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Sample records for necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

  1. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis presenting as bilateral pleural effusion: a case report

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    Rajalingham Sakthiswary

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis is an uncommon subacute form of Aspergillus infection. It typically occurs in immunocompromised individuals and in those with underlying lung disease. This interesting case highlights the occurrence of this entity of aspergillosis in an immunocompetent middle-aged woman with atypical radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis presenting with pleural effusion. Case presentation Our patient was a 64-year-old Malay woman with a background history of epilepsy but no other comorbidities. She was a lifelong non-smoker. She presented to our facility with a six-month history of productive cough and three episodes of hemoptysis. An initial chest radiograph showed bilateral pleural effusion with bibasal consolidation. Bronchoscopy revealed a white-coated endobronchial tree and bronchoalveolar lavage culture grew Aspergillus niger. A diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis was made based on the clinical presentation and microbiological results. She responded well to treatment with oral itraconazole. Conclusions The radiological findings in chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis can be very diverse. This case illustrates that this condition can be a rare cause of bilateral pleural effusion.

  2. Progressive increase in cavitation with the evolution of fungus ball: A clue to the diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad R.; Garg Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) is an uncommon pulmonary infection seen in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, pneumoconiosis, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, poor nutrition or low dose corticosteroid therapy. Here, we are presenting a case of CNPA with diabetes mellitus that was misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis.

  3. Progressive increase in cavitation with the evolution of fungus ball: A clue to the diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis

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    Prasad R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA is an uncommon pulmonary infection seen in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, pneumoconiosis, diabetes mellitus, alcoholism, poor nutrition or low dose corticosteroid therapy. Here, we are presenting a case of CNPA with diabetes mellitus that was misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis.

  4. Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis in pneumoconiosis - Clinical and radiologic findings in 10 patients

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    Kato, T.; Usami, I.; Morita, H.; Goto, M.; Hosoda, M.; Nakamura, A.; Shima, S. [Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan). School of Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine

    2002-01-01

    The authors studied 10 male patients with pneumoconiosis who were seen at Asahi Rosai Hospital and received a clinical diagnosis of chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA) during a 15-year period, and detailed the long-term clinical and radiologic courses of four cases. Their occupational histories included pottery making and coal mining. Chest radiographic findings by the International Labor Organization profusion grading system were greater than category 2. All patients were symptomatic, with a productive cough, haemoptysis, and dyspnea. Serum findings were positive for the aspergillosis antibody in seven patients. The radiologic findings consisted of parenchymal infiltrates and cavities mostly containing mycetoma, which generally involved the upper lobes. The disease progressed slowly; in one patient, broad destruction of the lung was observed after > 10 years without antifungal administration. Most of the patients experienced clinical and radiologic improvement after receiving antifungal therapy, by oral, inhaled, or intracavitary administration. It was concluded that chronic persistent or progressive upper-lobe infiltrates and cavities in patients with pneumoconiosis should raise the possibility of CNPA. Early diagnosis and initiation of effective therapy are recommended to achieve a better outcome.

  5. CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

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    Cheon, Jung Eun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    The fungus aspergillus can cause a variety of pulmonary disorders. Aspergilloma is a noninvasive aspergillus colonization of virtually any type of preexisting pulmonary cavity or cystic space. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is serious, usually fatal infection in patients being treated with immunosuppressants or who have chronic debilitating disease. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is characterized clinically by asthma, blood and sputum eosinophilia and positive immunologic reaction to aspergillus antigen. Awareness of the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis is important in making the diagnosis of aspergillus-caused pulmonary disorders. In this pictorial essay, we illustrated various radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis focused on CT findings correlated with gross pathologic specimens.

  6. Aspergilosis pulmonar necrotizante crónica como complicación de silicosis Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis as a complication of silicosis

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    J.J. Blanco

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available La aspergilosis pulmonar necrotizante crónica es una rara enfermedad que tiende a afectar a personas con enfermedad pulmonar subyacente o inmunocomprometidos en grado leve. Es una complicación excepcional de la silicosis y su diagnóstico precisa un alto índice de sospecha pues simula otras enfermedades como tuberculosis y neoplasia, complicaciones más frecuentes en estos pacientes. Presentamos tres casos con larga historia de exposición a sílice y diagnóstico de fibrosis masiva progresiva que presentaron aspergilosis pulmonar. Revisamos sus características clínicas, radiológicas y tratamiento.Chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis is un uncommon disease which is found in people with underlying lung disease or in mildly immunocompromised patients. It is an exceptional complication in silicosis and its diagnosis is difficult because it simulates other diseases like tuberculosis and cancer which are more common in such patients. We report on three cases with a long history of silica dust exposure with pulmonary aspergillosis complicating progressive massive fibrosis (PMF. We review their clinical, radiological and treatment features.

  7. Aspergilosis necrotizante crónica en un paciente con secuelas de tuberculosis pulmonar Chronic necrotizing aspergillosis in a patient with pulmonary tuberculosis sequelae

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    Alcides Zambrano F

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus puede causar diferentes patologías en el ser humano: aspergiloma, aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica, aspergilosis necrotizante crónica, aspergilosis invasora. En la aspergilosis necrotizante crónica hay invasión local del parénquima y destrucción. A diferencia de la aspergilosis invasora no invade vasos sanguíneos ni se disemina a otros órganos. La aspergilosis necrotizante crónica se presenta en pacientes de edad media o ancianos con patología pulmonar previa: EPOC, secuelas de tuberculosis, resección pulmonar, neumoconiosis, radioterapia, infarto pulmonar o sarcoidosis. La clínica es indolente e inespecífica, con fiebre, tos, expectoración y baja de peso. Se desconoce la incidencia de aspergilosis necrotizante crónica en nuestro medio. La aspergilosis necrotizante crónica es potencialmente fatal, por lo que requiere de un diagnóstico y tratamiento oportuno. Creemos que, debe considerarse esta entidad ante un cuadro consuntivo y febril prolongado, en pacientes con enfermedades predisponentes que producen una leve baja de la inmunidad. Describimos el caso de un paciente atendido en el Instituto Nacional del TóraxAspergillus fumigatus is the causative agent of differents pathologies in the human being: aspergilloma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive aspergillosis. In chronic necrotizing aspergillosis there is local invasion of the lung tissue and parenchyma destruction. Chronic necrotizing aspergillosis is different from invasive aspergillosis, because the abscence of vascular invasion or dissemination. Chronic necrotizing aspergillosis is seen in middle-aged and elderly with underlying lung diseases: COPD, tuberculosis sequelae, lung resection, pneumoconiosis, radiotherapy, lung infarction or sarcoidosis. Clinical manifestations are non specific, being the most usual fever, cough, sputum production and weight loss. Incidence of chronic necrotizing

  8. Radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

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    Song, Kounn Sik; Im, Chung Kie [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-02-15

    The pulmonary aspergillosis is a group of three separate disease, comprising invasive aspergillosis, aspergilloma, and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, or a disease process in which one of three entities overlap with another process such as mucoid impaction, pulmonary infiltration with eosinophilia, bronchocentric granulomatosis, microgranulomatous hypersensitivity, or asthma. The radiological findings of 24 cases of pulmonary aspergillosis diagnosed and treated at Seoul National University Hospital during the past 7 years were analyzed retrospectively. The results were as follows: 1. Final diagnosis of 24 cases of pulmonary aspergillosis was aspergilloma in 16 cases, invasive aspergillosis in 2 cases, variant form of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in 3 cases, and endobronchial aspergillosis in 3 cases. 2. The underlying causes of the aspergilloma were healed tuberculous cavity in 6 cases, bronchiectasis in 8 cases, and no underlying cause were found in 2 cases. All the 16 cases of aspergilloma were correctly diagnosed without difficultly by demonstrating the intracavitary mass or air meniscus. 3. Radiological findings of the invasive aspergillosis in kidney transplant patients were multiple round nodules with early cavitation and formation of aspergilloma which shows slowly progressive cavitation over 13 months in one case, and diffusely scattered miliary nodules with occasional cavitation in the other case. 4. Classic allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis were not found in our series but variant form of ABPA was found in 3 young female patients. All the three patients shows some degree of central bronchiectasis and combined aspergilloma was found in 2 cases. 5. Three patients diagnosed as endobronchial aspergillosis-saprophytic infection of aspergillus in the bronchial tree-by bronchoscopic biopsy shows nonspecific radiological findings.

  9. Pulmonary aspergillosis: Atypical presentation in immunocompetent individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishna Pai Jakribettu; Rekha Boloor; Shreevidya Kinila; Thomas S Kuruvilla

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillosis, an opportunistic infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. But, Aspergillus is also known to cause Pulmonary aspergillosis in immunocompetent host too. Only few cases have been reported in literature of Aspergillosis in Immunocompetent individuals so far. Here, we report 4 different cases of Pulmonary Aspergillosis , who have presented with acute symptoms.The possibility of pulmonary mycosis needs to be considered in patients with acu...

  10. Pseudomembranous necrotizing tracheobronchial aspergillosis:an analysis of 16 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Hai-dong; LI Qiang; HUANG Yi; BAI Chong; WU Ning; WANG Qing; YAO Xiao-peng; CHEN Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background In our clinical practice we have been attracted by a group of patients with airway aspergillosis who have airway obstruction; we termed the condition as pseudomembranous necrotizing tracheobronchial aspergillosis (PNTA).In this study we analyzed the clinical data from patients with PNTA,so as to guide the diagnosis and treatment of the disease.@@Methods A total of 16 PNTA patients were treated in Changhai Hospital from January 2000 to January 2009.Their clinical data,including the demographic information,clinical symptoms,imaging findings,bronchoscopy findings,treatment strategies and efficacy,and prognosis,were retrospectively analyzed.@@Results All 16 patients were found to have primary systemic immunodeficiency diseases and/or damage of the focal airways.Nine patients (9/16,56.3%) had pulmonary and tracheobronchial tumors,5/16 (31.3%) had tracheobronchial involvement secondary to non-pulmonary tumors,and 2/16 (12.5%) had lung transplantation.The most common causes of PNTA included local radiotherapy (10/16,62.5%),repeated chemotherapy (7/16,43.8%) and recurrent intervention therapy by bronchoscope (4/16,25.0%).Aspergillus fumigatus was the most frequent pathogen (62.5%,10/16).The main clinical manifestations included progressive dyspnea (14/16,87.5%) and irritable cough (12/16,75.0%).The trachea was involved in 9/16 patients (56.3%),right main bronchus in 10/16 (62.5%).All 16 patients were treated with systemic anti-aspergillosis agents,local anti-aspergillosis agents with amphotedcin B inhalation and direct perfusion of amphotericin B by bronchoscope,and interventional treatment by bronchoscope to ensure an unobstructed airway.The total efficiency was 31.3%.@@Conclusions PNTA is an infectious disease caused by aspergillus and it mainly involves the trachea,primary bronchus and segmental bronchus.A.fumigatus is the most common pathogen.PNTA can pose a severe clinical threat and often occurs after systemic immunodeficiency and

  11. Pulmonary aspergillosis: Atypical presentation in immunocompetent individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Pai Jakribettu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis, an opportunistic infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. But, Aspergillus is also known to cause Pulmonary aspergillosis in immunocompetent host too. Only few cases have been reported in literature of Aspergillosis in Immunocompetent individuals so far. Here, we report 4 different cases of Pulmonary Aspergillosis , who have presented with acute symptoms.The possibility of pulmonary mycosis needs to be considered in patients with acute pulmonary symptoms like breathlessness , hemoptysis, etc with signs of infection even in immunocompetent individuals, without underlying pulmonary disease.

  12. Pulmonary aspergillosis: a clinical review

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    M. Kousha

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a mould which may lead to a variety of infectious, allergic diseases depending on the host's immune status or pulmonary structure. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis occurs primarily in patients with severe immunodeficiency. The significance of this infection has dramatically increased with growing numbers of patients with impaired immune state associated with the management of malignancy, organ transplantation, autoimmune and inflammatory conditions; critically ill patients and those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appear to be at an increased risk. The introduction of new noninvasive tests, combined with more effective and better-tolerated antifungal agents, has resulted in lower mortality rates associated with this infection. Chronic necrotising aspergillosis is a locally invasive disease described in patients with chronic lung disease or mild immunodeficiency. Aspergilloma is usually found in patients with previously formed cavities in the lung, whereas allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, a hypersensitivity reaction to Aspergillus antigens, is generally seen in patients with atopy, asthma or cystic fibrosis. This review provides an update on the evolving epidemiology and risk factors of the major manifestations of Aspergillus lung disease and the clinical manifestations that should prompt the clinician to consider these conditions. Current approaches for the diagnosis and management of these syndromes are discussed.

  13. Allergic Broncho Pulmonary Aspergillosis Complicated by Nocardiosis

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    Brijesh Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 70-year-old male with a history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and asthma who presented with increasing breathlessness for 5 months. He was diagnosed to have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA by serological and radiographic criteria. He was treated with steroids and itraconazole. After initial improvement, he developed fever with cough and mucopurulent sputum. X-ray chest revealed multiple cavities with air fluid level. Patient was treated with antibiotics without any response. Sputum was negative for acid fast bacilli (AFB. Sputum culture for bacteria and fungus did not reveal any significant growth; however a delayed growth of Nocardia was noted on fungal plates. Modified Ziehl Nelsen stain was positive for AFB. Patient was treated with cotrimoxazole. We discuss the serological and radiological criteria of ABPA, presentation and treatment of nocardia pulmonary infection and other possible causes of necrotizing pneumonia in immunocompromised settings.

  14. Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis Complicating Bronchial Atresia

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    Mazen O. Al-Qadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchial atresia is a rare pulmonary developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of a focal obliteration of a segmental or lobar bronchial lumen. The lung distal to the atretic bronchus is typically emphysematous along with the presence of mucus filled ectatic bronchi (mucoceles. BA is usually asymptomatic but pulmonary infections can rarely develop in the emphysematous lung distal to the atretic bronchus. We present a unique case of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA in a patient with BA with no evidence of immune dysfunction. The patient was treated initially with voriconazole and subsequently underwent surgical excision of the involved area. On follow-up, she has done extremely well with no evidence for recurrence. In summary, we describe the first case of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient with bronchial atresia.

  15. Manifestation of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in the formation of mycetoma

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    Roos, N.; Peters, P.E.; Schellong, S.; Eiff, M. von

    1989-05-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is characterized by radiological signs allowing a correct diagnosis, including differentiation from pulmonary candidiasis, when they are associated with appropriate clinical symptoms (neutropenia and fever persisting despite broad-spectrum antibiotics). In particular the formation of a pulmonary mycetoma in a previously normal lung is one of these signs. Unlike a simple fungus ball (the saprophytic form of aspergillosis), the rounded density of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis consists of sequestrum of devitalized lung tissue owing to blood vessel invasion by Aspergillus hyphae. This morphologic phenomenon is demonstrated in the present case report and is discussed together with the other roentgenological signs of the invasive aspergillosis.

  16. Invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch with infectious Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae

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    Isao Watanabe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A patient with pulmonary bullae died of massive hemoptysis. At autopsy a hole was observed in the aortic wall. A microscopic examination indicated small Aspergillus lesions in pulmonary bullae and extensive necrotic lesions with Aspergillus hyphae in the media of the thoracic aorta. These findings led to a diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis in the aortic arch. This is a rare case in which Aspergillus invaded the aorta in a patient without hematologic neoplasms or neutropenia.

  17. Posaconazole prophylaxis in experimental azole-resistant invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi, S.; Mouton, J.W.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of posaconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Using a neutropenic murine model of pulmonary infection, posaconazole prophylaxis was evaluated using three isogenic clinical isolates, with posaconazo

  18. Accuracy of percutaneous lung biopsy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

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    Hoffer, F.A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Gow, K.; Davidoff, A. [Dept. of Surgery, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Flynn, P.M. [Dept. of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Background. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is fulminant and often fatal in immunosuppressed patients. Percutaneous biopsy may select patients who could benefit from surgical resection. Objective. We sought to determine the accuracy of percutaneous biopsy for pediatric invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Materials and methods. We retrospectively reviewed 28 imaging-guided percutaneous biopsies of the lungs of 24 children with suspected pulmonary aspergillosis. Twenty-two were being treated for malignancy and two for congenital immunodeficiency; 15 had received bone-marrow transplants. The accuracy of the percutaneous lung biopsy was determined by subsequent surgical resection, autopsy, or clinical course. Results. Histopathological studies showed ten biopsy specimens with septate hyphae, indicating a mold, and seven with Aspergillus flavus colonies in culture. The remaining 18 biopsies revealed no fungi. No patient had progressive aspergillosis after negative biopsy. Invasive pulmonary mold was detected by percutaneous biopsy with 100 % (10/10) sensitivity and 100 % (18/18) specificity. Percutaneous biopsy results influenced the surgical decision in 86 % (24 of 28) of the cases. Bleeding complicated the biopsy in 46 % (13/28) and hastened one death. Conclusion. Percutaneous biopsy of the lung is an accurate technique for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and correctly determines which immunosuppressed pediatric patients would benefit from therapeutic pulmonary resection. (orig.)

  19. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: A study of 39 cases at autopsy

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    Vaideeswar P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspergillus is a common cause of invasive mycosis, especially in immunocompromised or immunosuppressed individuals. Aims: To study the incidence of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and evaluate the predisposing factors and clinico-pathological manifestations. Settings and Design: Retrospective analysis of autopsy material from a tertiary care hospital. Material and Methods: All autopsies performed over a 12-year period were reviewed and cases with invasive aspergillosis were analysed with respect to their clinical presentation, predisposing factors, gross and histological features, complications and causes of death. Results: Among a total of 20475 autopsies performed in 12 years, 39 patients (0.19 % had invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. There were 28 males and 11 females. Their ages ranged from five months to 67 years. Dyspnoea, fever, cough with mucopurulent expectoration, chest pain and haemoptysis were commonly encountered symptoms. Forty-one per cent of the patients had no respiratory symptoms. Fungal aetiology was not entertained clinically in any of the patients. The major underlying conditions were prolonged antibiotic therapy, steroid therapy, and renal transplantation, often associated with underlying lung diseases. Pneumonia, abscesses, vascular thrombosis and infarction were common findings at autopsy. Antecedent tuberculosis, mucormycosis, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and Cytomegalovirus infection were also present. In most cases, death was related to extensive pulmonary involvement or fungal dissemination. Conclusion: A diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis should always be borne in mind whenever one is dealing with recalcitrant lung infections even with subtle immunosuppression. Radiological investigations and serologic markers can be utilised for confirmation and prompt therapy.

  20. Beware of the devastating pulmonary aspergillosis syndromes In certain environments

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kooblall, M

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays with more stem cell transplants and immunosuppressive therapies there has been a rise in pulmonary aspergillosis syndromes. The following illustrates such a case. A 49 year old man had a past history of ankylosing spondylitis with a bilateral hip replacement. He was also on surveillance for a superficial bladder tumour since 2007. His chest x-ray in 2008 was normal. In 2010 his CXR showed patchy opacification in the right apex. CT thorax confirm fibrotic changes.

  1. Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck ... Body Aspergillosis is an infection that frequently affects the lungs. It is caused by the fungus Aspergillus. Species of Aspergillus are found on decaying vegetation and ...

  2. Posaconazole Prophylaxis in Experimental Azole-Resistant Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Mouton, Johan W.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of posaconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Using a neutropenic murine model of pulmonary infection, posaconazole prophylaxis was evaluated using three isogenic clinical isolates, with posaconazole MICs of 0.063 mg/liter (wild type), 0.5 mg/liter (F219I mutation), and 16 mg/liter. A fourth isolate harboring TR34/L98H (MIC of 0.5 mg/liter) was also tested. Posaconazole prophylaxis was effec...

  3. Global burden of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis with asthma and its complication chronic pulmonary aspergillosis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, David W; Pleuvry, Alex; Cole, Donald C

    2013-05-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) complicates asthma and may lead to chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) yet global burdens of each have never been estimated. Antifungal therapy has a place in the management of ABPA and is the cornerstone of treatment in CPA, reducing morbidity and probably mortality. We used the country-specific prevalence of asthma from the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) report applied to population estimates to calculate adult asthma cases. From five referral cohorts (China, Ireland, New Zealand, Saudi Arabia and South Africa), we estimated the prevalence of ABPA in adults with asthma at 2.5% (range 0.72-3.5%) (scoping review). From ABPA case series, pulmonary cavitation occurred in 10% (range 7-20%), allowing an estimate of CPA prevalence worldwide using a deterministic scenario-based model. Of 193 million adults with active asthma worldwide, we estimate that 4,837,000 patients (range 1,354,000-6,772,000) develop ABPA. By WHO region, the ABPA burden estimates are: Europe, 1,062,000; Americas, 1,461,000; Eastern Mediterranean, 351,000; Africa, 389,900; Western Pacific, 823,200; South East Asia, 720,400. We calculate a global case burden of CPA complicating ABPA of 411,100 (range 206,300-589,400) at a 10% rate with a 15% annual attrition. The global burden of ABPA potentially exceeds 4.8 million people and of CPA complicating ABPA ˜ 400,000, which is more common than previously appreciated. Both conditions respond to antifungal therapy justifying improved case detection. Prospective population and clinical cohort studies are warranted to more precisely ascertain the frequency of ABPA and CPA in different locations and ethnic groups and validate the model inputs.

  4. Mycological and serological study of pulmonary aspergillosis in central India

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    Kurhade A

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the prevalence and predisposing factors of Aspergillus infection and correlate microscopic, culture and serological findings along with drug sensitivity. METHODS: Sputum samples from 123 patients of pulmonary disease with clinical suspicion of having fungal, especially Aspergillus infections, were examined microscopically and for culture. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of itraconazole was tested against the isolates. Serum samples from these patients were tested for precipitin against Aspergillus antigen using immunodiffusion (ID technique. RESULTS: Aspergillus species were isolated in 20 (16.26% cases and Aspergillus fumigatus was the predominant species isolated in 16 (80% cases. Precipitins were detected in 29 (23.58% cases. Serum samples collected from 50 healthy individuals to serve as controls showed no precipitin against Aspergillus antigen galactomannan. This fungus was found to be sensitive to itraconazole with MIC range 0.125-1µg/mL. CONCLUSIONS: Serological tests have an edge over routine smear and culture methods for the diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis. Itraconazole is more effective than amphotericin B and fluconazole in the treatment of aspergillosis.

  5. Posaconazole prophylaxis in experimental azole-resistant invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Mouton, Johan W; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy of posaconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Using a neutropenic murine model of pulmonary infection, posaconazole prophylaxis was evaluated using three isogenic clinical isolates, with posaconazole MICs of 0.063 mg/liter (wild type), 0.5 mg/liter (F219I mutation), and 16 mg/liter. A fourth isolate harboring TR34/L98H (MIC of 0.5 mg/liter) was also tested. Posaconazole prophylaxis was effective in A. fumigatus with posaconazole MICs of ≤0.5 mg/liter, where 100% survival was reached. However, breakthrough infection was observed in mice infected with the isolate for which the posaconazole MIC was >16 mg/liter.

  6. Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overview Aspiration pneumonia Asthma Blindness and vision loss Cancer Chemotherapy HIV/AIDS Immunodeficiency disorders Invasive Pneumonia - adults (community acquired) Pulmonary aspergilloma Pulmonary tuberculosis Review Date 5/1/2015 ...

  7. Efficacy of PTX3 and Posaconazole Combination in a Rat Model of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marra, Emanuele; Sousa, Vitor L.; Gaziano,Roberta; Pacello, M. Lucrezia; Arseni, Brunilde; Aurisicchio, Luigi; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Posaconazole is currently used for the prophylaxis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Limitations to posaconazole usage are drug-drug interactions and side effects. PTX3 is an innate immunity glycoprotein with opsonic activity, proven to be protective in IPA animal models. This study investigated the combination of posaconazole with PTX3. The results indicate synergy between PTX3 and posaconazole against aspergillosis, suggesting that a combination of reduced doses of posaconazole wit...

  8. Posaconazole-Loaded Leukocytes as a Novel Treatment Strategy Targeting Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baistrocchi, Shane R; Lee, Mark J; Lehoux, Melanie; Ralph, Benjamin; Snarr, Brendan D; Robitaille, Robert; Sheppard, Donald C

    2017-06-01

    Impaired delivery of antifungals to hyphae within necrotic lesions is thought to contribute to therapeutic failure in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). We hypothesized that transfusion of leukocytes loaded ex vivo with the lipophilic antifungal posaconazole could improve delivery of antifungals to the sites of established infection and improve outcome in experimental IPA. The HL-60 leukemia cell line was differentiated to a neutrophil-like phenotype (differentiated HL-60 [dHL-60] cells) and then exposed to a range of posaconazole concentrations. The functional capacity and antifungal activity of these cells were assessed in vitro and in a mouse model of IPA. Posaconazole levels in dHL-60 cells were 265-fold greater than the exposure concentration. Posaconazole-loaded cells were viable and maintained their capacity to undergo active chemotaxis. Contact-dependent transfer of posaconazole from dHL-60 cells to hyphae was observed in vitro, resulting in decreased fungal viability. In a neutropenic mouse model of IPA, treatment with posaconazole-loaded dHL-60 cells resulted in significantly reduced fungal burden in comparison to treatment with dHL-60 cells alone. Posaconazole accumulates at high concentrations in dHL-60 cells and increases their antifungal activity in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that posaconazole-loading of leukocytes may hold promise for the therapy of IPA.

  9. Intrapulmonary posaconazole penetration at the infection site in an immunosuppressed murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis receiving oral prophylactic regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi Tasieh, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Mouton, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Adequate penetration to the infection/colonization site is crucial to attain optimal efficacy of posaconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus diseases. We evaluated posaconazole exposure in pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The posaconazole

  10. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis accompanied by soft tissue lesions during treatment of a patient with hyperthyroidism: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Wei-Min; Yan, Xue-Bo; Wang, Cong-Hui; Liu, Rong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is difficult to diagnose because it requires histopathology and tissue culture, as well as due to its rapid progression. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is the primary cause of pulmonary mycosis in China, which can occur in patients with neutrophil deficiency, leukaemia or lymphoma, malignant tumours, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with long-term corticosteroid use or bacterial exacerbations. Such fungal infections can lead to disseminated dis...

  11. Rapid diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction using bronchial lavage fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Masahito; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Goyama, Susumu; Takeshita, Masataka; Nannya, Yasuhito; Niino, Miyuki; Komeno, Yukiko; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Kurokawa, Mineo; Tsujino, Shiho; Ogawa, Seishi; Aoki, Katsunori; Chiba, Shigeru; Motokura, Toru; Ohishi, Nobuya; Hirai, Hisamaru

    2003-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a sensitive method for detection of Aspergillus DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but it has not yet been able to distinguish infection from contamination. We have established a technique to quantify Aspergillus DNA using a real-time PCR method to resolve this problem, and we report herein a successful application of real-time PCR to diagnose invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by comparing the amount of Aspergillus DNA in bronchial lavage fluid from an affected area to that from an unaffected area. This novel tool will provide rapid, sensitive, and specific diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis.

  12. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis 10 years post bone marrow transplantation: a case report

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    Rashid Rifat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in bone marrow transplant recipients. Establishing the diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians working in acute care setting. However, prompt diagnosis and treatment can lead to favourable outcomes Case presentation We report a case of invasive aspergillosis occurring in a 39-year-old Caucasian female 10 years after an allogeneic haematopoietic bone marrow transplant, and 5 years after stopping all immunosuppression. Possible risk factors include bronchiolitis obliterans and exposure to building dust (for example, handling her husband's dusty overalls. There are no similar case reports in the literature at this time. Conclusion High clinical suspicion, especially in the setting of failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics, should alert clinicians to the possibility of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, which, in this case, responded to antifungal therapy.

  13. Radiological and clinical findings of pulmonary aspergillosis following solid organ transplant

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    Park, Y.S. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Seo, J.B. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: seojb@amc.seoul.kr; Lee, Y.K. [Department of Radiology, Bundang CHA Hospital, University of Pocheon Jungmoon College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Do, K.H.; Lee, J.S.; Song, J.-W.; Song, K.S. [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Aim: To evaluate the radiological and clinical findings in patients with pulmonary aspergillosis after solid organ transplantation. Materials and methods: This study included 13 consecutive patients (five liver, four kidney, and four heart transplant; 10 male and three female; median age 54 years; range 13-63 years) with histologically confirmed pulmonary aspergillosis after solid organ transplantation at a tertiary referral hospital. Chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) examinations performed for diagnosis were available in all patients. Radiological findings, such as lesion characteristics, location, and associated findings, were assessed retrospectively by two radiologists. The changes in radiological findings and clinical response after treatment were also assessed. Clinical findings, such as time of onset, initial symptoms, clinical course, and laboratory findings, were reviewed. Results: The most common radiographic and CT findings were pulmonary nodules or masses (n = 12). The number of nodules or masses was less than 10 in eight patients. Associated findings were surrounding ground-glass opacity (n = 4), central low density (n = 8), central air cavity (n = 5), and air bronchogram (n = 3). Follow-up radiographs and/or CT after treatment showed improvement in eight patients, persistence in two, and deterioration in three. The onset time of pulmonary aspergillosis was a median of 32 days (range 15-165 days). The most common symptom at diagnosis was fever (n = 6). Ten of 13 patients did not have leucopaenia. There were two aspergillosis-associated deaths during the follow-up period. Conclusion: The most common radiological finding of pulmonary aspergillosis after solid organ transplantation is multiple nodules or masses, which commonly appear within 1 month following transplantation.

  14. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: role of early diagnosis and surgical treatment in patients with acute leukemia

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    Ursavas Ahmet

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus is a ubiquitous soil-dwelling fungus known to cause significant pulmonary infection in immunocompromised patients. The incidence of aspergillosis has increased during the past two decades and is a frequently lethal complication of acute leukemia patients that occurs following both chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. The diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA according to the criteria that are established by European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group raise difficulties in severely ill patients. Despite established improvements in field of diagnosis (galactomannan antigen, quantitative PCR, real-time PCR for Aspergillus spp., and findings of computed tomography and treatment with new antifungals, it is still a major problem in patients with acute leukemia. However, prompt and effective treatment of IPA is crucial because most patients will need subsequent chemotherapy for underlying hematologic disease as soon as possible. Case presentation We report a 33-year-old male patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia diagnosed in 1993 that developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis due to A. flavus at relapse in 2003. The patient was successfully treated with liposomal amphotericin B and underwent surgical pulmonary resection. The operative course was uneventful. Conclusion This report emphasizes the clinical picture, applicability of recent advances in diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for IPA. For early identification of a patient infected with IPA, a high index of suspicion and careful clinical and radiological examinations with serial screening for galactomannan should be established. If aspergillosis is suspected, anti-aspergillosis drug should be administered immediately, and if a unique pulmonary lesion remains, surgical resection should be considered to prevent reactivation during consecutive chemotherapy courses and to improve the outcome.

  15. Efficacy of PTX3 and posaconazole combination in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Emanuele; Sousa, Vitor L; Gaziano, Roberta; Pacello, M Lucrezia; Arseni, Brunilde; Aurisicchio, Luigi; De Santis, Rita; Salvatori, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Posaconazole is currently used for the prophylaxis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Limitations to posaconazole usage are drug-drug interactions and side effects. PTX3 is an innate immunity glycoprotein with opsonic activity, proven to be protective in IPA animal models. This study investigated the combination of posaconazole with PTX3. The results indicate synergy between PTX3 and posaconazole against aspergillosis, suggesting that a combination of reduced doses of posaconazole with the immune response enhancer PTX3 might represent a treatment option with a higher therapeutic index than posaconazole.

  16. Quantitative galactomannan detection is superior to PCR in diagnosing and monitoring invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in an experimental rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Becker (Martin); S. de Marie (Siem); D. Willemse; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractTwo diagnostic tests, an Aspergillus-specific PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantitative determination of galactomannan, were compared for diagnosing and monitoring invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Persistently neutropenic rat

  17. Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Previously Healthy 13-Year-Old Boy

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    Jonathan H. Rayment

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a rare, polygenic primary immunodeficiency. In this case report, we describe a previously healthy 13-year-old boy who presented with multifocal pulmonary aspergillosis and was subsequently diagnosed with an autosomal recessive form of chronic granulomatous disease. CGD has a variable natural history and age of presentation and should be considered when investigating a patient with recurrent or severe infections with catalase-positive organisms.

  18. The Diagnosis of Invasive and Noninvasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis by Serum and Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Galactomannan Assay

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    Shuzhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and mortality of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA are rising, particularly in critically ill patients and patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Noninvasive aspergillosis occurring in these patients requires special attention because of the possibility of developing subsequent IPA, given the poor health and worsened immune state of these patients. We compared the performance of the Platelia galactomannan (GM enzyme immunoassay in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum. The sensitivity, and specificity of BALF-GM were 85.4% and 62.4%, and those of serum-GM were 67.9% and 93.5% at the cutoff index of 0.5. As the cutoff index increased, the specificity of BALF-GM detection was increased with the detriment of sensitivity. The area under the ROC curves was 0.817 (95% CI: 0.718–0.916 for BALF-GM and 0.819 (95% CI: 0.712–0.926 for serum-GM. The optimal cutoff index was 1.19 for BALF-GM, and the sensitivity and specificity were 67.9% and 89.2%. The BALF-GM assay is more sensitive in detecting pulmonary aspergillosis than serum-GM assay and fungal cultures. However, BALF-GM assay has a high false-positive rate at the cutoff index of 0.5. Hence, the diagnostic cutoff index of the BALF-GM assay should be improved to avoid the overdiagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis in clinic.

  19. Pulmonary toxocariasis mimicking invasive aspergillosis in a patient with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Jin; Song, Joon Young; Choi, Min Ju; Jeon, Ji Ho; Choi, Jah-Yeon; Yang, Tae Un; Hong, Kyung Wook; Noh, Ji Yun; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2014-08-01

    A 45-year-old-male who had underlying ulcerative colitis and presented with fever and dry cough. Initially, the patient was considered to have invasive aspergillosis due to a positive galactomannan assay. He was treated with amphotericin B followed by voriconazole. Nevertheless, the patient deteriorated clinically and radiographically. The lung biopsy revealed eosinophilic pneumonia, and ELISA for Toxocara antigen was positive, leading to a diagnosis of pulmonary toxocariasis. After a 10-day treatment course with albendazole and adjunctive steroids, the patient recovered completely without any sequelae. Pulmonary toxocariasis may be considered in patients with subacute or chronic pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic agents, particularly in cases with eosinophilia.

  20. Comparison of computed tomographic findings in pulmonary mucormycosis and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, J; Kim, M Y; Lee, H J; Park, Y S; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Kim, Y S; Woo, J H; Kim, S-H

    2015-07-01

    Because there are no available molecular markers for pulmonary mucormycosis (PM), which has low culture sensitivity, early diagnosis and treatment rely heavily on imaging modes such as computed tomography (CT). However, there are limited data comparing CT findings for PM with those for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Adult patients who met the modified criteria for proven and probable PM (over an 11-year period) and IPA (over a 6-year period, owing to the availability of the galactomannan assay) according to the modified European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group definitions were retrospectively enrolled. IPA cases were selected at a 1 : 4 (PM/IPA) ratio. Thoracic CT scans were reviewed by two experienced radiologists blinded to the patients' demographics and clinical outcomes. A total of 24 patients with PM, including 20 (83%) with proven PM and four (17%) with probable PM, and 96 patients with IPA, including 12 (13%) with proven IPA and 84 (87%) with probable IPA, were eventually analysed. The reverse halo sign was more common in patients with PM (54%) than in those with IPA (6%, p < 0.001), whereas some airway-invasive features, such as clusters of centrilobular nodules, peribronchial consolidations, and bronchial wall thickening, were more common in patients with IPA (IPA 52% vs. PM 29%, p 0.04; IPA 49% vs. PM 21%, p 0.01; IPA 34% vs. PM 4%, p 0.003, respectively). The reverse halo sign was more common, and airway-invasive features were less common, in patients with PM than in those with IPA. These findings may help physicians to initiate Zygomycetes-active antifungal treatment earlier.

  1. Pulmonary aspergillosis and aflatoxins in chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sana; Malik, Abida; Shahid, Mohd; Bhargava, Rakesh

    2013-10-01

    Fungal infections of lung have become increasingly common during the last few decades. Aspergillosis and the role of aflatoxins in various chronic lung diseases have not been extensively studied. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples and sera from 40 patients of chronic lung diseases were analyzed for galactomannan antigen (GM) and aflatoxin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Direct microscopy and culture of BAL samples were also done to detect the Aspergillus species. Results revealed that 15 (37.5 %) of the 40 patients had growth of Aspergillus on BAL culture. Out of these culture-positive cases, 13 (86.7 %) patients were positive for galactomannan antigen also. About 62.5 % cases did not show growth of Aspergillus in BAL culture. However, galactomannan antigen could be detected in 20 % of these patients. Overall, 20 % patients were diagnosed as proven invasive fungal disease (IFD), 32.5 % were of probable IFD, 17.5 % of possible IFD. Aspergillus growth was observed in 100 % of proven and 53.8 % of probable IFD cases. Galactomannan antigen was found in 100 % cases of proven and 76.9 % of probable IFD. Ten (25 %) patients were found to be positive for aflatoxins. It was detected in 6 (40 %) of culture-positive cases. About 62.5 % of the cases with proven IFD and 46.1 % of probable IFD had aflatoxin in their samples. Aflatoxin positivity was found to be more in patients with proven IFD than in probable IFD, and higher level of aflatoxins was detected in cases with proven IFD. Significant difference was observed in aflatoxin positivity among food grain workers when compared to other occupations.

  2. Aerosolized amphotericin B lipid complex and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Diana; Cazzadori, Angelo; Adami, Irene; Lifrieri, Francesca; Cristino, Stefania; Concia, Ercole

    2015-03-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an emerging life-threatening infection in immuno-compromised patients. The incidence of IPA following kidney transplantation is low (between 0.7 and 4%), yet mortality remains unacceptably high (75-80%). A first line therapy with voriconazole or lipid formulations of amphotericin B is often limited by co-morbidities, adverse effects and drug interactions. The case within this publication is the first described report of IPA in a renal transplant recipient responding to aerosolized amphotericin B lipid complex.

  3. Eradication of Pulmonary Aspergillosis in an Adolescent Patient Undergoing Three Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantations for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Döring

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic fungal infections are a major cause of infection-related mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies. This report addresses the case of an adolescent patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who underwent three allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations and developed pulmonary aspergillosis. Combination therapy with liposomal amphotericin B (L-AmB, 3 mg/kg bw/day and caspofungin (CAS, 50 mg/day during the first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT improved the pulmonary situation. After shifting the antifungal combination therapy to oral voriconazole (2 × 200 mg/day and CAS, a new pulmonal lesion occurred alongside the improvements in the existing pulmonary aspergillosis. An antifungal combination during a second HSCT with L-AmB (3 mg/kg bw/day and CAS showed an improvement in the pulmonary aspergillosis. A combination therapy with CAS and L-AmB (1 mg/kg bw/day during the third HSCT led once again to progress the pulmonary aspergillosis, after increasing the L-AMB to 3 mg/kg bw/day for recovery. The presented case provides an example of how, despite severe immunosuppression, a combination of antifungal drugs administered intravenously at therapeutic dosages may be more efficient than either intravenous monotherapy or combinations of intravenous and oral antifungals in selecting pediatric and adolescent patients with proven fungal infections.

  4. Equine pulmonary aspergillosis with encephalitic, myocardial, and renal dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Selwyn Arlington; de Carvalho, Pedro Henrique; Cunha Filho, Luiz Fernando C; Yamamura, Aline Artioli Machado; Okano, Werner

    2014-02-01

    The cause of the death of a 16-month-old Brasileiro-de-Hipismo filly and a 3-year-old male Paint Horse with clinical manifestations of anemia and apathy from southern Brazil was investigated. These horses were maintained at the same stable; received hay as part of their diet and were submitted for routine necropsy evaluations. Significant gross findings included several nodules randomly distributed throughout the pulmonary lobes of both horses, and the kidneys, myocardium, and the frontal lobes of the cerebrum of the filly. Histopathological evaluation revealed pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia in both horses; granulomatous interstitial nephritis, myocarditis, and encephalitis were observed in the filly. All lesions contained vasculitis and thrombosis associated with myriads of intralesional, branching, septate fungi consistent with Aspergillus spp.; intralesional fungi were more easily identified by the Grocott methenamine silver stain. Mycological culture of fresh pulmonary sections from both horses and the brain of the filly revealed pure growths of A. fumigatus. These findings confirmed the participation of A. fumigatus in the etiopathogenesis of the lesions observed in the lungs of both horses, and the cerebrum, myocardium and kidneys of the filly and might represent the first description of A. fumigatus-induced encephalitis in horses. Additionally, we believe that infection occurred during the ingestion of contaminated hay or by inhalation of spores within contaminated bedding that resulted in transient nasal mycosis, which progressed to pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia in both horses with embolic encephalitic, myocardial, and renal dissemination of A. fumigatus occurring only in the filly.

  5. Aspergillus Septic Arthritis of the Hip in an Immunocompetent Middle-aged Female with Undiagnosed Recurrent Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Pil Whan; Song, Joo Ho; Yoon, Kang Sup; Chang, Jae Suk; Kim, Hee Joong; Rhyu, Kee Hyung

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Aspergillus septic hip arthritis in an immunocompetent patient with undiagnosed recurrent pulmonary aspergillosis who underwent arthroscopic surgery. Biopsy specimens of synovium revealed fungal hyphae, confirming Aspergillus infection. Aspergillus septic hip arthritis can occur in immunocompetent patients, and arthroscopy can be a noninvasive surgical option in these cases.

  6. Fulminant Laryngeal-tracheobronchial-pulmonary Aspergillosis: A Rare and Fatal Complication in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Tao; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Xue, Sheng-Li; Wu, De-Pei; Chen, Feng

    2017-01-01

    A 23-year-old man who had previously undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for severe aplastic anemia was diagnosed with invasive laryngeal-tracheobronchial-pulmonary aspergillosis after presenting with a persistent dry cough at six months post-transplantation based on the findings of laryngoscopy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy. A fiberoptic bronchoscope was used to remove the obstructive material from the patient's airway and posaconazole plus caspofungin were administered to successfully to treat the patient. Our report suggests that laryngoscopy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy should be considered as alternative approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of allo-HSCT recipients with persistent respiratory symptoms when invasive laryngeal aspergillosis and invasive tracheobronchial aspergillosis are suspected. PMID:28154281

  7. Fatal Hemoptysis due to Chronic Cavitary Pulmonary Aspergillosis Complicated by Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Tuberculosis

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    Ioannis Kokkonouzis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old man, with a history of severe COPD and bilateral pneumothorax, who was under treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis due to mycobacterium avium, was admitted due to high-grade fever, weight loss, cough, and production of purulent sputum, for almost one month without any special improvement despite adequate antibiotics treatment in outpatient setting. A CT scan revealed multiple consolidations, fibrosis, scaring, and cavitary lesions in both upper lobes with newly shadows which were fungus balls inside them. Aspergillus flavius was isolated in three sputum samples, a diagnosis of chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis was made, and treatment with intravenous amphotericin B was started. An initially clinical improvement was noted, and a first episode of minor hemoptysis was treated with conservative measures. Unfortunately a second major episode of hemoptysis occurred and he died almost immediately. Aspergilloma is defined as the presence of a fungus ball inside a preexisting pulmonary cavity or dilated airway and is one of the clinical conditions associated with the clinical spectrum of pulmonary colonization. Tuberculosis is the most common underling disease. Hemoptysis is the most common symptom. Antifungal antibiotics, surgical interventions, bronchial arteries embolization, and intracavity infusion of antibiotics have been proposed without always adequate sufficiency.

  8. CCR7 deficiency on dendritic cells enhances fungal clearance in a murine model of pulmonary invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Adam J; Westwick, John; Jarai, Gabor; Hogaboam, Cory M

    2009-10-15

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a sporulating fungus found ubiquitously in the environment and is easily cleared from immunocompetent hosts. Invasive aspergillosis develops in immunocompromised patients, and is a leading cause of mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. CCR7 and its ligands, CCL19 and CCL21, are responsible for the migration of dendritic cells from sites of infection and inflammation to secondary lymphoid organs. To investigate the role of CCR7 during invasive aspergillosis, we used a well-characterized neutropenic murine model. During invasive aspergillosis, mice with a CCR7 deficiency in the hematopoietic compartment exhibited increased survival and less pulmonary injury compared with the appropriate wild-type control. Flow cytometric analysis of the chimeric mice revealed an increase in the number of dendritic cells present in the lungs of CCR7-deficient chimeras following infection with Aspergillus conidia. An adoptive transfer of dendritic cells into neutropenic mice provided a protective effect during invasive aspergillosis, which was further enhanced with the adoptive transfer of CCR7-deficient dendritic cells. Additionally, CCR7-deficient dendritic cells activated in vitro with Aspergillus conidia expressed higher TNF-alpha, CXCL10, and CXCL2 levels, indicating a more activated cellular response to the fungus. Our results suggest that the absence of CCR7 is protective during invasive aspergillosis in neutropenic mice. Collectively, these data demonstrate a potential deleterious role for CCR7 during primary immune responses directed against A. fumigatus.

  9. Hospital-acquired invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with hepatic failure

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    Tao Ran

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is a rapid, progressive, fatal disease that occurs mostly in immunocompromised patients. Patients with severe liver disease are at a heightened risk for infections. Little is known about the clinical presentation including predisposing factors and treatment of IPA in patients with hepatic failure. Methods Medical records of patients with hepatic failure between November 2005 and February 2007 were reviewed for lung infection. Nine medical records of definitive diagnosis of IPA and three of probable IPA were identified. Results The main predisposing factors were found to be prolonged antibiotic therapy and steroid exposure. Clinical signs and radiological findings were non-specific and atypical. Timely use of caspofungin was found to reduce the mortality due to the disease. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required for early IPA diagnosis in patients with hepatic failure.

  10. Blood and tissue distribution of posaconazole in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendejas-Bueno, E; Forastiero, A; Ruiz, I; Mellado, E; Gavaldà, J; Gomez-Lopez, A

    2017-02-01

    Posaconazole is the recommended prophylactic agent in patients at high risk of invasive fungal infection, since adequate drug levels seem to be reached in target sites despite the relatively low levels detected in blood. The objective of this study is to obtain pharmacokinetic (PK) information associated to blood and tissue distribution of posaconazole in an animal model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The PK parameters in lung samples were systematically higher than in serum. After multiple-dose administration of posaconazole, a significant accumulation of the drug was evident in lung tissue. The PK behavior of posaconazole in this particular experimental model is similar to that observed in humans. Thus, we believe this model could be a valid tool to evaluate posaconazole exposure-response relationship.

  11. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Sickle Cell Patient Transplant Recipient: A Successful Treatment

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    Katia Paciaroni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA is the most common inherited blood disorder and is associated with severe morbidity and decreased survival. Allogeneic Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT is the only curative approach. Nevertheless the decision to perform a marrow transplant includes the risk of major complications  and mortality transplant related. The infections represent the main cause of mortality for SCA patients undergoing transplant. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis (IPA is a devastating opportunistic infection and remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in HSCT recipients. Data regarding IPA in the setting of SCA are lacking. In the present report,  we describe a patient with SCA who developed IPA after allogeneic bone marrow transplant. The fungal infection was treated by systemic antifungal therapy in addition to the surgery, despite  mild chronic GVHD and with continuing immunosuppression therapy. This case shows that IPA occurring in bone marrow recipient with SCA can be successful treated

  12. Treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by combined intravenous and transthoracic injection of amphotericin B in a patient with acute leukemia: a case report

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    Park, Choong Ki; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Yong Soo; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok; Ahn, Myung Ju [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis may be a major cause of lethal opportunistic infection in neutropenic patients. The purpose of this report is to describe a combined treatment modality involving transthoracic injection of amphotericin B and gelatin solution for persistent mycetoma within the cavity. Mycetoma may interfere with consolidation chemotherapy after intravenous injection of ampho-tericin B for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a patient with acute monocytic leukemia in whom neutropenia developed during remission induction chemo-therapy.=20.

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary aspergillosis%肺曲霉菌病的诊治分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢旭东; 陆益民

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肺曲霉菌病的临床特征、影像学特点、诊断和治疗方法,提高对该病的认识。方法回顾性分析2003—2013年昆山市第一人民医院收治的肺曲霉菌病患者58例的临床资料。结果58例患者中,仅28例初步诊断考虑有肺曲霉菌感染,19例误诊为肺癌或肺结核;26例经手术治疗,32例为内科保守治疗;53例治疗后好转,5例患者死亡。结论肺曲霉菌病诊断困难,且常需与支气管哮喘、支气管扩张、肺结核及肺癌等疾病相鉴别。肺曲霉菌球经手术切除及抗真菌药物治疗后预后较好;变应性支气管肺曲霉菌病需长期激素联合抗真菌治疗;而侵袭性肺曲霉菌病病死率较高,预后较差。%Objective To explore the clinical characteristic,imaging features,diagnosis and therapies of pulmonary aspergillosis,to improve the cognition of pulmonary aspergillosis. Methods The clinical data of 58 pulmonary aspergillosis pa-tients were retrospectively analyzed from 2003 to 2013 in the First People's Hospital of Kunshan. Results In the 58 patients, only 28 cases were primary diagnosed,19 cases were misdiagnosed as tuberculosis or lung cancer;26 cases were treated with operation,32 cases were treated with conservative treatmen;53 cases were improved after treatment,5 patients died. Conclu-sion Clinical diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis is difficult,needs to differentiate from bronchial asthma,bronchiectasis, pulmonary tuberculosis and lung cancer. The prognosis of aspergilloma patients is good after operation resection and antifungal therapy;allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis patients need long - term hormone combined with antifungal therapy;the mor-tality of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis patients is high,has a poor prognosis.

  14. Combination Therapy of Advanced Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Transiently Neutropenic Rats Using Human Pharmacokinetic Equivalent Doses of Voriconazole and Anidulafungin▿

    OpenAIRE

    van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; Mathot, Ron A.A.; ten Kate, Marian T.; van Vianen, Wim; Tavakol, Mehri; Rijnders, Bart J. A.; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    At present, voriconazole (VOR) is the drug of first choice for treating invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). However, particularly in advanced stages of disease and in the severely immunocompromised host, the mortality remains substantial. The combination of VOR with an echinocandin may improve the therapeutic outcome. We investigate here whether combining VOR and anidulafungin (ANI) in advanced IPA in transiently neutropenic rats results in a higher therapeutic efficacy. Since VOR is meta...

  15. Successful non-standard approaches to massive hemoptysis in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitrović Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IA is the most frequent invasive fungal infection in patients with hematological malignancies. Massive hemoptysis (MH with blood loss more than 300- 600 ml in 24 hours is a rare (5-10% of IA patients but frequently fatal complication. Standard treatment of MH, such as oxygenation, a semi-sitting position with the bleeding site down, bronchoscopical suctioning, antifungal therapy, transfusion support and surgical resection might be either ineffective or not feasible in some cases. Outline of Cases. We report two patients with life threatening, non-controlled, massive hemoptysis who were successfully managed by non-standard measures. A 61-year-old male with acute myeloid leukemia developed pulmonary IA and massive hemoptysis after consolidation cure by chemotherapy. The bleeding site was localized in the VI lung segment by bronchoscopy. Local application of fibrinogen-thrombin concentrate (fibrin glue stopped the bleeding. A 22-year-old female patient with the diagnosis of severe aplastic anemia developed IA and massive hemoptysis early after application of immunosuppressive therapy (antilymphocyte globulin, cyclosporine and corticosteroids. Conventional transfusion therapy, desmopresine and antifibrinolytics were ineffective. This urgent condition was successfully treated with human activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven®. Conclusion. Our experience together with data from the available literature suggests a potential benefit of fibrinogen-thrombin concentrate and rFVIIa in the treatment of refractory critical bleeding in hematooncological patients.

  16. Successful voriconazole treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a patient with acute biphenotypic leukemia

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    Hirano,Teiichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year old woman with acute biphenotypic leukemia (ABL complained of chest pain with cough, high fever and hemoptysis during induction chemotherapy, although she had been treated with anti-biotics and micafungin. We made a clinical diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA based on a consolidation in the right upper lung field on a chest radiograph as well as a high level of serum beta-D-glucan (with no evidence of tuberculosis and candidiasis. We changed her treatment from micafungin to voriconazole. Later, we discovered an air-crescent sign by CT scan that supported the diagnosis of IPA. Following voriconazole treatment, clinical symptoms ceased and abnormal chest shadows improved gradually and concurrently with a recovery of neutrophils. IPA must be considered in immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates who do not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics. Serological tests and CT findings can aid in early diagnosis of IPA, which, along with treatment for IPA, will improve clinical outcomes.

  17. Initial CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in 45 non-HIV immunocompromised patients: association with patient outcome?

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    Horger, Marius [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)]. E-mail: mshorger@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Hebart, Holger [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Einsele, Hermann [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Lengerke, Claudia [Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Ottfried-Mueller-Str. 5, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Claussen, C.D. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Vonthein, Reinhard [Department of Medical Biometry, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Westbahnhofstrasse 55, 72070 Tuebingen (Germany); Pfannenberg, Christina [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To assess early high-resolution computer tomographic (CT) signs of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in non-HIV immunosuppressed patients and their potential association with patient's outcome, including frequency and severity of pulmonary hemorrhage, taking also in consideration the impact of other known risk factors contributory to IPA. Material and methods: A retrospective review of serial CT scans was performed in 45 immunocompromised patients with a total of 46 episodes of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. All patients underwent CT beginning with the day they showed clinical or laboratory signs of infection. Serial follow-up CT included more than two, up to 12 CT examinations. Patient's outcome was judged by clinical and radiological follow-up and classified as survival, death by IPA, or death unrelated to IPA. The influence of patient's age, underlying disease, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, neutropenia, graft versus host disease, and antifungal therapy onset was also statistically considered. Results: Three main CT findings were identified: small nodules (<1 cm) 43% (20/46), large nodules 21% (10/46) and consolidations, either in patchy {+-} segmental 26% (12/46), or peribronchial distribution {+-} tree in bud 9% (4/46). In 11 patients (24%) we found a combination of two or more of these signs: 9 (19%) patients presented concurrent small nodules accompanied by reticulation, tree in bud or peribronchial infiltrates, while 2 (4%) patients showed large pulmonary nodules accompanied by large consolidations. An accompanying 'halo' sign was observed in 38 patients (82%). Crescent sign followed by cavitation was encountered in 29 patients (63%). Two patients succumbed to massive pulmonary bleeding caused by IPA. Twenty-one patients (15/46) deceased in this series, 12 of them succumbed to IPA, 1 died from cerebral invasive aspergillosis, while in 9 patients the cause of death was not primarily IPA. Manifest pulmonary

  18. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in the Intensive Care Unit: A Case Report

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    Mehmet Akif Yazar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is an infection rarely seen in intensive care units (ICU. We aimed to discuss the case of IPA found in a patient followed up in our ICU due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. A 58-year old patient diagnosed with COPD has been admitted to our ICU due to respiratory failure. There were not any other diseases except from COPD. In his radiological imaging there were diffuse bilateral infiltrates in the chest X-ray and diffuse infiltration in the thorax tomography. Aspergillus spp was isolated in the bronchoalveolar lavage sample from patient and caspofungin was added to the treatment. On the 12th day of the treatment, it was observed that the results of the control radiological imaging became normal and there was no isolation in the control cultures. In recent years, fungal infections have been determined at an increasing rate in the patients who are not immunosuppressed and hospitalized in ICU. In the IPA cases, it has been shown that such underlying causes as diabetes, malnutrition, use of steroid, uremia, cirrhosis and COPD may create risk. Our patient did not have other disease except from COPD and there was a story of prolonged using of steroid. Steroids are quite frequently used in the ICUs. In the patients with chronic pulmonary diseases, even if it is low dose and short-term, the treatment of steroid is accepted as a risk factor in terms of IPA. Since signs and symptoms are atypical in this group of patients, it is rather difficult to diagnose IPA in the short term. The isolation of aspergillus in our patient’s tracheal aspirate taken earlier enabled us to start the treatment early. Although there are not comprehensive studies, it should be kept in mind that İPA may develop in the patients who is using long-term steroid, is admitted to the ICUs due to COPD exacerbations without any other disease.

  19. The iron chelator deferasirox enhances liposomal amphotericin B efficacy in treating murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; French, Samuel W.; Edwards, John E.; Spellberg, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Increased bone marrow iron levels in patients with haematological malignancies is an independent risk factor for developing invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), suggesting an important role for iron uptake in the pathogenesis of IPA. We sought to determine the potential for combination therapy with the iron chelator deferasirox + liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) to improve the outcome of murine IPA compared with LAmB monotherapy. Methods In vitro MIC and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of the iron chelator, deferasirox, for Aspergillus fumigatus were determined by microdilution assay. In addition, we studied the efficacy of deferasirox alone or combined with LAmB in treating immunocompromised mice infected with A. fumigatus via inhalation. Results Deferasirox was cidal in vitro against A. fumigatus, with an MIC and MFC of 25 and 50 mg/L, respectively. Deferasirox monotherapy modestly prolonged survival of mice with IPA. Combination deferasirox + LAmB therapy synergistically improved survival and reduced lung fungal burden compared with either monotherapy alone. Conclusions Iron chelation therapy with deferasirox alone or in combination with LAmB is effective in treating experimental IPA. Further study of deferasirox is warranted as adjunctive therapy for IPA infections. PMID:19942619

  20. Comparative pharmacodynamics of posaconazole in neutropenic murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and mucormycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Russell E; Albert, Nathaniel D; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-11-01

    We used two established neutropenic murine models of pulmonary aspergillosis and mucormycosis to explore the association between the posaconazole area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)-to-MIC ratio (AUC/MIC) and treatment outcome. Posaconazole serum pharmacokinetics were verified in infected mice to ensure that the studied doses reflected human exposures with the oral suspension, delayed-release tablet, and intravenous formulations of posaconazole. Sinopulmonary infections were then induced in groups of neutropenic mice with Aspergillus fumigatus strain 293 (posaconazole MIC, 0.5 mg/liter) or Rhizopus oryzae strain 969 (posaconazole MIC, 2 mg/liter) and treated with escalating daily dosages of oral posaconazole, which was designed to achieve AUCs ranging from 1.10 to 392 mg · h/liter. After 5 days of treatment, lung fungal burden was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The relationships of the total drug AUC/MIC and the treatment response were similar in both models, with 90% effective concentrations (EC90s) corresponding to an AUC/MIC threshold of 76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 46 to 102) for strain 293 versus 87 (95% CI, 66 to 101) for strain 969. Using a provisional AUC/MIC target of >100, these exposures correlated with minimum serum posaconazole concentrations (Cmins) of 1.25 mg/liter for strain 293 and 4.0 mg/liter for strain 969. The addition of deferasirox, but not liposomal amphotericin or caspofungin, improved the activity of a suboptimal posaconazole regimen (AUC/MIC, 33) in animals with pulmonary mucormycosis. However, no combination was as effective as the high-dose posaconazole monotherapy regimen (AUC/MIC, 184). Our analysis suggests that posaconazole pharmacodynamics are similar for A. fumigatus and R. oryzae when indexed to pathogen MICs.

  1. Necrotizing Liver Granuloma/Abscess and Constrictive Aspergillosis Pericarditis with Central Nervous System Involvement: Different Remarkable Phenotypes in Different Chronic Granulomatous Disease Genotypes

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    Sanem Eren Akarcan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a primary immune deficiency causing predisposition to infections with specific microorganisms, Aspergillus species and Staphylococcus aureus being the most common ones. A 16-year-old boy with a mutation in CYBB gene coding gp91phox protein (X-linked disease developed a liver abscess due to Staphylococcus aureus. In addition to medical therapy, surgical treatment was necessary for the management of the disease. A 30-month-old girl with an autosomal recessive form of chronic granulomatous disease (CYBA gene mutation affecting p22phox protein had invasive aspergillosis causing pericarditis, pulmonary abscess, and central nervous system involvement. The devastating course of disease regardless of the mutation emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and intervention of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as soon as possible in children with CGD.

  2. Interleukin-12 and interleukin-2 alone or in combination against the infection in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang-Ran; Lin, Jian-Cong; Xu, Wen-Ming; Li, Ming; Ye, Hui-Shao; Cui, Wei-Ling; Lin, Qing

    2013-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an intracellular opportunistic fungus causing invasive pulmonary mycosis, characterised by hyphal invasion and destruction of pulmonary tissue. Th1 cytokines could enhance fungicidal activity. The effects from the combination of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-2 are rarely known in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis infection. To assess the cleaning of A. fumigatus infection in the pulmonary tissues by IL-12 and IL-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was detected in the sera using ELISA, quantification of IFN-γ mRNA using real-time RT-PCR and lung Colony-forming unit was assayed by cultivation. Morphology was analysed by histopathological examination. Our results showed that IL-12 and/or IL-2 could enhance the IFN-γ expression in the pulmonary tissue, reduce the colony load in the pulmonary tissue and increase the survival rate of mouse. The combination of IL-12 and IL-2 could assist in increasing the IFN-γ expression in the pulmonary tissue, but neither reduce colony load in the pulmonary tissue nor increase the survival rate of mouse significantly. It was demonstrated that IL-12 and IL-2 were strong immunomodulatory cytokines as a prerequisite for protecting the host from infectious agents.

  3. Aspergillus culture filtrates and sputum sols from patients with pulmonary aspergillosis cause damage to human respiratory ciliated epithelium in vitro.

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    Amitani, R; Murayama, T; Nawada, R; Lee, W J; Niimi, A; Suzuki, K; Tanaka, E; Kuze, F

    1995-10-01

    Aspergillus species frequently colonize lower respiratory tracts and lungs with localized underlying conditions (healed tuberculous cavity, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis, etc.) even in subjects without systemic predisposing factors. We investigated the in vitro effects of culture filtrates of Aspergillus species and sputum sols from patients with pulmonary aspergillosis on ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and epithelial integrity of human respiratory ciliated epithelium. Culture filtrates of 25 clinically isolated fungi (16 Aspergillus fumigatus, three Aspergillus niger, one Aspergillus flavus, three Candida albicans, and two Cryptococcus neoformans) were obtained by culturing the fungi in Medium-199 at 37 degrees C for 7 days, and five sputum sols were obtained from patients with pulmonary aspergillosis infected by A. fumigatus. During 6 h experiments using a photometric technique, 14 out of 16 A. fumigatus culture filtrates caused progressive and significant reduction in CBF associated with marked epithelial disruption, whilst the culture filtrates of A. niger and A. flavus caused minor epithelial damage without slowing of CBF, and Medium-199 alone (Control) showed neither epithelial damage nor slowing of CBF. All of the sputum sols also caused significant slowing of CBF as well as epithelial disruption. Culture filtrates of C. albicans and Cr. neoformans had no effects on human respiratory epithelium. We conclude that Aspergillus species, especially A. fumigatus release a factor (or factors) which causes damage to respiratory epithelium and slows CBF, and that these factors may contribute to the colonization of the lower respiratory tracts by the Aspergillus species and may possibly contribute to the further proliferation and spread of the lesions in pulmonary aspergillosis.

  4. The potential impact of the pulmonary microbiome on immunopathogenesis of Aspergillus-related lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolwijck, E.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillosis is an infection or allergic response caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus. The most common forms of aspergillosis are allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, and invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Aspergillus also plays an important role in fungal s

  5. Combination antifungal therapy and surgery for the treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Tiziana Toffolutti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year old boy, affected by severe aplastic anemia, developed a probable pulmonary invasive aspergillosis (IA early after a second unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT. He was treated promptly with the combination of liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin. Despite the initial stabilization, the patient deteriorated and the antifungal therapy was switched to voriconazole and caspofungin. The patient gradually improved and was discharged home on day +29 post-HSCT on oral voriconazole. On day +119, a sudden episode of hemoptysis occurred and a right superior lobectomy was decided to remove the residual aspergilloma. The patient is now alive and well more than 24 months from HSCT. This case demonstrated that antifungal combination therapy and surgery are valid options to cure pulmonary IA even in patients at high-risk and severely immunosuppressed.

  6. Enhanced antifungal efficacy in experimental invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by combination of AmBisome with Fungizone as assessed by several parameters of antifungal response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Becker (Martin); S. de Marie (Siem); M.H.A.M. Fens (Marcel); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn common with a proportion of patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), the efficacy of AmBisome treatment regimens in our rat model remains suboptimal. To investigate whether this might be the result of initially low antifungal activity of amphotericin B a

  7. Experimental and Clinical Studies on Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Becker (Martin)

    2004-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Aspergillus is a saprofytic fungus that grows in humid environments on decaying organic matter. Its ability to adapt to a wide variability of conditions accounts for its worldwide distribution. Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a disease characterised by invasion of normal

  8. Galactomannan Testing and the Incidence of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis: A 10-Year Nationwide Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

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    Kuo-Shao Sun

    Full Text Available The clinical impact of the galactomannan (GM test for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is controversial. Our study evaluated the incidence and trends of IPA and GM testing in patients with aspergillus infections.We conducted a nationwide inpatient population study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 346 IPA (62.14% male patients from the years 2002 to 2011 were identified for inclusion in the study.The average incidence of IPA was 1.51 per million person-years. Over the study period, we observed an increasing trend from 0.94 to 2.06 per million person-years (P < 0.0001. We observed male predominance in IPA incidence (M/F: 1.85/1.15. Both males and females showed significantly increasing trends of IPA incidence over time (0.87 to 4.55 and 0.36 to 2.07 per million person-years for the males and females, respectively. GM testing for IPA significantly increased from 2002 to 2011, and the GM test was utilized more frequently for males than females. The increase in the incidence of IPA might be positively associated with the increase in GM testing over the past decade.The incidence rates of both IPA and GM testing have increased over time. GM testing is recommended for the early diagnosis of patients with suspected aspergillosis.

  9. Pulmonary Necrotizing Granulomas in a patient with familial mediterranean fever.

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    Kushima, Hisako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ishii, Koji; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2015-09-01

    We herein report a case of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) presenting with granulomatous lung lesions with neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP), MHC class II transcription activator (CIITA), incompatibility locus protein from Podospora anserina (HET-E), and telomerase-associated protein (TP1) (NACHT) leucine-rich-repeat 1-positive inflammatory cell infiltrates. FMF is an autoinflammatory disorder characterized by recurrent and self-limited attacks of pyrexia, arthritis and erysipelas-like skin lesions. Lung disorders associated with FMF are extremely rare. This is the first report of an immunologically-confirmed case of pulmonary manifestations of this disease.

  10. Prophylactic inhalation of Amphotericin B in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: distribution study. Prophylaktische Inhalation von Amphotericin B bei invasiver Aspergillose: Verteilungsstudie

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    Barzen, G. (Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany). Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik); Beyer, J. (Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany). Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik); Farshidfar, G. (Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostikforschung); Kramp, W. (Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostikforschung); Richter, W. (Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany). Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik); Felix, R. (Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Berlin (Germany). Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik)

    1993-04-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) during periods of immunosuppression or prolonged neutropenia is a serious condition with high mortality. Prophylaxis is unsatisfactory bcause of the low effectiveness of systemic administration of amphotericin B (AMB) and because of its side effects. Prophylactic inhalation of AMB by means of a nebulizing system may be able to reduce the incidence of IPA. Therefore, we studied the distribution of nebulized [sup 99m]Tc-labeled AMB and estimated its particle size. AMB is homogeneously distributed in the lung and partly deposited in the terminal respiratory unit; it remains there with a half-life of at least 14 h. Therefore, prophylaxis of IPA with AMB nebulized as described can be recommended. (orig.)

  11. Percutaneous treatment with amphotericin B in a case of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis; Tratamiento percutaneo con anfotericina B en un caso de aspergilosis pulmonar invasiva

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    Ruiz, A.; Lonjedo, E.; Agramunt, M.; Martinez-Rodrigo, J. J.; Palomero, J. [Hospital Universitario Dr. Peset. Valencia (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a serious complications that occurs in immunocompromised patients. We need a rapid and effective treatment both to treat the aspergillosis as well as to be able to continue, as soon as possible, treatment of the baseline disease. We present a case of a percutaneous treatment of the pulmonary lesions in a 55 year old male with IPA in the context of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With Computerized Tomography (CT) control and using a fine needle, we injected intralesionally a solution of Amphotericin B (AB) (5 mg/cc of 5% glucose solution). We evaluated the complications and efficacy in relationship to the clinical improvement and reduction in lesion size. (Author) 18 refs.

  12. Results of surgery for chronic pulmonary Aspergillosis, optimal antifungal therapy and proposed high risk factors for recurrence - a National Centre’s experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgery for pulmonary aspergillosis is infrequent and often challenging. Risk assessment is imprecise and new antifungals may ameliorate some surgical risks. We evaluated the medical and surgical management of these patients, including perioperative and postoperative antifungal therapy. Methods Retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for pulmonary aspergillosis between September 1996 and September 2011. Results 30 patients underwent surgery with 23 having a preoperative tissue diagnosis while 7 were confirmed post-resection. The median age was 57 years (17–78). The commonest presenting symptoms were cough (40%, n = 12) and haemoptysis (43%, n = 13). Twelve (40%) patients had simple aspergilloma (including 2 with Aspergillus nodules) while the remaining 18 (60%) had chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA) (complex aspergilloma). Most of the patients had underlying lung disease: tuberculosis (20%, n = 6), asthma (26%, n = 8) and COPD (20%, n = 6). The procedures included lobectomy 50% (n = 15), pneumonectomy 10% (n = 3), sublobar resection 27% (n = 8), decortication 7% (n = 2), segmentectomy 3% (n = 1), thoracoplasty 3% (n = 1), bullectomy and pleurectomy 3% (n = 1), 6% (n = 2) lung transplantation for associated disease. Median hospital stay was 9.5 days (3–37). There was no operative and 30 day mortality. Main complications were prolonged air leak (n = 7, 23%), empyema (n = 6, 20%), respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy /reintubation (n = 4, 13%). Recurrence of CCPA was noted in 8 patients (26%), most having prior CCPA (75%). Taurolidine 2% was active against all 9 A. fumigatus isolates and used for pleural decontamination during surgery. Conclusions Surgery in patients with chronic pulmonary aspergillosis offered good outcomes with an acceptable morbidity in a difficult clinical situation; recurrence is problematic. PMID:23915502

  13. A Case of Chronic Granulomatous Disease with a Necrotic Mass in the Bronchus: A Case Report and a Review of Literature

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    Ali Cheraghvandi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease is a rare phagocytic disorder with recurrent, severe bacterial and fungal infections. We describe an unusual case of chronic granulomatous disease manifesting as an invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with an obstructive necrotic mass at the right middle bronchus. The patient was successfully treated with a bronchoscopic intervention for the removal of the obstructive mass and a medical therapy.

  14. Research progress on animal model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis%侵袭性肺曲霉病动物模型的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冬梅; 宋泽庆

    2011-01-01

    近20年来,随着广谱抗生素、糖皮质激素、放疗、化疗的广泛应用,烧伤、器官移植、血液透析、肠外营养人数的增加以及艾滋病的流行等,侵袭性肺曲霉病的发病率日益增加.随着侵袭性肺曲霉病的发病机制以及早期诊断等相关研究不断深入,相关研究需建立在成功的动物模型基础上,所以动物模型的建立具有重要意义.本文对近几年肺曲霉病的动物模型研究作一综述.%In recent twenty years, with the extensive use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, corticosteroids, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, the increase of burns, organ transplantation, hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, and the prevalence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the morbidity of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is increasing. With the deep researches on mechanism and early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, relevant research should be based on successful animal model, so the animal model is important. This article summaries the researches about animal model of pulmonary aspergillosis in recent years.

  15. NAC is associated with additional alleviation of lung injury induced by invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a neutropenic model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng XU; Jie-ming QU; Jin-fu XU; Jing ZHANG; Hong-ni JIANG; Hui-jun ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:Neutropenic individuals are at high risk for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA),a life-threatening infection.To evaluate the therapeutic potential of antioxidants,IPA was induced in neutropenic mice and the effect of N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) on oxidative stress levels and lung injury was analyzed.Methods:Mice were pretreated with three daily intraperitoneal injections of 150 mg/kg cyclophosphamide,followed by intratracheal inoculation with 4.5×106 conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus.The infected mice were then randomly assigned to an amphotericin B (AMB) group,an AMB plus NAC group,or an untreated control (C) group.In each group,the duration of treatment was 24,48,or 72 h,and activities such as appearance,feeding,and dermal temperature were observed throughout the experiment.Sera and lung tissues were collected and analyzed by quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for total protein,superoxide dismutase(SOD),malondialdehyde (MDA),tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α),and interleukin-lO (IL-10) levels.The wet/dry weight ratio of the lung was also calculated and lung sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin for pathological examination and with methenamine silver stain for fungus detection.Results:Compared with the mice untreated with NAC,mice in the AMB plus NAC group had increased SOD and reduced MDA levels both systemically and locally at 24,48,and 72 h after inoculation with conidia.NAC treatment also decreased the pulmonary protein content at 48 and 72 h and the lung wet/dry weight ratio at 24 and 48 h.Additionally,NAC enhanced pulmonary production of TNF-α and IL-10 at 24 h and 48 h.Conclusion:In combination with antifungal therapy,NAC treatment can alleviate oxidative stress and lung injury associated with IPA in neutropenic mice.

  16. New inhalation-optimized itraconazole nanoparticle-based dry powders for the treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

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    Duret C

    2012-10-01

    -based DPI (<10 ng/mL.Conclusion: Embedding ITZ NP in inhalable microparticles is a very effective method to produce DPI formulations with optimal aerodynamic properties and enhanced ITZ solubility. These formulations could be applied to other poorly water-soluble drugs and could be a very effective alternative for treating invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.Keywords: aspergillosis, spray-drying, homogenization, inhalation, saturation, solubility

  17. The many faces of pulmonary aspergillosis: Imaging findings with pathologic correlation

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    Prasad Panse

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: In this article we correlate the radiologic findings of the various pulmonary manifestations of Aspergillus infection with their pathologic features to better understand the disease process and better comprehend the associated imaging patterns.

  18. mTOR Modulates Lymphocyte Differentiation through T-bet and Eomesodermin in Response to Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Cui; Long-Xiang Su; Hao Wang; Meng Xiao; Fei Yang; Min Zheng; Xin Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Aspergillosis infection is common in the patients with insufficient immunity.The role of mammalian target ofrapamycin (mTOR),T-box expressed in T-cells (T-bet),and eomesodermin (EOMES) in mediating T lymphocytes differentiation in response to Aspergillus fumigatus infection in immunocompromised rats was investigated in this study.Methods:Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) ofimmtmosuppressive twenty male rats were established and sacrificed at 24 h (n =5),48 h (n =5),72 h (n =5),and 96 h (n =5) after A.fumigatus infection.In addition,control (n =5),cyclophosphamide (CTX) (n =5),and aspergillosis (n =5) group were also established the tissues and pathology of lung tissue was examined by hematoxylin and eosin staining.CD8+ T-cells was sorted by flow cytometry.Serum mTOR,S6K,T-bet,and EOMES were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorhent assay.Results:Histology of lung tissue indicated severe lung tissue injury including infiltration of inflammatory cells,alveolar wall damage or degradation,blood congestion,and hemorrhage in the CTX,IPA,and CTX + IPA rats.Hyphae were seen in the IPA,and CTX + IPA groups.The proportion of CD8+ T-cells was significantly increased in the animals ofCTX + IPA.Memory CD8+ T-cells was significantly increased in early stage (24 h and 48 h,P < 0.001),but decreased in the late phase of fungal infection (72 h and 96 h) in the animals of CTX + IPA.In addition,at early stage of fungal infection (24 h and 48 h),serum mTOR (P < 0.001),S6K (P < 0.001),and T-bet (P < 0.05) was significantly higher,while EOMES was significantly lower (P < 0.001),in CTX + IPA group than that in control,CTX alone or IPA alone group.Conversely,serum mTOR,S6K,T-bet,and EOMES showed opposite changed in the late stage (72 h and 96 h).Pearson's correlation analysis indicated that mTOR and S6K were significantly correlated with T-bet (r =0.901 and 0.91,respectively,P < 0.001),but negatively and significantly correlated with EOMES (r =-0.758 and-0

  19. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C; Sellati, Timothy J; Harton, Jonathan A

    2016-03-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  20. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  1. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Periasamy

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection.

  2. Improved Detection of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis Arising during Leukemia Treatment Using a Panel of Host Response Proteins and Fungal Antigens.

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    Allan R Brasier

    Full Text Available Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is an opportunistic fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy for hematological malignancy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or other forms of immunosuppression. In this group, Aspergillus infections account for the majority of deaths due to mold pathogens. Although early detection is associated with improved outcomes, current diagnostic regimens lack sensitivity and specificity. Patients undergoing chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation were enrolled in a multi-site prospective observational trial. Proven and probable IPA cases and matched controls were subjected to discovery proteomics analyses using a biofluid analysis platform, fractionating plasma into reproducible protein and peptide pools. From 556 spots identified by 2D gel electrophoresis, 66 differentially expressed post-translationally modified plasma proteins were identified in the leukemic subgroup only. This protein group was rich in complement components, acute-phase reactants and coagulation factors. Low molecular weight peptides corresponding to abundant plasma proteins were identified. A candidate marker panel of host response (9 plasma proteins, 4 peptides, fungal polysaccharides (galactomannan, and cell wall components (β-D glucan were selected by statistical filtering for patients with leukemia as a primary underlying diagnosis. Quantitative measurements were developed to qualify the differential expression of the candidate host response proteins using selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assays, and then applied to a separate cohort of 57 patients with leukemia. In this verification cohort, a machine learning ensemble-based algorithm, generalized pathseeker (GPS produced a greater case classification accuracy than galactomannan (GM or host proteins alone. In conclusion, Integration of host response proteins with GM improves the diagnostic detection of probable IPA in patients

  3. Application of a low molecular weight antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum (PAF) to treat pulmonary aspergillosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palicz, Zoltán; Gáll, Tamás; Leiter, Éva; Kollár, Sándor; Kovács, Ilona; Miszti-Blasius, Kornél; Pócsi, István; Csernoch, László; Szentesi, Péter

    2016-11-09

    PAF, a small antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum, inhibits the growth of several pathogenic filamentous fungi, including members of the Aspergillus genus. PAF has been proven to have no toxic effects in vivo in mice by intranasal application. To test its efficacy against invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), experiments were carried out in mice suffering from IPA. Adult mice were immunosuppressed and then infected with Aspergillus fumigatus. After stable infection, the animals were inoculated with PAF intranasally at a concentration of 2.7 mg/kg twice per day. At this concentration-which is highly toxic in vitro to A. fumigatus-the mortality of the animals was slightly delayed but finally all animals died. Histological examinations revealed massive fungal infections in the lungs of both PAF-treated and untreated animal groups. Because intranasally administered PAF was unable to overcome IPA, modified and combined therapies were introduced. The intraperitoneal application of PAF in animals with IPA prolonged the survival of the animals only 1 day. Similar results were obtained with amphotericin B (AMB), with PAF and AMB being equally effective. Combined therapy with AMB and PAF-which are synergistic in vitro-was found to be more effective than either AMB or PAF treatment alone. As no toxic effects of PAF in mammals have been described thus far, and, moreover, there are so far no A. fumigatus strains with reported inherent or acquired PAF resistance, it is worth carrying out further studies to introduce PAF as a potential antifungal drug in human therapy.

  4. Disseminated Aspergillosis due to Aspergillus niger in Immunocompetent Patient: A Case Report

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    Ulku Ergene

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Many cases of pulmonary, cutaneous, cerebral, and paranasal sinus aspergillosis in immunocompetent patient were defined in literature but disseminated aspergillosis is very rare. Here we present an immunocompetent case with extrapulmonary disseminated aspergillosis due to Aspergillus niger, totally recovered after effective antifungal treatment with voriconazole.

  5. Significance of Aspergillus spp.isolation from lower respiratory tract samples for the diagnosis and prognosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Hang-yong; CHANG Shuo; DING Lin; SUN Bing; LI Fang; ZHAN Qing-yuan

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) is an emerging population at risk for invasive infection of Aspergillus.Isolation of Aspergillus from lower respiratory tract (LRT) samples is important for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA).The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of Aspergillus isolation from LRT samples for the diagnosis and prognosis of IPA in COPD population.Methods Clinical record with Aspergillus spp.isolation in COPD and immunocompromised patients was reviewed in a retrospective study.Patients were categorized and compared according to their severity of illness (admitted to general ward or ICU) and immunological function (COPD or immunocompromised).Results Multivariate statistical analysis showed that,combined with Aspergillus spp.isolation,APACHE Ⅱ scores >18,high cumulative doses of corticosteroids (>350 mg prednisone or equivalent dose) and more than four kinds of broad-spectrum antibiotics received in hospital may be predictors of IPA in COPD (OR=9.076,P=0.001; OR=4.073,P=-0.026; OR=4.448,P=0.021,respectively).The incidence of IPA,overall mortality,mortality of patients with IPA and mortality of patients with Aspergillus spp.colonization were higher in COPD patients in ICU than in general ward,but were similar between COPD and immunocompromised patients.Conclusions Aspergilltus spp.isolation from LRT in COPD may be of similar importance as in immunocompromised patients,and may indicate an increased diagnosis possibility of IPA and worse prognosis when these patients received corticosteroids,antibiotics,and need to admit to ICU.Aspergillus spp.isolation from LRT samples combined with certain risk factors may be useful in differentiating colonization from IPA and evaluating the prognosis of IPA in COPD patients.

  6. A pulmonary aspergillosis case with fatal course in a patient with SIRS clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim Çekmen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old male patient with a history of tuberculosis applied to emergency service with complaints of confusion, shortness of breath, tachycardia, hypothermia and hypotension. A bronchoalveolar lavage culture was collected because a fungus ball was seen on repeat chest X-ray and thoracic CT of the patient. Aspergillus fumigatus grew and voricona-zole treatment was started, but the patient was lost from multiple organ failure (MOF. In diagnosis of patients with SIRS clinic, causative factor may be aspergillus located in an old tuberculosis cavity, and this may have a fatal course in an old patient having previous pulmonary and systemic diseases.

  7. Computer tomography in pulmonary invasive aspergillosis in hematological patients with neutropenia: An useful tool for diagnosis and assessment of outcome in clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillot, Denis, E-mail: denis.caillot@chu-dijon.f [Dijon University Hospital Center, Dijon (France); Latrabe, Valerie [Bordeaux University Hospital Center, Bordeaux (France); Thiebaut, Anne [Lyon University Hospital Center, Lyon (France); Herbrecht, Raoul [Strasbourg Regional University Hospital Center, Strasbourg (France); De Botton, Stephane [Lille Regional University Hospital Center, Lille (France); Pigneux, Arnaud [Bordeaux University Hospital Center, Bordeaux (France); Monchecourt, Francoise; Mahi, Lamine [Gilead Sciences, Paris (France); Alfandari, Serge [Lille Regional University Hospital Center, Lille (France); Couaillier, Jean-Francois [Dijon University Hospital Center, Dijon (France)

    2010-06-15

    Background and objective: The exact timing of the evolution of lesion volumes of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) on CT scan images could be helpful in the management of hematological patients but has never been evaluated in a prospective study. We analyzed the CT scan data from the prospective Combistrat trial. Design and methods: Volumes of aspergillosis lesions from 30 patients (including 24 acute myeloid leukaemia) with probable (n = 26) or proven (n = 4) IPA according to the EORTC-MSG modified criteria, were measured prospectively on the thoracic CT scans at the enrolment in the study on day 0 (D0), D7, D14 and end of treatment (EOT). Results: For the overall population, the volume of pulmonary aspergillosis lesions increased significantly from D0 to D7 (1.6 fold; p = 0.003). Then this volume decreased significantly from D7 to D14 (1.36 fold at D14 with p = 0.003 for D14 vs. D7, but with p = 0.56 for D14 vs. D0). At EOT (= D17, median value), the volume of lesions was significantly lower than D14 (0.76 fold the initial volume; p < 0.001) but it was not significantly different when compared to D0 (p = 0.11). Conclusions: The results of this prospective study suggest that the sequential analysis of CT scan in neutropenic patients with IPA depicts more precisely the evolution of lesion volumes than comparison to baseline images. Moreover, the systematic use of chest CT appears to be a useful tool for diagnosis and outcome evaluation of IPA in clinical trials.

  8. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with a {sup 111}In-labeled cyclic peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhi [Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Infection Control and Employee Health, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wen Xiaoxia; Xiong Chiyi; Zhang Rui [Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Infection Control and Employee Health, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Albert, Nathaniel D. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Infection Control and Employee Health, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Li Chun [Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Infection Control and Employee Health, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)], E-mail: cli@mdanderson.org

    2009-04-15

    Introduction: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a leading cause of infection-associated death in immunosuppressed patients. Early detection and early administration of antifungal therapy are critical factors in improving outcome for patients with IPA. Here, we evaluated the imaging properties of a {sup 111}In-labeled cyclic peptide targeted to Aspergillus fumigatus in an immunosuppressed murine model of IPA. Methods: A cyclic peptide c(CGGRLGPFC)-NH{sub 2} was labeled with {sup 111}In by means of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Two days after intranasal inoculation of 17.5x10{sup 6} conidia of A. fumigatus, mice were injected {sup 111}In-DTPA-c(CGGRLGPFC)-NH{sub 2} intravenously. Biodistribution data were obtained at 2 h, and {gamma}-images were acquired at 10 min and 2 h after radiotracer injection. Healthy mice were used as controls. In addition, a group of infected mice were co-injected with the radiotracer and unlabeled c(CGGRLGPFC)-NH{sub 2} to evaluate the inhibition of radiotracer's binding to infected lungs. Autoradiographs of lungs from infected and healthy mice were compared with corresponding photographs of transaxial sections of the lung tissues stained for A. fumigatus hyphae. Results: The labeling efficiency was >98%, with specific radioactivity of up to 74 MBq/nmol peptide. Significantly higher uptake of {sup 111}In-DTPA-c(CGGRLGPFC)-NH{sub 2} was observed in the lungs of mice infected with A. fumigatus than in those of healthy mice (0.37{+-}0.06 %ID/g vs. 0.14{+-}0.02 %ID/g, P=.00044). Simultaneous injection with unlabeled peptide reduced radioactivity in the infected lungs by 41% (P=.0037). Increased radioactivity in the lungs of infected mice was visible in {gamma} images at both 10 min and 2 h after radiotracer injection. Moreover, autoradiography confirmed radiotracer uptake in infected lungs, but not in the lungs of healthy mice or infected mice co-injected with unlabeled peptide. Conclusions: {gamma}-Imaging with {sup

  9. Prognostic value of serum galactomannan index in critically ill patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at risk of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Hangyong; Li Qian; Chang Shuo; Ding Lin; Sun Bing; Li Fang; Zhan Qingyuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Critically ill chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) due to respiratory failure are at particularly high risk of Aspergillus infection.The serum galactomannan index (GMI) has proven to be one of the prognostic criteria for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in classical immunocompromised patients.However,the prognostic value of serum GMI in critically ill COPD patients needs evaluation.The purpose of this study is to investigate the prognostic value of serum GMI in patients with severe COPD.Methods In this single-center prospective cohort study,serum samples for GMI assay were collected twice a week from the first day of ICU admission to the day of the patients' discharge or death.Patients were divided into two groups according to their clinical outcome on the 28th day of their ICU admission.Univariate analysis and survival analysis were tested in these two groups.Results One hundred and fifty-three critically ill COPD patients were included and were divided into survival group (106 cases) and non-survival group (47 cases) according to their outcome.Univariate analysis showed that the highest GMI level during the first week after admission (GMI-high 1st week) was statistically different between the two groups.Independent prognostic factors for poor outcome in severe COPD patients were:GMI-high 1st week >0.5 (RR:4.04,95% CI:2.17-7.51) combined with accumulative dosage of corticosteroids >216 mg before the RICU admission (RR:2.25,95% CI:1.11-4.56) and clearance of creatinine (Ccr) <64.31 ml/min (RR:2.48,95% CI:1.22-5.07).Conclusions The positive GMI-high 1st week (>0.5) combined with an accumulative dosage of corticosteroids >216 mg before the ICU admission and a low Ccr may predicate a poor outcome of critically ill COPD patients.

  10. Effective management of pulmonary aspergillosis invading the thoracic spine in a child with high risk ALL requiring allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornbusch, Hans Jürgen; Sovinz, Petra; Lackner, Herwig; Schwinger, Wolfgang; Benesch, Martin; Strenger, Volker; Urban, Christian

    2008-08-01

    Due to unacceptably high mortality, invasive fungal infections (IFI) have long been considered a contraindication against allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Despite severe immunosuppression an 11-year-old girl requiring allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) for relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia was cured of a concurrent invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Treatment comprised combinations of liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin and voriconazole with donor granulocyte transfusions. This therapeutic regimen, including the choice of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC), allowed the patient to receive an allogeneic BMT. In hematological remission the child later developed fatal chronic graft-versus-host disease. Combined antifungal treatment and granulocyte support allow for effective management of IFI even in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients. However, short-term benefits of RIC may be outweighed by late complications.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in 21 children with non-hematologic diseases%非血液病患儿侵袭性肺曲霉病21例的诊断与治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓艳; 赵顺英; 钱素云; 胡英慧; 曾津津; 江载芳

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore diagnosis and treatments of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in children with non-hematologic diseases. Method Twenty one patients without hematological malignancy were diagnosed with proven or possible IPA from July 2002 to June 2008. The risk factors, clinical manifestations, chest radiographic findings, microbiological and histopathological evidence, diagnostic procedures, treatment and prognosis were retrospectively reviewed. Result Five children had proven IPA, and 16 patients had possible IPA. Thirteen children were classified as having acute invasive pulmonary asergillosis (AIPA), eight children as having chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA). Definitive diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency (PID) was made in 6 children (4 with chronic granulomatous disease, 2 with cellular immunodeficiency); three children were suspected of having PID. Corticosteroids and multiple broad-spectrum antibiotics had been administered in 5 patients (3 of these 5 patients also had invasive mechanical ventilation). Two children had underlying pulmonary disease. Three patients had unknown risk factors. Among these three patients, two had history of environmental exposure. Fever and cough were present in all the children. Fine rales were found in nineteen children. Six children had hepatosplenomegaly. The common roentgenographic feature of AIPA in 13 patients was nodular or mass-like consolidation with multiple cavity. "air-crescent" was seen in 10 of patients with AIPA. Lobar consolidation with cavity and adjacent pleural thickening was found in all children with CNPA. The positive rate of sputum and/or BALF culture in MPA and CNFA were 72.1% and 22.4%, respectively. A large number of septate hyphae on wet smear were found in all of the children whose sputum and/or BALF culture were positive. Lung biopsy was performed in 3 children with CNPA, and necrosis, granulomatous inflammation, as well as septate, branching hyphae were observed on

  12. [Acute necrotizing capillaritis in an adolescent dying from a a Goodpasture-like pulmonary-renal syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresi, E; Becchina, G; Orlando, E; Ottoveggio, G

    1995-12-01

    In this report the authors describe a rare case of pulmonary/renal syndrome like-Goodpasture's disease characterized by a necrotizing acute capillaritis in the lung, kidney, liver, spleen and heart. In the heart the capillaritis was associated with a contiguous acute ischemic lesion. The clinical and pathologic findings of the case suggest that the presence of vasculitis should not exclude a diagnosis of Goodpasture's Syndrome and that the multisystemic capillaritis would demonstrate the organ-non-specificity of anti-glomerular/alveolar basement membrane antibody.

  13. Halo sign nodules in angio invasive pulmonary aspergillosis: correlation of high-resolution computed tomography findings with anatomopathology; Nodulos com sinal do halo na aspergilose pulmonar angioinvasiva: correlacao da tomografia computadorizada de alta resolucao com a anatomopatologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Valiante, Paulo Marcos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Disciplina de Radiologia

    2002-08-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the early findings observed on high-resolution computed tomography with anatomopathology results of patients with angio invasive aspergillosis. The authors studied two patients with leukemia. The nodules seen on high-resolution computed tomography corresponded to areas of hemorrhagic infarction, necrotic coagulation and fungal hyphae infiltration whereas ground glass halo corresponded to intra alveolar hemorrhage. Nodules with halo sign were closely correlated with anatomopathology findings. We concluded that the anatomopathology findings can clearly explain the image features of the lesions observed on high-resolution computed tomography. (author)

  14. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulya Gunbatar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3. During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML.

  15. Successful management of pulmonary hemorrhage and aspergillosis in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunbatar, Hulya; Demir, Cengiz; Kara, Erdal; Esen, Ramazan; Sertogullarindan, Bunyamin; Asker, Selvi

    2015-01-01

    A 35-year-old man presented with a one month history of gingival bleeding. He was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML-M3). During treatment he developed alveolar hemorrhage for which he was treated with a steroid. After the steroid treatment he developed a nodule, a cavitary lesion and atelectasia in the left lung. He was treated with voriconazole. After therapy with voriconazole his lesion significantly decreased. This case illustrates the efficacy and safety of antifungal therapy with voriconazole for aspergillosis complicated by AML.

  16. Comparison of Real-Time PCR, Conventional PCR, and Galactomannan Antigen Detection by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Using Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid Samples from Hematology Patients for Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Pagano, Livio; Pagliari, Gabriella; Fianchi, Luana; Mele, Luca; La Sorda, Marilena; Franco, Angelica; Fadda, Giovanni

    2003-01-01

    An iCycler iQ real-time PCR assay targeting 18S rRNA Aspergillus-specific sequences was developed for the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). Positive findings were obtained for 18 of 20 (90%) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from patients with probable or confirmed IPA and were obtained for none of the 24 BAL samples from patients with no clinical evidence of aspergillosis. These results were concordant with those of a nested PCR assay, which detected 90% of the patients with IPA, while galactomannan ELISA revealed positivity for 100% of these patients, suggesting that combined use of methods might improve the diagnosis of IPA. PMID:12904419

  17. Immunopathogenesis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and airway remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauffman, HF

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a hypersensitivity lung disease clinically characterized by manifestation of wheezing, pulmonary infiltrates and bronchiectasis and fibrosis which afflicts asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The pathophysiologic mechanisms are mediated by a

  18. Differential diagnosis of infections in a patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ghiringhelli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of a 65-years-old patient with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, receiving oxygen therapy and resistant to antibiotic therapy. He was admitted with high fever, productive cough, marked leukocytosis, and chest X-ray findings of infiltration and fluid levels within lung cysts. A differential diagnosis was essential to start an adequate treatment and avoid the rapid worsening of patients respiratory status. In patients with chronic pulmonary diseases under immunotherapy, micotic infections should be considered. Aspergillus fumigatus was cultured from bronchial washing fluid and we diagnosed chronic necrotizing pulmonary aspergillosis (CNPA. Oral itraconazole was started and his symptoms and laboratory data markedly improved.

  19. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis requiring "hybrid" extracorporeal life support, and complicated by acute necrotizing pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisan, M; Lafargue, M; Calderon, J; Oses, P; Ouattara, A

    2013-04-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP), which was first described by Rosen in 1958, is a rare disease characterized by impaired surfactant metabolism that provokes the accumulation of proteinaceous material in the alveoli. PAP is usually an auto-immune disease though, less commonly, may be congenital or secondary to another underlying disorder, such as infection, an immunodeficiency or a haematological disease. A positive diagnosis can be made with the appearance of "crazy-paving" on a computed tomography scan, with a milky fluid bronchial aspiration. A cytological examination will also show eosinophilic material and pink stained periodic acid-Schiff-positive material. A whole lung lavage is the most widely accepted therapy for hypoxemic PAP. Herein, we report the case of a 27-year-old woman admitted into our intensive care unit for hypoxemic PAP that was complicated by a pulmonary embolism. Because the patient presented with refractory hypoxemia associated with a brief cardiac arrest, femoral veno-arterial extracorporeal life support (ECLS) was rapidly inserted. Under ECLS, the patient subsequently developed "Harlequin syndrome", which was managed using an original and minimally invasive method. A whole lung lavage as well as prone positioning was effectively performed under ECLS, and resulted in substantial improvement in oxygenation. The patient could be discharged from the hospital 40 days later.

  20. Evaluation of the Double Agar Gel Immunodiffusion Test and of the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay in the Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Patients with Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Zacarias de Azevedo

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA depends on the radiologic image and the identification of specific antibodies. The present study aimed to evaluate accuracy parameters of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and of the determination of serum galactomannan level in the diagnosis of patients with CPA, comparing these results with the double agar gel immunodiffusion (DID test. In addition, the prevalence of cross-reactivity and the serological progression after treatment were evaluated by comparing DID and ELISA. Six study groups were formed: G1: 22 patients with CPA, 17 of whom had Aspergillus fungus ball, one chronic cavitary pulmonary aspergillosis (CCPA and four chronic fibrosing pulmonary aspergillosis (CFPA; G2: 28 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB; G3: 23 patients with histoplasmosis (HST; G4: 50 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM; G5: 20 patients with cryptococcosis (CRC; and G6: 200 healthy controls. Serum antibodies were measured by DID and ELISA, with two antigen preparations--Aspergillus fumigatus (DID1, ELISA1 and a pool of A. fumigatus, A. flavus and A. niger antigens (DID2, ELISA2. The Platélia Aspergillus Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA kit was used to measure galactomannan. The cut-off points of ELISA were determined for each antigen preparation and for the 95% and 99% confidence intervals. Despite the low sensitivity, DID was the technique of choice due to its specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive likelihood ratio-especially with the antigen pool and due to the low frequency of cross-reactivity. ELISA1 and a 0.090 cut-off showed high sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive value, but a high frequency of cross-reactivity with CRC. The best degree of agreement was observed between ELISA1 and ELISA2. The detection of serum galactomannan showed high sensitivity, comparable to ELISA2. The immunodiffusion test showed an excellent relationship with the progression after

  1. Literature review of 35 cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease complicated with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis%慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并侵袭性肺曲霉病35例文献分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘菁; 刘学东

    2013-01-01

    Objective To review the reported cases of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in recent 10 years in China in terms of risk factors,clinical and imaging characteristics,in an attempt to provide important clues for prompt and accurate diagnosis.Methods The literature reports of COPD complicated with IPA from 2002 to 2012 in China were analyzed retrospectively.A total of 35 cases were identfied and reviewed in terms of the relevant clinical data.Results Broad spectrum antibiotic treatment was found in 33 of the 35 cases.Long-term use of glucocorticoids was documented in 34 cases.The most common clinical symptoms included dyspnea,chest tightness,breathlessness,chest pain,fever and pulmonary rales.Conclusions Broad spectrum antibiotic treatment,long-term use of glucocorticoids and invasive procedures are the risk factors of IPA in COPD patients.The clinical manifestations are variable and nonspecific.Early diagnosis and empirical antifungal treatment are effective for improving the outcome.%目的 总结10年来国内报道的慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)合并侵袭性肺曲霉病(IPA)的危险因素、临床特点、影像学特点、诊断方法,为临床医师早期、快速、准确地诊断该病提供依据.方法 回顾性分析2002-2012年国内有关COPD合并IPA的文献资料,统计分析并总结了35例COPD合并IPA患者的临床资料.结果 35例患者中应用广谱抗生素33例,长期应用糖皮质激素34例.常见症状是呼吸困难、胸闷憋气、胸痛、发热和肺部啰音.结论 使用广谱抗生素、长期激素治疗、有创操作是COPD合并IPA的危险因素,患者临床和胸部CT表现多样,缺乏特异性;减少危险因素,做到早期诊断和早期治疗是改善预后的有效方法.

  2. Cerebral Air Embolism from Angioinvasive Cavitary Aspergillosis

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    Chen Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nontraumatic cerebral air embolism cases are rare. We report a case of an air embolism resulting in cerebral infarction related to angioinvasive cavitary aspergillosis. To our knowledge, there have been no previous reports associating these two conditions together. Case Presentation. A 32-year-old female was admitted for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Her hospital course was complicated by pulmonary aspergillosis. On hospital day 55, she acutely developed severe global aphasia with right hemiplegia. A CT and CT-angiogram of her head and neck were obtained demonstrating intravascular air emboli within the left middle cerebral artery (MCA branches. She was emergently taken for hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT. Evaluation for origin of the air embolus revealed an air focus along the left lower pulmonary vein. Over the course of 48 hours, her symptoms significantly improved. Conclusion. This unique case details an immunocompromised patient with pulmonary aspergillosis cavitary lesions that invaded into a pulmonary vein and caused a cerebral air embolism. With cerebral air embolisms, the acute treatment option differs from the typical ischemic stroke pathway and the provider should consider emergent HBOT. This case highlights the importance of considering atypical causes of acute ischemic stroke.

  3. Altered CD8+ T-cell counts as an early predictor of prognosis in critically ill immunocompromised patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Na; Wang Hao; Long Yun; Liu Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of critically ill immunocompromised (CIIC) patients has increased dramatically in recent years,and they represent a high risk population for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) infection.Host immunity should play a major role in determining the outcome and recovery of these patients.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dynamic changes in host immune status and its potential influence on prognosis in CIIC patients with IPA.Methods We monitored the evolution of a number of key cellular and humoral parameters on days 1,3,and 10 (D1,D3 and D10) following ICU admission in sixty-two CIIC patients with microbiological evidence of IPA.We included immunoglobulins IgG,IgA and IgM,complement factors C3 and C4,and lymphocyte subgroups CD3+,CD4+,CD8+,CD28+CD4+,and CD28+CD8+ T cells,CD19+B cells,and CD3-CD16+CD56+ natural killer cells (NK).Results The primary outcome was 28-day mortality.Thirty-eight (61.3%) patients died within the 28 days following ICU admission.Compared to patients who died,CD3+,CD8+,CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts on D1,D3,and D10,CD28+CD4+ T-cell counts on D3 and D10,and NK counts on D3 and D10 were significantly higher in survivors.Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of immune parameters predicting 28-day mortality revealed area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.82 (95% CI 0.71-0.92),0.94 (95% CI 0.87-0.99),and 0.94 (95% CI 0.85-0.99) for CD8+ T-cell counts for D1,D3,and D10 respectively,and 0.84 (95% CI 0.75-0.94),0.92 (95% CI 0.85-0.99),and 0.90 (95% CI 0.79-0.99) for CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts for D1,D3,and D10 respectively.Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that CD8+ T-cell counts <149.5×106 cells/L and CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts <75×106 cells/L at ICU admission were associated with lower survival probabilities in CIIC patients with IPA (both Log rank:P<0.001).Conclusions Low CD8+ and CD28+CD8+ T-cell counts were associated with high mortality in CIIC patients with IPA.Early counts of CD8+ and

  4. Necrotizing enterocolitis

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    ... please enable JavaScript. Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the death of tissue in the intestine. It occurs most often in premature or sick babies. Causes Necrotizing enterocolitis occurs when the lining of the ...

  5. Necrotizing vasculitis

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000432.htm Necrotizing vasculitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Necrotizing vasculitis is a group of disorders that involve inflammation ...

  6. 血清甘露聚糖结合凝集素检测在诊断肺烟曲霉菌感染中的意义%Application of detecting mannose-binding lectins in pulmonary aspergillosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡华; 杨燕; 陈影; 李学政; 滕隔玲; 张琳琳

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of mannose-binding lectins (MBL) in pulmonary aspergillosis.Methods A total of 96 adult Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups of aspergillus fumigatus (A.fumigatus) pulmonary,colonization and normal (n =32 each).An intramuscular injection (0.6 mg/kg × 3 d) of dexamethasone sodium phosphate and a nostril drop (1 × 107 cfu/ml) were administered for modeling.The animals were sacrificed at Days 3,7,14 and 28 post-inoculation and blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture for MBL detection.Lung tissues were prepared for routine pathology examinations.The lung tissues infected with A.fumigatus showed remarkable inflammatory reactions.The serum value of MBL was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).And the results were compared and analyzed.Results All infected lung tissues showed remarkable inflammatory reactions.The serum MBL levels of A.fumigatus pulmonary and colonization groups were (8.57 ±0.88) and (7.87 ± 0.45) ng/ml and both significantly increased compared with non-pulmonary aspergillosis group (P < 0.05).The area under the curve was 0.744 (P =0.002).The diagnosis of MBL had a sensitivity of 75.0%,a specificity of 86.7%,a positive predictive value of 87.1% and a negative predictive value of 74.3% for pulmonary aspergillosis.The inflammatory cells infiltration were detected in pathology in infection and colonization groups at Day 3 and Day 7.Conclusion The detection of serum MBL may be used for the diagnosis of pulmonary aspergillosis.%目的 探讨血清甘露聚糖结合凝集素(MBL)动态检测在诊断肺烟曲霉菌感染中的意义.方法 成年Wistar大鼠96只,雌雄各半,按随机数字表法随机分为3组,每组32只:(1)对照组:未免疫抑制,未接种烟曲霉菌;(2)感染组(免疫抑制+接种烟曲霉菌):采用地塞米松0.6 mg/kg肌肉注射×3d,通过双侧鼻孔分别滴入烟曲霉菌孢子(1×107 cfu/ml),建立大鼠肺曲菌病模型;(3)定植组:仅双侧

  7. Invasive aspergillosis related to ibrutinib therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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    Benjamin Arthurs, MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in a patient taking ibrutinib, a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor used to treat refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We hypothesize that ibrutinib promoted this infection by suppressing innate immune responses against Aspergillus. Clinicians should be aware of potential Aspergillus infections in patients treated with this drug.

  8. Abdominal aspergillosis: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Suk Keu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hye Jin, E-mail: kimhyejin@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jae Ho, E-mail: jhbyun@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ah Young, E-mail: aykim@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moon-Gyu, E-mail: mglee@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon, E-mail: hkha@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 388-1, Poongnap2-dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul, 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    Objective: In order to retrospectively evaluate the CT findings of abdominal aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Materials and methods: CT scans were reviewed with regard to the sites, number, morphologic appearance, attenuation, and the contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions in six patients (5 women, 1 man; mean age, 43.4 years; range, 23-59 years) with pathologically proved abdominal aspergillosis by two gastrointestinal radiologists in consensus. Medical records were also reviewed to determine each patient's clinical status and outcome. Results: All patients were immunocompromised state: 4 patients received immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ transplantation and 2 patients received chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Aspergillosis involved blood vessels (n = 3), liver (n = 2), spleen (n = 2), gastrointestinal tract (n = 2), native kidney (n = 1), transplanted kidney (n = 1), peritoneum (n = 1), and retroperitoneum (n = 1). CT demonstrated solid organ or bowel infarction or perforation secondary to vascular thrombosis or pseudoaneurysm, multiple low-attenuating lesions of solid organs presenting as abscesses, concentric bowel wall thickening mimicking typhlitis, or diffuse or nodular infiltration of the peritoneum and retroperitoneum. Conclusion: Familiarity with findings commonly presenting as angioinvasive features or abscesses on CT, may facilitate the diagnosis of rare and fatal abdominal aspergillosis.

  9. Invasive aspergillosis in developing countries.

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    Chakrabarti, Arunaloke; Chatterjee, Shiv Sekhar; Das, Ashim; Shivaprakash, M R

    2011-04-01

    To review invasive aspergillosis (IA) in developing countries, we included those countries, which are mentioned in the document of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), called the Emerging and Developing Economies List, 2009. A PubMed/Medline literature search was performed for studies concerning IA reported during 1970 through March 2010 from these countries. IA is an important cause of morbidity and mortality of hospitalized patients of developing countries, though the exact frequency of the disease is not known due to inadequate reporting and facilities to diagnose. Only a handful of centers from India, China, Thailand, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Malaysia, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Sudan, South Africa, Turkey, Hungary, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Argentina had reported case series of IA. As sub-optimum hospital care practice, hospital renovation work in the vicinity of immunocompromised patients, overuse or misuse of steroids and broad-spectrum antibiotics, use of contaminated infusion sets/fluid, and increase in intravenous drug abusers have been reported from those countries, it is expected to find a high rate of IA among patients with high risk, though hard data is missing in most situations. Besides classical risk factors for IA, liver failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and tuberculosis are the newly recognized underlying diseases associated with IA. In Asia, Africa and Middle East sino-orbital or cerebral aspergillosis, and Aspergillus endophthalmitis are emerging diseases and Aspergillus flavus is the predominant species isolated from these infections. The high frequency of A. flavus isolation from these patients may be due to higher prevalence of the fungus in the environment. Cerebral aspergillosis cases are largely due to an extension of the lesion from invasive Aspergillus sinusitis. The majority of the centers rely on conventional techniques including direct microscopy, histopathology, and culture to diagnose IA

  10. Necrotizing Fasciitis

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    Jagdish Sadasivan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is among the most challenging surgical infections faced by a surgeon. The difficulty in managing this entity is due to a combination of difficulty in diagnosis, and also of early as well as late management. For the patient, such a diagnosis means prolonged hospital stay, painful dressings, an extended recovery, and in some unfortunate cases even loss of limb or life. Necrotizing fasciitis is a fairly common condition in surgical practice in the Indian context resulting in a fairly large body of clinical experience. This article reviews literature on MEDLINE with the key words ′′necrotizing,′′ ′′fasciitis,′′ and ′′necrotizing infections′′ from 1970, as well as from articles cross referenced therein. The authors attempt to draw comparisons to their own experience in managing this condition to give an Indian perspective to the condition.

  11. [Pseudotumoral allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero González, I; Montero Martínez, C; Blanco Aparicio, M; Valiño López, P; Verea Hernando, H

    2000-06-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) develops as the result of a hypersensitivity reaction to fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Clinical and radiological presentation can be atypical, requiring a high degree of suspicion on the part of the physician who treats such patients. We report the cases of two patients with APBA in whom the form of presentation--with few asthma symptoms, images showing lobar atelectasia and hilar adenopathy--led to an initial suspicion of lung cancer.

  12. Role of inhaled amphotericin in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

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    I S Sehgal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is an immunological pulmonary disorder caused by immune reactions mounted against the ubiquitous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease clinically manifests with poorly controlled asthma, hemoptysis, systemic manifestations like fever, anorexia and weight loss, fleeting pulmonary opacities and bronchiectasis. The natural course of the disease is characterized by repeated episodes of exacerbations. Almost 30-40% of the patients require prolonged therapy, which currently consists of corticosteroids and anti-fungal azoles; both these agents have significant adverse reactions. Amphotericin B administered via the inhaled route can achieve a high concentration in the small airways with minimal systemic side-effects. Nebulized amphotericin B has been used in the management of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The aim of this review is to study the utility of inhaled amphotericin in ABPA.

  13. Aspergillosis and proventricular impaction in an ostrich (Struthio camelus

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    Shahrzad Azizi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis is the most common mycotic infection in a wide variety of bird and causes significant economic losses. The present study described concurrent occurrence of aspergillosis and proventricular impaction in a 4-year-old male ostrich. The bird had respiratory problems, coughing and anorexia. Postmortem examination revealed numerous greenish-white caseous foci, 0.5 to 1 cm in diameter distributed on the surfaces of the air sacs and throughout the lungs. In histopathological study, multifocal areas of caseous necrosis that surrounded by inflammatory cells including heterophils, lymphocytes and macrophages were present. Long branching septated hyphae were visible in the necrotic areas with hematoxylin and eosin and Periodic acid-Schiff staining. Thrombi were present in the blood vessels. The proventriculus was full of gravel.

  14. Bronchopulmonary allergic aspergillosis Aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica

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    Rodrigo Ramírez

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available

    A series of well defined entitles associated with colonization or invasion by fungi of the genus Aspergillus are grouped under the term Aspergillosis; there are various modalities of pulmonary involvement, namely, extrinsec asthma, extrinsec allergic alveolitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, aspergilloma and an invasive form in debilitated terminal patients; besldes there exists a form of food poisoning. We report on the case of a 45 year-old asthmatic woman suffering from allerglc bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and sum. maryze the clinical and laboratory features of the different pulmonary forms of aspergillosis.

    El término Aspergllosis reúne una serle de entidades bien definidas, causadas por hongos del género Aspergillus. En este artículo se presenta el caso de una mujer de 45 años con aspergllosis broncopulmonar alérgica, atendida en el Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paúl, de Medellín y se hace una somera revisión clínico-patológica de las diferentes formas de aspergllosis pulmonar.

  15. Image findings of a false positive radioactive iodine-131 uptake mimicking metastasis in pulmonary aspergillosis identified on single photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography

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    Kamaleshwaran Koramadai Karuppusamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High doses of iodine-131 are commonly used in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after total or subtotal thyroidectomy, in order to ablate the remaining cancer or normal thyroid tissue. Multiple different false-positive scans can occur in the absence of residual thyroid tissue or metastases. The authors present a case of abnormal uptake of radioactive iodine in the aspergilloma, potentially masquerading as pulmonary metastases.

  16. 实体器官移植后侵袭性肺曲菌病的CT表现%CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after solid organ transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董莘; 李海斌

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The morbidity and mortality of lung infection after solid organ transplantation remains high, especial y the opportunistic aspergil osis infection. The early diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergil osis is difficult. OBJECTIVE:To summarize the CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergil osis after solid organ transplantation. METHODS:The VIP database, CNKI database, Medline database, Highwire database and Foreign Journals Integration System were retrieved with the key words of“solid organ transplantation/renal transplantation/liver transplantation/lung transplantation/heart transplantation, aspergil osis, fungus, mold, pulmonary invasive, tomography computerized”in Chinese and English for the articles published from January 2001 to October 2012. The clinical reports related with the CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergil osis among the reports of pulmonary aspergil osis infections and the fungus or mold lung infections were selected. Secondary manual retrieval of solid organ transplantation was performed, and the literatures on the CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergil osis after solid organ transplantation were included. Reproductive research and atypical report were excluded. RESULTS AND CONCLUSlON:The typical chest CT manifestations of invasive pulmonary aspergil osis after solid organ transplantation included nodules, masses, consolidations and ground-glass opacities. With infection time prolonged, the halo sign, reversed halo sign, cavitis and air crescent sign appeared successively. Different incidences of these signs may be associated with the time interval between onset to a CT examination, fungus preventive treatment time and early antifungal treatment. Meaningful results are the relationship between invasive pulmonary aspergil osis signs and the prognosis of patients. No consolidations or masses and presence of smal cavitis may be related with a better prognosis. Greater nodules, multi-infarct consolidation

  17. Chronic aspergillosis of the lungs: Unravelling the terminology and radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Hedayati, V.; Patel, K. [King' s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, The Department of Radiology, King' s Health Partners, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hansell, D.M. [The Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    The propensity for Aspergillus spp. to cause lung disease has long been recognised but the satisfactory classification of these disorders is challenging. The problems caused by invasive disease in severely neutropenic patients, saprophytic infection of pre-existing fibrotic cavities and allergic reactions to Aspergillus are well documented. In contrast, a more chronic form of Aspergillus-related lung disease that has the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality is under-reported. The symptoms of this form of Aspergillus infection may be non-specific and the radiologist may be the first to suspect a diagnosis of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. The current review considers the classification conundrums in diseases caused by Aspergillus spp. and discusses the typical clinical and radiological profile of patients with chronic pulmonary aspergillosis. (orig.)

  18. CT "halo sign" in pulmonary tuberculoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, M; Volta, S; Stroscio, S; Romeo, P; Pandolfo, I

    1992-01-01

    The CT halo sign has been described as the CT finding of a low-attenuation zone surrounding a pulmonary nodule. It is an early clue to the diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. We describe a case of CT halo sign associated with a pulmonary tuberculoma. Therefore, we think that a diagnosis other than invasive pulmonary aspergillosis should be considered in the presence of the CT halo sign in immunocompetent patients.

  19. Risk and Prevention of Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recommendations, please visit CDC’s Basic Facts about Mold webpage . If you are a healthcare provider or healthcare ... on diagnostic strategies of invasive aspergillosis. Curr Pharm Design 2013;19(20):3595-614. Weber DJ et ...

  20. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  1. Necrotizing Pneumonia Caused by Penicillium chrysogenum

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    D’Antonio, Domenico; Violante, Beatrice; Farina, Claudio; Sacco, Rocco; Angelucci, Domenico; Masciulli, Maurizio; Iacone, Antonio; Romano, Ferdinando

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of necrotizing pneumonia due to Penicillium chrysogenum in a 57-year-old woman operated on for lung cancer. The residual right lower pulmonary lobe was infiltrated by Penicillium chrysogenum. The patient underwent a second pulmonary right lobectomy and was successfully treated with oral itraconazole. To our knowledge, this is the first case of pneumonia due to P. chrysogenum.

  2. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in an adult with Kartagener syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Inderpaul Singh; Dhooria, Sahajal; Bal, Amanjit; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-08-06

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a pulmonary disorder resulting from immune responses directed against inhaled Aspergillus fumigatus antigens. It manifests with poorly controlled asthma, fleeting pulmonary opacities and structural lung damage in the form of bronchiectasis. Initially defined in individuals suffering from bronchial asthma and cystic fibrosis, it has also been described in patients with other structural lung disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary tuberculosis, idiopathic bronchiectasis and others. Kartagener syndrome is a manifestation of primary ciliary dyskinesia characterised by the presence of dextrocardia, bronchiectasis and chronic sinusitis. We report a case of ABPA in an adult suffering from Kartagener syndrome. We also performed a systematic review of the literature on the association between Kartagener syndrome and ABPA.

  3. Immunopathology and immunogenetics of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Alan P

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1%-2% of asthmatic and 7%-9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE, and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10 -1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4, and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA.

  4. Immunopathology and Immunogenetics of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Knutsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1%–2% of asthmatic and 7%–9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE, and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA polymorphisms, IL-10 −1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2 polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4, and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA.

  5. Sinobronchial allergic aspergillosis with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a less common co-existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Kant, Surya; Prakash, Ved; Saheer, S

    2014-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is an immunological pulmonary disorder that is characterised by a hyper-responsiveness of the airways to Aspergillus fumigatus. Although several other fungi may also present with similar clinical conditions, Aspergillus remains the most common fungal pathogen causing airway infections. Co-existence of ABPA with allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS) is an uncommon presentation. The concept of one airway/one disease justifies the co-existence of ABPA with AAS, but it does not always hold true. We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with symptoms suggestive of bronchial asthma. On further investigation, the radiological pattern showed fleeting shadows and CT scan showed central cystic bronchiectatic changes characteristic of ABPA. The nasal secretions were investigated for the presence of Aspergillus and were found to be positive. Hence a diagnosis of ABPA with AAS was established. The patient was treated with oral steroids and antifungal drugs. PMID:25371437

  6. Sinobronchial allergic aspergillosis with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a less common co-existence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Kant, Surya; Prakash, Ved; Saheer, S

    2014-11-04

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is an immunological pulmonary disorder that is characterised by a hyper-responsiveness of the airways to Aspergillus fumigatus. Although several other fungi may also present with similar clinical conditions, Aspergillus remains the most common fungal pathogen causing airway infections. Co-existence of ABPA with allergic Aspergillus sinusitis (AAS) is an uncommon presentation. The concept of one airway/one disease justifies the co-existence of ABPA with AAS, but it does not always hold true. We report a case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with symptoms suggestive of bronchial asthma. On further investigation, the radiological pattern showed fleeting shadows and CT scan showed central cystic bronchiectatic changes characteristic of ABPA. The nasal secretions were investigated for the presence of Aspergillus and were found to be positive. Hence a diagnosis of ABPA with AAS was established. The patient was treated with oral steroids and antifungal drugs.

  7. Post-influenza aspergillosis, do not underestimate influenza B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nulens EF

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Eric FL Nulens,1 Marc JC Bourgeois,2 Marijke BML Reynders1 1Laboratory Medicine, Medical Microbiology, 2Department of Intensive Care, Algemeen Ziekenhuis Sint-Jan Brugge-Oostende AV, Brugge, Belgium Abstract: Our objective is to highlight and focus on post-influenza aspergillosis, triggered by influenza B virus. This relatively new clinical entity is often associated with a fulminant course of respiratory decline and high mortality. A 51-year immunocompetent woman, without any medical history or risk factors for developing a complicated influenza infection, was admitted to the intensive care unit. During admission, she presented with an afebrile flu-like syndrome, myocarditis, rhabdomyolysis, multiple organ failure, and evolved to severe respiratory distress. The broncho-alveolar lavage contained influenza B RNA, and the culture revealed Aspergillus fumigatus. Despite maximal organ support, immunoglobulin, antiviral and antifungal therapy, the patient died. This case demonstrates that influenza B virus may be life threatening even to immunocompetent adults and may trigger an invasive Aspergillus superinfection. Keywords: post-influenza aspergillosis, influenza B, invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, rhabdomyolysis, ARDS, antiviral therapy 

  8. Clinical analysis of chronic airway diseases combined with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis%慢性气道疾病合并侵袭性肺曲霉病临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴然然; 张旻

    2013-01-01

    目的 回顾性总结慢性气道疾病合并侵袭性肺曲霉病(IPA)患者的临床资料,分析慢性气道疾病患者发生IPA的危险因素、临床特点、诊断、治疗和预后.方法 收集2007年1月-2012年8月上海交通大学医学院附属瑞金医院呼吸科和上海交通大学附属第一人民医院呼吸科病房收治的慢性气道疾病合并IPA患者的临床资料.分析其危险因素、临床表现、实验室检查和影像学检查特征、诊断、治疗及预后.结果 共入选18例患者,2例患者经肺活组织穿刺病理学检查明确诊断为IPA,16例患者临床诊断为IPA.男14例,女4例,年龄29~80岁,中位年龄为62.2岁.慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD) 13例,支气管哮喘3例,支气管扩张2例.COPD和支气管哮喘患者住院后均应用糖皮质激素治疗,包括静脉注射甲泼尼龙及口服泼尼松,疗程均>2周.3例支气管哮喘患者平时均不规则口服泼尼松.2例COPD和2例支气管哮喘患者有口服邮购的“中成药”(含糖皮质激素)史,疗程均>半年.2例支气管扩张患者因反复感染,长期口服抗生素.13例COPD患者中4例合并糖尿病.所有患者均接受抗真菌药物治疗,其中6例患者死于IPA和呼吸衰竭.结论 慢性气道疾病易合并严重的IPA,大部分患者由于基础疾病急性加重反复使用糖皮质激素治疗,临床和影像学检查无特异性,当临床高度怀疑IPA时应给予尽早诊断和治疗,可以降低病死率.%Objective To retrospectively study the clinical data of the patients with chronic airway disease combined with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), and to analyze the risk factors, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of IPA. Methods Clinical data of chronic airway disease patients with IPA were collected. All the patients were hospitalized in Ruijin Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Shanghai First People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai

  9. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a unique presentation in a pediatric patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppmann, Michael V.; Monson, Matthew [Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Infection by the Aspergillus species of fungus can result in a variety of clinically and radiographically unique pulmonary diseases. The specific disease manifested is most dependent upon the immunocompetency of the infected individual. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is most commonly seen in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. Since its original description in 1952, much has been published describing the radiographic manifestations of this disease. In this article, we present the unusual case of a 13-year-old whose initial radiographic presentation was that of a dense lobar consolidation. Additionally, we highlight the contributory role of the radiologist in guiding the appropriate clinical work-up and treatment of this disease. (orig.)

  10. Conidial heads (Fruiting Bodies) as a hallmark for histopathological diagnosis of angioinvasive aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzarin, Luciana Depiere; Mariano, Livia Caroline Barbosa; Macedo, Maria Cristina Martins de Almeida; Batista, Marjorie Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillosis is a mycosis that afflicts immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts; among the former it exhibits different clinical pictures, and among the latter the infection renders an invasive form of the disease. The histologic diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis is somewhat challenging mostly because of some morphological similarities between other fungi. However, when present, the conidial heads are pathognomonic of aspergillosis. The authors present the case of a 68-year-old woman who was submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the pursuit of multiple myeloma treatment. The post-transplantation period was troublesome with the development of severe neutropenia, human respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia, and disseminated aspergillosis, which was suspected because of a positive serum galactomannan antigen determination, and resulted in a fatal outcome. The autopsy findings showed diffuse alveolar damage associated with angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis with numerous hyphae and conidial heads in the lung parenchyma histology. The authors call attention to the aid of autopsy in confirming the diagnosis of this deep mycosis, since only the research of the galactomannan antigen may be insufficient and uncertain due to its specificity and of the possibility of false-positive results. PMID:26894041

  11. NECROTIZING FASCIITIS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kharlamova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors presented a review of literature of necrotizing fasciitis in children. A rare case of necrotizing fasciitis in 3-year-old child is described. The difficulties of differential diagnostics of the given disease are presented.

  12. [Asthma, alveolitis, aspergillosis, berylliosis. What to do when there is allergic reaction of the lung?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vier, H; Protze, M; Brunner, R; Gillissen, A

    2003-03-06

    Among the major allergic pulmonary disorders are bronchial asthma, extrinsic allergic alveolitis, allergic aspergillosis and berylliosis. Asthma is diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms (wheezing, respiratory distress, tight chest, coughing) and lung function tests possibly supplemented by allergic and provocative testing. Asthma treatment is differentiated into long-term medication and as-required medication. Specific immunotherapy is considered the sole causal therapy. Extrinsic allergic alveolitis is work- or hobby-related (farmer's/cheese worker's/bird-fancier's lung) and manifests as diffuse pneumonitis with dyspnea, coughing and fever. For the diagnosis, the antigen provocative test in particular plays a major role. In the main, treatment comprises strict avoidance of allergens. The diagnosis of allergic pulmonary aspergillosis is based on the history, clinical findings, skin tests, serology and radiography. Treatment is stage-related by means of immunosuppressive agents. In terms of radiographic and pulmonary function findings, berylliosis is similar to sarcoidosis. Here, too, immunosuppressive agents are to the fore.

  13. Clinical features of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in critically ill patients with chronic respiratory diseases%重症慢性呼吸道疾病合并侵袭性肺曲霉病的临床特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    詹庆元; 贺航咏; 童朝晖; 栗芳; 孙兵; 王辰

    2008-01-01

    目的 总结重症慢性呼吸道疾病(CRD)合并侵袭性肺曲霉病(IPA)的临床特点,为早期诊断和治疗提供依据.方法 分析2004年10月至2007年2月在北京朝阳医院呼吸科重症监护室(RICU)住院的149例痰或BALF分离出曲霉的CRD患者资料.以SPSS 10.0统计软件进行数据处理,所有计量资料以均数±标准差表示,计数资料以例数表示.计量资料采用t检验,计数资料采用X2检验.结果 149例CRD患者中共收集16例IPA病例(COPD 11例,COPD合并支气管哮喘4例,支气管扩张症1例),其中3例确诊,10例临床诊断,3例拟诊.12例在人RICU前使用过大量糖皮质激素,15例使用广谱抗生素.15例临床表现为严重气道痉挛,9例行无创通气失败,14例因严重呼吸衰竭而需有创机械通气.12例X线胸片可见明显渗出影.外周血白细胞及中性粒细胞比例在疾病后期迅速增高;早期气管镜检查可见气道黏膜充血、水肿、糜烂,气道痉挛,痰液黏稠,后期气道黏膜可出现伪膜;早期真菌病原学检查阳性率低(2/12),后期阳性率高(10/12);早期治疗的患者存活率高(4/4),晚期治疗效果差(11/12),由呼吸衰竭迅速进展为多脏器衰竭是最主要的死亡原因.结论 CRD合并IPA并不少见,预后差.根据临床特点进行早期诊断及经验性治疗可改善患者的预后.%Objective To describe the clinical features of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis(IPA) in critically ill patients with chronic respiratory diseases(CRD)and to estimate its value for early diagnosis and treatment. Methods Retrospective study of critically ill CRD patients with Dositive Aspergillus from sputum or bronchial alveolar lavage fluid in a respiratory ICU of a teaching hospital.Results There were 149 CRD patients admitted between October 2004 and February 2007. Among these patients,16 cases of IPA(11 COPD,4 COPD with asthma,1 bronchiectasis)were collected.Three cases fulfilled the criteria of proven IPA,10 of probable

  14. Cutaneous Invasive Aspergillosis: Retrospective Multicenter Study of the French Invasive-Aspergillosis Registry and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardeschi, Céline; Foulet, Francoise; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Ortonne, Nicolas; Sitbon, Karine; Quereux, Gaëlle; Lortholary, Olivier; Chosidow, Olivier; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-07-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) has poor prognosis in immunocompromised patients. Skin manifestations, when present, should contribute to an early diagnosis. The authors aimed to provide prevalence data and a clinical and histologic description of cutaneous manifestations of primary cutaneous IA (PCIA) and secondary CIA (SCIA) in a unique clinical series of IA and present the results of an exhaustive literature review of CIA. Cases of proven and probable IA with cutaneous manifestations were retrospectively extracted from those registered between 2005 and 2010 in a prospective multicenter aspergillosis database held by the National Reference Center for Invasive Mycoses and Antifungals, Pasteur Institute, France. Patients were classified as having PCIA (i.e., CIA without extracutaneous manifestations) or SCIA (i.e., disseminated IA). Among the 1,410 patients with proven or probable IA, 15 had CIA (1.06%), 5 PCIA, and 10 SCIA. Hematological malignancies were the main underlying condition (12/15). Patients with PCIA presented infiltrated and/or suppurative lesions of various localizations not related to a catheter site (4/5), whereas SCIA was mainly characterized by disseminated papules and nodules but sometimes isolated nodules or cellulitis. Histologic data were available for 11 patients, and for 9, similar for PCIA and SCIA, showed a dense dermal polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate, with the epidermis altered in PCIA only. Periodic acid Schiff and Gomori-Grocott methenamine silver nitrate staining for all but 2 biopsies revealed hyphae compatible with Aspergillus. Aspergillus flavus was isolated in all cases of PCIA, with Aspergillus fumigatus being the most frequent species (6/10) in SCIA. Two out 5 PCIA cases were treated surgically. The 3-month survival rate was 100% and 30% for PCIA and SCIA, respectively. Our study is the largest adult series of CIA and provides complete clinical and histologic data for the disease. Primary cutaneous IA should be recognized early

  15. Sinonasal aspergillosis in a British Shorthair cat in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Tamborini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 13-year-old, castrated male, British Shorthair cat presented for investigation of chronic, intermittent, bilateral epistaxis and stertor. CT revealed severe asymmetric bilateral intranasal involvement with extensive turbinate lysis, increased soft tissue attenuation and lysis of the sphenopalatine bone and cribriform plate. On retroflexed pharyngoscopy, a plaque-like mass occluded the choanae. Rostral rhinoscopic examination revealed extensive loss of nasal turbinates, necrotic tissue and mucosal fungal plaques in the left nasal cavity. The right nasal cavity was less severely affected. The nasal cavities were debrided extensively of plaques and necrotic tissue. Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated on fungal culture, and species identity was confirmed using comparative sequence analysis of the partial β-tubulin gene. On histopathology of nasal biopsies, there was ulcerative lymphoplasmacytic and neutrophilic rhinitis, and fungal hyphae were identified on nasal mucosa, consistent with a non-invasive mycosis. The cat was treated with oral itraconazole after endoscopic debridement, but signs relapsed 4.5 months from diagnosis. Residual left nasal fungal plaques were again debrided endoscopically and oral posaconazole was administered for 6 months. Fourteen months from diagnosis, the cat remains clinically well with mild intermittent left nasal discharge secondary to atrophic rhinitis. Relevance and novel information This is the first case of rhinoscopically confirmed sinonasal aspergillosis to be diagnosed in a cat in the UK. Endoscopic confirmation of resolution of infection is useful in cases where mild nasal discharge persists after treatment.

  16. Evidence Supporting a Role for Mammalian Chitinases in Efficacy of Caspofungin against Experimental Aspergillosis in Immunocompromised Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.B. Verwer (Patricia); M.T. ten Kate (Marian); F.H. Falcone (Franco); S. Morroll (Shaun); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:Caspofungin, currently used as salvage therapy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA), strangely only causes morphological changes in fungal growth in vitro but does not inhibit the growth. In vivo it has good efficacy. Therefore the question arises how this in vivo activi

  17. Evaluation of the Aspergillus Western blot IgG kit for diagnosis of chronic aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, A; Flori, P; Hennequin, C; Dubus, J-C; Reynaud-Gaubert, M; Charpin, D; Vergnon, J M; Gay, P; Colly, A; Piarroux, R; Pelloux, H; Ranque, S

    2015-01-01

    Immunoprecipitin detection (IPD) is the current reference confirmatory technique for anti-Aspergillus antibody detection; however, the lack of standardization is a critical drawback of this assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Aspergillus Western blot (Asp-WB) IgG kit (LDBio Diagnostics, Lyon, France), a recently commercialized immunoblot assay for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of chronic aspergillosis. Three hundred eight serum samples from 158 patients with aspergillosis sensu lato (s.l.) were analyzed. More specifically, 267 serum samples were derived from patients with Aspergillus disease, including 89 cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis, 10 of aspergilloma, and 32 of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, while 41 samples were from patients with Aspergillus colonization, including 15 cystic fibrosis (CF) and 12 non-CF patients. For blood donor controls, the Asp-WB specificity was 94%, while the kit displayed a sensitivity for the aspergillosis s.l. diagnosis of 88.6%, with a diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of 119 (95% confidence interval [CI], 57 to 251). The DOR values were 185.22 (95% CI,78.79 to 435.45) and 43.74 (95% CI, 15.65 to 122.20) for the diagnosis of Aspergillus disease and Aspergillus colonization, respectively. Among the patients, the sensitivities of the Asp-WB in the diagnosis of Aspergillus colonization were 100% and 41.7% in CF and non-CF patients, respectively. The Asp-WB yielded fewer false-negative results than did IPD. In conclusion, the Asp-WB kit performed well for the diagnosis of various clinical presentations of aspergillosis in nonimmunocompromised patients, with an enhanced standardization and a higher sensitivity than with IPD, which is the current reference method.

  18. Direct molecular diagnosis of aspergillosis and CYP51A profiling from respiratory samples of French patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microbiological diagnosis of aspergillosis and triazole resistance is limited by poor culture yield. To better estimate this shortcoming, we compared culture and molecular detection of A. fumigatus in respiratory samples from French patients at risk for aspergillosis. Methods: A total of 97 respiratory samples including bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL, bronchial aspirates (BA, tracheal aspirates, sputa, pleural fluids, and lung biopsy were collected from 33 patients having invasive aspergillosis (n=12, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (n=3, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (n=7 or colonization (n=11 and 28 controls. Each specimen was evaluated by culture, pan-Aspergillus qPCR, and CYP51A PCR and sequencing. Results: One A. flavus and 19 A. fumigatus with one multiazole resistant strain (5.3% were cultured from 20 samples. Culture positivity was 62.5%, 75%, 42.9%, and 15.8% in ABPA, CPA, IA and colonized patients, respectively. Aspergillus detection rate was significantly higher by pan-Aspergillus qPCR than by culture in IA (90.5% vs 42.9%; P<0.05 and colonization group (73.7% vs 15.8%; P<0.05. The CYP51A PCR found one TR34/L98H along with 5 novel cyp51A mutations (4 non-synonymous and 1 promoter mutations, yet no association can be established currently between these novel mutations and azole resistance. The analysis of 11 matched pairs of BA and BAL samples found that 9/11 BA carried greater fungal load than BAL and CYP51A detection was more sensitive in BA than in BAL. Conclusion: Direct molecular detection of Aspergillus spp. and azole resistance markers are useful adjunct tools for comprehensive aspergillosis diagnosis. The observed superior diagnostic value of BAs to BAL fluids warrants more in-depth study.

  19. Pituitary aspergillosis abscess in an immunocompetent black ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pituitary aspergillosis abscess in an immunocompetent black woman. ... female patient showed up with amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome with infertility for several years. The CT Findings and hormonal studies strongly suggested pituitary ...

  20. Tomografia computadorizada na avaliação da aspergilose pulmonar angioinvasiva em pacientes com leucemia aguda Computed tomography in the assessment of angioinvasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Carneiro Leão

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os principais achados na tomografia computadorizada de pacientes portadores de leucemia aguda complicada com aspergilose pulmonar angioinvasiva. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas, retrospectivamente, as tomografias computadorizadas de 19 pacientes, avaliando-se a presença de consolidações, nódulos e massas, com ou sem sinal do halo, escavação e sinal do crescente aéreo. RESULTADOS: Áreas de consolidação foram o achado mais comum, ocorrendo em 12 dos 19 casos. A maioria delas apresentou o sinal do halo, enquanto escavação foi encontrada em 5 dos 12 casos com consolidações, sendo um deles com sinal do crescente aéreo. Nódulos e massas ocorreram em, respectivamente, seis e quatro casos, a maioria com sinal do halo. Escavação foi encontrada em apenas um caso de massa. Outros achados observados foram pavimentação em mosaico (dois casos, áreas de vidro fosco esparsas (três casos e envolvimento pleural (sete casos, sob a forma de derrame ou espessamento. CONCLUSÃO: Áreas de consolidação, massas ou nódulo, mesmo solitário, com sinal do halo, quando vistos na tomografia computadorizada em um contexto clínico apropriado, são altamente sugestivos de aspergilose angioinvasiva.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the main findings of computed tomography in patients presenting acute leukemia complicated by angioinvasive aspergillosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Computed tomography images of 19 patients were retrospectively studied for the presence of consolidations, nodules and masses, with or without presentation of halo sign, cavitation and air crescent sign. RESULTS: Consolidation was the most frequent finding, occurring in 12 of the 19 cases, most of them presenting the halo sign; cavitation was found in 5 of 12 cases, one of them with air crescent sign. Nodules and masses occurred respectively in six and four cases, most of them with halo sign. Cavitation was found

  1. Tube Thoracostomy-Related Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Pin Hsu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious complication of pulmonary tuberculosis that requires immediate treatment. Necrotizing fasciitis is a serious, rapidly progressive infection of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia, most related to trauma or surgery. Here, we report a case of pulmonary tuberculosis with spontaneous pneumothorax. A standard procedure of tube thoracostomy was performed for lung re-expansion. Two days after the tube was removed, necrotizing fasciitis developed from the puncture site. Computed tomography of the chest showed focal thickness with gas formation and loss of the fat plane over the chest wall, which is compatible with the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. Aggressive treatment was given, including emergency fasciectomy and adequate systemic antibiotic and antituberculous treatment. The necrotizing fasciitis was successfully treated. The patient was discharged and sent home with maintenance antituberculous therapy.

  2. Opportunistic filamentous mycoses: aspergillosis, mucormycosis, phaeohyphomycosis and hyalohyphomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perusquía-Ortiz, Ana María; Vázquez-González, Denisse; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2012-09-01

    Opportunistic filamentous mycoses are widely distributed all over the world. They are rarely observed in Europe but are common in developing countries. The most common are the aspergilloses (due to Aspergillus spp.) mostly in neutropenia and immunosuppression; the mucormycoses characterized by rapid progression in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis; the phaeohyphomycoses due to pigmented fungi causing either a mild superficial or a very serious deep disease and the hyalohyphomycoses due to hyaline filamentous fungi (Fusarium spp., Pseudallescheria spp., Scopulariopsis spp.). Cutaneous manifestations are usually secondary to dissemination from pulmonary or visceral disease; primary cases are less frequent and due to direct inoculation into the skin. We review epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic data on the four most important opportunistic filamentous mycoses: aspergillosis, mucormycosis, phaeohyphomycosis and hyalohyphomycosis.

  3. The diagnostic value in bronchoalveolar lavage galactomannan antigen detection of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients without granulocyte deficiency%支气管肺泡灌洗液半乳甘露聚糖抗原检测对非粒细胞缺乏患者的侵袭性肺曲霉病诊断价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭庆玲; 郭禹标; 廖康; 朱智文

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨针对感染的肺组织局部进行支气管肺泡灌洗术得到支气管肺泡灌洗液(BALF)进行半乳甘露聚糖(GM)检测是否能协助提高非粒细胞缺乏的患者并侵袭性肺曲霉病(IPA)的诊断效率,并了解其最佳GM界值. 方法: 收集并分析2011年1月至2013年12月在呼吸科内镜中心检查考虑IPA可能并行BALF GM检测的患者173例. 按照国内外诊断标准,将病例分为4组,IPA组(n=23),肺结核组(n=11),细菌性肺炎组(n = 90),非感染组(n = 49).采用ELISA方法测定血清及BALF GM.用统计学方法了解BALF GM检测在非粒细胞缺乏的患者并发IPA中的诊断价值. 结果:在非粒细胞缺乏的患者并发IPA的诊断中,与非IPA患者相比,IPA患者的BALF GM检测数值高, 组间差异有统计学意义; 与血清GM检测相比, BALF GM检测的IPA诊断效率高.ROC曲线分析发现,当BALF GM检测界值为≥0.95时,IPA的诊断效率最高.结论:BALF GM检测有利于非粒细胞缺乏患者并IPA的早期鉴别与诊断.同时研究发现BALF GM值最佳界值为≥0.95.%Objective To study infection of the lung tissue by bronchoalveolar lavage for BALF and explore whether GM can help improve the he diagnosis efficiency in patients without granulocyte deficiency with IPA, and find the threshold of GM values. Methods Between January 2011 and December 2011, 173 cases of patients were considered possible invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in parallel BALF GM detection in the center of the respiratory endoscopic examination.. According to the diagnostic criteria at home and abroad, all the cases were divided into four groups, including group of IPA, group of tuberculosis, group of bacterial pneumonia and group of non-infection. Using ELISA method for determination of serum and BALF GM. The diagnostic value was made by statistical methods in BALF GM detection without patients of granulocyte deficiency with IPA. Results There were 11 cases in the group of IPA, 23 cases in the

  4. Invasive aspergillosis: results of multicenter study

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    N. N. Klimko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a multicenter study of 445 patients with “proven” and “probable” invasive aspergillosis (EORTC/MSG, 2008. Invasive aspergillosis usually occurs in patients with hematological malignancies (88 %, main underlying diseases were acute myeloid and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The risk factors: prolonged agranulocytosis (64 %, cytostatic chemotherapy (57 %, corticosteroid treatment (45 %, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (29 %. The pathogens – A. fumigatus (42 %, A. niger (33 %, and A. flavus (21 %. The main site of infection were lungs (86 %. 12 week overall survival was 83 %. Bronchoscopy use for the early diagnosis (p = 0.01, adequatetherapy with voriconazole (p = 0.002 and secondary antifungal prophylaxis (p = 0.0003 were positive prognostic factors for survival of patients with invasive aspergillosis.

  5. Invasive aspergillosis in near drowning nonneutropenic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munta, Kartik; Gopal, Palepu B N; Vigg, Ajit

    2015-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed people has been well documented, but to diagnose and treat in an immunocompetent individual after near drowning, it requires early suspicion and proper empirical treatment. We report a case diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis with systemic dissemination of the infection to the brain, gluteal muscles, and kidneys after a fall in a chemical tank of a paper manufacturing company. He was ventilated for acute respiratory distress syndrome and managed with antibiotics and vasopressors. Due to nonresolving pneumonia and positive serum galactomannan, trans-tracheal biopsy was performed which confirmed invasive aspergillosis and was treated with antifungals. With the availability of galactomannan assay and better radiological investigative modalities, occurrence of such invasive fungal infections in cases of drowning patients should be considered early in such patients and treated with appropriate antifungals.

  6. Invasive aspergillosis in near drowning nonneutropenic patient

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    Kartik Munta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis in immunosuppressed people has been well documented, but to diagnose and treat in an immunocompetent individual after near drowning, it requires early suspicion and proper empirical treatment. We report a case diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis with systemic dissemination of the infection to the brain, gluteal muscles, and kidneys after a fall in a chemical tank of a paper manufacturing company. He was ventilated for acute respiratory distress syndrome and managed with antibiotics and vasopressors. Due to nonresolving pneumonia and positive serum galactomannan, trans-tracheal biopsy was performed which confirmed invasive aspergillosis and was treated with antifungals. With the availability of galactomannan assay and better radiological investigative modalities, occurrence of such invasive fungal infections in cases of drowning patients should be considered early in such patients and treated with appropriate antifungals.

  7. [Could pleural aspergillosis happen to be a complication of pleural drainage?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, J; Onea, F; N'Guyen Huu, P

    2013-12-01

    Four cases of nosocomial aspergillosis are described where the responsibility of pleural drainage is advocated. Infection was pulmonary once, pleural three times. Pleural suction had been long lasting with incomplete re-expansion of the lung and major air leaks. The hypothesis of the responsibility of pleural drainage in the advent of aspergillosis is reinforced by the revision of medical papers, which leads to the conviction that similar cases have been described yet, even though the mechanism of the contamination had not been understood. Prevention needs to limitate the lasting of the suction, especially if there are major air leaks. Cure needs total re-expansion of the lung and suppression of any pleural cavity, even if a thoracoplasty is needed. An anti-fungal therapy is not always needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

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    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Weyer, Nils; Metzger, Marc C; Schön, Ralf

    2006-05-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is a fast spreading acute soft tissue inflammation. Death can occur within 12-24 h. Early identification and treatment is needed. We report the case of a 75 year old woman with diabetes and high cholesterol, adipositas who developed cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odotongenic origin with massive subcutaneous air collection and first sign of septicaemia. Surgical treatment with debridement and drainage in combination with intravenous broadbased antibiotics as well as daily irrigation of the wound with iodine solution (Betaisodona) and metronidazol (local antibiotic treatment) was performed. The patient recovered completely. Surgical debridement combined with broad-spectrum of antibiotics showed satisfying result for the management of cervical necrotizing fasciitis of dentogenous origin.

  9. [Necrotizing fasciitis after varicella].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, E; Furtado, F; Estrada, J; Vale, M C; Pinto, M; Santos, M; Moura, G; Vasconcelos, C

    2001-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and severe infection characterised by extremely rapid progressive involvement of the superficial fascias and deep dermal layers of the skin, with resultant vasculitis and necrosis. The authors present three clinical cases of necrotizing fasciitis; all three patients previously had varicella rash, rapid progressive spreading erythema with severe pain and toxic shock syndrome. Two patients had positive cultures of b-haemolytic streptococcus. Early stage differential diagnosis with celulitis, aggressive antibiotic treatment and pediatric intensive care support are essential. However, the main therapy is early extensive surgical approach involving all indurate areas, down to and including the muscle fascia.

  10. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Alan P; Slavin, Raymond G

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1-2% of asthmatic and 7-9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10-1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4 and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA.

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis: an alternative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Percival, R.; Hargreaves, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of necrotizing fasciitis are presented. The initial management of necrotizing fasciitis remains undisputed. However, following a limited success with a conventional treatment policy, a more radical approach with immediate skin grafting following debridement is suggested.

  12. [Cosmetic blepharoplasty complicated by necrotizing periorbital fasciitis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laouar, K; Ruban, J-M; Baggio, E; Dupeyron, G

    2012-06-01

    Necrotizing periorbital or palpebro-orbital fasciitis represents a unique anatomical site for necrotizing fasciitis, which is an extremely rare and very severe, potentially devastating bacterial infection, rapidly leading to facial necrosis with loss of vision and even death of the patient from toxic shock. In this paper, we report a case of necrotizing periorbital fasciitis as a complication of cosmetic lower eyelid blepharoplasty. Necrotizing fasciitis most often affects the upper and lower limbs, the trunk and the perineal area. It is rarely observed in the facial region due to the rich blood supply in this area. The most commonly implicated pathogen is group A, β-hemolytic "pyogenic"Streptococcus, either alone or in combination with other bacteria, such as staphylococcus or pseudomonas. Mortality varies according to the series and anatomical site. The mortality rate for necrotizing fasciitis is approximately 28 %. It is slightly lower in the periorbital area (15 %). Risk factors for death include alcoholism, diabetes mellitus, immunocompromise, hematologic or pulmonary diseases, and the identity of the causative agent (group A Streptococcus), although approximately 50 % of patients have no predisposing conditions. Management of periorbital necrotizing fasciitis is based on early detection of initial symptoms and on aggressive multidisciplinary treatment including surgical debridement of necrotic areas and antibiotic coverage. The timeliness of treatment and the multidisciplinary approach are considered to be the two essential factors in influencing the mortality and morbidity of this condition.

  13. NECROTIZING SIALOMETAPLASIA. CASE REPORT

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    A.I. Navazo Eguía

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NSM is a benign lesion affecting the salivary glands mainly in the hard palate. It presents as an ulcer with irregular borders, slightly elevated and necrotic The differential diagnosis should include malignant neoplasms. Case Report: A 26-year-old woman sought medical advice for a painful 2 cm ulceration of the hard palate. She is carrying pierced tongue. The patient had a history of cigarette smoking, chronic anxiety disorder and bulimia,. Analytical normal (including HIV and syphilis serology. Histopathology: accessory gland with squamous metaplasia, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia and conservation lobulararchitecture. She had an important improvement with total resolution of the lesion in 4 months Discussion: The NSM is a necrotizing inflammatory process. It presents as an ulcer located in the posterior hard palate or the junction between the hard and soft palate. This situation has been associated with local ischemia as surgical trauma, thromboangiitis obliterans, dentures, alcohol, snuff, cocaine, and certain malignancies such as lymphomas, rhabdomyosarcoma or Warthin tumor. Currently associated withbulimia, it being necessary suspected in young women. It is important to rule out neoplasms and infectious processes (tuberculosis or syphilis. Also consider subacute necrotizing sialadenitis, nonspecific acute inflammatory process of unknown cause, with focal necrosis without hyperplasia or ductal metaplasia pseudoepitheliomatous. Treatment is symptomatic and usually resolves in 2-3 months. Conclusion: The NSM is a benign lesion which may mimic neoplasia. The trend is toward resolution. It must be recognized to avoid unnecessary surgery.

  14. Role of innate immune receptors in paradoxical caspofungin activity in vivo in preclinical aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Silvia; Bozza, Silvia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Casagrande, Andrea; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Pitzurra, Lucia; Romani, Luigina; Aversa, Franco

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the paradoxical caspofungin activity in vivo in preclinical aspergillosis. We evaluated the activity of escalating doses of caspofungin in vivo in different preclinical models of invasive aspergillosis, including mice deficient for selected innate immune receptors. The therapeutic efficacy of caspofungin in experimental invasive aspergillosis was strictly dose dependent, being observed at doses of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg of body weight depending on the experimental models. Paradoxical increase in pulmonary fungal burden as well as inflammatory pathology was observed at the highest dose of caspofungin (5 mg/kg), occurred independently of the so-called Eagle effect and susceptibility to caspofungin in vitro, and was contingent upon the presence of TLR2, Dectin-1, and TLR9. Increased expression of Dectin-1 and TLR9 were observed upon exposure to caspofungin in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that the net activity of caspofungin in vivo is orchestrated by the activation, directly or indirectly, of multiple innate immune receptors.

  15. Aspergillus felis sp. nov., an emerging agent of invasive aspergillosis in humans, cats, and dogs.

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    Vanessa R Barrs

    Full Text Available We describe a novel heterothallic species in Aspergillus section Fumigati, namely A. felis (neosartorya-morph isolated from three host species with invasive aspergillosis including a human patient with chronic invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, domestic cats with invasive fungal rhinosinusitis and a dog with disseminated invasive aspergillosis. Disease in all host species was often refractory to aggressive antifungal therapeutic regimens. Four other human isolates previously reported as A. viridinutans were identified as A. felis on comparative sequence analysis of the partial β-tubulin and/or calmodulin genes. A. felis is a heterothallic mold with a fully functioning reproductive cycle, as confirmed by mating-type analysis, induction of teleomorphs within 7 to 10 days in vitro and ascospore germination. Phenotypic analyses show that A. felis can be distinguished from the related species A. viridinutans by its ability to grow at 45°C and from A. fumigatus by its inability to grow at 50°C. Itraconazole and voriconazole cross-resistance was common in vitro.

  16. Invasive Aspergillosis in a Renal Transplant Recipient Successfully Treated with Interferon-Gamma

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    C. Estrada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation. An early diagnosis is hampered by the lack of reliable serum markers and, even if appropriately diagnosed and treated with current antifungal agents, has a high mortality rate. We report a case of invasive pulmonary and cerebral aspergillosis in a renal transplant patient treated with IFN-γ in conjunction with combination anti-fungal therapy for six weeks in whom complete resolution of the fungal infection was achieved. Renal function remained intact throughout the treatment period. Surveillance CT scans of the chest and head showed resolution of prior disease but revealed a new left upper lobe mass four months after completion of treatment with IFN-γ. Biopsy of the lesion was positive for primary lung adenocarcinoma, for which she underwent left upper lobe resection. The pathology report confirmed clear surgical margins and lymph nodes and no evidence of fungal hyphae. IFN-γ should be considered early in the management of invasive aspergillosis in renal transplant patients. To date, allograft rejection has not been encountered.

  17. Invasive aspergillosis: new insights into disease, diagnostic and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthaus, Meinolf; Buchheidt, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus infections are a threat to in patients with hematological malignancies. Known risk factors are profound and long lasting neutropenia, uncontrolled graft versus host disease, continuous administration of steroids and environmental factors such as hospital construction. Numerous efforts have been undertaken for prophylaxis of invasive aspergillosis in high-risk populations. Most of them failed to demonstrate survival advantages. Prophylaxis makes sense, since diagnosis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis remain difficult. The introduction of non-culture based tools for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis is an important step forward for early and sensitive diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. Early treatment is the cornerstone of a successful management of invasive aspergillosis. Substantial improvement came with the introduction of lipid formulations of amphotericin B in the early 1990s. Voriconazole was the first azole that improved the overall survival for patients with invasive aspergillosis. Newer azoles and the echinocandins were introduced for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the late 1990s. Voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B allow a safer and more effective treatment of invasive aspergillosis when compared with amphotericin B-desoxycholate. Combination of antifungal agents has been introduced in clinical trials. Up to now no significant benefit has been obtained with antifungal combination compared to voriconazole alone. Because mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains up to more than 50%, prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungal therapy are of utmost importance for the reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Despite all advances in the management of invasive aspergillosis important questions remain unresolved. This article reviews the current state and new insights in the management of invasive aspergillosis and points out clinicians unmet needs.

  18. CT findings in rhinocerebral mucormycosis and aspergillosis

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    Kim, Dong Ik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Kyu Chang [Yeonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    Invasive aspergillosis or mucormycosis of the paranasal sinuses involving the cranial cavity is termed rhinocerebral mycosis, which is often difficult to differentiate from malignancy. Prognosis of rhinocerebral mycosis is disastrous and usually fatal. The authors herein report 6 cases of rhinocerebral mycosis; two of them were mucormycosis and four were aspergillosis histopathologically. Main CT features are nodular mucosal thickening in the multiple sites of the paranasal sinuses that extend to orbital apex or cavernous sinus through focal destruction of bony wall. In spite of their invasiveness beyond bony boundary, destruction is not so remarkable and it is always accompanied by bony sclerosis. Awareness of these disease and CT patterns discussed in this report should be helpful in leading to early biopsy and treatment.

  19. Disseminated aspergillosis associated with tsunami lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yutaka; Tagami, Takashi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Kido, Norihiro; Kawaguchi, Takanori; Omura, Mariko; Tosa, Ryoichi

    2012-10-01

    Many survivors of the tsunami that occurred following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, contracted a systemic disorder called "tsunami lung," a series of severe systemic infections following aspiration pneumonia caused by near drowning in the tsunami. Generally, the cause of aspiration pneumonia is polymicrobial, including fungi and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but Aspergillus infection is rarely reported. Here we report a case of tsunami lung complicated by disseminated aspergillosis, as diagnosed during autopsy.

  20. Systemic Aspergillosis in Emu Chicks in an organised farm in Kerala

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    Sunitha Karunakaran1

    Full Text Available Systematic post mortem examination was carried out on seven Emu chicks submitted for disease diagnosis to Clinical Laboratory, District Veterinary Centre, Palakkad. On examination, numerous small greyish white nodules were seen in the lungs, air sacs, kidney and serosal surface of proventriculus. Dark red liver with necrotic areas and dark coloured spleen were the other lesions. Microscopically the lungs revealed granulomas with central areas of caseation surrounded by mononuclear cells and fibroblasts. PAS positive fungal hyphae could be seen in the lesion. Aspergillus fumigatus could be isolated in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar from the lesions. This is the first report on the occurrence of systemic aspergillosis in Emus from Kerala. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(10.000: 453-455

  1. Case Report Associated with Aspergillosis and Hepatitis E Virus Coinfection in Himalayan Griffons

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    Heng Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study involved a death which occurred in four Himalayan griffons housed in Beijing zoo, China. Based on pathogen identification and the pathological changes observed, we did characterize the fungi and Hepatitis E virus (HEV in four dead Himalayan griffons. Pathological changes were severe. Membranous-like material was observed on the surface of the internal organs. Spleen was necrotic. Focal lymphocyte infiltration in the liver and many sunflower-like fungi nodules were evident in the tissues, especially in the kidney. PCR was used to identify the pathogen. Based on the 18SrRNA genomic sequence of known fungi, the results confirmed that all four dead Himalayan griffons were infected with Aspergillus. At the same time the detection of HEV also showed positive results. To the best of our knowledge, this work appears to be the first report of concurrent presence of Aspergillosis and Hepatitis E virus in rare avian species.

  2. 雾化吸人两性霉素B对侵袭性肺曲霉病预防效果的Meta分析%Efficacy and Safety of Inhaled Amphotericin B in Prophylaxis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis:A Meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢鑫; 孙文逵; 高伟; 苏欣; 施毅

    2012-01-01

    目的 采用Meta分析方法对现已发表的关于雾化吸入两性霉素B(AmB)预防侵袭性肺曲霉病(IPA)的文献进行综合分析,从动物实验和临床研究两个方面分别评价雾化吸入AmB对IPA的预防作用.方法 检索MEDLINE生物医学数据库、科学引文索引(ISI)、医学文摘资料库(EMBASE)及万方数据库,检索发表于2011年3月以前关于雾化吸入AmB预防IPA的文献,由2名评价员分别筛选符合标准的文献,进行质量评价和数据提取.采用RevMan4.22软件进行异质性分析,合并效应量的检验采用优势比(OR)及95%可信区间(95%CI).结果 共纳入符合标准的动物实验文献5篇,包括实验动物626只;临床研究文献6篇,包括1354例真菌感染高危病人.Meta分析结果显示感染前雾化吸入AmB的实验动物存活率高于安慰剂对照组(38.3%比9.7%,OR=13.93,95%CI7.46 ~26.01,P<0.000 01).真菌感染高危人群中,预防性雾化吸入AmB的患者IPA发生率较安慰剂或空白对照组为低(2.6%比9.2%,OR =0.27,95%CI0.16 ~0.46,P<0.000 01);雾化预防组与对照组患者IPA相关病死率及总死亡率差异无统计学意义(RR =0.65,95% CI0.33~1.30,P=0.23;OR=1.17,95% CI0.73 ~ 1.89,P=0.51);雾化吸入AmB绝大部分不良反应程度轻微.结论 预防性雾化吸入AmB能有效降低实验动物肺曲霉感染死亡率,对粒细胞缺乏等高危人群预防性雾化吸入AmB能有效降低IPA发生率,不良反应轻微,但未降低曲霉感染相关病死率及总死亡率.需要更多高质量大型临床研究进一步提供循证医学证据.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of inhaled amphotericin B ( AmB) in prophylaxis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis ( IP A) in both animal studies and clinical researches. Methods MEDLINE.ISI.EMBASE and Wanfang Periodical Databases were searched until march 2011 for case-control study on the efficacy and safety of inhaled AmB in prophylaxis of IPA. The

  3. A case of fever of unknown origin: necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlü, G; Onyılmaz, T A; Barış, S A; Turhan, N; Vural, C; Başyiğit, I; Boyacı, H

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis is a rare type of vasculitis; its etiology and pathogenesis are still unknown. The disease primarily affects the lungs, although extra-pulmonary involvement has been reported. The typical symptoms are cough, chest pain, dyspnea, and weight loss; high temperatures have been reported in rare cases. We present the case of a 65-year-old woman who was diagnosed with lymph node tuberculosis, for which she received treatment for six months. The patient experienced no improvement in her symptoms, which included fever, weakness and dyspnea. A re-evaluation of previously collected thoracoscopic biopsy material revealed compatibility with necrotizing sarcoid granulomatosis.

  4. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ahmed Janahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is a pulmonary disorder that often occurs in patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis (CF and is characterized by a hypersensitivity response to the allergens of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. In patients with CF, growth of A. fumigatus hyphae within the bronchial lumen triggers an immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated hypersensitivity response that results in airway inflammation, bronchospasm, and bronchiectasis. In most published studies, the prevalence of ABPA is about 8.9% in patients with CF. Since the clinical features of this condition overlap significantly with that of CF, ABPA is challenging to diagnose and remains underdiagnosed in many patients. Diagnosis of ABPA in CF patients should be sought in those with evidence of clinical and radiologic deterioration that is not attributable to another etiology, a markedly elevated total serum IgE level (while off steroid therapy and evidence of A. fumigatus sensitization. Management of ABPA involves the use of systemic steroids to reduce inflammation and modulate the immune response. In patients who do not respond to steroids or cannot tolerate them, antifungal agents should be used to reduce the burden of A. fumigatus allergens. Recent studies suggest that omalizumab may be an effective option to reduce the frequency of ABPA exacerbations in patients with CF. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to better establish the efficacy of omalizumab in managing patients with CF and ABPA.

  5. Complicated necrotizing otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawas, Mariam T; Daruwalla, Vistasp J; Spirer, David; Micco, Alan G; Nemeth, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing (malignant) otitis externa (NOE) is a rare and invasive infection originating in the external acoustic meatus seen most commonly in diabetes and other immunocompromised states. After a protracted course, disease can smolder and extend into the mastoid, skull base, dural sinuses, and intracranially. We present a case of NOE complicated by mastoiditis, dural sinus thrombosis, and Bezold's abscess in an uncontrolled diabetic presenting with a prolonged course of facial nerve palsy. We stress the importance of maintaining a high index of clinical suspicion for NOE in diabetic patients and offering timely, aggressive treatment to mitigate its complications.

  6. Complete heart block in a neutropenic patient with aspergillosis: An unusual adverse effect of caspofungins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasmita Biswal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of complete heart block (CHB in a 58-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML with no past history of cardiac disease, who received caspofungin in the treatment of disseminated fungal infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CHB associated with caspofungins. Subsequent to induction chemotherapy the patient developed invasive pulmonary aspergillosis with sudden tachypnea, dyspnoea, fever, bilateral pulmonary infiltrates and acute respiratory insufficiency consequent to neutropenia with ANC<500. During the first dose of antifungal therapy with caspofungins, she developed complete atrioventricular block and cardiac arrest. Complete heart block is an unusual adverse effect of caspofungins which has not been reported previously. Caspofungins release histamine in peripheral blood cells, so possible histamine-mediated symptoms ranging from severe fatal anaphylaxis can occur. These data suggest that infusion-related reactions associated with caspofungin may be mediated by histamine release secondary to caspofungin therapy.

  7. CT in childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

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    Shah, A.; Bhagat, R.; Panchal, N. (Delhi Univ. (India). Vallabhabhai Patel Chest Inst.); Pant, C.S. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India). Imaging Div.)

    1992-06-01

    CT of the thorax done during acute severe asthma in two paediatric patients demonstrated central bronchiectasis, a sine qua non for the diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Bronchography, regarded as the gold standard, was done subsequently on recovery. A comparative segmental analysis revealed that CT was able to identify immediately 24 of 27 segments which showed central bronchiectasis on bronchography. Early diagnosis with the aid of CT enabled immediate intervention which may have helped to prevent further lung damage in the paediatric patients. (orig.).

  8. Necrotizing faciitis: report of case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruthyunjaya, B

    1981-01-01

    A case of necrotizing fasciitis following infection of a mandibular third molar is reported. Necrotizing fasciitis is a relatively rare but fulminating clinical entity characterized by necrosis of fascia with widespread undermining of the superficial tissue and extreme systemic toxicity. Prompt recognition and proper management can reduce the morbidity and mortality in this severe soft tissue infection.

  9. Treatment of Primary Pulmonary Aspergillosis: An Assessment of the Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan R. Stewart

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus spp. are a group of filamentous molds that were first described due to a perceived similarity to an aspergillum, or liturgical device used to sprinkle holy water, when viewed under a microscope. Although commonly inhaled due to their ubiquitous nature within the environment, an invasive fungal infection (IFI is a rare outcome that is often reserved for those patients who are immunocompromised. Given the potential for significant morbidity and mortality within this patient population from IFI due to Aspergillus spp., along with the rise in the use of therapies that confer immunosuppression, there is an increasing need for appropriate initial clinical suspicion leading to accurate diagnosis and effective treatment. Voriconazole remains the first line agent for therapy; however, the use of polyenes, novel triazole agents, or voriconazole in combination with an echinocandin may also be utilized. Consideration as to which particular agent and for what duration should be made in the individual context for each patient based upon underlying immunosuppression, comorbidities, and overall tolerance of therapy.

  10. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Ayyıldız

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infections are common and life-threatening among immunosupressive patients.Invasive pulmonar aspergilloz (IPA generally occurs when Aspergillus inhaled, but rarelywith the hematogen spread of dermal or gastrointestinal Aspergillus. We present here, IPA ina 58 year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. He was admitted to ourclinic with fatigue, weakness, pansitopenia, and with petechia. Supportive treatment,vincristine and prednisone was initiated. Chest roentgenogram was normal. Dyspnea andfever (39.5’C were seen after 1 month of therapy. Thorax high resolution computerizedtomography was obtained and cavitary lesion was seen in the left upper-anterior segment oflung. Sputum and blood culture were negative. In spite of the empiric use of Meropenem 3gr/d, Vancomycin 2 gr/d and fluconazole 200 mg/d, fever was not turned to normal andclinical symptoms were not healed. On the fifth days of therapy amphotericin-B was initiatedand the other antibiotics were stopped after 3 days. General symptoms were healed on the 8thdays. Radiologic findings were improved partially after 20 days. The patient clinically is welland remains in remission and radiologic findings were turn to near normal after 10 monthsof treatment. We aimed to emphasis about treatment of empirical Amphotericin-B incritically ill patient with ALL.

  11. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Slavin1; Paula Ghaneh; Robert Sutton1; Mark Hartley; Peter Rowlands; Conall Garvey; Mark Hughes; John Neoptolemos

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB,and the role of enteral feeding.

  12. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisel, R H; Karlen, R

    1994-07-01

    Nine cases of cervical necrotizing faciitis are presented. Five were odontogenic, three were pharyngeal in origin, and one developed from a soft-tissue spider bite. The bacteriology represented a polyculture of gram-positive, gram-negative, as well as anaerobic bacteria, and initial medical treatment by third-generation cephalosporin and metronidazole or clindamycin was successful and is recommended. Airway control is necessary early, as is a wide exploration of the fascial spaces of the neck, with frequent reexploration in either the operating room or at the bedside to evaluate the effects of treatment and to prevent further progression of the disease. Intensive medical support is crucial, and hyperbaric oxygen is advised for patients who are deteriorating under standard therapy.

  13. Fluoxetin-induced pulmonary granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kerviler, E; Trédaniel, J; Revlon, G; Groussard, O; Zalcman, G; Ortoli, J M; Espié, M; Hirsch, A; Frija, J

    1996-03-01

    A patient treated with fluoxetin for a manic depressive disorder developed pulmonary inflammatory nodules with noncaseating giant cell granulomas, interstitial pneumonia and non-necrotizing vasculitis, whilst remaining asymptomatic. A progressive resolution of pulmonary nodules occurred after withdrawal of the offending agent, and the chest radiograph returned to normal in 9 months. The diagnosis was assessed by an open lung biopsy.

  14. Protective Effector Cells of the Recombinant Asp f3 Anti-Aspergillosis Vaccine

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    Diana eDiaz-Arevalo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An Aspergillus fumigatus vaccine based on recombinant Asp f3 protein has the potential to prevent aspergillosis in humans, a devastating fungal disease that is the prime obstacle to the success of hematopoietic cell transplantation. This vaccine protects cortisone acetate (CA-immunosuppressed mice from invasive pulmonary aspergillosis via CD4+ T cell mediators. Aside from these mediators, the nature of downstream fungicidal effectors is not well understood. Neutrophils and macrophages protect immunocompetent individuals from invasive fungal infections, and selective neutrophil depletion rendered mice susceptible to aspergillosis whereas macrophage depletion failed to increase fungal susceptibility. We investigated the effect of neutrophil depletion on rAsp f3 vaccine protection, and explored differences in pathophysiology and susceptibility between CA-immunosuppression and neutrophil depletion. In addition to being protective under CA-immunosuppression, the vaccine also had a protective effect in neutrophil-depleted mice. However, in non-immunized mice, a ten-fold higher conidial dose was required to induce similar susceptibility to infection with neutrophil-depletion than with CA- immunosuppression. The lungs of non-immunized neutrophil-depleted mice became invaded by a patchy dense mycelium with highly branched hyphae, and the peribronchial inflammatory infiltrate consisted mainly of CD3+ T cells and largely lacked macrophages. In contrast, lungs of non-immunized CA-immunosuppressed mice were more evenly scattered with short hyphal elements. With rAsp f3-vaccination, the lungs were largely clear of fungal burden under either immunosuppressive condition. We conclude that neutrophils, although substantial for innate antifungal protection of immunocompetent hosts, are not the relevant effectors for rAsp f3-vaccine derived protection of immunosuppressed hosts. It is therefore more likely that macrophages represent the crucial effectors of the r

  15. Is it necrotizing fasciitis or necrotizing cellulitis after varicella zoster infection? Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeslioglu, Ayse Ozlem; Selimoglu, Muhammed Nebil; Toy, Hatice

    2014-08-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis and necrotizing cellulitis are serious cutaneous complications in varicella patients. Differentiation of necrotizing cellulitis from necrotizing fasciitis can initially be challenging because of indistinct clinical course at the onset of infection and the lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This paper reports 2 children with necrotizing cellulitis that developed after varicella infection to draw the attention of health care providers to necrotizing cellulitis that showed slower clinical course than necrotizing fasciitis and recovered with conservative treatment approaches without aggressive surgical intervention.

  16. An unusual case of invasive aspergillosis in an immunocompetent individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Afsal P; Dhunputh, Pushwinder; Chiluka, Raghuvaran; Umakanth, Shashikiran

    2015-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a highly lethal opportunistic infection that poses a significant threat to immunocompromised patients. With studies suggesting that the incidence of this disease is increasing, and mortality rates remain high, early diagnosis and treatment are very important to improve patient survival. We present the case of a 33-year-old immunocompetent woman who presented with a history of cough and severe breathlessness, and was diagnosed to have invasive aspergillosis. This case emphasises the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion and also of remembering that invasive aspergillosis is no longer only a disease of immunocompromised individuals. In addition, this case tells us that aspergillosis is one of the new emerging infections in intensive care units. PMID:26123468

  17. Isolated Aspergillosis Myocardial Abscesses in a Liver-Transplant Patient

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    Kim-Diêp Dang-Tran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac abscess is an uncommon and fatal complication after transplantation. We report a case of an initially isolated aspergillosis myocardial abscess diagnosed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI. At that time, there was no other biological evidence or other extracardiac manifestations. A three-month course of dual antifungal therapy followed by a single antifungal therapy was empirically given. Six month after admission, Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated for the first time and the patient deceased from a disseminated aspergillosis.

  18. Aspergillosis and proventricular impaction in an ostrich (Struthio camelus)

    OpenAIRE

    Shahrzad Azizi; Seyed Razi Ghalebi; Reza Kheirandish; Neda Ghasem; Fateme Akrami Mohajeri

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillosis is the most common mycotic infection in a wide variety of bird and causes significant economic losses. The present study described concurrent occurrence of aspergillosis and proventricular impaction in a 4-year-old male ostrich. The bird had respiratory problems, coughing and anorexia. Postmortem examination revealed numerous greenish-white caseous foci, 0.5 to 1 cm in diameter distributed on the surfaces of the air sacs and throughout the lungs. In histopathologi...

  19. 慢性阻塞性肺疾病合并变应性支气管肺曲霉病三例临床分析%Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease:report of 3 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓芳; 孙永昌; 金建敏; 李然; 刘涌

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解慢性阻塞性肺疾病(简称慢阻肺)合并变应性支气管肺曲霉病(ABPA)的临床表现及影像学特征,以提高认知水平.方法 回顾性分析北京同仁医院2009年1月至2012年12月诊断的3例慢阻肺合并ABPA病例的临床资料.结果 3例慢阻肺合并ABPA患者均为男性,年龄68 ~ 82岁,均以咳嗽、咳痰、活动后气短为主要表现,伴发作性喘息;既往均无支气管扩张症、支气管哮喘、变应性鼻炎、鼻窦炎及湿疹等疾病史及支气管哮喘家族史.均有吸烟史.肺功能检查显示阻塞性通气功能障碍,吸入支气管舒张剂后FEV1/FVC分别为30%、33%和43%,均符合慢阻肺的诊断标准,依据慢阻肺诊断、处理和预防全球策略的肺功能严重程度分级,1例为Ⅲ级,2例为Ⅳ级.高分辨率CT均显示肺气肿伴或不伴有肺大疱.3例均存在曲霉抗原皮试速发反应阳性,血清总IgE>1000kU/L,血清曲霉特异性IgE增高(>0.35 kU/L),血清曲霉特异性IgG增高(>40 mg/L),高分辨率CT显示不同程度的支气管扩张.此外,3例的外周血嗜酸粒细胞比值均>0.05,曾出现肺部浸润阴影,2例曾咳褐色痰栓,1例痰培养烟曲霉阳性,3例均符合ABPA的诊断标准.确诊后给予口服泼尼松治疗,呼吸困难和FEV1均明显改善.结论 慢阻肺合并ABPA在临床上较为少见,及时诊断和治疗有利于改善症状和预后.临床上对于反复出现发作性喘息及常规治疗不能控制的慢阻肺病例,应考虑有合并ABPA的可能性.%Objective To improve the clinical knowledge on allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) combined with COPD by report of cases.Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical information of 3 cases of ABPA combined with COPD diagnosed in our hospital from Jan.2009 to Dec.2012.Results The 3 patients were all males,and aged from 68 to 82 years.The main complaints of all the patients were exertional dyspnea,cough and sputum production

  20. Efficacy of oral E1210, a new broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action, in murine models of candidiasis, aspergillosis, and fusariosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-Aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action-inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated.

  1. Intracranial Aspergillosis in an Immunocompetent Young Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Prasan Kumar; Mavidi, Sunil Kumar; Wig, Naveet; Garg, Ajay; Nalwa, Aasma; Sharma, M C

    2017-01-04

    Intracranial aspergillosis (ICA) is very rare in the immunocompetent individuals, usually misdiagnosed as a tumor or an abscess. A high index of clinical suspicion is required in patients who present with focal neurological deficits, headache, or seizures. We report the case of a 25-year-old immunocompetent female, who presented with a 15-month history of headache, seizures, left-sided proptosis and ophthalmoplegia, and right hemiparesis. Recovery from the symptoms and decrease in the lesion size seen on the radiological assessment were achieved through two decompressive craniotomies followed by prolonged combined systemic antifungal therapies. Although the initial neuroimaging suggested a mitotic pathology, the surgical sample confirmed ICA. Now the patient is on single antifungal therapy (Tab. voriconazole, 200 mg twice daily) and doing her daily activities, but with a reduced intelligent quotient. We report a challenging case of ICA where multiple courses of combined antifungal therapies and repeat surgeries paved the way for a good prognosis.

  2. Pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Sanders, Jan S F; Stegeman, Coen A; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2010-01-01

    Pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis is the most frequent cause of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and, in most cases, is associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). It is either the renal manifestation of Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis of Churg-St

  3. Pediatric Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ericka; Chun, Robert; Sulman, Cecille

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case of a pediatric cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF), a rapidly progressive infection, and a review of a 10-year pediatric inpatient database. Design Case report and review. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit. Patients A healthy 5-year-old male who developed NF of the lower lip 36 hours following minor trauma. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code 728.86 (NF), was the inclusion criteria for the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) in 1997 and 2006. Results A pediatric case is presented with a thorough photographic record demonstrating the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment. In a review of the KID from 1997 and 2006, the relative risk of being discharged with NF in 2006 vs 1997 was 1.4 (95% CI, 9.95-2.28). Age at diagnosis of NF was older in 2006 compared with 1997 (11.5 years vs 8.05 years; Ppediatric discharges with a diagnosis of NF compared with discharges without a diagnosis of NF (Pnecrotizing fasciitis with aggressive medical and surgical treatment are still the foundation in disease survival. PMID:22508620

  4. Probiotics and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul; Hall, Nigel J; Eaton, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have attracted a huge interest. Combined data from heterogeneous randomised controlled trials suggest that probiotics may decrease the incidence of NEC. However, the individual studies use a variety of probiotic products, and the group at greatest risk of NEC, i.e., those with a birth weight of less than 1000 g, is relatively under-represented in these trials so we do not have adequate evidence of either efficacy or safety to recommend universal prophylactic administration of probiotics to premature infants. These problems have polarized neonatologists, with some taking the view that it is unethical not to universally administer probiotics to premature infants, whereas others regard the meta-analyses as flawed and that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine probiotic administration. Another problem is that the mechanism by which probiotics might act is not clear, although some experimental evidence is starting to accumulate. This may allow development of surrogate endpoints of effectiveness, refinement of probiotic regimes, or even development of pharmacological agents that may act through the same mechanism. Hence, although routine probiotic administration is controversial, studies of probiotic effects may ultimately lead us to effective means to prevent this devastating disease.

  5. CD4+ T cells mediate the protective effect of the recombinant Asp f3-based anti-aspergillosis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Arevalo, Diana; Bagramyan, Karine; Hong, Teresa B; Ito, James I; Kalkum, Markus

    2011-06-01

    The mortality and morbidity caused by invasive aspergillosis present a major obstacle to the successful treatment of blood cancers with hematopoietic cell transplants. Patients who receive hematopoietic cell transplants are usually immunosuppressed for extended periods, and infection with the ubiquitous mold Aspergillus fumigatus is responsible for most cases of aspergillosis. Previously, we demonstrated that vaccination with recombinant forms of the A. fumigatus protein Asp f3 protected cortisone acetate-immunosuppressed mice from experimentally induced pulmonary aspergillosis. Here, we investigated the vaccine's protective mechanism and evaluated in particular the roles of antibodies and T cells. After vaccination, Asp f3-specific preinfection IgG titers did not significantly differ between surviving and nonsurviving mice, and passive transfer of anti-Asp f3 antibodies did not protect immunosuppressed recipients from aspergillosis. We experimentally confirmed Asp f3's predicted peroxisomal localization in A. fumigatus hyphae. We found that fungal Asp f3 is inaccessible to antibodies, unless both cell walls and membranes have been permeabilized. Antibody-induced depletion of CD4+ T cells reduced the survival of recombinant Asp f3 (rAsp f3)-vaccinated mice to nonimmune levels, and transplantation of purified CD4+ T cells from rAsp f3-vaccinated mice into nonimmunized recipients transferred antifungal protection. In addition, residues 60 to 79 and 75 to 94 of Asp f3 contain epitopes that induce proliferation of T cells from vaccinated survivors. Vaccine-primed CD4+ T cells are not expected to clear the fungal pathogen directly; however, they may locally activate immunosuppressed phagocytes that elicit the antifungal effect.

  6. Common invasive fungal diseases: an overview of invasive candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiedel, Yvonne; Zimmerli, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Every year, Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus and Pneumocystis infect an estimated two million individuals worldwide. Most are immunocompromised or critically ill. Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of the critically ill and of recipients of transplanted abdominal organs. In high-risk haemato-oncological patients, in contrast, the introduction of antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole and later with mould-active posaconazole has led to a remarkable reduction of invasive candidiasis and is likely to have a similar effect on invasive aspergillosis. Invasive aspergillosis remains the dominant invasive fungal disease (IFD) of haemato-oncological patients and solid-organ transplant recipients and is increasingly found in individuals with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on corticosteroids. In the developed world, owing to antiretroviral therapy Pneumocystis pneumonia and cryptococcosis have become rare in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are mainly found in solid-organ transplant recipients or immunocompromised patients. In the developing world, cryptococcosis remains a common and highly lethal disease of HIV positive individuals. With invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis, timely diagnosis is the principal challenge. The clinical presentation is nonspecific and current diagnostic tests lack sensitivity and specificity. The combination of several tests improves sensitivity, but not specificity. Standardised polymerase chain-reaction-based assays may be promising tools for more rapid and specific diagnosis of candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Nevertheless, initiation of treatment is often based solely on clinical suspicion. Empirical therapy, however, may lead to over-treatment of patients without IFD or it may miss its target in the case of resistance. Despite the success of antifungal prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of IFDs in haemato-oncological patients, there are a considerable number of

  7. Combination therapy of murine mucormycosis or aspergillosis with iron chelation, polyenes, and echinocandins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Luo, Guanpingsheng; Fu, Yue; French, Samuel W; Edwards, John E; Spellberg, Brad

    2011-04-01

    Liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) combined wither either micafungin or deferasirox was synergistic in previous murine studies with mucormycosis or aspergillosis. We hypothesized that triple therapy using LAmB, micafungin, and deferasirox could further improve outcomes of mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Triple therapy improved survival and reduced tissue fungal burden of mice with mucormycosis and to a lesser extent with aspergillosis. Continued investigation into the use of triple therapy against mucormycosis and aspergillosis is warranted.

  8. Aspergillosis in a Patient Receiving Temozolomide for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ramella Munhoz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Leukopenia and selective CD4+ lymphopenia represent major adverse events associated with the use of temozolomide (TMZ, an oral alkylating agent incorporated in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM. The increased risk of opportunistic infections, including those caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci and cytomegalovirus, has been previously described in the literature. Here we report the case, the first to our knowledge, of a patient with pulmonary invasive aspergillosis immediately after the completion of chemoradiation with TMZ for GBM. Diagnosis was confirmed through a CT-guided lung biopsy, and the patient had excellent response to systemic voriconazole. This case illustrates that TMZ can be associated with severe opportunistic infections, presumably associated with T lymphocyte immune dysfunction, and patients exposed to this agent should be carefully monitored.

  9. Necrotizing enterocolitis Enterocolitis necrosante.

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    Norma Carmenate González

    Full Text Available Necrosantizing enterocolitis constitutes the most frequent and devastator gastrointestinal emergency in newborn patients, affecting especially premature patients and those with low weight (< 1500 g during the two first weeks of life, that by some motive have suffered episodes of anoxy during the labor or shortly after and in which habitually the oral diet has been initiated. It can be seen in small infants, especially in the less than 3 months and associated to diarrhea. It is reported between 15 and 75 cases by each 1000 admissions in a unit of neonatal intensive cares. The mortality varies from 10 to 40%, greater in groups of high risk and is greater than the surgical mortality of all the congenital anomalies of the digestive tract combined. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Necrotizing enterocolitis, approved by consensus in the 2nd National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Manzanillo, Cuba, September 31 - October 3, 2002.

    La enterocolitis necrosante constituye la emergencia gastrointestinal más frecuente y devastadora del recién nacido, afecta especialmente a los pretérminos y a los de bajo peso al nacer (< 1500 g durante las dos primeras semanas de vida, que por algún motivo han sufrido episodios de anoxia durante el parto o poco después y en los que habitualmente se ha iniciado la alimentación oral. Puede verse en lactantes pequeños, en especial en los menores de tres meses y asociado a cuadros de diarrea. Se reportan entre 15 y 75 casos por cada 1000 admisiones en una unidad de cuidados intensivos neonatales. La mortalidad varía de 10 a 40 %, mayor en grupos de alto riesgo y supera la mortalidad quirúrgica de todas las anomalías congénitas del tracto digestivo combinadas. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para Enterocolitis Necrosante, aprobada por consenso en el 2º Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pedi

  10. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery.

  11. Aspergilosis: una patología a considerar Aspergillosis: a phatology to be considered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Guillermo Oxilia

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available La aspergilosis pulmonar es una infección micótica causada por el Aspergillus fumigatus, saprófito del esputo humano normal. Se estudiaron cinco casos de pacientes con aspergilosis, cuatro de ellos adultos, tres del sexo femenino y uno masculino, todos de presentación no invasiva, y uno, pediátrico, sexo masculino, del tipo invasiva. Fueron estudiados con radiología convencional, tomografía computada (TC helicoidal, TC multislice y video cápsula endoscópica. Afecta 3:1 a los hombres en relación con las mujeres. Hay tres formas de presentación: a invasiva: en los pacientes neutropénicos, donde predomina la afectación pulmonar, con diseminación a cerebro, corazón, riñón, tracto gastrointestinal, hígado, tiroides y bazo; tiene mal pronóstico y la mortalidad es muy elevada; b semiinvasiva: compromete fundamentalmente a pacientes con patología pulmonar preexistente; c no invasiva: afecta cavidades preexistentes, cavernas TBC ( tuberculosis o quistes, donde coloniza el hongo, y se denomina aspergiloma o micetoma.Pulmonary aspergillosis is a mycotic infection caused by the Aspergillus fumigatus, saprophyte of the normal human sputum. Five patients with non invasive aspergillosis were studied, of whom 4 were adults (3 women, 1 man and one, pediatric, with invasive aspergillosis. All of them were studied by conventional X-ray, spiral CT, multislice CT and video capsule endoscopy. The presentation is predominant among men (3 to 1. There are three forms of presentation: a invasive: in neutropenic patients it prevails the lung affectation; the brain, heart, kidney gastrointestinal tract, liver, thyroid and spleen spreading has a bad prognosis and mortality rate is very high; b semiinvasive: it mainly compromises patients with pre-existing pulmonary pathology; c non invasive: affects pre-existing cavities, TBC caverns or cysts where the fungus establishes; it is called aspergilloma or mycetoma.

  12. Percutaneous treatment with amphotericin B of mycotic lung lesions from invasive aspergillosis: results in 10 immunocompromised patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veltri, A.; Anselmetti, G.C.; Bartoli, G.; Martina, M.C.; Galli, J. [Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, DiUniv. Torino (Italy); Regge, D. [Servizio di Radiodiagnostica, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura per il Cancro, Ordine Mauriziano, Candiolo (Italy); Bertini, M. [U.O.A. Ematologia, Azienda Ospedaliera San Giovanni Battista, Torino (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous treatment of pulmonary lesions from invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. From 1992 to 1998, ten patients (seven men and three women; mean age 56 years) affected by hematological neoplasms (8 acute myeloid leukemias, 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas) and post-chemotherapy prolonged neutropenia developed pulmonary lesions from invasive aspergillosis. A total of 13 lesions (diameter 2-7 cm, median 5 cm) were treated percutaneously due to insufficiency of the high-dose i. v. therapy; under CT guidance, a median of 10 cm{sup 3} per session of a 1 mg/cm{sup 3} diluted solution of amphotericin B was injected through a fine needle (21-22 G); 45 sessions overall were performed (one to five per lesion, median four), according to the volume of the nodules, tolerance, and complications. The results were retrospectively evaluated either radiologically or clinically. Complications were cough, mild hemoptysis, and small pneumothorax and/or pleural effusion. No major complications occurred. One month after the beginning of treatment, 8 lesions completely resolved, 4 greatly improved, and 1 was not significantly reduced. In all ten patients symptoms improved (eight of ten could restart chemotherapy as scheduled). After antiblastic retreatment, 1 patient had mycotic recurrence. In our experience transthoracic topical treatment with amphotericin B of single or few lung lesions from invasive aspergillosis was effective, affording a rapid improvement of the lesions and symptoms, and allowing continuation of chemotherapy as scheduled, thereby reducing the risk of recurrences. (orig.)

  13. Implementation of different histochemical methods in diagnostics of brain Aspergillosis in turkey chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kureljušić Branislav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis is a frequent fungal disease in different species of birds and mammals caused by fungi of the genus Aspergillus. It is characterized by inflammatory changes primarily in the respiratory system, even though it sometimes takes on a generalized form when several organ systems are affected. Mucotic-granulomatous meningoencephalitis with a predominant localization in the cerebellum has been described in turkeys, ducks and geese. Within this paper, examinations have been performed on a flock of broiler turkeys aged 12 days who had sustained evident neurological disorders in the form of ataxy, torticollis, paresis, and paralysis of the hind extremities and wings. In three of the ten autopsied chicks the macroscopic findings indicated granulomatous encephalitis of the cerebellum. A white-coloured granuloma, around 3mm in diameter, was situated cranioventrally and was clearly visible on the sagital section of the cerebellum. Mucological examinations of the cerebellum lesion resulted in the isolation of the fungi Aspergillus fumigatus. Haematoxylin-eosin (HE, Grocott and PAS methods were used for the evaluation of histopathological changes and proving Aspergillus fumigatusa hyphae. The microscopic examination of brain tissue sections stained with the HE method revealed the existence of a granuloma with a centrally placed necrotic area. The necrotic area was infiltrated with heterophilic granulocytes and surrounded by macrophage, giant cells and lymphocytes. A connective tissue capsule was located on the periphery of the granuloma. The fungi hyphae, as integral parts of the granuloma, were difficult to observe, and in some samples stained using the HE method they could not be seen at all. On the other hand, sections stanied using the Grocott and PAS methods showed prominent septed and branched hyphae in different parts of the granuloma. With the objective of making an etiological diagnosis of mucotic diseases, it is necessary to apply several

  14. Radiological aspects of Aspergillosis in the paranasal sinuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, W.; Fotter, R.; Ebner, F.; Beaufort, F.; Stammberger, H.

    1986-08-01

    A retrospective radiographic study was performed on 142 proven cases of Aspergillosis in the paranasal sinuses. In all but two cases the mycosis was unilateral and in all cases the maxillary sinus was infected. A common radiographic presentation was a homogeneous opacity of the infected maxillary sinus, while about 50% of the cases showed nonspecific infectious changes of other paranasal sinuses additionally. Earlier stages of the disease showed an intraluminal soft tissue mass, representing the mycelium conglomerate. Bone destruction due to Aspergillosis could not be proven. 58% of the cases presented with intraluminal structures of metallic density. Histochemical studies proved these to consist mainly of tertiary Calciumphosphate. These concrements are considered to be pathognomonic of Aspergillosis.

  15. State of immune status in hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Frolova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis – is severe mycotic infection that often occurs in hematological patients and is characterized by high mortality. We examined the immunological parameters of hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis developed after cytostatic chemotherapy. Was founded, disruption of all parts of the immune respons: reduction in the absolute number of T-helper cells (CD4 +, natural killer cells (CD16 +, lowering of IFN-γ and IL-10 production, reduction in the number of B-lymphocytes and immunoglobulin levels of all classes, suppression killer ability of neutrophils are features of immune status in hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis receiving cytostatic chemotherapy.

  16. Aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses. The growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, D W; Ward, J I; Ajello, L; Plikaytis, B D

    1979-10-12

    To measure the incidence in the United States of systemic mycoses necessitating hospitalization, we reviewed discharge records of 1,875 hospitals participating in the Professional Activity Study of the Commission on Professional and Hospital Activities. Projected incidence rates in 1976 ranged from 23.0 per million for histoplasmosis to 0.2 per million for blastomycosis. High prevalences of leukemia or lymphoma (5.9% to 10.2%) or of other malignancies (9.9% to 13.2%) were recorded in patients with aspergillosis, candidasis, or cryptococcosis. High prevalences of chronic obstructive lung disease (9.6% to 9.9%) were recorded in those with aspergillosis or histoplasmosis. Marked increases from 1970 to 1976 were found in the incidence of aspergillosis (158%), actinomycosis (92%), cryptococcosis (78%), and coccidioidomycosis (74%). Increasing numbers of persons with immunosuppressive conditions, migration of susceptible persons into hyperendemic areas, and aging of the population contributed to the increases.

  17. Intra-aneurysmal glue embolisation of a giant pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm after left upper lobe lobectomy: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, Ashwin; Chandrasekaran, Kiruthika; Jadhav, Sidram; Chandok, Gurbaag; Ringe, Apama; Sankhe, Ashwini [Dept. of Radiology, Lokmanya Tilak Medical College and Municipal General Hospital, Sion (India)

    2013-06-15

    We report a case of pseudoaneurysm of the anterior ascending branch of the left pulmonary artery, following a left upper lobectomy for pulmonary aspergillosis, for which we have done an endovascular treatment. This is the first case where complete pseudoaneurysm occlusion was accomplished after a transcatheter intra-aneurysmal N-butyl 2-cyanoacrylate (glue) injection.

  18. Invasive Aspergillosis: Current Strategies for Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Jose; Thompson, George R; Patterson, Thomas F

    2016-03-01

    Aspergillosis remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunocompromised population. The spectrum of disease is broad, ranging from severe and rapidly fatal infection to noninvasive disease. The diversity of patients and risk factors complicates diagnostic and therapeutic decision-making. Invasive procedures are often precluded by host status; noninvasive diagnostic tests vary in their sensitivity and specificity. Advancements in understanding the pathophysiology of invasive aspergillosis and host genetics in differential risk have also occurred. Future work may assist in therapeutic decision-making and patient prognosis. Voriconazole remains the preferred agent for treatment. Additional alternatives have emerged.

  19. Aspergillosis of the sphenoid sinus simulating a pituitary tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larranaga, J.; Fandino, J.; Gomez-Bueno, J.; Botana, C.; Rodriguez, D.; Gonzalez-Carrero, J.

    1989-09-01

    Sphenoidal aspergillosis is an unusual cause of sella turcica enlargement. Pituitary abscess secondary to Aspergillus had been reported. In the present case, a woman with sphenoid sinus aspergillosis mimiced a pituitary tumor. This patient survived her infection with intact pituitary function following a transsphenoidal approach. No postoperative amphotericine-B and 5-fluorocytosine were necessary. CT scan revealed a mass occupying the sphenoid sinus extending to the sella turcica. Factors that should alert the clinican to the presence of a sphenoidal and pituitary abscess in a patient with sella turcica enlargement are prior episodes of sinusitis, meningitis and immunosuppression and, as in the present case, hyperglycemia. (orig.).

  20. Management of invasive aspergillosis in patients with COPD: rational use of voriconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Ader

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Florence Ader1, Anne-Lise Bienvenu2, Blandine Rammaert3, Saad Nseir41Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales; 2Service de Parasitologie et Mycologie Médicale, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hôpital de La Croixrousse, Lyon, France; 3Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Université Paris Descartes, Hôpital Necker Enfants Malades, Centre d’infectiologie Necker-Pasteur, Paris, France; 4Service de Réanimation Médicale, Hôpital A. Calmette, Centre Hospitalier Régional Universitaire, Lille, FranceAbstract: Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is an important cause of mortality in patients with hematologic malignancies. The reported incidence of IPA in the context of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD seems to increase. Approximately 1%–2% of overall fatal cases of IPA occur in COPD patients. The combination of factors such as lung immune imbalance, long-term corticosteroid use, increasing rate of bacterial exacerbations over time, and malnutrition are responsible for the emergence of IPA in these patients. The diagnosis of IPA is difficult to establish, which explains the delay in implementing accurate antifungal therapy and the high mortality rate. Persistent pneumonia nonresponsive to appropriate antibiotic treatment raises the concern of an invasive fungal infection. Definite diagnosis is obtained from tissue biopsy evidencing Aspergillus spp. on microscopic examination or in culture. Culture and microscopy of respiratory tract samples have a sensitivity and specificity of around 50%. Other diagnostic tools can be useful in documenting IPA: computed tomography (CT scan, nonculture-based tests in serum and/or in bronchoalveolar lavage such as antibody/antigen tests for Aspergillus spp. More recent tools such as polymerase chain reaction or [1→3]-β-D-glucan have predictive values that need to be further investigated in COPD patients. Antifungal monotherapy using azole

  1. Escherichia coli necrotizing fasciitis in Hirschsprung's disease

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    Manal A. Alsaif

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare post-operative complication of Hirschsprung's disease. Very recently the only previous case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure was reported with the etiologic agent being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we are reporting the second case of necrotizing fasciitis following a Soave procedure caused by an extended spectrum beta lactamase harboring strain of Escherichia coli which is a rare pathogen in type II necrotizing fasciitis.

  2. Fatal Necrotizing Fasciitis following Episiotomy

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    Faris Almarzouqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon condition in general practice but one that provokes serious morbidity. It is characterized by widespread fascial necrosis with relative sparing of skin and underlying muscle. Herein, we report a fatal case of necrotizing fasciitis in a young healthy woman after episiotomy. Case Report. A 17-year-old primigravida underwent a vaginal delivery with mediolateral episiotomy. Necrotizing fasciitis was diagnosed on the 5th postpartum day, when the patient was referred to our tertiary care medical center. Surgical debridement was initiated together with antibiotics and followed by hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The patient died due to septic shock after 16 hours from the referral. Conclusion. Delay of diagnosis and consequently the surgical debridement were most likely the reasons for maternal death. In puerperal period, a physician must consider necrotizing fasciitis as a possible diagnosis in any local sings of infection especially when accompanied by fever and/or tenderness. Early diagnosis is the key for low mortality and morbidity.

  3. Pulmonary infections by the fungus aspergillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao P

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available Five cases of respiratory infection by Aspergillus fumigates are described. Species of aspergillus is ubiquitous in nature. Therefore, repeated demonstration of fungus, serological evidence tend radiological findings are essential for diagnosis. Potassium iodide is a useful drug in aspergillus infection of the lung when other drugs are not available. Injection Emetine hydrochloride is promising as a therapeutic agent in pulmonary aspergillosis, where the lung parenchyma is involved.

  4. Disseminated aspergillosis attributable to Aspergillus deflectus in a springer spaniel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, J S; Leach, M W; Jang, S; Wong, A

    1990-10-01

    Disseminated aspergillosis attributable to Aspergillus deflectus was diagnosed in a Springer Spaniel with lethargy, lameness, anorexia, weight loss, pyrexia, lymphadenopathy, hematuria, and urinary incontinence. Necropsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and numerous fungal hyphae in many organs. The conidial heads of the fungus have a characteristic briar-pipe appearance in culture.

  5. Diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, M; Koch, C; Reimert, C M;

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may be difficult to establish because ABPA shares many characteristics with coexisting atopy or other lung infections in these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity...

  6. Aspergillosis of the Petrous Apex and Meckel's Cave

    OpenAIRE

    Ederies, Ash; Chen, Joseph; Aviv, Richard I.; Pirouzmand, Farhad; Bilbao, Juan M.; Thompson, Andrew L.; Symons, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Cranial cerebral aspergillosis is a rare entity in immunocompetent patients. Invasive disease involving the petrous apex and Meckel's cave has rarely been described. We present a case of localized invasive petrous apical and Meckel's cave disease in an immunocompetent patient who presented with hemicranial neuralgic pain.

  7. Aspergillosis of the Petrous Apex and Meckel's Cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ederies, Ash; Chen, Joseph; Aviv, Richard I; Pirouzmand, Farhad; Bilbao, Juan M; Thompson, Andrew L; Symons, Sean P

    2010-05-01

    Cranial cerebral aspergillosis is a rare entity in immunocompetent patients. Invasive disease involving the petrous apex and Meckel's cave has rarely been described. We present a case of localized invasive petrous apical and Meckel's cave disease in an immunocompetent patient who presented with hemicranial neuralgic pain.

  8. A novel case of canine disseminated aspergillosis following mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jackson T; Frazho, Jean K; Randell, Susan C

    2012-02-01

    An intact bitch with a history of mating was presented with severe lameness and a vulvar discharge. A mixed lytic, proliferative tibial lesion and open pyometra were diagnosed. Bone biopsy and uterine culture revealed disseminated aspergillosis. This is the first report of Aspergillus pyometra with dissemination following mating in the dog.

  9. [Primitive aspergillosis of the posterior cerebral fossa in immunocompetent patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seffar, M; Tligui, H; Kabbaj, H; Agoumi, A; Rifi, L; Alaoui, A E; Harmouch, A; Jiddane, M; Sefiani, S

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis arises in the great majority of cases during an invasive aspergillosis with hematogene scattering from the lung hurts. The cerebral, not rare location is one of the worse criteria forecast during the invasive aspergillosis. We report the case of patient who was hospitalized in the neurosurgery department for syndrome of increased intracranial pressure, hemiparesis and cerebellar syndrome in febrile context. The radiological exploration objectified a collection of the posterior fossa. A stereotactic biopsy was performed. It collected fragments biopsy and pus. The pathological and microbiological analysis allowed the identification of Aspergillus fumigatus. The originality of this observation comes from the rare location in the posterior fossa of aspergillosis and because the patient is immunocompetent and no primary location is found. The patient presents however a viral hepatitis B of fortuitous discovery. He is put under treatment by amphotericin B. The evolution is marked by meningitis comment-diversion. Antibiotics are prescribed, and then the patient is operated for total ablation of the tumor. He dies following an osmolar coma associated with thrombopenia and a secondary renal insufficiency due to his treatment by the amphotericin B.

  10. Cerebral and spinal cord involvement resulting from invasive aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, A.; Benchaib, N.; Zagdanski, A.M.; Rili, M.; Kerviler, E. de [Department of Radiology, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France); Hocqueloux, L.; Molina, J.M. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris (France)

    2002-01-01

    Although central nervous system involvement in disseminated aspergillosis is known to occur in immunocompromised patients, particularly after bone marrow transplantation, localized involvement of the spinal cord is exceedingly rare. In this report we present and illustrate detailed imaging findings of central nervous system invasion by Aspergillus fumigatus in a 30-year-old woman, with emphasis on the spinal cord involvement. (orig.)

  11. Infant with MRSA necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panglao Rajan M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maria Panglao Rajan,1 Pinkal Patel,1 Lori Cash,1 Anjali Parish,2 Scott Darby,1 Jack Yu,3 Jatinder Bhatia11Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 2Medical Center of Central Georgia, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Department of Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospital of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USAAbstract: This is an unusual case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in this premature infant, which highlights severity, rapid progression of this disease and shows outcome if intervention is initiated at an early stage. This case also highlights one of the possible serious complications of percutaneous inserted central catheter (PICC line, which can be life threatening.Keywords: necrotizing fasciitis, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, PICC, premature infant

  12. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissi, D R; Barros, C S L

    2013-09-01

    An 18-month-old Charolais cow developed depression and drooling and was submitted for necropsy after euthanasia. The cow was 1 of 50 moved between 2 farms approximately 5 days before the onset of clinical disease. Gross findings included swollen and hemorrhagic areas of malacia in the frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Microscopically there was a necrotizing meningoencephalitis with intranuclear astrocytic and neuronal eosinophilic viral inclusions in the frontal, temporal, and parietal cerebral cortex as well as in the basal nuclei and thalamus. The gross and microscopic findings were consistent with necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by bovine herpesvirus (BHV-1 or BHV-5), and the diagnosis was confirmed by detection of bovine herpesviral antigen on fresh samples of brain via fluorescent antibody test using a monoclonal antibody against BHV-1 glycoprotein C.

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis: an urgent diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz Maya, Silvia; Dualde Beltran, Delfina [Hospital Clinico Universitario de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Lemercier, Pierre; Leiva-Salinas, Carlos [Hospital Politecnico y Universitario La Fe, Valencia (Spain)

    2014-05-15

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare, life-threatening soft-tissue infection and a medical and surgical emergency, with increasing incidence in the last few years. It is characterized by a rapidly spreading, progressive necrosis of the deep fascia and subcutaneous tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is often underestimated because of the lack of specific clinical findings in the initial stages of the disease. Many adjuncts such as laboratory findings, bedside tests - e.g., the ''finger test'' or biopsy - and imaging tests have been described as being helpful in the early recognition of the disease. Imaging is very useful to confirm the diagnosis, but also to assess the extent of the disorder, the potential surgical planning, and the detection of underlying etiologies. The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic, but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, best seen on magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  14. [Necrotizing Fasciitis: A comprehensive review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, F; Carusi, V; Guidi, M; David, V

    Even though necrotizing fasciitis is considered a rare disease, the spreading of the predisposing factors such as diabetes and chronic diseases, contribute to increase the incidence of this infection. Thus, how to diagnose and treat this clinical pathology, which represents an emerging need. This infection could be fatal for patients if not early diagnosed and treated and it represents a challenge both for the clinicians both for the surgeons. From this consideration was born the idea to write this review article in order to furnish to the readers a helpful tool in the management of this disease starting from its clinical and epidemiological features leading to the diagnosis, both clinical and radiological, and concluding with the treatment both medical both surgical .This article reviews literature on PubMed/MEDLINE with key words "necrotizing", "fasciitis" and "necrotizing fasciitis" from 1967 to 2014, considering all the aspects of the disease. The authors attempt to draw comparisons to their own experience managing this condition to give an Italian perspective to the condition.

  15. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cruz, L; Navarro, S; Valderrama, R; Sáenz, A; Guarner, L; Aparisi, L; Espi, A; Jaurietta, E; Marruecos, L; Gener, J

    1994-04-01

    A multicenter study of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) classified in accordance with the Balthazar criteria (grades D and E), has been performed in 12 teaching hospitals. A total of 233 patients were reviewed, and the mortality rate was 26.6%. The most common etiology was biliary pancreatitis (45.5%). Among the complications, shock, renal insufficiency, pulmonary insufficiency and hemorrhagic gastritis were associated with a mortality rate of 51-66%. Diffuse fluid collections were associated with a higher mortality rate (26.8%) than localized fluid collections (14.5%). In 106 patients with gallstone pancreatitis, early surgery was performed in 17, and 5 patients (29.4%) died. No mortality was observed in 32 patients with delayed surgery. Sphincterotomy was performed in 13 patients, and 4 (30.7%) died. Early surgery (necrosectomy and closed peritoneal lavage) was undertaken in 75 patients, with a mortality rate of 39%. In conclusion, the morbidity and mortality rates of ANP can be improved with proper monitoring, adequate supportive care and the judicious use of surgery based on clinical and morphological findings.

  16. Conidial heads (Fruiting Bodies) as a hallmark for histopathological diagnosis of angioinvasive aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Lanzarin, Luciana Depiere; Mariano,Livia Caroline Barbosa; Macedo,Maria Cristina Martins de Almeida; Batista, Marjorie Vieira; Duarte, Amaro Nunes

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillosis is a mycosis that afflicts immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts; among the former it exhibits different clinical pictures, and among the latter the infection renders an invasive form of the disease. The histologic diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis is somewhat challenging mostly because of some morphological similarities between other fungi. However, when present, the conidial heads are pathognomonic of aspergillosis. The authors present the case of a 68-year-old woman w...

  17. Efficacy of Posaconazole in a Murine Model of Central Nervous System Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Jackie K.; Singh, Gaurav; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Human central nervous system (CNS) aspergillosis has >90% mortality. We compared posaconazole with other antifungals for efficacy against murine CNS aspergillosis. All tested regimens of posaconazole were equivalent to those of amphotericin B and superior in prolonging survival and reducing CFU to those of itraconazole and caspofungin and to vehicle controls. No antifungal regimen effected cure. No toxicity was noted. Overall, posaconazole shows potential for treating CNS aspergillosis.

  18. Performance of Aspergillus PCR in cerebrospinal fluid for the diagnosis of cerebral aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbert, S; Brossas, J-Y; Palous, M; Joly, I; Meyer, I; Fekkar, A

    2017-06-20

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare but often fatal form of invasive aspergillosis that remains difficult to diagnose. The literature has shown the value of Aspergillus PCR in blood-derived samples for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis but provides far less information for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral aspergillosis. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of an Aspergillus PCR assay performed on CSF for the diagnosis of cerebral aspergillosis. This retrospective study involved 72 patients with suspected cerebral aspergillosis for a total of 88 CSF samples in whom CSF Aspergillus PCR was performed. Seventeen patients had proven/probable invasive aspergillosis according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria, including 12 cases of proven/probable cerebral aspergillosis. Aspergillus PCR in CSF was positive in nine of the twelve patients with cerebral aspergillosis, i.e. 75% sensitivity. In contrast, CSF culture was positive for Aspergillus in only two patients. In the non-cerebral aspergillosis group (60 patients), PCR was positive in one patient, i.e. 98.3% specificity. In this particular population of high-risk patients with suspicion of cerebral aspergillosis, the disease incidence was 16.7%. Therefore, the positive and negative predictive values of PCR were 90% and 95.2%, respectively. The results of this study indicate that Aspergillus PCR in CSF is an interesting tool that may eliminate the need for cerebral biopsy in patients with suspected cerebral aspergillosis. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging features of gastric invasive aspergillosis: A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dong Jin; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Seong Hoon; Shin, Ji Yeol; Lee, Yil Gi [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Invasive aspergillosis is an opportunistic infection that usually occurs in immunocompromised patients. Although there are a few rare reports of isolated invasive aspergillosis affecting the small intestine, isolated or disseminated gastric invasive aspergillosis is extremely rare. Herein, we report 2 cases of gastric invasive aspergillosis in a 72 year old woman and a 43 year old man; the woman had been recovering from ruptured left posterior communicating artery aneurysm, which presented as emphysematous gastritis and the man from acute subdural haemorrhage in the intensive care unit, which presented as a pseudoaneurysm on CT imaging.

  20. Nonodontogenic Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Sialadenitis

    OpenAIRE

    Alper Yenigun; Bayram Veyseller; Omer Vural; Orhan Ozturan

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive infectious disease of the soft tissue with high mortality and morbidity rates. Necrotizing fasciitis is occasionally located in the head and neck region and develops after odontogenic infections. Factors affecting treatment success rates are early diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment, and surgical debridement. We present a necrotizing fasciitis case located in the neck region that developed after sialoadenitis. It is important to emphasize...

  1. Necrotizing otitis externa: a painless reminder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Daniel; Reece, Phillip; Herdman, Rory

    2008-08-01

    Necrotizing otitis externa is a necrotizing osteomyelitis of the skull base that predominantly affects diabetic and immunocompromised patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most frequently implicated organism. Patients present with severe otalgia, otorrhoea with or without facial palsy, or rarely, facial pain as a symptomatic feature. We report a case of necrotizing otitis externa presenting with totally painless otorrhoea and highlight the need for a high index of suspicion when treating patients with otitis externa.

  2. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  3. MRI in necrotizing fasciitis of the extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S Z; Srinivasan, S; Peh, W C G

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft-tissue infection of bacterial origin, which involves mainly the deep fascia. Early recognition of this condition may be hampered by the uncommon nature of the disease and non-specificity of initial clinical signs and symptoms in less fulminant cases, making the role of imaging important. MRI is the most useful imaging modality in the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The presence of thick (>3 mm) hyperintense signal in the deep fascia (particularly intermuscular fascia) on fat-suppressed T2 weighted or short tau inversion-recovery images is an important marker for necrotizing fasciitis. Contrast enhancement of the thickened necrotic fascia can be variable, with a mixed-pattern of enhancement being more commonly encountered. Involvement of multiple musculofascial compartments increases the likelihood of necrotizing fasciitis. It is important to remember that T2-hyperintense signal in the deep fascia is not specific to necrotizing fasciitis and can also be seen in cases such as non-infective inflammatory fasciitis or muscle tear. In this pictorial essay, we aim to review the MRI findings in necrotizing fasciitis, discuss its limitations and pitfalls and identify differentiating features from non-necrotizing soft-tissue infections, such as cellulitis and infective myositis/pyomyositis, conditions which may clinically mimic necrotizing fasciitis.

  4. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis due to Aspergillus flavus: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang-qiang; LI Li; ZHU Min; ZHANG Chao-ying; WANG Jia-jun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Infections caused by opportunistic organisms which have been known as etiologic agents of disease become more and more frequent.Aspergillus spp. is one of the agents. Fungi of aspergillus genus are widely distributed in nature, particularly in the soil and in the decomposed vegetation. They are frequent opportunist pathogens in immunocompromised patients. The most frequent causative organisms that cause cutaneous aspergillosis are A.fumigatus and A.flavus.1-3 In this report, we present a case of primary cutaneous aspergillosis manifested by ulceration of the shank due to A. flavus. The patient had no deficiency of immunological status and severe disease associated with fungal infection. Excellent response was shown to anti-fungal therapy.

  5. Nasal Aspergillosis in a Dog: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Padilla Peñuela

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nasal aspergillosis is a major chronic disease affecting the nostrils in dogs. Clinical sinology is typical in every chronic nasal disease. Epistaxis and occasional pain occurs. Rhinoscopic assessment of the area evidences findings associated with the pathology and allows collecting samples for cytology and culture. Systemic therapy with oral antifungals has had variable utility, but now it has been replaced by direct topical medication to the affected area. This article describes the case of a 4-years-old male dog, submitted to consultation by unilateral muco-bloody nasal discharge with a week of evolution. The patient was treated by another vet center with cyclonamine and vitamin K for a possible clotting disorder. After a series of tests that included rhinoscopy and fungal culture, nasal aspergillosis was diagnosed. Intranasal clotrimazole was applied twice and it allowed the resolution of the clinical signs.

  6. Pulmonary trichomoniasis and Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, S M

    1985-08-01

    Pulmonary trichomoniasis is usually caused by aspirated Trichomonas tenax. Adult men with chronic purulent or necrotic pulmonary disease are usually affected. Sixty-eight patients were previously described. A Russian study demonstrated pulmonary trichomoniasis in 19 of 112 patients (17%), mostly in patients with lung cancer, lung abscess, or bronchiectasis. Rarely, pulmonary trichomoniasis may be caused by an intra-abdominal (T. hominis) or genitourinary (T. vaginalis) infection. T. tenax is usually regarded as a harmless commensal of the human mouth. Its prevalence ranges from 4% to 53% and may exceed that of vaginal infection with T. vaginalis in adult females. It is frequently found in patients with poor oral hygiene. Cultural identification is superior to microscopic examination of wet-smear, gram-stained and Papanicolaou-stained preparations. Aspirated pulmonary trichomoniasis is an opportunistic infection. Until the question of possible pathogenicity is resolved, metronidazole should be given. The underlying pulmonary disease should be vigorously treated.

  7. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  8. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis treated successfully for one year with omalizumab

    OpenAIRE

    Collins J; de Vos G; Hudes G; Rosenstreich D

    2012-01-01

    Jennifer Collins,1 Gabriele deVos,2 Golda Hudes,2 David Rosenstreich21New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, 2Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USABackground: Current therapy for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) uses oral corticosteroids, exposing patients to the adverse effects of these agents. There are reports of the steroid-sparing effect of anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab for ABPA in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but the...

  9. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral vie...

  10. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral vie...

  11. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    OpenAIRE

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires,Mario Cezar; Kakizaki,Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente,Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection...

  12. Pyoderma Gangrenosum Simulating Necrotizing Fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Friedrich Alex de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum received this name due to the notion that this disease was related to infections caused by bacteria in the genus Streptococcus. In contrast to this initial assumption, today the disease is thought to have an autoimmune origin. Necrotizing fasciitis was first mentioned around the fifth century AD, being referred to as a complication of erysipelas. It is a disease characterized by severe, rapidly progressing soft tissue infection, which causes necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and the fascia. On the third day of hospitalization after antecubital venipuncture, a 59-year-old woman presented an erythematous and painful pustular lesion that quickly evolved into extensive ulceration circumvented by an erythematous halo and accompanied by toxemia. One of the proposed etiologies was necrotizing fasciitis. The microbiological results were all negative, while the histopathological analysis showed epidermal necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate composed predominantly of dermal neutrophils. Pyoderma gangrenosum was considered as a diagnosis. After 30 days, the patient was discharged with oral prednisone (60 mg/day, and the patient had complete healing of the initial injury in less than two months. This case was an unexpected event in the course of the hospitalization which was diagnosed as pyoderma gangrenosum associated with myelodysplastic syndrome.

  13. Bacteriological and clinical evaluation of twelve cases of post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-01

    Jun 1, 2008 ... from a case of osteosarcoma with necrotic tissues. the anaerobic bacteria were 100% sensitive to metronidazole ... metastases even after repeated surgical intervention ..... a patient to pulmonary aspergillosis (6) while.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis in a pediatric orthopedic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancevski, Aleksandar; Bono, Kenneth; Willis, Leisel; Klingele, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    Few studies have analyzed necrotizing fasciitis in children, and all have relied on cases of necrotizing fasciitis in the abdomen, head, and neck region. The authors sought to correlate the preoperative values of several laboratory tests previously validated in the adult literature, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis, with surgically confirmed necrotizing fasciitis in children to provide clinical guidance for the preoperative laboratory workup of necrotizing fasciitis. A retrospective chart review was performed on consecutive patients younger than 18 years with a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. A total of 13 patients with an average age of 7.9 years (range, 9 months-16 years) were included. Ten (76.9%) infections were found in the lower extremity and 3 (23.1%) in the upper extremity. Seven (53.8%) patients had ecchymosis on examination. All patients presented with an elevated white blood cell count. No amputations were performed, and no mortality occurred. All patients underwent surgery within 24 hours of presentation. Elevated temperature, white blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein values are typically seen in pediatric patients with necrotizing fasciitis; however, no correlation existed between other the preoperative laboratory values with the previously described scoring systems, such as the Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis. Aggressive monitoring of signs and symptoms is suggested, even if a patient does not meet all conventional diagnostic criteria. The authors recommend prompt surgical debridement and early administration of antibiotics, which should include clindamycin.

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a life-threatening soft tissue infection that results in rapid local tissue destruction. Type 1 necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by polymicrobial, synergistic infections that are caused by non-Group A streptococci, aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Type 2 necrotizing fasciitis involves Group A Streptococcus (GAS with or without a coexisting staphylococcal infection. Here we provide the first report of necrotizing fasciitis jointly associated with the microbes Group B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis. S. lugdunensis is a commensal human skin bacterium known to cause often painful and prolonged skin and soft tissue infections. To our knowledge, however, this is the first case of Staph. lugdunensis-associated necrotizing fasciitis to be reported in the literature.

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Study of 48 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurjit; Bharpoda, Pragnesh; Reddy, Raghuveer

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis represents a group of highly lethal infections characterized by rapidly progressing inflammation and necrosis. The aim of the study was to analyze the clinical profile, microbial flora, and predisposing risk factors in patients with necrotizing fasciitis. Lastly, we aimed to formulate a protocol for management of necrotizing fasciitis. Forty-eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis patients who reported to our hospital between April 2007 and September 2009 were included in the study. The commonest predisposing factors were age greater than 50 years (58 % cases) and diabetes mellitus (52 % cases). The commonest site involved was extremity (70.8 %). Majority of infections were polymicrobial (87.5 %). Repeated aggressive debridement was the commonest surgical procedure performed. Early and aggressive surgical debridement, often in multiple sittings, supplemented by appropriate antibiotics and supportive therapy, forms the key to a successful outcome in necrotizing fasciitis.

  17. [Esophageal aspergillosis in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia and febrile neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besa, Santiago; Kattan, Eduardo; Cid, Ximena; Claro, Juan C

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillosis usually compromises the respiratory system, but can also affect others. We report a 46 yo female with acute myeloid leukemia, developed febrile neutropenia and dysphagia. Endoscopy revealed esophageal cytomegalovirus-like ulcers, but biopsies showed Aspergillus spp. It's important to consider aspergillosis in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions in high-risk patients.

  18. Chronic invasive aspergillosis of paranasal sinuses: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash P Tamgadge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis of the nasal and paranasal sinuses is recognized as being second to candidiasis, among opportunistic fungal infections in immunocompromised patients. However, invasive variant in normal and mildly immunocompromised hosts is a very rare occurrence. We report one such case of aspergillosis involving paranasal sinuses in mildly immunocompromised patient.

  19. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: A diagnostic dilemma!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A Joshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS is a benign, self-limiting inflammatory reaction of salivary gland tissue which may mimic squamous cell carcinoma or mucoepidermoid carcinoma, both clinically and histologically, that creates diagnostic dilemma leading to unwarranted aggressive surgery. Most commonly affected site is the minor salivary glands of the palate. The pathogenesis is unknown but is believed to be due to ischemia of vasculature supplying the salivary gland lobules. A simple incisional biopsy is required to confirm the histological diagnosis and to rule out more serious disease processes. It is a self-limiting disease process and requires no treatment. It will be prudent to do repeat biopsy in case if the lesion does not heal within 3 months.

  20. What next in necrotizing enterocolitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakök, Murat

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of premature infants, with a mortality rate of 10-50%. It is uncommon in term infants and in premature infants who have not yet been fed. Most commonly NEC develops suddenly in a preterm infant who was otherwise well, with initial symptoms of abdominal distention, bilious or bloody emesis or gastric aspirates, hematochezia, and pneumatosis intestinalis, and sometimes progresses quickly to include bowel perforation, acidosis, shock, and death. Trigger factors (i.e. perinatal hypoxia, mild infection or formula feeding) cause focal mild intestinal mucosal injury. In the presence of proliferation of commensal bacteria, local breakdown of mucosal barrier may cause entry of bacterial products (e.g. lipopolysaccharides, platelet-activating factor). Endothelial platelet-activating factor and/or tumor necrotizing factor and/or direct stimulating effects of polymorphonuclear leukocytes cause proinflammatory cascade and focal necrosis, which increase the entry of large amounts of bacterial toxins, and then severe NEC, sepsis, and shock develop. Therapies for the prevention of NEC that appear to have some benefit are breastfeeding and antenatal steroids, and probably probiotics. Enteral immunoglobulin, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and arginine or glutamine supplementation are therapies for the prevention of NEC that do not appear to be of benefit. Enteral erythropoietin and enteral granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are promising novel therapies. Treatment options are limited to gut rest, parenteral nutrition, broad-spectrum antibiotics, and surgical interventions for enteral perforation. Two commonly used methods for NEC with intestinal perforation are laparotomy or primary peritoneal drainage ("patch, drain and wait"); however, the preferred method is controversial.

  1. Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Liver Transplantation Complicated by Systemic Aspergillosis with Pancarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Romagnuolo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is a common complication after bone marrow transplantation, with characteristic rash and diarrhea being the most common features. After liver transplantation, however, this phenomenon is very rare. Most transplant patients are on a variety of medications, including immunosuppressants; therefore, the differential diagnosis of skin rash or diarrhea is broad. A 37-year-old man who underwent liver transplantation for primary biliary cirrhosis, and developed a rash and watery diarrhea, is presented. Skin and colonic biopsies confirmed acute GVHD. A pulse of intravenous steroids was given. The skin rash improved, but he developed pancytopenia. His course was complicated by central line infection, jugular and subclavian vein thrombosis, pseudomembranous colitis, recurrent bacteremia, cholestasis on total parenteral nutrition and cytomegalovirus infection. After the onset of pleuritic chest pain and clinical sepsis, spiral computed tomography scan of his chest and abdomen revealed septic infarcts in multiple organs. Despite empirical treatment with amphotericin B, he died of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome within 72 h. Autopsy revealed systemic aspergillosis with pancarditis, endocardial vegetations, and septic pulmonary, splenic, hepatic and renal infarcts. The pathogenesis and experience with this rare, but often fatal, complication of liver transplantation are reviewed. In contrast to GVHD after bone marrow transplantation, pancytopenia is common and liver dysfunction is rare. One should have a high level of suspicion in the liver transplant recipient presenting with rash and/or diarrhea.

  2. PTX3 binds MD-2 and promotes TRIF-dependent immune protection in aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, Silvia; Campo, Silvia; Arseni, Brunilde; Inforzato, Antonio; Ragnar, Lindstedt; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Moretti, Silvia; Oikonomous, Vasileios; De Santis, Rita; Carvalho, Agostinho; Salvatori, Giovanni; Romani, Luigina

    2014-09-01

    The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) modulates different effector pathways involved in innate resistance to Aspergillus fumigatus, including complement activation or promotion of phagocytosis by interacting with FcγRs. However, whether and how TLRs modulate PTX3 mediates antifungal resistance is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that PTX3 binds myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) in vitro and exerts its protective antifungal activity in vivo through TLR4/MD-2-mediated signaling. Similar to Tlr4(-/-) mice, Md2(-/-) mice displayed high susceptibility to pulmonary aspergillosis, a phenotype associated with a proinflammatory cytokine profile and impaired antifungal activity of polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Treating Md2(-/-) mice with PTX3 failed to confer immune protection against the fungus, whereas adoptive transfer of MD-2-competent polymorphonuclear neutrophils restored it. Mechanistically, engagement of MD-2 by PTX3-opsonized Aspergillus conidia activated the TLR4/Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β-dependent signaling pathway converging on IL-10. Thus, we have identified a novel receptor mechanism, involving the TLR4/MD-2/Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β-mediated signaling, whereby PTX3 elicits antifungal resistance with limited immunopathology in A. fumigatus infection. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Pharmacokinetic effect of voriconazole on cyclosporine in the treatment of aspergillosis after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seok J; Song, Im-Sook; Kang, Sun W; Joo, Hyun; Kim, Tae H; Yoon, Young C; Kim, Euiyong; Choi, Yeong-Lim; Shin, Jae-Gook; Son, Ji H; Kim, Yeong H

    2012-11-01

    Azole antifungal agents are essential drugs in the treatment of fungal infections in renal transplant patients. As azoles, these antifungal agents are inhibitors of CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein (P-gp); and thus therapeutic drug monitoring is important. We evaluated a patient with cutaneous and pulmonary aspergillosis who was successfully treated with voriconazole and a low cyclosporine trough level (3.2 - 27.9 ng/ml) for 3 months. During that period, the patient showed good allograft function with the co-administration of voriconazole and cyclosporine. We measured the patient's genotype of MDR1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5 and CYP2C19 enzymes in addition to the intracellular concentration of cyclosporine in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The intracellular concentration of cyclosporine in PBMC is 3.2 times higher with no functionally defected alleles in MDR1, CYP3A4, CYP3A5 or CYP2C19 enzymes when cyclosporine is co-administered with voriconazole ex vivo. Although other confounding factors causing immunological modulation may exist, it is plausible that low serum and high intracellular cyclosporine concentrations, due to the inhibition of P-gp activity by voriconazole, also contribute to an immunosuppressive state.

  4. Second-Hand Smoke Increases Bronchial Hyperreactivity and Eosinophilia in a Murine Model of Allergic Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian W. P. Seymour

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary inhalation of tobacco smoke has been shown to aggravate the allergic response. Antibodies to fungal antigens such as Aspergillus fumigatus (Af cause an allergic lung disease in humans. This study was carried out to determine the effect of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS on a murine model of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA. BALB/c mice were exposed to aged and diluted sidestream cigarette smoke to simulate 'second-hand smoke'. The concentration was consistent with that achieved in enclosed public areas or households where multiple people smoke. During exposure, mice were sensitized to Af antigen intranasally. Mice that were sensitized to Af antigen and exposed to ETS developed significantly greater airway hyperreactivity than did mice similarly sensitized to Af but housed in ambient air. The effective concentration of aerosolized acetylcholine needed to double pulmonary flow resistance was significantly lower in Af + ETS mice compared to the Af + AIR mice. Immunological data that supports this exacerbation of airway hyperresponsiveness being mediated by an enhanced type 1 hypersensitivity response include: eosinophilia in peripheral blood and lung sections. All Af sensitized mice produced elevated levels of IL4, IL5 and IL10 but no IFN-γ indicating a polarized Th2 response. Thus, ETS can cause exacerbation of asthma in ABPA as demonstrated by functional airway hyperresponsiveness and elevated levels of blood eosinophilia.

  5. Disseminated aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus ustus in a patient following allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwen, P C; Rupp, M E; Bishop, M R; Rinaldi, M G; Sutton, D A; Tarantolo, S; Hinrichs, S H

    1998-12-01

    The first case of disseminated aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus ustus in an allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplant patient is described. The patient, a 46-year-old female with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome, underwent high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation prior to transplantation. She was released from the hospital 49 days posttransplant (p.t.) in a stable condition with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC) of 2,700 cells per microl. Multiple antimicrobial agents, including itraconazole (ITR), were prescribed during hospitalization and at the time of discharge. Three days after discharge, the patient was readmitted with hemorrhagic cystitis, persistent thrombocytopenia, and bilateral pulmonary consolidation, although no fever was present. The ANC at the time of readmission was 3,500. Upon detection of a pulmonary nodule (day 67 p.t.), a bronchoalveolar lavage was performed; the lavage fluid was positive for both cytomegalovirus and parainfluenza virus and negative for fungus. The patient was placed on ganciclovir. A biopsy specimen from a leg lesion also noted on day 67 p.t. revealed septate hyphae consistent with Aspergillus species, and a culture subsequently yielded Aspergillus ustus. Confirmation detection of A. ustus was made by demonstration of characteristic reproductive structures with the presence of Hülle cells. On day 67 p.t., ITR was discontinued and liposomal amphotericin B (AMB) was initiated. The patient's condition worsened, and she died 79 days p.t. At the time of autopsy, septate hyphae were present in heart, thyroid, and lung tissues, with lung tissue culture positive for A. ustus. In vitro susceptibility testing indicated probable resistance to AMB but not to ITR. This case supports the need for the development of rapid methods to determine antifungal susceptibility.

  6. Status of aspergillosis and sea fan populations in Curaçao ten years after the 1995 Caribbean epizootic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M Nugues

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1995, a survey of sea fan corals was conducted in Curaçao during a Caribbean-wide outbreak of the sea fan disease aspergillosis. The survey was repeated in 2005 using the same methodology and identical sites to examine changes in sea fan populations 10 years after the initial epizootic. Necrotic lesions typical of aspergillosis were present on as many sea fans in 2005 as in 1995 (mean ± SE: 52 ± 6 vs 43 ± 10%. The disease also showed no significant variation in virulence (9.6 ± 1.2 vs 8.8 ± 1.0% tissue loss per diseased colony. However, the average number of sea fan colonies per 10 m² decreased from 2.7 ± 1.1 to 0.7 ± 0.2 over the 10-year period, a decline of almost 75%. This decrease occurred for all colony sizes, but was more pronounced among small colonies, resulting in an overall trend of domination by large colonies. These results support that aspergillosis can have a significant, long-term impact on sea fan population size and structure. The continued presence of the disease in 2005 could be contributing to reduced recruitment and/or selective mortality among the smallest colonies. This study provides no indication that host resistance against aspergillosis could reverse the decline of Caribbean sea fan corals. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 153-160. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.En 1995, se realizó un sondeo de los abanicos de mar durante un brote de aspergilosis, una enfermedad de abanicos de mar extendida en todo el Caribe. En el año 2005 se repitió el sondeo utilizando exactamente la misma metodología y los mismos sitios para examinar cambios en las poblaciones tras 10 años del inicio del brote. Se presentaron lesiones necróticas típicas de la aspergilosis en tantos abanicos en el 2005, como en 1995 (promedio ± ES: 52 ± 6 vs 43 ± 10%. La enfermedad tampoco mostró variaciones significativas en la virulencia (9.6 ± 1.2 vs 8.8 ± 1.0%, pérdida de tejido por colonia enferma. Sin embargo, el número promedio de colonias de

  7. Infection increases mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werge, Mikkel; Novovic, Srdjan; Schmidt, Palle N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the influence of infection on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: Eligible prospective and retrospective studies were identified through manual and electronic searches (August 2015). The risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Meta...... sterile necrosis and organ failure was associated with a mortality of 19.8%. If the patients had infected necrosis without organ failure the mortality was 1.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are more than twice as likely to die if the necrosis becomes infected. Both organ failure...... and infected necrosis increase mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis....

  8. Mortality associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, J B; Harper, J L; Jauch, E C

    1996-09-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection but still occurs and carries a mortality rate up to 60%. It is a polymicrobial infection that is characterized by diffuse necrosis of fascial planes and subcutaneous tissues. Diagnosing early stages of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in relationship to other soft tissue infections of odontogenic origin is difficult and leads to less aggressive treatment with resulting increased morbidity and mortality. To prevent this significant mortality and morbidity associated with cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis early presentation, recognition and treatment by health care provider is essential.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Aspergillosis: Imaging and Pathological Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabou, Marcela; Lannes, Béatrice; Cotton, François; Meyronet, David; Galanaud, Damien; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Grand, Sylvie; Desal, Hubert; Kreutz, Julie; Schenck, Maleka; Meyer, Nicolas; Schneider, Francis; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Koob, Meriam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The imaging data present different patterns and no full consensus exists on typical imaging characteristics of the cerebral lesions. We reviewed MRI findings in 21 patients with cerebral aspergillosis and correlated them to the immune status of the patients and to neuropathological findings when tissue was available. The lesions were characterized by their number, topography, and MRI signal. Dissemination to the brain resulted from direct spread from paranasal sinuses in 8 patients, 6 of them being immunocompetent. Hematogenous dissemination was observed in 13 patients, all were immunosuppressed. In this later group we identified a total of 329 parenchymal abscesses involving the whole brain with a predilection for the corticomedullary junction. More than half the patients had a corpus callosum lesion. Hemorrhagic lesions accounted for 13% and contrast enhancement was observed in 61% of the lesions. Patients with hematogenous dissemination were younger (p = 0.003), had more intracranial lesions (p = 0.0004) and had a higher 12-week mortality rate (p = 0.046) than patients with direct spread from paranasal sinuses. Analysis of 12 aneurysms allowed us to highlight two distinct situations. In case of direct spread from the paranasal sinuses, aneurysms are saccular and located on the proximal artery portions, while the hematogenous dissemination in immunocompromised patients is more frequently associated with distal and fusiform aneurysms. MRI is the exam of choice for cerebral aspergillosis. Number and type of lesions are different according to the mode of dissemination of the infection. PMID:27097323

  10. Sino-orbital Aspergillosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sino-orbital aspergillosis in a 61-year-old male with uncontrolled non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus presented with three months history of left ear pain, left side headache with mucopurulent nasal discharge and one week history of progressive swelling and pain with difficulty in opening of the left eye and sudden loss of vision. In spite of surgical debridement and medical management with amphotericin B and itraconazole his visual outcome was poor and the infection was unabated at one month follow up.

  11. Orbital apex syndrome due to aspergillosis: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Yvens B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 73-year-old female who presented facial numbness and pain in the first division of the trigeminal nerve, ptosis, diplopia and visual loss on the right side for the previous four months. The neurological, radiological and histological examination demonstrated a rare case of invasive fungal aspergillosis of the central nervous system, causing orbital apex syndrome, later transformed in temporal brain abscess. She died ten months later due to respiratory and renal failure in spite of specific antimycotic therapy.

  12. Necrotizing fasciitis: a case report of a premature infant with necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Denise M; Stebbins, Karen; Howland, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe infection involving the superficial fascia, subcutaneous tissue, and, occasionally, deeper tissue layers. Usual treatment is with surgical debridement in combination with antibiotics. In review of the literature there is one neonatal report of NF associated with necrotizing enterocolitis. We present a case report of a 25 week gestation infant with necrotizing fasciitis and the complexity of wound and pain management presented for the nursing staff in the neonatal intensive care unit.

  13. Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A165108252 External Vocabularies MeSH: Pancreatitis, Acute Necrotizing (D019283) SnoMedCT: Acute necrotizing... pancreatitis (7881005) UMLS: C0267941 (C0267941) MedDRA: Necrotising pancreatitis (10056219) NDFRT: Pancreatitis, Acute... Necrotizing [Disease/Finding] (N0000003910) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing pancreatitis ...

  14. Necrotizing sialometaplasia: Report of 2 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo; Cho, Bong Hae; Jung, Yun Hoa [Pusan National Univ. College of Dentistry, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) was defined by Abrams et al. in 1973 as a reactive necrotizing inflammatory process involving minor salivary glands of the hard palate. Before that recognition, many patients with this condition had been improperly treated because of its clinical and histologic resemblance to malignancy such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. We report two cases of necrotizing sialometaplasia. One case involved a 58-year-old male who had an ulcerative palatal lesion exposing underlying bone which has the typical features of the above mentioned condition. Another case involved a 59-year-old male who developed a necrotizing sialometaplasia in association with a dome-shaped palatal swelling which was proves as an adenoid cystic carcinoma after operation biopsy.

  15. Surgical intervention in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselink, MG; de Bruijn, MT; Rutten, JP; Boermeester, MA; Hofker, HS; Gooszen, HG

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the various surgical strategies for treatment of (suspected) infected necrotizing pancreatitis (INP) and patient referrals for this condition in the Netherlands. Methods: This retrospective study included all 106 consecutive patients who had surgical treatment for IN

  16. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, K Y; Ma, L; Wong, S S; Ng, W F

    1993-01-01

    A patient who succumbed to fulminant necrotizing fasciitis due to Vibrio damsela after injury by a rabbitfish is described. Despite the absence of any known underlying illness, he did not respond to appropriate antibiotic therapy and radical surgical intervention. This represents the first documented case of necrotizing fasciitis due to this organism, and is also the first reported case in Southeast Asia inflicted by rabbitfish.

  17. Necrotizing Faciitis-Acute Abdomen And Anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Güleç, Handan; Akın Kepek, Yurdal; Yaşar, Hansa; Kurtay, Aysun; Tutal, Zehra; Babayiğit, Münire; Horasanlı, Eyüp

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis ( NF) is a rare  soft-tissue infection characterized by progressive necrosis of the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and fascia with a high morbidity and mortality.  This infection, which is usually induced by  toxin producing bacteria, can occur in any region of the body but it is predominantly located in the abdominal wall, perineum and extremities . NF treatments consist of  radical surgical debridement of all involved necrotic tissue, use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and...

  18. Clinical Features and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 7 Dogs with Central Nervous System Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A R; Young, B D; Levine, G J; Eden, K; Corapi, W; Rossmeisl, J H; Levine, J M

    2015-01-01

    Systemic aspergillosis is a manifestation of Aspergillus sp. infection that can result in central nervous system (CNS) involvement with marked alterations in CNS function. Information regarding the clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in cases of aspergillosis with CNS involvement is lacking, resulting in a need for better understanding of this disease. The primary objectives were to describe the clinical features and MRI findings in dogs with CNS aspergillosis. The secondary objectives were to describe clinicopathologic findings and case outcome. Seven dogs with CNS aspergillosis. Archived records from 6 institutions were reviewed to identify cases with MRI of CNS aspergillosis confirmed with serum galactomannan enzyme immunoassay (EIA) testing, culture, or supported by histopathology. Signalment, clinical, MRI, clinicopathologic, histopathologic, and microbiologic findings were recorded and evaluated. Aspergillosis of the CNS was identified in 7 dogs from 3 institutions. The median age was 3 years and six were German Shepherd dogs. Five dogs had signs of vestibular dysfunction as a component of multifocal neurological abnormalities. The MRI findings ranged from normal to abnormal, including hemorrhagic infarction and mass lesions. Until now, all reported MRI findings in dogs with CNS aspergillosis have been abnormal. We document that CNS aspergillosis in dogs, particularly German Shepherd dogs, can be suspected based on neurologic signs, whether MRI findings are normal or abnormal. Confirmatory testing with galactomannan EIA, urine, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or tissue culture should be performed in cases where aspergillosis is a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Feng; XIA Jie

    2012-01-01

    Varicella is a self-limited disease,but sometimes it may be associated with some serious life-threatening complications.Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare complication of varicella.This is a case of a 7-year-old girl with septic shock caused'by necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of varicella.Swelling and pain in the left inguinal region and left axillary region were found five days after varicella.Then a high fever occurred followed by hypotension.Fluid infusion,vasopressor and antibiotics were administered.Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from exudates from the wounds.The clinical symptoms markedly improved after surgical drainage and removal of the necrotic tissue.Both wounds were covered with skin grafts after healthy granulation tissue formed.Although there have been few reports of life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in western countries,it is rare in China.Usually patients with varicella were admitted to pediatric or infectious disease department but not surgical departments; so that the clinicians should be aware that varicella may be complicated by life-threatening surgical infections.Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients of varicella who showed an increasing pain and swelling in any body areas associated with increasing fever and local erythema.Early identification,surgical drainage and debridement are essential for successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.

  20. Necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Xia, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Varicella is a self-limited disease, but sometimes it may be associated with some serious life-threatening complications.Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare complication of varicella. This is a case of a 7-year-old girl with septic shock caused by necrotizing fasciitis as a complication of varicella. Swelling and pain in the left inguinal region and left axillary region were found five days after varicella. Then a high fever occurred followed by hypotension. Fluid infusion, vasopressor and antibiotics were administered. Group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus was isolated from exudates from the wounds. The clinical symptoms markedly improved after surgical drainage and removal of the necrotic tissue. Both wounds were covered with skin grafts after healthy granulation tissue formed. Although there have been few reports of life-threatening necrotizing fasciitis following varicella in western countries, it is rare in China. Usually patients with varicella were admitted to pediatric or infectious disease department but not surgical departments; so that the clinicians should be aware that varicella may be complicated by life-threatening surgical infections. Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients of varicella who showed an increasing pain and swelling in any body areas associated with increasing fever and local erythema. Early identification, surgical drainage and debridement are essential for successful treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.

  1. Isavuconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donnelley MA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monica A Donnelley,1,2 Elizabeth S Zhu,1 George R Thompson 3rd3 1Department of Inpatient Pharmacy, University of California – Davis, Sacramento, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Touro University College of Pharmacy, Vallejo, 3Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California – Davis, Davis, CA, USAAbstract: We have a limited arsenal with which to treat invasive fungal infections caused by Aspergillus and Mucorales. The morbidity and mortality for both pathogens remains high. A triazole antifungal, isavuconazole, was recently granted approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis. A randomized double-blind comparison trial for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis found isavuconazole noninferior to voriconazole. A separate, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of isavuconazole in the treatment of mucormycosis found comparable response rates to amphotericin B and posaconazole treated historical controls. The prodrug isavuconazonium sulfate is commercially available in both an oral and intravenous formulation and is generally well tolerated. Isavuconazole’s broad spectrum of activity, limited side effect profile, and favorable pharmacokinetics will likely solidify its place in therapy. Keywords: isavuconazonium, antifungal, zygomycosis, mucor, mould infection, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, therapy, new agent

  2. "Aspergillosis following Cytomegalovirus disease in a kidney transplant patient "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Ameri Sh

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old end stage renal disease (ESRD woman was scheduled for transplantation. Also, she has had fever of unknown origin (FUO, rise of ESR and PPD>22 mm. Therefore treatment with isoniazid and rifampin was started three months prior to transplantation. She developed allograft dysfunction on week after transplantation. She received a few course pulse therapy (methyl prednisolone, antilymphocyte globulin (ALG, hemodialysis and because of low blood level of cyclosporine, isoniazid and rifampin were stopped. She was seen because of unilateral decreased vision, fever, cough and in physical examination, chorioretinitis and bilateral infiltration in both lungs were seen three weeks later. Severe cytomegalovirus (CMV antigenemia was detected and she responded rapidly to gancyclovir. One month later, she complained of fever and productive cough again. In chest X-ray (CXR, cavitary lesions were shown and with transthoracic biopsy, invasive aspergillosis was detected. In spite of amphotericin B therapy, she developed CNs involvement. Unfortunately she expired six months post transplantation. This is an interesting case of aspergillosis following CMV infection most likely because of an excess of immunosuppression.

  3. Standardization and characterization of antigens for the diagnosis of aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopiglia, Cheila Denise Ottonelli; Arechavala, Alicia; Carissimi, Mariana; Sorrentino, Julia Medeiros; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; Daboit, Tatiane Caroline; Kammler, Luana; Negroni, Ricardo; Scroferneker, Maria Lúcia

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and characterize antigens for the diagnosis of aspergillosis. Nine strains of Aspergillus species Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus flavus , and Aspergillus niger were grown in Sabouraud and Smith broth to produce exoantigens. The antigens were tested by immunodiffusion against sera from patients with aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses. The protein fraction of the antigens was detected by SDS-PAGE; Western blot and representative bands were assessed by mass spectrometry coupled to a nano Acquity UltraPerformance LC and analyzed by the Mascot search engine. Concurrently, all sera were tested with Platelia Aspergillus EIA. The most reactive antigens to sera from patients infected by A. fumigatus were produced by A. fumigatus MG2 Sabouraud and pooled A. fumigatus Sabouraud samples, both with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100% and 97%, respectively. Aspergillus niger and A. flavus antigens were reactive against A. niger and A. flavus sera, each one with a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Two proteins, probably responsible for antigenic activity, β-glucosidase in A. fumigatus and α-amylase in A. niger were attained. The commercial kit had a specificity of 22%, sensitivity of 100%, positive predictive value of 48%, and negative predictive value of 100%. The antigens produced showed high sensitivity and specificity and can be exploited for diagnostics of aspergilloma.

  4. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a rare cause of pleural effusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    Aspergillus fumigatus is one of the most ubiquitous of the airborne saprophytic fungi. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a syndrome seen in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis, and is characterized by hypersensitivity to chronic colonization of the airways with A. fumigatus. We report the case of a patient with ABPA presenting with pleural effusion. A 27-year-old male was referred with recurrent right pleural effusion. Past medical history was remarkable for asthma, allergic sinusitis, and recurrent pleurisy. Investigations revealed peripheral eosinophilia with elevated serum immunoglobulin E and bilateral pleural effusions with bilateral upper lobe proximal bronchiectasis. Precipitating serum antibodies to A. fumigatus were positive and the A. fumigatus immediate skin test yielded a positive reaction. A diagnosis of ABPA associated with bilateral pleural effusions was made and the patient was commenced on prednisolone. At review, the patient\\'s symptoms had considerably improved and his pleural effusions had resolved. ABPA may present with diverse atypical syndromes, including paratracheal and hilar adenopathy, obstructive lung collapse, pneumothorax and bronchopleural fistula, and allergic sinusitis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is a rare cause of pleural effusion and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with a pleural effusion, in particular those with a history of asthma.

  5. Case report: allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and allergic fungal sinusitis successfully treated with voriconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Gary E; Fitzgerald, John E

    2007-12-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and allergic fungal sinusitis are closely related disorders that rarely present in the same individual. The mainstay of treatment for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is systemic corticosteroids. Itraconazole is used as adjunctive therapy in refractory cases. Allergic fungal sinusitis requires initial sinus surgery followed by systemic steroids. Antifungal therapy has not proven to be beneficial in allergic fungal sinusitis. We report a case of concomitant allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and allergic fungal sinusitis that was refractory to standard therapy but had dramatic clinical response following treatment with voriconazole.

  6. Development and characterization of spray dried microparticles for pulmonary delivery of antifungal drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathpal, Divita; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is a life threatening fungal infection mainly caused by Aspergillus species. Available treatment strategy against pulmonary aspergillosis is having very limited applicability, due to its toxicity and low circulation half-life. Pulmonary drug delivery is one of the strategies that can minimize these pitfalls. In the present study, polymeric and lipidic nanoparticles of amphotericin B were prepared by spray drying technique using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) and stearylamine with oleic acid respectively. Formulations were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in-vitro release studies, uptake analysis and in-vivo bio distribution studies. Developed polymeric and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) were found in submicron size (600-700nm) and spherical in shape. Studies suggested that NLCs have better entrapment efficiency (77.1±5.5 %) as compared to HPMC carrier (71.28±5.22 %). Both formulations provided sustained drug release (HPMC, 82.05% releases up to 32 hrs and NLC, 88.2 % up to 40 hrs) and reduced dose dumping that may be helpful to reduce the toxicity and improve patient compliance. In-vitro antifungal studies suggested that stearylamine formulations exhibited better antifungal activity over control and HPMC formulations. Pharmacokinetic and organ distribution studies also support our hypothesis i.e. localized drug delivery for prolong period, improving the therapeutic effectiveness of the encapsulated drug against pulmonary aspergillosis. Studies suggested that drug delivery by pulmonary route is beneficial for local action in lungs.

  7. Pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  8. Pulmonary coccidioidomycosis : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yong Soo; Lee, Jin Seong; Kim, Hyae Young; Song, Koun Sik; Sohn, Kwang Hyun; Lim, Tae Hwan [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    A 72-year-old woman was admitted due to a solitary pulmonary nodule incidentally found after routine chest radiography. Chest CT showed a solitary pulmonary nodule without calcification in the right upper lobe. Three years earlier, she had spent 3 months in Arizona. Surgical resection was performed after percutaneous transthoracic fine needle aspiration had suggested malignaney. The lesion was caseous and necrotic, and histologic examination indicated the presence of endosporulating spherules. We report a case of coccidioidomycosis which was resected in order to rule out lung cancer.

  9. Cytologic features of pulmonary blastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Shalini C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary blastomas are rare lung neoplasms constituting 0.5% of all lung tumors. This tumor has an aggressive course and needs to be recognized on cytology. A preoperative diagnosis of pulmonary blastoma is difficult to obtain by cytopathologic methods. A diagnosis of biphasic pulmonary blastoma should be considered when there is a dimorphic population of cells on cytology. A 30-year-old male presented with gradually progressing breathlessness and left-sided chest pain for the past one month. Chest radiograph and computed tomography of thorax revealed an anterior mediastinal mass that was subjected to ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology. Aspiration cytology showed a highly cellular lesion with a dimorphic population of tumor cells in a necrotic background. The possibility of a non-small cell carcinoma was suggested. Subsequent histopathology revealed the tumor to be a pulmonary blastoma. The importance of recognizing the dimorphic population of cells in cytology is discussed.

  10. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alcides Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections.

  11. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  12. Efficacy of Orally Delivered Cochleates Containing Amphotericin B in a Murine Model of Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Delmas, G.; Park, S.; Chen, Z W; Tan, F.; Kashiwazaki, R.; Zarif, L.; Perlin, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  13. Efficacy of orally delivered cochleates containing amphotericin B in a murine model of aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, G; Park, S; Chen, Z W; Tan, F; Kashiwazaki, R; Zarif, L; Perlin, D S

    2002-08-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  14. Invasive central nervous system aspergillosis in bone marrow transplantation recipients: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Department of Radiology, Saint-Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Paris (France); Gluckman, Eliane [Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation, Saint-Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Paris (France); Tabti, Bachir [Department of Radiology, Saint-Louis Hospital, AP-HP, Paris (France); Miaux, Yves [Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Invasive central nervous system aspergillosis is being seen with an increased frequency, particularly due to the increased number of immunosuppressed patients. The major cause of invasive central nervous system aspergillosis is bone marrow transplantation. In most cases, aspergillosis develops in the paranasal sinuses and in the lungs, and secondarily spreads to the brain. Imaging of cerebral aspergillosis may present different patterns depending on the lesion's age and the immunologic status of the patient. Lesions of the spinal cord are far less common but has been encountered in our series. In this article we review the clinical and radiologic features of aspergillosis affecting the central nervous system in patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation. Different CT and MR patterns are presented, including pertinent clinical and pathologic material. Significant morbidity and mortality can be associated with this fungal infection, and it is therefore incumbent upon the radiologist to identify intracranial aspergillosis as early as possible so that appropriate therapy can be administered. (orig.)

  15. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: A review of 42 patients from a tertiary care center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the clinical, radiological, and laboratory profile in patients of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 42 cases of ABPA, diagnosed over a period of 10 years from 1995 to 2005, for their clinical, radiological, and laboratory profiles. Results: Of 42 ABPA patients, 27 were men and 17 were women. Their mean age at the time of diagnosis was 31.2 years and mean duration of illness was 12.2 years. Breathlessness was the chief symptom. Other allergic disorders existed in 17 (40.5% patients, and family history suggestive of allergic disease was present in 22 (52.4% patients. Most common chest radiographic finding was fleeting pulmonary shadows in 28 (66.7% patients. High resolution CT thorax revealed central bronchiectasis as predominant finding. Peripheral blood eosinophilia more than 1000 cells/µl, Type I and type III cutaneous reactivity to Aspergillus antigen, elevated serum titers of total IgE antibody, A. fumigatus specific IgE and IgG antibodies, and serum precipitin against A. fumigatus were positive in majority of patients, who underwent these tests. Thirty eight (90.5% patients had had history of antitubercular treatment during the course of their illness. All 42 patients met at least four criteria for the diagnosis of ABPA. Conclusion: Any patient of bronchial asthma, presenting with recurrent shadows in chest radiograph and high peripheral blood eosinophilia, should be investigated for ABPA. Efforts need to be intensified to improve the awareness level among general physicians for early diagnosis and prompt treatment of this disease to avoid misuse of antitubercular drugs.

  16. Post-influenza aspergillosis, do not underestimate influenza B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nulens, Eric FL; Bourgeois, Marc JC; Reynders, Marijke BML

    2017-01-01

    Our objective is to highlight and focus on post-influenza aspergillosis, triggered by influenza B virus. This relatively new clinical entity is often associated with a fulminant course of respiratory decline and high mortality. A 51-year immunocompetent woman, without any medical history or risk factors for developing a complicated influenza infection, was admitted to the intensive care unit. During admission, she presented with an afebrile flu-like syndrome, myocarditis, rhabdomyolysis, multiple organ failure, and evolved to severe respiratory distress. The broncho-alveolar lavage contained influenza B RNA, and the culture revealed Aspergillus fumigatus. Despite maximal organ support, immunoglobulin, antiviral and antifungal therapy, the patient died. This case demonstrates that influenza B virus may be life threatening even to immunocompetent adults and may trigger an invasive Aspergillus superinfection.

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibition as an alternative strategy against invasive aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic eLamoth

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a life-threatening infection due to Aspergillus fumigatus and other Aspergillus spp. Drugs targeting the fungal cell membrane (triazoles, amphotericin B or cell wall (echinocandins are currently the sole therapeutic options against IA. Their limited efficacy and the emergence of resistance warrant the identification of new antifungal targets. Histone deacetylases (HDACs are enzymes responsible of the deacetylation of lysine residues of core histones, thus controlling chromatin remodeling and transcriptional activation. HDACs also control the acetylation and activation status of multiple non-histone proteins, including the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90, an essential molecular chaperone for fungal virulence and antifungal resistance. This review provides an overview of the different HDACs in Aspergillus spp. as well as their respective contribution to total HDAC activity, fungal growth, stress responses, and virulence. The potential of HDAC inhibitors, currently under development for cancer therapy, as novel alternative antifungal agents against IA is discussed.

  18. [An unusual cause of acute respiratory distress: obstructive bronchial aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margery, J; Perez, J-P; Vaylet, F; Bordier, E; Dot, J-M; Saint-Blancard, P; Bonnichon, A; Guigay, J; Pats, B; L'Her, P

    2004-06-01

    We report the case of a 77-Year-old immunocompetent woman who required intensive care for acute dyspnea revealing complete atelectasia of the left lung related to an aspergillus mycelium plug blocking the principal bronchus. The clinical course was favorable after deobstruction by thermocoagulation and oral itraconazole given for six Months. The patient was free of parenchymatous or endobronchial sequelae. Adjuvant oral corticoid therapy was given temporarily during the second Month of treatment when signs of transition towards allergic aspergillosis developed. Four Months after discontinuing the antifungal treatment, the patient developed a new episode of acute dyspnea caused by atelectasia limited to the right lower lobe. Treatment by itraconazole was resumed and continued as long-term therapy. No recurrence has been observed for eighteen Months. The diagnostic and therapeutic problems raised by Aspergillus fumigatus are well known in the immunocompromised subject, but can also be encountered in the immunocompetent subject.

  19. [Pharmacology of the antifungals used in the treatment of aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, José Ramón; Sádaba, Belén; Gómez-Guíu, Almudena

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of invasive aspergillosis requires the use of drugs that characteristically have complex pharmacokinetic properties, the knowledge of which is essential to achieve maximum efficacy with minimal risk to the patient. The lipid-based amphotericin B formulations vary significantly in their pharmacokinetic behaviour, with very high plasma concentrations of the liposomal form, probably related to the presence of cholesterol in their structure. Azoles have a variable absorption profile, particularly in the case of itraconazole and posaconazole, with the latter very dependent on multiple factors. This may also lead to variations in voriconazole, which requires considering the possibility of monitoring plasma concentrations. The aim of this article is to review some of the most relevant aspects of the pharmacology of the antifungals used in the prophylaxis and treatment of the Aspergillus infection. For this reason, it includes the most relevant features of some of the azoles normally prescribed in this infection (itraconazole, posaconazole and voriconazole) and the amphotericin B formulations.

  20. NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF LIMB: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaarna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, rare, potentially lethal, soft tissue infection that tends to develop in scrotum, perineum, abdominal wall or the extremities. It is a medical emergency that threatens both patient’s limb and life. Necrotizing fasciitis has the potential to become quite severe - in such cases a radical debridement amounting to amputation of the limb may be required to save the patient’s life. Early diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. We describe a case of a 49-year-old obese woman who developed necrotizing fasciitis in her left lower limb for which she underwent multiple radical surgical debridement, followed by skin grafting for reconstruction of the limb defects. Our main focus was to salvage the limb with the help of antibiotics and multiple debridements. This report emphasizes the need to have a relook at the use of Parenteral Crystalline Penicillin and diligent management of wounds resulting from repeated debridements.

  1. Anesthetic implications of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Mehmood A; Mansfield, John F

    2003-08-01

    Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis is a necrotizing soft tissue infection of face and neck spreading at the level of fascia. It has been described as a putrid ulcer, phagedaena, and hospital gangrene. It has a high mortality rate, and presents a challenge to anesthesiologists who must secure an airway to deliver anesthesia safely. We report a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis in which the patient underwent repeated radical surgical debridement of face and neck, including a mandibulectomy. These critically ill patients often present with sepsis and multiple system organ failure. Extensive preoperative evaluation, invasive monitoring, and possibly the use of vasopressors and inotropes are essential in treating these patients. The tracheas of these patients should remain intubated after initial debridement. Tracheostomy should be performed early. Antibiotic therapy, nutritional support, early debridement, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy all help to decrease mortality in these patients.

  2. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis treated successfully for one year with omalizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Collins,1 Gabriele deVos,2 Golda Hudes,2 David Rosenstreich21New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, NY, 2Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USABackground: Current therapy for allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA uses oral corticosteroids, exposing patients to the adverse effects of these agents. There are reports of the steroid-sparing effect of anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab for ABPA in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, but there is little information on its efficacy against ABPA in patients with bronchial asthma without CF.Objective: To examine the effects of omalizumab, measured by asthma control, blood eosinophilia, total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE, oral corticosteroid requirements, and forced expiratory volume spirometry in patients with ABPA and bronchial asthma.Methods: A retrospective review of charts from 2004–2006 of patients treated with omalizumab at an academic allergy and immunology practice in the Bronx, New York were examined for systemic steroid and rescue inhaler usage, serum immunoglobulin E levels, blood eosinophil counts, and asthma symptoms, as measured by the Asthma Control Test (ACT.Results: A total of 21 charts were screened for the diagnosis of ABPA and bronchial asthma. Four patients with ABPA were identified; two of these patients were male. The median monthly systemic corticosteroid use at 6 months and 12 months decreased from baseline usage. Total serum IgE decreased in all patients at 12 months of therapy. Pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory vital capacity at one second (FEV1 was variable at 1 year of treatment. There was an improvement in Asthma Control Test (ACT symptom scores for both daytime and nighttime symptoms.Conclusions: Treatment with omalizumab creates a steroid-sparing effect, reduces systemic inflammatory markers, and results in improvement in ACT scores in patients with ABPA.Keywords: allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis

  3. A breath fungal secondary metabolite signature to diagnose invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Sophia; Thomas, Horatio R; Daniels, S David; Lynch, Robert C; Fortier, Sean M; Shea, Margaret M; Rearden, Preshious; Comolli, James C; Baden, Lindsey R; Marty, Francisco M

    2014-12-15

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains a leading cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients, in part due to the difficulty of diagnosing this infection. Using thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, we characterized the in vitro volatile metabolite profile of Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common cause of IA, and other pathogenic aspergilli. We prospectively collected breath samples from patients with suspected invasive fungal pneumonia from 2011 to 2013, and assessed whether we could discriminate patients with proven or probable IA from patients without aspergillosis, as determined by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group consensus definitions, by direct detection of fungal volatile metabolites in these breath samples. The monoterpenes camphene, α- and β-pinene, and limonene, and the sesquiterpene compounds α- and β-trans-bergamotene were distinctive volatile metabolites of A. fumigatus in vitro, distinguishing it from other pathogenic aspergilli. Of 64 patients with suspected invasive fungal pneumonia based on host risk factors, clinical symptoms, and radiologic findings, 34 were diagnosed with IA, whereas 30 were ultimately diagnosed with other causes of pneumonia, including other invasive mycoses. Detection of α-trans-bergamotene, β-trans-bergamotene, a β-vatirenene-like sesquiterpene, or trans-geranylacetone identified IA patients with 94% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 81%-98%) and 93% specificity (95% CI, 79%-98%). In patients with suspected fungal pneumonia, an Aspergillus secondary metabolite signature in breath can identify individuals with IA. These results provide proof-of-concept that direct detection of exogenous fungal metabolites in breath can be used as a novel, noninvasive, pathogen-specific approach to identifying the precise microbial cause of pneumonia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America

  4. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first case of the confirmed necrotizing fasciitis caused by Group A Streptococcus in Yugoslavia was presented. Male patient, aged 28, in good health, suddenly developed symptoms and signs of severe infective syndrome and intensive pain in the axillary region. Parenteral antibiotic, substitution and supportive therapy was conducted along with the radical surgical excision of the necrotizing tissue. The patient did not develop streptococcal toxic shock syndrome thanks to the early established diagnosis and timely applied aggressive treatment. He was released from the hospital as completely cured two months after the admission.

  5. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  6. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis following periodontal abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Rui; Catunda, Ivson de Sousa; Queiroz, Isaac Vieira; de Morais, Hecio Henrique Araujo; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue infections are characterized by acute inflammation, diffuse edema, and suppuration, and are often associated with symptoms such as malaise, fever, tachycardia, and chills. Necrotizing fasciitis is a destructive bacterial infection affecting subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia and is associated with high rates of mortality. It usually involves the abdomen and extremities, but it also can occur in the head and neck. Early diagnosis is critical and the most commonly accepted treatment includes radical surgical intervention and administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics. This article reports and discusses the case of a patient with odontogenic cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, and emphasizes the importance of early and effective treatment.

  7. Ascending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to emphysematous pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajer-Fadel, Walid Leonardo; Pichardo-González, Martha; Estrada-Ramos, Sandra; Palafox, Damián; Navarro-Reynoso, Francisco Pascual; Argüero-Sánchez, Rubén

    2014-09-01

    Mediastinal infections usually originate from postoperative complications or in a descending manner from a cervical infectious process; few reports have emerged describing an ascending trajectory. A 56-year-old woman with a Huang class 1 left emphysematous pyelonephritis was referred due to a progression of an ascending necrotizing mediastinitis. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed, drainage and thorough lavage were carried out with a successful outcome. We believe this is the first reported case of ascending necrotizing mediastinitis secondary to an emphysematous renal infection. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. [Epidemiology of invasive group A streptococcal infections in developed countries : the Canadian experience with necrotizing fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovetchkine, Ph; Bidet, Ph; Minodier, Ph; Frère, J; Bingen, E

    2014-11-01

    In industrialized countries, group A streptococcal infections were a source of concern, mainly due to the occurrence of rheumatic fever and its cardiac complications. At present, the incidence of rheumatic fever is decreasing in these countries, giving way to an increasing occurrence of invasive streptococcal group A infections with high level of morbidity and mortality. Streptococcal necrotizing fasciitis, a specific entity, emerged these last decades, often in association with chickenpox. The introduction of the varicella vaccine in the province of Quebec routine immunization program, was followed by a significant decrease in the number of necrotizing fasciitis or other skin and soft-tissues infections in our pediatric population. However, in our experience at the CHU Sainte-Justine, this immunization program has not been helpful to reduce the overall incidence of invasive group A streptococcal infections. Conversely, an increase in the number of pleuro-pulmonary and osteo-articular infections was observed.

  9. Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Necrotizing Fasciitis: A Rare Disease, Especially for the Healthy Language: ... based hand rub if washing is not possible. Necrotizing Fasciitis Is Rarely Spread from Person to Person Most ...

  10. Necrotizing fasciitis : plain radiographic and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Dae; Park, Jeong Hee; Jeon, Hae Jeong; Lim, Jong Nam; Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Dong Rib [Konkuk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-11-01

    To evaluate the plain radiographic and CT findings of the necrotizing fasciitis. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic findings of 4 cases with necrotizing fasciitis. Three cases were proven pathologically. We evaluated pattern and extent of the gas shadows in plain films. CT findings were analysed, with emphasis on : (a) gas pattern, (b) extent, (c) location and involved site, (d) associated focal abscess, and (e) swelling of the adjacent muscles. On plain radiographs, four cases showed streaky or mottled gas densities in the pelvis, three cases in the perineum, one case in the abdomen, and two cases in the thigh. On CT images, gas pattern was mottled and streaky appearance with swelling of the adjacent muscles. Gas shadows located in the extraperitoneal space in four cases, fascial layer in four cases, and subcutaneous layer in four cases. There were gas shadows in pelvic wall, perineum, abdominal wall, buttock, thigh, and scrotum. Focal low density lesion suggestive of focal abscess was not visualized. Plain radiography is useful for early diagnosis of the necrotizing fasciitis and CT is very useful for detection of precise location and extent of the disease. CT is also useful for differentiation of necrotizing fasciitis from focal abscess and cellulitis.

  11. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in infant: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiavetto, Renata Rennó

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial infection characterized by extensive necrosis of tissues, and may include skin and muscles. It's more frequent in adults than in children and generally involves the trunk and extremities. Head and neck area is less commonly affected. The most frequently isolated pathogens are the Streptococcus pyogenes (group A and Staphylococcus aureus. The anatomopathological exam is the best diagnostic method, which early identifies the disease. The clinical support, surgical debridement, and the intravenous antibiotic therapy, are fundamental for the treatment. Objective: To report a case of an infant who suffered from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis. Case Report: Infant, male sex, white, 2 months old, previously healthy, with Necrotizing Fasciitis involving the frontal and right lateral cervical regions. After adequate treatment the patient obtained excellent recovery without presenting important aesthetic or functional alterations. Conclusion: The Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis is uncommon in children. The early surgical debridement is necessary to control the infection, even if it may result in great and deep injuries. The wide spectrum antibiotic therapy and hemodynamic support are also basic for the therapeutic success.

  12. Intestinal proteome changes during infant necrotizing enterocolitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Pingping; Smith, Birgitte; Qvist, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Changes in the intestinal and colonic proteome in patients with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) may help to characterize the disease pathology and identify new biomarkers and treatment targets for NEC. Methods: Using gel-based proteomics, proteins in NEC-affected intestinal and coloni...

  13. Odontogenic cervical necrotizing fasciitis, etiological aspects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-26

    Jun 26, 2015 ... E-mail: dr_simionbran@yahoo.com. Introduction. Necrotizing ... each case were obtained through the study of the clinical observation ..... infection experience in West China: A retrospective study of 212 cases. Int J. Infect Dis ...

  14. Protein synthesis persists during necrotic cell death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saelens, X.; Festjens, N.; Parthoens, E.; Overberghe, I. van; Kalai, M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Vandenabeele, P.

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is an intrinsic part of metazoan development and mammalian immune regulation. Whereas the molecular events orchestrating apoptosis have been characterized extensively, little is known about the biochemistry of necrotic cell death. Here, we show that, in contrast to apoptosis, the inductio

  15. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the lower limbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Muggeo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We report an uncommon ssevere soft-tissue infection of the thighs in a male child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Early and aggressive medical treatment and the conservative surgical approach were successful. Necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in any soft-tissue infection until it can be definitely ruled out, since prompt deliver of medical and surgical intervention is essential.

  16. Radioiodine uptake in inactive pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakheet, S.M.; Powe, J.; Al Suhaibani, H. [Department of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hammami, M.M.; Bazarbashi, M. [Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1999-06-01

    Radioiodine may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection. We have seen such accumulation in six thyroid cancer patients with a history of previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis. We also review the causes of false-positive radioiodine uptake in lung infection/inflammation. Eight foci of radioiodine uptake were seen on six iodine-123 diagnostic scans. In three foci, the uptake was focal and indistinguishable from thyroid cancer pulmonary metastases from thyroid cancer. In the remaining foci, the uptake appeared nonsegmental, linear or lobar, suggesting a false-positive finding. The uptake was unchanged, variable in appearance or non-persistent on follow-up scans and less extensive than the fibrocystic changes seen on chest radiographs. In the two patients studied, thyroid hormone level did not affect the radioiodine lung uptake and there was congruent gallium-67 uptake. None of the patients had any evidence of thyroid cancer recurrence or of reactivation of tuberculosis and only two patients had chronic intermittent chest symptoms. Severe bronchiectasis, active tuberculosis, acute bronchitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, rheumatoid arthritis-associated lung disease and fungal infection such as Allescheria boydii and aspergillosis can lead to different patterns of radioiodine chest uptake mimicking pulmonary metastases. Pulmonary scarring secondary to tuberculosis may predispose to localized radioiodine accumulation even in the absence of clinically evident active infection. False-positive radioiodine uptake due to pulmonary infection/inflammation should be considered in thyroid cancer patients prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastases. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 9 refs.

  17. Hyperostosis of the maxillary sinus wall in aspergillosis: is it a characteristic finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Cho, Woo Ho; Kim, Joung Sook; Kim, Myung Gyu; Kim, Young Hoon; Woo, Hoon Young [College of Medicine, Inje Univ., Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To determine whether the wall thickening of the maxillary sinus is a characteristic finding in aspergillosis. In 103 patients, including 26 with aspergillosis, 21 with inverted papilloma (IP), and 56 with unilateral chronic sinusitis, the thickness of the maxillary sinus wall was determined by CT scanning. All cases were proven pathologically, and patients with a history of previous surgery of bone destruction were excluded. Two neuroradiologists retrospectively reviewed the CT scans using bone window settings for sinus wall hyperostosis and the presence of intrasinus calcification. Thickening of the maxillary sinus wall was assessed visually in a semiquantitative manner, and graded as 'none' (absence of thickening), 'mild' (thickening of up to 1.5 times), or moderate ot severe(over 1.5 times thicker than normal contralateral sinus wall at its thickest point). Moderate to severe wall thickening was found only in patients with aspergillosis (21/26, 80.8%). Mild wall thickening was seen in two patients with aspergillosis (2/26, 7.7%), in 12 of 21 with IP (57.1%), and in 5 of 56 with chronic maxillary sinusitis (8.9%). Most cases of chronic maxillary sinusits( 51/56,91.1%), 9/21 IP cases (42.9%), and 3/26 cases of aspergillosis (11.5%) showed no thickening of the maxillary sinus wall. Calcifications were found in 18 patients with aspergillosis (69.2%), in no patient with IP (0%), and in one with chronic maxillary sinusitis (1.8%). We suggest that 'moderate to severe' wall thickening of the maxillary sinus is the characteristic finding of aspergillosis. Although various sinonasal diseases can cause bone change, CT findings of hyperostosis of the maxillary sinus and intrasinus calcification are very helpful in differentiating fungal sinusitis from other types of chronic inflammatory lesions.

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Cervical Region following Extravasation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Özlem Gündeşlioğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection that can cause local tissue destruction, necrosis, and life threatening severe sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis in the head and neck region caused by an extravasation injury is rare. This paper reports a patient with necrotizing fasciitis of the cervical region caused by an extravasation injury which required an early surgical debridement.

  19. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Cervical Region following Extravasation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşe Özlem Gündeşlioğlu; Emine Çiğdem Özen

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive soft tissue infection that can cause local tissue destruction, necrosis, and life threatening severe sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis in the head and neck region caused by an extravasation injury is rare. This paper reports a patient with necrotizing fasciitis of the cervical region caused by an extravasation injury which required an early surgical debridement.

  20. Galactomannan enzyme immunoassay and quantitative Real Time PCR as tools to evaluate the exposure and response in a rat model of aspergillosis after posaconazole prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendejas-Bueno, Emilio; Forastiero, Agustina; Ruiz, Isabel; Mellado, Emilia; Buitrago, María José; Gavaldà, Joan; Gomez-Lopez, Alicia

    2016-11-01

    A steroid-immunosuppressed rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was use to examine the usefulness of galactomannan enzyme immunoassay (GM) and quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) in evaluating the association between response and exposure after a high dose of prophylactic posaconazole. Two different strains of Aspergillus fumigatus with different in vitro posaconazole susceptibility were used. Serum concentrations demonstrated similar posaconazole exposure for all treated animals. However, response to posaconazole relied on the in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain. After prophylaxis, galactomannan index and fungal burden only decreased in those animals infected with the most susceptible strain. This study demonstrated that both biomarkers may be useful tools for predicting efficacy of antifungal compounds in prophylaxis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Economic considerations in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis: a review of voriconazole pharmacoeconomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kem P Krueger

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Kem P Krueger, A Christie NelsonSchool of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USAAbstract: Invasive aspergillosis is a life-threatening fungal infection predominately affecting immunocompromised individuals. The incidence of inpatient-treated aspergillosis cases in the US is estimated to be between 3.02 and 3.80 per 10,000 hospitalized patients. The estimated difference in hospital costs of patients with an aspergillosis infection is US$36,867 to US$59,356 higher than those of patients without the infection. Voriconazole is a synthetic, broad spectrum triazole antifungal agent, with FDA-approved indications for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, esophageal candidiasis, candidemia in nonneutropenic patients, invasive candidiasis, and infections due to Scedosporium apiospermum and Fusarium species in patients refractory to or intolerant of other therapy. Eight cost-effectiveness analyses, one cost-minimization analysis, and one cost analysis were identified from a Medline search. The 10 pharmacoeconomic analyses were conducted in six different countries comparing voriconazole to conventional amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, itraconazole, and caspofungin. All the cost-effectiveness and cost-minimization analyses identified voriconazole as the most cost-effective therapy. The cost analysis demonstrated voriconazole cost-savings. While the acquisition costs of voriconazole are higher than those of conventional amphotericin B, the toxicity profile and rate of treatment success associated with voriconazole result in lower total treatment costs per successfully treated patient.Keywords: voriconazole, antifungal agents, invasive aspergillosis, pharmacoeconomics 

  2. Immunoproteome of Aspergillus fumigatus Using Sera of Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emylli D. Virginio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is a life-threatening lung or systemic infection caused by the opportunistic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. The disease affects mainly immunocompromised hosts, and patients with hematological malignances or who have been submitted to stem cell transplantation are at high risk. Despite the current use of Platelia™ Aspergillus as a diagnostic test, the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains a major challenge in improving the prognosis of the disease. In this study, we used an immunoproteomic approach to identify proteins that could be putative candidates for the early diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis. Antigenic proteins expressed in the first steps of A. fumigatus germination occurring in a human host were revealed using 2-D Western immunoblots with the serum of patients who had previously been classified as probable and proven for invasive aspergillosis. Forty antigenic proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS/MS. A BLAST analysis revealed that two of these proteins showed low homology with proteins of either the human host or etiological agents of other invasive fungal infections. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing specific antigenic proteins of A. fumigatus germlings that are recognized by sera of patients with confirmed invasive aspergillosis who were from two separate hospital units.

  3. INCIDENCE DENSITY, PROPORTIONATE MORTALITY, AND RISK FACTORS OF ASPERGILLOSIS IN MAGELLANIC PENGUINS IN A REHABILITATION CENTER FROM BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Filho, Rodolfo Pinho da; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; Martins, Aryse Moreira; Ruoppolo, Valéria; Mendoza-Sassi, Raúl Andrés; Adornes, Andréa Corrado; Cabana, Ângela Leitzke; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Aspergillosis, an opportunistic mycosis caused by the Aspergillus genus, affects mainly the respiratory system and is considered one of the most significant causes of mortality in captive penguins. This study aimed to examine a 6-yr period of cases of aspergillosis in penguins at the Centro de Recuperação de Animais Marinhos (CRAM-FURG), Rio Grande, Brazil. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the institution's records of penguins received from January 2004 to December 2009. Animals were categorized according to the outcome "aspergillosis," and analyzed by age group, sex, oil fouling, origin, prophylactic administration of itraconazole, period in captivity, body mass, hematocrit, and total plasma proteins. A total of 327 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) was studied, 66 of which died of aspergillosis. Proportionate mortality by aspergillosis was 48.5%, and incidence density was 7.3 lethal aspergillosis cases per 100 penguins/mo. Approximately 75% of the aspergillosis cases occurred in penguins that had been transferred from other rehabilitation centers, and this was considered a significant risk factor for the disease. Significant differences were also observed between the groups in regard to the period of time spent in captivity until death, hematocrit and total plasma proteins upon admission to the center, and body mass gain during the period in captivity. The findings demonstrate the negative impacts of aspergillosis on the rehabilitation of Magellanic penguins, with a high incidence density and substantial mortality.

  4. Successful treatment of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a bottlenose dolphin with high-dose posaconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E. Bunskoek (Paulien); S. Seyedmousavi (Seyedmojtaba); S. Gans (Steven); van Vierzen, P.B.J. (Peter B.J.); W.J. Melchers (Willem); C.E. van Elk; J.W. Mouton (Johan); P.E. Verweij (Paul)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractInvasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is difficult to manage. We describe a case of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a female bottlenose dolphin, who failed to respond to voriconazole and posaconazole therapy. As intravenous therapy was precluded,

  5. Pulmonary embolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  6. Evidence supporting a role for mammalian chitinases in efficacy of caspofungin against experimental aspergillosis in immunocompromised rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia E B Verwer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Caspofungin, currently used as salvage therapy for invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA, strangely only causes morphological changes in fungal growth in vitro but does not inhibit the growth. In vivo it has good efficacy. Therefore the question arises how this in vivo activity is reached. Caspofungin is known to increase the amount of chitin in the fungal cell wall. Mammals produce two chitinases, chitotriosidase and AMCase, which can hydrolyse chitin. We hypothesized that the mammalian chitinases play a role in the in vivo efficacy of caspofungin. METHODS: In order to determine the role of chitotriosidase and AMCase in IPA, both chitinases were measured in rats which did or did not receive caspofungin treatment. In order to understand the role of each chitinase in the breakdown of the caspofungin-exposed cells, we also exposed caspofungin treated fungi to recombinant enzymes in vitro. RESULTS: IPA in immunocompromised rats caused a dramatic increase in chitinase activity. This increase in chitinase activity was still noted when rats were treated with caspofungin. In vitro, it was demonstrated that the action of both chitinases were needed to lyse the fungal cell wall upon caspofungin exposure. CONCLUSION: Caspofungin seemed to alter the cell wall in such a way that the two chitinases, when combined, could lyse the fungal cell wall and assisted in clearing the fungal pathogen. We also found that both chitinases combined had a direct effect on the fungus in vitro.

  7. [Management of aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. Recommendations of Lille University Hospital--4th version--November 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfandari, S; Leroy, O; de Botton, S; Yakoub-Agha, I; Durand-Joly, I; Leroy-Cotteau, A; Beaucaire, G

    2005-03-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a severe complication in immunocompromised patients. The arrival of new antifungal agents motivated the redaction of guidelines, regularly updated, by a Lille University hospital multidisciplinary task force. These guidelines assess diagnostic and therapeutic issues. The main recommended diagnosis tool is the chest CT scan, ordered at the smallest suspicion and, also, measure of the blood and broncho alveolar lavage fluid galactomannan. Treatment guidelines assess prophylaxis, empirical and documented therapy. Primary prophylaxis is warranted in only two cases, pulmonary graft or stem cell transplant in patients with chronic GVH and receiving corticosteroids. Empirical therapy should use one of the available amphotericin B formulations, chosen according to the patient history. Caspofungin is another choice. Documented therapy, depending on presentation, can be a single drug or a combination. First line therapy for single drug is i.v. voriconazole. Lipid formulations of amphotericin B are another choice. A combination therapy can be used as a first line treatment, for multiple lesions, or as salvage therapy. It must include caspofungin, associated with liposomal amphotericin B or voriconazole. A tight cooperation with thoracic surgeons is recommended.

  8. Primary diagnostic approaches of invasive aspergillosis--molecular testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretagne, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    The PCR methods published for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) are diverse in terms of amplification protocols and methods, equipment, fluorescent detection dyes, PCR chemistries, and clinical specimens used. This explains why PCR is still not included in the revised EORTC/MSG definitions of IA despite encouraging results. Therefore, achieving consensual PCR procedures at the international level is mandatory. When using PCR as a diagnostic tool, emphasis must be put on limiting false positive results due to contamination either with previously amplified products or with environmental commensals. Internal amplification controls are compulsory to evidence false negative results. For most of these aspects, quantitative PCR (qPCR) should improve both the results' reliability and the clinicians' confidence. A checklist of items (Minimum information for publication of quantitative real-time PCR experiments) has been proposed to help scientists and reviewers. Currently, the main limitation relies in the DNA extraction procedure the choice of which dramatically depends on the still unknown origin of the Aspergillus DNA to amplify. There is an urgent need for basic studies to elucidate the origin and kinetics of Aspergillus DNA in blood. Once a technical consensus is achieved, clinical studies should be initiated to integrate qPCR in the diagnostic armentarium of IA.

  9. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral view confirmed a MLS, which was further corroborated by high resolution computed tomography. Central bronchiectasis was also observed, which prompted a work-up for ABPA. The child met 7/8 major diagnostic criteria for ABPA. She was then initiated on oral prednisolone that resulted in a marked clinical improvement within a fortnight. Radiological clearance occurred at 3 months with inflation of the middle lobe. ABPA presenting with MLS in a child is yet to be reported. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis of ABPA in a child presenting with MLS. This would obviate the invasive investigations usually done to ascertain the cause of MLS.

  10. [Necrotizing enterocolitis. Pathogenesis and iatrogenic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, M

    1986-08-01

    Following clinical observations, measurements of osmolarity of liquid drugs, and determination of blood loss due to sampling in very low birthweight infants, the following hypothesis on iatrogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis is proposed: Due to diagnostic blood sampling during intensive care, premature infants may become severely anemic. Therefore their intestinal perfusion is reduced, causing hypoxia and hypoperfusion in the submucosa. Especially in infants with oral feeding and hyperosmolar medication, mechanical factors, hyperosmolarity and infection can affect the mucosa from the luminal side. Simultaneous hypoperfusion and hyperosmolar load may contribute to the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis. This hypothesis, which needs experimental verification, explains the different incidence of the disease in different hospitals.

  11. A case of acute periorbital necrotizing fasciitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nurhayati Abdul Kadir; Syed Shoeb Ahmad; Shuaibah Abdul Ghani; Madusudhan Paramananda

    2016-01-01

    Periorbital necrotizing fasciitis is a rare but potentially fatal infection. It is most commonly caused by Gram-positive group A b-haemolytic Streptococci and rarely by fungal infections. In this report, we present a rare case of periorbital necrotizing fasciitis caused by Aspergillus species in an immunocompromised patient. He presented to us with a history of a slowly progressive eyelid necrosis leading to a loss of vision in one eye. The patient was started on an antibiotic and subsequently, surgical debridement and enucle-ation were performed. A few days post-operatively, yellow white mould colonies were noted to grow on the wound surface. Microbiology cultures identified them as Aspergillus species and intravenous amphotericin B 10 mg was added daily. However, despite the extensive medical and surgical treatments, he failed to respond and succumbed from septicaemia and multi-organ failure.

  12. Invasive aspergillosis in a user of inhaled cocaine: rhinosinusitis with bone and cartilage destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Azulay-Abulafia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillosis is an infection caused by saprophytic fungi of the genus Aspergillus, which typically occurs in immunosuppressed individuals, but has also been reported in immunocompetent patients. The main routes of entry are the respiratory tract, skin, cornea, and ear, and the infection may be localized or disseminated by contiguity or vascular invasion. We report a severe case of rhinosinusitis with cutaneous involvement, caused by invasive aspergillosis, in an immunocompetent user of inhaled cocaine. Invasive aspergillosis related to cocaine abuse has not yet been reported in the literature. After itraconazole treatment and surgical debridement, complete clinical remission was achieved. Nasal reconstruction with a skin graft over a silicone prosthesis resulted in a satisfactory esthetic outcome.

  13. Visual loss due to paranasal sinus invasive aspergillosis in a diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, George; Gkinis, George; Dais, Panayotis; Stathopoulos, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus species are commonly found in the soil and decaying organic matter. The spores can be typically inhaled or ingested, yet disease due to tissue invasion is rarely seen in the immunocompetent host. In the immunocompromised patient, there has been an increased incidence of invasive aspergillosis in the last 20 years. Invasive aspergillosis of the maxillary sinus with orbital and cranial spread can be lethal, therefore, necessitates early diagnosis and prompt treatment. The predilection of Aspergillus for infiltration of blood vessels can result in serious ocular complications which can lead to loss of vision. We present the case of an uncontrolled diabetic patient with invasive maxillary sinus aspergillosis and extension to the orbital contents. Our purpose was to emphasize the need of early recognition and prompt initiation of combined antifungal treatment and surgical intervention with the intent to preserve the involved vital structures.

  14. CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL FINDINGS OF ASPERGILLOSIS IN MAGELLANIC PENGUINS (Spheniscus magellanicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MELISSA ORZECHOWSKI XAVIER

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We studied a series of fifteen fatal cases of aspergillosis in penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus, seen over a 4-year period at a rehabilitation center in Southern Brazil. The clinical and pathological findings based on the lesions found at necropsy are described herein. The majority of animals (11/15 had sudden death without clinical signs. In 33.3% (5/15 of the cases, aspergillosis was restricted to the respiratory system and 66.6% showed disseminateddisease, with liver, kidney, adrenal gland and gastrointestinal tract involvement. Typical lesions were characterized as white-yellowish granulomatous nodules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest series of aspergillosis cases described in penguins in SouthAmerica.

  15. Etiologic Agents and Diseases Found Associated with Clinical Aspergillosis in Falcons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Tarello

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe parasitological, microbiological, and pathological findings associated with the isolation of Aspergillus species in 94 clinically diseased captive falcons from Dubai. Concomitant agents and/or diseases were identified in 64 cases, causing either single (=36 or multiple coinfections (=28. Diagnoses found more often in association with aspergillosis were chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS (=29, Caryospora sp. (=16, Serratospiculum seurati infestation (=14, cestodiasis (=6, bumblefoot (=5, trematodosis due to Strigea falconispalumbi (=5, trichomoniasis (=4, Babesia shortti (=4, Mannheimia (Pastorella haemolytica (=4, interstitial hepatitis (=4, Escherichia coli (=3, and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia (=2. Compared with a control group of 2000 diseased falcons without evidence of aspergillosis, the prevalence of Babesia shortti, CFIDS, Mannheimia (Pastorella haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and falcon herpes virus infection was conspicuously higher in association with aspergillosis. These entities may be considered suitable candidates as predisposing factors for the mycosis.

  16. Necrotizing Periodontal Diseases II: Clinical Features

    OpenAIRE

    Maita Véliz, Luis V.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.; Castañeda Mosto, María; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.; Gálvez Calla, Luis; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.; Maita Castañeda, Luis M; Facultad de Odontología USMP; Navarro Contreras, Carmen; Odontóloga práctica privada; Ramos Perfecto, Donald; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Odontología.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a review of the most important aspects from necrotizing periodontal disease, specia-lly about clinical features, diagnostics, etiology, evolution, prognose and treatment. Se presenta una revisión de las enfermedades periodontales necrotizantes (EPN), sintetizando los aspec-tos clínicos, criterios de diagnóstico, etiología, evolución, diagnóstico diferencial, pronóstico y trata-miento.

  17. Necrotizing pancreatitis: a review of multidisciplinary management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Anthony; Goussous, Naeem; Sardana, Neeraj; Patel, Shirali; Cunningham, Steven C

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this review is to summarize the current state of the art of the management of necrotizing pancreatitis, and to clarify some confusing points regarding the terminology and diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis, as these points are essential for management decisions and communication between providers and within the literature. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Despite the publication of the Atlanta guidelines, misuse of pancreatitis terminology continues in the literature and in clinical practice, especially regarding the local complications associated with severe acute pancreatitis. Necrotizing pancreatitis is a manifestation of severe acute pancreatitis associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is aided by pancreas-protocol computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, ideally 72 h after onset of symptoms to achieve the most accurate characterization of pancreatic necrosis. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, organ failure, need for debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach, ideally at a high-volume pancreatic center. The role of antibiotics is determined by the presence of infected necrosis. Early enteral feeds improve outcomes compared with parenteral nutrition. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with a multitude of complications which can lead to long-term morbidity or mortality. Interventional therapy should be guided by available resources and the principle of a minimally invasive approach. When open debridement is necessary, it should be delayed at least 3-6 weeks to allow demarcation of necrotic from viable tissue.

  18. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  19. Traumatic abdominal hernia complicated by necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Aleix; Garrigós-Ortega, Gonzalo; Gómez-Abril, Segundo Ángel; Martí-Martínez, Eva; Torres-Sánchez, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a critical illness involving skin and soft tissues, which may develop after blunt abdominal trauma causing abdominal wall hernia and representing a great challenge for physicians. A 52-year-old man was brought to the emergency department after a road accident, presenting blunt abdominal trauma with a large non-reducible mass in the lower-right abdomen. A first, CT showed abdominal hernia without signs of complication. Three hours after ICU admission, he developed hemodynamic instability. Therefore, a new CT scan was requested, showing signs of hernia complication. He was moved to the operating room where a complete transversal section of an ileal loop was identified. Five hours after surgery, he presented a new episode of hemodynamic instability with signs of skin and soft tissue infection. Due to the high clinical suspicion of necrotizing fasciitis development, wide debridement was performed. Following traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH), patients can present unsuspected injuries in abdominal organs. Helical CT can be falsely negative in the early moments, leading to misdiagnosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a potentially fatal infection and, consequently, resuscitation measures, wide-spectrum antibiotics, and early surgical debridement are required. This type of fasciitis can develop after blunt abdominal trauma following wall hernia without skin disruption.

  20. A successfully treated case of necrotizing fasciitis with complicated sepsis due to intramuscular steroid injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karakas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrotising fasciitis is a devastating soft tissue infection which characterised by rapidly progressing necrosis involving mainly fascia and subcutaneous tissues. A 66-year old male patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to our hospital with fever, pain and swelling in the right thigh and right leg, difficulty in walking, dry mouth and weakness. There was a single dose intramuscular steroid injection story in his anamnesis. Physical examination revealed swelling, hyperemia and pain in the right gluteal region spreading through the right femur and popliteal fossa. He was diagnosed necrotizing fasciitis complicated with sepsis. We administered the supportive therapy and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy in addition to the surgical debridement, vacuum assisted closure and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The patient was discharged after six months of the follow-up period in hospital. In conclusion, Health-care personnel should be careful when the intramuscular injections planned for patients at the risk of development of necrotizing fasciitis reason of their chronic illnesses or immunosuppressive conditions. In patients who developed necrotizing fasciitis despite everything, we want to strongly emphasise the advantageous hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an additional therapy to the broad spectrum antibiotherapy and surgical debridement [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 787-791

  1. Correlation between high-resolution computed tomography and galactomannan antigenemia in adult hematologic patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, A. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: alhidalgop@yahoo.es; Parody, R.; Martino, R. [Department of Hematology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, F. [Department of Microbiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Franquet, T.; Gimenez, A.; Blancas, C. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-07-15

    Objectives: To analyse the predominant radiological pattern of pulmonary lesions in adult hematologic patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis (IA) together with the results of serial serum Aspergillus galactomannan antigen testing (GM). Material and methods: In a prospective study for patients at high risk of aspergillus pulmonary infection, serum GM were performed 2-3 times per week during the periods of high risk for IA and high-resolution CT (HRCT) was performed in case of abnormal chest X-ray (CXR) and/or persistent fever after 5 days of antibiotic treatment. Changes on HRCT scan were classified as airway IA and angioinvasive IA. IA was classified as proven or probable in accordance with the definitions stated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group (EORTC-MS). Positive GM testing was not considered as microbiological criterion. Results: 38 hematological patients were diagnosed of probable (n = 28) or proven (n = 10) IA. 55% patients had a neutrophil count less than 500 mm{sup -3} (n = 21), and 37% patients {>=}2 risk factors for IA. All probable IA were diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Proven IA was reached by positive histopathologic and culture results of samples obtained by autopsy (n = 4), percutaneous (n = 3) or transbronchial biopsy (n = 3). 18 patients had airway IA, and 60% had a GM level {>=}1.5. 20 patients were diagnosed of angioinvasive IA from which 80% had a GM level {>=}1.5. Conclusion: Serum GM levels may be lower in patients with airway IA than in those with an angioinvasive form. HRCT and serum GM are complementary tests in the diagnosis of IA.

  2. Development of murine monoclonal antibodies for the immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine aspergillosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Aspergillus fumigatus were produced by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. The supernatants of in vitro cultured hybridomas were in.......e., aspergillosis was diagnosed. The characteristics of the 2 MAbs (MAb-WF-AF-1 and-2) raised against the WF of A. fumigatus in ELISA and immunoblotting and immunohistochemical assays justify their application for the in situ diagnosis of systemic aspergillosis of cattle....

  3. Application of enzyme-immunohistochemistry for the diagnosis of aspergillosis, candidiasis, and zygomycosis in three lovebirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L; Bautista, M J; de las Mulas, J M; Jensen, H E

    1993-01-01

    Aspergillosis, candidiasis, and zygomycosis were diagnosed in tissues from three lovebirds (Agapornis roseicollis) using indirect enzyme-immunohistochemical techniques. In these techniques, the first antibody was raised against fungal antigen. A second antibody, which was raised in another animal species, was added to link the first antibody to enzyme-immunocomplexes. The reactivity of specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies was visualized by immunoreactivity of alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase and peroxidase anti-peroxidase immunocomplexes. All three birds examined had dermal candidiasis. In addition, one of the birds was diagnosed with concomitant acute ocular aspergillosis, and another bird was diagnosed with chronic zygomycotic myocarditis.

  4. MR imaging of cerebral aspergillosis in an infant with normal-immunity : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ji Yeoun; Choi, Jin Ok; Lee, Kang Soo; Chae, Soo Hyun; Joo, Myung Jin [Presbyterian Medical Center, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-04-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is a rare condition, and like other opportunistic fungal infections, it most commonly occurs in immunocompromised patients. Because of the increasing use of chemotherapy in organ transplantation, cases involving neoplasms, corticosteroid therapy, and cases of lymphoma and leukemia, the incidence of fungal infections in the brain has recently increased. Cerebral aspergillosis in an infant with normal immunity is a very rare condition, and has not been reported in Korea. We report the MR findings of this condition in an infant with normal immunity. (author)

  5. Pleuritis clinically diagnosed as aspergillosis during the course of microscopic polyangiitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Yasutaka; Oryoji, Kensuke; Uchino, Ayumi; Yoshizawa, Shigeru; Niiro, Hiroaki; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Pleural aspergillosis is a rare fungal infection. We herein report a case of pleuritis clinically diagnosed as aspergillosis without apparent Aspergillus lung lesions. A 75-year-old man receiving immunosuppressive therapy due to microscopic polyangiitis was admitted for treatment of massive pleural effusion. Histology of the parietal pleura revealed septate hyphae. In addition, a hematological marker of Aspergillus indicated Aspergillus pleuritis. The pleural effusion resolved after administration of the voriconazole. The trigger for invasion of Aspergillus into the pleura was thought to be spontaneous pneumothorax, which had occurred five months earlier.

  6. Scintigraphic detection of pulmonary aspergillosis in rabbits with a radiolabeled leukotriene b4 antagonist.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerd-Vismale, J.E.M. van; Rennen, H.J.J.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Harris, T.D.; Edwards, D.S.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Boerman, O.C.

    2004-01-01

    Radiolabeled chemotactic peptides have been studied for their applicability to the visualization of infectious and inflammatory foci. Because a radiolabeled leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist allowed visualization of intramuscular E. coli abscesses in rabbits within a few hours after injection, we dec

  7. Cerebral aspergillosis and pulmonary tuberculosis in a child with chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Muhammed; Zafar, Sidra; Rehman, Tooba; Riyaz, Muhammed; Bari, Muhammed E.; Idrees, Romana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an immune disorder that affects phagocytes. It is characterized by recurrent or persistent bacterial and fungal infections. Reports of tuberculosis (TB) in patients with CGD are rare. In developing countries, where TB is endemic, possibility of other chronic infections is often overlooked by physicians. Case Description: We report the case of a 4-year-old boy who had recurrent respiratory infections and episodes of headache. He was put on antituberculosis (ATT) drugs without microbiological or pathological evidence 2 months prior to presentation. The child did not improve and was brought to our hospital where a computed tomography scan revealed multiple cerebral abscesses. These abscesses were excised. The microbiological specimen was determined to be positive for Aspergillus fumigatus. His tracheal aspirate was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis polymerase chain reaction assay. Further work-up confirmed the diagnosis of CGD in the child. Conclusion: This report describes the course of the patient's illness in order to highlight the challenges associated with the management of these infections. We also aim to stress on the importance of pathological diagnosis before starting a therapy. PMID:27308089

  8. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient with severe dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasa, Prashant; Yadav, Rohit; Nagrani, S K; Raina, Sanjay; Gupta, Ankur; Jain, Shakti

    2014-05-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female diagnosed with sever dengue fever. She started showing recovery from dengue fever with medical management. On day 6 of admission, she had leukocytosis, altered mental sensorium, and hemoptysis. Chest tomography showed air space consolidation with multiple nodules in the left upper and middle lobe sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage cultures were positive for Aspergillus flavus. The patient showed improvement with voriconazole and therapy was continued for 6 weeks.

  9. Development and optimization of quantitative PCR for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackman Robert C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA remains challenging. Culture and histopathological examination of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid are useful but have suboptimal sensitivity and in the case of culture may require several days for fungal growth to be evident. Detection of Aspergillus DNA in BAL fluid by quantitative PCR (qPCR offers the potential for earlier diagnosis and higher sensitivity. It is important to adopt quality control measures in PCR assays to address false positives and negatives which can hinder accurate evaluation of diagnostic performance. Methods BAL fluid from 94 episodes of pneumonia in 81 patients was analyzed. Thirteen episodes were categorized as proven or probable IPA using Mycoses Study Group criteria. The pellet and the supernatant fractions of the BAL were separately assayed. A successful extraction was confirmed with a human 18S rRNA gene qPCR. Inhibition in each qPCR was measured using an exogenous DNA based internal amplification control (IAC. The presence of DNA from pathogens in the Aspergillus genus was detected using qPCR targeting fungal 18S rRNA gene. Results Human 18S rRNA gene qPCR confirmed successful DNA extraction of all samples. IAC detected some degree of initial inhibition in 11 samples. When culture was used to diagnose IPA, the sensitivity and specificity were 84.5% and 100% respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis of qPCR showed that a cutoff of 13 fg of Aspergillus genomic DNA generated a sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of 77%, 88%, 50%, 96% respectively. BAL pellet and supernatant analyzed together resulted in sensitivity and specificity similar to BAL pellet alone. Some patients did not meet standard criteria for IPA, but had consistently high levels of Aspergillus DNA in BAL fluid by qPCR. Conclusion The Aspergillus qPCR assay detected Aspergillus DNA in 76.9% of subjects with proven or probable IPA when

  10. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the palate. Ulcerative or necrotizing stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipsen, H P; Petersen, J K; Simonsen, B H

    1976-12-01

    A typical case of the recently described tumor-suspect lesion, necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) of the palate, in a 54-year old Caucasian male is presented. Results of complete blood- and urinanalysis including serum electrophoresis and labial salivary gland biopsy strongly pointed at a local etiologic factor. Previous statements that the disease represents a new entity are questioned. The present authors favor the idea that NS is the necrotizing (ulcerative) or terminal stage of leukokeratosis nicotina palati (nicotinic stomatitis). It is of particular importance that this lesion is not diagnosed as a malignancy, as it heals spontaneously and uneventfully.

  11. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by a primary appendicocutaneous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Makoto; Higashi, Yukihiro; Shoji, Tuyoshi; Hiraide, Takanori; Maruo, Hirotoshi

    2012-08-01

    We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the loin of a 76-year old man with several coexisting or past health issues, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alcohol-related liver cirrhosis, gastrectomy for gastric cancer, subarachnoid hemorrhage, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and cerebral infarction. Incision of the necrotizing fasciitis was successful, but it revealed an appendicocutaneous fistula; thus, we performed appendectomy and fistulectomy. We think that the necrotizing fasciitis was caused by appendicitis perforation involving the retroperitoneum, inducing the formation of an appendicocutaneous fistula. Necrotizing fasciitis and appendicocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of appendicitis. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first report of fluoroscopic examination demonstrating that a primary appendicocutaneous fistula had caused necrotizing fasciitis. Our search of the literature found 12 cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by preoperative appendicitis. We discuss the characteristics and findings of these cases.

  12. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Youn; Park, So Young; Moon, Soo-Youn; Son, Jun Seong; Lee, Mi Suk

    2011-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is known to be a highly lethal infection of deep-seated subcutaneous tissue and superficial fascia. Reports of necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae are exceedingly rare. We report a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a 62-yr-old man with liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus. He presented with painful swelling of left leg and right hand. On the day of admission, compartment syndrome was aggravated and the patient underwent surgical exploration. Intra-operative findings revealed necrotizing fasciitis and cultures of two blood samples and wound aspirates showed S. pneumoniae. The patient died despite debridement and proper antimicrobial treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis with meningitis reported in Korea. We also review and discuss the literature on pneumococcal necrotizing fasciitis.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of vulva: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal A

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Vulvar necrotizing fascitis is an uncommon infectious disorder. Since the first reported cases almost 100 years, ago, necrotizing fasciitis continues to present a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. What usually begins as a subtle infection can become life-threatening. We report two cases of vulvar necrotizing fasciitis, one after posterior colporrhaphy in a woman with four risk factors and the other in a young woman without any risk factor.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis: A decade of surgical intensive care experience

    OpenAIRE

    Shaikh Nissar

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare disease, potentially limb and life-threatening infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissue with occasionally muscular involvement. Necrotizing faciitis is surgical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Aim: Aim of this study was to analyze presentation, microbiology, surgical, resuscitative management and outcome of this devastating soft tissue infection. Materials and Methods: The medical records of necrotizing fasciitis patients treated in surgical in...

  15. Renal infarction secondary to invasive aspergillosis in a 5-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hyun; Im, Soo Ah; Cho, Bin

    2014-07-01

    Aspergillus species have angioinvasive properties and can involve extrapulmonary organs by hematogenous spread from the lungs. However, renal involvement by Aspergillus is uncommon and is usually associated with the formation of abscesses. We report an unusual case of invasive renal aspergillosis presenting with extensive renal infarction in a 5-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This case emphasizes the fact that renal aspergillosis initially presents with only renal infarction, and metastatic-embolism by invasive aspergillosis should be considered in differential diagnosis for any focal lesion of kidney in a patient with leukemia.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis: strategies for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanar Hakan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is uncommon and difficult to diagnose, and it cause progressive morbidity until the infectious process is diagnosed and treated medically and surgically. The literature addressed NF contains confusing information, inaccurate bacteriologic data, and antiquated antibiotic therapy. A delay in diagnosis is associated with a grave prognosis and increased mortality. The main goal of the clinician must be to establish the diagnosis and initially treat the patient within the standard of care. This review is planned as a guide for the clinician in making an early diagnosis of NF and initiating effective medical and surgical therapy.

  17. Rapid diagnosis of azole-resistant aspergillosis by direct PCR using tissue specimens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, J.W.M. van der; Snelders, E.; Arends, J.P.; Daenen, S.M.G.J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of PCR techniques on a formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue specimen for direct detection of one dominant azole resistance mechanism in a case of disseminated invasive aspergillosis. Rapid detection of mutations associated with azole resistance directly in tissue significant

  18. Rapid Diagnosis of Azole-Resistant Aspergillosis by Direct PCR Using Tissue Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, Jan W. M.; Snelders, Eveline; Arends, Jan P.; Daenen, Simon M.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    We report the use of PCR techniques on a formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue specimen for direct detection of one dominant azole resistance mechanism in a case of disseminated invasive aspergillosis. Rapid detection of mutations associated with azole resistance directly in tissue significant

  19. Early proinflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein trends as predictors of outcome in invasive Aspergillosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, L.; Netea, M.G.; Teerenstra, S.; Earnest, A.; Vonk, A.G.; Schlamm, H.T.; Herbrecht, R.; Troke, P.F.; Kullberg, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Monitoring treatment response in invasive aspergillosis is challenging, because an immunocompromised host may not exhibit reliable symptoms and clinical signs. Cytokines play a pivotal role in mediating host immune response to infection; therefore, the profiling of biomarkers may be an a

  20. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in a Liver Transplant Recipient with Central Nervous System Invasive Aspergillosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionissios, Neofytos; Shmuel, Shoham; Kerry, Dierberg; Katharine, Le; Simon, Dufresne; Sean, Zhang X; Kieren, Marr A

    2012-01-01

    This is a case report of central nervous system (CNS) invasive aspergillosis (IA) in a liver transplant recipient, which illustrates the utility of enzyme-based diagnostic tools for the timely and accurate diagnosis of IA, the treatment challenges and poor outcomes associated with CNS IA in liver transplant recipients. PMID:22676861

  1. Detection of circulating galactomannan for the diagnosis and management of invasive aspergillosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennink-Kersten, M.A.S.H.; Donnelly, J.P.; Verweij, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    The availability of the Platelia Aspergillus, a sandwich ELISA kit that detects circulating galactomannan, has been a major advance for managing patients at risk for invasive aspergillosis because of the early detection of the antigen. The assay is now widely used throughout the world, including the

  2. Economic evaluation of voriconazole in the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.P.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.; Wout, J.W. van 't

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To asses the cost-effectiveness of voriconazole in comparison to conventional amphotericin B and itraconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the Netherlands. METHODS: The cost-effectiveness of voriconazole in comparison to conventional amphotericin B or itraconazole was ev

  3. Pattern recognition pathways leading to a Th2 cytokine bias in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, K.L.; Gresnigt, M.S.; Smeekens, S.P.; Jacobs, C.W.M.; Magis-Escurra Ibanez, C.; Jaeger, M.; Wang, X.; Lubbers, R.; Oosting, M.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Reijers, M.H.E.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is characterised by an exaggerated Th2 response to Aspergillus fumigatus, but the immunological pathways responsible for this effect are unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to decipher the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and

  4. Aspirin induced asthma accompanied with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Rui; ZHANG Hong-yu

    2010-01-01

    @@ In this paper, we describe a patient with a rather severe form of aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA). The patient is a man born in 1948, who first presented with rhinorrhea,nasal congestion and chronic urticaria, and had an episode of asthma after ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for the further eight years.

  5. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to necrotic toxin-producing Escherichia coli strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gallois

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a fatal case of necrotizing soft tissues infection caused by an Escherichia coli strain belonging to phylogenetic group C and harbouring numerous virulence factors reported to be part of a pathogenicity island (PAI such as PAI IIJ96 and conserved virulence plasmidic region.

  6. Fatal necrotizing fasciitis due to necrotic toxin-producing Escherichia coli strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallois, C.; Hauw-Berlemont, C.; Richaud, C.; Bonacorsi, S.; Diehl, J.-L.; Mainardi, J.-L.

    2015-01-01

    We report a fatal case of necrotizing soft tissues infection caused by an Escherichia coli strain belonging to phylogenetic group C and harbouring numerous virulence factors reported to be part of a pathogenicity island (PAI) such as PAI IIJ96 and conserved virulence plasmidic region. PMID:26693024

  7. Cancer incidence in pulmonary vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zycinska, Katarzyna; Kostrzewa-Janicka, Jolanta; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Wardyn, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis is a potentially lethal autoimmune disease characterized by granulomatous inflammation of respiratory tract, necrotizing vasculitis affecting small-to medium-size vessels and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies elevation. Typical therapy involves high-dose glucocorticosteroids combined with cyclophosphamide in a dose 1-2 mg/kg/per day. A high relapse rate in pulmonary vasculitis means prolonged courses of cyclophosphamide in some patients. Carcinogenic effects of cyclophosphamide, especially its toxic metabolite acrolein that is excreted into the urine, are responsible for the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and bladder cancer. These and other malignancies are cyclophosphamide dose-depended. The aim of the present study was to assess the incidence of cancer in patients with pulmonary vasculitis in comparison with the incidence of cancer in the general population. Analyses were done according to the cumulative dose of cyclophosphamide, subdivided into low (≤35 g) and high (>35 g). During the observation period 15 cancers occurred. A significantly increased standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was observed for non-melanoma skin cancers (SIR 5.2; 95 % Cl 2.3-8.7), AML (SIR 4.3; 95 % Cl 2.1-11.2), and bladder cancer (SIR 3.4; 95 % Cl 1.6-5.2). Induction remission treatment and relapse treatment with cyclophosphamide involves a substantial risk of late appearing malignances in patients with pulmonary vasculitis. Monitoring and prophylactic management in pulmonary vasculitis after cessation of cyclophosphamide therapy is crucial.

  8. Investigation of dissemination of aspergillosis in poultry and possible control measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapetanov Miloš C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi belonging to genus Aspegillus are ubiquitous saprophytic microorganisms which are, in certain circumstances, responsible for clinical infections of respiratory tract in all poultry, particularly in young birds. In case of a lung form, Aspergillus fumigatus, A. niger and A. glaucus are the most frequently isolated fungi. In general, poultry is constantly exposed to these fungi in its environment. Predisposing factors, such as long exposition and highly contaminated environment and litter, high humidity in poultry houses, poor ventilation, malnutrition and stress, all contribute to clinical aspergillosis. Some geographic and seasonal regularities are observed in relation to the distribution of disease outbreaks. In this sense, cases of aspergillosis in our country were more frequently noted in wild areas located northern from the rivers Sava and Danube. Influence of some factors on the outbreak and spreading, as well as predominant clinical features of aspergillosis in poultry were investigated in this paper. Possible prophylactic and intervention measures were discussed. The occurrence of Aspergillus sp. in poultry was analyzed according to the clinical and laboratory investigations performed during the two selected years, 2000 and 2010. Widespread aspergillosis was noted in poultry flocks of different age, both in young and adult birds. During the years 2000 and 2010, acute aspergillosis was found in 12 and 16 commercial flocks of chickens and turkeys, respectively. Ocular infection with Aspergillus was determined in 10 day old broilers from two flocks. Aspergillus sp. was isolated from unhatched eggs (6.86%, litter (23.07%, environmental (36.17% and hatchery swabs (3.85%. Besides the appropriate antifungal therapy, enforcement of proper sanitary-hygiene measures on poultry farms and hatcheries, as well as microbiological control of feed are considered essential for an efficient control of infection and its spreading.

  9. Intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-yi; WANG Fang; FENG Jie-xiong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Based on the observation that coagulation necrosis occurs in the majority of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) patients,it is clear that intestinal ischemia is a contributing factor to the pathogenesis of NEC.However,the published studies regarding the role of intestinal ischemia in NEC are controversial.The aim of this paper is to review the current studies regarding intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction and NEC,and try to elucidate the exact role of intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction in NEC.Data sources The studies cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms used were "intestinal microcirculatory dysfunction" and "neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis".Study selection Mainly original milestone articles and critical reviews written by major pioneer investigators in the field were selected.Results Immature regulatory control of mesentery circulation makes the neonatal intestinal microvasculature vulnerable.When neonates are subjected to stress,endothelial cell dysfunction occurs and results in vasoconstriction of arterioles,inflammatory cell infiltration and activation in venules,and endothelial barrier disruption in capillaries.The compromised vasculature increases circulation resistance and therefore decreases intestinal perfusion,and may eventually progress to intestinal necrosis.Conclusion Intestinal ischemia plays an important role through the whole course of NEC.New therapeutic agents targeting intestinal ischemia,like HB-EGF,are promising therapeutic agents for the treatment of NEC.

  10. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  12. Mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm as an unusual complication of thoracic actinomycosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyung-Soo; Lee, Sang-Yeub [Wonkwang University College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yu-Whan; Noh, Hyung-Jun; Lee, Ki-Yeol; Kang, Eun-Young [Korea University Hospital and Korea University College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-03-15

    Although pulmonary artery aneurysms are a rare vascular anomaly, they are seen in a wide variety of conditions, such as congenital heart disease, infection, trauma, pulmonary hypertension, cystic medial necrosis and generalized vasculitis. To our knowledge, mycotic aneurysms caused by pulmonary actinomycosis have not been reported in the radiologic literature. Herein, a case of pulmonary actinomycosis complicated by mycotic aneurysm is presented. On CT scans, this case showed focal aneurysmal dilatation of a peripheral pulmonary artery within necrotizing pneumonia of the right lower lobe, which was successfully treated with transcatheter embolization using wire coils.

  13. Activity and Safety of Inhaled Itraconazole Nanosuspension in a Model Pulmonary Aspergillus fumigatus Infection in Inoculated Young Quails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlaź, Piotr; Knaga, Sebastian; Kasperek, Kornel; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Jeżewska-Witkowska, Grażyna; Winiarczyk, Stanisław; Wyska, Elżbieta; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Rundfeldt, Chris

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is frequently reported in parrots, falcons, and other birds held in captivity. Inhalation is the main route of infection for Aspergillus fumigatus, resulting in both acute and chronic disease conditions. Itraconazole (ITRA) is an antifungal commonly used in birds, but its administration requires repeated oral dosing, and the safety margin is narrow. To investigate the efficacy of inhaled ITRA, six groups of ten young quails (Coturnix japonica) were inoculated intratracheally with 5 × 10(6) spores (3 groups) or 5 × 10(7) spores (3 groups). Animals were exposed to nebulized ITRA nanosuspension as 10 % suspension or 4 % suspension, once daily for 30 min, starting 2 h after inoculation for 6 days. Control groups were exposed to nebulized saline for the same period of time. Survival and clinical scores were evaluated, and animals were subjected to gross pathology. In control animals, aspergillosis resulted in systemic disease without pulmonary or air sac granulomas. Animals died from multiple organ failure. Inhalation of 10 % ITRA nanosuspension blocked lethality and prevented disease-related symptoms in the quails exposed to the low dose of spores, while the disease course in quails inoculated with the high-spore dose was retarded. Inhalation of 4 % ITRA nanosuspension was less effective. Both inhalations were well tolerated, and gross pathology did not reveal signs of local toxicity. The data indicate that inhaled administration of 10 % ITRA nanosuspension is capable of alleviating an acute A. fumigatus infection in quails. A lower ITRA concentration may be only active in chronic pulmonary aspergillosis.

  14. Review of 58 patients with necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, S.F. van; Vries, J. de; Bijker, J.B.; Mollen, R.M.; Hekma, E.J.; Lemson, S.M.; Tan, E.C.T.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life threatening soft tissue infection, primarily involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissue. In a large cohort of patients presenting with Necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands we analysed all available data to determine the causative pathogens and

  15. Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute necrotising ulcerative gingivostomatitis; V...lcerative (D005892) SnoMedCT: Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis (173599005) UMLS: C0017575 (C00...lcerative [Disease/Finding] (N0000001343) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivostomatitis ...

  16. Review of 58 patients with necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigt, S.F. van; Vries, J. de; Bijker, J.B.; Mollen, R.M.; Hekma, E.J.; Lemson, S.M.; Tan, E.C.T.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, life threatening soft tissue infection, primarily involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissue. In a large cohort of patients presenting with Necrotizing fasciitis in the Netherlands we analysed all available data to determine the causative pathogens and

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis: contribution and limitations of diagnostic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malghem, Jacques; Lecouvet, Frédéric E; Omoumi, Patrick; Maldague, Baudouin E; Vande Berg, Bruno C

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare, rapidly spreading, deep-seated infection causing thrombosis of the blood vessels located in the fascia. Necrotizing fasciitis is a surgical emergency. The diagnosis typically relies on clinical findings of severe sepsis and intense pain, although subacute forms may be difficult to recognize. Imaging studies can help to differentiate necrotizing fasciitis from infections located more superficially (dermohypodermitis). The presence of gas within the necrotized fasciae is characteristic but may be lacking. The main finding is thickening of the deep fasciae due to fluid accumulation and reactive hyperemia, which can be visualized using computed tomography and, above all, magnetic resonance imaging (high signal on contrast-enhanced T1 images and T2 images, best seen with fat saturation). These findings lack specificity, as they can be seen in non-necrotizing fasciitis and even in non-inflammatory conditions. Signs that support a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis include extensive involvement of the deep intermuscular fascias (high sensitivity but low specificity), thickening to more than 3mm, and partial or complete absence on post-gadolinium images of signal enhancement of the thickened fasciae (fairly high sensitivity and specificity). Ultrasonography is not recommended in adults, as the infiltration of the hypodermis blocks ultrasound transmission. Thus, imaging studies in patients with necrotizing fasciitis may be challenging to interpret. Although imaging may help to confirm deep tissue involvement and to evaluate lesion spread, it should never delay emergency surgical treatment in patients with established necrotizing fasciitis.

  18. A case of fatal necrotizing fasciitis arising from chronic lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Young Joon; Kang, In Sook; Lee, Jung Ho; Kim, Sue Min; Kim, Young Jin

    2013-12-01

    Chronic lymphedema and lymphangitis are common adverse effects following treatment for gynecological cancer. Because the early symptoms of necrotizing fasciitis are similar to those of lymphangitis, fatal outcome can occur if patients or physicians underestimate this condition. Here, we present a case of necrotizing fasciitis in a patient with chronic lymphedema.

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis in association with Ludwig's angina - A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavarodi, A M

    2011-07-01

    A 28 year old male diabetic patient developed Ludwig's angina which subsequently evolved into cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. The differential characteristic of Ludwig's angina and cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis, as it relates to this rare presentation is discussed. The clinical and radiological features, pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management that resulted in a successful outcome are presented.

  20. Pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood for a long time (chronic) Lung disease, such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis Medicines (for example, certain diet drugs) Obstructive sleep ...

  1. Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed March 13, 2014. Pinto DS, et al. Pathophysiology of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. http://www.uptodate.com/ ... hvd/. Accessed March 10, 2014. What is pulmonary hypertension? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www. ...

  2. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This ... blood may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  3. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shortness of breath and increase your ability to exercise. You may have heard that pulmonary rehabilitation is only for people with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). We now know that ...

  4. Periorbital Necrotizing Fasciitis Secondary to Candida parapsilosis and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Matthew; Chelnis, James; Mawn, Louise A

    Necrotizing fasciitis is most often caused by either polymicrobial bacterial infections or by Gram-positive organisms, such as Streptococcus or Staphylococcus; however, rare cases of fungal necrotizing fasciitis have been reported. Candida parapsilosis is an emerging fungal pathogen. This fungus grows in either a yeast or pseudohyphal form. C. parapsilosis has been reported to cause keratitis, intraocular infection, and seeding of frontalis slings. C. parapsilosis is a commensal of human skin and can be acquired by nosocomial spread. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Candida has rarely been reported, but to date C. parapsilosis has not been identified as the causative organism in necrotizing fasciitis. This is the first documented case of human periocular soft tissue infection by C. parapsilosis, and also the first report providing evidence of mycotic infection in a necrotizing fasciitis concurrently infected by Streptococcus pyogenes.

  5. Caspofungin for treatment of invasive aspergillosis in Germany: results of a pre-planned subanalysis of an international registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egerer Gerlinde

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study is a pre-planned country-specific subanalysis of results in Germany from a multinational multicenter registry to prospectively assess real-world experience with caspofungin administered for treatment of proven or probable invasive aspergillosis (IA. Methods Data from patients treated with caspofungin for a single episode of IA were collected. Effectiveness was determined by the local investigator as favorable (complete or partial response or unfavorable (stable disease, failure or death at the end of caspofungin therapy. Descriptive statistics with binomial exact confidence intervals were employed. Results Forty-two consecutive patients were identified in three German centers. Three patients (7% had proven IA and 39/42 (93% had probable IA (modified European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycosis Study Group (EORTC/MSG criteria. Forty-one patients had pulmonary IA and one had tracheal IA. Caspofungin monotherapy was received by 36/42 patients (86%; of these, 26/36 (72% received salvage therapy. A favorable response was observed in 29/42 patients (69%; 95% CI 53 to 82%; of these, 21/29 (72% had a complete and 8/29 (28% a partial response. Favorable response rate was 69% in patients with monotherapy (95% CI 52% to 84%; 25/36 patients, and 67% in patients receiving combination therapy (95% CI 22% to 96%; 4/6 patients. Favorable response rate in patients with first line therapy was 64% (95% CI 31% to 89%; 7/11 patients, and 73% in patients with second line therapy (95% CI 54% to 88%; 20/30 patients. No adverse events were reported. In total, 35/42 patients (83%; 95% CI 69 to 93% survived seven days after completion of caspofungin therapy. Conclusions These real-life findings in Germany are consistent with the international findings from this registry and with findings from randomized studies.

  6. Caspofungin Use in Daily Clinical Practice for Treatment of Invasive Aspergillosis: Results of a Prospective Observational Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandwani Sheenu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prospective observational registry assessed real world experience with caspofungin monotherapy or combination therapy for the initial or salvage treatment of proven or probable invasive aspergillosis (IA. Methods Data were collected from April 2006 to September 2007 for patients treated with caspofungin for a single episode of IA. Clinical effectiveness was categorized as favorable (complete or partial or unfavorable (stable disease or failure at the end of caspofungin therapy (EOCT. Results Consecutive patients (n = 103 with proven or probable IA (per EORTC/MSG criteria were identified from 11 countries. Malignancy (76.7%, neutropenia (64.1%, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, 22.3%, solid organ transplantation (8.7%, autologous HSCT (4.9%, and HIV/AIDS (2.9% were the most common underlying conditions. Most patients (84.5% had pulmonary IA. Aspergillus fumigatus was the most frequently isolated species. The majority of patients received caspofungin monotherapy (82.5% primarily as salvage therapy (82.4%. The main reason for switching to salvage therapy was clinical failure of the first-line therapy (69%. A favorable response at EOCT was seen in 56.4% (57/101 of patients overall, including 56.5% (48/85 and 56.3% (9/16 of patients receiving caspofungin monotherapy and combination therapy, respectively. Favorable response rates in clinically relevant subgroups were: malignancy, 51.9% (41/79; allogeneic HSCT, 56.5% (13/23; and neutropenia at time of hospitalization, 53.0% (35/66. There was a 72.3% (73/101 survival at 7 days after EOCT. Serious adverse events related to caspofungin were reported in 4 cases (3.9%; 3 patients (2.9% discontinued treatment due to an adverse event related to caspofungin. Conclusions Caspofungin was both effective and well tolerated among high-risk patient groups such as those with neutropenia and active malignancies.

  7. Pure White Cell Aplasia and Necrotizing Myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Geon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure white cell aplasia (PWCA is a rare hematologic disorder characterized by the absence of neutrophil lineages in the bone marrow with intact megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. PWCA has been associated with autoimmune, drug-induced, and viral exposures. Here, we report a case of a 74-year-old female who presented with severe proximal weakness without pain and was found to have PWCA with nonspecific inflammatory necrotizing myositis and acute liver injury on biopsies. These findings were associated with a recent course of azithromycin and her daily use of a statin. Myositis improved on prednisone but PWCA persisted. With intravenous immunoglobulin and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapies, her symptoms and neutrophil counts improved and were sustained for months.

  8. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of palate: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, Sowmya [V.S Dental College and Hospital, Karnataka (India); Ramnarayan BK [Dayanada Sagar College of Dental Sciences and Hospital, Karnataka (India)

    2011-03-15

    Necrotizing sialometaplasia (NS) which mimics malignancy both clinically and histopathologically is an uncommon benign, self-limiting inflammatory disease of the mucus-secreting minor salivary glands. The lesion is believed to be the result of vascular ischemia that may be initiated by trauma. Till date, the diagnosis of NS remains a challenge. This report demonstrates a case of NS in a 73-year-old male patient who presented with an ulcerative lesion in his palate. He had a history of local trauma and was long-term user of salbutamol inhaler. An incisional biopsy was carried out and the diagnosis was established through history, clinical examination, histopathology using Hematoxylin and Eosin stain. The patient was given symptomatic treatment and the lesion healed in about 7 weeks.

  9. Necrotizing granulomatous inflammation of the glans penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulidou, Michelle; Bunker, Christopher B; Trevisan, Giorgia; Muneer, Asif

    2016-08-24

    We describe the case of a 73-year-old man who presented with a 10-month history of an ulcerating lesion on the glans penis. Initially this was thought to be an invasive squamous cell carcinoma but a biopsy showed histological features consistent with necrotizing granulomatous inflammation. Extensive serological, immunological and microbiological tests only showed a positive antinuclear and perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies indicating a possible autoimmune aetiology but an underlying systemic cause was not identified. Treatment with oral corticosteroids limited the inflammatory process but due to the gross destruction of the glans penis, he still required a glansectomy and split-skin graft reconstruction from which he recovered well. Although this patient ultimately required surgery for this rare presentation, this case highlights the differential diagnosis of penile ulceration (that transcends neoplasia) and the importance of performing and interpreting penile biopsies before undertaking potentially mutilating definitive surgery.

  10. Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis. Relation to systemic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T M; Comacchi, C; Ghersetich, I

    1999-01-01

    Cutaneous necrotizing vasculitis (CNV) is a complex multisystem disease generally involving the skin and mucous membranes, often accompanied by renal, gastrointestinal, pericardial, neurological, and articular signs and symptoms. CNV may be idiopatical or occur in association with a drug, infection, or underlying disease. CNV has been shown in patients with chronic infections (viral, bacterial, protozoa, helminthic), serum sickness, a variety of collagen vascular diseases (systemic lupus erythematous, Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, Behçet's disease) hyperglobulinemic states, cryoglobulinemia, bowel bypass syndrome, ulcerative colitis, cystic fibrosis, primary biliary cirrhosis and HIV infection. Association with malignancies is not frequent. Lymphoproliferative disorders (Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides, lymphosarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, multiple mieloma) and solid tumors (lung cancer, colon carcinoma, renal, prostate, head and neck cancer and breast cancer) may be associated with CNV. Whenever possible, treatment is directed at the elimination of the cause. In other cases after adequate laboratory screening local and systemic therapy are recommended.

  11. Statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Ząber

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Myositides comprise a large group of disorders involving limb muscle weakness. In differential diagnosis we have to consider idiopathic myositides, myositides associated with other diseases, and those induced by external factors, e.g. drug-induced. Statins are commonly used drugs, but many patients experience a broad spectrum of adverse effects including symptoms from skeletal muscle. Physicians should pay special attention to patients reporting muscle weakness lasting longer than 12 weeks, despite statin withdrawal, as well as other symptoms: dysphagia, disturbed grip function, elevated creatinine kinase (CK levels and abnormal electromyography. The reported case deals with the problem of differential diagnosis of drug-induced muscle injury, polymyositis with a recently reported myopathy – statin-induced autoimmune necrotizing myositis, related to anti-HMGCR antibodies.

  12. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in five Chihuahua dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, R J; Dickinson, P J; Kube, S A; Moore, P F; Couto, S S; Vernau, K M; Sturges, B K; Lecouteur, R A

    2008-05-01

    An acute to chronic idiopathic necrotizing meningoencephalitis was diagnosed in 5 Chihuahua dogs aged between 1.5 and 10 years. Presenting neurologic signs included seizures, blindness, mentation changes, and postural deficits occurring from 5 days to 5.5 months prior to presentation. Cerebrospinal fluid analyses from 2 of 3 dogs sampled were consistent with an inflammatory disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of 2 dogs demonstrated multifocal loss or collapse of cortical gray/white matter demarcation hypointense on T1-weighted images, with T2-weighted hyperintensity and slight postcontrast enhancement. Multifocal asymmetrical areas of necrosis or collapse in both gray and white matter of the cerebral hemispheres was seen grossly in 4 brains. Microscopically in all dogs, there was a severe, asymmetrical, intensely cellular, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis usually with cystic necrosis in subcortical white matter. There were no lesions in the mesencephalon or metencephalon except in 1 dog. Immunophenotyping defined populations of CD3, CD11d, CD18, CD20, CD45, CD45 RA, and CD79a immunoreactive inflammatory cells varying in density and location but common to acute and chronic lesions. In fresh frozen lesions, both CD1b,c and CD11c immunoreactive dendritic antigen-presenting cells were also identified. Immunoreactivity for canine distemper viral (CDV) antigen was negative in all dogs. The clinical signs, distribution pattern, and histologic type of lesions bear close similarities to necrotizing meningoencephalitis as described in series of both Pug and Maltese breed dogs and less commonly in other breeds.

  13. Pulmonary vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Lindsay; Spiera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis encompasses inflammation in the pulmonary vasculature with involved vessels varying in caliber from large elastic arteries to capillaries. Small pulmonary capillaries are the vessels most commonly involved in vasculitis affecting the lung. The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, which include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg-Strauss syndrome), are the small vessel vasculitides in which pulmonary vasculitis is most frequently observed and are the major focus of this review. Vasculitic involvement of the large pulmonary vessels as may occur in Behçet syndrome and Takayasu arteritis is also discussed.

  14. Pulmonary echinococcal cyst with a filamentous fungus co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, P; Dixit, A K; Tanwar, A; Mahajan, N C

    2013-09-01

    Fungal infections are known to colonize the pre-existing lung cavities formed as a result of diseases like tuberculosis, sarcoidosis, bronchiectasis and cavitatary neoplasia, mostly encountered in immunocompromised patients. Pulmonary echinococcal cysts have been reported coexistent with cryptococcosis and other saprophytic mycosis, but the coexistence of aspergillosis and echinococcal cyst is extremely rare and occasionally been reported in English literature. Active invasion and proliferation of the fungi in the laminated ectocyst of the echinococcal cyst is very unusual. We report a case of 60 years old immunocompetent female, presented with cough, chest pain and shortness of breath. The chest X-ray showed a large thick walled cavity in the lower and mid zone of right lung with positive water lily sign. Surgical enucleation of the echinococcal cyst revealed aspergilloma involving the cavity with massive invasion of laminated ectocyst by filamentous fungus, morphologically resembling an Aspergillus species and was further treated with Itraconazole for 3 months. This unique coexistence of active pulmonary echinococcosis and aspergillosis is being reported because of its rarity and clinical importance for its management.

  15. Retroperitoneal Necrotizing Fasciitis Masquerading as Perianal Abscess - Rare and Perilous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranathan, Anandhi; Sahoo, Ashok Kumar; Barathi, Deepak; Shankar, Gomathi; Sistla, Sarath Chandra

    2017-01-17

    Necrotizing fasciitis is one of the uncommon presentations of a rapidly spreading subcutaneous tissue infection. Although the actual cause is unclear in many cases, most of them are due to the rapid proliferation of microorganisms. Retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis is extremely rare. It is a potentially lethal infection that requires immediate and aggressive surgical care. Early diagnosis is the key to a better prognosis. The possibility of retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis should be suspected in patients with symptoms of sepsis that are disproportionate to clinical findings. The rapid deterioration of the patient also gives a clue towards the diagnosis. We report a 35-year-old male with perianal abscess who had been progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis. The patient was managed successfully with aggressive debridement and drainage after laparotomy. Appropriate antibiotics were used to combat the sepsis. The patient recovered well at follow up, three months after discharge. Another patient, a 45-year-old male with a retroperitoneal abscess, progressed to retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis, and extra peritoneal drainage and debridement was done. Antibiotics depending upon the culture and sensitivity were used to control sepsis. But the patient succumbed to death 45 days after surgery due to uncontrolled sepsis. Necrotizing fasciitis of any anatomical site needs aggressive surgical care with early intervention. But retroperitoneal necrotizing fasciitis needs an extra effort for diagnosis. After diagnosis, it needs timely surgical intervention and appropriate antibiotic therapy for the recovery of the patients.

  16. Aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male masquerading as breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra G Nasit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal species are not frequently encountered in an immunocompetent host. Invasive aspergillosis typically occurs in severely immunocompromised patient. Aspergillus infection of breast and chest wall are rarely encountered in an immunocompetent as well as in immunocompromised host. Till date only 13 cases of fungal infection of breast and chest wall have been reported in the literature. This report presents a case of aspergillosis of bilateral breast and chest wall in an immunocompetent male, clinically mimicking breast cancer. Diagnosis was achieved by fine-needle aspiration cytology and subsequently Aspergillus flavus was identified on fungal culture. The patient was successfully treated with voriconazole. Prompt diagnosis by cytology and appropriate treatment is necessary to prevent adverse outcome. Here, we present this rare case of fungal infection of breast and chest wall with relevant review of the literature.

  17. [Unilateral frontal sinus aspergillosis: the combined endoscopic and mini-trephination approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, V; Portmann, D; Boudard, Ph

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillosis is a common fungal infection of the paranasal sinuses. Localization in the frontal sinus is usually secondary to involvement of one of the other sinuses. Isolated frontal sinus aspergillosis is rare and only 5 cases are described in literature. We report a case of a patient with a frontal sinus aspergilloma associated with ipsilateral chronic ethmoidal and maxillary sinusitis, successfully treated with a combined endoscopic and mini-trephination approach "Lemoyne technique". The endoscopic approach to the frontal sinus is considered the best way to deal with frontal sinus aspergilloma, but it is sometimes not sufficient to guarantee the complete removal of the fungus ball. In such cases a mini-trephination of the frontal sinus with associated irrigation provides a more accurate visualization and toilette of the sinus.

  18. Invasive aspergillosis osteomyelitis in children - a case report and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterstein, Anton R.; Bohndorf, Klaus; Vollert, Kurt [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Wagner, Theodor [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Pathology, Augsburg (Germany); Gnekow, Astrid [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Pediatrics, Augsburg (Germany); Roemer, Frank W. [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Immunocompromised patients are at high risk of secondary infection associated with high morbidity. In children these complications include fungal osteomyelitis due to continuous infiltration or hematogenous spread. The case of a 4-year-old boy is presented who developed lumbalgia and thigh pain during ongoing chemotherapy for acute lymphatic leukemia. MRI revealed infarct-like lesions in the femur and L5 vertebra, which were biopsied. The histologic diagnosis was consistent with angioinvasive aspergillosis. A multifocal osseous presentation has rarely been described in children and an overview of the literature is presented. Invasive aspergillosis is a rare complication to be considered in children with MRI-detected bony lesions of infarct-like appearance. (orig.)

  19. Invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis in a healthy 22-year-old battle casualty: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radowsky, Jason S; Strawn, Alan A; Sherwood, Jeffrey; Braden, Adam; Liston, William

    2011-10-01

    Invasive mucormycosis or aspergillosis is a life-threatening infection. The disease typically occurs in immunocompromised patients (e.g., those with diabetes mellitus or burns) but is rarely serious in otherwise-healthy young trauma patients. Case report and literature review. A previously-healthy 22-year-old United States Marine who sustained large soft tissue injuries in support of Operation Enduring Freedom underwent multiple operations in theater to stabilize his wounds. He was evacuated first to Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany and thence to the National Naval Medical Center in Maryland, where appropriate antifungal therapies were initiated and wide débridements were undertaken without success. His clinical status deteriorated, and he died. Tissue examination revealed systemic invasive mucormycosis and aspergillosis. The suspicion of invasive fungal infections must be tested early if intervention is to be curative.

  20. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Nose Complicated with Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Swaminath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive life threatening bacterial infection of the skin, the subcutaneous tissue, and the fascia. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis involving the nose complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis. Few cases of septic cavernous sinus thrombosis have been reported to be caused by cellulitis of the face but necrotizing fasciitis of the nose is rare. It is very important to recognize the early signs of cavernous thrombosis. Treatment for septic cavernous sinus thrombosis is controversial but early use of empirical antibiotics is imperative.

  1. Polymicrobial abdominal wall necrotizing fasciitis after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuro, Jp; Hanna, Af; Chalas, E; Cunha, Ba

    2012-09-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy woman after an uneventful caesarean section who developed polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis. She was given a non-steroidal anti-inflamatory drug (NSAID) after her delivery. Her post-delivery course was complicated by septic shock, and required multiple debridements before abdominal reconstruction. This case describes the increased risk of necrotizing fasciitis with NSAID use. Unusual were the organisms causing the polymicrobial necrotizing fasciitis: Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter agglomerans, Acinetobacter baumannii, and two strains of Enterobacter cloacae.

  2. Necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lip simulating squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, A; Willén, H; Willén, R; Thorstensson, S; Ekman, L

    1980-01-01

    A case of necrotizing sialometaplasia of the lip in an 68-year-old pipe smoker is described. Necrotizing sialometaplasia is a self-healing non-neoplastic disease probably of ischaemic nature. Thirty-nine cases of sialometaplasia are described in the literature up to early 1979. These cases appeared in the palate, nasal cavity, gingiva, lip, hypopharynx and maxillary sinus. Six cases have also been reported from major salivary glands. Histologically there is necrosis of mucous cells with partial replacement by squamous epithelium. This entity has often been mistaken for squamous or mucoepidermoid carcinoma. One has to be familiar with the existence of necrotizing sialometaplasia in ordeg surgery.

  3. An atypical case of necrotizing fasciitis of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufty, H; Smeets, A; Christiaens, M R

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and aggressive soft tissue infection involving the fascia and subcutaneous tissues. It carries a high mortality and morbidity rate. In literature, the few case reports on necrotizing fasciitis of the breast, describe the need for a mastectomy in 90% of the cases. We report on a case of a 72-year old Caucasian women with an atypical presentation of necrotizing fasciitis of the breast in combination with an acute abdomen, successfully treated with breast-conserving debridement and secondary wound closure.

  4. A Case of Necrotizing Epiglottitis Due to Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jessica A; Ehrhardt, Matthew J; Suchi, Mariko; Chun, Robert H; Willoughby, Rodney E

    2015-07-01

    Diphtheria is a rare cause of infection in highly vaccinated populations and may not be recognized by modern clinicians. Infections by nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae are emerging. We report the first case of necrotizing epiglottitis secondary to nontoxigenic C diphtheriae. A fully vaccinated child developed fever, poor oral intake, and sore throat and was found to have necrotizing epiglottitis. Necrotizing epiglottitis predominantly occurs in the immunocompromised host. Laboratory evaluation revealed pancytopenia, and bone marrow biopsy was diagnostic for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of aggressive infections that identify immunocompromised patients. This case highlights the features of a reemerging pathogen, C diphtheriae.

  5. Diagnosis of necrotizing faciitis with bedside ultrasound: the STAFF Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberg, Erik; Jenson, Natasa; Dinh, Vi Am

    2014-02-01

    The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is often ambiguous. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, while sensitive and specific modalities, are often time consuming or unavailable. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis that was rapidly diagnosed using bedside ultrasound evaluating for subcutaneous thickening, air, and fascial fluid (STAFF). We propose the STAFF ultrasound exam may be beneficial in the rapid evaluation of unstable patients with consideration of necrotizing fasciitis, in a similar fashion to the current use of a focused assessment with sonography for trauma exam in the setting of trauma.

  6. Aspergillosis in Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients: epidemiology and economic outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baddley John W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few data are available regarding the epidemiology of invasive aspergillosis (IA in ICU patients. The aim of this study was to examine epidemiology and economic outcomes (length of stay, hospital costs among ICU patients with IA who lack traditional risk factors for IA, such as cancer, transplants, neutropenia or HIV infection. Methods Retrospective cohort study using Premier Inc. Perspective™ US administrative hospital database (2005–2008. Adults with ICU stays and aspergillosis (ICD-9 117.3 plus 484.6 who received initial antifungal therapy (AF in the ICU were included. Patients with traditional risk factors (cancer, transplant, neutropenia, HIV/AIDS were excluded. The relationship of antifungal therapy and co-morbidities to economic outcomes were examined using Generalized linear models. Results From 6,424 aspergillosis patients in the database, 412 (6.4% ICU patients with IA were identified. Mean age was 63.9 years and 53% were male. Frequent co-morbidities included steroid use (77%, acute respiratory failure (76% and acute renal failure (41%. In-hospital mortality was 46%. The most frequently used AF was voriconazole (71% received at least once. Mean length of stay (LOS was 26.9 days and mean total hospital cost was $76,235. Each 1 day lag before initiating AF therapy was associated with 1.28 days longer hospital stay and 3.5% increase in costs (p  Conclusions Invasive aspergillosis in ICU patients is associated with high mortality and hospital costs. Antifungal timing impacts economic outcomes. These findings underscore the importance of timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and consideration of Aspergillus as a potential etiology in ICU patients.

  7. Laboratory Diagnosis of Invasive Aspergillosis: From Diagnosis to Prediction of Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA), an infection caused by fungi in the genus Aspergillus, is seen in patients with immunological deficits, particularly acute leukaemia and stem cell transplantation, and has been associated with high rates of mortality in previous years. Diagnosing IA has long been problematic owing to the inability to culture the main causal agent A. fumigatus from blood. Microscopic examination and culture of respiratory tract specimens have lacked sensitivity, and biopsy tissue f...

  8. Non-invasive aspergillosis of the paranasal sinuses: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, Y. [Service de Radiologie Ouest, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France); Lamy, O. [Service de Radiologie Ouest, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France); Chevalier, D. [Service d`Orl, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France); Rocourt, N. [Service de Radiologie Ouest, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France); Darras, J. [Service d`Orl, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France); Piquet, J.J. [Service d`Orl, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France); Lemaitre, L. [Service de Radiologie Ouest, Hopital Claude Huriez, 59 Lille (France)

    1995-08-01

    Aspergillosis is the most common fungal infection of the paranasal sinuses, and needs to be recognized because it requires surgical removal. Twenty proven cases of aspergillosis of the paranasal sinuses are reported here. CT was performed in all the cases and MRI in 2 cases. The maxillary sinus was affected in 19 patients and the sphenoid sinus in 1. Mycosis was unilateral in all but 1 of the cases. Foci of increased attenuation at CT were observed in 18 cases, with calcification in 10 cases and/or dental material in 13 cases. An increased bony wall thickness was observed in 16 cases. All the patients but 1 had at least one of the signs. At MRI the fungal mass displayed a hypointense signal on T1- and T2-weighted images. No enhancement was noted on post-contrast T1-weighted images. The diagnosis of paranasal sinus aspergillosis is suggested by the CT findings, when a hyperdense mass with calcifications and/or dental material is noted with thickening of the sinus wall. MRI may have a complementary diagnostic role in doubtful cases. (orig.)

  9. Erythropoietin combined with liposomal amphotericin b improves outcome during disseminated aspergillosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    nathalie erousseau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated aspergillosis is responsible for a high mortality rate despite the use of antifungal drugs. Adjuvant therapies are urgently needed to improve the outcome. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the cytoprotective effect of erythropoietin combined to amphotericin b can reduce the mortality rate in a murine model of disseminated aspergillosis. After infection with Aspergillus fumigatus, neutropenic mice were randomized to receive vehicle or 7,5 mg/Kg of Liposomal Amphotericin B (LAmB or 7,5 mg/Kg of LAmB combined with 1000 IU/Kg of EPO (16 mice per group. Aspergillus galactomannan and organ cultures were performed to evaluate fungal burden at day 5. Cumulative long-term survival was analyzed at day 12 post-infection according to the Kaplan-Meier method. At day 5, fungal burden was similar between non-treated and treated groups. At day 12, mortality rates were 75 %, 62.5 % and 31 % in control group, LAmB group and EPO/LAmB group, respectively. We observed a significant decreased in mortality using EPO/LAmB combination compared to control group (p < 0.01. LAmB single treatment did not improve the survival rate compared to control group (p = 0.155.Our results provided the first evidence that erythropoietin improved the outcome of mice presenting disseminated aspergillosis when combined with amphotericin b.

  10. Etiologic agents and diseases found associated with clinical aspergillosis in falcons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarello, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe parasitological, microbiological, and pathological findings associated with the isolation of Aspergillus species in 94 clinically diseased captive falcons from Dubai. Concomitant agents and/or diseases were identified in 64 cases, causing either single (n = 36) or multiple coinfections (n = 28). Diagnoses found more often in association with aspergillosis were chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome (CFIDS) (n = 29), Caryospora sp. (n = 16), Serratospiculum seurati infestation (n = 14), cestodiasis (n = 6), bumblefoot (n = 5), trematodosis due to Strigea falconispalumbi (n = 5), trichomoniasis (n = 4), Babesia shortti (n = 4), Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica (n = 4), interstitial hepatitis (n = 4), Escherichia coli (n = 3), and Clostridium perfringens enterotoxemia (n = 2). Compared with a control group of 2000 diseased falcons without evidence of aspergillosis, the prevalence of Babesia shortti, CFIDS, Mannheimia (Pastorella) haemolytica, Escherichia coli, and falcon herpes virus infection was conspicuously higher in association with aspergillosis. These entities may be considered suitable candidates as predisposing factors for the mycosis.

  11. Performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis in febrile, neutropenic patients: a multi-state model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Schwarzinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis expectedly depends on the timing of test results relative to the empirical administration of antifungal therapy during neutropenia, although a dynamic evaluation framework is lacking. METHODS: We developed a multi-state model describing simultaneously the likelihood of empirical antifungal therapy and the risk of invasive aspergillosis during neutropenia. We evaluated whether the first positive test result with a biomarker is an independent predictor of invasive aspergillosis when both diagnostic information used to treat and risk factors of developing invasive aspergillosis are taken into account over time. We applied the multi-state model to a homogeneous cohort of 185 high-risk patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Patients were prospectively screened for galactomannan antigenemia twice a week for immediate treatment decision; 2,214 serum samples were collected on the same days and blindly assessed for (1->3- β-D-glucan antigenemia and a quantitative PCR assay targeting a mitochondrial locus. RESULTS: The usual evaluation framework of biomarker performance was unable to distinguish clinical benefits of β-glucan or PCR assays. The multi-state model evidenced that the risk of invasive aspergillosis is a complex time function of neutropenia duration and risk management. The quantitative PCR assay accelerated the early detection of invasive aspergillosis (P = .010, independently of other diagnostic information used to treat, while β-glucan assay did not (P = .53. CONCLUSIONS: The performance of serum biomarkers for the early detection of invasive aspergillosis is better apprehended by the evaluation of time-varying predictors in a multi-state model. Our results provide strong rationale for prospective studies testing a preemptive antifungal therapy, guided by clinical, radiological, and bi-weekly blood screening with galactomannan

  12. Atorvastatin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyanov, Yves; Landon-Cardinal, Océane; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Ferreira, José; Targoff, Ira N.; Rich, Eric; Goulet, Michelle; Goulet, Jean-Richard; Bourré-Tessier, Josiane; Robitaille, Yves; Drouin, Julie; Albert, Alexandra; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The general aim of this study was to evaluate the disease spectrum in patients presenting with a pure polymyositis (pPM) phenotype. Specific objectives were to characterize clinical features, autoantibodies (aAbs), and membrane attack complex (MAC) in muscle biopsies of patients with treatment-responsive, statin-exposed necrotizing autoimmune myositis (NAM). Patients from the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal autoimmune myositis (AIM) Cohort with a pPM phenotype, response to immunosuppression, and follow-up ≥3 years were included. Of 17 consecutive patients with pPM, 14 patients had a NAM, of whom 12 were previously exposed to atorvastatin (mean 38.8 months). These 12 patients were therefore suspected of atorvastatin-induced AIM (atorAIM) and selected for study. All had aAbs to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and none had overlap aAbs, aAbs to signal recognition particle, or cancer. Three stages of myopathy were recognized: stage 1 (isolated serum creatine kinase [CK] elevation), stage 2 (CK elevation, normal strength, and abnormal electromyogram [EMG]), and stage 3 (CK elevation, proximal weakness, and abnormal EMG). At diagnosis, 10/12 (83%) patients had stage 3 myopathy (mean CK elevation: 7247 U/L). The presenting mode was stage 1 in 6 patients (50%) (mean CK elevation: 1540 U/L), all of whom progressed to stage 3 (mean delay: 37 months) despite atorvastatin discontinuation. MAC deposition was observed in all muscle biopsies (isolated sarcolemmal deposition on non-necrotic fibers, isolated granular deposition on endomysial capillaries, or mixed pattern). Oral corticosteroids alone failed to normalize CKs and induce remission. Ten patients (83%) received intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) as part of an induction regimen. Of 10 patients with ≥1 year remission on stable maintenance therapy, IVIG was needed in 50%, either with methotrexate (MTX) monotherapy or combination immunosuppression. In the remaining

  13. Invasive aspergillosis in 4 children with chronic granulomatous disease%慢性肉芽肿病患儿侵袭性曲霉菌病4例分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺建新; 殷菊; 刘秀云; 赵顺英; 徐保平; 胡英惠; 申昆玲; 江载芳

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察慢性肉芽肿病患儿患侵袭性曲霉菌病的临床特点.方法 收集4例经基因检测明确诊断慢性肉芽肿病伴侵袭性曲霉菌病患儿的临床资料并总结其起病时间、症状、体征、组织病理、影像学表现、治疗、转归情况.结果 4例患儿均为烟曲霉菌感染.3例经肺组织或脓液培养确诊为侵袭性肺曲霉菌病.起病年龄17 d ~ 3月,入院前病程为17 ~ 40 d.有发热、咳嗽等不典型症状,无感染中毒貌;肺内体征为呼吸音减弱,肺部影像学异常出现时间10 ~ 13 d,肺CT表现为结节、不规则、球形或类圆形高密度灶,不伴有晕轮征、新月征及空洞;肺组织病理均示肉芽肿性化脓性炎症,无菌丝血管侵蚀或凝固坏死.1例伊曲康唑治疗治愈,1例切除受累肺叶后治愈,1例卡泊芬净治疗死亡,另1例曲霉菌关节炎伊曲康唑治疗控制.结论 对慢性肉芽肿病患儿,在新生儿期或婴儿早期,呼吸道症状及体征不典型,但影像学异常明显,肺CT表现为结节或团块影,肺组织病理表现为化脓性肉芽肿性炎症者,应注意侵袭性肺曲霉菌病可能.%Objective To investigate the clinical features of invasive aspergillosis cases with chronic granuloma-tous disease (CGD). Methods From Jul 2007 to Oct 2010, invasive aspergillosis was definitely diagnosed in 4 CGD cases. The records were reviewed, including the first presenting sign and its occurring age, physical examinations, radiological and histopathological features, treatment and pharmaceutical effect. Results Aspergillosis fumagitus was positive for all 4 cases. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis was diagnosed in 3 cases whose isolation was from lung specimen in 2 cases, lung specimen pus in 1 case. The occurring age was 17 days to 3 months, with nonspecific fever and cough symptoms. Physical examination showed decreased breath sound. 10 - 13 days was needed for radiologic infiltrates to occur. Chest CT showed nodules

  14. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy in a child with H1N1 influenza infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyon, Jane B. [Driscoll Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Remigio, Cheryl [Pediatric Residency Program, Department of Medical Education, Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Milligan, Thomas [Driscoll Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Deline, Carol [Driscoll Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurology, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Since the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic of novel influenza A H1N1 in June 2009, there has been a sustained rise in the number of cases of this strain of influenza. Although most cases are mild with complete and uneventful recovery, multiple cases of severe infection with complications including death have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, the majority of fatal outcomes in the United States have been related to pulmonary complications. We report a 12-year-old girl infected with influenza A H1N1 whose clinical course was complicated by rapid progressive neurologic deterioration and striking CT and MRI findings consistent with acute necrotizing encephalopathy (ANE). To our knowledge this has not been reported in the pediatric radiology literature. We hope this case will alert radiologists to this complication and familiarize radiologists with imaging findings that herald ANE. (orig.)

  15. Pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a pathological condition associated with various diseases, which must be remembered by the physicians, since early diagnosis may anticipate and avoid dangerous complications and even death if appropriate measures were not taken. The relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, important pathological process that is in increasing prevalence in developing countries, and leading position as cause of death, emphasizes its importance. Here are presented the classifications, pathophysiology, and general rules of treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  16. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  17. Pharm GKB: Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: PharmGKB Accession Id: PA164924608 Publications related to Acute...uman genetics. 2009. Neilson Derek E, et al. Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy ...

  18. Metabolomic determinants of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies in premature infants and animals show that carbohydrate malabsorption and gut microbiota colonisation are key elements for triggering necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Our aim was to determine how dietary carbohydrate composition affects the metabolomic profile and whether unique metabolite s...

  19. The phylum Synergistetes in gingivitis and necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baumgartner, Angelica; Thurnheer, Thomas; Lüthi-Schaller, Helga; Gmür, Rudolf; Belibasakis, Georgios N

    2012-01-01

    The clinical manifestation of necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis (NUG) is distinct from that of common gingivitis in that it is characterized by local necrosis of the gingival tissues, rapid onset, pain and extensive bleeding...

  20. Avian necrotic enteritis: Experimental models, climate change, and vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review summarizes recent developments in disease models, pathogenesis, host immunity, risk factors, and vaccine development for Clostridium perfringens infection of poultry and necrotic enteritis (NE). The increasing trends of legislative restrictions and voluntary removal of antibiotic growth...

  1. Interventions for Necrotizing Pancreatitis Summary of a Multidisciplinary Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Martin L.; Werner, Jens; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Baron, Todd H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Windsor, John A.; Horvath, Karen D.; vanSonnenberg, Eric; Bollen, Thomas L.; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis may result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis. Many recommendations have been made for management of necrotizing pancreatitis, but no published guidelines have incorporated the many recent developments in minimally invasi

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in a Latin American male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichino, Jon; Tran, Richard; Sutjita, Made; Kim, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae, is a rare and life-threatening bacterial infection. Most documented cases have been reported from Asia, particularly associated with diabetes mellitus. The prevalence of this infection in the USA is rare, especially among persons of non-Asian descent and those without travel to Asia. We report a case of disseminated necrotizing fasciitis, caused by K. pneumoniae, in a Latin American male with diabetes mellitus. Given our review of the literature, this is the only case report, to our knowledge, of a Latin American patient with Klebsiella necrotizing fasciitis in the USA. This case may reflect the geographical spread and emergence of K. pneumoniae infection in the USA. Clinicians need to be aware of the possible relationship between this organism and necrotizing fasciitis in persons of Latin American descent with diabetes mellitus.

  3. [NUG--necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Y

    2014-07-01

    Necrotizing Ulcerative Gingivitis (NUG) is an acute and rare (0.5-11% of the population) infectious disease of the gum tissue, which is characterized by ulceration and inflammation of the inter-dental gum tissue. NUG was documented by historians since the fourth century BC, most of the reports from the ancient world were in the context of illness among fighting troops, present studies of NUG in the modern world are still common among soldiers. NUG is associated with poor oral hygiene and weakening of the host, especially in immunocompromised patients, malnutrition and poor living conditions, as well as in the context of mental stress. NUG is more common in young adults, but reports of morbidity in young children with malnutrition in the background are not uncommon. NUG diagnosis is based on three essential symptoms: sore gums, bleeding gums and the most diagnostic characteristic, ulceration and necrosis of the interdental papillae. The disease is considered to have a clear initial infectious etiology, when the main bacteria, associated with the disease, include: Bacteroides intermedius and Fusobacterium sp. The infection involves anaerobic \\ aerobic bacteria with a majority of Gram-negative bacteria. The treatment of NUG is based on combining mechanical removal of tartar with local and systemic delivery of antimicrobial agents. Adequate treatment usually prevent the progression of the disease and ulcer healing is expected in a few days. Nevertheless, lack of treatment can lead to deterioration in the form NUP to Noma.

  4. Microecology, intestinal epithelial barrier and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Renu; Tepas, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Soon after birth, the neonatal intestine is confronted with a massive antigenic challenge of microbial colonization. Microbial signals are required for maturation of several physiological, anatomical, and biochemical functions of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) after birth. Commensal bacteria regulate intestinal innate and adaptive immunity and provide stimuli for ongoing repair and restitution of IEB. Colonization by pathogenic bacteria and/or dysmature response to microbial stimuli can result in flagrant inflammatory response as seen in necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Characterized by inflammation and hemorrhagic-ischemic necrosis, NEC is a devastating complication of prematurity. Although there is evidence that both prematurity and presence of bacteria, are proven contributing factors to the pathogenesis of NEC, the molecular mechanisms involved in IEB dysfunction associated with NEC have begun to emerge only recently. The metagenomic advances in the field of intestinal microecology are providing insight into the factors that are required for establishment of commensal bacteria that appear to provide protection against intestinal inflammation and NEC. Perturbations in achieving colonization by commensal bacteria such as premature birth or hospitalization in intensive care nursery can result in dysfunction of IEB and NEC. In this article, microbial modulation of functions of IEB and its relationship with barrier dysfunction and NEC are described.

  5. EXTENSIVE NECROTIZING FASCIITIS OF TRUNK FOLLOWING APPENDICECTOMY

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    Siddharth

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute appendicitis is usually diagnosed and managed easily with a low mortality and morbidity. However, in 20.74% patients, acute appendicitis may occasionally become extraordinarily complicated and life threatening with significant morbidity and mortality . [1] We report a case of 44 year old male, a known case of Diabetes Mellitus since 4 years (on irregular treatment who was brought to our hospital with severe pain in right lower quadrant of abdomen since 4 days. On examination, patient had tachycardia, tender ness and guarding in the right iliac fossa. Laboratory results revealed leucocytosis and raised blood glucose levels. Measures for glycemic control were initiated. At exploratory laparotomy, an inflamed and retrocaecal appendix ruptured at the base with sm all local abscess was found. Abscess was drained and appendectomy done. Initially patient did well but at the end of second post - operative week, the patient started having pain and swelling over posterior chest wall, flank, sacral and occipital regions sug gestive of inflammation. CT abdomen and pelvis showed extensive necrotizing fasciitis of trunk, occiput and sacrum. Repeated multiple fasciotomies were performed over the back. The patient finally recovered fully at the end of 8 th post - operative week

  6. Necrotizing Fasciitis and The Diabetic Foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopi, Elisabetta; Coppelli, Alberto; Goretti, Chiara; Piaggesi, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) represents a rapidly progressive, life-threatening infection involving skin, soft tissue, and deep fascia. An early diagnosis is crucial to treat NF effectively. The disease is generally due to an external trauma that occurs in predisposed patients: the most important risk factor is represented by diabetes mellitus. NF is classified into 3 different subtypes according to bacterial strains responsible: type 1 associated to polymicrobial infection, type 2 NF, generally associated to Streptococcus species, often associated to Staphylococcus aureus and, eventually, Type 3, due to Gram-negative strains, such as Clostridium difficile or Vibrio. NF is usually characterized by the presence of the classic triad of symptoms: local pain, swelling, and erythema. In daily clinical practice immune-compromised or neuropathic diabetic patients present with atypical symptomatology. This explains the high percentage of misdiagnosed cases in the emergency department and, consequently, the worse outcome presented by these patients. Prompt aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic systemic therapy are the cornerstone of its treatment. These must be associated with an accurate systemic management, consisting in nutritional support, glycemic compensation, and hemodynamic stabilization. Innovative methods, such as negative pressure therapy, once the acute conditions have resolved, can help fasten the surgical wound closure. Prompt management can improve prognosis of patients affected from NF reducing limb loss and saving lives.

  7. Necrotizing gastritis due to Bacillus cereus in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Scanff, J; Mohammedi, I; Thiebaut, A; Martin, O; Argaud, L; Robert, D

    2006-04-01

    Bacillus cereus is increasingly being acknowledged as a serious bacterial pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We present a case of acute necrotizing gastritis caused by B. cereus in a 37-year-old woman with acute myeloblastic leukemia, who recovered following total parenteral nutrition and treatment with imipenem and vancomycin. B. cereus was isolated from gastric mucosa and blood cultures. Up to now, no case of acute necrotizing gastritis due to this organism has been reported.

  8. Necrotizing enterocolitis and cytomegalovirus infection in a premature infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lynn; Ferris, Michael; Norori, Johana; Stark, Matthew; Craver, Randall; Dowd, Scot; Penn, Duna

    2013-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in neonates. The etiology is considered multifactorial. Risk factors include prematurity, enteral feeding, hypoxia, and bacterial colonization. The etiologic role of viruses is unclear. We present a case of necrotizing enterocolitis associated with cytomegalovirus and Proteobacteria in a 48-day-old, ex-premature infant and discuss the effects of potential viral-bacterial interactions on host susceptibility to this disease.

  9. Necrotic enteritis in broilers: an updated review on the pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbermont, L; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis and related subclinical disease have become economically significant problems for the broiler industry. Fortunately, scientific interest in this topic has grown: new C. perfringens virulence factors have been discovered and new insight gained about the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis. It has been shown that alpha toxin, for a long time thought to be the key virulence factor, is not essential for the development of the disease. Moreover, it is now clearly established that only certain C. perfringens strains are capable of inducing necrotic enteritis under specific conditions that predispose to the disease and they constitute only a minority in the intestinal tract of healthy chickens. A novel pore-forming toxin, NetB, has been identified in these virulent avian C. perfringens strains. Using a gene knockout mutant, it has been shown that NetB is a critical virulence factor in the pathogenesis of necrotic enteritis in broilers. In addition to toxin production, other factors have been described that contribute to the ability of certain C. perfringens strains to cause necrotic enteritis in broilers. It has been suggested that proteolytic enzymes play an important role in the initial stages of necrotic enteritis since the villi are first affected at the level of the basement membrane and the lateral domain of the enterocytes. In field outbreaks of necrotic enteritis, a single clone of C. perfringens is dominant in intestines of all affected birds, as opposed to the mixture of different C. perfringens strains that can be isolated from healthy bird intestines. It has been proposed that bacteriocin production is responsible for the dominance of a single strain in necrotic enteritis cases. Furthermore, it has been shown that virulent strains are more able to adhere to extracellular matrix molecules than non-virulent strains. The current knowledge on the pathogenesis of the disease has been summarized in this short review.

  10. Diagnosis of Necrotizing Fasciitis with Bedside Ultrasound: the STAFF Exam

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Castleberg; Natasa Jenson; Vi Am Dinh

    2014-01-01

    The early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis is often ambiguous. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, while sensitive and specific modalities, are often time consuming or unavailable. We present a case of necrotizing fasciitis that was rapidly diagnosed using bedside ultrasound evaluating for subcutaneous thickening, air, and fascial fluid (STAFF). We propose the STAFF ultrasound exam may be beneficial in the rapid evaluation of unstable patients with consideration of necrotizi...

  11. Bacterial translocation and intestinal injury in experimental necrotizing enterocolitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, I; Ozdemir, M; Aktan, M; Aslan, K

    2012-01-01

    To study the occurrence of bacterial translocation and to assess the impact of breastfeeding on bacterial translocation in the animal model of necrotizing enterocolitis. A total of 20 neonate Sprague-Dawley rats were enrolled in the study. Rats were randomly allocated into either control or study group just after birth. Ten newborn rats in the control group were left with their mother to be breast-fed. In contrary, necrotizing enterocolitis group consisted of neonates that were separated from their mothers, housed in an incubator and were gavaged with a special rodent formula three times daily. Survival rates, weight changes, and morphologic scoring obtained after microscopic evaluation were determined as microbiologic evaluation criteria. All the rats in the control group survived, while 1 (10 %) rat died in the necrotizing enterocolitis group. Mortality rates of the two groups were similar. All the formula-fed animals in the necrotizing enterocolitis group had significant weight loss compared to the breast milk-fed rats in the control group (p<0.05). A total of 7 (70 %) and 2 (20 %) E. coli growths were identified in the bowel lumen, liver, and spleen of necrotizing enterocolitis and control groups, respectively. This difference was statistically significant. In peritoneal smear cultures, a total of 3 (30 %) growths were detected in the necrotizing enterocolitis group and 1 (10 %) growth in the control group. As the result of a disturbance in the intestinal flora and impairment of the intestinal barrier in necrotizing enterocolitis, microrganisms in the bowel pass through the intestinal barrier and reach the liver and the spleen via the hematogenous route. This condition is closely related to the impairment of physiological and functional features of the intestinal barrier and is independent from the degree of intestinal injury. Bacterial translocation should be remembered in cases suspected of necrotizing enterocolitis, and a rapid and effective treatment

  12. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Chest Wall: Report of Pediatric Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Monica; Meeks, Andrew; Kearl, Liza

    2015-09-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a soft tissue infection uncommonly described in children and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated early and aggressively. Reports of cases involving the upper torso are rare in general. In adults, necrotizing fasciitis is most commonly described in the abdomen, perineum, and extremities. For children, particularly neonates, necrotizing fasciitis most commonly involves the trunk presenting as omphalitis. In this report, we describe 2 pediatric cases of necrotizing fasciitis of the chest wall that presented within 6 months from each other at Los Angeles County Hospital/University of Southern California Pediatric Emergency Department. Both cases involved previously healthy children with above normal body mass indices of 36 and 25.6, respectively. These cases are noteworthy because of the rarity of necrotizing fasciitis among children especially in the chest wall, atypical presentation with nonspecific symptoms which made the diagnosis challenging, and suggestion that obesity may be a potential risk factor. Despite the rarity of this disease, the information presented in these cases may aid in raising the index of suspicion for diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis.

  13. Optimal treatment of cervical necrotizing fasciitis associated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkas, A; Chahine, K; Schmerber, S; Brichon, P-Y; Righini, C A

    2010-04-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) associated with descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is a rapidly evolving and life-threatening condition. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe a treatment strategy for CNF with DNM and present a management algorithm for mediastinal extensions of CNF. Patients diagnosed and treated for CNF with DNM over 14 years in a tertiary referral centre were included. Seventeen adult patients were included. The origin of infection was mainly oropharyngeal. The diagnosis of CNF/DNM was based on clinical and computed tomography findings. All patients underwent cervicotomy for CNF. In ten patients, DNM was located above the carina and could be accessed by a cervical approach. In seven patients, DNM was below the carina, and necessitated sternotomy for anteroinferior mediastinal involvement and posterolateral thoracotomy for posteroinferior mediastinal involvement. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics. One patient died 3 days after surgery. The median hospital stay was 30 days. There was no recurrence during long-term follow-up. Prompt diagnosis and early surgical treatment are essential for reducing mortality in CNF/DNM. All patients should undergo extensive cervicotomy. The surgical approach to the mediastinum depends on the supracarinal or infracarinal location of the disease. Copyright (c) 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Necrotizing fasciitis: A decade of surgical intensive care experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare disease, potentially limb and life-threatening infection of fascia, subcutaneous tissue with occasionally muscular involvement. Necrotizing faciitis is surgical emergency with high morbidity and mortality. Aim: Aim of this study was to analyze presentation, microbiology, surgical, resuscitative management and outcome of this devastating soft tissue infection. Materials and Methods: The medical records of necrotizing fasciitis patients treated in surgical intensive care unit (SICU of our hospital from Jan 1995 to Feb 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Ninety-four patients with necrotizing fasciitis were treated in the surgical intensive care unit during the review period. Necrotizing fasciitis accounted for 1.15% of total admissions to our SICU. The mean age of our patients was 48.6 years, 75.5% of the cases were male. Diabetes mellitus was the most common comorbid disease (56.4%, 24.5% patients had hypertension, 14.9% patients had coronary artery disease, 9.6% had renal disease and 6.4% cases were obese. History of operation (11.7% was most common predisposing factor in our patients. All patients had leucocytosis at admission to the hospital. Mean duration of symptoms was 3.4 days. Mean number of surgical debridement was 2.1, mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score at admission to SICU was 8.6, 56.38% cases were type 1 necrotizing fasciitis and 43.61% had type 2 infection. Streptococci were most common bacteria isolated (52.1%, commonest regions of the body affected by necrotizing fasciitis were the leg and the foot. Mean intubated days and intensive care unit (ICU stay were 4.8 and 7.6 days respectively. Mean fluid, blood, fresh frozen plasma and platelets concentrate received in first 24 hours were 4.8 liters, 2.0 units, 3.9 units and 1.6 units respectively. Most commonly used antibiotics were tazocin and clindamycin. Common complication was ventricular tachycardia (6.4. 46.8% patients had

  15. Necrotizing fasciitis: a six-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunovic, Edin; Gawaziuk, Justin; Bzura, Tom; Embil, John; Esmail, Ali; Logsetty, Sarvesh

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a life-threatening infectious disease whose incidence has been on the rise. Commonly a consequence of group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infection, it results in high levels of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is difficult and treatment involves emergent surgical intervention and antibiotic therapy. The aim of this study is to examine the incidence of NF in Manitoba with the goal of observing whether there is a geographic variation in incidence and outcomes based on Regional Health Authorities (RHAs). This is a 6-year retrospective chart review of all NF patients who presented to the Health Sciences Center from 2004 to 2009. A total of 130 patients satisfied the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 47 ± 16 years. The most common comorbidities were diabetes (33.8%) and hypertension (33.1%). The overall mortality was 13.1% with advanced age being an independent risk factor (P < .05). Lower extremity was the most common location of infection (44.6%) and the most common causative organism was group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (63.9%). The type of infection (mono- vs. polymicrobial) was not found to affect length of stay, amputation rate, or mortality. There was no statistical difference in rate of amputations, length of stay, or mortality based on RHA. Incidence within the province, however, varied significantly based on RHA and ethnicity (P < .05). We determined that regardless of origin before admission, all our patients have equivalent prognosis. Burntwood RHA was found to have substantially higher incidence than the rest of the province, and higher incidence was established among the Aboriginal population.

  16. Necrotizing soft tissue infection in pregnancy

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    Nestorović Milica

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI is a life-threatening condition, characterized by widely spread necrosis of skin, subcutaneous fat, fascia and muscles. Treatment involves surgical debridement and broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy. Mortality is still high due to diagnostic delays. NSTI is rare in general population, there are even less literature data of this condition in pregnancy. Timely diagnosis and therapy is crucial for outcome of these patients. Clinicians should have in mind NSTI in patients with perianal infections, especially in cases where immunosuppressive role of pregnancy is present. Case outline. We present a case of a 21-year-old pregnant woman with NSTI spreading from perianal region. The patient was admitted to hospital in the 31st week of otherwise healthy twin pregnancy one day after incision of perianal abscess. At admission she was examined by a gynecologist; vital signs were stable, laboratory results showed the presence of infection. She was referred for another surgical procedure and broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed. The next morning the patient complained of intense abdominal pain. Clinical exam revealed only discrete redness of the skin tender on palpation, crepitating. She was immediately referred to surgery. Intraoperative findings revealed massive soft tissue infection spreading up to the chest wall. Wide skin incisions and debridement were performed. The patient developed septic shock and after initial resuscitation gynecologist confirmed intrauterine death of twins and indicated labor induction. Over the next few days the patient’s general condition improved. On several occasions the wounds were aggressively debrided under general anesthesia, which left the patient with large abdominal wall defect. Twenty-three days after the initial operation, the defect was reconstructed with partial-thickness skin grafts, providing satisfactory results. Conclusion. Diagnosis and outcome of

  17. Immune Function Changes in Patients with Invasive Pulmonary Fungal Infections by Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease%慢性阻塞性肺病合并肺部真菌感染免疫功能的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨青茹; 武焱旻; 张敬浩

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨慢性阻塞性肺病(慢阻肺)合并肺部真菌感染患者免疫功能的变化及其意义。方法对2010年1月至2012年12月在徐州市中心医院呼吸科(含呼吸ICU)住院患者中慢性阻塞性肺病(chronic obstructive pulmonary disease,COPD)合并肺部念珠菌感染患者53例及合并肺部曲霉菌感染患者25例作为研究对象,对其免疫功能进行检测,并与20名正常健康人群(健康对照组)进行对比分析。采用流式细胞仪检测周血T淋巴细胞亚群(CD3+CD4+、CD3+CD8+、CD4+/CD8+)的表达率,采用全自动蛋白分析仪检测患者血清IgM、IgG、IgA含量。结果念珠菌组和曲霉菌组的CD3+CD4+百分比及CD4+/CD8+均明显低于健康对照组(P<0.01),念珠菌组及曲霉菌组CD3+CD8+百分比高于健康对照组(P<0.05),念珠菌组的CD3+CD4+百分比及CD4+/CD8+均低于曲霉菌组(P<0.01),而CD3+CD8+百分比在曲霉菌组及念珠菌组之间无统计学差异。与健康对照组比较,念珠菌组和曲霉菌组的IgG明显低于健康对照组,(P<0.01),IgA均高于健康对照组,(P<0.05),念珠菌组的IgG高于曲霉菌组(P<0.01),而念珠菌组及曲霉菌组IgA比较及三组间IgM比较,无统计学差异。结论慢性阻塞性肺病合并肺部念珠菌及曲霉菌感染时,细胞免疫及体液免疫均受损,其中合并曲霉菌感染时的免疫受损状况较合并念珠菌感染时更重。%Objective To investigate the changes of immune function in patients with invasive pulmonary fungal infections by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods 78 patients with invasive pulmonary fungal infections by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were slected, in which ,53 patients were pulmonary candidiasis and 25 patients were pulmonary aspergillosis. The T lymphocyte subsets in peripheral whole blood samples were derected by flow cytometry. The levels of IgM,IgG, IgA were

  18. Pulmonary fungal infections after bone marrow transplantation: the value of high-resolution computed tomography in predicting their etiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang-sheng; ZHU Hong-xian; FAN Hong-xia; ZHU Ling; WANG Heng-xiang; SONG Yun-long

    2011-01-01

    Background The correct diagnosis of etiology of fungal infection after bone marrow transplantation is very important to the choice of antifungal drugs and a premise for improvement of therapeutic efficacy.This study aimed to compare high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings of the pulmonary fungal infections to determine whether the etiology of various fungal infections could be diagnosed with HRCT.Methods Eighty-five cases were enrolled.According to the pathogens responsible for fungal infections,the patients were classified into three groups including invasive aspergillosis (n=52),candidiasis (n=19) and cryptococcosis (n=14)groups.All the patients underwent HRCT scans.Two independent radiologists retrospectively analyzed the HRCT scans regarding CT patterns and distribution of lung abnormality.Results Most fungal infections in the three groups occurred in the neutropenic phase.There was no significant difference in the constituent ratio of fungal infections at different phases after bone marrow transplantation among the three groups.Agreement between the two observers for all the CT characteristics of fungal infections was excellent (k>0.75).There was a significant difference in occurrence ratio of mass among the three groups (P=0.02).Occurrence ratio of mass (43.3%,13/30) in the group with invasive aspergillosis was higher than in each of other two groups (20.0%,2/10;14.3%,1/7).There was no significant difference in other CT characteristics of nodules or masses; including number,margin,halo sign,cavitation and air-crescent sign.There was no significant difference in number,margin,air bronchogram and distribution of air-space consolidation.Conclusions The HRCT appearance of various pulmonary fungal infections has a great deal of overlap and is nonspecific.Mass is more common in invasive aspergillosis,which is helpful to the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis after bone marrow transplantation.

  19. Successful treatment of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a bottlenose dolphin with high-dose posaconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulien E. Bunskoek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus is difficult to manage. We describe a case of azole-resistant invasive aspergillosis in a female bottlenose dolphin, who failed to respond to voriconazole and posaconazole therapy. As intravenous therapy was precluded, high dose posaconazole was initiated aimed at achieving trough levels exceeding 3 mg/l. Posaconazole serum levels of 3–9.5 mg/l were achieved without significant side-effects. Follow-up bronchoscopy and computed tomography showed complete resolution of the lesions.

  20. Computed tomographic characteristics of eosinophilic pulmonary granulomatosis in five dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Caroline; Vignoli, Massimo; Terragni, Rossella; Rossi, Federica; Wisner, Erik; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2014-01-01

    Canine pulmonary eosinophilic granulomatosis is a rare inflammatory pulmonary disease characterized by formation of eosinophilic granulomas that tend to obliterate the normal pulmonary architecture. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the CT characteristics of confirmed idiopathic pulmonary eosinophilic granulomatosis in a group of dogs. Five dogs met inclusion criteria. All patients were young adult dogs of variable breeds. No dog had concurrent occult heartworm disease. Computed tomographic characteristics most commonly included pulmonary masses and nodules of variable size, and lesions were most commonly located in the caudal lung lobes. Four dogs had large pulmonary masses with or without additional nodules and one dog had nodular lesions disseminated throughout the entire lung parenchyma. All large eosinophilic granulomas were smoothly margined, heterogeneous pulmonary masses displaying heterogeneous contrast enhancement. A honeycomb-like enhancement pattern was observed in all but one mass and consisted of multiple hyperattenuating rims delineating central hypoattenuating areas, suggestive of bronchiectatic lung with peripheral enhancing airway walls and fluid-filled, necrotic bronchial lumen. One dog had evidence of tracheobronchial lymphadenopathy. Findings indicated that canine eosinophilic pulmonary granulomatosis should be included as a differential diagnosis for dogs with CT characteristics of multiple pulmonary masses and/or nodules in caudal lung lobes, and a honeycomb-like enhancement pattern in masses after intravenous administration of iodinated contrast medium.

  1. Pulmonary zygomycosis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of pulmonary zygomycosis in an adult male diabetic patient who presented with fever and altered sensorium initially and later developed streaky haemoptysis. Bronchoscopy showed picture of necrotizing pneumonia. Sputum was negative for fungal elements on admission but later bronchial wash and repeat sputum samples were positive by microscopy and culture showed growth of Rhizopus species. Immediately the patient was put on amphotericin B but had a bout of massive haemoptysis and succumbed. A high index of suspicion is needed for an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of this infection in view of the high mortality rate.

  2. An Unusual Case of Pulmonary Nocardiosis in Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Yaşar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary nocardiosis is a subacute or chronic necrotizing pneumonia caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia and rare in immune-competent patients. A 35-year-old male, who had treated with antituberculosis drugs, presented with cough, dyspnea, and expectoration with episodes of hemoptysis with purulent sputum. The diagnosis of nocardiosis was made by microscopic examination of the surgically resected portion of the lung and revealed filamentous Gram-positive bacteria.

  3. Chest radiographic staging in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: relationship with immunological findings.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kiely, J L

    2012-02-03

    The question of whether a chest radiographic severity staging system could be correlated with standard blood\\/serum diagnostic indices in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) was addressed in 41 patients. Asthma and positive Aspergillus fumigatus (AF) serology were considered essential diagnostic inclusion criteria. Eosinophil count, serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and immediate skin hypersensitivity were also tested to grade patients as "definite" or "likely" ABPA. Definite cases had all five of these factors present, whereas likely cases had three or more. Chest radiographs were examined by experienced radiologists blinded to the clinical data. The six-stage radiographic score (0-5) was based on the severity and duration of changes seen: stage 0: normal; stage 1: transient hyperinflation; stage 2: transient minor changes; stage 3: transient major changes; stage 4: permanent minor changes; and stage 5: permanent major changes. Significant positive correlations (p<0.05) were observed between peak AF titres (expressed as an index), peak eosinophil count and radiographic severity stage. When considered as subgroups, these correlations approached, but did not reach, significance for the group with "likely" ABPA (n=28), but in the group with definite ABPA (n=13), there was a high correlation between radiographic score and peak AF index (r=0.59), as well as peak eosinophil count (r=0.62). This study suggests that the peak Aspergillus fumigatus index and eosinophil counts correlate best with the severity of radiographic stages in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. This chest radiographic staging system may be useful in the clinical assessment and management of patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, particularly in those patients with more severe radiographic stages.

  4. Galactomannan and Real-Time PCR in the diagnosis of invasive Aspergillosis: preliminary data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Pedrotti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis is notoriously difficult. The standard culture-based methods have shown considerable limitations in performance. For this reason, non-culture methods have been increasingly employed for the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis, and, among them, the methods based on Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. In this study we assess the contribution in lowering diagnosis errors provided by the RT-PCR method when run alongside other methods. We analyzed 23 biological samples, 14 serum samples, and 9 bronchoalveolar lavage samples (BAL from 10 immunocompromised patients who were selected according to EORTC/MSG criteria (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group. On the serum sample we searched the galactomannan (GM (Platelia Aspergillus® and the fungal genome (MycAssayTMAspergillus; the BAL samples were subjected also to the culture tests. In 11 serum samples the results showed concordance between GM and RT–PCR tests, while in 3 samples we report discordance: 2 results were GM positive and RT-PCR negative, and 1 results GM negative and RT-PCR indeterminate. In 5 BAL samples the results showed concordance between the two methods, while 4 were GM positive and RT-PCR negative. The data, although still preliminary, suggest an increased accuracy in the diagnosis of suspected invasive aspergillosis when employing both RT-PCR and GM tests given that the RT-PCR test eliminates the false positive results of the GM test. The PCR methods require, however, further applications of this type of diagnostic because of the severe limit given by the lack of standardization.

  5. Aspergillus flavus induces granulomatous cerebral aspergillosis in mice with display of distinct cytokine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, R; Shankar, J; Tiwary, B N; Singh, A P

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the leading Aspergillus spp. resulting in invasive aspergillosis of central nervous system (CNS) in human beings. Immunological status in aspergillosis of central nervous system remains elusive in case of both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Since cytokines are the major mediators of host response, evaluation of disease pathology along with cytokine profile in brain may provide snapshots of neuro-immunological response. An intravenous model of A. flavus infection was utilized to determine the pathogenicity of infection and cytokine profile in the brain of male BALB/c mice. Enumeration of colony forming units and histopathological analyses were performed on the brain tissue at distinct time periods. The kinetics of cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-12/IL-23p40, IL-6, IL-23, IL-17A and IL-4) was evaluated at 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h post infection (hPI) in brain homogenates using murine cytokine specific enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Histological analysis exhibited the hyphae with leukocyte infiltrations leading to formation of granulomata along with ischemia and pyknosis of neurons in the brain of infected mice. Diseased mice displayed increased secretion of IFN-γ, IL-12p40 and IL-6 with a concomitant reduction in the secretion of Th2 cytokine IL-4, and Th17 promoting cytokine, IL-23 during the late phase of infection. A.flavus induced inflammatory granulomatous cerebral aspergillosis in mice, characterized by a marked increase in the Th1 cytokines and neurons undergoing necrosis. A marked increase in necrosis of neurons with concurrent inflammatory responses might have led to the host mortality during late phase of infection.

  6. Aspergilosis broncopulmonar alérgica. Complicaciones poco usuales de la afección ALLERGIC BRONCHOPULMONARY ASPERGILLOSIS. UNUSUAL COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDGARDO CARRASCO C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Se revisa definición, etiología, etapas clínicas, tratamiento y complicaciones de la Aspergilosis Broncopulmonar Alérgica (ABPA. En el Instituto Nacional del Tórax se han seguido 35 casos de ABPA durante un promedio de 15 años. De esta serie se presentan dos pacientes de sexo femenino que corresponden a ABPA complicada por infección por Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI. Las pacientes que tenían 71 y 72 años de edad respectivamente, presentaron una infección pulmonar por MAI, 3 y diez años después de habérseles diagnosticado ABPA. El diagnóstico de ABPA se basó en sus características clínicas, radiológicas y en sus pruebas inmunológicas (prueba cutánea y Elisa IgG + para A. fumigatus. En ambos casos la infección pulmonar por MAI -confirmada por dos cultivos positivos- estuvo asociada a agravación clínica y radiológica. Las pacientes fueron tratadas exitosamente con claritromicina y etambutol durante 12 meses; este tratamiento estuvo asociado a estreptomicina y minociclina durante los primeros dos meses. La infección por MAI es una complicación poco frecuente de la ABPA. Esta asociación se debe sospechar si una TAC de alta resolución muestra nódulos asociados a bronquiectasias difusas ubicadas más allá de las bronquiectasias centrales (lesiones típicas de la ABPA no complicada. La infección pulmonar por MAI debe ser confirmada a través de cultivos de MAI en expectoración o en el líquido de lavado broncoalveolarDefinition, etiology, clinical stages, treatment and complications of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA are reviewed. Thirty five cases of ABPA have been followed during an average of 15 years at Instituto Nacional del Tórax-Chile. From this series two female patients, corresponding to ABPA complicated by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI infection are presented. The patients that were 71 and 72 years old respectively, presented a MAI pulmonary infection 3 and ten years after

  7. Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis score for early diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in Darwin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Vignesh; Ooi, Geraldine; Weidlich, Stephanie; Carson, Phillip

    2017-03-15

    Soft tissue infections are a major health burden in the Top End of the Northern Territory of Australia. Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is associated with mortality rates from 8 to 40%. Early recognition and aggressive surgical debridement are the cornerstones of successful treatment. The Laboratory Risk Indicator for Necrotizing Fasciitis (LRINEC) score, developed by Wong et al., uses six routine biochemical variables to aid early diagnosis. We aim to assess the diagnostic efficacy of the LRINEC score in our population. A retrospective review of patients with NF between 2005 and 2013 was conducted. A time matched cohort of abscesses/cellulitis was selected. Admission bloods were used to calculate the LRINEC score. An intraoperative finding of NF was used as the gold standard definition for comparison. The diagnostic accuracy of the LRINEC score was assessed. Ninety-eight patients with NF and 205 control patients were identified. The area under the receiver operator curve for the LRINEC score in detecting NF was 0.925 (0.890-0.959, P < 0.001). The sensitivity of the LRINEC ≥5 for NF was 76.3%, with a specificity of 93.1%. The positive and negative predictive values were 95.5 and 88.1%, respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 11 and 0.25. The LRINEC score is a useful, robust, non-invasive and easily calculated scoring system that can be used as an adjunct to early diagnosis of NF. However, a high degree of clinical suspicion remains the most important factor in early diagnosis of NF. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis due to Aspergillus niger in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohapatra S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous aspergillosis is a rare entity, usually caused by A. fumigatus and A. flavus . Here, we present such a case, manifested by ulceration due to A. niger, which remained undiagnosed for a prolonged period. The immunological status was intact, although the patient had associated severe fungal infection. Recurrence of the lesion occurred despite repeated anti-fungal therapies. Anti fungal testing was done based on the broth dilution (M-38A, NCCLS, USA method. The culture isolate was found to be sensitive to fluconazole and amphotericin B. Continuation of antifungal therapy improved the symptoms, reducing the size of the lesion.

  9. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of maxilla with cervical nodal metastasis associated with sinonasal aspergillosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virender Suhag

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP is defined as neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells in the soft tissue. It represents approximately 3% of all plasma cell neoplasms. EMP of the head and neck are very uncommon tumors, representing approximately 0.4% of all head and neck malignancies; amongst them, plasmacytoma of the maxilla is extremely rare. We present a rare case of EMP which had metastasized to multiple cervical lymph nodes and was associated with aspergillosis. The possibility of extramedullary plasmacytoma should be considered when an elderly patient presents with symptoms of recurrent rhinosinusitis not responding to conservative management and imaging shows a destructive soft tissue mass.

  10. Voriconazole in the treatment of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glackin, L

    2009-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) can cause a significant clinical deterioration in patients with cystic fibrosis. There is very little research in the current literature with regard to alternatives for treatment, apart from long courses of steroids. We conducted a retrospective review of all our patients with ABPA treated with the antifungal voriconazole and found there was a significant drop in IgE levels post treatment as well as a decrease in steroid dosing. The improvement in FEV was not statistically significant; however there was a very wide variation in pre-treatment levels.

  11. Causes of Death in a Contemporary Cohort of Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal; Maddalena Peghin; Carlos Cervera; Carlota Gudiol; Isabel Ruiz-Camps; Asunción Moreno; Cristina Royo-Cebrecos; Eva Roselló; Jordi Puig de la Bellacasa; Josefina Ayats; Jordi Carratalà

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding the processes leading to death in patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) is lacking. We sought to determine the causes of death in these patients, the role that IA played in the cause, and the timing of death. The factors associated with IA-related mortality are also analyzed. We conducted a multicenter study (2008-2011) of cases of proven and probable IA. The causes of death and whether mortality was judged to be IA-related or IA-unrelated were determined by consensu...

  12. Treatment strategies for invasive aspergillosis in neutropenic patients: voriconazole or liposomal amphotericin-B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, L; Valentini, C G; Fianchi, L; Caira, M

    2011-02-01

    The proportion of patients with cancers who develop invasive fungal infections has increased dramatically over the past few decades. Most of these infections are diagnosed in patients with hematological malignancies, mainly in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and those undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. For years deoxycolate amphotericin B has been considered the drug of choice for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis, but it has been outclassed by its lipid formulations and new triazoles (i.e. voriconazole), that produced better response rates; nonetheless recovery from neutropenia remains the most important factor influencing outcome.

  13. Aggressive and multifocal pulmonary inflammatory myofiberblastic tumor in young woman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yang Sean; Chung, Myung Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Ki Hoon; Kim, Jeanna; Kwon, Soon Suck; Yoo, Won Jong [Bucheon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We report a case of pulmonary inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) showing aggressive and unusually rapid progression. A 27-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to dry cough, fever and blood-tinged sputum that lasted one week. Initial chest radiograph and computed tomography scan revealed multifocal pulmonary nodules, which subsequently progressed into large necrotic masses within two months. She underwent a fine needle biopsy of the largest mass in the right middle lung zone which revealed inflammatory myofibroblastic cells consistent with IMT. The masses showed complete regression after six months of corticosteroid therapy. This unusual clinical manifestation could help explain the reactive inflammatory nature associated with IMTs.

  14. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grows on dead leaves, stored grain, bird droppings, compost piles, and other decaying vegetation. Cavities in the ... Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin M. ...

  15. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Miliary tuberculosis Tuberculosis of the lungs Erythema nodosum associated with sarcoidosis Respiratory system Tuberculin skin test References Fitzgerald DW, Sterling TR, Haas DW. ...

  16. Pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, more than 800 papers were published in the field of pulmonary hypertension. A Clinical Year in Review article cannot possibly incorporate all this work and needs to be selective. The recently published European guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension contain an inclusive summary of all published clinical studies conducted until very recently. Here, we provide an overview of papers published after the finalisation of the guideline. In addition, we summaris...

  17. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  18. Pulmonary Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1981-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients.

  19. [Immunonegative necrotizing glomerulonephritis: an atypical case of lupus nephropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, E; Vallès, M; Torguet, P; Bronsoms, J; Maté, G; Bernadó, L; Mauri, J M

    2003-01-01

    We report here a case of systemic lupus erythematosus with severe, active pauci-immune necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. This patient had been diagnosed of a lupus nephritis type III previously and treated with steroids and azathioprine. After a renal symptomless period of nine years, she developed heavy proteinuria and hypertension. A second kidney biopsy was then performed. The pathological study disclosed a pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic and segmental glomerulonephritis. The absence of subendothelial and mesangial deposits was confirmed by both immunofluorescent microscopy and electron microscopy. The simultaneous immunological study showed normal ANCA levels while complement, anti-dsDNA and ANA were altered. The patient was treated with steroids and cyclophosphamide eith good response. This case points out the possibility previously recognized by others of an association between lupus and an pauci-immune necrotizing glomerulonephritis.

  20. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Salehi Omran MR, Nooreddini H, Baghdadi F. Acute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood; A Case Report. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Spring;7(2:51-54. AbstractAcute Necrotizing Encephalopathy of Childhood (ANEC is an atypical disease followed by respiratory or gastrointestinal infection, high fever, which is accompanied with rapid alteration of consciousness and seizures. This disease is seen nearly exclusively in East Asian infants and children who had previously a good health. Serial MRI examinations demonstrated symmetric lesions involving the thalami, brainstem, cerebellum, and white matter. This disease has a poor prognosis, often culminating in profound morbidity and mortality. A 22-month infant with ANEC hospitalized in Amirkola Children Hospital has been evaluated. References1. Mizuguchi M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: a novel form of acute encephalopathy prevalent in Japan and Taiwan. Brain Dev. 1997 Mar;19(2:81-92. Review.2. Wang HS, Huang SC. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood. Chang Gung Med J 2001 Jan;24(1:1-10.3. Campistol J, Gassió R, Pineda M, Fernandez-Alvarez E. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood (infantile bilateral  thalamic necrosis: two non-Japanese cases. Dev Med Child Neurol 1998 Nov;40(11:771-4.4. Ito Y, Ichiyama T, Kimura H, Shibata M, Ishiwada N, Kuroki H, Furukawa S, Morishima T. Detection of influenza virus RNA by reverse transcription-PCR and proinflammatory cytokines in influenza-virus-associated encephalopathy. J Med Virol 1999 Aug;58(4:420-5.5. Sugaya N. Influenza-associated encephalopathy in Japan. Semin Pediatr Infect Dis 2002 Apr;13(2:79-84. Review.6. Skelton BW, Hollingshead MC, Sledd AT, Phillips CD, Castillo M. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood: typical findings in an atypical disease. Pediatr Radiol 2008 Jul; 38(7:810-3.7. Wong AM, Simon EM, Zimmerman RA, Wang HS, Toh CH, Ng SH. Acute necrotizing encephalopathy of childhood

  1. Quantification of gut lesions in a subclinical necrotic enteritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholamiandehkordi, Ahmad R.; Timbermont, Leen; Lanckriet, Anouk

    2007-01-01

    , E. maxima or an overdose of live coccidial vaccine inoculations did not result in grossly visible necrotic gut lesions, while combined inoculation resulted in typical necrotic lesions at approximately 4 days after inoculations with C. perfringens in approximately one-half of the inoculated animals....... Semi-quantitative histological lesion scoring was done to evaluate gut damage in gut sections of animals in which no gross necrotic lesions were detected. This included scoring of hyperaemia, haemorrhages, the amount of red blood cells and protein precipitate in the lumen, villus fusion and epithelial......-inoculated and single-inoculated groups. In general, the highest histological scores for gut lesions were observed in the double-inoculated groups, but the single-inoculated groups had higher scores than the control group. It was concluded that oral inoculation of broilers with an overdose of live coccidial vaccine...

  2. TNF α and reactive oxygen species in necrotic cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Morgan; You-Sun Kim; Zheng-gang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Death receptors, including the TNF receptor-1 (TNF-RI), have been shown to be able to initiate caspase-independent cell death. This form of "necrotic cell death" appears to be dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Recent data have indicated that superoxide generation is dependent on the activation of NADPH oxidases, which form a complex with the adaptor molecules RIP1 and TRADD. The mechanism of superoxide generation further establishes RIP1 as the central molecule in ROS production and cell death initiated by TNFa and other death receptors. A role for the sustained JNK activation in necrotic cell death is also suggested. The sensitization of virus-infected cells to TNFa indicates that necrotic cell death may represent an alternative cell death pathway for clearance of infected cells.

  3. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Necrotizing black tattoo reaction: what's in a name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhogal, Ricky Harminder; Thomas, Sunil Solomon

    2009-01-01

    We report the rare case of an 18-year-old man who developed a necrotizing cutaneous reaction 5 days after having a permanent black tattoo on his left forearm spelling his name. Three cases of reactions to permanent black tattoos have been reported within the literature. These cases described the development of cellulitis of the skin adjacent to the tattoo but none reported florid necrotizing cutaneous reactions. The initial management with oral antibacterials failed to resolve the symptoms and use of intravenous antibacterials and topical corticosteroids was needed. Six weeks after presentation the tattoo lettering showed the presence of hyperpigmented skin. Subsequent patch testing confirmed that the patient had no allergy to black tattoo pigments suggesting that the necrotizing cutaneous reaction was secondary to infection. We show that successful treatment of this rare infective complication of permanent black tattoos involves the early institution of intravenous antibacterial agents and topical corticosteroids.

  5. Clinical analysis of 68 patients with pulmonary mycosis in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Bai-ling

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the lack of specific clinical manifestations and imaging features, the diagnosis of pulmonary mycosis is difficult. This study aimed to investigate the pathogens, clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnosis and management of pulmonary mycosis. Methods Data on 68 patients diagnosed as pulmonary mycosis in Xiang Ya hospital from January 2001 to December 2010 were collected and their clinical manifestations, radiographic characterization, diagnostic methods and management were analyzed. Results All patients were diagnosed by pathological examination. Of the 68 cases, 38 (55.9% had pulmonary aspergillosis and 19 (27.9% pulmonary cryptococcosis. Open-lung surgery was performed in 38 patients (55.9%, transbronchial biopsy in 15 (22.0%, and computerized tomography (CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy in 11 (16.2%. Main symptoms were as follows: cough in 51 cases (75.0%, expectoration in 38 (55.9%, hemoptysis in 25 (37.8%, fever in 20 (29.4%, while 6 cases (11.1% were asymptomatic. X-ray and chest CT showed masses or nodular lesions in 52 cases (76.5%, patchy lesions in 10 (14.7%, cavity formation in 15 (22.0%, and diffuse miliary nodules in 1 case. In 51 cases (75.0% misdiagnosis before pathological examination occurred. Surgical resection was performed in 38 patients (55.9%. In 25 patients (36.7% systemic antifungal therapy was administered, and 20 patients (29.4% experienced complete responses or partial responses. Conclusion The main pathogens of pulmonary mycosis are Aspergillus, followed by cryptococcosis. Final diagnosis of pulmonary mycosis mainly depends on pathological examination. The clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnostic methods and management differ depending on the pathogens. Satisfactory therapy can be obtained by both antifungal and surgical treatment.

  6. Biofilm in group A streptococcal necrotizing soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemens, Nikolai; Chakrakodi, Bhavya; Shambat, Srikanth Mairpady

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus (GAS) is a life-threatening, rapidly progressing infection. At present, biofilm is not recognized as a potential problem in GAS necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI), as it is typically linked to chronic infections or associated with foreign...... devices. Here, we present a case of a previously healthy male presenting with NSTI caused by GAS. The infection persisted over 24 days, and the surgeon documented the presence of a "thick layer biofilm" in the fascia. Subsequent analysis of NSTI patient tissue biopsies prospectively included...

  7. Analysis of a mathematical model describing necrotic tumor growth

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study a model describing the growth of necrotic tumors in different regimes of vascularisation. The tumor consists of a necrotic core of death cells and a surrounding nonnecrotic shell. The corresponding mathematical formulation is a moving boundary problem where both boundaries delimiting the nonnecrotic shell are allowed to evolve in time.We determine all radially symmetric stationary solutions of the problem and reduce the moving boundary problem into a nonlinear evolution. Parabolic theory provides us the perfect context in order to show local well-posed of the problem for small initial data.

  8. Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection Occurring after Exposure to Mycobacterium marinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani S. Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous infections caused by Mycobacterium marinum have been attributed to aquarium or fish exposure after a break in the skin barrier. In most instances, the upper limbs and fingers account for a majority of the infection sites. While previous cases of necrotizing soft tissue infections related to M. marinum have been documented, the importance of our presenting case is to illustrate the aggressive nature of M. marinum resulting in a persistent necrotizing soft tissue infection of a finger that required multiple aggressive wound debridements, followed by an amputation of the affected extremity, in order to hasten recovery.

  9. Ischemic Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in a Marathon Runner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J Mast

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic ischemia is a rare condition. Case report In this case report we describe a 57-year-old male who developed an acute necrotizing pancreatitis after running a marathon and visiting a sauna the same evening, with an inadequate fluid and food consumption during both events. Conclusions Pancreatic ischemia imposed by mechanical and physical stress and dehydration can induce the development of acute pancreatitis. Separately, these factors are rare causes of ischemic acute pancreatitis. But when combined, as in this particular case, the risk of an acute necrotizing pancreatitis cannot be neglected

  10. Neonatal necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum caused by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Junpei; Inoue, Nobuaki; Satoh, Hiroyuki; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Terakawa, Toshiro; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2015-04-01

    We herein describe the case of a 27-day-old male infant who was brought to the emergency room for intermittent crying, and swelling of the left scrotum. Based on the clinical findings, necrotizing fasciitis was suspected, and surgical intervention was successfully completed within a few hours of admission. Streptococcus agalactiae type Ia was cultured from the drained abscess, and was considered the causative pathogen. To our knowledge, this is the first report of neonatal necrotizing fasciitis caused by S. agalactiae. Prompt diagnosis and immediate surgical debridement are crucial in the initial management of this disease.

  11. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis: report of three cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, R J; Sisto, J M; Bosack, R C

    1988-06-01

    Three cases of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis have been reported, two of dental etiology, and one the result of blunt and abrasive facial trauma. All cases responded well to aggressive surgical intervention in combination with broad spectrum antibiotic coverage and supportive medical therapy. The presence of increased vascularity in the head and neck region probably minimizes the amount of overlying soft tissue that must be excised during surgical management (in comparison to extremity and trunk necrotizing fasciitis cases). The key to successful management of such infections is early diagnosis of the disease process with prompt surgical and medical intervention.

  12. Retrospective evaluation of caspofungin therapy in invasive aspergillosis (RECAM-IA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Tami; Klimko, Nikolay; Laverdiere, Michel; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Kliasova, Galina; Trenschel, Rudolf; Kumar, Ritesh N

    2011-07-01

    To evaluate caspofungin in high-risk invasive aspergillosis (IA) patient, a retrospective review of patient characteristics, antifungal therapies and clinical outcomes on hospitalised patients at sites in Russia, Canada, Germany, and Thailand was performed. Fifty-five patients were included, six with proven and 49 with probable aspergillosis; 76.4% had haematological diseases, 80% were on immunosuppressive drugs, 32.7% were neutropenic at caspofungin initiation. Median duration of prior antifungal therapy was 9 days (range 1-232). Reasons for initiating caspofungin included: disease refractory to first-line antifungal (49.1%) and toxicities with prior antifungals (18.2%). Median caspofungin therapy duration was 14 days (range 2-62), with a median of 13 days (range 1-62) as monotherapy. Favourable responses were observed in 45.5% of the patients, complete responses in 40% and partial responses in 5.5%; 74.5% survived 7 days after completion of caspofungin therapy with 69.1% having been successfully discharged from the hospital. Few patients (14.6%) on caspofungin switched because of suspected resistance, lack of response or adverse events. There were no increases in hospital stay as a result of adverse events or drug-drug interactions related to caspofungin; 7.3% of patients had a mean value of 13 (± 14.11) days of increased stay attributable to treatment failure. Caspofungin was well-tolerated. It exhibited effectiveness and high survival in treating severe IA patients.

  13. Invasive orbital aspergillosis in an apparently immunocompetent host without evidence of sinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Primeggia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis is uncommon in healthy individuals. We report a case of Aspergillus fumigatus orbital cellulitiswith intracranial extension in an apparently immunocompetent patient with a history of benign lymphoid hyperplasiaof the lacrimal gland. A 68 year-old man with no significant past medical history underwent orbitotomy and biopsy of alacrimal gland mass. Pathology showed benign lymphoid hyperplasia of the lacrimal gland and he completed radiationtherapy. Three months after orbitotomy and one month after completion of radiation therapy, he presented with orbitalcellulitis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated invasion into the frontal lobe. Clinical and radiographicfindings failed to improve with prolonged antibiotic therapy; transcranial orbitotomy with right frontal craniotomy forabscess drainage and orbit washout was performed. Intraoperative cultures grew Aspergillus fumigatus. The patientcompleted a six month course of therapy with oral voriconazole and has remained free from relapse with long-termfollow-up. Efficacy of voriconazole was guided by serial imaging and voriconazole trough levels. Aspergillus may causeinvasive disease in immunocompetent hosts, even without evidence of sinusitis, and should be considered in the differentialdiagnosis when patients do not demonstrate clinical improvement with antibiotic therapy. J Microbiol Infect Dis2012; 2(3: 113-116Key words: Aspergillosis, orbital cellulitis, brain abscess

  14. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  15. Necrotizing Cervical Lymphadenitis Caused by Mycobacterium simiae in an HIV Positive Patient: Imaging with {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William [Brandon Regional Health Centre, Brandon (Canada); Rush, Christopher [Jewish General Hospital, McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Mycobacterium simiae is an opportunistic pathogen rarely associated with human disease, although in recent years M. simiae has been detected with increasing frequency in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients, usually causing disseminated infection with fever, diarrhea and weight loss. We report the case of an HIV positive man, who was referred for an 1{sup 8F} FDG PET/CT to evaluate a solitary pulmonary nodule. The PET/CT showed incidental large necrotic cervical lymph nodes, compatible with necrotizing cervical lymph adenitis. Biopsy and culture of one of the affected lymph nodes were positive for M. simiae. We present the first report of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT imaging of an infectious process caused by M. simiae in humans.

  16. Immunochemical analysis of fumigaclavine mycotoxins in respiratory tissues and in blood serum of birds with confirmed aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Hadri; Gross, Madeleine; Fischer, Dominik; Lierz, Michael; Usleber, Ewald

    2015-11-01

    The ergoline alkaloid fumigaclavine A (FuA) is one of the major mycotoxins produced by Aspergillus fumigatus, the main causative fungal agent of avian aspergillosis. To study in situ production of FuA, post-mortem respiratory tissues of various avian species, as well as blood samples of falcons (Falco sp.), were analysed by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). At a detection limit of 1.5 ng/ml, FuA EIA positive results were obtained for tissue samples from seven (64%) out of 11 birds with confirmed aspergillosis, with a maximum concentration of 38 ng/g, while all controls (n = 7) were negative. No FuA could be detected in blood serum (detection limit 0.7 ng/ml) of 15 falcons, experimentally inoculated with A. fumigatus conidia. Fungal mycelium material from tissue of clinical aspergillosis cases, cultured on malt extract agar, was highly positive in the FuA EIA in milligrams per gram range. Chromatographic analysis of mycelium extracts revealed the co-presence of FuA and the structurally related fumigaclavine C (FuC). Alkaline hydrolysis of FuA and FuC yielded the corresponding deacetylation products, FuB and FuE. This is the first report showing that fumigaclavine alkaloids are produced by A. fumigatus in situ during the course of clinical aspergillosis in birds; however, the role of these compounds in the pathogenesis of this disease is still unknown.

  17. Case report - Bilateral renal aspergillosis in a patient with AIDS : A case report and review of reported cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, A.W.; Sprenger, H.G.; Van Leeuwen, J.T.M.; Meessen, N.E.L.; Van Assen, S.

    2008-01-01

    Renal aspergillosis is an extremely uncommon complication in HIV-infected patients. In general, prognosis is poor and the need for nephrectomy is emphasized. We report the case of a 37-year-old patient with AIDS since April 2003 (CD4 count 10 cells/mm(3), a high viral load, Candida esophagitis, bila

  18. Systematic review of percutaneous catheter drainage as primary treatment for necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baal, M.C. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Bollen, T.L.; Bakker, O.J.; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in patients with (infected) necrotizing pancreatitis was evaluated. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were: consecutive cohort of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis undergoing PCD as primary trea

  19. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zgraj Oskar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  20. Triple diagnostics for early detection of ambivalent necrotizing fasciitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, Falco; Bode, Lonneke G.; Riddez, Louis; Leenen, Luke P H; van Dijk, MR

    2016-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive and potential lethal condition. Over the last decade time to surgery decreased and outcome improved, most likely due to increased awareness and more timely referral. Early recognition is key to improve mortality and morbidity.

  1. Novel Phaeoacremonium species associated with necrotic wood of Prunus trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damm, U.; Mostert, L.; Crous, P.W.; Fourie, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Phaeoacremonium is associated with opportunistic human infections, as well as stunted growth and die-back of various woody hosts, especially grapevines. In this study, Phaeoacremonium species were isolated from necrotic woody tissue of Prunus spp. (plum, peach, nectarine and apricot) from

  2. Neonatal scrotal wall necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene): a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, Oskar

    2011-12-12

    Abstract Introduction Necrotizing fasciitis in neonates is rare and is associated with almost 50% mortality. Although more than 80 cases of neonates (under one month of age) with necrotizing fasciitis have been reported in the literature, only six of them are identified as originating in the scrotum. Case presentation We report the case of a four-week-old, full-term, otherwise-healthy Caucasian baby boy who presented with an ulcerating lesion of his scrotal wall. His scrotum was explored because of a provisional diagnosis of missed torsion of the testis. He was found to have necrotizing fasciitis of the scrotum. We were able to preserve the testis and excise the necrotic tissue, and with intravenous antibiotics there was a successful outcome. Conclusions Fournier gangrene is rarely considered as part of the differential diagnosis in the clinical management of the acute scrotum. However, all doctors who care for small babies must be aware of this serious condition and, if it is suspected, should not hesitate in referring the babies to a specialist pediatric surgical center immediately.

  3. [Method and procedures in bacteriological study of necrotic teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Ponce, A; López Campos, A; López Paz, J; Pazos Sierra, R

    1991-01-01

    Research was conducted of 160 radicular canals with necrotic pulp. Results of different bacteriological analyses are presented. Culture analyses in aerobic and anaerobic media, resulted in the isolation of Staphylococcus Epidermidis, Streptococcus Viridans and Corynebacterium sp in the group studied, as the most frequent bacteria. There was no evidence of a specific germ linked with the pulp necrosis.

  4. Cerebral and splanchnic oxygenation and necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schat, Trijntje Eelkje

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common and deadliest gastrointestinal disease in preterm infants. Mortality rates of NEC can be as high as 40%. Furthermore, NEC is associated with adverse neurological outcomes at school age and gastrointestinal complications in the long term, such as sho

  5. Risk Factors For Development Of Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovic Bojan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP is a severe form of acute pancreatitis that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, an adequate initial treatment of patients who present with acute pancreatitis (AP based on correct interpretation of early detected laboratory and clinical abnormalities may have a significant positive impact on the disease course.

  6. Temporary feed restriction partially protects broilers from necrotic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiouris, V; Georgopoulou, I; Batzios, Chr; Pappaioannou, N; Ducatelle, R; Fortomaris, P

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of feed restriction on the intestinal ecosystem and on the pathogenesis of experimental necrotic enteritis in broiler chicks. To induce subclinical necrotic enteritis, an experimental challenge model using a specific diet formulation, Gumboro vaccination, oral inoculation of broilers with a 10-fold dose of attenuated anticoccidial vaccine and multiple oral inoculations with a specific strain of Clostridium perfringens was adopted. Two hundred and forty 1-day-old Cobb 500 broilers were randomly allocated to four groups: feed restricted, challenged, both feed restricted and challenged, and negative control. At 21, 22, 23 and 24 days of age, the intestines, gizzard and liver were collected from 15 birds in each group and scored for gross lesions. The intestinal digesta was collected for pH and viscosity determination. One caecum from each bird was taken for microbiological analysis. The application of feed restriction in birds challenged with C. perfringens reduced the necrotic enteritis lesion score significantly (P ≤ 0.05) and feed restriction significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) pH in the small intestine, the viscosity of the jejunum digesta as well as the C. perfringens counts in the caeca compared with the controls. In conclusion, feed restriction of broilers has a positive effect on the intestinal ecosystem and a significant protective effect against necrotic enteritis in the subclinical experimental model.

  7. Necrotizing enterocolitis. New thoughts about pathogenesis and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKendrick, W; Caplan, M

    1993-10-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. An incomplete understanding of its pathogenesis has hampered efforts to devise an effective preventative strategy. New insights into the pathogenesis of NEC, particularly at the cellular and biochemical level, however, offer a rational basis for the development of new approaches to this disease.

  8. Severe necrotizing cutaneous reaction to topical 5-fluorouracil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available 5-flourouracil (5-FU has been used for the treatment of various malignant and pre-malignant conditions. It has also been used to treat viral warts as a topical agent. It usually does not produce any significant adverse effects when used topically. Severe necrotizing cutaneous reaction following topical 5-FU used for the treatment of warts is being reported.

  9. Carbohydrate maldigestion induces necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains the most severe gastrointestinal disorder in preterm infants. It is associated with the initiation of enteral nutrition and may be related to immature carbohydrate digestive capacity. We tested the hypothesis that a formula containing maltodextrin vs. lactose ...

  10. Negative pressure treatment for necrotizing fasciitis after chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraia Melchionda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe 2 cases of children with malignant disease who developed severe mucositis with perineal necrotizing fasciitis during severe neutropenia after chemotherapy. Treatment with topical negative pressure therapy with silver foam dressing, together with large spectrum antibiotics, resolved the problem with complete closure of the wound after 30 and 36 days of treatment, respectively.

  11. Necrotizing enterocolitis with recurrent hepatic portal venous gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, J H; Smith, W L; Tsang, R C

    1976-03-01

    Two separate episodes of pneumatosis intestinalis and hepatic portal venous gas were observed in a premature infant with necrotizing enterocolitis. Although HPVG has previously been considered an ominous roentgenographic sign, the infant survived without surgical intervention. As in several cases reported by others, clinical and roentgenographic signs of NEC reappeared when enteric feedings were restarted prior to 10 days of medical therapy.

  12. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M; Scott, Steven J; Cerda-Gonzalez, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    A 4-year-old 26-kg (57.2-lb) spayed female Staffordshire Bull Terrier mix was evaluated because of a 24-hour history of cluster seizures. Neurologic examination revealed altered mentation and multifocal intracranial signs; MRI was performed. The MRI findings included multifocal, asymmetric forebrain lesions affecting both the gray and white matter, an area suggestive of focal necrosis, and loss of corticomedullary distinction. A midline shift and caudal transtentorial herniation were noted, suggestive of greater than normal intracranial pressure. Because the dog's clinical signs worsened despite medical treatment and additional evidence of increased intracranial pressure, bilateral craniectomy and durectomy were performed. Histologic evaluation of a brain biopsy specimen revealed bilateral and asymmetric areas of necrosis in the subcortical white matter and adjacent gray matter. At the periphery of the necrotic areas, there was increased expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and Virchow-Robin spaces were expanded by CD3+ lymphocytes. Results of immunohistochemical analysis of brain tissue were negative for canine distemper virus, Neospora canis, and Toxoplasma gondii. These clinical, imaging, and histopathologic findings were compatible with necrotizing meningoencephalitis. The dog's neurologic status continued to worsen following surgery. Repeated MRI revealed ongoing signs of increased intracranial pressure, despite the bilateral craniectomy. The owners elected euthanasia. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis in a large mixed-breed dog. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in dogs other than small or toy breeds that have signs suggestive of inflammatory disease.

  13. Triple diagnostics for early detection of ambivalent necrotizing fasciitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hietbrink, Falco; Bode, Lonneke G.; Riddez, Louis; Leenen, Luke P H; van Dijk, MR

    2016-01-01

    Background: Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon, rapidly progressive and potential lethal condition. Over the last decade time to surgery decreased and outcome improved, most likely due to increased awareness and more timely referral. Early recognition is key to improve mortality and morbidity. How

  14. [Dentogene Focus as a Rare Cause of Necrotizing Fasciitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, Christopher; Hoefert, Sebastian; Fischborn, Till; Schraml, Christina

    2017-02-01

    History and clinical findings We elaborate the case of a 72-year-old patient who presented with a painful swelling of the lower jaw in the emergency unit. Investigations and diagnosis In the clinical examination and the CT scan, a widespread cervical emphysema was found which raised suspicion for the presence of a necrotizing fasciitis of the head and neck due to aerogenic infection. Close spatial vicinity to the teeth of the left upper and lower jaw was present, so that the necrotizing fasciitis was assumed to be odontogenic. Treatment and course Based on the clinical presentation and the imaging findings the diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis in the sense of a possible infection with gas building bacteria accompanying with an infection of the mediastinum was made. Immediately performed therapy included sternotomy and extended surgical debridement of necrosis. Conclusion The presented case emphasizes that necrotizing fasciitis due to gas-producing infections should be considered as a differential diagnosis for cervical soft tissue emphysema for which an odontogenic focus is the most common cause. Rapid diagnosis is essential for successful treatment consisting of immediate surgical debridement and intravenous antibiotics.

  15. Allelism and Molecular Mapping of Soybean Necrotic Root Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutability of the w4 flower color locus in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is conditioned by an allele designated w4-m. Germinal revertants recovered among self-pollinated progeny of mutable plants have been associated with the generation of necrotic root mutations, chlorophyll-deficiency mutation...

  16. [Necrotizing fasciitis caused by cutaneous mucormycosis. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Pérez-Ortíz, Andric Christopher; Telich-Vidal, José

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis are opportunistic infections with high morbidity and mortality caused by fungi of the class Zygomycetes, they mainly affect diabetic and immunocompromised patients. In up to 20% of all cases the main infection is localized in the skin, with a great number of them presenting in healthy patients that have suffered from severe trauma or burns. Zygomycetes tend to invade arteries, which leads to thrombosis and generates wide necrotic areas; this favors the progress of the infection and invasion of deep tissues. Up to 24% of primary cutaneous mucormycosis can be complicated with necrotizing fasciitis. We present the case of a 52 year-old male that received the clinical diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis. The patient received wide spectrum antibiotics and was submitted to extensive debridement of the wound bed; transoperative biopsy revealed the presence of zygomycetes in the tissues and the diagnosis of primary cutaneous zygomycosis was made. Antifungal treatment with amphotericin B was initiated and two weeks later autologous skin grafts were applied over the wounds. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose cutaneous zygomycosis, therefore it should always be considered amongst the differentials of necrotic wounds that do not respond to standard treatment. The rapid evolution of the disease remarks the importance of biopsying the wound bed early and treating aggressively.

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Filipino female in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Frazee, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been described in Southeast Asia, but has only recently begun to emerge in North America. The hypermucoviscous strain of K. pneumoniae is a particularly virulent strain known to cause devastatingly invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Here we present the first known case of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae in North America.

  18. Immunohistochemical analyses of a case of extralobar pulmonary sequestration with chest pain in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Ohtsuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography of a Japanese man in his mid-forties with a complaint of right-side chest pain showed a dome-shaped smooth-surfaced mediastinal mass, which was extirpated. The cut surface was highly hemorrhagic and necrotic and not related to the original pulmonary tissues. Although routine sectioning detected bronchial cartilage, immunohistochemical analyses clearly showed the presence of alveolar type II cells; only the alveolar type II cells located at the periphery of this mass showed positive staining for cytokeratins, thyroid transcription factor 1, surfactant protein A, epithelial membrane antigen and Krebs von den Lungen-6. Thus, these analyses are useful for the detection of pulmonary components, even in severely hemorrhagic and necrotic tissues with marked sequestration. The clinical diagnosis was a rare, adult type of extralobar pulmonary sequestration accompanied by chest pain.

  19. Failure of posaconazole therapy in a renal transplant patient with invasive aspergillosis due to Aspergillus fumigatus with attenuated susceptibility to posaconazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, S.; Bruggemann, R.J.M.; Sevaux, R.G. de; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Mouton, J.W.; Verweij, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a kidney transplant recipient with invasive aspergillosis due to Aspergillus fumigatus resistant to voriconazole and intermediately susceptible to posaconazole who failed posaconazole therapy. Plasma posaconazole concentrations indicated an unfavorable ratio of the area under t

  20. Ligustrazine alleviates acute lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xin Zhang; Sheng-Chun Dang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Acute necrotizing pancreatitis leads to a systemic inlfammatory response characterized by widespread leukocyte activation and, as a consequence, distant lung injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ligustrazine, extracted from Ligusticum wallichii a traditional Chinese medicine, on lung injury in a rat model of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP). METHODS:A total of 192 rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (C group); ANP without treatment (P group); and ANP treated with ligustrazine (T group). Each group was further divided into 0.5, 2, 6 and 12 hours subgroups. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of sodium pentobarbital. Sodium taurocholate was infused through the pancreatic membrane to induce ANP. For the T group, sodium taurocholate was infused as above, then 0.6%ligustrazine was administered via the femoral vein. The effects of ligustrazine on the severity of lung injury were assessed by lung wet/dry weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and histopathological changes. Pulmonary blood lfow was determined by the radioactive microsphere technique (RMT). RESULTS:The blood lfow in the P group was signiifcantly lower than that of the C group, while the blood lfow in the T group was signiifcantly higher than that of the P group but showed no signiifcant difference from the C group. Compared with C group, the lung wet/dry ratios in both the P and T groups were signiifcantly increased, but there was no signiifcant difference between them. The MPO activity in the P group was greatly increased over that of the C group. In the T group, although the MPO activity was also higher than in the C group, it much less increased than in the P group. Moreover, the difference between P and T groups was signiifcant after 0.5 to 12 hours. After induction of the ANP model, the pancreas showed mild edema and congestion;the longer the time, the more severe this became. The pulmonary pathological changes were

  1. Failure of Posaconazole Therapy in a Renal Transplant Patient with Invasive Aspergillosis Due to Aspergillus fumigatus with Attenuated Susceptibility to Posaconazole ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, Saskia; Brüggemann, Roger J. M.; Ruud G.L. de Sévaux; Heesakkers, John P. F. A.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Mouton, Johan W.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a kidney transplant recipient with invasive aspergillosis due to Aspergillus fumigatus resistant to voriconazole and intermediately susceptible to posaconazole who failed posaconazole therapy. Plasma posaconazole concentrations indicated an unfavorable ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve over the MIC. Posaconazole should be used with caution for invasive aspergillosis caused by strains with attenuated posaconazole susceptibility, as drug exposure may be ...

  2. A double-blind comparative study of the safety and efficacy of caspofungin versus micafungin in the treatment of candidiasis and aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, S; Izumikawa, K; Yoshida, M; Takesue, Y; Oka, S; Kamei, K; Miyazaki, Y; Yoshinari, T; Kartsonis, N A; Niki, Y

    2013-03-01

    The safety and efficacy profile of caspofungin and micafungin in Japanese patients with fungal infections were directly compared in this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. The proportion of patients who developed significant drug-related adverse event(s) (defined as a serious drug-related adverse event or a drug-related adverse event leading to study therapy discontinuation) was compared in 120 patients [caspofungin 50 mg, or 50 mg following a 70-mg loading dose on Day 1 (hereinafter, 70/50 mg) group: 60 patients; micafungin 150 mg: 60 patients]. The overall response rate was primarily evaluated in the per-protocol set (PPS) population. The proportion of patients who developed significant drug-related adverse events was 5.0 % (3/60) in the caspofungin group and 10.0 % (6/60) in the micafungin group [95 % confidence interval (CI) for the difference: -15.9 %, 5.2 %]. The favorable overall response in the PPS population for patients with esophageal candidiasis, invasive candidiasis, and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis including aspergilloma was 100.0 % (6/6), 100.0 % (3/3), and 46.7 % (14/30) in the caspofungin group, and 83.3 % (5/6), 100.0 % (1/1), and 42.4 % (14/33) in the micafungin group, respectively. In Japanese patients with Candida or Aspergillus infections, there was no statistical difference in the safety between caspofungin and micafungin. Consistent with other data on these two agents, the efficacy of caspofungin and micafungin was similar.

  3. Multiple bronchoceles in a non-asthmatic patient with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad Umar; Mahmood, Rabia

    2008-09-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a hypersensitivity reaction due to a fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus. It is typically seen in patients with long-standing asthma. Our patient was a non-asthmatic 18 years old male who presented with chronic cough for 2 years. Peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated scrum IgE were observed. His x-ray chest revealed v-shaped opacity in the left upper lobe close to the hilum. High resolution computed tomographic scan of the chest revealed multiple dilated bronchi filled with mucous (bronchoceles) and central bronchiectasis (CB) involving main segmental bronchi. Central bronchiectasis (CB) was typical of ABPA but bronchocele formation was a rare manifestation of the disease. The patient was managed with oral prednisolone and was relieved of his symptoms. Occurrence of ABPA in non-asthmatics is very rare and deserves reporting.

  4. Novel and sensitive qPCR assays for the detection and identification of aspergillosis causing species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paholcsek, Melinda; Leiter, Eva; Markovics, Arnold; Biró, Sándor

    2014-09-01

    Despite concerted efforts, diagnosis of aspergillosis is still a great challenge to clinical microbiology laboratories. Along with the requirement for high sensitivity and specificity, species-specific identification is important. We developed rapid, sensitive and species-specific qPCR assays using the TaqMan technology for the detection and identification of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus. The assays were designed to target orthologs of the Streptomyces factor C gene that are only found in a few species of filamentous fungi. Fungi acquired this gene through horizontal gene transfer and divergence of the gene allows identification of species. The assays have potential as a molecular diagnosis tool for the early detection of fungal infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus, which merits future diagnostic studies. The assays were sensitive enough to detect a few genomic equivalents in blood samples.

  5. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in garden waste (compost) collectors--occupational implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, C J M; Wong, M

    2013-10-01

    The separation of rotting garden material from general domestic waste and its collection for processing in industrial composting sites is a relatively new industry in the UK. Two cases of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and the results of health surveillance are described in a team of 28 garden waste (compost) collectors. A few cases of extrinsic allergic alveolitis due to Aspergillus fumigatus have previously been reported in compost workers. In the absence of any guidance from research and to prevent similar cases of a potentially serious illness, we advise that new starters to the job of collecting or processing compost are screened for asthma and aspergillus sensitivity, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis and immunodeficiency if their exposure to high levels of Aspergillus sp cannot be controlled. Annual health surveillance for these workers is also recommended.

  6. 肺曲菌病的临床与影像学%Clinic and Imaging of Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    党明海; 郭佑民

    2006-01-01

    肺曲菌病(pulmonarya spergillosis)是一种由曲菌引起的感染性、进展性、变态反应性疾病。曲菌广泛的存在于腐烂的有机物中,如霉变的谷物、腐烂的植被等。自然界大约有200多种曲菌,但是仅仅有10种左右可以致病,常见的致病菌株是烟曲菌(aspergillus fumigatus)、黄曲菌(aspergillus flavus)和黑曲菌(aspergillus niger)。曲菌为条件致病菌,只有当人体抵抗力下降或有大量菌丝侵入时才可致病。曲菌病的高危人群包括患有癌症、艾滋病、白血病的患者,以及器官移植者、高剂量的皮质甾类应用者、接受化学疗法的患者等,诸如此类长期处于白细胞计数较低的人群。

  7. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  8. Isavuconazole for the treatment of invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis: current evidence, safety, efficacy, and clinical recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natesan SK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suganthini Krishnan Natesan,1,2 Pranatharthi H Chandrasekar1 1Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Wayne State University, 2John D Dingell VA Medical Center, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: The majority of invasive mold infections diagnosed in immunocompromised cancer patients include invasive aspergillosis (IA and mucormycosis. Despite timely and effective therapy, mortality remains considerable. Antifungal agents currently available for the management of these serious infections include triazoles, polyenes, and echinocandins. Until recently, posaconazole has been the only triazole with a broad spectrum of anti-mold activity against both Aspergillus sp. and mucorales. Other clinically available triazoles voriconazole and itraconazole, with poor activity against mucorales, have significant drug interactions in addition to a side effect profile inherent for all triazoles. Polyenes including lipid formulations pose a problem with infusion-related side effects, electrolyte imbalance, and nephrotoxicity. Echinocandins are ineffective against mucorales and are approved as salvage therapy for refractory IA. Given that all available antifungal agents have limitations, there has been an unmet need for a broad-spectrum anti-mold agent with a favorable profile. Following phase III clinical trials that started in 2006, isavuconazole (ISZ seems to fit this profile. It is the first novel triazole agent recently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of both IA and mucormycosis. This review provides a brief overview of the salient features of ISZ, its favorable profile with regard to spectrum of antifungal activity, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters, drug interactions and tolerability, clinical efficacy, and side effects. Keywords: isavuconazole, aspergillosis, mucormycosis, efficacy, antifungal therapy, novel azole, tolerability, drug interactions

  9. Comparison of Nonculture Blood-Based Tests for Diagnosing Invasive Aspergillosis in an Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P Lewis; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Loeffler, Juergen; Najvar, Laura K; Melchers, Willem; Herrera, Monica; Bretagne, Stephane; Wickes, Brian; Kirkpatrick, William R; Barnes, Rosemary A; Donnelly, J Peter; Patterson, Thomas F

    2016-04-01

    The EuropeanAspergillusPCR Initiative (EAPCRI) has provided recommendations for the PCR testing of whole blood (WB) and serum/plasma. It is important to test these recommended protocols on nonsimulated "in vivo" specimens before full clinical evaluation. The testing of an animal model of invasive aspergillosis (IA) overcomes the low incidence of disease and provides experimental design and control that is not possible in the clinical setting. Inadequate performance of the recommended protocols at this stage would require reassessment of methods before clinical trials are performed and utility assessed. The manuscript describes the performance of EAPCRI protocols in an animal model of invasive aspergillosis. Blood samples taken from a guinea pig model of IA were used for WB and serum PCR. Galactomannan and β-d-glucan detection were evaluated, with particular focus on the timing of positivity and on the interpretation of combination testing. The overall sensitivities for WB PCR, serum PCR, galactomannan, and β-d-glucan were 73%, 65%, 68%, and 46%, respectively. The corresponding specificities were 92%, 79%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. PCR provided the earliest indicator of IA, and increasing galactomannan and β-d-glucan values were indicators of disease progression. The combination of WB PCR with galactomannan and β-d-glucan proved optimal (area under the curve [AUC], 0.95), and IA was confidently diagnosed or excluded. The EAPRCI-recommended PCR protocols provide performance comparable to commercial antigen tests, and clinical trials are warranted. By combining multiple tests, IA can be excluded or confirmed, highlighting the need for a combined diagnostic strategy. However, this approach must be balanced against the practicality and cost of using multiple tests.

  10. Iatrogenic Pulmonary Nodule in a Heart Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul C. Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old female with a history of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and end-stage nonischemic cardiomyopathy from Adriamycin toxicity underwent orthotic heart transplantation during June 2013. She developed shortness of breath in September 2013 and was suspected to have invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. A flexible bronchoscopy (FB with a transbronchial biopsy (TBBx was performed. She was found to have a focal lung nodule in the same location at the site of the TBBx on day 13 after the FB. Spontaneous resolution of the nodule was confirmed on the computed tomography (CT scan of chest performed at 3 months. We believe that this nodule was as a consequence of the TBBx. Formation of a peripheral pulmonary nodule (PPN following a TBBx is occasionally encountered among the recipients of the lung transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first case of TBBx producing a pulmonary nodule in a heart transplant recipient. Physicians caring for the patients with heart transplantation should be cognizant of the iatrogenic nature of such nodule to avoid unnecessary diagnostic work-up.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  12. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  13. Surgical Strategies for the Management of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica M Dua

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis continues to evolve and now includes multiple alternatives to traditional open debridement – minimally invasive strategies have been developed with the intent to decrease the physiologic stress associated with this procedure. Proponents of each procedure report their technical success and the “safety and feasibility” of their favored strategy. However, extension into routine clinical practice is limited by considerable variation in technique and lack of widespread expertise. No single approach is optimal for all patients. The strategy for drainage/debridement among the breadth of techniques now available must be individualized according to patient presentation and anatomy. The purpose of this review is to present the current state of interventions for necrotizing pancreatitis and provide a practical guide to understanding the indications and application of these procedures.

  14. Necrotizing enterocolitis: A multifactorial disease with no cure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kareena L Schnabl; John E Van Aerde; Alan BR Thomson; Michael T Clandinin

    2008-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is an inflammatory bowel disease of neonates with significant morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Due to the multifactorial nature of the disease and limitations in disease models, early diagnosis remains challenging and the pathogenesis elusive. Although preterm birth, hypoxic-ischemic events,formula feeding, and abnormal bacteria colonization are established risk factors, the role of genetics and vasoactive/inflammatory mediators is unclear.Consequently, treatments do not target the specific underlying disease processes and are symptomatic and surgically invasive. Breast-feeding is the most effective preventative measure. Recent advances in the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis have focused on bioactive nutrients and trophic factors in human milk. Development of new disease models including the aspect of prematudty that consistently predisposes neonates to the disease with multiple risk factors will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and lead to discovery of innovative therapeutics.

  15. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis: a rare and fatal complication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezala, Hassen Ben; Feriani, Najla

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative parietal complications can be exceptionally severe and serious threatening vital prognosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the skin and deep subcutaneous tissues, spreading along fascia and adipose tissue. It is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes) but also by other bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus, Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a real surgical and medical emergency. We report, in this study, a very rare case of abdominal parietal gangrene occurring in a 75-year-old woman on the fifth day after surgery for an ovarian cyst. Evolution was marked by occurrence of a refractory septic shock with a rapidly fatal course on the third day of management.

  16. Acute anterior necrotizing scleritis:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuen Keat Gan; Syed Shoeb Ahmad; Sheena Mary Alexander; Amir Samsudin

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing scleritis is an uncommon but potential disastrous infection to the eye. It is commonly caused by vaso-occlusive autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or surgically-induced, and rarely due to infections. In this article, we presented a rare case of necrotizing scleritis caused by herpes infection in an immunocompromised patient. A 49 years old, retroviral positive gentleman presented to our clinic with a painful, red right eye associated with watering, photophobia and blurring of vision. His right eye rapidly deteriorated leading to an impending perforation of the sclera despite intensive antimicrobial therapy. The patient was started on acyclovir ointment and subsequently improved remarkably salvaging the eye from the need of an evis-ceration. Although the visual prognosis was poor, structural integrity of the eye was achieved.

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis: unreliable MRI findings in the preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Arzu E-mail: arzuarslan@netscape.net; Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Borthne, Arne

    2000-12-01

    The authors present two cases of necrotizing fasciitis (NF), one case of dermatomyositis and one case of posttraumatic muscle injury, which have similar magnetic resonance imaging findings in terms of skin, subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fasciae and muscle involvement. These cases highlight the need for cautious interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, for they are nonspecific and the preoperative decision should be based mostly on the evolution of the clinical status.

  18. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis as fi rst manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeroen; I; Lenz; Jimmy; M; Jacobs; Bart; Op; de; Beeck; Ivan; A; Huyghe; Paul; A; Pelckmans; Tom; G; Moreels

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a female patient with severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis associated with hypercalcemia as first manifestation of primary hyperparathyroidism caused by a benign parathyroid adenoma.Initially the acute pancreatitis was treated conservatively.The patient subsequently underwent surgical resection of the parathyroid adenoma and surgical clearance of a large infected pancreatic pseudocyst.Although the association of parathyroid adenoma-induced hypercalcemia and acute pancreatitis is a kno...

  19. Emergence of a unique group of necrotizing mycobacterial diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Dobos, K. M.; Quinn, F D; Ashford, D. A.; Horsburgh, C R; King, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Although most diseases due to pathogenic mycobacteria are caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, several other mycobacterial diseases-caused by M. ulcerans (Buruli ulcer), M. marinum, and M. haemophilum-have begun to emerge. We review the emergence of diseases caused by these three pathogens in the United States and around the world in the last decade. We examine the pathophysiologic similarities of the diseases (all three cause necrotizing skin lesions) and common reservoirs of infection (sta...

  20. Necrotizing hepatitis in a domestic pigeon (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmel, L; O'Connor, M; Premanandan, C

    2014-11-01

    An adult male domestic pigeon (Columba livia) was presented for necropsy following natural death after a period of chronic weight loss and severe intestinal ascariasis. Histopathologic examination of the liver found moderate to marked, multifocal necrotizing hepatitis with large, basophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies. Transmission electron microscopy of affected hepatocytes demonstrated numerous intra- and perinuclear icosahedral virions arranged in a lattice structure, consistent with adenoviral infection.