. J.

    2018-05-01

    A graphene nanoribbon superlattice with a large negative differential resistance (NDR) is proposed. Our results show that the peak-to-valley ratio (PVR) of the graphene superlattices can reach 21 at room temperature with bias voltages between 90-220 mV, which is quite large compared with the one of traditional graphene-based devices. It is found that the NDR is strongly influenced by the thicknesses of the potential barrier. Therefore, the NDR effect can be optimized by designing a proper barrier thickness. The large NDR effect can be attributed to the splitting of the gap in transmission spectrum (segment of Wannier-Stark ladder) with larger thicknesses of barrier when the applied voltage increases.

  17. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Kwee, R E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp-collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.09 < |eta| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presen...

  18. Implicit bias in healthcare professionals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Chloë; Hurst, Samia

    2017-03-01

    Implicit biases involve associations outside conscious awareness that lead to a negative evaluation of a person on the basis of irrelevant characteristics such as race or gender. This review examines the evidence that healthcare professionals display implicit biases towards patients. PubMed, PsychINFO, PsychARTICLE and CINAHL were searched for peer-reviewed articles published between 1st March 2003 and 31st March 2013. Two reviewers assessed the eligibility of the identified papers based on precise content and quality criteria. The references of eligible papers were examined to identify further eligible studies. Forty two articles were identified as eligible. Seventeen used an implicit measure (Implicit Association Test in fifteen and subliminal priming in two), to test the biases of healthcare professionals. Twenty five articles employed a between-subjects design, using vignettes to examine the influence of patient characteristics on healthcare professionals' attitudes, diagnoses, and treatment decisions. The second method was included although it does not isolate implicit attitudes because it is recognised by psychologists who specialise in implicit cognition as a way of detecting the possible presence of implicit bias. Twenty seven studies examined racial/ethnic biases; ten other biases were investigated, including gender, age and weight. Thirty five articles found evidence of implicit bias in healthcare professionals; all the studies that investigated correlations found a significant positive relationship between level of implicit bias and lower quality of care. The evidence indicates that healthcare professionals exhibit the same levels of implicit bias as the wider population. The interactions between multiple patient characteristics and between healthcare professional and patient characteristics reveal the complexity of the phenomenon of implicit bias and its influence on clinician-patient interaction. The most convincing studies from our review are those

  19. Sb-mediated Ge quantum dots in Ti-oxide-Si diode: negative differential capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio; Tonkikh, Alexander; Werner, Peter; Jantsch, Wolfgang

    2013-06-01

    The negative differential capacitance (NDC) effect is observed on a titanium-oxide-silicon structure, formed on n-type silicon with embedded germanium quantum dots (QDs). The Ge QDs were grown by an Sb-mediated technique. The NDC effect was observed for temperatures below 200 K. We found that approximately six to eight electrons can be trapped in the valence band states of Ge QDs. We explain the NDC effect in terms of the emission of electrons from valence band states in the very narrow QD layer under reverse bias.

  20. Sb-mediated Ge quantum dots in Ti–oxide–Si diode: negative differential capacitance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor-Tapio Rangel-Kuoppa, Alexander Tonkikh, Peter Werner and Wolfgang Jantsch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The negative differential capacitance (NDC effect is observed on a titanium–oxide–silicon structure, formed on n-type silicon with embedded germanium quantum dots (QDs. The Ge QDs were grown by an Sb-mediated technique. The NDC effect was observed for temperatures below 200 K. We found that approximately six to eight electrons can be trapped in the valence band states of Ge QDs. We explain the NDC effect in terms of the emission of electrons from valence band states in the very narrow QD layer under reverse bias.

  1. Negative ion extraction from hydrogen plasma bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudini, N. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Laboratoire des plasma de décharges, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout BP 17 Baba Hassen, 16081 Algiers (Algeria); Taccogna, F.; Minelli, P. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Aanesland, A.; Raimbault, J.-L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    A two-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision model has been developed and used to study low electronegative magnetized hydrogen plasma. A configuration characterized by four electrodes is used: the left electrode is biased at V{sub l} = −100 V, the right electrode is grounded, while the upper and lower transversal electrodes are biased at an intermediate voltage V{sub ud} between 0 and −100 V. A constant and homogeneous magnetic field is applied parallel to the lateral (left/right) electrodes. It is shown that in the magnetized case, the bulk plasma potential is close to the transversal electrodes bias inducing then a reversed sheath in front of the right electrode. The potential drop within the reversed sheath is controlled by the transversal electrodes bias allowing extraction of negative ions with a significant reduction of co-extracted electron current. Furthermore, introducing plasma electrodes, between the transversal electrodes and the right electrode, biased with a voltage just above the plasma bulk potential, increases the negative ion extracted current and decreases significantly the co-extracted electron current. The physical mechanism on basis of this phenomenon has been discussed.

  2. Preferences, country bias, and international trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Roy (Santanu); J.M.A. Viaene (Jean-Marie)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractAnalyzes international trade where consumer preferences exhibit country bias. Why country biases arise; How trade can occur in the presence of country bias; Implication for the pattern of trade and specialization.

  3. Enhanced confinement with plasma biasing in the MST reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, D.; Almagri, A.F.; Anderson, J.K.

    1997-06-01

    We report an increase in particle confinement with plasma biasing in a reversed field pinch. Miniature plasma sources are used as electrodes to negatively bias the plasma at the edge (r/a ∼ 0.9). Particle content increases and H α radiation decreases upon application of bias and global particle confinement roughly doubles as a result. Measurements of plasma potential, impurity flow, and floating potential fluctuations indicate that strong flows are produced and that electrostatic fluctuations are reduced

  4. Effect of combined external uniaxial stress and dc bias on the dielectric property of BaTiO3-based dielectrics in multilayer ceramic capacitor: thermodynamics and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Gang; Yue Zhenxing; Sun Tieyu; Gou Huanlin; Li Longtu

    2008-01-01

    The dielectric properties of (Nb, Y)-doped BaTiO 3 in a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under combined external uniaxial compressive stress and dc bias field were investigated at room temperature by using a modified Ginsburg-Landau-Devonshire thermodynamic theory and the dielectric measurement. It is found that although dc bias decreases the dielectric properties dominantly, the influence of the external uniaixial compressive stress should not be neglected. When applied along a direction perpendicular to the internal electrode layer in the MLCC, the external uniaixal compressive stress will strengthen the negative effect of dc bias. In contrast, the external uniaxial compressive stress along a direction parallel to the internal electrode layer in the MLCC will increase the dielectric permittivity under dc bias field, i.e. improve the ε-V response of the MLCC. Furthermore, although there is a difference between the calculated permittivity and the measured permittivity, the effects of the combined external uniaxial compressive stress and dc bias field on the dielectric permittivity described through two approaches are in good agreement

  5. Hispanic nurses' experiences of bias in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moceri, Joane T

    2014-01-01

    The continuing issue of health inequity for Hispanics highlights the importance of retaining Hispanic nurses in the workplace. This article describes the use of short answers such as "Describe the bias you experienced" and "If a patient refused care, what was the reason given?" to increase understandings about bias through the descriptions of Hispanic nurses. In this study, bias was defined as those implicit negative stereotypes and attitudes that negatively affect judgments about, evaluations of, and actions toward others. For this qualitative component of a descriptive study employing both qualitative and quantitative methods, 111 Hispanic nurses responded to open-ended questions about experiences of bias that were included with a survey tool and demographic questionnaire. Three themes emerged: being overlooked and undervalued, having to prove competency, and living with "only-ness." Respect was an overarching concept. The written descriptions of bias provided depth and understanding to the quantitative findings. Nurse leaders are well positioned to develop and implement strategies to more effectively support Hispanic nurses and to promote nonbiased interactions in the workplace. Retaining Hispanic nurses is a vital component to address issues of health inequity for Hispanic patients.

  6. Comparative risk perception and foods: The impact of optimistic bias on risk communication and health promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, S.; Frewer, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    Optimistic bias is a phenomenon in which people believe they are less likely to experience negative events, and more likely to experience positive ones, than other people. There is evidence that optimistic bias reduces people's motivation to undertake self-protective behaviour, as well as reducing

  7. The mixed impact of medical school on medical students' implicit and explicit weight bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Sean M; Puhl, Rebecca M; Burke, Sara E; Hardeman, Rachel; Dovidio, John F; Nelson, David B; Przedworski, Julia; Burgess, Diana J; Perry, Sylvia; Yeazel, Mark W; van Ryn, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    Health care trainees demonstrate implicit (automatic, unconscious) and explicit (conscious) bias against people from stigmatised and marginalised social groups, which can negatively influence communication and decision making. Medical schools are well positioned to intervene and reduce bias in new physicians. This study was designed to assess medical school factors that influence change in implicit and explicit bias against individuals from one stigmatised group: people with obesity. This was a prospective cohort study of medical students enrolled at 49 US medical schools randomly selected from all US medical schools within the strata of public and private schools and region. Participants were 1795 medical students surveyed at the beginning of their first year and end of their fourth year. Web-based surveys included measures of weight bias, and medical school experiences and climate. Bias change was compared with changes in bias in the general public over the same period. Linear mixed models were used to assess the impact of curriculum, contact with people with obesity, and faculty role modelling on weight bias change. Increased implicit and explicit biases were associated with less positive contact with patients with obesity and more exposure to faculty role modelling of discriminatory behaviour or negative comments about patients with obesity. Increased implicit bias was associated with training in how to deal with difficult patients. On average, implicit weight bias decreased and explicit bias increased during medical school, over a period of time in which implicit weight bias in the general public increased and explicit bias remained stable. Medical schools may reduce students' weight biases by increasing positive contact between students and patients with obesity, eliminating unprofessional role modelling by faculty members and residents, and altering curricula focused on treating difficult patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Measurement bias of fluid velocity in molecular simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tysanner, Martin W.; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2004-01-01

    In molecular simulations of fluid flow, the measurement of mean fluid velocity is considered to be a straightforward computation, yet there is some ambiguity in its definition. We show that in systems far from equilibrium, such as those with large temperature or velocity gradients, two commonly used definitions give slightly different results. Specifically, a bias can arise when computing the mean fluid velocity by measuring the mean particle velocity in a cell and averaging this mean over samples. We show that this bias comes from the correlation of momentum and density fluctuations in non-equilibrium fluids, obtain an analytical expression for predicting it, and discuss what system characteristics (e.g., number of particles per cell, temperature gradients) reduce or magnify the error. The bias has a physical origin so although we demonstrate it by direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) computations, the same effect will be observed with other particle-based simulation methods, such as molecular dynamics and lattice gases

  9. North Atlantic climate model bias influence on multiyear predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Park, T.; Park, W.; Latif, M.

    2018-01-01

    The influences of North Atlantic biases on multiyear predictability of unforced surface air temperature (SAT) variability are examined in the Kiel Climate Model (KCM). By employing a freshwater flux correction over the North Atlantic to the model, which strongly alleviates both North Atlantic sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) biases, the freshwater flux-corrected integration depicts significantly enhanced multiyear SAT predictability in the North Atlantic sector in comparison to the uncorrected one. The enhanced SAT predictability in the corrected integration is due to a stronger and more variable Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and its enhanced influence on North Atlantic SST. Results obtained from preindustrial control integrations of models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) support the findings obtained from the KCM: models with large North Atlantic biases tend to have a weak AMOC influence on SAT and exhibit a smaller SAT predictability over the North Atlantic sector.

  10. Neutron detection using a current biased kinetic inductance detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishido, Hiroaki; Miyajima, Shigeyuki; Ishida, Takekazu; Narukami, Yoshito; Oikawa, Kenichi; Harada, Masahide; Oku, Takayuki; Arai, Masatoshi; Hidaka, Mutsuo; Fujimaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate neutron detection using a solid state superconducting current biased kinetic inductance detector (CB-KID), which consists of a superconducting Nb meander line of 1 μm width and 40 nm thickness. 10 B-enriched neutron absorber layer of 150 nm thickness is placed on top of the CB-KID. Our neutron detectors are able to operate in a wide superconducting region in the bias current–temperature diagram. This is in sharp contrast with our preceding current-biased transition edge detector, which can operate only in a narrow range just below the superconducting critical temperature. The full width at half maximum of the signals remains of the order of a few tens of ns, which confirms the high speed operation of our detectors

  11. Lateral posture biases, habituation, and risk monitoring by wild ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Found, Rob

    2017-09-01

    In protected areas, wildlife may lose their fear of humans, and prey species may use human-disturbed areas to escape natural predators. Lateral bedding posture bias may reflect difference in monitoring and these changing patterns of risk stimuli. I studied wild elk in Banff and Jasper National Parks, Canada, where habituated animals enter into conflicts with humans, abandon migration, and negatively affect entire ecosystems. I recorded lateral bedding postures and lateral differences in detection distances when elk were approached. Elk had leftward posture biases when facing away from the herd toward the presumptive direction of potential predation, but had rightward biases when facing towards conspecifics. I found migratory elk had stronger lateral biases than elk residing year-round near humans. These results show lateral posture biases are context dependent on risk, and as these risks change, lateral biases change as well. These results provide important insights for the management of prey species subject to changing patterns of predation and human disturbance, and contribute to our growing understanding of the ecological implications of laterality in wild species.

  12. Impacts of gate bias and its variation on gamma-ray irradiation resistance of SiC MOSFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Koichi; Mitomo, Satoshi; Matsuda, Takuma; Yokoseki, Takashi [Saitama University, Sakuraku (Japan); National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Takasaki (Japan); Makino, Takahiro; Onoda, Shinobu; Takeyama, Akinori; Ohshima, Takeshi [National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology (QST), Takasaki (Japan); Okubo, Shuichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Kandori, Mikio; Yoshie, Toru [Sanken Electric Co., Ltd., Niiza, Saitama (Japan); Hijikata, Yasuto [Saitama University, Sakuraku (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Gamma-ray irradiation into vertical type n-channel hexagonal (4H)-silicon carbide (SiC) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) was performed under various gate biases. The threshold voltage for the MOSFETs irradiated with a constant positive gate bias showed a large negative shift, and the shift slightly recovered above 100 kGy. For MOSFETs with non- and a negative constant biases, no significant change in threshold voltage, V{sub th}, was observed up to 400 kGy. By changing the gate bias from positive bias to either negative or non-bias, the V{sub th} significantly recovered from the large negative voltage shift induced by 50 kGy irradiation with positive gate bias after only 10 kGy irradiation with either negative or zero bias. It indicates that the positive charges generated in the gate oxide near the oxide-SiC interface due to irradiation were removed or recombined instantly by the irradiation under zero or negative biases. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Anticipated Regret and Omission Bias in HPV Vaccination Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Holm

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated effects of anticipated regret on parents’ HPV vaccination intentions and effects of omission bias on HPV vaccination intentions and vaccine uptake. An online survey was completed by 851 parents of adolescent girls in Denmark, a country where HPV vaccine safety is currently...... in a hypothetical vaccination vignette as a significant negative predictor of HPV vaccination intention as well as vaccine uptake. Finally, the study tested effects of anticipated regret and omission bias on evaluations of two extisting Danish pro-vaccine campaign videos. Here, the result revealed anticipated...

  14. Hindsight bias in political elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Hartmut; Fischer, Volkhard; Erdfelder, Edgar

    2003-01-01

    Two studies on political hindsight bias were conducted on the occasions of the German parliament election in 1998 and the Nordrhein-Westfalen state parliament election in 2000. In both studies, participants predicted the percentage of votes for several political parties and recalled these predictions after the election. The observed hindsight effects were stronger than those found in any prior study on political elections (using percentage of votes as the dependent variable). We argue that the length of the retention interval between original judgement and recollection is mainly responsible for this difference. In our second study, we investigated possible artifacts in political hindsight biases using a control-group design where half of the participants recalled their predictions shortly before or after the election. Hindsight bias was preserved, reinforcing the results of earlier studies with non-control-group designs. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the hindsight experience (in political judgement and in general) actually consists of three different, partly independent components.

  15. Analysis and elimination of bias error in a fiber-optic current sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaxiao; Zhao, Zijie; Li, Chuansheng; Yu, Jia; Wang, Zhenjie

    2017-11-10

    Bias error, along with scale factor, is a key factor that affects the measurement accuracy of the fiber-optic current sensor. Because of polarization crosstalk, the coherence of parasitic interference signals could be rebuilt and form an output independent of the current to be measured, i.e., the bias error. The bias error is a variable of the birefringence optical path difference. Hence, when the temperature changes, the bias error shows a quasi-periodical tendency whose envelope curve reflects the coherence function of light source. By identifying the key factors of bias error and setting the propagation directions of a super-luminescent diode, polarization-maintaining coupler and polarizer to fast axis, it is possible to eliminate the coherence of parasitic interference signals. Experiments show that the maximum bias error decreases by one order of magnitude at temperatures between -40°C to 60°C.

  16. News Consumption and Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Xiang; Miklos Sarvary

    2007-01-01

    Bias in the market for news is well-documented. Recent research in economics explains the phenomenon by assuming that consumers want to read (watch) news that is consistent with their tastes or prior beliefs rather than the truth. The present paper builds on this idea but recognizes that (i) besides “biased” consumers, there are also “conscientious” consumers whose sole interest is in discovering the truth, and (ii) consistent with reality, media bias is constrained by the truth. These two fa...

  17. Biased limiter experiments on text

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, P.E.; Wootton, A.J.; Rowan, W.L.; Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Bengtson, R.D.; Hodge, W.L.; Durst, R.D.; McCool, S.C.; Richards, B.; Gentle, K.W.; Schoch, P.; Forster, J.C.; Hickok, R.L.; Evans, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments using an electrically biased limiter have been performed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). A small movable limiter is inserted past the main poloidal ring limiter (which is electrically connected to the vacuum vessel) and biased at V Lim with respect to it. The floating potential, plasma potential and shear layer position can be controlled. With vertical strokeV Lim vertical stroke ≥ 50 V the plasma density increases. For V Lim Lim > 0 the results obtained are inconclusive. Variation of V Lim changes the electrostatic turbulence which may explain the observed total flux changes. (orig.)

  18. Ombud’s Corner: defeating unconscious bias

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2016-01-01

    Do you have a tendency to switch off at meetings every time a particular colleague starts to speak? Is it obvious to you that your colleagues will never accept a peer as a project leader? And doesn’t that candidate from your own alma mater clearly have a definite edge over the others?   How do we come to these conclusions and what can we do to ensure that our decisions are based on objective criteria alone? Can we always be sure that we are not influenced by pre-conceived notions or prejudices that may unconsciously bias our thinking? Unconscious bias is a part of everyday life – it refers to the insidious influences that our backgrounds, cultural environments or personal experiences exert on the way in which we judge or assess people or situations. In the workplace, it has a negative impact on our goals and interactions when it causes us to make decisions based on generalisations or mental associations that we are not even aware of, and that have little or no bearing on the o...

  19. Unpacking the Evidence of Gender Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender bias in pre-service principals using the Gender-Leader Implicit Association Test. Analyses of student-learning narratives revealed how students made sense of gender bias (biased or not-biased) and how each reacted to evidence (surprised or not-surprised). Two implications were: (1) the need for…

  20. Without Bias: A Guidebook for Nondiscriminatory Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Judy E., Ed.; And Others

    This guidebook discusses ways to eliminate various types of discrimination from business communications. Separately authored chapters discuss eliminating racial and ethnic bias; eliminating sexual bias; achieving communication sensitive about handicaps of disabled persons; eliminating bias from visual media; eliminating bias from meetings,…

  1. Collection Development and the Psychology of Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The library literature addressing the role of bias in collection development emphasizes a philosophical approach. It is based on the notion that bias can be controlled by the conscious act of believing in certain values and adhering to a code of ethics. It largely ignores the psychological research on bias, which suggests that bias is a more…

  2. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  3. Size scaling of negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Schiesko, L.; Wimmer, C.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source (H-, D-) for the international fusion experiment ITER has a width of 0.9 m and a height of 1.9 m and is based on a ⅛ scale prototype source being in operation at the IPP test facilities BATMAN and MANITU for many years. Among the challenges to meet the required parameters in a caesiated source at a source pressure of 0.3 Pa or less is the challenge in size scaling of a factor of eight. As an intermediate step a ½ scale ITER source went into operation at the IPP test facility ELISE with the first plasma in February 2013. The experience and results gained so far at ELISE allowed a size scaling study from the prototype source towards the ITER relevant size at ELISE, in which operational issues, physical aspects and the source performance is addressed, highlighting differences as well as similarities. The most ITER relevant results are: low pressure operation down to 0.2 Pa is possible without problems; the magnetic filter field created by a current in the plasma grid is sufficient to reduce the electron temperature below the target value of 1 eV and to reduce together with the bias applied between the differently shaped bias plate and the plasma grid the amount of co-extracted electrons. An asymmetry of the co-extracted electron currents in the two grid segments is measured, varying strongly with filter field and bias. Contrary to the prototype source, a dedicated plasma drift in vertical direction is not observed. As in the prototype source, the performance in deuterium is limited by the amount of co-extracted electrons in short as well as in long pulse operation. Caesium conditioning is much harder in deuterium than in hydrogen for which fast and reproducible conditioning is achieved. First estimates reveal a caesium consumption comparable to the one in the prototype source despite the large size.

  4. The mixed impact of medical school on medical students’ implicit and explicit weight bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhl, Rebecca M.; Burke, Sara E.; Hardeman, Rachel; Dovidio, John F.; Nelson, David B.; Przedworski, Julia; Burgess, Diana J.; Perry, Sylvia; Yeazel, Mark W.; van Ryn, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare trainees demonstrate implicit (automatic, unconscious) and explicit (conscious) bias against people from stigmatized and marginalized social groups, which can negatively influence communication and decision-making. Medical schools are well positioned to intervene and reduce bias in new physicians. Objective To assess medical school factors that influence change in implicit and explicit bias against individuals from one stigmatized group, people with obesity. Design Prospective cohort study of medical students enrolled at 49 US medical schools randomly selected from all US medical schools within strata of public/private schools and region. Participants 1,795 medical students surveyed at the beginning of their 1st year and end of their 4th year. Measurement Web-based surveys included measures of weight bias, and medical school experiences and climate. We compared bias change to changes in the general public over the same time period. We used linear mixed models to assess the impact of curriculum, contact with people who have obesity, and faculty role-modelpan>ing on weight bias change. Results Increased implicit and explicit biases were associated with less positive contact with patients who have obesity and more exposure to faculty role-modelpan>ing of discriminatory behavior or negative comments about patients with obesity. Increased implicit bias was associated with training in how to deal with difficult patients. On average, implicit weight bias decreased and explicit bias increased during medical school, over a period of time where implicit weight bias in the general public increased and explicit bias remained stable. Conclusion Medical schools may reduce students’ weight biases by increasing positive contact between students and patients with obesity, eliminating unprofessional role-modelpan>ing by faculty and residents, and altering curricula focused on treating difficult patients. PMID:26383070

  5. How does dynamical downscaling affect model biases and future projections of explosive extratropical cyclones along North America's Atlantic coast?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, C.; Zwiers, F. W.; Hodges, K. I.; Scinocca, J. F.

    2018-01-01

    Explosive extratropical cyclones (EETCs) are rapidly intensifying low pressure systems that generate severe weather along North America's Atlantic coast. Global climate models (GCMs) tend to simulate too few EETCs, perhaps partly due to their coarse horizontal resolution and poorly resolved moist diabatic processes. This study explores whether dynamical downscaling can reduce EETC frequency biases, and whether this affects future projections of storms along North America's Atlantic coast. A regional climate model (CanRCM4) is forced with the CanESM2 GCM for the periods 1981 to 2000 and 2081 to 2100. EETCs are tracked from relative vorticity using an objective feature tracking algorithm. CanESM2 simulates 38% fewer EETC tracks compared to reanalysis data, which is consistent with a negative Eady growth rate bias (-0.1 day^{-1}). Downscaling CanESM2 with CanRCM4 increases EETC frequency by one third, which reduces the frequency bias to -22%, and increases maximum EETC precipitation by 22%. Anthropogenic greenhouse gas forcing is projected to decrease EETC frequency (-15%, -18%) and Eady growth rate (-0.2 day^{-1}, -0.2 day^{-1}), and increase maximum EETC precipitation (46%, 52%) in CanESM2 and CanRCM4, respectively. The limited effect of dynamical downscaling on EETC frequency projections is consistent with the lack of impact on the maximum Eady growth rate. The coarse spatial resolution of GCMs presents an important limitation for simulating extreme ETCs, but Eady growth rate biases are likely just as relevant. Further bias reductions could be achieved by addressing processes that lead to an underestimation of lower tropospheric meridional temperature gradients.

  6. sheath characteristics in multi-component plasma with negative ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Properties of steady state ion sheath formed in front of a negatively biased metal plate under the influence of negative ions have been investigated in collisionless argon/SF6 plasma. This experiment is carried out at a fixed discharge voltage and fixed filament heating power. In this experiment, the decrement in ...

  7. Towards a theory of bias and equivalence

    OpenAIRE

    Vijver, Fons J.R. van de

    1998-01-01

    "Bias refers to the presence of nuisance factors in cross-cultural research. Three types of bias are distinguished, depending on whether the nuisance factor is located at the level of the construct (construct bias), the measurement instrument as a whole (method bias) or the items (item bias or differential item functioning). Equivalence refers to the measurement level characteristics that apply to cross-cultural score comparisons; three types of equivalence are defined: construct (identity of...

  8. Gender bias in teaching evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mengel, Friederike; Sauermann, Jan; Zölitz, Ulf Zoelitz

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides new evidence on gender bias in teaching evaluations. We exploit a quasi-experimental dataset of 19,952 student evaluations of university faculty in a context where students are randomly allocated to female or male instructors. Despite the fact that neither students’ grades nor

  9. Ratio Bias and Policy Preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2016-01-01

    Numbers permeate modern political communication. While current scholarship on framing effects has focused on the persuasive effects of words and arguments, this article shows that framing of numbers can also substantially affect policy preferences. Such effects are caused by ratio bias, which...

  10. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against non-

  11. Perception bias in route choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreeswijk, Jacob Dirk; Thomas, Tom; van Berkum, Eric C.; van Arem, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Travel time is probably one of the most studied attributes in route choice. Recently, perception of travel time received more attention as several studies have shown its importance in explaining route choice behavior. In particular, travel time estimates by travelers appear to be biased against

  12. Genetic Variations in COMT and DRD2 Modulate Attentional Bias for Affective Facial Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pingyuan; Shen, Guomin; Li, She; Zhang, Guoping; Fang, Hongchao; Lei, Lin; Zhang, Peizhe; Zhang, Fuchang

    2013-01-01

    Studies have revealed that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and dopaminegic receptor2 (DRD2) modulate human attention bias for palatable food or tobacco. However, the existing evidence about the modulations of COMT and DRD2 on attentional bias for facial expressions was still limited. In the study, 650 college students were genotyped with regard to COMT Val158Met and DRD2 TaqI A polymorphisms, and the attentional bias for facial expressions was assessed using the spatial cueing task. The results indicated that COMT Val158Met underpinned the individual difference in attentional bias for negative emotional expressions (P = 0.03) and the Met carriers showed more engagement bias for negative expressions than the Val/Val homozygote. On the contrary, DRD2 TaqIA underpinned the individual difference in attentional bias for positive expressions (P = 0.003) and individuals with TT genotype showed much more engagement bias for positive expressions than the individuals with CC genotype. Moreover, the two genes exerted significant interactions on the engagements for negative and positive expressions (P = 0.046, P = 0.005). These findings suggest that the individual differences in the attentional bias for emotional expressions are partially underpinned by the genetic polymorphisms in COMT and DRD2. PMID:24312552

  13. Is there a universal positivity bias in attributions? A meta-analytic review of individual, developmental, and cultural differences in the self-serving attributional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezulis, Amy H; Abramson, Lyn Y; Hyde, Janet S; Hankin, Benjamin L

    2004-09-01

    Researchers have suggested the presence of a self-serving attributional bias, with people making more internal, stable, and global attributions for positive events than for negative events. This study examined the magnitude, ubiquity, and adaptiveness of this bias. The authors conducted a meta-analysis of 266 studies, yielding 503 independent effect sizes. The average d was 0.96, indicating a large bias. The bias was present in nearly all samples. There were significant age differences, with children and older adults displaying the largest biases. Asian samples displayed significantly smaller biases (d = 0.30) than U.S. (d = 1.05) or Western (d = 0.70) samples. Psychopathology was associated with a significantly attenuated bias (d = 0.48) compared with samples without psychopathology (d = 1.28) and community samples (d = 1.08). The bias was smallest for samples with depression (0.21), anxiety (0.46), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (0.55). Findings confirm that the self-serving attributional bias is pervasive in the general population but demonstrates significant variability across age, culture, and psychopathology. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  14. SPICE Modeling of Body Bias Effect in 4H-SiC Integrated Circuit Resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    The DC electrical behavior of n-type 4H-SiC resistors used for realizing 500C durable integrated circuits (ICs) is studied as a function of substrate bias and temperature. Improved fidelity electrical simulation is described using SPICE NMOS model to simulate resistor substrate body bias effect that is absent from the SPICE semiconductor resistor model.

  15. Characteristics of Cu films prepared using a magnetron sputter type negative ion source (MSNIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Namwoong

    2005-12-01

    Cu films have been deposited at room temperature using a magnetron sputter type negative ion source (MSNIS) at various conditions. By the principle of operation, the negative ion production probability is the function of the Cs flow rate in MSNIS. A set of films were deposited at different Cs flow rates and compared with normal-magnetron-sputtered films. The long-throw method was combined to MSNIS to increase the directionality and the negative ion arrival ratio. The film properties, such as resistivity, surface roughness, film structure, and step coverage on high aspect-ratio trench samples were obtained and analyzed using SEM, SIMS and AFM methods. The results showed that the resistivity of the film improved toward the theoretical values from 2.3 to 1.8 μΩ cm for the 100 nm thickness films. AFM scan of the film showed surface roughness was improved using MSNIS by ion bombarding effect. Depth profiling SIMS result showed Cs level resided in the film was less than 1 × 10 19 at./cm 3. As an application, Cu seed layer deposition on trench structure was investigated. Cross-sectional SEM was employed to see the step coverage of the film. The biasing effect was investigated. The different biasing conditions resulted as the clearly different coverage mode.

  16. Costs of detection bias in index-based population monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C.T.; Kendall, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Managers of wildlife populations commonly rely on indirect, count-based measures of the population in making decisions regarding conservation, harvest, or control. The main appeal in the use of such counts is their low material expense compared to methods that directly measure the population. However, their correct use rests on the rarely-tested but often-assumed premise that they proportionately reflect population size, i.e., that they constitute a population index. This study investigates forest management for the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) and the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) at the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in central Georgia, U.S.A. Optimal decision policies for a joint species objective were derived for two alternative models of Wood Thrush population dynamics. Policies were simulated under scenarios of unbiasedness, consistent negative bias, and habitat-dependent negative bias in observed Wood Thrush densities. Differences in simulation outcomes between biased and unbiased detection scenarios indicated the expected loss in resource objectives (here, forest habitat and birds) through decision-making based on biased population counts. Given the models and objective function used in our analysis, expected losses were as great as 11%, a degree of loss perhaps not trivial for applications such as endangered species management. Our analysis demonstrates that costs of uncertainty about the relationship between the population and its observation can be measured in units of the resource, costs which may offset apparent savings achieved by collecting uncorrected population counts.

  17. Morph matters: aggression bias in a polymorphic sparrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent M Horton

    Full Text Available In species with discrete morphs exhibiting alternative behavioral strategies, individuals may vary their aggressive behavior in competitive encounters according to the phenotype of their opponent. Such aggression bias has been documented in multiple polymorphic species evolving under negative frequency-dependent selection, but it has not been well-studied under other selection regimes. We investigated this phenomenon in white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis, a passerine with plumage polychromatism maintained by disassortative mating. The two distinct color morphs differ with respect to reproductive strategy in that white-striped birds invest more in territorial aggression than tan-striped birds. Whether territorial aggression in this species is biased according to the morph of an intruder is less understood. We found that during peak territorial and mating activity, both color morphs and sexes can exhibit aggression bias, but whether they do so depends on the strategy (morph of the intruder. During simulated territorial intrusions, resident white-striped males and tan-striped females, which represent the opposite ends of a continuum from high to low territorial aggression, altered their territorial responses according to intruder morph. Tan-striped males and white-striped females, which represent the middle of the continuum, did not show a bias. We propose that because of the disassortative mating system and morph differences in reproductive strategy, the fitness risks of intrusions vary according to the morphs of the resident and the intruder, and that aggression bias is an attuned response to varying threats to fitness.

  18. Diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbic, Danijela; Pincus, Tamar

    2014-08-01

    Patients' beliefs about the origin of their pain and their cognitive processing of pain-related information have both been shown to be associated with poorer prognosis in low back pain (LBP), but the relationship between specific beliefs and specific cognitive processes is not known. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias in 2 groups of chronic LBP patients, those who were certain about their diagnosis and those who believed that their pain was due to an undiagnosed problem. Patients (N=68) endorsed and subsequently recalled pain, illness, depression, and neutral stimuli. They also provided measures of pain, diagnostic status, mood, and disability. Both groups exhibited a recall bias for pain stimuli, but only the group with diagnostic uncertainty also displayed a recall bias for illness-related stimuli. This bias remained after controlling for depression and disability. Sensitivity analyses using grouping by diagnosis/explanation received supported these findings. Higher levels of depression and disability were found in the group with diagnostic uncertainty, but levels of pain intensity did not differ between the groups. Although the methodology does not provide information on causality, the results provide evidence for a relationship between diagnostic uncertainty and recall bias for negative health-related stimuli in chronic LBP patients. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Information filtering via biased heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Qiang

    2011-09-01

    The process of heat conduction has recently found application in personalized recommendation [Zhou , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA PNASA60027-842410.1073/pnas.1000488107107, 4511 (2010)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. By decreasing the temperatures of small-degree objects, we present an improved algorithm, called biased heat conduction, which could simultaneously enhance the accuracy and diversity. Extensive experimental analyses demonstrate that the accuracy on MovieLens, Netflix, and Delicious datasets could be improved by 43.5%, 55.4% and 19.2%, respectively, compared with the standard heat conduction algorithm and also the diversity is increased or approximately unchanged. Further statistical analyses suggest that the present algorithm could simultaneously identify users' mainstream and special tastes, resulting in better performance than the standard heat conduction algorithm. This work provides a creditable way for highly efficient information filtering.

  20. Optimistic bias, advertising skepticism, and consumer intentions for seeking information about the health risks of prescription medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seong; Ahn, Ho-Young Anthony; Haley, Eric John

    2017-01-01

    Based on a survey of prescription drug users (N = 408), this study revealed that: (a) the frequency of consumers' personal experience of prescription medicine adverse reactions negatively related to the extent of their optimistic bias about the chances of such events, (b) consumers' perceived personal control over adverse reactions positively related to optimistic bias, and (c) optimistic bias related more negatively to intentions to seek risk information when consumer skepticism toward direct-to-consumer advertising was high. When skepticism was low to average, optimistic bias did not inhibit such intentions. Implications and recommendations for the practice of direct-to-consumer advertising are provided.

  1. Investigation of attentional bias in obsessive compulsive disorder with and without depression in visual search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Morein-Zamir

    Full Text Available Whether Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD is associated with an increased attentional bias to emotive stimuli remains controversial. Additionally, it is unclear whether comorbid depression modulates abnormal emotional processing in OCD. This study examined attentional bias to OC-relevant scenes using a visual search task. Controls, non-depressed and depressed OCD patients searched for their personally selected positive images amongst their negative distractors, and vice versa. Whilst the OCD groups were slower than healthy individuals in rating the images, there were no group differences in the magnitude of negative bias to concern-related scenes. A second experiment employing a common set of images replicated the results on an additional sample of OCD patients. Although there was a larger bias to negative OC-related images without pre-exposure overall, no group differences in attentional bias were observed. However, OCD patients subsequently rated the images more slowly and more negatively, again suggesting post-attentional processing abnormalities. The results argue against a robust attentional bias in OCD patients, regardless of their depression status and speak to generalized difficulties disengaging from negative valence stimuli. Rather, post-attentional processing abnormalities may account for differences in emotional processing in OCD.

  2. Overweight people have low levels of implicit weight bias, but overweight nations have high levels of implicit weight bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Maddalena; Sriram, Natarajan; Schnabel, Konrad; Maliszewski, Norbert; Devos, Thierry; Ekehammar, Bo; Wiers, Reinout; HuaJian, Cai; Somogyi, Mónika; Shiomura, Kimihiro; Schnall, Simone; Neto, Félix; Bar-Anan, Yoav; Vianello, Michelangelo; Ayala, Alfonso; Dorantes, Gabriel; Park, Jaihyun; Kesebir, Selin; Pereira, Antonio; Tulbure, Bogdan; Ortner, Tuulia; Stepanikova, Irena; Greenwald, Anthony G; Nosek, Brian A

    2013-01-01

    Although a greater degree of personal obesity is associated with weaker negativity toward overweight people on both explicit (i.e., self-report) and implicit (i.e., indirect behavioral) measures, overweight people still prefer thin people on average. We investigated whether the national and cultural context - particularly the national prevalence of obesity - predicts attitudes toward overweight people independent of personal identity and weight status. Data were collected from a total sample of 338,121 citizens from 71 nations in 22 different languages on the Project Implicit website (https://implicit.harvard.edu/) between May 2006 and October 2010. We investigated the relationship of the explicit and implicit weight bias with the obesity both at the individual (i.e., across individuals) and national (i.e., across nations) level. Explicit weight bias was assessed with self-reported preference between overweight and thin people; implicit weight bias was measured with the Implicit Association Test (IAT). The national estimates of explicit and implicit weight bias were obtained by averaging the individual scores for each nation. Obesity at the individual level was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) scores, whereas obesity at the national level was defined as three national weight indicators (national BMI, national percentage of overweight and underweight people) obtained from publicly available databases. Across individuals, greater degree of obesity was associated with weaker implicit negativity toward overweight people compared to thin people. Across nations, in contrast, a greater degree of national obesity was associated with stronger implicit negativity toward overweight people compared to thin people. This result indicates a different relationship between obesity and implicit weight bias at the individual and national levels.

  3. Overweight people have low levels of implicit weight bias, but overweight nations have high levels of implicit weight bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Marini

    Full Text Available Although a greater degree of personal obesity is associated with weaker negativity toward overweight people on both explicit (i.e., self-report and implicit (i.e., indirect behavioral measures, overweight people still prefer thin people on average. We investigated whether the national and cultural context - particularly the national prevalence of obesity - predicts attitudes toward overweight people independent of personal identity and weight status. Data were collected from a total sample of 338,121 citizens from 71 nations in 22 different languages on the Project Implicit website (https://implicit.harvard.edu/ between May 2006 and October 2010. We investigated the relationship of the explicit and implicit weight bias with the obesity both at the individual (i.e., across individuals and national (i.e., across nations level. Explicit weight bias was assessed with self-reported preference between overweight and thin people; implicit weight bias was measured with the Implicit Association Test (IAT. The national estimates of explicit and implicit weight bias were obtained by averaging the individual scores for each nation. Obesity at the individual level was defined as Body Mass Index (BMI scores, whereas obesity at the national level was defined as three national weight indicators (national BMI, national percentage of overweight and underweight people obtained from publicly available databases. Across individuals, greater degree of obesity was associated with weaker implicit negativity toward overweight people compared to thin people. Across nations, in contrast, a greater degree of national obesity was associated with stronger implicit negativity toward overweight people compared to thin people. This result indicates a different relationship between obesity and implicit weight bias at the individual and national levels.

  4. Strengthening forensic DNA decision making through a better understanding of the influence of cognitive bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanguenat, Amy M; Budowle, Bruce; Dror, Itiel E

    2017-11-01

    Cognitive bias may influence process flows and decision making steps in forensic DNA analyses and interpretation. Currently, seven sources of bias have been identified that may affect forensic decision making with roots in human nature; environment, culture, and experience; and case specific information. Most of the literature and research on cognitive bias in forensic science has focused on patterned evidence; however, forensic DNA testing is not immune to bias, especially when subjective interpretation is involved. DNA testing can be strengthened by recognizing the existence of bias, evaluating where it influences decision making, and, when applicable, implementing practices to reduce or control its effects. Elements that may improve forensic decision making regarding bias include cognitively informed education and training, quality assurance procedures, review processes, analysis and interpretation, and context management of irrelevant information. Although bias exists, reliable results often can be (and have been) produced. However, at times bias can (and has) impacted the interpretation of DNA results negatively. Therefore, being aware of the dangers of bias and implementing measures to control its potential impact should be considered. Measures and procedures that handicap the workings of the crime laboratory or add little value to improving the operation are not advocated, but simple yet effective measures are suggested. This article is meant to raise awareness of cognitive bias contamination in forensic DNA testing and to give laboratories possible pathways to make sound decisions to address its influences. Copyright © 2017 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Jets in minimum bias physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancheri, G.; Srivastava, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion was made on a phenomenological evidence to support the hypothesis that several new phenomena observed in low psub(t) physics are due to the presence of low-x QCD jets in minimum bias physics. The phenomena we examine are KNO scaling violations, growth of with multiplicity and rise of the non-single diffractive part of the total cross-section. We have discussed the importance of low-x hard parton scattering in minimum bias events and pointed out its connection to both KNO scaling violations as well as to the observed growth of with multiplicity in inclusive pion distributions. The contribution of these mini-jets to the total cross-section has been calculated and a model for the transverse energy distribution characterizing any event accompanied by jets has been presented. (author)

  6. BEHAVIORAL BIASES IN TRADING SECURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turcan Ciprian Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The main thesis of this paper represents the importance and the effects that human behavior has over capital markets. It is important to see the link between the asset valuation and investor sentiment that motivate to pay for an asset a certain prices over/below the intrinsic value. The main behavioral aspects discussed are emotional factors such as: fear of regret, overconfidence, perseverance, loss aversion ,heuristic biases, misinformation and thinking errors, herding and their consequences.

  7. Cultural Biases in Economic Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Guiso; Paola Sapienza; Luigi Zingales

    2004-01-01

    How much do cultural biases affect economic exchange? We try to answer this question by using the relative trust European citizens have for citizens of other countries. First, we document that this trust is affected not only by objective characteristics of the country being trusted, but also by cultural aspects of the match between trusting country and trusted country, such as religion, history of conflicts, and genetic and somatic similarities. We then find that lower relative...

  8. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen E Allahverdyan

    Full Text Available Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science.We formulate a (non-Bayesian model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency or the first opinion (primacy -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties.The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  9. Opinion dynamics with confirmation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect-when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) -and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development.

  10. The effect of repeated testing on judgement biases in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Rebecca E; Vidal, Stephanie; Hinch, Geoff N; Fisher, Andrew D; Boissy, Alain; Lee, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Testing judgement biases of animals may provide insight into their affective states; however important questions about methodologies need to be answered. This experiment investigated the effect of repeated testing using unreinforced, ambiguous cues on the response of sheep to a go/no-go judgement bias test. Fifteen sheep were trained to differentiate between two locations, reinforced respectively with feed (positive) or with the presentation of a dog (negative). The responses to nine ambiguous locations, positioned between the positively and negatively reinforced locations, were tested repeatedly over 3 weeks. Sheep exhibited a symmetrical gradation in response to ambiguous locations between the positive and negative reinforcers. There was a significant decline (P=0.001) in the total number of approaches to the ambiguous positions over time (weeks). This effect of time suggests that sheep learnt that the ambiguous locations were unrewarded. This result supplies evidence of a limitation identified in current judgement bias methodology, due to repeated testing, which has the potential to provide misleading results. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ti is known to act as protective sacrificial layer between metallic silver (Ag) and dielectric layers (SnO2) by prevent- ing the latter from oxidizing with dielectric layer (Godfroid et al 2003). Recently, thin layer of Ti is considered to be a good candidate for nuclear micro batteries due to higher tritium storage capacity (Lee et al ...

  12. Substrate bias voltage and deposition temperature dependence on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    which were ultrasonically cleaned with acetone and alcohol. Prior to deposition, substrates were etched with 2% HF solu- tion in order to remove native oxide layer on the surface. To ensure purity of deposited films, pre-sputtering of titanium target for about 5 min was done to remove surface oxides. In order to maintain ...

  13. Chemical and Morphological Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered at Different Bias Voltages Cr-Al-C Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei Obrosov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available MAX phases (M = transition metal, A = A-group element, and X = C/N are of special interest because they possess a unique combination of the advantages of both metals and ceramics. Most attention is attracted to the ternary carbide Cr2AlC because of its excellent high-temperature oxidation, as well as hot corrosion resistance. Despite lots of publications, up to now the influence of bias voltage on the chemical bonding structure, surface morphology, and mechanical properties of the film is still not well understood. In the current study, Cr-Al-C films were deposited on silicon wafers (100 and Inconel 718 super alloy by dc magnetron sputtering with different substrate bias voltages and investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, and nanoindentation. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM was used to analyze the correlation between the growth of the films and the coating microstructure. The XPS results confirm the presence of Cr2AlC MAX phase due to a negative shift of 0.6–0.9 eV of the Al2p to pure aluminum carbide peak. The XRD results reveal the presence of Cr2AlC MAX Phase and carbide phases, as well as intermetallic AlCr2. The film thickness decreases from 8.95 to 6.98 µm with increasing bias voltage. The coatings deposited at 90 V exhibit the lowest roughness (33 nm and granular size (76 nm combined with the highest hardness (15.9 GPa. The ratio of Al carbide to carbide-like carbon state changes from 0.12 to 0.22 and correlates with the mechanical properties of the coatings. TEM confirms the columnar structure, with a nanocrystalline substructure, of the films.

  14. The Probability Distribution for a Biased Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Colin

    2012-01-01

    This article advocates biased spinners as an engaging context for statistics students. Calculating the probability of a biased spinner landing on a particular side makes valuable connections between probability and other areas of mathematics. (Contains 2 figures and 1 table.)

  15. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP correlates of decision bias in recognition memory judgments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Hill

    Full Text Available Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure. Event related potentials (ERP correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias. In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320 that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500-700 ms poststimulus, bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions.

  16. The effect of strand bias in Illumina short-read sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When using Illumina high throughput short read data, sometimes the genotype inferred from the positive strand and negative strand are significantly different, with one homozygous and the other heterozygous. This phenomenon is known as strand bias. In this study, we used Illumina short-read sequencing data to evaluate the effect of strand bias on genotyping quality, and to explore the possible causes of strand bias. Result We collected 22 breast cancer samples from 22 patients and sequenced their exome using the Illumina GAIIx machine. By comparing the consistency between the genotypes inferred from this sequencing data with the genotypes inferred from SNP chip data, we found that, when using sequencing data, SNPs with extreme strand bias did not have significantly lower consistency rates compared to SNPs with low or no strand bias. However, this result may be limited by the small subset of SNPs present in both the exome sequencing and the SNP chip data. We further compared the transition and transversion ratio and the number of novel non-synonymous SNPs between the SNPs with low or no strand bias and those with extreme strand bias, and found that SNPs with low or no strand bias have better overall quality. We also discovered that the strand bias occurs randomly at genomic positions across these samples, and observed no consistent pattern of strand bias location across samples. By comparing results from two different aligners, BWA and Bowtie, we found very consistent strand bias patterns. Thus strand bias is unlikely to be caused by alignment artifacts. We successfully replicated our results using two additional independent datasets with different capturing methods and Illumina sequencers. Conclusion Extreme strand bias indicates a potential high false-positive rate for SNPs.

  17. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP) Correlates of Decision Bias in Recognition Memory Judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Holger; Windmann, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure). Event related potentials (ERP) correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias) and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias). In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied) items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320) that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500–700 ms poststimulus), bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions. PMID

  18. Examining Event-Related Potential (ERP) correlates of decision bias in recognition memory judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Holger; Windmann, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Memory judgments can be based on accurate memory information or on decision bias (the tendency to report that an event is part of episodic memory when one is in fact unsure). Event related potentials (ERP) correlates are important research tools for elucidating the dynamics underlying memory judgments but so far have been established only for investigations of accurate old/new discrimination. To identify the ERP correlates of bias, and observe how these interact with ERP correlates of memory, we conducted three experiments that manipulated decision bias within participants via instructions during recognition memory tests while their ERPs were recorded. In Experiment 1, the bias manipulation was performed between blocks of trials (automatized bias) and compared to trial-by-trial shifts of bias in accord with an external cue (flexibly controlled bias). In Experiment 2, the bias manipulation was performed at two different levels of accurate old/new discrimination as the memory strength of old (studied) items was varied. In Experiment 3, the bias manipulation was added to another, bottom-up driven manipulation of bias induced via familiarity. In the first two Experiments, and in the low familiarity condition of Experiment 3, we found evidence of an early frontocentral ERP component at 320 ms poststimulus (the FN320) that was sensitive to the manipulation of bias via instruction, with more negative amplitudes indexing more liberal bias. By contrast, later during the trial (500-700 ms poststimulus), bias effects interacted with old/new effects across all three experiments. Results suggest that the decision criterion is typically activated early during recognition memory trials, and is integrated with retrieved memory signals and task-specific processing demands later during the trial. More generally, the findings demonstrate how ERPs can help to specify the dynamics of recognition memory processes under top-down and bottom-up controlled retrieval conditions.

  19. Environmental Scan of Weight Bias Exposure in Primary Health Care Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Nutter, Sarah; Alberga, Angela; Jelinski, Susan; Ball, Geoff D. C.; Edwards, Alun; Oddie, Scott; Sharma, Arya M.; Pickering, Barbara; Forhan, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Negative attitudes and beliefs about individuals with obesity (also known as weight bias) have negative consequences for physical and mental health for individuals with obesity and impact the quality of care provided by health professionals. A preliminary environmental scan of college and university training programs was conducted consisting of 67…

  20. Voltage-Controlled Negative Index in Vertically Coupled Quantum Dot Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huan; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that voltage-controlled negative index can be obtained in self-organized InAs quantum dot systems. As the bias voltage changes, the refractive index can be adjusted and controlled continuously from -7 to 7. Simultaneously, the absorption of light in the system will be very small. The single-negative index materials and the double-negative index materials can be achieved in different bias voltages.

  1. Numerical modelling of pump limiter biasing on TEXTOR-94 and Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhauser, H.; Claassen, H.A.; Mank, G.; Zagorski, R.; Loarer, T.; Gunn, J.; Boucher, C.

    2002-01-01

    The two-dimensional multifluid code TECXY has been used to model the biasing (with respect to the first wall) of the toroidal belt limiter ALT-II on the tokamak TEXTOR-94 and of the new toroidal pump limiter being installed on Tore Supra tokamak in the framework of the CIEL project. It is well known that the edge flow pattern can be influenced by the poloidal electric drifts from imposing radial electric fields. The modelling with TECXY introduces imprinted bias currents in the scrape-off layer (SOL) for the case of negative (limiter) biasing, and imprinted bias potentials for the case of positive biasing. This allowed us to simulate sufficiently well the experimental I-V characteristics for either biasing of ALT-II and also reproduced the essential features and trends of the observed plasma profiles in the SOL of TEXTOR-94. For negative biasing a moderate improvement of the pumping exhaust efficiency can be achieved in the case of TEXTOR. For Tore Supra, however, only a negligible improvement of the limiter performance with biasing can be predicted, which is explained by the relatively weak drift flows in Tore Supra. (author)

  2. Negating the Verum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsnes, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    an (aboutness-)topic. The negation of a verum predicate explains why preposed negation—like other constructions with verum-focus—fails to license strong negative polarity items and fails to rule out positive ones. The lack of a topic explains why preposed negation is preferred with non-referential subjects...

  3. Sentential Negation in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper undertakes a detailed analysis of sentential negation in the English language with Chomsky's Government-Binding theory of Transformational Grammar as theoretical model. It distinguishes between constituent and sentential negation in English. The essay identifies the exact position of Negation phrase in an English clause structure. It…

  4. Culturally Biased Assumptions in Counseling Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul B.

    2003-01-01

    Eight clusters of culturally biased assumptions are identified for further discussion from Leong and Ponterotto's (2003) article. The presence of cultural bias demonstrates that cultural bias is so robust and pervasive that is permeates the profession of counseling psychology, even including those articles that effectively attack cultural bias…

  5. Using Newspapers to Study Media Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn to recognize media bias by studying media reports of current events or historical topics. Describes a study unit using media coverage of the second anniversary of the Palestinian uprising against Israel. Discusses lesson objectives, planning, defining bias teaching procedures, and criteria for determining bias. (DK)

  6. Attentional bias predicts heroin relapse following treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, Marlies A. E.; Franken, Ingmar H. A.; Waters, Andrew J.; Blanken, Peter; van den Brink, Wim; Hendriks, Vincent M.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Previous studies have shown that abstinent heroin addicts exhibit an attentional bias to heroin-related stimuli. It has been suggested that attentional bias may represent a vulnerability to relapse into drug use. In the present study, the predictive value of pre-treatment attentional bias on

  7. Ethnic differences in attitudes and bias toward older people comparing White and Asian nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Shin

    2015-03-01

    To identify attitudes and bias toward aging between Asian and White students and identify factors affecting attitudes toward aging. A cross-sectional sample of 308 students in a nursing program completed the measure of Attitudes Toward Older People and Aging Quiz electronically. There were no differences in positive attitudes and pro-aged bias between Asian and White groups, but Asian students had significantly more negative attitudes and anti-aged bias toward older people than White students. Multiple regression analysis showed ethnicity/race was the strongest variable to explain negative attitudes toward older people. Feeling uneasy about talking to older adults was the most significant factor to explain all attitudinal concepts. Asian students were uneasy about talking with older people and had negative attitudes toward older adults. To become competent in cross-cultural care and communication in nursing, educational strategies to reduce negative attitudes on aging are necessary. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Negative ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Junzo; Takagi, Toshinori

    1983-01-01

    Negative ion sources have been originally developed at the request of tandem electrostatic accelerators, and hundreds of nA to several μA negative ion current has been obtained so far for various elements. Recently, the development of large current hydrogen negative ion sources has been demanded from the standpoint of the heating by neutral particle beam injection in nuclear fusion reactors. On the other hand, the physical properties of negative ions are interesting in the thin film formation using ions. Anyway, it is the present status that the mechanism of negative ion action has not been so fully investigated as positive ions because the history of negative ion sources is short. In this report, the many mechanisms about the generation of negative ions proposed so far are described about negative ion generating mechanism, negative ion source plasma, and negative ion generation on metal surfaces. As a result, negative ion sources are roughly divided into two schemes, plasma extraction and secondary ion extraction, and the former is further classified into the PIG ion source and its variation and Duoplasmatron and its variation; while the latter into reflecting and sputtering types. In the second half of the report, the practical negative ion sources of each scheme are described. If the mechanism of negative ion generation will be investigated more in detail and the development will be continued under the unified know-how as negative ion sources in future, the development of negative ion sources with which large current can be obtained for any element is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  10. Attentional biases in problem and non-problem gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, Maria; Nigro, Giovanna; Griffiths, Mark D; Cosenza, Marina; D'Olimpio, Francesca

    2016-07-01

    From a cognitive perspective, attentional biases are deemed as factors responsible in the onset and development of gambling disorder. However, knowledge relating to attentional processes in gambling is scarce and studies to date have reported contrasting results. Moreover, no study has ever examined which component and what type of bias are involved in attentional bias in gambling. In the present study, 108 Italian participants, equally divided into problem and non-problem gamblers, were administered a modified Posner Task, an attentional paradigm in which - through the manipulation of stimuli presentation time - it is possible to measure both initial orienting and maintenance of attention. In addition to the experimental task, participants completed self-report measures involving (i) craving (Gambling Craving Scale), (ii) depression, anxiety and stress (Depression Anxiety Stress Scale) and (iii) emotional dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale). Analyses revealed facilitation in detecting gambling-related stimuli at the encoding level in problem gamblers but not in non-problem gamblers. Compared to non-problem gamblers, problem gamblers also reported higher levels of craving, emotional dysregulation, and negative mood states. Furthermore, all measures correlated with the gambling severity. The use of indirect measure of attentional bias could be less accurate compared to direct measures. The facilitation in detecting gambling-related stimuli in problem gamblers and the correlation between subjective craving and facilitation bias suggests that attentional bias could not be due to a conditioning process but that motivational factors such as craving could induce addicted-related seeking-behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On Size Biased Kumaraswamy Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreamlee Sharma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce and study the size-biased form of Kumaraswamy distribution. The Kumaraswamy distribution which has drawn considerable attention in hydrology and related areas was proposed by Kumarswamy. The new distribution is derived under sizebiased probability of sampling taking the weights as the variate values. Various distributional and characterizing properties of the model are studied. The methods of maximum likelihood and matching quantiles estimation are employed to estimate the parameters of the proposed model. Finally, we apply the proposed model to simulated and real data sets.

  12. Polemic and Descriptive Negations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horslund, Camilla Søballe

    2011-01-01

    as such may be more or less central to the meaning of the utterance. The present paper investigates the role of morphosyntactic and prosodic prominence as well as register and social setting on the interpretation of negations. It seems plausible to expect that if the negation as such is central to the meaning...... of the utterance (as in polemic negations), the negation will be articulated prominently in order to emphasise this importance. Likewise, if the negation is not central to the meaning of the utterance, it should not be articulated prominently. Moreover, it is plausible to expect descriptive negations to be more...... common in certain social context or genres, while polemic negations are more likely to come up in other genres and social settings. Previous studies have shown a relation between articulatory prominence and register, which may further inform the analysis. Hence, the paper investigates how articulatory...

  13. An inclusive taxonomy of behavioral biases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Peón

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper overviews the theoretical and empirical research on behavioral biases and their influence in the literature. To provide a systematic exposition, we present a unified framework that takes the reader through an original taxonomy, based on the reviews of relevant authors in the field. In particular, we establish three broad categories that may be distinguished: heuristics and biases; choices, values and frames; and social factors. We then describe the main biases within each category, and revise the main theoretical and empirical developments, linking each bias with other biases and anomalies that are related to them, according to the literature.

  14. Negative response of HgCdTe photodiode induced by nanosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zuodong; Zhang, Jianmin; Lin, Xinwei; Shao, Bibo; Yang, Pengling

    2017-05-01

    Photodetectors' behavior and mechanism of transient response are still not understood very well, especially under high photon injection. Most of the researches on this topic were carried out with ultra-short laser pulse, whose pulse width ranged from femtosecond scale to picosecond scale. However, in many applications the durations of incident light are in nanosecond order and the light intensities are strong. To investigate the transient response characteristics and mechanisms of narrow-bandgap photovoltaic detectors under short laser irradiation, we performed an experiment on HgCdTe photodiodes. The n+-on-p type HgCdTe photodiodes in the experiment were designed to work in spectrum from 1.0μm to 3.0μm, with conditions of zero bias and room temperature. They were exposed to in-band short laser pulses with dwell time of 20 nanosecond. When the intensity of incident laser beam rose to 0.1J/cm2 order, the photodiodes' response characteristics turned to be bipolar from unipolar. A much longer negative response with duration of about 10μs to 100μs followed the positive light response. The amplitude of the negative response increased with the laser intensity, while the dwell time of positive response decreased with the laser intensity. Considering the response characteristics and the device structure, it is proposed that the negative response was caused by space charge effect at the electrodes. Under intense laser irradiation, a temperature gradient formed in the HgCdTe material. Due to the temperature gradient, the majority carriers diffused away from upper surface and left space charge at the electrodes. Then negative response voltage could be measured in the external circuit. With higher incident laser intensity, the degree of the space charge effect would become higher, and then the negative response would come earlier and show larger amplitude.

  15. Motion signals bias localization judgments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleman, David M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    In the flash-lag illusion, a moving object aligned with a flash is perceived to be offset in the direction of motion following the flash. In the “flash-drag” illusion, a flash is mislocalized in the direction of nearby motion. In the “flash-jump” illusion, a transient change in the appearance of a moving object (e.g., color) is mislocalized in the direction of subsequent motion. Finally, in the Frohlich illusion, the starting position of a suddenly appearing moving object is mislocalized in the direction of the subsequent motion. We demonstrate, in a series of experiments, a unified explanation for all these illusions: Perceptual localization is influenced by motion signals collected over ∼80 ms after a query is triggered. These demonstrations rule out “latency difference” and asynchronous feature binding models, in which objects appear in their real positions but misaligned in time. Instead, the illusions explored here are best understood as biases in localization caused by motion signals. We suggest that motion biasing exists because it allows the visual system to account for neural processing delays by retrospectively “pushing” an object closer to its true physical location, and we propose directions for exploring the neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic updating of location by the activity of motion-sensitive neurons. PMID:17461687

  16. Gender Bias Affects Forests Worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Elias

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gender biases persist in forestry research and practice. These biases result in reduced scientific rigor and inequitable, ineffective, and less efficient policies, programs, and interventions. Drawing from a two-volume collection of current and classic analyses on gender in forests, we outline five persistent and inter-related themes: gendered governance, tree tenure, forest spaces, division of labor, and ecological knowledge. Each emerges across geographic regions in the northern and southern hemisphere and reflects inequities in women’s and men’s ability to make decisions about and benefit from trees, forests, and their products. Women’s ability to participate in community-based forest governance is typically less than men’s, causing concern for social equity and forest stewardship. Women’s access to trees and their products is commonly more limited than men’s, and mediated by their relationship with their male counterparts. Spatial patterns of forest use reflect gender norms and taboos, and men’s greater access to transportation. The division of labor results in gender specialization in the collection of forest products, with variations in gender roles across regions. All these gender differences result in ecological knowledge that is distinct but also complementary and shifting across the genders. The ways gender plays out in relation to each theme may vary across cultures and contexts, but the influence of gender, which intersects with other factors of social differentiation in shaping forest landscapes, is global.

  17. Volunteer bias, sexuality, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, N; Sabini, J

    1998-04-01

    Participants were recruited either for a study of sexual attitudes and behavior or for a study of attitudes and behavior without mention of sexuality. Both groups answered questions about their sexual behavior and completed the Self-Monitoring Scale, the Balanced F Scale, and the Social Responsibility Scale. No differences were found as a function of recruitment technique in the mean reports of subjects' sexual behavior, but substantial differences were found in some of the relationships between these personality variables and sexual behavior reports as a function of recruitment technique; the correlation between the balanced F Scale score and masturbation frequency for females was +0.61 for those recruited for a study of sexual behavior and -0.61 for those recruited for a study of general attitudes and behavior. In both groups, larger correlations were found between female sexual behavior and personality than between male sexual behavior and personality. In all groups, the Self-Monitoring Scale was significantly correlated with masturbation frequency. The results are discussed in terms of self-selection bias and self-presentation bias, both of which may affect research on sexuality.

  18. Weight bias in the media: a review of recent research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Rheanna N; Thompson, J Kevin

    2010-02-01

    There is ample evidence that overweight and obese individuals are stigmatized in various forms of media. This weight bias is particularly disconcerting when it targets children and adolescents. The current review surveys the most recent 15 years of research on weight bias and stigmatization in the media and discusses some theoretical models that might help explain the negative effects of such material. PsycINFO searches were conducted using weight bias- and stigmatization-related terms and phrases. Results were limited to journal articles published in English between 1994 and 2009. Overall, the data indicate that a wide range of media - from television shows to books, newspapers, and the internet - portray overweight and obese individuals in a stigmatizing manner. More research on this topic is needed to discern a direct connection between exposure to such material and psychological or physical harm to the viewer. Additionally, virtually all of the research has been conducted in the USA; research in other countries should be a top priority. Efforts to try to educate the media to the deleterious effects of media presentations of weight bias are indicated. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Functional Flexibility in Women's Commitment-Skepticism Bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available If a woman overestimates her romantic partner's commitment, the cost to her fitness—reproduction without an investing partner—can be considerable. Error Management Theory predicts that women have an evolved bias to be skeptical of men's commitment in a relationship, which reduces the likelihood of making a costly false positive error. However, because error probabilities are inversely related, this commitment-skepticism bias simultaneously increases the likelihood of missed opportunities, or false negatives. False positives when gauging a partner's commitment are the more costly error for women, but missing an opportunity to secure a genuinely high-quality mate can also be quite costly. We predicted and found that women's mating cognitions are functionally flexible, such that women do not exhibit the commitment-skepticism bias when faced with behavioral evidence that a male partner is willing to commit (Study 1. This suggests that relationship-enhancing behaviors are one contextual cue that may lessen the bias. However, not all relationship-enhancing behaviors are equally diagnostic of a person's true commitment intent. When comparing men and women's commitment thresholds, we found that women require more behavioral evidence than men do to feel certain of their partner's commitment to them (Study 2.

  20. Time-course of attention biases in social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Casey A; Inhoff, Albrecht W; Coles, Meredith E

    2013-10-01

    Theoretical models of social phobia implicate preferential attention to social threat in the maintenance of anxiety symptoms, though there has been limited work characterizing the nature of these biases over time. The current study utilized eye-movement data to examine the time-course of visual attention over 1500ms trials of a probe detection task. Nineteen participants with a primary diagnosis of social phobia based on DSM-IV criteria and 20 non-clinical controls completed this task with angry, fearful, and happy face trials. Overt visual attention to the emotional and neutral faces was measured in 50ms segments across the trial. Over time, participants with social phobia attend less to emotional faces and specifically less to happy faces compared to controls. Further, attention to emotional relative to neutral expressions did not vary notably by emotion for participants with social phobia, but control participants showed a pattern after 1000ms in which over time they preferentially attended to happy expressions and avoided negative expressions. Findings highlight the importance of considering attention biases to positive stimuli as well as the pattern of attention between groups. These results suggest that attention "bias" in social phobia may be driven by a relative lack of the biases seen in non-anxious participants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Biased Perception of Mean Emotion in Abstinent Heroin Abusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xuan; Hu, Chun; Liao, Huayu; Yang, Tong; Shen, Mowei

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence suggests that drug abusers exhibit biases when coding individual emotional facial expressions, little is known about how they process multiple expressions simultaneously. The present study evaluated the mean emotions perceived by abstinent heroin abusers. Male abstinent heroin abusers (AHs) and healthy controls (HCs) were randomly assigned into three emotional conditions (happy, sad, or angry), viewed sets of four faces (Experiment 1) or individual faces (Experiment 2) that varied in emotionality (neutral to happy/sad/angry), and judged whether a test face presented later was more/less emotional than the preceding stimuli. Average points of subjective equality were calculated to reflect participants' biases in perceiving emotions of sets or single faces. Relative to HCs, AHs overestimated mean emotions for sad and angry faces in Experiment 1; however, no such biases were found in Experiment 2. This suggests biased ensemble coding towards negative emotional facial expressions in AHs. Furthermore, when controlling for depression and anxiety, AHs' enhanced perception of mean emotion for angry or sad faces in Experiment 1 decreased, indicating a possible mediating effect of these psychopathological variables in the relationship between drug addiction history and abnormal ensemble processing for sets of emotional expressions.

  2. Debiasing the mind through meditation: mindfulness and the sunk-cost bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafenbrack, Andrew C; Kinias, Zoe; Barsade, Sigal G

    2014-02-01

    In the research reported here, we investigated the debiasing effect of mindfulness meditation on the sunk-cost bias. We conducted four studies (one correlational and three experimental); the results suggest that increased mindfulness reduces the tendency to allow unrecoverable prior costs to influence current decisions. Study 1 served as an initial correlational demonstration of the positive relationship between trait mindfulness and resistance to the sunk-cost bias. Studies 2a and 2b were laboratory experiments examining the effect of a mindfulness-meditation induction on increased resistance to the sunk-cost bias. In Study 3, we examined the mediating mechanisms of temporal focus and negative affect, and we found that the sunk-cost bias was attenuated by drawing one's temporal focus away from the future and past and by reducing state negative affect, both of which were accomplished through mindfulness meditation.

  3. Post-Event Processing and Memory Bias for Performance Feedback in Social Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Meghan W.; Teachman, Bethany A.

    2010-01-01

    Despite predictions following from cognitive theories of anxiety, evidence for memory biases in social anxiety has been mixed. This study extends previous research by using stimuli relevant to participants’ concerns and allowing time for post-event processing. Participants high (n = 42) or low (n = 39) in social anxiety symptoms gave speeches and received standardized feedback on their and a confederate’s performance. Participants then took recognition and recall tests for the feedback immediately after it was given and after a two-day delay. Results showed no recall biases. However, the hypothesized recognition biases were found: the high social anxiety group remembered the confederate’s feedback more positively than their own, remembered their negative feedback as worse than the low group, and diminished positive feedback over time. Moreover, post-event processing mediated the relationship between social anxiety and memory for negative feedback. Results suggest that biased recognition of social feedback is linked to social anxiety. PMID:20399601

  4. Unimode metamaterials exhibiting negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, Krzysztof K; Attard, Daphne; Caruana-Gauci, Roberto; Grima, Joseph N; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W

    2016-01-01

    Unimode metamaterials made from rotating rigid triangles are analysed mathematically for their mechanical and thermal expansion properties. It is shown that these unimode systems exhibit positive Poisson’s ratios irrespective of size, shape and angle of aperture, with the Poisson’s ratio exhibiting giant values for certain conformations. When the Poisson’s ratio in one loading direction is larger than +1, the systems were found to exhibit the anomalous property of negative linear compressibility along this direction, that is, the systems expand in this direction when hydrostatically compressed. Also discussed are the thermal expansion properties of these systems under the assumption that the units exhibit increased rotational agitation once subjected to an increase in temperature. The effect of the geometric parameters on the aforementioned thermo-mechanical properties of the system, are discussed, with the aim of identifying negative behaviour. (paper)

  5. Age differences in optimism bias are mediated by reliance on intuition and religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaczynski, Paul A

    2017-11-01

    The relationships among age, optimism bias, religiosity, creationist beliefs, and reliance on intuition were examined in a sample of 211 high school students (M age =16.54years). Optimism bias was defined as the difference between predictions for positive and negative live events (e.g., divorce) for the self and age peers. Results indicated that older adolescents displayed less optimism bias, were less religious, believed less in creationism, and relied on intuition less than younger adolescents. Furthermore, the association between age and optimism bias was mediated by religiosity and reliance on intuition but not by creationist beliefs. These findings are considered from a dual-process theoretic perspective that emphasizes age increases in metacognitive abilities and epistemological beliefs and age declines in impulsive judgments. Research directed toward examining alternative explanations of the association among religiosity, age, and optimism bias is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Emissive limiter bias experiment for improved confinement of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Pribyl, P.A.; Liberati, J.R.; Taylor, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments have been performed in Ohmic discharges of the UCLA CCT tokamak with a LaB 6 biased limiter, capable of emitting energetic electrons as a technique to improve confinement in tokamaks. To study the effects of emitted electrons, the limiter position, bias voltage, and plasma position were varied. The results have shown that the plasma positioning with respect to the emissive limiter plays an important role in obtaining H-mode plasmas. The emissive cathode must be located close to the last closed flux surface in order to charge up the plasma. As the cathode is moved closer to the wall, the positioning of the plasma becomes more critical since the plasma can easily detach from the cathode and reattach to the wall, resulting in the termination of H-mode. The emissive capability appears to be important for operating at lower bias voltage and reducing impurity levels in the plasma. With a heated cathode, transition to H-mode was observed for V bias ≤ 50 V and I inj ≥ 30 A. At a lower cathode heater current, a higher bias voltage is required for the transition. Moreover, with a lower cathode heater current, the time delay for inducing H-mode becomes longer, which can be attributed to the required time for the self-heating of the cathode to reach the emissive temperature. From this result, we conclude that the capacity for emission can significantly improve the performance of limiter biasing for inducing H-mode transition. With L-mode plasmas, the injection current flowing out of the cathode was generally higher than 100 A

  7. Addressing Omitted Prior Achievement Bias in International Assessments: An Applied Example Using PIRLS-NPD Matched Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Daniel H.; Kyriakides, Leonidas; Televantou, Ioulia

    2018-01-01

    Omitted prior achievement bias is pervasive in international assessment studies and precludes causal inference. For example, reported negative associations between student-oriented teaching strategies and student performance are against expectations and might actually reflect omitted prior achievement bias. Namely, that these teaching strategies…

  8. Numerical experiment to estimate the validity of negative ion diagnostic using photo-detachment combined with Langmuir probing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudini, N. [Laboratoire des plasmas de décharges, Centre de Développement des Technologies Avancées, Cité du 20 Aout BP 17 Baba Hassen, 16081 Algiers (Algeria); Sirse, N.; Ellingboe, A. R. [Plasma Research Laboratory, School of Physical Sciences and NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Benallal, R. [Unité de Recherche Matériaux et Energies Renouvelables, BP 119, Université Abou Bekr Belkaïd, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Taccogna, F. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e di Plasmi, CNR, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Aanesland, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, (CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud), École Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bendib, A. [Laboratoire d' Electronique Quantique, Faculté de Physique, USTHB, El Alia BP 32, Bab Ezzouar, 16111 Algiers (Algeria)

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a critical assessment of the theory of photo-detachment diagnostic method used to probe the negative ion density and electronegativity α = n{sub -}/n{sub e}. In this method, a laser pulse is used to photo-detach all negative ions located within the electropositive channel (laser spot region). The negative ion density is estimated based on the assumption that the increase of the current collected by an electrostatic probe biased positively to the plasma is a result of only the creation of photo-detached electrons. In parallel, the background electron density and temperature are considered as constants during this diagnostics. While the numerical experiments performed here show that the background electron density and temperature increase due to the formation of an electrostatic potential barrier around the electropositive channel. The time scale of potential barrier rise is about 2 ns, which is comparable to the time required to completely photo-detach the negative ions in the electropositive channel (∼3 ns). We find that neglecting the effect of the potential barrier on the background plasma leads to an erroneous determination of the negative ion density. Moreover, the background electron velocity distribution function within the electropositive channel is not Maxwellian. This is due to the acceleration of these electrons through the electrostatic potential barrier. In this work, the validity of the photo-detachment diagnostic assumptions is questioned and our results illustrate the weakness of these assumptions.

  9. Brain systems underlying encounter expectancy bias in spider phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aue, Tatjana; Hoeppli, Marie-Eve; Piguet, Camille; Hofstetter, Christoph; Rieger, Sebastian W; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-06-01

    Spider-phobic individuals are characterized by exaggerated expectancies to be faced with spiders (so-called encounter expectancy bias). Whereas phobic responses have been linked to brain systems mediating fear, little is known about how the recruitment of these systems relates to exaggerated expectancies of threat. We used fMRI to examine spider-phobic and control participants while they imagined visiting different locations in a forest after having received background information about the likelihood of encountering different animals (spiders, snakes, and birds) at these locations. Critically, imagined encounter expectancies modulated brain responses differently in phobics as compared with controls. Phobics displayed stronger negative modulation of activity in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex by encounter expectancies for spiders, relative to snakes or birds (within-participants analysis); these effects were not seen in controls. Between-participants correlation analyses within the phobic group further corroborated the hypothesis that these phobia-specific modulations may underlie irrationality in encounter expectancies (deviations of encounter expectancies from objective background information) in spider phobia; the greater the negative modulation a phobic participant displayed in the lateral prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and visual cortex, the stronger was her bias in encounter expectancies for spiders. Interestingly, irrationality in expectancies reflected in frontal areas relied on right rather than left hemispheric deactivations. Our data accord with the idea that expectancy biases in spider phobia may reflect deficiencies in cognitive control and contextual integration that are mediated by right frontal and parietal areas.

  10. The shortwave radiative forcing bias of liquid and ice clouds from MODIS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Oreopoulos

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an assessment of the plane-parallel bias of the shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCRF of liquid and ice clouds at 1 deg scales using global MODIS (Terra and Aqua cloud optical property retrievals for four months of the year 2005 representative of the meteorological seasons. The (negative bias is estimated as the difference of SWCRF calculated using the Plane-Parallel Homogeneous (PPH approximation and the Independent Column Approximation (ICA. PPH calculations use MODIS-derived gridpoint means while ICA calculations use distributions of cloud optical thickness and effective radius. Assisted by a broadband solar radiative transfer algorithm, we find that the absolute value of global SWCRF bias of liquid clouds at the top of the atmosphere is about 6 W m−2 for MODIS overpass times while the SWCRF bias for ice clouds is smaller in absolute terms by about 0.7 W m−2, but with stronger spatial variability. If effective radius variability is neglected and only optical thickness horizontal variations are accounted for, the absolute SWCRF biases increase by about 0.3–0.4 W m−2 on average. Marine clouds of both phases exhibit greater (more negative SWCRF biases than continental clouds. Finally, morning (Terra–afternoon (Aqua differences in SWCRF bias are much more pronounced for ice clouds, up to about 15% (Aqua producing stronger negative bias on global scales, with virtually all contribution to the difference coming from land areas. The substantial magnitude of the global SWCRF bias, which for clouds of both phases is collectively about 4 W m−2 for diurnal averages, should be considered a strong motivation for global climate modelers to accelerate efforts linking cloud schemes capable of subgrid condensate variability with appropriate radiative transfer schemes.

  11. Moderators of age effects on attention bias toward threat and its association with anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namaky, Nauder; Beltzer, Miranda L; Werntz, Alexandra J; Lambert, Ann E; Isaacowitz, Derek M; Teachman, Bethany A

    2017-07-01

    The current study used a research domain criteria (RDoC) approach to assess age differences in multiple indicators of attention bias and its ties to anxiety, examining stimulus domain and cognitive control as moderators of older adults' oft-cited positivity effect (bias towards positive and away from negative stimuli, when compared to younger adults). 38 Younger adults and 38 older adults were administered a battery of cognitive control and trait and state anxiety measures, and completed a dot-probe task to assess attention bias, during which reaction time and fixation duration (using eye-tracking) were recorded for negative and neutral social (a salient threat domain for younger adults) and physical (a salient threat domain for older adults) stimuli. Mixed-effects models demonstrated that older adults were faster to react to dot-probe trials when the probe appeared in the place of negative (vs. neutral) physical stimuli, but displayed no difference in reaction time for social stimuli. Also, older (vs. younger) adults with lower levels of cognitive control were less negatively biased in their visual fixation to social stimuli. A negative reaction time attention bias on the dot-probe task predicted greater trait anxiety among participants with low levels of cognitive control, with a more complex pattern predicting state anxiety. Older adults do attend to social and physical stimuli differently. When stimuli concern a social threat, older adults do not preferentially attend to either neutral or negative stimuli. However, when stimuli concern physical threat, older adults preferentially attend to negative stimuli. Threat biases are associated with anxiety at all ages for those with low cognitive control. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Believing is seeing : The causal role of interpretive bias in anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Salemink, E.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 20 years evidence has accumulated stating that anxiety is associated with a negative interpretive bias. That is, high anxious individuals have the tendency to interpret ambiguous information in a more threatening way than low anxious individuals. Cognitive theories argue that this biased information processing is not an incidental epiphenomenon of anxiety, but that it plays a critical role in the aetiology and maintenance of pathological anxiety. Thus, a causal relationship is p...

  13. Information processing biases concurrently and prospectively predict depressive symptoms in adolescents: Evidence from a self-referent encoding task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Samantha L; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2016-01-01

    Negative information processing biases have been hypothesised to serve as precursors for the development of depression. The current study examined negative self-referent information processing and depressive symptoms in a community sample of adolescents (N = 291, Mage at baseline = 12.34 ± 0.61, 53% female, 47.4% African-American, 49.5% Caucasian and 3.1% Biracial). Participants completed a computerised self-referent encoding task (SRET) and a measure of depressive symptoms at baseline and completed an additional measure of depressive symptoms nine months later. Several negative information processing biases on the SRET were associated with concurrent depressive symptoms and predicted increases in depressive symptoms at follow-up. Findings partially support the hypothesis that negative information processing biases are associated with depressive symptoms in a nonclinical sample of adolescents, and provide preliminary evidence that these biases prospectively predict increases in depressive symptoms.

  14. Impact of chlorophyll bias on the tropical Pacific mean climate in an earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Gyu; Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong

    2017-12-01

    Climate modeling groups nowadays develop earth system models (ESMs) by incorporating biogeochemical processes in their climate models. The ESMs, however, often show substantial bias in simulated marine biogeochemistry which can potentially introduce an undesirable bias in physical ocean fields through biogeophysical interactions. This study examines how and how much the chlorophyll bias in a state-of-the-art ESM affects the mean and seasonal cycle of tropical Pacific sea-surface temperature (SST). The ESM used in the present study shows a sizeable positive bias in the simulated tropical chlorophyll. We found that the correction of the chlorophyll bias can reduce the ESM's intrinsic cold SST mean bias in the equatorial Pacific. The biologically-induced cold SST bias is strongly affected by seasonally-dependent air-sea coupling strength. In addition, the correction of chlorophyll bias can improve the annual cycle of SST by up to 25%. This result suggests a possible modeling approach in understanding the two-way interactions between physical and chlorophyll biases by biogeophysical effects.

  15. Enhanced exchange bias fields for CoO/Co bilayers: influence of antiferromagnetic grains and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Cheng-Hsun-Tony; Chang, Shin-Chen [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Tsay, Jyh-Shen, E-mail: jstsay@phy.ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yao, Yeong-Der [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • An antiferromagnetic grain model on exchange bias phenomena is proposed. • Grain size and grain density are considered. • For smaller grain size, the dependence of t{sub CoO} on T{sub B} showed a less pronounced variation. • An increased grain density is responsible for the enhancement in the exchange bias fields. - Abstract: The emergence and optimization of devices that can be applied to spintronics have attracted considerable interest, and both experimental and theoretical approaches have been used in studies of exchange bias phenomena. A survey of the literature indicates that great efforts have been devoted to improving exchange bias fields, while only limited attempts have been made to control the temperature dependence of exchange bias. In this study, the influence of antiferromagnetic grains on exchange bias phenomena in CoO/Co bilayers on a semiconductor surface was investigated. Based on an antiferromagnetic grain model, a correlation between grain size, grain density, blocking temperature, and the exchange bias field was established. For crystallites with a smaller median diameter, the dependence of the thickness of the CoO layer on blocking temperature showed a less pronounced variation. This is due to the larger thermal agitation of the atomic spin moments in the grain, which causes a weaker exchange coupling between atomic spin moments. The enhanced density of antiferromagnetic/ferromagnetic pinning sites resulting from an increased grain density is responsible for the enhancement in the exchange bias fields. The results reported herein provide insights into our knowledge related to controlling the temperature dependence of exchange bias and related mechanisms.

  16. Intergroup biases and eyewitness testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, T; Christianson, S A

    1998-12-01

    The study examined how the in-group/out-group status of a perpetrator of a distinctly violent crime might influence an eyewitness's evaluation of his behavior and a witness's performance in an identification task. Immigrant and Swedish students saw a film showing a simulated robbery, with an immigrant or a Swede as the perpetrator. Results showed that both groups evaluated an ethnically dissimilar perpetrator as more culpable than an ethnically similar perpetrator. In a line-up task, both immigrant and Swedish participants mistakenly identified an innocent immigrant more often than an innocent Swede. Participants' biased evaluations of the perpetrator are discussed in terms of cognitive and motivational mechanisms. Expectations regarding the typical ethnicity of a perpetrator of this type of crime are suggested to account for the findings of the line-up task.

  17. Attention bias in older women with remitted depression is associated with enhanced amygdala activity and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Kimberly; Gau, Violet; Taylor, Warren D; Newhouse, Paul A

    2017-03-01

    Cognitive bias is a common characteristic of major depressive disorder (MDD) and is posited to remain during remission and contribute to recurrence risk. Attention bias may be related to enhanced amygdala activity or altered amygdala functional connectivity in depression. The current study examined attention bias, brain activity for emotional images, and functional connectivity in post-menopausal women with and without a history of major depression. Attention bias for emotionally valenced images was examined in 33 postmenopausal women with (n=12) and without (n=21) a history of major depression using an emotion dot probe task during fMRI. Group differences in amygdala activity and functional connectivity were assessed using fMRI and examined for correlations to attention performance. Women with a history of MDD showed greater attentional bias for negative images and greater activity in brain areas including the amygdala for both positive and negative images (pcorr amygdala activity for negative images was correlated with attention facilitation for emotional images. Women with a history of MDD had significantly greater functional connectivity between the amygdala and hippocampal complex. In all participants amygdala-hippocampal connectivity was positively correlated with attention facilitation for negative images. Small sample with unbalanced groups. These findings provide evidence for negative attentional bias in euthymic, remitted depressed individuals. Activity and functional connectivity in limbic and attention networks may provide a neurobiological basis for continued cognitive bias in remitted depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved confinement regimes induced by limiter biasing in the TJ-II stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, C; Pedrosa, M A; Dreval, N; McCarthy, K J; Eliseev, L; Ochando, M A; Estrada, T; Pastor, I; AscasIbar, E; Calderon, E; Cappa, A; Chmyga, A A; Fernandez, A; Goncalves, B; Herranz, J; Jimenez, J A; Khrebtov, S M; Komarov, A D; Kozachok, A S; Krupnik, L; Lopez-Fraguas, A; Lopez-Sanchez, A; Melnikov, A V; Medina, F; Milligen, B van; Silva, C; Tabares, F; Tafalla, D

    2004-01-01

    The influence of limiter biasing on plasma confinement, turbulence and plasma flows is investigated in the TJ-II stellarator. Experimental results show that it is possible to modify global confinement and edge plasma parameters with both positive and negative biasing. Significant and minor modifications in the structure of plasma fluctuations have been observed during the transition to improved confinement regimes induced by limiter biasing. These results show evidence of electric field induced improved confinement via multiple mechanisms. The investigation of the relaxation of plasma potential and electric fields shows evidence of two different characteristic decay times

  19. Anxiety, fatigue, and attentional bias toward threat in patients with hematopoietic tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Koizumi

    Full Text Available Cancer patients with hematopoietic tumors exhibit particularly high rates of anxiety disorders and depression, and often develop negative affect. In addition, psychological problems experienced by cancer patients impair their quality of life. When cancer patients feel anxious, they tend to direct their attention toward stimuli associated with threat in the surrounding environment. If attentional bias occurs in patients with hematopoietic tumors, who are at particular risk of developing negative affect, resolution of the bias could be useful in alleviating their anxiety. The current study examined the association between attentional bias and negative affect in patients with hematopoietic tumors and tested the hypothesis that negative affect would be more severe in those who exhibited greater attentional bias. Twenty-seven patients with hematopoietic tumors participated in the study. Reaction time (RT was measured as the time between the presentation of the threatening and neutral images, and the subject's button press to indicate choice (neutral expressions. Eight combinations of "threatening" expressions with high emotional valence and "neutral" expressions with low emotional valence were presented. The images used to measure attentional bias were taken from the Japanese Female Facial Expression Database and had been rated as expressive of anger, sadness, or neutrality, with predetermined emotional valence. Psychological testing was performed with the Profile of Mood States (POMS. To examine the association between attentional bias and negative affect, we calculated Spearman's rank correlation coefficients for RTs and POMS. Subjects' mean RT was 882.9 (SD = 100.9 ms, and 19 of the 27 subjects exhibited slower RTs relative to healthy individuals. RT was significantly positively correlated with Tension-Anxiety (r = .679, p < .01 and Fatigue (r = .585, p < .01 subscale scores. The results of the study suggested that attentional bias toward

  20. Cognitive advantage in bilingualism: an example of publication bias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Angela; Treccani, Barbara; Della Sala, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    It is a widely held belief that bilinguals have an advantage over monolinguals in executive-control tasks, but is this what all studies actually demonstrate? The idea of a bilingual advantage may result from a publication bias favoring studies with positive results over studies with null or negative effects. To test this hypothesis, we looked at conference abstracts from 1999 to 2012 on the topic of bilingualism and executive control. We then determined which of the studies they reported were subsequently published. Studies with results fully supporting the bilingual-advantage theory were most likely to be published, followed by studies with mixed results. Studies challenging the bilingual advantage were published the least. This discrepancy was not due to differences in sample size, tests used, or statistical power. A test for funnel-plot asymmetry provided further evidence for the existence of a publication bias. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Resonant tunneling in small current-biased Josephson Junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, John Mark [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Effects of resonant tunneling between bound quantum states of a current-biased Josephson tunnel junction is studied both theoretically and experimentally. Several effects are predicted to arise from resonant tunneling, including a series of voltage peaks along the supercurrent branch of the current-voltage characteristic, and enhanced rate of escape from zero voltage state to voltage state at particular values of bias current. A model is developed to estimate magnitude and duration of voltage peaks, and to estimate enhancement of the escape rate, which appears as peaks in the rate as a function of bias current. An experimental investigation was carried out in an attempt to observe these predicted peaks in the escape rate distribution in a current-biased DC SQUID, which is shown to be dynamically equivalent to a Josephson junction with adjustable critical current. Electrical contact to each SQUID (fabricated from aluminium) was made through high resistance thin film leads located on the substrate. These resistors provided a high impedance at the plasma frequency which is for the isolation of the SQUID from its electromagnetic environment. Measurements were carried out on a dilution refrigerator at temperatures as low as 19 mK. No evidence was found for resonant tunneling; this is attributed to effective temperatures of hundreds of millikelvin. The behavior is well explained by a heating model where the high effective temperatures are generated by ohmic heating of the electron gas of the isolation resistors, which decouples from the phonon system (hot electron effect). The prospects for further theoretical and experimental research are discussed.

  2. Surface Winds and Dust Biases in Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evan, A. T.

    2018-01-01

    An analysis of North African dust from models participating in the Fifth Climate Models Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) suggested that, when forced by observed sea surface temperatures, these models were unable to reproduce any aspects of the observed year-to-year variability in dust from North Africa. Consequently, there would be little reason to have confidence in the models' projections of changes in dust over the 21st century. However, no subsequent study has elucidated the root causes of the disagreement between CMIP5 and observed dust. Here I develop an idealized model of dust emission and then use this model to show that, over North Africa, such biases in CMIP5 models are due to errors in the surface wind fields and not due to the representation of dust emission processes. These results also suggest that because the surface wind field over North Africa is highly spatially autocorrelated, intermodel differences in the spatial structure of dust emission have little effect on the relative change in year-to-year dust emission over the continent. I use these results to show that similar biases in North African dust from the NASA Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) version 2 surface wind field biases but that these wind biases were not present in the first version of MERRA.

  3. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus plasma generated with high positive or negative applied potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.R.; Gerdin, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kV by applying d.c. voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer midplane electrode rings. The electric fields, which are responsible for raising the ions to high energies by E x B/B 2 drift, then point radially outward or inward. The influence of electric field direction on ion kinetic temperatures and ion heating efficiency was investigated. Under equivalent conditions of magnetic field, deuterium background pressure, and midplane electrode voltage, the ion kinetic temperatures and ion heating efficiencies were virtually the same whether all 12 midplane electrodes were positive or negative. Deuterium ion kinetic temperatures of 340-2500 eV were observed. The ion heating efficiency ranged from 5 to 22%, increases with increasing background pressure or magnetic field, decreases with increasing anode voltage, and is higher in the high pressure than in the low pressure mode of operation. (author)

  4. Professional Culture and Climate: Addressing Unconscious Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    Unconscious bias reflects expectations or stereotypes that influence our judgments of others (regardless of our own group). Everyone has unconscious biases. The end result of unconscious bias can be an accumulation of advantage or disadvantage that impacts the long term career success of individuals, depending on which biases they are subject to. In order to foster a professional culture and climate, being aware of these unconscious biases and mitigating against them is a first step. This is particularly important when judgements are needed, such as in cases for recruitment, choice of speakers for conferences, and even reviewing papers submitted for publication. This presentation will cover how unconscious bias manifests itself, what evidence exists to demonstrate it exists, and ways it can be addressed.

  5. Symmetry as Bias: Rediscovering Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a rational reconstruction of Einstein's discovery of special relativity, validated through an implementation: the Erlanger program. Einstein's discovery of special relativity revolutionized both the content of physics and the research strategy used by theoretical physicists. This research strategy entails a mutual bootstrapping process between a hypothesis space for biases, defined through different postulated symmetries of the universe, and a hypothesis space for physical theories. The invariance principle mutually constrains these two spaces. The invariance principle enables detecting when an evolving physical theory becomes inconsistent with its bias, and also when the biases for theories describing different phenomena are inconsistent. Structural properties of the invariance principle facilitate generating a new bias when an inconsistency is detected. After a new bias is generated. this principle facilitates reformulating the old, inconsistent theory by treating the latter as a limiting approximation. The structural properties of the invariance principle can be suitably generalized to other types of biases to enable primal-dual learning.

  6. A visual analysis of gender bias in contemporary anatomy textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Rhiannon; Larkin, Theresa; Cockburn, Jon

    2017-05-01

    Empirical research has linked gender bias in medical education with negative attitudes and behaviors in healthcare providers. Yet it has been more than 20 years since research has considered the degree to which women and men are equally represented in anatomy textbooks. Furthermore, previous research has not explored beyond quantity of representation to also examine visual gender stereotypes and, in light of theoretical advancements in the area of intersectional research, the relationship between representations of gender and representations of ethnicity, body type, health, and age. This study aimed to determine the existence and representation of gender bias in the major anatomy textbooks used at Australian Medical Schools. A systematic visual content analysis was conducted on 6044 images in which sex/gender could be identified, sourced from 17 major anatomy textbooks published from 2008 to 2013. Further content analysis was performed on the 521 narrative images, which represent an unfolding story, found within the same textbooks. Results indicate that the representation of gender in images from anatomy textbooks remain predominantly male except within sex-specific sections. Further, other forms of bias were found to exist in: the visualization of stereotypical gendered emotions, roles and settings; the lack of ethnic, age, and body type diversity; and in the almost complete adherence to a sex/gender binary. Despite increased attention to gender issues in medicine, the visual representation of gender in medical curricula continues to be biased. The biased construction of gender in anatomy textbooks designed for medical education provides future healthcare providers with inadequate and unrealistic information about patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Political Accountability, Electoral Control, and Media Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Takanori Adachi; Yoichi Hizen

    2012-01-01

    Are anti-establishment mass media really useful in preventing politicians from behaving dishonestly? This paper proposes a voting model for analyzing how differences in the direction of media bias affect politicians' behavior. In particular, the probability of corruption by an incumbent is higher (than that in the case of no media bias) if and only if the mass media have some degree of "anti-incumbent" bias (i.e., information favorable to the incumbent is converted into unfavorable news about...

  8. Production bias and cluster annihilation: Why necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Trinkaus, H.; Woo, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    the primary cluster density is high. Therefore, a sustained high swelling rate driven by production bias must involve the annihilation of primary clusters at sinks. A number of experimental observations which are unexplainable in terms of the conventional dislocation bias for monointerstitials is considered....... It is found that the production bias and cluster annihilation are necessary to explain these observations, with, in many cases, the explicit consideration of the annihilation of the primary interstitial clusters....

  9. Exchange bias properties in Sr2LnRuO6 (Ln  =  Dy, Ho and Er)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Prachi; Marik, Sourav; Singh, Deepak; Singh, Ravi P.

    2017-12-01

    Herein, we report the exchange bias effect in Sr2 LnRuO6 (Ln  =  Dy, Ho and Er) compounds. These ruthenium-based double perovskite compounds exhibited the exchange bias effect below their AFM ordering temperatures when they cooled in the presence of a magnetic field. Detailed magnetization measurements indicate that the exchange bias properties may associate with the Dzyaloshinskii–Moria (D–M) interactions originated due to the low crystallographic symmetry in these system types.

  10. Preference-driven biases in decision makers' information search and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie Chaxel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While it is well established that the search for information after a decision is biased toward supporting that decision, the case of preference-supporting search before the decision remains open. Three studies of consumer choices consistently found a complete absence of a pre-choice bias toward searching for preference-supporting information. The absence of this confirming search bias occurred for products that were both hedonic and utilitarian, both expensive and inexpensive, and both high and low in expected brand loyalty. Experiment 3 also verified the presence of the expected post-choice search bias to support the chosen alternative. Therefore the absence of a pre-choice search bias in all three studies was not likely to be due to our using a method that was so insensitive that a search bias would not be observed under any circumstances. In addition to the absence of an effect of prior preferences on information selection, subjects' self-reported search strategies exhibited a clear tendency toward a balance of positive and negative information. Across the three studies, we also tested for the presence of a preference-supporting bias in the evaluation of the information acquired in the search process. This evaluation bias was found both pre- and post-choice.

  11. Gene × environment interaction on intergroup bias: the role of 5-HTTLPR and perceived outgroup threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Bobby K; Livingston, Robert W; Hong, Ying-Yi; Chiao, Joan Y

    2014-09-01

    Perceived threat from outgroups is a consistent social-environmental antecedent of intergroup bias (i.e. prejudice, ingroup favoritism). The serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) has been associated with individual variations in sensitivity to context, particularly stressful and threatening situations. Here, we examined how 5-HTTLPR and environmental factors signaling potential outgroup threat dynamically interact to shape intergroup bias. Across two studies, we provide novel evidence for a gene-environment interaction on the acquisition of intergroup bias and prejudice. Greater exposure to signals of outgroup threat, such as negative prior contact with outgroups and perceived danger from the social environment, were more predictive of intergroup bias among participants possessing at least one short allele (vs two long alleles) of 5-HTTLPR. Furthermore, this gene x environment interaction was observed for biases directed at diverse ethnic and arbitrarily-defined outgroups across measures reflecting intergroup biases in evaluation and discriminatory behavior. These findings reveal a candidate genetic mechanism for the acquisition of intergroup bias, and suggest that intergroup bias is dually inherited and transmitted through the interplay of social (i.e. contextual cues of outgroup threat) and biological mechanisms (i.e. genetic sensitivity toward threatening contexts) that regulate perceived intergroup threats. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Attentional bias for positive emotional stimuli: A meta-analytic investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Eva; Brosch, Tobias; Delplanque, Sylvain; Sander, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite an initial focus on negative threatening stimuli, researchers have more recently expanded the investigation of attentional biases toward positive rewarding stimuli. The present meta-analysis systematically compared attentional bias for positive compared with neutral visual stimuli across 243 studies (N = 9,120 healthy participants) that used different types of attentional paradigms and positive stimuli. Factors were tested that, as postulated by several attentional models derived from theories of emotion, might modulate this bias. Overall, results showed a significant, albeit modest (Hedges' g = .258), attentional bias for positive as compared with neutral stimuli. Moderator analyses revealed that the magnitude of this attentional bias varied as a function of arousal and that this bias was significantly larger when the emotional stimulus was relevant to specific concerns (e.g., hunger) of the participants compared with other positive stimuli that were less relevant to the participants' concerns. Moreover, the moderator analyses showed that attentional bias for positive stimuli was larger in paradigms that measure early, rather than late, attentional processing, suggesting that attentional bias for positive stimuli occurs rapidly and involuntarily. Implications for theories of emotion and attention are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Do anxious parents interpretive biases towards threat extend into their child's environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J; Field, Andy P; Oliver, Samantha; Cartwright-Hatton, Sam

    2009-02-01

    Anxiety disorders are known to run in families [Turner, S. M., Beidel, D. C., & Costello, A. (1987). Psychopathology in the offspring of anxiety disorder patients. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 55(2), 229-235] and environmental factors may largely account for the concordance between parental and child anxieties. Cognitive psychology models emphasise the importance of interpretive biases towards threat in the maintenance of anxiety and it is well established that anxious adults and children display similar interpretive biases and that these biases in anxious parents and their children are correlated. This raises the question of whether anxious cognitions/cognitive style may be transmitted from parent to child. We propose that this is more likely if anxious parents demonstrate interpretive biases not only about potential threats in their own environment but also about potential threats in their child's environment. Forty parents completed a recognition memory measure of interpretation bias adapted from Eysenck, Mogg, May, Richards, and Mathews (1991) [Bias in interpretation of ambiguous sentences related to threat in anxiety. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100(2), 144-150] to measure biases in response to potentially threat provoking situations involving themselves and their child. The interpretive biases demonstrated by parents were similar across situations involving themselves and their children. As expected, parental interpretive biases were further modified by anxiety with higher levels of parental anxiety associated with more negative interpretive biases about situations in their own and their child's environment, although this association was significantly stronger for potentially threat provoking situations in their own environment. These results are consistent with parent's interpretive biases extending beyond their own environment into their child's environment, although future research should continue to consider the mechanisms by which

  14. Direct extraction of negative lithium ions from a lithium plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, M.; Tsuda, H.; Sasao, M.

    1990-01-01

    Negative lithium ions (Li - ) were directly extracted from a lithium plasma in a multiline cusp plasma container. A pair of permanent magnets mounted near the extractor electrode created the filter magnetic field that separated the extraction region plasma from the main discharge plasma. The plasma electrode facing the extraction region plasma was biased with respect to the other parts of the chamber wall, which acted as discharge anodes. The larger filter magnetic field resulted larger Li - current. When the bias to the plasma electrode was several volts positive against the anode potential, extracted Li - current took the maximum for a fixed strength of the filter field. These dependences of Li - upon the filter magnetic field and the plasma electrode bias are similar to the ones of negative hydrogen ions

  15. Assessment of MTI Water Temperature Retrievals with Ground Truth from the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station Cooling Lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Surface water temperatures calculated from Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) brightness temperatures and the robust retrieval algorithm, developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), are compared with ground truth measurements at the Squaw Creek reservoir at the Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station near Granbury Texas. Temperatures calculated for thirty-four images covering the period May 2000 to March 2002 are compared with water temperatures measured at 10 instrumented buoy locations supplied by the Savannah River Technology Center. The data set was used to examine the effect of image quality on temperature retrieval as well as to document any bias between the sensor chip arrays (SCA's). A portion of the data set was used to evaluate the influence of proximity to shoreline on the water temperature retrievals. This study found errors in daytime water temperature retrievals of 1.8 C for SCA 2 and 4.0 C for SCA 1. The errors in nighttime water temperature retrievals were 3.8 C for SCA 1. Water temperature retrievals for nighttime appear to be related to image quality with the largest positive bias for the highest quality images and the largest negative bias for the lowest quality images. The daytime data show no apparent relationship between water temperature retrieval error and image quality. The average temperature retrieval error near open water buoys was less than corresponding values for the near-shore buoys. After subtraction of the estimated error in the ground truth data, the water temperature retrieval error was 1.2 C for the open-water buoys compared to 1.8 C for the near-shore buoys. The open-water error is comparable to that found at Nauru

  16. Effect of scattering on zero-bias anomaly and conductance reduction in quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K. M.; Umansky, V.; Hsu, S. Y.

    2010-06-01

    We present a systematic study on the zero-bias conductance peak and its dependences on the carrier density and structural geometry in quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires (QWs). This zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) is suppressed by either decreasing the carrier density or increasing the QW length. The differential conductance at zero bias decreases with increasing temperature in accordance with a thermal-activation model up to a well-defined cut-off temperature. We demonstrate that the activation energy, cut-off temperature, and width of the ZBA are correlated, and suggest that these features are controlled by electron scattering in QWs.

  17. Attribution bias and social anxiety in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M. Achim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia have produced mixed results, whereas such biases have been more consistently reported in people with anxiety disorders. Anxiety comorbidities are frequent in schizophrenia, in particular social anxiety disorder, which could influence their patterns of attribution biases. The objective of the present study was thus to determine if individuals with schizophrenia and a comorbid social anxiety disorder (SZ+ show distinct attribution biases as compared with individuals with schizophrenia without social anxiety (SZ− and healthy controls. Attribution biases were assessed with the Internal, Personal, and Situational Attributions Questionnaire in 41 individual with schizophrenia and 41 healthy controls. Results revealed the lack of the normal externalizing bias in SZ+, whereas SZ− did not significantly differ from healthy controls on this dimension. The personalizing bias was not influenced by social anxiety but was in contrast linked with delusions, with a greater personalizing bias in individuals with current delusions. Future studies on attribution biases in schizophrenia should carefully document symptom presentation, including social anxiety.

  18. An Exploration Based Cognitive Bias Test for Mice: Effects of Handling Method and Stereotypic Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Janja; Bailoo, Jeremy D.; Melotti, Luca; Rommen, Jonas; Würbel, Hanno

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural tests to assess affective states are widely used in human research and have recently been extended to animals. These tests assume that affective state influences cognitive processing, and that animals in a negative affective state interpret ambiguous information as expecting a negative outcome (displaying a negative cognitive bias). Most of these tests however, require long discrimination training. The aim of the study was to validate an exploration based cognitive bias test, using two different handling methods, as previous studies have shown that standard tail handling of mice increases physiological and behavioural measures of anxiety compared to cupped handling. Therefore, we hypothesised that tail handled mice would display a negative cognitive bias. We handled 28 female CD-1 mice for 16 weeks using either tail handling or cupped handling. The mice were then trained in an eight arm radial maze, where two adjacent arms predicted a positive outcome (darkness and food), while the two opposite arms predicted a negative outcome (no food, white noise and light). After six days of training, the mice were also given access to the four previously unavailable intermediate ambiguous arms of the radial maze and tested for cognitive bias. We were unable to validate this test, as mice from both handling groups displayed a similar pattern of exploration. Furthermore, we examined whether maze exploration is affected by the expression of stereotypic behaviour in the home cage. Mice with higher levels of stereotypic behaviour spent more time in positive arms and avoided ambiguous arms, displaying a negative cognitive bias. While this test needs further validation, our results indicate that it may allow the assessment of affective state in mice with minimal training—a major confound in current cognitive bias paradigms. PMID:26154309

  19. On the frequency dependent negative dielectric constant behavior in Al/Co-doped (PVC+TCNQ)/p-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücedağ, I.; Kaya, A.; Altındal, Ş.

    2014-06-01

    The dielectric properties, electric modulus and ac electrical conductivity (σac) of Al/Co-doped (PVC+TCNQ)/p-Si structures have been investigated in the wide frequency and voltage range of 0.5 kHz-3 MHz and (-4 V)-(9 V), respectively, using the capacitance-voltage (C-V) and conductance-voltage (G/ω-V) measurements at room temperature. The real and imaginary parts of dielectric constant (ɛ‧, ɛ″), loss tangent (tan δ), σac and the real and imaginary parts of electric modulus (M‧, M″) were found strongly function of frequency and applied voltage especially at low frequencies. The ɛ‧-V plot shows an anomalous peak in the forward bias region due to the series resistance (Rs), surface states (Nss) and interfacial layer (PVC+TCNQ) effects for each frequency and then it goes to negative values known as negative dielectric constant (NDC) at low frequencies (f ≤ 70 kHz). Such observation of NDC is important result because it implies that an increment of bias voltage produces a decrease in the charge on the electrodes. The amount of negativity ɛ‧ value increases with decreasing frequency and this decrement in the NDC corresponds to the increment in the ɛ″.

  20. Pharmacogenomics Bias - Systematic distortion of study results by genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zietemann, Vera

    2008-04-01

    trial. Results: We found four studies that systematically evaluated heterogeneity bias. All of them indicated that there is a potential of heterogeneity bias. However, none of these studies explicitly investigated the effect of genetic heterogeneity. Therefore, we performed our own simulation study. Our generic simulation showed that a purely HT-related bias is negative (conservative and a purely HP-related bias is positive (liberal. For many typical scenarios, the absolute bias is smaller than 10%. In case of joint HP and HT, the overall bias is likely triggered by the HP component and reaches positive values >100% if fractions of „fast progressors" and „strong treatment responders" are low. In the clinical example with pravastatin therapy, the unadjusted model overestimated the true life-years gained (LYG by 5.5% (1.07 LYG vs. 0.99 LYG for 56-year-old men. Conclusions: We have been able to predict the pharmacogenomics bias jointly caused by heterogeneity in progression of disease and heterogeneity in treatment response as a function of characteristics of patients, chronic disease, and treatment. In the case of joint presence of both types of heterogeneity, models ignoring this heterogeneity may generate results that overestimate the treatment benefit.