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Sample records for neck trauma part

  1. Thyroid Emphysema Following Penetrating Neck Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Karadağ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although traumatic thyroid gland rupture or hemorrhage is usually seen in goitrous glands, injuries of the normal thyroid gland after neck trauma have rarely been described in the literature. We describe a 44-year-old man who presented with thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema (SCE that occurred after penetrating neck trauma. CT images showed complete resolution of thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema at follow-up examination. Neck injuries can be life threatening. After penetrating neck traumas, physicians should consider subtle esophageal or tracheal laceration. Thyroid emphysema can occur as the result of penetrating neck trauma. The mechanism of emphysema of the thyroid parenchyma can be explained by the thyroid gland’s presence in a single visceral compartment that encompasses the larynx, trachea and thyroid gland. We describe an unusual case of thyroid emphysema of a normal thyroid gland following a penetrating neck injury.

  2. Thyroid Emphysema Following Penetrating Neck Trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Karadağ, Demet; Doner, Egemen; Adapınar, Baki

    2014-01-01

    Although traumatic thyroid gland rupture or hemorrhage is usually seen in goitrous glands, injuries of the normal thyroid gland after neck trauma have rarely been described in the literature. We describe a 44-year-old man who presented with thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema (SCE) that occurred after penetrating neck trauma. CT images showed complete resolution of thyroid emphysema and subcutaneous emphysema at follow-up examination. Neck injuries can be life threatening. After pene...

  3. Management of twenty patients with neck trauma in Khartoum ENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neck trauma is a great surgical challenge, because there are multi organ and systems involved. Objective: To study the clinical presentation, management and outcome of twenty patients presented to Khartoum ENT Hospital with neck trauma. Methods: This is a prospective study conducted in Khartoum ENT ...

  4. Thyroid gland rupture caused by blunt trauma to the neck

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Hirotaka; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Thyroid rupture following blunt trauma is extremely rare, and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. However, hemorrhage and hematoma subsequently causes severe tracheal compression and respiratory distress. Case presentation A 71-year-old Japanese woman visited our emergency room with a complaint of increasing right-sided neck pain at the thyroid cartilage level after she tripped and accidentally hit her neck against a pole 3?h back. On admission, her vital...

  5. Thyroid gland rupture caused by blunt trauma to the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hirotaka; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2016-02-19

    Thyroid rupture following blunt trauma is extremely rare, and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. However, hemorrhage and hematoma subsequently causes severe tracheal compression and respiratory distress. A 71-year-old Japanese woman visited our emergency room with a complaint of increasing right-sided neck pain at the thyroid cartilage level after she tripped and accidentally hit her neck against a pole 3 h back. On admission, her vital signs were stable. There was no swelling or subcutaneous emphysema. Laryngeal endoscopy revealed mild laryngeal edema, although there was no impairment in vocal fold mobility on either side. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed rupture of the right lobe of the thyroid gland accompanied by a large hematoma extending from the neck to the mediastinum. Under general anesthesia, the right lobe was resected and the hematoma was evacuated. Only a few isolated cases of thyroid rupture caused by blunt neck trauma have been reported in patients with normal thyroid glands and neck pain without swelling may be the only presenting symptom. When suspected, CT should be performed to confirm the diagnosis determine the optimal treatment.

  6. Evaluation of the use of tomography in penetrating neck trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADONIS NASR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective:the study has the intention of evaluate the accuracy of computed tomography for the diagnosis of cervical lesions on penetrating neck trauma and also identify the most frequent mechanisms of trauma. Most injured structures, determine the age range and the most prevalent sex.Methods: observational descriptive retrospective study executed by the systematic retrospective review of medical records of all patients victims of penetrating neck trauma that went through surgery and CT scans, admitted into Hospital do Trabalhador, between January 2009 and December 2013.Results:the final sample was of 30 patients, 96.7% of the male sex, the median age was of 28 years old. Most patients suffered injuries by gun (56.7% and 33,3% suffered stab wounds. The most stricken area of the neck was Zone II (77.8% and the left side (55.2%. Regarding the structures injured, the CT showed 6.7% lesions on airways but the surgery showed 40% of damaged, with a value of p=0.002. As to damages of the esophagus and pharynx the CT detected 10% of lesions, while surgery found 30% of lesions, therefore with a significant value of p=0.013. As for the analysis the CT showed reliable. As for the analysis of vascular damage, the CT showed to be, in most cases, reliable to the findings during the surgical act.Conclusion:besides the great use of CT for the diagnosis of penetrating neck injuries we can say that this is an exam with low accuracy for the diagnosis of lesions of aerodigestive tract, therefore it is important a clinical correlation for a good diagnosis.as for the vascular lesions and of other structures, the CT had high sensibility and specificity, thus a good exam to be used in overall.

  7. Head and neck trauma in Iraq and Afghanistan: different war, different surgery, lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Joseph

    2013-10-01

    The objectives are to compare and contrast the head and neck trauma experience in Iraq and Afghanistan and to identify trauma lessons learned that are applicable to civilian practice. A retrospective review of one head and neck surgeon's operative experience in Iraq and Afghanistan was performed using operative logs and medical records. The surgeon's daily operative log book with patient demographic data and operative reports was reviewed. Also, patient medical records were examined to identify the preoperative and postoperative course of care. The head and neck trauma experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan were very different, with a higher percentage of emergent cases performed in Iraq. In Iraq, only 10% of patients were pretreated at a facility with surgical capabilities. In Afghanistan, 93% of patients were pretreated at such facilities. Emergent neck exploration for penetrating neck trauma and emergent airway surgery were more common in Iraq, which most likely accounted for the increased perioperative mortality also seen in Iraq (5.3% in Iraq vs. 1.3% in Afghanistan). Valuable lessons regarding soft tissue trauma repair, midface fracture repair, and mandible fracture repair were learned. The head and neck trauma experiences in Iraq and Afghanistan were very different, and the future training for mass casualty trauma events should reflect these differences. Furthermore, valuable head and neck trauma lessons learned in both war zones are applicable to the civilian practice of trauma. Level 4. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Pain and Disability in the Jaw and Neck Region following Whiplash Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggman-Henrikson, B; Lampa, E; Marklund, S; Wänman, A

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between whiplash trauma and chronic orofacial pain is unclear, especially with regard to the time elapsed from trauma to development of orofacial pain. The aim was to analyze prevalence of jaw pain and disability, as well as the relationship between pain and disability in the jaw and neck regions in the early nonchronic stage after whiplash trauma. In this case-control study, 70 individuals (40 women, 30 men, mean age 35.5 y) who visited an emergency department with neck pain following a car accident were examined within 3 wk of trauma (group 1) and compared with 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 33.8 y), who declined to attend a clinical examination but agreed to fill in questionnaires (group 2). The 2 case groups were compared with a matched control group of 70 individuals (42 women, 28 men, mean age 37.6 y) without a history of neck trauma. All participants completed questionnaires regarding jaw pain and dysfunction, rating pain intensity in jaw and neck regions on the Numerical Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index, and Jaw Disability Checklist. Compared with controls, individuals with a recent whiplash trauma reported more jaw pain and dysfunction. Furthermore, there was a moderate positive correlation between jaw and neck pain ratings for group 1 (r = 0.61, P whiplash trauma report more jaw pain and disability compared with controls without a history of neck trauma. Furthermore, the correlation between jaw and neck pain intensity implies that intensity of neck pain in the acute stage after whiplash trauma might be a possible risk factor also for development of chronic orofacial pain. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  9. Misdiagnosis of Talar Body or Neck Fractures as Ankle Sprains in Low Energy Traumas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ki-Won; Kim, Jin-Su; Cho, Hun-Ki; Choo, Ho-Sik; Park, Jang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background The talus has a very complex anatomical morphology and is mainly fractured by a major force caused by a fall or a traffic accident. Therefore, a talus fracture is not common. However, many recent reports have shown that minor injuries, such as sprains and slips during sports activities, can induce a talar fracture especially in the lateral or posterior process. Still, fractures to the main parts of the talus (neck and body) after ankle sprains have not been reported as occult fractures. Methods Of the total 102 cases from January 2005 to December 2012, 7 patients had confirmed cases of missed/delayed diagnosis of a talus body or neck fracture and were included in the study population. If available, medical records, X-rays, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance imaging of the confirmed cases were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Results In the 7-patient population, there were 3 talar neck fractures and 4 talar body fractures (coronal shearing type). The mechanisms of injuries were all low energy trauma episodes. The causes of the injuries included twisting of the ankle during climbing (n = 2), jumping to the ground from a 1-m high wall (n = 2), and twisting of the ankle during daily activities (n = 3). Conclusions A talar body fracture and a talar neck fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with acute and chronic ankle pain after a minor ankle injury. PMID:27583114

  10. Isolated Multiple Fragmented Cricoid Fracture Associated with External Blunt Neck Trauma: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Hoon; Hwang, Yoon Joon; Kim, Yong Hoon; Seo, Jung Wook; Cho, Hyeon Je; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2010-01-01

    Blunt laryngeal trauma is a relatively uncommon but possibly life-threatening injury. An isolated cricoid fracture associated with blunt trauma is rare. We report a case of an isolated multiple fragmented cricoid cartilage fracture that developed in a 20-year-old man after a blunt neck trauma that occurred during a baseball game and was diagnosed by 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT)

  11. The Joint Facial and Invasive Neck Trauma (J-FAINT) Project, Iraq and Afghanistan 2003-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Original Research— Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery The Joint Facial and Invasive Neck Trauma (J-FAINT) Project, Iraq and Afghanistan 2003...number and type of facial and penetrat- ing neck trauma injuries sustained in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). Study...queried for data from OIF and OEF from January 2003 to May 2011. Information on demographics; type and severity of facial , neck, and associated trauma

  12. Challenges in management of pediatric life-threatening neck and chest trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neck and thoracic trauma in children pose unforeseen challenges requiring variable management strategies. Here, we describe some unusual cases. Patients and Methods: Pediatric cases of unusual neck and thoracic trauma prospectively managed from April 2012 to March 2014 at a Level 1 trauma center were studied for management strategies, outcome, and follow-up. Results: Six children with a median age of 5.5 (range 2–10 years were managed. Mechanism of injury was road traffic accident, fall from height and other accidental injury in 2, 3 and 1 patient respectively. The presentation was respiratory distress and quadriplegia, exposed heart, penetrating injury in neck, dysphagia and dyspnea, and swelling over the chest wall in 1, 1, 1, 2 and 1 cases respectively. Injuries included lung laceration, open chest wall, vascular injury of the neck, tracheoesophageal fistula (2, and chest wall posttraumatic pyomyositis. One patient had a flare of miliary tuberculosis. Immediate management included chest wall repair; neck exploration and repair, esophagostomy, gastroesophageal stapling, and feeding jejunostomy (followed by gastric pull-up 8 months later. Chest tube insertion and total parenteral nutrition was required in one each. 2 and 4 patients required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. The patient with gastric pull-up developed a stricture of the esophagogastric anastomosis that was revised at 26-month follow-up. At follow-up of 40–61 months, five patients are well. One patient with penetrating neck injury suffered from blindness due to massive hemorrhage from the vascular injury in the neck and brain ischemia with only peripheral vision recovery. Conclusion: Successful management of neck and chest wall trauma requires timely appropriate decisions with a team effort.

  13. Penetrating and blunt trauma to the neck: clinical presentation, assessment and emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdonck, P; de Schoutheets, J C; Monsieurs, K G; Van Laer, C; Vander Poorten, V; Vanderveken, O

    Penetrating and blunt trauma to the neck: clinical presentation, assessment ana emergency management. In Belgium, and even in Western Europe, penetrating and blunt injury to the neck is relatively uncommon in both the civilian and military populations. Pre-hospital and emergency assessment and management will therefore always prove challenging, as individual exposure to this specific type of injury remains low. Historically, the neck has been divided into three anatomical zones with specific landmarks to guide the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to penetrating neck injuries. Most penetrating injuries need to be explored surgically, although with the advent of multi-detector computed tomographic angiography (MDCTA), which yields high diagnostic sensitivity, this inflexible approach has recently changed to a more targeted management, based on clinical, radiographic and, if deemed necessary, endoscopic findings. However, some authors have addressed their concern about this novel, 'no-zone' approach, since the risk of missing less apparent aerodigestive tract injuries may increase. It is recommended, therefore, that all patients with penetrating neck injuries be closely observed, irrespective of the initial findings. The incidence of blunt neck injury is much lower, and this makes risk assessment and management even more difficult in comparison with penetrating injuries. Again, MDCTA is most often the first diagnostic tool if a blunt neck injury is suspected, due to its good sensitivity for blunt cerebrovascular injuries (BCVI) as well as for aerodigestive tract injuries. Specific patterns of injury and unexpected neurological and neuro-radiological findings in trauma patients should always warrant further investigation. Despite ongoing debate, systemic anticoagulation is recommended for most BCVI, sometimes combined with endovascular treatment. Aerodigestive tract injuries may present dramatically, but are often more subtle, making the diagnosis more difficult

  14. Pneumoperitoneum in a patient with pneumothorax and blunt neck trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Yaqoob Hakim

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Free air in the abdomen after blunt traumatic neck injury is very rare. If pneumoperitoneum is suspected in the presence of pneumothorax, exploratory laparotomy should be performed to rule out intraabdominal injury. As, there is no consensus for this plan yet, further prospective studies are warrant. Conservative management for pneumoperitoneum in the absence of viscus perforation is still a safe option in carefully selected cases.

  15. Successful outcome of descending necrotizing mediastinitis due to neck trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurowski, K.; Matuszek, I.; Nunez, C. F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Descending necrotizing mediastinitis (DNM) is an uncommon form of mediastinitis that can rapidly progress to septicemia. The optimal surgical approach still remains controversial. In this paper we would like to present a case of descending necrotizing mediastinitis that was treated successfully by means of thoracic drainage through trans-thoracic approach. In our case DNM occurred as a complication of oropharyngeal abscesses and a complication of cervical spine trauma. (authors)

  16. Neck ligament strength is decreased following whiplash trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous clinical studies have documented successful neck pain relief in whiplash patients using nerve block and radiofrequency ablation of facet joint afferents, including capsular ligament nerves. No previous study has documented injuries to the neck ligaments as determined by altered dynamic mechanical properties due to whiplash. The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic mechanical properties of whiplash-exposed human cervical spine ligaments. Additionally, the present data were compared to previously reported control data. The ligaments included the anterior and posterior longitudinal, capsular, and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. Methods A total of 98 bone-ligament-bone specimens (C2–C3 to C7-T1 were prepared from six cervical spines following 3.5, 5, 6.5, and 8 g rear impacts and pre- and post-impact flexibility testing. The specimens were elongated to failure at a peak rate of 725 (SD 95 mm/s. Failure force, elongation, and energy absorbed, as well as stiffness were determined. The mechanical properties were statistically compared among ligaments, and to the control data (significance level: P Results For all whiplash-exposed ligaments, the average failure elongation exceeded the average physiological elongation. The highest average failure force of 204.6 N was observed in the ligamentum flavum, significantly greater than in middle-third disc and interspinous and supraspinous ligaments. The highest average failure elongation of 4.9 mm was observed in the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments, significantly greater than in the anterior longitudinal ligament, middle-third disc, and ligamentum flavum. The average energy absorbed ranged from 0.04 J by the middle-third disc to 0.44 J by the capsular ligament. The ligamentum flavum was the stiffest ligament, while the interspinous and supraspinous ligaments were most flexible. The whiplash

  17. "No zone" approach in penetrating neck trauma reduces unnecessary computed tomography angiography and negative explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibraheem, Kareem; Khan, Muhammad; Rhee, Peter; Azim, Asad; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Joseph, Bellal

    2018-01-01

    The most recent management guidelines advocate computed tomography angiography (CTA) for any suspected vascular or aero-digestive injuries in all zones and give zone II injuries special consideration. We hypothesized that physical examination can safely guide CTA use in a "no zone" approach. An 8-year retrospective analysis of all adult trauma patients with penetrating neck trauma (PNT) was performed. We included all patients in whom the platysma was violated. Patients were classified into three groups as follows: hard signs, soft signs, and asymptomatic. CTA use, positive CTA (contrast extravasation, dissection, or intimal flap) and operative details were reported. Primary outcomes were positive CTA and therapeutic neck exploration (TNE) (defined by repair of major vascular or aero-digestive injuries). A total of 337 patients with PNT met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-two patients had hard signs and all of them went to the operating room, of which 59 (72%) had TNE. One hundred fifty-six patients had soft signs, of which CTA was performed in 121 (78%), with positive findings in 12 (10%) patients. The remaining 35 (22%) underwent initial neck exploration, of which 14 (40%) were therapeutic yielding a high rate of negative exploration. Ninty-nine patients were asymptomatic, of which CTA was performed in 79 (80%), with positive findings in 3 (4%), however, none of these patients required TNE. On sub analysis based on symptoms, there was no difference in the rate of TNE between the neck zones in patients with hard signs (P = 0.23) or soft signs (P = 0.51). Regardless of the zone of injury, asymptomatic patients did not require a TNE. Physical examination regardless of the zone of injury should be the primary guide to CTA or TNE in patients with PNT. Following traditional zone-based guidelines can result in unnecessary negative explorations in patients with soft signs and may need rethinking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Forty hours with a traumatic carotid transection: A diagnostic caveat and review of the contemporary management of penetrating neck trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eugene; Campbell, Ian; Choong, Andrew; Kruger, Allan; Walker, Philip J

    2018-02-20

    Although penetrating neck trauma (PNT) is uncommon, it is associated with the significant morbidity and mortality. The management of PNT has changed significantly over the past 50 years. A radiological assessment now is a vital part of the management with a traditional surgical exploration. A 22 years old male was assaulted by a screwdriver and sustained multiple penetrating neck injuries. A contrast CT scan revealed a focal pseudoaneurysm in the left common carotid artery bulb. There was no active bleeding or any other vascular injuries and the patient remained haemodynamically stable. In view of these findings, he was initially managed conservatively without an open surgical exploration. However, the patient was noted to have an acute drop in his hemoglobin count overnight post injury and the catheter directed angiography showed active bleeding from the pseudoaneurysm. Surgical exploration 40 hours following the initial injury revealed a penetrating injury through both arterial walls of the left carotid bulb which was repaired with a great saphenous vein patch. A percutaneous drain was inserted in the carotid triangle and a course of intravenous antibiotics for five days was commenced. The patient recovered well with no complications and remained asymptomatic at five months followup. Copyright © 2018 Daping Hospital and the Research Institute of Surgery of the Third Military Medical University. All rights reserved.

  19. The Joint Facial and Invasive Neck Trauma (J-FAINT) Project, Iraq and Afghanistan: 2011-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanigan, Alexander; Lindsey, Brentley; Maturo, Stephen; Brennan, Joseph; Laury, Adrienne

    2017-10-01

    Objective Define the number and type of facial and penetrating neck injuries sustained in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2011 to 2016. Compare recent injury trends to prior years of modern conflict. Study Design Case series with chart review. Setting Tertiary care hospital. Methods The Joint Theater Trauma Registry (JTTR) was queried for facial and neck injuries from Iraq and Afghanistan from June 2011 to May 2016. Injury patterns, severity, and patient demographics were analyzed and compared to previously published data from combat operations during January 2003 to May 2011. Results A total of 5312 discrete facial and neck injuries among 922 service members were identified. There were 3842 soft tissue injuries (72.3%) of the head/neck and 1469 (27.7%) facial fractures. Soft tissue injuries of the face/cheek (31.4%) and neck/larynx/trachea (18.8%) were most common. The most common facial fractures were of the orbit (26.3%) and maxilla/zygoma (25.1%). Injuries per month were highest in 2011 to 2012 and steadily declined through 2016. The percentage of nonbattle injuries trended up over time, ranging from 14.7% to 65%. Concurrent facial/neck soft tissue trauma or fracture was associated with an overall mortality rate of 2.44%. Comparison of our data to that previously published revealed no statistical difference in concurrent mortality (3.5%-2.2%, P = .053); an increase in orbital fractures ( P < .005), facial nerve injury ( P < .0005), and ear/tympanic membrane perforations ( P < .0005); and a decrease in mandible fractures ( P < .005). Conclusion Penetrating neck and facial injuries remain common in modern warfare. Assessing injury characteristics and trends supports continued improvements in battlefield protection and identifies areas requiring further intervention.

  20. Feasibility and profitability of a radiology department providing trauma US as part of a trauma alert team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, L W; Simmons, S; Kozar, R; Kinback, R; Hallowell, M J; Mulhern, C

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and profitability of a radiology department providing a six-point trauma ultrasound (US) examination for abdominal or pelvic free fluid as part of a trauma alert team. The study included 191 trauma alerts, which generated 156 US examinations. A radiologist and a departmental technologist carried beepers and responded to level I and II traumas. A departmental secretary or technologist recorded when the responding technologist exited and re-entered the department and if US was performed. If performed, the US examination evaluated the four abdominal and pelvic quadrants and the suprapubic and subxiphoid regions. For 64 patients, the responding technologist recorded the times of the trauma alert, emergency room arrival, US start and finish, and return to the radiology department. Median response, wait, scan duration, and return times were 2, 8, 5, and 7 minutes, respectively. Median costs for the technician, physician, archiving, transcription, and equipment were $8.17, $30.85, $0.97, $4.80, and $41.22, respectively. Reimbursement per examination averaged $110.60. Sensitivity analyses that varied the time spent (median vs mean), US non-use rate (10%-18%), and years of depreciation (5-7 years) yielded net results ranging from a $36.60 profit to a $6.12 loss per examination. A radiology department can profitably respond to trauma alerts and provide a six-point trauma US examination for free fluid.

  1. Are there gender differences in coping with neck pain following acute whiplash trauma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, T B W; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Oernboel, E

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about gender differences in coping after whiplash, and to date possible interaction of gender and coping on recovery has not been investigated. AIMS: To examine if gender differences in coping are associated with long-lasting neck pain after acute whiplash. METHODS...... they completed the Coping Strategies Questionnaire, and after 12months a VAS scale on neck pain intensity. RESULTS: The odds for long-lasting neck pain were more than twice as high for women than for men (OR=2.17 (95% CI: 1.40; 3.37). However, no gender difference in coping and no interaction between gender.......10 (95% CI: 1.05; 1.13) for each point on these scales. CONCLUSIONS: No interaction between coping and gender on neck pain was found, thus different coping strategies 3months post-collision did not explain the different prognosis observed in men and women. Clinically relevant influence...

  2. Educational paper Abusive Head Trauma Part II: Radiological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Boos, Stephen; Spivack, Betty; Bilo, Rob A. C.; van Rijn, Rick R.

    2012-01-01

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a relatively common cause of neurotrauma in young children. Radiology plays an important role in establishing a diagnosis and assessing a prognosis. Computed tomography (CT), followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), is the

  3. Delayed post-traumatic spinal cord infarction in an adult after minor head and neck trauma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartanusz Viktor

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Delayed post-traumatic spinal cord infarction is a devastating complication described in children. In adults, spinal cord ischemia after cardiovascular interventions, scoliosis correction, or profound hypotension has been reported in the literature. However, delayed spinal cord infarction after minor head trauma has not been described yet. Case presentation We report the case of a 45-year-old Hispanic man who had a minor head trauma. He was admitted to our hospital because of paresthesias in his hands and neck pain. A radiological workup showed cervical spinal canal stenosis and chronic cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Twelve hours after admission, our patient became unresponsive and, despite full resuscitation efforts, died. The autopsy revealed spinal cord necrosis involving the entire cervical spinal cord and upper thoracic region. Conclusions This case illustrates the extreme fragility of spinal cord hemodynamics in patients with chronic cervical spinal canal stenosis, in which any further perturbations, such as cervical hyperflexion related to a minor head injury, can have catastrophic consequences. Furthermore, the delayed onset of spinal cord infarction in this case shows that meticulous maintenance of blood pressure in the acute post-traumatic period is of paramount importance, even in patients with minimal post-traumatic symptoms.

  4. [Low grade renal trauma (Part II): diagnostic validity of ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, R; Báca, V; Otcenásek, M; Zátura, F

    2010-04-01

    The aim of the study was to verify whether ultrasonography can be considered a reliable method for the diagnosis of low-grade renal trauma. The group investigated included patients with grade I or grade II blunt renal trauma, as classified by the AAST grading system, in whom ultrasonography alone or in conjunction with computed tomography was used as a primary diagnostic method. B-mode ultrasound with a transabdominal probe working at frequencies of 2.5 to 5.0 MHz was used. Every finding of post-traumatic changes in the renal tissues, i.e., post-contusion hypotonic infiltration of the renal parenchyma or subcapsular haematoma, was included. The results were statistically evaluated by the Chi-square test with the level of significance set at 5%, using Epi Info Version 6 CZ software. The group comprised 112 patients (43 women, 69 men) aged between 17 and 82 years (average, 38 years). It was possible to diagnose grade I or grade II renal injury by ultrasonography in only 60 (54%) of them. The statistical significance of ultrasonography as the only imaging method for the diagnosis of low-grade renal injury was not confirmed (p=0.543) Low-grade renal trauma is a problem from the diagnostic point of view. It usually does not require revision surgery and, if found during repeat surgery for more serious injury of another organ, it usually does not receive attention. Therefore, the macroscopic presentation of grade I and grade II renal injury is poorly understood, nor are their microscopic findings known, because during revision surgery these the traumatised kidneys are not usually removed and their injuries at autopsy on the patients who died of multiple trauma are not recorded either. The results of this study demonstrated that the validity of ultrasonography for the diagnosis of low-grade renal injury is not significant, because this examination can reveal only some of the renal injuries such as perirenal haematoma. An injury to the renal parenchyma is also indicated by

  5. Delayed Stroke following Blunt Neck Trauma: A Case Illustration with Recommendations for Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Anyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI to the carotid artery is a relatively rare injury that is difficult to identify even with imaging. Any symptoms or neurological deficits following blunt neck injury mandate evaluation and consideration of BCVI. In an effort to highlight this issue, we report the case of a 31-year-old male patient who presented with left-sided weakness consistent with transient ischemic attack (TIA and concussion. The patient’s symptoms occurred within 24 hours of a blunt neck injury sustained by a knee strike during a basketball game. An initial computerized tomography (CT scan of the brain was normal; a CT angiogram (CTA of the neck and carotids did not reveal obstruction, dissection, stenosis, or abnormalities of the carotid or vertebral vessels and the patient was subsequently discharged. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain obtained four days after the initial injury demonstrated an acute infarct in the right middle cerebral artery (MCA territory. Thus, despite initial negative imaging, neurological deficits must be aggressively pursued in order to prevent stroke in BCVI cases.

  6. Educational paper: Abusive Head Trauma part I. Clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Boos, Stephen; Spivack, Betty; Bilo, Rob A C; van Rijn, Rick R

    2012-03-01

    Abusive Head Trauma (AHT) refers to the combination of findings formerly described as shaken baby syndrome. Although these findings can be caused by shaking, it has become clear that in many cases there may have been impact trauma as well. Therefore a less specific term has been adopted by the American Academy of Pediatrics. AHT is a relatively common cause of childhood neurotrauma with an estimated incidence of 14-40 cases per 100,000 children under the age of 1 year. About 15-23% of these children die within hours or days after the incident. Studies among AHT survivors demonstrate that approximately one-third of the children are severely disabled, one-third of them are moderately disabled and one-third have no or only mild symptoms. Other publications suggest that neurological problems can occur after a symptom-free interval and that half of these children have IQs below the 10th percentile. Clinical findings are depending on the definitions used, but AHT should be considered in all children with neurological signs and symptoms especially if no or only mild trauma is described. Subdural haematomas are the most reported finding. The only feature that has been identified discriminating AHT from accidental injury is apnoea. AHT should be approached with a structured approach, as in any other (potentially lethal) disease. The clinician can only establish this diagnosis if he/she has knowledge of the signs and symptoms of AHT, risk factors, the differential diagnosis and which additional investigations to perform, the more so since parents seldom will describe the true state of affairs spontaneously.

  7. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    trauma and on most vascular injuries. South Africa is one of the few .... scan of the brain and abdomen showed a sliver of left subdural and subarachnoid .... and especially on RT. In the event of a life-threatening condition, the rapid response ...

  8. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... However, the physical and financial resources to manage this massive burden of disease are inadequate. This is especially the case in terms of access to critical care facilities. The development of an electronic trauma registry at our institution has allowed us to capture data in real time on all patients and.

  9. TRAUMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... unit in Durban, and to correlate it with injury severity, length of hospital stay ... and via a password protected mobile application program within 6 ..... usage and costs performed in larger numbers on major trauma patients will ...

  10. Management of Blunt Trauma to the Spleen (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abbas Banani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSpleen is the most frequent solid organ to be injured in bluntabdominal trauma. Considering its important role in providingimmunity and preventing infection by a variety of mechanisms,every attempt should be made, if possible, to salvagethe traumatized spleen at any age particularly in children. Afterprimary resuscitation, mandatory requirements for nonoperativemanagement include absence of homodynamic instability,lack of associated major organ injury, admission inthe intensive care unit for high-grade splenic injury and in theward for milder types with close monitoring. About two thirdof the patients would respond to non-operative management.In most patients, failure of non-operative measures usuallyoccur within 12 hours of management. Determinant role ofabdominal sonography or computed tomography, and in selectedcases, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, for appropriate decisioncannot be overemphasized. However, the high status ofclinical judgment would not be replaced by any paraclinicalinvestigations. When operation is unavoidable, if possible,spleen saving procedures (splenorrhaphy or partial splenectomyshould be tried. In case of total splenectomy, autotransplantation,preferably in the omental pouch, may lead toreturn of immunity, at least partially, to prevent or reduce thechance of subsequent infection. Although total splenectomywith autograft is immunologically superior to total splenectomy-only procedure, these patients should also be protectedby vaccination and daily antibiotic for certain period of time.The essential steps for prevention of overwhelming infectionafter total splenectomy are not only immunization and administrationof daily antibiotic (up to 5 years of age or one year inolder children, but include education and information aboutthis dangerous complication. When non-operative managementis successful, the duration of activity restriction (inweeks is almost equal to the grade of splenic injury plus 2.Iran J Med Sci 2010

  11. Improved clinicopathologic assessments of acute liver damage due to trauma in Indian ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Susan M; Holthaus, Lisa; Barron, Heather Wilson; Divers, Stephen J; McBride, Michael; Almy, Frederic; Bush, Sharon; Latimer, Kenneth S

    2012-06-01

    Increased activities of certain biochemical enzymes (alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], lactate dehydrogenase [LDH], alkaline phosphatase [ALP]) have been associated with blunt liver injury in many species. To evaluate changes in plasma hepatic biochemical parameters in acute avian liver disease caused by trauma and to compare biochemical changes with histologic lesions in hepatic parenchyma, 30 healthy fasted Indian ring-necked parakeets (Psittacula krameri manillensis) were divided into 2 groups, and traumatic liver injury was caused by endoscopic liver biopsy (group 1) or by liver biopsy and crushing injury to the hepatic parenchyma with endoscopic forceps (group 2) in anesthetized birds. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, and 120 hours in alternate groups to compare analyte values after injury with those at baseline. Results showed consistently decreased plasma ALP activity (excluding 1 time point) throughout the study, which was thought to be associated with isoflurane administration. Plasma glutamate dehydrogenase activity initially increased but rapidly declined thereafter and was attributed to acute focal hepatocellular injury. In both groups, increases in plasma AST, ALT, and LDH activities was most likely caused by muscle injury because creatine kinase activity was concurrently increased. Compared with baseline values, bile acid concentration and y-glutamyl transferase activity were not affected by liver biopsy or crush injury. Plasma sorbitol dehydrogenase activity was the most specific indicator of liver injury in both groups. Histologic changes correlated poorly with biochemical results, possibly because the small area of hepatic parenchyma that was damaged did not affect enzyme values substantially.

  12. Sonography, CT and MR in soft part growths in the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, G.; Brix, F.; Beigel, A.

    1990-01-01

    14 patients with a space-occupying growth in the head and neck region were examined via sonography, CT and MR to explore and demonstrate by means of a prospective comparative study the possibilities offered by these three imaging methods. Stages are best diagnosed by means of sonography; the leading role of this method is undisputed. To clarify sonographically unclear findings and especially in pre-surgery planning, MR offers advantages over CT on account of the high soft-part contrast and multiplanar visualisation. However, it is impossible or very difficult to differentiate abscesses and lymphadenitides from malignant growths with these three methods solely on the basis of image-morphological criteria. (orig.) [de

  13. [The forensic medical assessment of the results of a study of laryngeal injuries in blunt trauma to the neck].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetlakov, A V; Korenev, S A; Akishin, A N

    1997-01-01

    Presents the methodological principles and succession of examination of the basic formations of the larynx in cases with blunt injuries of the neck. Describes variants of anatomic structure of the sublingual bone and laryngeal cartilages influencing the morphology of injuries thereof. Offers differential diagnostic criteria of various mechanisms of fractures of the basic formations and recommendations on medical criminological assessment of laryngeal injuries.

  14. Women’s journey of recovery from sexual assault trauma : a grounded theory - Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Duma

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to explore and analyse the journey of recovery which is undertaken by women who have been sexually assaulted, with the aim of discovering the grounded theory of recovery from sexual assault within the first six months following the event of rape. The main research question was: ‘What is the journey o f recovery that is undertaken by women within the first six months following sexual assault?’ Another question that developed during data collection and data analysis was ‘What is the meaning that women attach to recovery?’ The findings are discussed under the eight concepts or categories and the context and the intervening conditions that influence the journey of recovery from sexual assault trauma. Refer to part 1 article. These are complemented with abstracts of data from the participants’ voices and the related discussions. The developed theory highlights the process and the interconnectedness of the different stages of what the women experience in their journey of recovery from sexual assault trauma.

  15. Poetic devices as part of the trauma narrative in Country of My Skull ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article investigates the role of poetic devices in a trauma narrative like Country of My Skull. The nature and characteristics of a trauma narrative are described with reference to Country of My Skull and Antjie Krog's style as poet and journalist. The theory and role of figurative language in trauma narratives suggest an ...

  16. Subjective safety and self-confidence in prehospital trauma care and learning progress after trauma-courses: part of the prospective longitudinal mixed-methods EPPTC-trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häske, David; Beckers, Stefan K; Hofmann, Marzellus; Lefering, Rolf; Grützner, Paul A; Stöckle, Ulrich; Papathanassiou, Vassilios; Münzberg, Matthias

    2017-08-14

    Prehospital trauma care is stressful and requires multi-professional teamwork. A decrease in the number of accident victims ultimately affects the routine and skills and underlines the importance of effective training. Standardized courses, like PHTLS, are established for health care professionals to improve the prehospital care of trauma patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the subjective safety in prehospital trauma care and learning progress by paramedics in a longitudinal analysis. This was a prospective intervention trial and part of the mixed-method longitudinal EPPTC-trial, evaluating subjective and objective changes among participants and real patient care as a result of PHTLS courses. Participants were evaluated with pre/post questionnaires as well as one year after the course. We included 236 datasets. In the pre/post comparison, an increased performance could be observed in nearly all cases. The result shows that the expectations of the participants of the course were fully met even after one year (p = 0.002). The subjective safety in trauma care is significantly better even one year after the course (p < 0.001). Regression analysis showed that (ABCDE)-structure is decisive (p = 0.036) as well as safety in rare and common skills (both p < 0.001). Most skills are also rated better after one year. Knowledge and specific safety are assessed as worse after one year. The courses meet the expectations of the participants and increase the subjective safety in the prehospital care of trauma patients. ABCDE-structure and safety in skills are crucial. In the short term, both safety in skills and knowledge can be increased, but the courses do not have the power to maintain knowledge and specific subjective safety issues over a year. German Clinical Trials Register, ID DRKS00004713 , registered 14. February 2014.

  17. Airway Management in a Patient With Tracheal Disruption due to Penetrating Neck Trauma With Hollow Point Ammunition: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela M; Hill, James L; Zagorski, Dave J; McClain, Joseph M; Maronian, Nicole C

    2018-05-01

    Rapid sequence induction and intubation was performed for a patient in respiratory distress after a gunshot wound to the neck. Resistance was noted distal to vocal cords. With a bronchoscope unavailable, the endotracheal tube was advanced with a corkscrew maneuver. Subcutaneous emphysema had developed. The endotracheal tube was advanced into the right mainstem with adequate ventilation. Imaging illustrated tracheoesophageal injury. The patient was emergently explored. An intraluminal bullet was removed, lateral wall tracheal defect was repaired, and a tracheostomy was placed. The intubating provider should secure the airway by the method they are most comfortable, have high suspicion of airway injury, and prepare to manage airway disruption.

  18. Nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: a clinical approach. Part 1: cervicofacial swelling, dysphagia, and dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea Álvarez, B; Tuñón Gómez, M; Esteban García, L; García Hidalgo, C Y; Ruiz Peralbo, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck represent a challenge in the field of neuroradiology for two reasons: first, they affect an area where the thorax joins the cranial cavity and can thus compromise both structures; second, they are uncommon, so they are not well known. Various publications focus on nontraumatic emergencies of the head and neck from the viewpoints of anatomic location or of particular diseases. However, these are not the most helpful viewpoints for dealing with patients in the emergency department, who present with particular signs and symptoms. We propose an analysis starting from the four most common clinical presentations of patients who come to the emergency department for nontraumatic head and neck emergencies: cervical swelling, dysphagia, dyspnea, and loss of vision. Starting from these entities, we develop an approach to the radiologic management and diagnosis of these patients. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacological Interventions Including Medical Injections for Neck Pain: An Overview as Part of the ICON§ Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Paul M; Khan, Mahweesh; Gross, Anita R; Carlesso, Lisa; Santaguida, Lina; Lowcock, Janet; MacDermid, Joy C; Walton, Dave; Goldsmith, Charlie H; Langevin, Pierre; Shi, Qiyun

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview (review-of-reviews) on pharmacological interventions for neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched from 2006 to 2012. Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCT) in adults with acute to chronic neck pain reporting effects of pharmacological interventions including injections on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality of life and patient satisfaction. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias and extracted data The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel provided critical review. Main Results: We found 26 reviews reporting on 47 RCTs. Most pharmacological interventions had low to very low quality methodologic evidence with three exceptions. For chronic neck pain, there was evidence of: a small immediate benefit for eperison hydrochloride (moderate GRADE, 1 trial, 157 participants);no short-term pain relieving benefit for botulinum toxin-A compared to saline (strong GRADE; 5 trial meta-analysis, 258 participants) nor for subacute/chronic whiplash (moderate GRADE; 4 trial meta-analysis, 183 participants) including reduced pain, disability or global perceived effect; andno long-term benefit for medial branch block of facet joints with steroids (moderate GRADE; 1 trial, 120 participants) over placebo to reduce pain or disability; Reviewers' Conclusions: While in general there is a lack of evidence for most pharmacological interventions, current evidence is against botulinum toxin-A for chronic neck pain or subacute/chronic whiplash; against medial branch block with steroids for chronic facet joint pain; but in favour of the muscle relaxant eperison hydrochloride for chronic neck pain. PMID:24155805

  20. Modern molecular biomarkers of head and neck cancer. Part I. Epigenetic diagnostics and prognostics: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juodzbalys, Gintaras; Kasradze, David; Cicciù, Marco; Sudeikis, Aurimas; Banys, Laurynas; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Guobis, Zygimantas

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of the head and neck cancer cases are diagnosed in late stages. Traditional screening modalities have many disadvantages. The aim of the present article was to review the scientific literature about novel head and neck cancer diagnostics - epigenetic biomarkers. A comprehensive review of the current literature was conducted according to the PRISMA guidelines by accessing the NCBI PubMed database. Authors conducted the search of articles in English language published from 2004 to 2015. A total of thirty three relevant studies were included in the review. Fifteen of them concerned DNA methylation alterations, nine evaluation of abundancies in histone expressions and nine miRNA expression changes in HNC. Considerable number of epigenetic biomarkers have been identified in both tumor tissue and salivary samples. Genes with best diagnostic effectiveness rates and further studying prospects were: TIMP3, DCC, DAPK, CDH1, CCNA1, AIM1, MGMT, HIC1, PAX1, PAX5, ZIC4, p16, EDNRB, KIF1A, MINT31, CD44, RARβ , ECAD. Individual histone and miRNA alterations tend to be hnc specific. Prognostic values of separate biomarkers are ambiguous. No established standards for molecular assay of head and neck cancer was found in order to elude the paradoxical results and discrepancies in separate trials.

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  2. Multidisciplinary management of head and neck cancer: First expert consensus using Delphi methodology from the Spanish Society for Head and Neck Cancer (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mañós, M; Giralt, J; Rueda, A; Cabrera, J; Martinez-Trufero, J; Marruecos, J; Lopez-Pousa, A; Rodrigo, J P; Castelo, B; Martínez-Galán, J; Arias, F; Chaves, M; Herranz, J J; Arrazubi, V; Baste, N; Castro, A; Mesía, R

    2017-07-01

    Head and neck cancer is one of the most frequent malignances worldwide. Despite the site-specific multimodality therapy, up to half of the patients will develop recurrence. Treatment selection based on a multidisciplinary tumor board represents the cornerstone of head and neck cancer, as it is essential for achieving the best results, not only in terms of outcome, but also in terms of organ-function preservation and quality of life. Evidence-based international and national clinical practice guidelines for head and neck cancer not always provide answers in terms of decision-making that specialists must deal with in their daily practice. This is the first Expert Consensus on the Multidisciplinary Approach for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC) elaborated by the Spanish Society for Head and Neck Cancer and based on a Delphi methodology. It offers several specific recommendations based on the available evidence and the expertise of our specialists to facilitate decision-making of all health-care specialists involved. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The management of neglected trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    more patients could be treated in the peripheral hospitals. .... most of the inovement from Perkins exercises will occur at the fracture site .... neglected femoral neck fracture in the elderly. ... The best treatment of neglected trauma is prevention.

  4. Soft tissue hematoma of the neck due to thyroid rupture with unusual mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Tsukahara

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although hemorrhage from the thyroid gland without blunt trauma is rare, emergency physicians should regard possible thyroid gland rupture in patients with swelling of the neck or acute respiratory failure after direct/indirect trauma to the neck. Observation or operative management for limited or expanding hematoma are appropriately based on fundamental neck trauma principles.

  5. CT Imaging of facial trauma. The role of different types of reconstruction. Part II - soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myga-Porosilo, J.; Sraga, W.; Borowiak, H.; Jackowska, Z.; Kluczewska, E.; Skrzelewski, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Injury to facial soft tissues as a complication of skeleton fractures is an important problem among patients with facial trauma. The aim of this work was to assess the value of multiplanar and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using multi-detector row technology in spiral data acquisition in patients with facial injuries of soft tissue. Material/Methods: Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with injury to the facial skeleton underwent a CT scan with the use of GE Hispeed Qx/i scanner. For each patient: a two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and 3D volume rendering (VR) were conducted. Post-injury lesions of soft tissues were assessed. During the assessment of the post-injury lesions of soft tissues, the following features were evaluated: Extra ocular muscle and fat tissue herniation through fractures in the medial and inferior orbital walls. Fluid in the sinuses and in the nasal cavity. Subcutaneous tissue emphysema. Results: For subcutaneous emphysema and sinus fluid imaging, both the axial and the 2D image reconstruction proved comparably effective. However, 2D reconstructions were superior to transverse plane images with regard to herniations into fractures of the inferior orbital wall. 3D reconstruction has no importance in diagnosing soft tissue injuries. Conclusions: Multiplanar CT reconstructions increase the effectiveness of imaging of orbital tissue herniations, especially in case of fractures in the inferior orbital wall. In suspected soft tissue herniations, as well as prior to surgical treatment, spiral CT with 2D multiplanar reconstructions should be the method of choice. (authors)

  6. Epidemiology of work related neck and upper limb problems: Psychosocial and personal risk factors (Part I) and effective interventions from a bio behavioural perspective (Part II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, P.M.; IJmker, S.; Heuvel, S. van den; Blatter, B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Work related neck and upper limb symptoms have a multi-factorial origin. Possible risk factors are of a physical, psychosocial or personal origin. These factors can reinforce each other and their influence can also be mediated by cultural or societal factors. Initially, most research on neck and

  7. Results of triple muscle (sartorius, tensor fascia latae and part of gluteus medius pedicle bone grafting in neglected femoral neck fracture in physiologically active patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Femoral neck fractures are notorious for complications like avascular necrosis and nonunion. In developing countries, various factors such as illiteracy, low socioeconomic status, ignorance are responsible for the delay in surgery. Neglected fracture neck femur always poses a formidable challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of triple muscle pedicle bone grafting using sartorius, tensor fasciae latae and part of gluteus medius in neglected femoral neck fracture. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study with medical record of 50 patients, who were operated by open reduction, internal fixation along with muscle pedicle bone grafting by the anterior approach. After open reduction, two to three cancellous screws (6.5 mm were used for internal fixation in all cases. A bony chunk of the whole anterior superior iliac spine of 1 cm thickness, 1 cm width and 4.5 cm length, taken from the iliac crest comprised of muscle pedicle of sartorius, tensor fascia latae and part of gluteus medius. Then the graft with all three muscles mobilized and put in the trough made over the anterior or anterosuperior aspect of the femoral head. The graft was fixed with one or two 4.5 mm self-tapping cortical screw in anterior to posterior direction. Results: 14 patients were lost to followup. The results were based on 36 patients. We observed that in our series, there was union in 34, out of 36 (94.4% patients. All patients were within the age group of 15-51 years (average 38 years with displaced neglected femoral neck fracture of ≥30 days. Mean time taken for full clinicoradiological union was 14 weeks (range-10-24 weeks. Conclusion: Triple muscle pedicle bone grafting gives satisfactory results for neglected femoral neck fracture in physiologically active patients.

  8. Does applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduce cervical spine radiography rates in alert patients with blunt trauma to the neck? A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesupalan Rajam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cautious outlook towards neck injuries has been the norm to avoid missing cervical spine injuries. Consequently there has been an increased use of cervical spine radiography. The Canadian Cervical Spine rule was proposed to reduce unnecessary use of cervical spine radiography in alert and stable patients. Our aim was to see whether applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule reduced the need for cervical spine radiography without missing significant cervical spine injuries. Methods This was a retrospective study conducted in 2 hospitals. 114 alert and stable patients who had cervical spine radiographs for suspected neck injuries were included in the study. Data on patient demographics, high risk & low risk factors as per the Canadian Cervical Spine rule and cervical spine radiography results were collected and analysed. Results 28 patients were included in the high risk category according to the Canadian Cervical Spine rule. 86 patients fell into the low risk category. If the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied, there would have been a significant reduction in cervical spine radiographs as 86/114 patients (75.4% would not have needed cervical spine radiograph. 2/114 patients who had significant cervical spine injuries would have been identified when the Canadian Cervical Spine rule was applied. Conclusion Applying the Canadian Cervical Spine rule for neck injuries in alert and stable patients would have reduced the use of cervical spine radiographs without missing out significant cervical spine injuries. This relates to reduction in radiation exposure to patients and health care costs.

  9. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis, hypo-salivation and xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.), are often debilitating. These effects tend to be underestimated and insufficiently addressed in the medical community. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on clinical definitions and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for developing the consensus, and external experts evaluated the conclusions. This paper contains 10 clusters of statements about the clinical definitions and management of head and neck cancer treatment sequels (dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses) that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecroses (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasonography in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) protocol is considered beneficial in emergent evaluation of trauma patients with blunt or penetrating injury and has become integrated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocol. No guidelines exist as to the use...... of ultrasonography in trauma in Denmark. We aimed to determine the current use of ultrasonography for assessing trauma patients in Denmark. METHODS: We conducted a nation-wide cross-sectional investigation of ultrasonography usage in trauma care. The first phase consisted of an Internet-based investigation....... Twenty-one (95.5%) of the guidelines included and recommended FAST as part of trauma assessment. The recommended person to perform the examination was the radiologist in n = 11 (50.0%), the surgeon in n = 6 (27.3%), the anesthesiologist in n = 1 (4.5%), and unspecified in n = 3 (13.6%) facilities. FAST...

  11. Biogeometry of femoral neck for implant placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwa J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Treatment of fracture neck femur with three cannulated cancellous screws in an apex proximal configuration is practised in many parts of the world. Methods : Dimensions of femoral neck at the middle of transcervical neck using CT scan (live neck and vernier caliper (dry cadeveric neck in 20 subjects respectively were measured. Results : Inferior half of the neck is narrower than superior half. Conclusion : Biogeometry of the neck of femur does not accomodate two inferior screws and thus fixation of fracture neck femur with three canulated cancellous screws in an apex distal configuration is recommended.

  12. Study of relation between Neck Shaft Angle (NSA and mineral density of the femoral head among old post menopausal women in east part of mazandaran province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Malekzadeh Shafaroudi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diversity in Proximal Femur Geometric Parameters (PFGPs will be led to frequency changes in hip fractures. The purpose of the present study is to investigate of the relation between Bone Mineral Density (BMD in proximal femur with Neck Shaft Angle (NSA in both of osteoporotic and normal groups among old postmenopausal women in eastern part of Mazandaran province as a appropriate indicator to predict hip fractures occurance. Materials and Methods: Among 5103 postmenopausal women reffered to bone densitometry center, for 221 postmenopausal women who had inclusion criteria to this study, simultaneously by using densitometry system and completing a standard questionnaire, history of disease and demographic information including body mass index (BMI were recorded for each patient. Obtained information from densitometers was analyzed by the statistical software SPSS version 16 and Pearson correlation coefficient test was used. Results: Geometric parameters of 221 post-menopausal women aged 50 to 60 were analyzed. The mean of neck shaft angle (NSA were recorded for osteoporotic group 121.55 and for control group 121.44. Pearson correlation coefficient t-test results showed a negative significant correlation between mineral density in the femoral neck in osteoporotic group and NSA (P<0.05. Considering the effect of weight and BMI in strength and bone density in the femoral neck, the mean of BMI and weight in osteoporotic group was lower compared to control group. Conclusion: according to the findings of this study, NSA is effective in predicting of the proximal femur BMD in osteoporotic group.

  13. Management of radiation therapy-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients. Part II: supportive treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cheong Ngeow

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal mucositis is the acute inflammatory and ulcerative reaction of the oral mucosa following radiation therapy to the head and neck region. It is such a common problem that nearly all head and neck cancer patients develop some degree of mucositis. This complication is usually transient in nature but it also represents an important clinical problem as it is a painful, debilitating, dose-dependent side effect for which there is no widely acceptable prophylaxis or effective treatment. As several authoritative groups have recently either undertaken systematic reviews or issued guidelines on the management of mucositis, it is the aim of this review instead, to provide an overview of all the remedies and pharmaceutical agents available, as well as highlighting to researchers the gaps that need to be filled.

  14. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Xerostomia and trismus (Part 2). Literature review and consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Bossi, Paolo; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Berruti, Alfredo; Trippa, Fabio; Nicolai, Pietro; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M

    2016-06-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is a well-known radical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Nevertheless acute side effects (such as moist desquamation, skin erythema, loss of taste, mucositis etc.) and in particular late toxicities (osteoradionecrosis, xerostomia, trismus, radiation caries etc.) are often debilitating and underestimated. A multidisciplinary group of head and neck cancer specialists from Italy met in Milan with the aim of reaching a consensus on a clinical definition and management of these toxicities. The Delphi Appropriateness method was used for this consensus and external experts evaluated the conclusions. The paper contains 20 clusters of statements about the clinical definition and management of stomatological issues that reached consensus, and offers a review of the literature about these topics. The review was split into two parts: the first part dealt with dental pathologies and osteo-radionecrosis (10 clusters of statements), whereas this second part deals with trismus and xerostomia (10 clusters of statements). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... too many hours hunched over your computer or smartphone, often triggers muscle strains. Even minor things, such ... your shoulder. The weight can strain your neck. Sleep in a good position. Your head and neck ...

  16. Griffon Helicopter Neck Strain Project: Part 1: Mission Function Task Analysis and Physical Demands Analysis Report. Part 2: Physical Demands Analysis Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    characterized by the sudden onset of high acceleration forces, impact , extreme neck angles or a combination thereof. Numerous investigations on helmet and...Regular IFR 2-Full Check FE Take-off to Hover Regular Transit Contour 2-Full Check NFP Pilot Post-Take off Checks Transit NOE SAR Check Taxi to Hold...Area Transit with Slung Load Plan ISR Land at Hold Area Race Track or Circular Conduct ISR Profile Obtain IFR Clearance Loiter Figure 8 Plan

  17. Gas tonometry for evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion: experimental models of trauma, shock and complex surgical maneuvers - Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo Luiz Francisco Poli de

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Substantial clinical and animal evidences indicate that the mesenteric circulatory bed, particularly the gut mucosa, is highly vulnerable to reductions in oxygen supply and prone to early injury in the course of hemodynamic changes induced by trauma, shock, sepsis and several complex surgical maneuvers. Gut hypoxia or ischemia is one possible contributing factor to gastrointestinal tract barrier dysfunction that may be associated with the development of systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, a common cause of death after trauma, sepsis or major surgeries. Monitoring gut perfusion during experiments may provide valuable insights over new interventions and therapies highly needed to reduce trauma and sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. We present our experience with gas tonometry as a monitor of the adequacy of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion in clinical and experimental models of trauma, shock and surgical maneuvers associated with abrupt hemodynamic changes, such as aortic occlusion and hepatic vascular exclusion. Next issue we will be presenting our experience with gas tonometry in experimental and clinical sepsis.

  18. Head and neck position sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  19. Radiology in chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, W.; Kloehn, I.; Wolfart, W.; Freiburg Univ.

    1979-01-01

    In chest trauma, a routine chest film, preferably in the lateral as well as the frontal projection, is the basic part of the work-up. Occasionally valuable additional methods are fluoroscopy, tomography, bronchography, contrast studies of the GI Tract and angiography and angiocardiography. In 679 chest trauma patients, traffic accidents and falls were the main reason for the trauma. There were 248 fractures; then - in order of frequency - hemopneumothorax (76), lung contusion (58), subcutaneous emphysema (33) cardiac (16) and vascular trauma (12) and damage to other organs. While 20-30% mistakes are made in diagnosing rib fractures in acute trauma, there is high accuracy in the diagnosis of the other injuries. Many cases are shown to demonstrate the value of diagnostic radiology. (orig.) [de

  20. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F. [Department of Radiology, Division of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland); Mentha, G. [Department of Surgery, Division of Abdominal Surgery, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1998-05-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.) With 11 figs., 5 tabs., 64 refs.

  1. Blunt abdominal trauma in adults: role of CT in the diagnosis and management of visceral injuries. Part 1. Liver and spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, C.D.; Terrier, F.; Mentha, G.

    1998-01-01

    Computed tomography is now widely used in the initial diagnostic workup of adult trauma victims with suspected intra-abdominal injuries. We review the role of CT in the detection and management of blunt visceral injuries in two parts. In the first part we discuss general aspects of performing CT in the setting of abdominal trauma and the diagnostic findings of intra-abdominal hemorrhage and blunt hepatic and splenic injuries. Hepatic and splenic injuries can be detected by means of CT with a high accuracy. The vast majority of hepatic injuries can be successfully managed conservatively, even when CT demonstrates parenchymal damage of more than three segments and major hemoperitoneum. Delayed complications, e. g., formation of biloma or a false aneurysm, can be readily detected on repeat CT studies, although they are quite uncommon. The outcome of conservative treatment of splenic injuries remains unpredictable because delayed splenic rupture may occur even when initial CT shows only minor parenchymal lesions and little or no intraperitoneal hemorrhage. (orig.)

  2. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of recategorized Neer classification in differentiating 2-part surgical neck fractures from multi-fragmented proximal humeral fractures in 116 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumrein, Bakir O; Mattila, Ville M; Lepola, Vesa

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Optimal fracture classification should be simple and reproducible and should guide treatment. For proximal humeral fractures, the Neer classification is commonly used. However, intraobserver and interobserver reliability of the Neer classification has been shown to be poor. In clinical...... for interobserver reliability showed substantial correlation (0.61-0.73) and was as follows: 0.73 for radiographs alone, 0.61 for CT scans alone, and 0.72 for radiographs and CT scans viewed together. After 24 weeks, the process was repeated and intraobserver reliability was calculated.The κ coefficient...... for intraobserver reliability showed substantial correlation (0.62-0.75) and was as follows: 0.62 for radiographs alone, 0.64 for CT scans alone, and 0.75 for radiographs and CT scans viewed together. CONCLUSION: Clinicians were able to differentiate 2-part surgical neck fractures from multi-fragmented fractures...

  3. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    interest in developing an appropriate and sustainable trauma system in South ... trauma evolved with the social instability which accompanied political change in the ... increased use of military style assault weapons resulted in severe injuries ...

  4. A comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, Part II: glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory, and hypoglossal nerves and cervical spinal nerves 1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Chern, Joshua J; Rizk, Elias B; Loukas, Marios; Miller, Joseph H; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate on the skull base and upper neck regions in order to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections between the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized into two parts. Part I discusses the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches and other nerve trunks or branches in the vicinity. Part II deals with the anastomoses between the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or between these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part II is presented in this article. Extensive and variable neural anastomoses exist between the lower cranial nerves and between the upper cervical nerves in such a way that these nerves with their extra-axial communications can be collectively considered a plexus. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Neck Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vomiting Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children Neck Pain Neck Swelling Shortness of Breath Shortness of Breath ... worse or doesn’t get better. Start OverDiagnosisYour pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  6. How to Choose between the Implant Materials Steel and Titanium in Orthopedic Trauma Surgery: Part 2 - Biological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perren, S M; Regazzoni, P; Fernandez, A A

    2017-01-01

    BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF STEEL AND TITANIUM AS IMPLANT MATERIAL IN ORTHOPEDIC TRAUMA SURGERY The following case from the ICUC database, where a titanium plate was implanted into a flourishing infection, represents the clinical experience leading to preferring titanium over steel. (Fig. 1) (6). Current opinions regarding biological aspects of implant function. The "street" opinions regarding the biological aspects of the use of steel versus titanium as a surgical trauma implant material differ widely. Statements of opinion leaders range from "I do not see any difference in the biological behavior between steel and titanium in clinical application" to "I successfully use titanium implants in infected areas in a situation where steel would act as foreign body "sustaining" infection." Furthermore, some comments imply that clinical proof for the superiority of titanium in human application is lacking. The following tries to clarify the issues addressing the different aspects more through a practical clinical approach than a purely scientific one, this includes simplifications. Today's overall biocompatibility of implant materials is acceptable but: As the vast majority of secondary surgeries are elective procedures this allows the selection of implant materials with optimal infection resistance. The different biological reactions of stainless steel and titanium are important for this segment of clinical pathologies. Biological tole - rance (18) depends on the toxicity and on the amount of soluble implant material released. Release, diffusion and washout through blood circulation determine the local concentration of the corrosion products. Alloying components of steel, especially nickel and chromium, are less than optimal in respect to tissue tolerance and allergenicity. Titanium as a pure metal provides excellent biological tolerance (3, 4, 16). Better strength was obtained by titanium alloys like TiAl6V4. The latter found limited application as surgical implants. It

  7. [Trauma and psychosis--part 1. On the association of early childhood maltreatment in clinical populations with psychotic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive literature stresses a high percentage of severe childhood maltreatment in the history of many psychotically ill patients treated in mental health services. Early childhood abuse seems to be associated among other things with a more severe clinical state, a more chronic course of illness and a more unfavourable psychosocial adaptation. In order not to jump to unwarranted causal conclusions, several conceptual und methodological problems have to be clarified before. From a conceptual perspective psychotic disorders diagnosed according to conventional criteria define only a minor subgroup within a much broader psychosis continuum in general population. Early childhood abuse has to be differentiated according to type, severity, timing, and context. The rates of early childhood abuse are high in general population. The methods of measurement of psychotic symptoms on the one side, of early trauma on the other side have to be critically evaluated. There is an empirically well founded association of childhood maltreatment and psychological and psychosomatic morbidity during adult years in general. In order to establish a potential conditional link also to psychotic disorders, clinical populations have to be compared to adequate control groups at least. A systematic literature search shows a very small number of studies including control groups at all. These studies underline that early childhood abuse may be significantly associated to the risk of psychosis indeed. The conditional role of early childhood abuse, however, has to be investigated only within a multifactorial biopsychosocial model of psychotic illness.

  8. Neck pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause of neck pain is muscle strain or tension. Most often, everyday activities are to blame. Such ... of a heart attack , such as shortness of breath, sweating, nausea, vomiting, or arm or jaw pain. ...

  9. Bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture in a renal disease patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous bilateral femoral neck facture in a renal disease patient is not common. We report a case of 47-year-old female patient with chronic renal failure and on regular hemodialysis for the past 5 years who sustained bilateral impacted femoral neck fracture without history of trauma and injury and refused any surgical ...

  10. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved and dosimetric parameters may lead to the management of a broader range of complications associated with HNC treatment. This could enhance patient adherence to cancer therapy, and improve quality of life and treatment outcomes. The mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations for PBM have been reviewed in part 1. Part 2 discusses the head and neck treatment side effects for which PBM may prove to be effective. In addition, PBM parameters for each of these complications are suggested and future research directions are discussed. Methods Narrative review and presentation of PBM parameters are based on current evidence and expert opinion. Results PBM may have potential applications in the management of a broad range of side effects of (chemo)radiation therapy (CRT) in patients being treated for HNC. For OM management, optimal PBM parameters identified were as follows: wavelength, typically between 633 and 685 nm or 780–830 nm; energy density, laser or light-emitting diode (LED) output between 10 and 150 mW; dose, 2–3 J (J/cm2), and no more than 6 J/cm2 on the tissue surface treated; treatment schedule, two to three times a week up to daily; emission type, pulsed (<100 Hz); and route of delivery, intraorally and/or transcutaneously. To facilitate further studies, we propose potentially effective PBM parameters for prophylactic and therapeutic use in supportive care for dermatitis, dysphagia, dry mouth, dysgeusia, trismus, necrosis, lymphedema, and voice/speech alterations. Conclusion PBM may have a role in supportive care for a broad range of complications associated with the treatment of HNC with CRT

  11. Unrecognized blunt tracheal trauma with massive pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Shetty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt neck trauma with an associated laryngotracheal injury is rare. We report a patient with blunt neck trauma who came to the emergency room and was sent to ward without realizing the seriousness of the situation. He presented later with respiratory distress and an anesthesiologist was called in for emergency airway management. Airway management in such a situation is described in this report.

  12. Facial trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxillofacial injury; Midface trauma; Facial injury; LeFort injuries ... Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  13. The Patient Concerns Inventory integrated as part of routine head and neck cancer follow-up consultations: frequency, case-mix, and items initiated by the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, S N; Thomson, F; Lowe, D

    2018-03-01

    Introduction The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance Improving Supportive and Palliative Care for Adults with Cancer (2004) and the Cancer Reform Strategy (2007) support the premise that assessment and discussion of patients' needs for physical, social, psychological, and spiritual wellbeing should be undertaken during oncology follow-up. We report the use of the Patient Concerns Inventory in a routine head and neck cancer clinic setting over a seven-year period, summarising the number of available clinics, the number of patients completing the inventory within a clinic, the range of clinical characteristics and the concerns they wanted to discuss. Methods The data were analysed from oncology follow-up clinics between 1 August 2007 and 10 December 2014. Audit approval was given by the Clinical Audit Department, University Hospital Aintree. Results There were 386 patients with 1198 inventories completed at 220 clinics, median 6 (range 4-7) per clinic. The most common concerns raised by patients across all the clinic consultations were dry mouth (34%), fear of recurrence (33%), sore mouth (26%), dental health (25%), chewing (22%) and fatigue/tiredness (21%). Conclusions The incorporation of the Patient Concerns Inventory as part of routine oncology clinics allows for a more patient initiated and focused consultation available to the majority of patients throughout their follow-up. The inventory allows for greater opportunity to provide holistic targeted multiprofessional intervention and support.

  14. The role of the trauma nurse leader in a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, Lee Ann; Coffey, Carla; Haley, Kathy; Covert, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The trauma nurse leader role was developed by a group of trauma surgeons, hospital administrators, and emergency department and trauma leaders at Nationwide Children's Hospital who recognized the need for the development of a core group of nurses who provided expert trauma care. The intent was to provide an experienced group of nurses who could identify and resolve issues in the trauma room. Through increased education, exposure, mentoring, and professional development, the trauma nurse leader role has become an essential part of the specialized pediatric trauma care provided at Nationwide Children's Hospital.

  15. Skeleton scintigraphy in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal trauma is common and presents both an opportunity and a problem in skeletal scintigraphy. The opportunity arises in the ability of skeletal scintigraphy to demonstrate abnormalities early after direct trauma. It is well recognized that the early detection of fractures in some sites cannot be reliably achieved by standard radiography, especially in the femoral neck and scaphoid bone. The problem comes in recognizing the effects of skeletal trauma when using skeletal scintigraphy for another purpose, such as the detection of metastatic disease. iatrogenic trauma to either the skeleton or soft tissues may be manifest scintigraphic ally. For example Craniotomy typically leaves a rim pattern at the surgical margin. Rib Retraction during thoracotomy can elicit periosteal reaction. Areas of the skeletal receiving curative levels of ionizing radiation (typically 4000 rads or greater) characteristically demonstrate decreased uptake within 6 months to 1 year after therapy. The generally high sensitivity of the skeletal scintigraphy seems to make it an ideal survey test in cases of suspected child abuse especially in which radiographs are unrevealing. Because of difficulties in obtaining a history of trauma from a preschool child or even eliciting a satisfactory description of the location and nature of the pain, skeletal scintigraphy provides a simple and reliable investigation in these children. Subtle trauma, such as that from stress fractures is often difficult to visualize on a plain radiograph. Skeletal scintigraphy is frequently positive at the time of clinical presentation. Skeletal scintigraphy is exquisitely sensitive to the remodeling process and typically shows abnormalities 1 to 2 weeks or more before the appearance of radiographic changes in stress fractures. The periosteal reaction can be visualized within hours of the injury. Insufficiency and fatigue fractures such as vertebral compression fracture, which is probably the most common consequence of

  16. Reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Yadegari Naeeni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite advances in trauma management, treatment of the consequent infections has remained a major challenge. Antibiotic prophylaxis has been widely applied to reduce such infections. Although bacteria are present in most body parts, severe infections after treatment are less frequent in the head and neck of healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to review the reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma. Materials and Methods: In this review article, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies on antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma published during 2000-2014. Conclusion: Antibiotics were not prescribed for tears and small clean wounds in the face and mouth. However, prophylaxis was applied for extensive mouth injuries which involved the facial skin. In case of maxillofacial fractures, 24-hour administration of antibiotics sufficed for compound fractures of the mandible and other parts of the face. Antibiotics were not required in other types of fractures. Prophylaxis should be applied over short pre- or post-operative periods based on the severity and complexity of maxillofacial fractures and their relations with intra- and extraoral environments. Apparently, more detailed studies are warranted to further clarify the subject.

  17. Assessment of Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Eugene J.; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Weiner, Shira Schecter; Hurwitz, Eric L.; Peloso, Paul M.; Guzman, Jaime; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Holm, Lena W.; Côté, Pierre; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To critically appraise and synthesize the literature on assessment of neck pain. Summary of Background Data The published literature on assessment of neck pain is large and of variable quality. There have been no prior systematic reviews of this literature. Methods The Bone and Joint Decade 2000–2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders conducted a critical review of the literature (published 1980– 2006) on assessment tools and screening protocols for traumatic and nontraumatic neck pain. Results We found 359 articles on assessment of neck pain. After critical review, 95 (35%) were judged scientifically admissible. Screening protocols have high predictive values to detect cervical spine fracture in alert, low-risk patients seeking emergency care after blunt neck trauma. Computerized tomography (CT) scans had better validity (in adults and elderly) than radiographs in assessing high-risk and/or multi-injured blunt trauma neck patients. In the absence of serious pathology, clinical physical examinations are more predictive at excluding than confirming structural lesions causing neurologic compression. One exception is the manual provocation test for cervical radiculopathy, which has high positive predictive value. There was no evidence that specific MRI findings are associated with neck pain, cervicogenic headache, or whiplash exposure. No evidence supports using cervical provocative discography, anesthetic facet, or medial branch blocks in evaluating neck pain. Reliable and valid self-report questionnaires are useful in assessing pain, function, disability, and psychosocial status in individuals with neck pain. Conclusion The scientific evidence supports screening protocols in emergency care for low-risk patients; and CT-scans for high-risk patients with blunt trauma to the neck. In nonemergency neck pain without radiculopathy, the validity of most commonly used objective tests is lacking. There is

  18. Trauma Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y. Kong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available “Major Trauma. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately. Dr. Kong, please come to the Trauma Unit immediately.” Even though I have been working at Edendale Hospital as a trauma registrar for over a year, whenever I hear this announcement over the hospital intercom system, my heart beats just a little faster than normal. When I first arrived at Edendale my colleagues told me that the adrenaline rush I would experience after being called out to attend a new emergency would decrease over time, and indeed they were right. However, it is also true to say that on some occasions more than others, it is still felt more strongly than ever.

  19. Tailbone trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    For tailbone trauma when no spinal cord injury is suspected: Relieve pressure on the tailbone by sitting on an inflatable rubber ring or cushions. Take acetaminophen for pain. Take a stool softener to avoid constipation. If you suspect injury ...

  20. Paediatric trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma Unit, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town ... projects, educational initiatives and advocacy roles on child safety initiatives regarding child injuries as well as child abuse. ... The development of the total body digital.

  1. Facial trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, N; Lemkens, P; Leach, R; Gemels B; Schepers, S; Lemmens, W

    Facial trauma. Patients with facial trauma must be assessed in a systematic way so as to avoid missing any injury. Severe and disfiguring facial injuries can be distracting. However, clinicians must first focus on the basics of trauma care, following the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) system of care. Maxillofacial trauma occurs in a significant number of severely injured patients. Life- and sight-threatening injuries must be excluded during the primary and secondary surveys. Special attention must be paid to sight-threatening injuries in stabilized patients through early referral to an appropriate specialist or the early initiation of emergency care treatment. The gold standard for the radiographic evaluation of facial injuries is computed tomography (CT) imaging. Nasal fractures are the most frequent isolated facial fractures. Isolated nasal fractures are principally diagnosed through history and clinical examination. Closed reduction is the most frequently performed treatment for isolated nasal fractures, with a fractured nasal septum as a predictor of failure. Ear, nose and throat surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons and ophthalmologists must all develop an adequate treatment plan for patients with complex maxillofacial trauma.

  2. Abdominal trauma in infants and children: prompt identification and early management of serious and life-threatening injuries. Part II: Specific injuries and ED management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, S G; Green, S M; Morgan, R

    2000-06-01

    Evaluation of children with suspected abdominal trauma could be a difficult task. Unique anatomic and physiologic features render vital sign assessment and the physical examination less useful than in the adult population. Awareness of injury patterns and associations will improve the early diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Clinicians must have a complete understanding of common and atypical presentations of children with significant abdominal injuries. Knowledge of the utility and limitations of available laboratory and radiologic adjuncts will assist in accurately identifying abdominal injury. While other obvious injuries (eg, facial, cranial, and extremity trauma) can distract physicians from less obvious abdominal trauma, an algorithmic approach to evaluating and managing children with multisystem trauma will improve overall care and help to identify and treat abdominal injuries in a timely fashion. Finally, physicians must be aware of the capabilities of their own facility to handle pediatric trauma. Protocols must be in place for expediting the transfer of children who require a higher level of care. Knowledge of each of these areas will help to improve the overall care and outcome of children with abdominal trauma.

  3. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmody, R.F.; Seeger, J.F.; Smith, R.L.; Horsley, W.W.; Miller, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally. (orig.)

  4. Digital subtraction angiography in head and neck radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmody, R F; Seeger, J F; Smith, R L; Horsley, W W; Miller, R W

    1984-07-01

    Intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA) was used to evaluate 44 patients with suspected otolaryngologic abnormalities. Sixteen had IVDSA for pulsatile tinnitus or suspected glomus tumor of the petrous bone. Nine patients were evaluated because of pulsatile neck masses, and 12 others had suspected tumors of the neck, face, and paranasal sinuses. Seven had IVDSA following head and neck trauma. The technique of examination is described. The current indications of IVDSA in head and neck radiology are discussed. It is concluded that IVDSA is a suitable substitute for conventional angiography for many otolaryngologic conditions and, because of its safety, can be used more liberally.

  5. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Meka Srinivasa; Arjun, Kalyanpur

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance

  6. Sonography of scrotal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meka Srinivasa Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to depict the spectrum of scrotal injuries in blunt trauma. Scrotal injuries are not very common and are mostly due to blunt trauma from direct injury, sports injuries or motor vehicle accidents. To minimize complications and ensure testicular salvage, rapid and accurate diagnosis is necessary. High-resolution USG is the investigation of choice, as it is readily available, accurate and has been seen to improve outcomes. An understanding of and familiarity with the sonographic appearance of scrotal injuries on the part of the radiologist/sonographer is therefore of key importance.

  7. Patterns of ocular trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babar, T.F.; Khan, M.T.; Marwat, M.; Shah, A.; Murad, Y.; Khan, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    To describe the patterns of ocular trauma, cause of injury and its effects on eye. A retrospective case series. Medical records of 1105 patients admitted with ocular trauma were reviewed. The details of patients regarding age, gender, literacy, cause of injury and its effects on eye were entered into specially-designed performa. Sample selection consisted of all patients with history of ocular trauma and who were admitted to hospital. Population details consisted patients who were referred to the hospital from all parts of N.W.F.P. Thus, the frequency of trauma in the hospital admissions was analysed. Ophthalmic trauma comprised 6.78% of the hospital admission. One thousand one hundred and five patients presented with eye injuries. Out of them, 21 patients suffered from trauma to both eyes. Almost 80% patients were male and 69% patients were below 30 years of age. Delayed presentation was more common and 63.61% patients presented after one week. Open globe injuries were more common (520 eyes (46.18%)) than closed globe injuries (484 eyes (42.98%)). 23.26% of open globe injuries were associated with intraocular and intra-orbital foreign bodies. Superficial non-perforating, eyelid and adnexal and burns were seen in 122 eyes (10.83%). Among the complications, lens damage and hyphema was seen in more than 50% of the patients, 16.60% eyes were infected at the time of admission and 4.88% of eyes needed enucleation or evisceration. The common causes of injury were violence in 37.37%, occupational in 24.43% and domestic accidents in 19.18%. Ophthalmic trauma is a major public health problem. Majority of the involved are male and under 30 years of age. Delayed presentation is more common. Open globe injuries are more frequent. Violence and occupational injuries are the major causes. (author)

  8. [Chest trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. CT of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has made a significant contribution to the radiologic assessment of the injured larynx. CT is an accurate, noninvasive modality that can rapidly diagnose both soft tissue and cartilaginous injuries. CT of the larynx involves a minimal degree of patient manipulation and discomfort and can be performed in conjunction with CT evaluation of intracranial or facial injuries. Conventional radiologic studies (anteroposterior and lateral soft tissue films of the neck, tomograms, or xerograms) are capable of demonstrating some cartilaginous fractures but are of limited value in defining the extent of soft tissue injury. In the acute trauma setting, laryngography is often technically difficult to perform because of patient discomfort and inability to cooperate. Although the overall experience is somewhat limited, CT appears to overcome many of the limitations of these conventional radiologic methods. The following is a discussion of the role of CT scanning in evaluating injuries to the larynx and cervical soft tissues

  10. Geriatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sasha D; Holcomb, John B

    2015-12-01

    The landscape of trauma is changing due to an aging population. Geriatric patients represent an increasing number and proportion of trauma admissions and deaths. This review explores recent literature on geriatric trauma, including triage criteria, assessment of frailty, fall-related injury, treatment of head injury complicated by coagulopathy, goals of care, and the need for ongoing education of all surgeons in the care of the elderly. Early identification of high-risk geriatric patients is imperative to initiate early resuscitative efforts. Geriatric patients are typically undertriaged because of their baseline frailty being underappreciated; however, centers that see more geriatric patients do better. Rapid reversal of anticoagulation is important in preventing progression of brain injury. Anticipation of difficult disposition necessitates early involvement of physical therapy for rehabilitation and case management for appropriate placement. Optimal care of geriatric trauma patients will be based on the well established tenets of trauma resuscitation and injury repair, but with distinct elements that address the physiological and anatomical challenges presented by geriatric patients.

  11. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  12. Oral toxicity management in head and neck cancer patients treated with chemotherapy and radiation: Dental pathologies and osteoradionecrosis (Part 1) literature review and consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buglione, Michela; Cavagnini, Roberta; Di Rosario, Federico; Sottocornola, Lara; Maddalo, Marta; Vassalli, Lucia; Grisanti, Salvatore; Salgarello, Stefano; Orlandi, Ester; Paganelli, Corrado; Majorana, Alessandra; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Bossi, Paolo; Berruti, Alfredo; Pavanato, Giovanni; Nicolai, Piero; Maroldi, Roberto; Barasch, Andrei; Russi, Elvio G.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith; Murphy, Barbara; Magrini, Stefano M.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy and/or surgery is the typical treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Acute side effects (such as oral mucositis, dermatitis, salivary changes, taste alterations, etc.), and late toxicities in particular (such as osteo-radionecrosis,

  13. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2 : proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, J.A.E.M.; Raber-Durlacher, J.E.; Nair, R.G.; Epstein, J.B.; Elad, S.; Hamblin, M.R.; Barasch, A.; Migliorati, C.A.; Milstein, D.M.J.; Genot, M.T.; Lansaat, L.; van der Brink, R.; Arnabat-Dominguez, J.; van der Molen, L.; Jacobi, I.; van Diessen, J.; de Lange, J.; Smeele, L.E.; Schubert, M.M.; Bensadoun, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together

  14. Low-level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 2: proposed applications and treatment protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM) for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a

  15. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the "Pubmed" search with the keywords "NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture." A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG, (b closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective, classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu′s staging neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90

  16. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  17. Splenic Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Diaz, Fabio F; Buitrago Mejia, Francisco; Ulloa Guerrero, Luis Heber

    2001-01-01

    The spleen is the organ that is injured during the closed trauma with more frequency and it is the cause more common of foregone death in the patients with wounded abdominal. At the present time the complications of the splenic trauma are related with their severity, associate wounds, diagnostic fail or inadequate treatments. The lesions that are diagnosed in early form are managed quick and satisfactorily, but the forgotten wounds or the diagnoses and late treatments take for themselves high rates of morbid-mortality. The paper includes their phyto pathology, diagnoses, classification and treatment

  18. Ballistic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Devi Munishwar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunshot injuries are rather serious but uncommon type of trauma in India. Radiologists can contribute substantially in the evaluation and treatment of patients with gunshot wounds. Foreign bodies that enter a patient as a result of trauma are contaminated and produce a range of symptoms. Oral and maxillofacial gunshot injuries are usually fatal due to close proximity with vital structures. Here, we report a case in which radiographic evidence of foreign bodies in the right orofacial region exposed a history of a gunshot injury. The patient did not have any major complaints except for reduced mouth opening. These foreign bodies were clinically silent for approximately 12 years.

  19. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric nontraumatic myositis ossificans of the neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkosis, Angela A. [Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Balsam, Dvorah [Stony Brook University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Lee, Thomas K. [Stony Brook University Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Schreiber, Z.J. [Stony Brook University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Nontraumatic myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC) is a rarely reported benign heterotopic ossification characterized by the aberrant formation of bone in extraskeletal soft tissues. Although a history of trauma can be elicited in 75% of MOC patients, the etiology is unclear in patients without inciting injury. MOC is associated with young male athletes, and is most often localized to the muscle groups of the extremities. Rare cases have been reported in children and adolescents of nontraumatic MOC in the neck. We present a 15-year-old adolescent with a rapidly growing, painful neck mass without traumatic stimulus. (orig.)

  1. Pediatric nontraumatic myositis ossificans of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkosis, Angela A.; Balsam, Dvorah; Lee, Thomas K.; Schreiber, Z.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nontraumatic myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC) is a rarely reported benign heterotopic ossification characterized by the aberrant formation of bone in extraskeletal soft tissues. Although a history of trauma can be elicited in 75% of MOC patients, the etiology is unclear in patients without inciting injury. MOC is associated with young male athletes, and is most often localized to the muscle groups of the extremities. Rare cases have been reported in children and adolescents of nontraumatic MOC in the neck. We present a 15-year-old adolescent with a rapidly growing, painful neck mass without traumatic stimulus. (orig.)

  2. Trauma Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bodil Maria

    There are two main trends in psychological approaches to human suffering related to what we term trauma. Although they have their respective limitations both approaches may help us explore and alleviate human suffering. One trend, primarily using concepts like traumatic events and traumatisation ...

  3. Psychological Care, Patient Education, Orthotics, Ergonomics and Prevention Strategies for Neck Pain: An Systematic Overview Update as Part of the ICON§ Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anita R.; Kaplan, Faith; Huang, Stacey; Khan, Mahweesh; Santaguida, P. Lina; Carlesso, Lisa C.; MacDermid, Joy C.; Walton, David M.; Kenardy, Justin; Söderlund, Anne; Verhagen, Arianne; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To conduct an overview on psychological interventions, orthoses, patient education, ergonomics, and 1⁰/2⁰ neck pain prevention for adults with acute-chronic neck pain. Search Strategy: Computerized databases and grey literature were searched (2006-2012). Selection Criteria: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on pain, function/disability, global perceived effect, quality-of-life and patient satisfaction were retrieved. Data Collection & Analysis: Two independent authors selected articles, assessed risk of bias using AMSTAR tool and extracted data. The GRADE tool was used to evaluate the body of evidence and an external panel to provide critical review. Main Results: We retrieved 30 reviews (5-9 AMSTAR score) reporting on 75 RCTs with the following moderate GRADE evidence. For acute whiplash associated disorder (WAD), an education video in emergency rooms (1RCT, 405participants] favoured pain reduction at long-term follow-up thus helping 1 in 23 people [Standard Mean Difference: -0.44(95%CI: -0.66 to -0.23)). Use of a soft collar (2RCTs, 1278participants) was not beneficial in the long-term. For chronic neck pain, a mind-body intervention (2RCTs, 1 meta-analysis, 191participants) improved short-term pain/function in 1 of 4 or 6 participants. In workers, 2-minutes of daily scapula-thoracic endurance training (1RCT, 127participants) over 10 weeks was beneficial in 1 of 4 participants. A number of psychosocial interventions, workplace interventions, collar use and self-management educational strategies were not beneficial. Reviewers' Conclusions: Moderate evidence exists for quantifying beneficial and non-beneficial effects of a limited number of interventions for acute WAD and chronic neck pain. Larger trials with more rigorous controls need to target promising interventions PMID:24133554

  4. Effectiveness of educational poster on knowledge of emergency management of dental trauma--part 2: cluster randomised controlled trial for secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Cecilia; Wong, Kin Yau; Cheung, Lim K

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of educational poster on improving secondary school students' knowledge of emergency management of dental trauma. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted. 16 schools with total 671 secondary students who can read Chinese or English were randomised into intervention (poster, 8 schools, 364 students) and control groups (8 schools, 305 students) at the school level. Baseline knowledge of dental trauma was obtained by a questionnaire. Poster containing information of dental trauma management was displayed in a classroom for 2 weeks in each school in the intervention group whereas in the control group there was no display of such posters. Students of both groups completed the same questionnaire after 2 weeks. Two-week display of posters improved the knowledge score by 1.25 (p-value = 0.0407) on average. Educational poster on dental trauma management significantly improved the level of knowledge of secondary school students in Hong Kong. HKClinicalTrial.com HKCTR-1343 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01809457.

  5. Neck curve polynomials in neck rupture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurniadi, Rizal; Perkasa, Yudha S.; Waris, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    The Neck Rupture Model is a model that explains the scission process which has smallest radius in liquid drop at certain position. Old fashion of rupture position is determined randomly so that has been called as Random Neck Rupture Model (RNRM). The neck curve polynomials have been employed in the Neck Rupture Model for calculation the fission yield of neutron induced fission reaction of 280 X 90 with changing of order of polynomials as well as temperature. The neck curve polynomials approximation shows the important effects in shaping of fission yield curve.

  6. Trauma in Guilan (North of Iran: An Epidemiologic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehnadimoghadam Anoosh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Injuries, especially traffic accidents are so important causes of death, disability, hospital expenses, economic damages to the society which World Health Organization selected them as the main subjects for investigation and research. We have done an epidemiologic study about trauma in Guilan, a province in north of Iran. This is  a descriptive study carried out on patients with traumatic injuries, admitted in Poursina Teaching Hospital, during September 2005 to July 2006. Data were collected prospectively using a data collection form including demographic information, mechanism of trauma, anatomical site of injuries, according to AIS90 and severity of head trauma according to glasgow coma scale (GCS. Data were processed by SPSS 11.5 and are shown in tables and figures. Overall 3598 patients admitted. Mean age was 31.85 ± 17.76 years with male to female ratio  about 3.5:1. Most of patients were 25-44 years old (33.9%. Traffic accidents were the leading  cause of injuries (73.84% and then fall (15.7%. Motorcycle was the most common mode of transport in our patients (47.07% after that car (24.3%. Occurrence of traffic accidents increased through evening. Forty six percent of patients transported to hospital by people or came themselves (46.42%. Head and neck were the most common injured part of body (82.4 %, however about in 81.66% of patients were mild and then limb and pelvis (34.7%. Finally about 2.8% of them died. A trauma especially traffic accidents are an important public health issue in Guilan, we recommend conducting other studies focusing on risk factors in details, and considering injury prevention in local decision making.

  7. Bilateral femoral neck fractures following pelvic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuda, Kenji; Nishi, Hosei; Oba, Hiroshi

    1977-01-01

    Over 300 cases of femoral neck fractures following radiotherapy for intrapelvic malignant tumor have been reported in various countries since Baensch reported this disease in 1927. In Japan, 40 cases or so have been reported, and cases of bilateral femoral neck fractures have not reached to ten cases. The authors experienced a case of 75 year-old female who received radiotherapy for cancer of the uterus, and suffered from right femoral neck fracture 3 months after and left femoral neck fracture one year and half after. As clinical symptoms, she had not previous history of trauma in bilateral femurs, but she complained of a pain in a hip joint and of gait disturbance. The pain in left femoral neck continued for about one month before fracture was recognized with roentgenogram. As histopathological findings, increase of fat marrow, decrease of bone trabeculae, and its marked degeneration were recognized. Proliferation of some blood vessels was found out, but thickness of the internal membrane and thrombogenesis were not recognized. Treatment should be performed according to degree of displacement of fractures. In this case, artificial joint replacement surgery was performed to the side of fracture of this time, because this case was bilateral femoral neck fractures and the patient had received artificial head replacement surgery in the other side of fracture formerly. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. [Pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  9. Suspension trauma; Le traumatisme de suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel, S. [Le Centre de sante et de services sociaux du rocher Perce, Chandler, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the precautions that should be taken to avoid falls from wind turbines or transmission towers. Suspension trauma was explained by a medical doctor in terms of physiology and the body's normal circulation and the elements that disturb normal physiology when in suspension. The trauma occurs following a fall, which carries the risk of 1or more disorders, such as massive hemorrhage, high cardiac pulse, and constriction of blood vessels. Nausea, vertigo, cardiac arrhythmia and sweating occur 15 to 20 minutes following the fall. The presentation emphasized the importance of having qualified personnel at the site and wearing proper harnesses and equipment that supports the neck. figs.

  10. [Surgical tactics in duodenal trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P A; Grishin, A V

    2004-01-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 61 patients with injuries of the duodenum are analyzed. The causes of injuries were stab-incised wounds in 24 patients, missile wound -- in 7, closed abdominal trauma -- in 26, trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy -- in 4. All the patients underwent surgery. Complications were seen in 32 (52.5%) patients, 21 patients died, lethality was 34.4%. Within the first 24 hours since the trauma 7 patients died due to severe combined trauma, blood loss, 54 patients survived acute period of trauma, including 28 patients after open trauma, 26 -- after closed and 4 -- after trauma of the duodenum during endoscopic papillosphincterotomy. Diagnostic and surgical policies are discussed. Results of treatment depending on kind and time of surgery are regarded. It is demonstrated that purulent complications due to retroperitoneal phlegmona, traumatic pancreatitis, pneumonia are the causes of significant number of unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, it is important to adequately incise and drainage infected parts of retroperitoneal fat tissue with two-lumen drainages. Decompression through duodenal tube is the effective procedure for prophylaxis of suture insufficiency and traumatic pancreatitis. Suppression of pancreatic and duodenal secretion with octreotid improves significantly surgical treatment results.

  11. An Overview of Systematic Reviews on Prognostic Factors in Neck Pain: Results from the International Collaboration on Neck Pain (ICON) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, David M; Carroll, Linda J; Kasch, Helge; Sterling, Michele; Verhagen, Arianne P; MacDermid, Joy C; Gross, Anita; Santaguida, P. Lina; Carlesso, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Given the challenges of chronic musculoskeletal pain and disability, establishing a clear prognosis in the acute stage has become increasingly recognized as a valuable approach to mitigate chronic problems. Neck pain represents a condition that is common, potentially disabling, and has a high rate of transition to chronic or persistent problems. As a field of research, prognosis in neck pain has stimulated several empirical primary research papers, and a number of systematic reviews. As part of the International Consensus on Neck (ICON) project, we sought to establish the general state of knowledge in the area through a structured, systematic review of systematic reviews (overview). An exhaustive search strategy was created and employed to identify the 13 systematic reviews (SRs) that served as the primary data sources for this overview. A decision algorithm for data synthesis, which incorporated currency of the SR, risk of bias assessment of the SRs using AMSTAR scoring and consistency of findings across SRs, determined the level of confidence in the risk profile of 133 different variables. The results provide high confidence that baseline neck pain intensity and baseline disability have a strong association with outcome, while angular deformities of the neck and parameters of the initiating trauma have no effect on outcome. A vast number of predictors provide low or very low confidence or inconclusive results, suggesting there is still much work to be done in this field. Despite the presence of multiple SR and this overview, there is insufficient evidence to make firm conclusions on many potential prognostic variables. This study demonstrates the challenges in conducting overviews on prognosis where clear synthesis critieria and a lack of specifics of primary data in SR are barriers. PMID:24115971

  12. Head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. Some of the titles are: Combined Surgical Resection and Irradiation for Head and Neck Cancers; Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Head and Neck Database: Identification of Prognostic Factors and the Re-evaluation of American Joint Committee Stages; Combined Modality Approach to Head and Neck Cancer; Induction Combination Chemotherapy of Regionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer; and Outcome after Complete Remission to Induction Chemotherapy in Head and Neck Cancer

  13. Population-based study of ischemic stroke risk after trauma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine K; Hills, Nancy K; Vinson, David R; Numis, Adam L; Dicker, Rochelle A; Sidney, Stephen; Fullerton, Heather J

    2017-12-05

    To quantify the incidence, timing, and risk of ischemic stroke after trauma in a population-based young cohort. We electronically identified trauma patients (trauma and 3 controls per case. A physician panel reviewed medical records, confirmed cases, and adjudicated whether the stroke was related to trauma. We calculated the 4-week stroke incidence and estimated stroke odds ratios (OR) by injury location using logistic regression. From 1,308,009 trauma encounters, we confirmed 52 trauma-related ischemic strokes. The 4-week stroke incidence was 4.0 per 100,000 encounters (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.0-5.2). Trauma was multisystem in 26 (50%). In 19 (37%), the stroke occurred on the day of trauma, and all occurred within 15 days. In 7/28 cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no abnormalities were detected. In unadjusted analyses, head, neck, chest, back, and abdominal injuries increased stroke risk. Only head (OR 4.1, CI 1.1-14.9) and neck (OR 5.6, CI 1.03-30.9) injuries remained associated with stroke after adjusting for demographics and trauma severity markers (multisystem trauma, motor vehicle collision, arrival by ambulance, intubation). Stroke risk is elevated for 2 weeks after trauma. Onset is frequently delayed, providing an opportunity for stroke prevention during this period. However, in one-quarter of stroke cases with cerebrovascular angiography at the time of trauma, no vascular abnormality was detected. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Non union of the neck of radius: a case report and review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fractures of the neck of radius are frequent in trauma. They happen without being noticed at the moment of injury of the elbow or in the context of polytrauma. A case of non union of the radius neck occurring in a young person due to ignorance, during first consultation has been reported by the authors. They insist on the ...

  15. Subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Oshitani, Takashi; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Takada, Yoshiki; Kono, Michio; Abe, Mitsuyuki

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 233 cases of patients who had undergone whole neck irradiation with 4-MV X-ray or 8-10-MeV electrons, or both, and had been followed with regard to their skin condition for at least 1 year. The prescribed dose to the whole neck ranged from 19.2 to 72.4 Gy (median 50). The skin-absorbed dose was specified as that at a depth of 4.1 mm (d4.1-mm depth ), and a biologically equivalent dose (BED) of d4.1-mm depth was also estimated (BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth ). Results: Univariate analysis revealed that previous neck dissection, concurrent chemotherapy, corticosteroid administration as a part of chemotherapy, fractionation, and BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth were significant prognostic variables. Multivariate analysis showed that BED 1.8 4.1-mm depth and previous neck dissection were the only prognostic variables for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis. Conclusion: A high dose to a 4.1-mm depth of the skin and a history of neck dissection were identified as the predominant risk factors for moderate to severe subcutaneous fibrosis after whole neck irradiation. A subcutaneous dose should be considered in radiotherapy treatment planning involving the whole neck, especially in cases in which patients have undergone previous neck dissection

  16. The influence of psychosocial factors on recovery following acute whiplash trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Tina Birgitte Wisbech

    2012-12-01

    Persistent pain and disability after whiplash trauma has become an increasingly significant problem in many industrialized countries entailing comprehensive individual as well as social costs. The dissertation includes two areas of research within whiplash trauma. The first part contains two empirical articles focusing on risk factors for poor recovery. The second part contains a systematic review and an empirical article and concerns the influence of coping strategies on recovery with a special emphasis on possible gender differences. All empirical articles in the dissertation are based on self-reported questionnaire data on a patient cohort of whiplash-exposed. Patients are consecutively included in the study within the first ten days of collision recruited from emergency departments and general practitioners in four counties in Denmark from April 2001 to June 2003. One of the empirical articles in the dissertation is supplemented with data from a social register of transfer benefits on the patient cohort as well as on a matched register control cohort in the general population. In this dissertation we wish to answer the following questions: 1) Do self-reported pre-collision health-related and socio-demographic factors affect self-reported work capability and neck pain one year after acute whiplash trauma? 2) Do transfer benefits before the accident predict negative change in future health-related provisional situation and future neck pain? 3) Do persons with acute whiplash trauma experience more negative change in future health-related provisional situation compared to a matched register control group? 4) Does research in the use of coping strategies after whiplash trauma show that these predict poor restitution and is there any research on gender differences in the use of coping strategies in whiplash-exposed? 5) Do gender and coping strategies interact in the prediction of future neck pain following acute whiplash trauma? Self-reported unspecified pain, female

  17. Urethral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrington, B.M.; Hricak, H.; Dixon, C.; McAninch, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the role of MR imaging in posterior urethral trauma. Fifteen patients with posttraumatic membranous urethral strictures underwent prospective MR imaging with a 1.5-T unit before open urethroplasty. All patients had transaxial T1-weighted (500/20) and T2-weighted (2,500/70) spin-echo images and T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images (matrix, 192 x 256; section thickness, 4 mm with 20% gap). Conventional retrograde and cystourethrography were performed preoperatively. Compared with conventional studies, MR imaging defined the length and location of the urethral injury and provided additional information regarding the direction and degree of prostatic and urethral dislocation

  18. Altered cerebral blood flow in chronic neck pain patients but not in whiplash patients: a 99mTc-HMPAO rCBF study

    OpenAIRE

    Sundström, Torbjörn; Guez, Michel; Hildingsson, Christer; Toolanen, Göran; Nyberg, Lars; Riklund, Katrine

    2006-01-01

    A cross-sectional study to investigate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and chronic neck pain patients without previous history of trauma along with a healthy control group. Chronic neck pain is a common disorder and a history of cervical spine injury including whiplash trauma constitute a risk factor for persistent neck pain. The aetiology of the late whiplash syndrome is unknown with no specific diagnostic criteria based on imaging, physiologica...

  19. Images in kidney trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Sonia Pilar; Manzano, Ana Cristina

    2007-01-01

    A case of a 3 years old female patient, who suffered blunt lumbar trauma (horse kick) with secondary kidney trauma, is reported. Imaging findings are described. Renal trauma classification and imaging findings are reviewed

  20. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ... and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with ...

  2. 64-MDCT angiography of blunt vascular injuries of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Falgun H; Munera, Felipe; Rivas, Luis A; Henry, Robert P; Quencer, Robert M

    2011-03-01

    CT angiography (CTA) using 64-MDCT enables timely evaluation of injuries associated with blunt neck trauma. The purpose of this article is to familiarize the reader with the most frequent CTA signs of blunt vascular injury. CTA is a valuable tool to detect blunt vascular injuries, especially using its multiplanar and 3D reconstruction capabilities.

  3. Recurrent neck mass after carotid body tumour excision: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MARCH 2018 SAJS. Case Report. A 53-year-old woman was referred to our vascular unit with a two-year history of a non-trauma related slow growing, painful left neck mass. The mass ... duration. During that period, she was diagnosed as HIV ... propose a classification for recurrences after CBT to aid further management.

  4. Prehospital spine immobilization/spinal motion restriction in penetrating trauma: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velopulos, Catherine G; Shihab, Hasan M; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Feinman, Marcie; Raja, Ali; Salomone, Jeffrey; Haut, Elliott R

    2018-05-01

    Spine immobilization in trauma has remained an integral part of most emergency medical services protocols despite a lack of evidence for efficacy and concern for associated complications, especially in penetrating trauma patients. We reviewed the published evidence on the topic of prehospital spine immobilization or spinal motion restriction in adult patients with penetrating trauma to structure a practice management guideline. We conducted a Cochrane style systematic review and meta-analysis and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to construct recommendations. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to evaluate the literature on the critical outcomes of mortality, neurologic deficit, and potentially reversible neurologic deficit. A total of 24 studies met inclusion criteria, with qualitative review conducted for all studies. We used five studies for the quantitative review (meta-analysis). No study showed benefit to spine immobilization with regard to mortality and neurologic injury, even for patients with direct neck injury. Increased mortality was associated with spine immobilization, with risk ratio [RR], 2.4 (confidence interval [CI], 1.07-5.41). The rate of neurologic injury or potentially reversible injury was very low, ranging from 0.002 to 0.076 and 0.00034 to 0.055, with no statistically significant difference for neurologic deficit or potentially reversible deficit, RR, 4.16 (CI, 0.56-30.89), and RR, 1.19 (CI, 0.83-1.70), although the point estimates favored no immobilization. Spine immobilization in penetrating trauma is associated with increased mortality and has not been shown to have a beneficial effect on mitigating neurologic deficits, even potentially reversible neurologic deficits. We recommend that spine immobilization not be used routinely for adult patients with penetrating trauma. Systematic review with meta-analysis study, level III.

  5. Trauma management in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutserimpas, Christos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Samonis, George

    2017-08-01

    Homer's Iliad is one of the highest intellectual products of the early ancient Greek civilisation. A plethora of medical information lies within Iliad's 24 rhapsodies, and a total of 147 injuries are described. The present study records and evaluates all cases of trauma management included in this epic poem. Not only Iliad's original text but also all myths related to Iliad from the five-volume Greek Mythology by Ioannis Kakridis were meticulously studied to locate the injured person, the type of trauma, the care provider and the type of given care as well as the outcome of each case. A total of 21 cases were found and evaluated with a 5% mortality rate. The majority of these injuries were caused by an arrow (43%) and were located to the upper extremity (43%). Injuries of the head, neck and trunk were not treated as all of them were lethal. Many of the recorded trauma management techniques can be correlated to modern medicine. Furthermore, the role and skills of military doctors and paramedics, mentioned by Homer, is discussed. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  7. CT of laryngotracheal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupetin, A.R.; Daffner, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the usefulness of CT for the diagnosis of traumatic laryngotracheal abnormalities. The authors retrospectively evaluated the neck CT studies of 50 patients (36 males, 14 females; age range, 16-75 years) who presented to a level I trauma center after suffering a blunt or penetrating laryngotracheal injury. CT results were correlated with endoscopic or surgical findings in 43 cases. Three groups emerge. CT positive: hyloid bone or laryngotracheal cartilage injury; CT positive: soft-tissue injury only; and CT negative. In group 1, CT demonstrated all bony or cartilaginous injuries proved at surgery or suggested at endoscopy. CT failed to demonstrate laryngotracheal separation in 1 case. In group 2, CT demonstrated all soft-tissue injuries suggested at endoscopy. In group 3, CT findings agreed with those of endoscopy in 7 cases, but minor soft-tissue findings seen at endoscopy were missed in 3 cases. Seven patients were studied only with CT. Ct is an accurate technique for detecting bony or cartilaginous laryngotracheal traumatic abnormalities. However, laryngotracheal separation and minor soft-tissue injuries can be missed

  8. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, A.B.; Jacobs, B.

    1984-09-01

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora.

  9. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, A.B.; Jacobs, B.

    1984-01-01

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora. (orig.)

  10. Femoral neck fractures complicating gaucher disease in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, A B; Jacobs, B

    1984-09-01

    In normal children, fractures of the femoral neck are uncommon and accompany severe trauma and multiple injuries elsewhere in the skeleton. In children with Gaucher disease, a rare hereditary disorder of lipid metabolism, midcervical or basicervical fractures can occur with minor or no trauma and without other injury to the skeleton. Three children with Gaucher disease who developed pathologic fractures of the femoral neck are described. In all three, the fractures occurred between five and nine years of age, and the fracture lines passed through areas of abnormal bone characterized by poorly defined patches of increased and decreased density and cortical thinning along the medial femoral necks. In the affected hips, there was no evidence of avascular necrosis of the femoral heads at the time of injury. One child's fracture was preceeded by multiple bone 'crisis' localized to the proximal femora.

  11. Head Trauma: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Head trauma: First aid Head trauma: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff Most head trauma involves injuries that are minor and don't require ... 21, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-head-trauma/basics/ART-20056626 . Mayo ...

  12. Femoral neck fractures after removal of hardware in healed trochanteric fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquet, Antonio; Giannoudis, Peter V; Gelink, Andrés

    2017-12-01

    Hardware removal in healed trochanteric fractures (TF) in the absence of infection or significant mechanical complications is rarely indicated. However, in patients with persistent pain, prominent material and discomfort in the activities of daily living, the implant is eventually removed. Publications of ipsilateral femoral neck fracture after removal of implants from healed trochanteric fractures (FNFARIHTF) just because of pain or discomfort are rare. The purpose of this systematic review of the literature is to report on the eventual risk factors, the mechanisms, the clinical presentation, and frequency, and to pay special emphasis in their prevention. A comprehensive review of the literature was undertaken using the PRISMA guidelines with no language restriction. Case reports of FNFARIHTF and series of TF with cases of FNFARIHTF due to pain or discomfort published between inception of journals to December 2016 were eligible for inclusion. Relevant information was divided in two parts. Part I included the analysis of cases of FNFARIHTF, with the objective of establishing the eventual risk factors, mechanisms and pathoanatomy, clinical presentation and diagnosis, treatment and prevention. Part II analyzed series of TF which included cases of FNFARIHTF for assessing the incidence of femoral neck fractures in this condition. Overall 24 publications with 45 cases of FNFARIHTF met the inclusion criteria. We found that the only prevalent factors for FNFARIHTF were: 1) preexisisting systemic osteoporosis, as most patients were older and elder females, with lower bone mineral density and bone mass; 2) local osteoporosis as a result of preloading by the fixation device in the femoral neck, leading to stress protection, reducing the strain at the neck, and increasing bone loss and weakness; and 3) the removal of hardware from the femoral neck, with reduction of the failure strength of the neck. The femoral neck fractures were spontaneous, i.e. not related to trauma or

  13. Talar Neck Fracture after United Tibiotalar Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Platt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tibiotalar arthrodesis is a well-established treatment for tibiotalar arthritis, for example, in younger high demand patients. Talar neck fractures are less common though well-recognised sequelae of foot ankle trauma. Here we present the clinical case of a 69-year-old male who presented to our institution with a nonunion of a talar neck fracture, having undergone a left tibiotalar fusion 24 years previously. To the authors’ knowledge, this injury has only been described once previously in the literature. However, the original case described a fracture sustained in the very early postoperative period following tibiotalar fusion, postulated to be secondary to postimmobilisation osteopaenia or stress risers from metalwork. The aetiology in this case is likely due to axial compression transmitted to the talar neck via the calcaneus. The predisposing factors for nonunion are discussed, highlighting the importance of vigilance for this injury in any patient with concomitant tibiotalar fusion and foot trauma. The management of this patient is discussed.

  14. Sexuality following trauma injury: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie Marie Connell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Restoration of the quality of life (QoL of trauma injury survivors is the aim of trauma rehabilitation. It is generally acknowledged that sexuality is an important component of QoL; however, rehabilitation services frequently fall short of including sexuality as a matter of routine. The literature was reviewed to examine the experiences of trauma survivors from three groups: spinal cord injury (SCI, traumatic brain injury (TBI and burns. The focus was on the impact of trauma on the QoL to identify future research directions and to advocate for the inclusion of sexuality as an integral part of rehabilitation. Databases searched were Proquest, Ovid, Cinahl, Medline, PsycInfo and Cochrane Central Register of controlled trials. A total of 36 eligible studies were included: SCI (n = 25, TBI (n = 6, burns (n = 5. Four themes were identified across the three trauma groups that were labeled as physiological impact of trauma on sexuality, cognitive-genital dissociation (CGD, sexual disenfranchisement (SD and sexual rediscovery (SR. Trauma injury has a significant impact on sexuality, which is not routinely addressed within rehabilitation services. Further sexuality research is required among all trauma groups to improve rehabilitation services and in turn QoL outcomes for all trauma survivors.

  15. Gênero e trauma Gender and trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucio Ary Dillon Soares

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available As conseqüências sociais e psicológicas da violência urbana sobre os parentes e amigos de pessoas vitimadas por mortes violentas (homicídio, suicídio ou acidentes são analisadas à luz das diferenças de gênero. A literatura especializada nesta área propõe que mulheres e homens vivenciam experiências traumáticas de forma peculiar. Porém, os traumas típicos são diferentes em cada gênero, deixando em aberto a questão sobre quanto das diferenças entre as respostas se devem a gênero e quanto se devem ao tipo de trauma. Testamos a hipótese de que as mulheres são mais suscetíveis à desordem de estresse pós-trauma (DEPT numa situação traumática comum, usando dados qualitativos e quantitativos. Comparamos os sintomas do trauma e as percepções sobre o significado da perda de seus entes queridos. A amostra, de 425 mulheres (62% e 265 homens (38%, foi retirada de uma lista de parentes de pessoas que sofreram morte violenta na cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Incluímos trinta relatos de parentes e amigos próximos das vítimas diretas. Os resultados revelaram que 54% das mulheres e 41% dos homens tiveram o cotidiano alterado depois da morte de um parente/amigo. Há diferenças estatisticamente significativas nos problemas de saúde e na diversão. Essa área foi a mais afetada, atingindo metade dos entrevistados. Uma variável intimamente correlacionada com os sintomas da DEPT é o contato com o corpo: controlando a extensão do contato (fez o reconhecimento do corpo; viu, mas não reconheceu e nem viu nem reconheceu. Em cada uma dessas categorias, as mulheres foram mais afetadas do que os homens. O artigo conclui que as mulheres sentem mais as perdas do que os homens, mas que parte das diferenças não são internas aos gêneros, mas externas a eles, dependendo das interações e dos contatos pessoais.The social and psychological consequences endured by friends and relatives of people victimized by violent death (homicide, suicide or

  16. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hotspots in trauma memories and their relationship to successful trauma-focused psychotherapy: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijdam, Mirjam J.; Baas, Melanie A. M.; Olff, Miranda; Gersons, Berthold P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Imaginal exposure is an essential element of trauma-focused psychotherapies for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Exposure should in particular focus on the "hotspots," the parts of trauma memories that cause high levels of emotional distress which are often reexperienced. Our aim was to

  18. Anastomoses between lower cranial and upper cervical nerves: a comprehensive review with potential significance during skull base and neck operations, part I: trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Oyesiku, Nelson M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Radcliff, Virginia; Loukas, Marios; Chern, Joshua J; Benninger, Brion; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of the anatomy of the neural communications among the cranial nerves and their branches is lacking in the literature. Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found among these nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate in these regions to avoid inadvertent traction or transection. We review the literature regarding the anatomy, function, and clinical implications of the complex neural networks formed by interconnections among the lower cranial and upper cervical nerves. A review of germane anatomic and clinical literature was performed. The review is organized in two parts. Part I concerns the anastomoses between the trigeminal, facial, and vestibulocochlear nerves or their branches with any other nerve trunk or branch in the vicinity. Part II concerns the anastomoses among the glossopharyngeal, vagus, accessory and hypoglossal nerves and their branches or among these nerves and the first four cervical spinal nerves; the contribution of the autonomic nervous system to these neural plexuses is also briefly reviewed. Part I is presented in this article. An extensive anastomotic network exists among the lower cranial nerves. Knowledge of such neural intercommunications is important in diagnosing and treating patients with pathology of the skull base. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Blunt pancreatic trauma. Role of CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procacci, C.; Graziani, R.; Bicego, E.; Mainardi, P.; Bassi, C.; Bergamo Andreis, I.A.; Valdo, M.; Guarise, A.; Girelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To define the evolution patterns of blunt pancreatic trauma, and to point out the CT features most significant for the diagnosis. Material and Methods: Ten cases of pancreatic trauma, observed over a period of about 10 years, were analyzed in retrospect. The cases were divided into 3 groups according to the time that had elapsed between trauma and first CT: Early phase (within 72 h: n=3/10); late phase (after 10 days: n=3/10); and following pancreatic drainage (n=4/10). Results: In the early phase, one case showed a blood collection surrounding the pancreatic head and duodenum, and displacing the mesenteric vessels to the left. In the 2 other cases it was possible to demonstrate a tear in the pancreas at the neck, perpendicular to the main pancreatic axis. In the late phase in all 3 cases, one cystic lesion was present at the site of the tear, either surrounding the gland or embedded - more or less deeply - within the parenchyma. One of the lesions subsided spontaneously; the 2 others required surgery. In the postoperative phase, an external fistula was demonstrated in 2 cases following percutaneous drainage of pancreatic cysts; the fistula was fed by a cystic lesion in the pancreatic neck. In the 2 other cases a pseudocyst developed. (orig.)

  20. Blunt pancreatic trauma. Role of CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procacci, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Graziani, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Bicego, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Mainardi, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Bassi, C. [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Bergamo Andreis, I.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Valdo, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Guarise, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy); Girelli, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Verona (Italy)

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: To define the evolution patterns of blunt pancreatic trauma, and to point out the CT features most significant for the diagnosis. Material and Methods: Ten cases of pancreatic trauma, observed over a period of about 10 years, were analyzed in retrospect. The cases were divided into 3 groups according to the time that had elapsed between trauma and first CT: Early phase (within 72 h: n=3/10); late phase (after 10 days: n=3/10); and following pancreatic drainage (n=4/10). Results: In the early phase, one case showed a blood collection surrounding the pancreatic head and duodenum, and displacing the mesenteric vessels to the left. In the 2 other cases it was possible to demonstrate a tear in the pancreas at the neck, perpendicular to the main pancreatic axis. In the late phase in all 3 cases, one cystic lesion was present at the site of the tear, either surrounding the gland or embedded - more or less deeply - within the parenchyma. One of the lesions subsided spontaneously; the 2 others required surgery. In the postoperative phase, an external fistula was demonstrated in 2 cases following percutaneous drainage of pancreatic cysts; the fistula was fed by a cystic lesion in the pancreatic neck. In the 2 other cases a pseudocyst developed. (orig.).

  1. Trauma facilities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Jesper; Nielsen, Klaus; Primdahl, Stine C

    2018-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of death among adults aged challenge. Evidence supports the centralization of trauma facilities and the use multidisciplinary trauma teams. Because knowledge is sparse on the existing distribution of trauma facilities...... and the organisation of trauma care in Denmark, the aim of this study was to identify all Danish facilities that care for traumatized patients and to investigate the diversity in organization of trauma management. Methods: We conducted a systematic observational cross-sectional study. First, all hospitals in Denmark...... were identified via online services and clarifying phone calls to each facility. Second, all trauma care manuals on all facilities that receive traumatized patients were gathered. Third, anesthesiologists and orthopedic surgeons on call at all trauma facilities were contacted via telephone...

  2. A customized head and neck support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentel, Gunilla C.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a customized head and neck immobilization system for patients receiving radiotherapy including a head support that conforms to the posterior contour of the head and neck. Methods: The system includes a customized headrest to support the posterior head and neck. This is fixed to a thermoplastic face mask that molds to the anterior head/face contours. The shape of these customized head and neck supports were compared to 'standard' supports. Results: This system is comfortable for the patients and appears to be effective in reproducing the setup of the treatment. Conclusions: The variability in the size and shape of the customized posterior supports exceeded that of 'standard' headrests. It is our clinical impression that the customized supports improve reproducibility and are now a standard part of our immobilization system. The quantitative analysis of the customized headrests and some commonly used 'standard' headrests suggests that the customized supports are better able to address variabilities in patient shape

  3. Management of Colorectal Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Although the treatment strategy for colorectal trauma has advanced during the last part of the twentieth century and the result has improved, compared to other injuries, problems, such as high septic complication rates and mortality rates, still exist, so standard management for colorectal trauma is still a controversial issue. For that reason, we designed this article to address current recommendations for management of colorectal injuries based on a review of literature. According to the reviewed data, although sufficient evidence exists for primary repair being the treatment of choice in most cases of nondestructive colon injuries, many surgeons are still concerned about anastomotic leakage or failure, and prefer to perform a diverting colostomy. Recently, some reports have shown that primary repair or resection and anastomosis, is better than a diverting colostomy even in cases of destructive colon injuries, but it has not fully established as the standard treatment. The same guideline as that for colonic injury is applied in cases of intraperitoneal rectal injuries, and, diversion, primary repair, and presacral drainage are regarded as the standards for the management of extraperitoneal rectal injuries. However, some reports state that primary repair without a diverting colostomy has benefit in the treatment of extraperitoneal rectal injury, and presacral drainage is still controversial. In conclusion, ideally an individual management strategy would be developed for each patient suffering from colorectal injury. To do this, an evidence-based treatment plan should be carefully developed. PMID:21980586

  4. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a better understanding of mechanisms involved, may expand the applications for PBM in the management of other complications associated with HNC treatment. This article (part 1) describes PBM mechanisms of action, dosimetry, and safety aspects and, in doing so, provides a basis for a companion paper (part 2) which describes the potential breadth of potential applications of PBM in the management of side-effects of (chemo)radiation therapy in patients being treated for HNC and proposes PBM parameters. Methods This study is a narrative non-systematic review. Results We review PBM mechanisms of action and dosimetric considerations. Virtually, all conditions modulated by PBM (e.g., ulceration, inflammation, lymphedema, pain, fibrosis, neurological and muscular injury) are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of (chemo)radiation therapy-induced complications in patients treated for HNC. The impact of PBM on tumor behavior and tumor response to treatment has been insufficiently studied. In vitro studies assessing the effect of PBM on tumor cells report conflicting results, perhaps attributable to inconsistencies of PBM power and dose. Nonetheless, the biological bases for the broad clinical activities ascribed to PBM have also been noted to be similar to those activities and pathways associated with negative tumor behaviors and impeded response to treatment. While there are no anecdotal descriptions of poor tumor outcomes in patients treated with PBM, confirming its neutrality with respect to cancer responsiveness is a critical priority. Conclusion Based on its therapeutic effects, PBM may have utility in a broad range of oral, oropharyngeal, facial, and neck

  5. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What are my ... and neck cancer. For updated information on new cancer treatments that are available, you should discuss these issues ...

  6. Congenital neck masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Peter A; Hirsch, David L; Dierks, Eric J

    2008-08-01

    Congenital neck lesions reflect abnormal embryogenesis in head and neck development. A thorough knowledge of embryology and anatomy is critical in the diagnosis and treatment of these lesions. The appropriate diagnosis of these lesions is necessary to provide appropriate treatment and long-term follow up, because some of these lesions may undergo malignant transformation or be harbingers of malignant disease.

  7. The burden of neck pain: its meaning for persons with neck pain and healthcare providers, explored by concept mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Randeraad-van der Zee, Carlijn H; Beurskens, Anna J H M; Swinkels, Raymond A H M; Pool, Jan J M; Batterham, Roy W; Osborne, Richard H; de Vet, Henrica C W

    2016-05-01

    To empirically define the concept of burden of neck pain. The lack of a clear understanding of this construct from the perspective of persons with neck pain and care providers hampers adequate measurement of this burden. An additional aim was to compare the conceptual model obtained with the frequently used Neck Disability Index (NDI). Concept mapping, combining qualitative (nominal group technique and group consensus) and quantitative research methods (cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling), was applied to groups of persons with neck pain (n = 3) and professionals treating persons with neck pain (n = 2). Group members generated statements, which were organized into concept maps. Group members achieved consensus about the number and description of domains and the researchers then generated an overall mind map covering the full breadth of the burden of neck pain. Concept mapping revealed 12 domains of burden of neck pain: impaired mobility neck, neck pain, fatigue/concentration, physical complaints, psychological aspects/consequences, activities of daily living, social participation, financial consequences, difficult to treat/difficult to diagnose, difference of opinion with care providers, incomprehension by social environment, and how person with neck pain deal with complaints. All ten items of the NDI could be linked to the mind map, but the NDI measures only part of the burden of neck pain. This study revealed the relevant domains for the burden of neck pain from the viewpoints of persons with neck pain and their care providers. These results can guide the identification of existing measurements instruments for each domain or the development of new ones to measure the burden of neck pain.

  8. Computed tomography in trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented

  9. Computed tomography in trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toombs, B.D.; Sandler, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book begins with a chapter dealing with the epidemiology and mechanisms of trauma. Trauma accounts for more lives lost in the United States than cancer and heart disease. The fact that 30%-40% of trauma-related deaths are caused by improper or delayed diagnoses or treatment emphasizes the importance of rapid and accurate methods to establish a diagnosis. Acute thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic trauma and their complications are discussed. A chapter on high-resolution CT of spinal and facial trauma and the role of three-dimensional reconstruction images is presented.

  10. Maxillofacial trauma: managing potentially dangerous and disfiguring complex injuries [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Devjani; Salazar, Lea; Zaurova, Milana

    2017-04-22

    Patients with maxillofacial trauma require a careful evaluation due to the anatomical proximity of the maxillofacial region to the head and neck. Facial injuries can range from soft-tissue lacerations and nondisplaced nasal fractures to severe, complex fractures, eye injuries, and possible brain injury. Though the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines provide a framework for the management of trauma patients, they do not provide a detailed reference for many subtle or complex facial injuries. This issue adds a more comprehensive and systematic approach to the secondary survey of the maxillofacial area and emergency department management of injuries to the face. In addition to an overall review of maxillofacial trauma pathophysiology, associated injuries, and physical examination, this review will also discuss relevant imaging, treatment, and disposition plans. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  11. Panhypopituitarism after multisystem trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechecka, Joanna; Krzewska, Aleksandra; Droń, Izabela; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    The pituitary gland plays a key role in hormonal regulation in the organism, contributing to maintenance of balance of basic vital functions. To emphasise the need for assessment of pituitary function after head injury, as correct diagnosis and hormone replacement therapy prove to be a life-saving therapy accelerating the recovery process. A healthy, normally developing 9-year-old girl, a child of young and healthy parents, was struck by a falling tree. The results of severe head trauma included adrenal crisis, hypothyroidism, and diabetes insipidus as manifestations of damage to the anterior and posterior pituitary gland. Administration of hormone replacement therapy, i.e. hydrocortisone, L-thyroxine, and desmopressin greatly improved the patient´s condition and facilitated effective rehabilitation. Determination of pituitary hormones in children after severe head injury should be an important part of diagnosis allowing identification of an early stage of acute hypopituitarism and acceleration of recovery through hormone replacement therapy.

  12. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    In our cases of acute and subacute subdural hematoma, the use of CT was evaluated. In our department of surgery, acute subdural hematoma was found in 46 of 388 patients of head trauma who underwent CT. Acute subdural hematoma, like epidural hematoma was usually visualized as a high-density area along the cranial inner table, and this was easily differenciated from epidural hematoma because of difference in shape from the other. The picture of acute subdural hematoma was occasionally confused with that of intracerebral hematoma or cerebral contusion. Single use of CT does not differenciate subacute subdural hematoma from chronic subdural hematoma. However, CT usually visualized acute hematoma as a high-density area, showing the extent of hematoma. Comparison of the thickness of hematoma with the axis deviation of the median part such as the 3rd cerebral ventricle suggested severity of cerebral edema. CT also revealed bilateral or multiple lesions of cerebral contusion or intracerebral hematoma. (Ueda, J.)

  13. 1029: Tranexamic Acid for Pediatric Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    parts. Of total 74 cases of rib fracture , the number of fracture between bone scan and CT are identical in only 9 cases (12%), and different in 65...OF BONE SCANNING IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF HIDDEN FRACTURE IN MAJOR TRAUMA PATIENTS Hang Joo Cho1, Sung Jeep Kim1, Jin Seok Baek2; 1The Catholic University...the hidden fracture . We investi- gated the usefulness of bone scan in the diagnosis of hidden fracture of major trauma patients. Methods: This study

  14. Morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C.P.; Dijkstra, P.U.; van der Laan, B.F.; Plukker, J.T.; Roodenburg, J.L.

    Background. Studies on morbidity of the neck after head and neck cancer therapy are scarcely described. Methods. Patients who underwent surgery, including neck dissection, with and without radiation therapy at least 1 year before the study were asked to participate. We assessed neck pain, loss of

  15. Femur Neck Fracture in a Young Marfan Syndrome Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Uk; Kong, Gyu-Min; Park, Jun-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant and could decrease bone mineral density. So patients with Marfan syndrome could vulnerable to trauma in old ages. We present the first report, to the best of our knowledge, of a rare fracture of the femoral neck with a minor traumatic history in a juvenile Marfan syndrome patient whose physis is still open. Although the patient is young, her bone mineral density was low and the geometry of femur is changed like old ages. The femur neck fracture in children is very rare and only caused by high energy trauma, we concluded that the Marfan syndrome makes the bone weaker in young age and preventative medications to avoid fractures in younger Marfan syndrome patients are necessary in early ages.

  16. Pitfalls in neck imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, S.B.; Phillips, C.D.; Cornett, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    CT and MR imaging have become effective imaging modalities in the evaluation of primary head and neck neoplasms. As radiologists have gained experience in head and neck imaging, certain pitfalls have become evident. Identification of pathologic lymph nodes is the critical element in staging neoplasms of the head and neck. The diagnosis of cervical lymphadenopathy may be complicated by confusion with normal structures, inadequate contrast opacification of vascular structures, and poor scanning technique. This paper illustrates these potential problem areas on both CT and MR images and offers the authors' approach to further evaluation in problem cases

  17. Multidisciplinary treatment of the neck

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bree, Remco; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Leemans, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    Since lymph node metastases are one of the most important prognostic factors, treatment of the neck is challenging. In clinically N0 neck, (super)selective neck dissection is indicated, whereas a more extensive neck dissection with preservation of important structures is performed in N2-N3 disease.

  18. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... find out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  20. Key performance indicators in British military trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stannard, Adam; Tai, Nigel R; Bowley, Douglas M; Midwinter, Mark; Hodgetts, Tim J

    2008-08-01

    Key performance indicators (KPI) are tools for assessing process and outcome in systems of health care provision and are an essential component in performance improvement. Although KPI have been used in British military trauma for 10 years, they remain poorly defined and are derived from civilian metrics that do not adjust for the realities of field trauma care. Our aim was to modify current trauma KPI to ensure they more faithfully reflect both the military setting and contemporary evidence in order to both aid accurate calibration of the performance of the British Defence Medical Services and act as a driver for performance improvement. A workshop was convened that was attended by senior, experienced doctors and nurses from all disciplines of trauma care in the British military. "Speciality-specific" KPI were developed by interest groups using evidence-based data where available and collective experience where this was lacking. In a final discussion these were streamlined into 60 KPI covering each phase of trauma management. The introduction of these KPI sets a number of important benchmarks by which British military trauma can be measured. As part of a performance improvement programme, these will allow closer monitoring of our performance and assist efforts to develop, train, and resource British military trauma providers.

  1. Cervical muscle dysfunction in chronic whiplash-associated disorder grade 2: the relevance of the trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederhand, Marc J; Hermens, Hermie J; IJzerman, Maarten J; Turk, Dennis C; Zilvold, Gerrit

    2002-05-15

    Surface electromyography measurements of the upper trapezius muscles were performed in patients with a chronic whiplash-associated disorder Grade 2 and those with nonspecific neck pain. To determine the etiologic relation between acceleration-deceleration trauma and the presence of cervical muscle dysfunction in the chronic stage of whiplash-associated disorder. From a biopsychosocial perspective, the acceleration-deceleration trauma in patients with whiplash-associated disorder is not regarded as a cause of chronicity of neck pain, but rather as a risk factor triggering response systems that contribute to the maintenance of neck pain. One of the contributing factors is dysfunction of the cervical muscles. Considering the limited etiologic significance of the trauma, it is hypothesized that in patients with neck pain, there are no differences in muscle activation patterns between those with and those without a history of an acceleration-deceleration trauma. Muscle activation patterns, expressed in normalized smooth rectified electromyography levels of the upper trapezius muscles, in patients with whiplash-associated disorder Grade 2 were compared with those of patients with nonspecific neck pain. The outcome parameters were the mean level of muscle activity before and after a physical exercise, the muscle reactivity in response to the exercise, and the time-dependent behavior of muscle activity after the exercise. There were no statistical significant differences in any of the outcome parameters between patients with whiplash-associated disorder Grade 2 and those with nonspecific neck pain. There was only a tendency of higher muscle reactivity in patients with whiplash-associated disorder Grade 2. It appears that the cervical muscle dysfunction in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder Grade 2 is not related to the specific trauma mechanism. Rather, cervical muscle dysfunction appears to be a general sign in diverse chronic neck pain syndromes.

  2. Management of duodenal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Guo-qing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature in PubMed by the keywords of duodenal trauma, therapy, diagnosis and abdomen. It shows that because the diagnosis and management are complicated and the mortality is high, duodenal trauma should be treated in time and tactfully. And application of new technology can help improve the management. In this review, we discussed the incidence, diagnosis, management, and complications as well as mortality of duodenal trauma. Key words: Duodenum; Wounds and injuries; Diagnosis; Therapeutics

  3. EPIDEMOLOGY OF TRAUMA GLOBALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Yuniarti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 This study describes the epidemiology of trauma globaly. Trauma can cause death, burden of disease and economic losses. Traffic accidents are the most common cause of injury in the whole world. Riskesdes 2007, the proportion of the highest injury of Yogyakarta, experienced by adult age group, higher in male, the high levels of injury increasing the proportion of respondents. Found in the work as an employee, in the upper midle economic level. Lower limb (leg is part most affected by injuries. Based on the types of injuries classified as serious in a row that a head injury. Traffic accidents are often caused by four factors: road user, drivers, pedestrian, and vehicle. Because the victim of traffic accident is quite high and high health costs incurred. By him that there are three phases of stage traffic accident prevention, the prevention of the pre-crash phase, the phase of the accident, when the accident occur, to minimize the injuries. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  4. Management of duodenal trauma

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN Guo-qing; YANG Hua

    2011-01-01

    【Abstract】Duodenal trauma is uncommon but nowadays seen more and more frequently due to the increased automobile accidents and violent events. The management of duodenal trauma can be complicated, especially when massive injury to the pancreatic-duodenal-biliary complex occurs simultaneously. Even the patients receive surgeries in time, multiple postoperative complications and high mortality are common. To know and manage duodenal trauma better, we searched the recent related literature...

  5. Head and Neck Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and neck include the following: Paan (betel quid) . Immigrants from Southeast Asia who use paan (betel quid) ... use this content on your website or other digital platform? Our syndication services page shows you how. ...

  6. TCGA head Neck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  7. Neck dissection - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drain in your neck when you leave the hospital. The provider will tell you how to care for it. Healing time will depend on how much tissue was removed. Diet and Nutrition You can eat your regular foods ...

  8. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 20K Loading... ...

  9. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 19K ...

  10. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 20K ...

  11. [Trauma registry and injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, S C

    2001-10-01

    The trauma registry network constitutes an essential database in every injury prevention system. In order to rationally estimate the extent of injury in general, and injuries from traffic accidents in particular, the trauma registry systems should contain the most comprehensive and broad database possible, in line with the operational definitions. Ideally, the base of the injury pyramid should also include mild injuries and even "near-misses". The Israeli National Trauma Registry has come a long way in the last few years. The eventual inclusion of all trauma centers in Israel will enable the establishment of a firm base for the allocation of resources by decision-makers.

  12. About Military Sexual Trauma

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    Full Text Available ... why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans Health Administration? Cancel Unsubscribe Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 19K Loading... ...

  13. BLADDER NECK RESECTION WITH PRESERVATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion The complication of retrograde ejaculation in young patients who are in need of fertililty may be avoided by preservation of > 1 cm of the supramontanal part during bladder neck resection. La Résection du Col de Vessie avec Préservation de l'Ejaculation Antégrade Objectif Evaluer une nouvelle méthode de ...

  14. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löfdahl Elisabet

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL. Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism, their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101 treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP, and Psychological Well Being (PGWB questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2. The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls.

  15. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfdahl, Elisabet; Berg, Gertrud; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Zachrisson, Maria Leonsson; Malmgren, Helge; Mercke, Claes; Olsson, Erik; Wiren, Lena; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-10-29

    Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5-2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8-3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0-9.3 Gy and 33.5-46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls.

  16. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Löfdahl, Elisabet; Berg, Gertrud; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Zachrisson, Maria Leonsson; Malmgren, Helge; Mercke, Claes; Olsson, Erik; Wiren, Lena; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2012-01-01

    Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls

  17. Bilateral Traumatic Fracture of Neck of Femur in a Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dhar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral femoral neck fractures are rare in the pediatric age group, and only a few cases have been reported following major trauma in children. A 9-year old girl presented with bilateral femoral neck fractures following a motor vehicle accident. The patient was managed with early operative fixation of the fractures with a successful outcome. This case highlights the importance of awareness of the occurrence of bilateral femoral neck fractures in the polytrauma patients. This case is presented due to its rarity.

  18. Prevalence of whiplash trauma in TMD patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggman-Henrikson, B; Rezvani, M; List, T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to describe the prevalence of whiplash trauma in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and to describe clinical signs and symptoms in comorbid TMD/whiplash compared with TMD localised to the facial region. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Bandolier databases was carried out for articles published from 1 January 1966 to 31 December 2012. The systematic search identified 129 articles. After the initial screening of abstracts, 32 articles were reviewed in full text applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six studies on the prevalence of neck trauma in patients with TMD met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Two of the authors evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. The reported prevalence of whiplash trauma ranged from 8·4% to 70% (median 35%) in TMD populations, compared with 1·7-13% in the non-TMD control groups. Compared with patients with TMD localised to the facial region, TMD patients with a history of whiplash trauma reported more TMD symptoms, such as limited jaw opening and more TMD pain, and also more headaches and stress symptoms. In conclusion, the prevalence of whiplash trauma is higher in patients with TMD compared with non-TMD controls. Furthermore, patients with comorbid TMD/whiplash present with more jaw pain and more severe jaw dysfunction compared with TMD patients without a history of head-neck trauma. These results suggest that whiplash trauma might be an initiating and/or aggravating factor as well as a comorbid condition for TMD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Prospects after Major Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtslag, H.R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. After patients survived major trauma, their prospects, in terms of the consequences for functioning, are uncertain, which may impact severely on patient, family and society. The studies in this thesis describes the long-term outcomes of severe injured patients after major trauma. In

  20. Trauma and the truth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Witnessing horrible things may leave a person scarred for life — an effect usually referred to as psychological trauma. We do not know exactly what it does or how it worms its way into our psyche, but psychological trauma has been linked to a wide range of fear- and depression-related symptoms

  1. Validity of vascular trauma codes at major trauma centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altoijry, Abdulmajeed; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Lindsay, Thomas F; Johnston, K Wayne; Melo, Magda; Mamdani, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    The use of administrative databases in vascular injury research has been increasing, but the validity of the diagnosis codes used in this research is uncertain. We assessed the positive predictive value (PPV) of International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision (ICD-10), vascular injury codes in administrative claims data in Ontario. We conducted a retrospective validation study using the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database, an administrative database that records all hospital admissions in Canada. We evaluated 380 randomly selected hospital discharge abstracts from the 2 main trauma centres in Toronto, Ont., St.Michael's Hospital and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, between Apr. 1, 2002, and Mar. 31, 2010. We then compared these records with the corresponding patients' hospital charts to assess the level of agreement for procedure coding. We calculated the PPV and sensitivity to estimate the validity of vascular injury diagnosis coding. The overall PPV for vascular injury coding was estimated to be 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 92.3-96.8). The PPV among code groups for neck, thorax, abdomen, upper extremity and lower extremity injuries ranged from 90.8 (95% CI 82.2-95.5) to 97.4 (95% CI 91.0-99.3), whereas sensitivity ranged from 90% (95% CI 81.5-94.8) to 98.7% (95% CI 92.9-99.8). Administrative claims hospital discharge data based on ICD-10 diagnosis codes have a high level of validity when identifying cases of vascular injury. Observational Study Level III.

  2. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH BLUNT ABDOMINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankareddi Vijaya Lakshmi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Blunt abdominal trauma is an emergency and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study is to study incidence, demographic profile, epidemiological factors, mechanism of trauma, treatment modalities, associated injuries, postoperative complications and morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective analysis of 72 patients of blunt abdominal trauma who were admitted in government general hospital between May 2013 to April 2015 in Department of General Surgery, Government General Hospital, Guntur, with in a span of 24 months were studied. Demographic data, mechanism of trauma, management and outcome were studied. RESULTS Most of the patients in our study were in the age group of 21-30 years. Spleen was the commonest organ involved and most common procedure performed was splenectomy. Most common extra-abdominal injury was rib fractures. Wound infection was the commonest complication. CONCLUSION Initial resuscitative measures, thorough clinical examination and correct diagnosis forms the vital part of the management. FAST is more useful in blunt abdominal trauma patients who are unstable. X-ray revealed 100% accuracy in hollow viscous perforation in blunt abdominal trauma patients. CT abdomen is more useful in stable patients. Definitive indication for laparotomy was haemodynamic instability and peritonitis. Associated injuries influenced morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment can save many lives.

  3. Mass Casualty Response of a Modern Deployed Head and Neck Surgical Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    tures (maxilla, mandible, frontal sinus), and miscellaneous injuries such as a parotid duct injury. Based on review of the operative log, 6 patients...trained to consider subtle head and neck injuries such as facial nerve or parotid duct transection. The flexibility to operate alongside other trauma

  4. Low level laser therapy/photobiomodulation in the management of side effects of chemoradiation therapy in head and neck cancer: part 1: mechanisms of action, dosimetric, and safety considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecha, Judith A. E. M.; Raber-Durlacher, Judith E.; Nair, Raj G.; Epstein, Joel B.; Sonis, Stephen T.; Elad, Sharon; Hamblin, Michael R.; Barasch, Andrei; Migliorati, Cesar A.; Milstein, Dan M. J.; Genot, Marie-Thérèse; Lansaat, Liset; van der Brink, Ron; Arnabat-Dominguez, Josep; van der Molen, Lisette; Jacobi, Irene; van Diessen, Judi; de Lange, Jan; Smeele, Ludi E.; Schubert, Mark M.; Bensadoun, René-Jean

    2016-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence supporting the efficacy of low level laser therapy (LLLT), more recently termed photobiomodulation (PBM), for the management of oral mucositis (OM) in patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer (HNC). Recent advances in PBM technology, together with a

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ... and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this ...

  6. Exercises for mechanical neck disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kay, Theresa M.; Gross, Anita; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Rutherford, Sherrill; Voth, Sandra; Hoving, Jan L.; Brønfort, Gert; Santaguida, Pasqualina L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Neck disorders are common, disabling and costly. The effectiveness of exercise as a physiotherapy intervention remains unclear. Objectives To improve pain, disability, function, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain. Search methods

  7. Heritability of neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, R; Hartvigsen, J; Kyvik, K O

    2006-01-01

    73%) answered the questions regarding neck pain. Probandwise concordance rates, zygosity-specific odds ratios and tetrachoric correlations showed a significant genetic effect on neck pain. An overall additive genetic component of 44% was found. The genetic effect decreased with age, accounting...... for only 10% in the oldest male group and 0% in the oldest female group. There was a statistically significant difference in heritability between males and females (34 vs 52%, P... gradually less important with increasing age, and environmental factors dominate almost completely in the older age groups....

  8. Prognostic factors for recurrences in neck pain patients up to 1 year after chiropractic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Anke; Humphreys, B Kim; Swanenburg, Jaap; Peterson, Cynthia K

    2015-09-01

    Information about recurrence and prognostic factors is important for patients and practitioners to set realistic expectations about the chances of full recovery and to reduce patient anxiety and uncertainty. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess recurrence and prognostic factors for neck pain in a chiropractic patient population at 1 year from the start of the current episode. Within a prospective cohort study, 642 neck pain patients were recruited by chiropractors in Switzerland. After a course of chiropractic therapy, patients were followed up for 1 year regarding recurrence of neck pain. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess prognostic factors for recurrent neck pain. The independent variables age, pain medication usage, sex, work status, duration of complaint, previous episodes of neck pain and trauma onset, numerical rating scale, and Bournemouth questionnaire for neck pain were analyzed. Prognostic factors that have been identified in previous studies to influence recovery of neck pain are psychologic distress, poor general health at baseline, and a previous history of pain elsewhere. Five hundred forty five patients (341 females), with a mean age of 42.1 years (SD, 13.1) completed the 1-year follow-up period. Fifty-four participants (11%) were identified as "recurrent." Prognostic factors associated with recurrent neck pain were previous episodes of neck pain and increasing age. The results of this study suggest that recurrence of neck pain within 1 year after chiropractic intervention in Swiss chiropractic patients presenting from varied onsets is low. This study found preliminary findings that older age and a previous episode of neck may be useful predictors of neck pain recurrence within 1 year. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Urological injuries following trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, C.; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M.; Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N.; Fotheringham, T.

    2008-01-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated

  10. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  11. Life Stories and Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongshøj, Inge Lise Lundsgaard; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Research has shown a connection between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and integration of traumatic experiences into the life story. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that life story formation begins in mid to late adolescence. Following these findings, the present study investigated...... whether experiencing trauma in youth was associated with a greater risk to integrate the trauma into the life story compared to adult traumatic exposure. Life stories were collected from 115 participants recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Moreover, participants filled out questionnaires regarding...... often integrate the trauma into their life story? Results will be discussed in relation to theories of development of life stories and of PTSD....

  12. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Diagnose and treatment of traumatic dental injuries is very complex due to the multiple trauma entities represented by 6 lunation types and 9 fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and lunation injuries are often combined...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an internet based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long term follow up is now available to the public and professionals, on the internet using the address www...

  13. Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Gerds, Thomas Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment for traumatic dental injuries are very complex owing to the multiple trauma entities represented by six luxation types and nine fracture types affecting both the primary and the permanent dentition. When it is further considered that fracture and luxation injuries are often...... problems in selecting proper treatment for some of these trauma types. To remedy this situation, an Internet-based knowledge base consisting of 4000 dental trauma cases with long-term follow up is now available to the public and the professions on the Internet using the address http://www.Dental...

  14. Trauma Induced Coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Per; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard

    2013-01-01

    It remains debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy compared to non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients were...... sampled (median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post-injury) upon admission to our trauma centre. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analysed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue...

  15. CT of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    There appears to be a limited role for computed tomography in the evaluation of chest trauma. The literature contains few papers specifically addressing the use of CT in the setting of chest trauma. Another series of articles relates anecdotal experiences in this regard. This paucity of reports attests to the remarkable amount of information present on conventional chest radiographs as well as the lack of clear indications for CT in the setting of chest trauma. In this chapter traumatic lesions of various areas of the thorax are discussed. The conventional radiographic findings are briefly described and the potential or proven application of CT is addressed

  16. Platelet aggregation following trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis A; Sørensen, Anne M; Perner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate platelet function in trauma patients, as it is pivotal for hemostasis yet remains scarcely investigated in this population. We conducted a prospective observational study of platelet aggregation capacity in 213 adult trauma patients on admission to an emergency department (ED...... severity score (ISS) was 17; 14 (7%) patients received 10 or more units of red blood cells in the ED (massive transfusion); 24 (11%) patients died within 28 days of trauma: 17 due to cerebral injuries, four due to exsanguination, and three from other causes. No significant association was found between...... aggregation response and ISS. Higher TRAP values were associated with death due to cerebral injuries (P 

  17. Urological injuries following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, C; Iyngkaran, T; Power, N; Matson, M; Hajdinjak, T; Buchholz, N; Fotheringham, T

    2008-12-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  18. [First aid system for trauma: development and status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D K; Lin, W C; Zhang, P; Kuang, S J; Huang, W; Wang, T B

    2017-04-18

    With the great progress of the economy, the level of industrialization has been increasing year by year, which leads to an increase in accidental trauma accidents. Chinese annual death of trauma is already more than 400 000, which makes trauma the fifth most common cause of death, following malignant tumor, heart, brain and respiratory diseases. Trauma is the leading cause of the death of young adults. At the same time, trauma has become a serious social problem in peace time. Trauma throws great treats on human health and life. As an important part in the medical and social security system, the emergency of trauma system occupies a very important position in the emergency medical service system. In European countries as well as the United States and also many other developed countries, trauma service system had a long history, and progressed to an advanced stage. However, Chinese trauma service system started late and is still developing. It has not turned into a complete and standardized system yet. This review summarizes the histories and current situations of the development of traumatic first aid system separately in European countries, the United States and our country. Special attentions are paid to the effects of the pre- and in-hospital emergency care. We also further try to explore the Chinese trauma emergency model that adapts to the situations of China and characteristics of different regions of China. Our review also introduces the trauma service system that suits the situations of China proposed by Professor Jiang Baoguo's team in details, taking Chinese conditions into account, they conducted a thematic study and made an expert consensus on pre-hospital emergency treatment of severe trauma, providing a basic routine and guidance of severe trauma treatment for those pre-hospital emergency physicians. They also advised to establish independent trauma disciplines and trauma specialist training systems, and to build the regional trauma care system as

  19. Spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorne, H.L.; Lander, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The diagnosis of spontaneous stress fractures of the femoral neck, a form of insufficiency stress fracture, can be missed easily. Patients present with unremitting hip pain without a history of significant trauma or unusual increase in daily activity. The initial radiographic features include osteoporosis, minor alterations of trabecular alignment, minimal extracortical or endosteal reaction, and lucent fracture lines. Initial scintigraphic examinations performed in three of four patients showed focal increased radionuclide uptake in two and no focal abnormality in one. Emphasis is placed on the paucity of early findings. Evaluation of patients with persistent hip pain requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and close follow-up; the sequelae of undetected spontaneous fractures are subcapital fracture with displacement, angular deformity, and a vascular necrosis of the femoral head

  20. From trauma victim to terrorist: redefining superheroes in Post-9/11 Hollywood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler-Forest, D.; Berninger, M.; Ecke, J.; Haberkorn, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I use trauma theory to identify and discuss post-9/11 film adaptation of graphic novels as trauma narratives. I argue, for example, that since the first major recognition of the graphic novel as a legitimate form of literature in the late 1980s, trauma has played an important part in

  1. Trauma no idoso Trauma in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ ANTONIO GOMES DE SOUZA

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available O crescimento populacional de idosos, associado a uma forma de vida mais saudável e mais ativa, deixa este grupo de pessoas mais exposto ao risco de acidentes. Em alguns países, o trauma do idoso responde por uma elevada taxa de mortalidade, a qual se apresenta de forma desproporcionalmente maior do que a observada entre a população de adultos jovens. Tal fato acarreta um grande consumo de recursos financeiros destinados à assistência da saúde e um elevado custo social. As características fisiológicas próprias do idoso, assim como a presença freqüente de doenças associadas, faz com que estes pacientes se comportem diferentemente e de forma mais complexa do que os demais grupos etários. Estas particularidades fazem com que o atendimento ao idoso vítima de trauma se faça de forma diferenciada. A presente revisão aborda aspectos da epidemiologia, da prevenção, da fisiologia, do atendimento e da reabilitação do idoso vítima de trauma.The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, desproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave diferently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and reabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  2. TC pathological Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Fontes, M.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is about different imaging techniques such as ultrasound, CT, RNM, PET-CT. These techniques permit to detect head and neck tumors, breast and digestive pathologies as well as congenital diseases and glandular tumor in the thyroid, parathyroid, muscles, lymphatic, nerves and vessels

  3. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... Veterans Health Administration 2,027 views 25:30 Language: English Location: United States Restricted Mode: Off History ...

  4. Trauma and Coagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yılmaz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding and coagulation disorders related to trauma are pathological processes which are frequently seen and increase mortality. For the purpose, trauma patients should be protected from hypoperfusion, hypothermia, acidosis and hemodilution which may aggravate the increase in physiological responses to trauma as anticoagulation and fibrinolysis. Performing damage control surgery and resuscitation and transfusion of adequate blood and blood products in terms of amount and content as stated in protocols may increase the rate of survival. Medical treatments augmenting fibrin formation (fibrinogen, desmopressin, factor VIIa or preventing fibrin degradation (tranexamic acid have been proposed in selected cases but the efficacy of these agents in trauma patients are not proven. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9:71-6

  5. Acute coagulopathy of trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R

    2010-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma predicts a poor clinical outcome. Tissue trauma activates the sympathoadrenal system resulting in high circulating levels of catecholamines that influence hemostasis dose-dependently through immediate effects on the two major compartments of hemostasis, i.......e., the circulating blood and the vascular endothelium. There appears to be a dose-dependency with regards to injury severity and the hemostatic response to trauma evaluated in whole blood by viscoelastic assays like thrombelastography (TEG), changing from normal to hypercoagulable, to hypocoagulable and finally......, is an evolutionary developed response that counterbalances the injury and catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage. Given this, the rise in circulating catecholamines in trauma patients may favor a switch from hyper- to hypocoagulability in the blood to keep the progressively more procoagulant...

  6. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... Loading... Loading... Rating is available when the video has been rented. This feature is not available right ...

  7. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) [for posttraumatic stress disorder]? - Duration: 2:01. Veterans Health Administration 27,844 ...

  8. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... 5:31 Get Fit for Life (8) Strength/Balance Training - Duration: 32:02. Veterans Health Administration 2, ...

  9. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from ... 5:31 Get Fit for Life (8) Strength/Balance Training - Duration: 32:02. Veterans Health Administration 2, ...

  10. Suspension Trauma / Orthostatic Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Suspension Trauma/Orthostatic Intolerance Safety and Health Information Bulletin SHIB 03-24-2004, updated 2011 This Safety ... the harness, the environmental conditions, and the worker's psychological state all may increase the onset and severity ...

  11. Anaesthesia for trauma patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    casualty incident, or a natural disaster. ... Exposure/environmental control: completely undress the ... E. Figure 1: Advance Trauma Life Support® management priorities ..... requiring operative intervention: the patient too sick to anesthetize.

  12. Cervical Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorder Grade 2: The Relevance of the Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, Marcus Johannes; Hermens, Hermanus J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Turk, Dennis C.; Zilvold, Gerrit

    2002-01-01

    Study Design. Surface electromyography measurements of the upper trapezius muscles were performed in patients with a chronic whiplash-associated disorder Grade 2 and those with nonspecific neck pain. Objective. To determine the etiologic relation between acceleration–deceleration trauma and the

  13. Blunt chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Daphne J

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with a wide range of injuries, many of which are life threatening. This article is a case study demonstrating a variety of traumatic chest injuries, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Literature on the diagnosis and treatment was reviewed, including both theoretical and research literature, from a variety of disciplines. The role of the advance practice nurse in trauma is also discussed as it relates to assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with traumatic chest injuries.

  14. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Airway management in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeron, O; Birenbaum, A; Amour, J

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance of a patent and prevention of aspiration are essential for the management of the trauma patient, that requires experienced physicians in airway control techniques. Difficulties of the airway control in the trauma setting are increased by the vital failures, the risk of aspiration, the potential cervical spine injury, the combative patient, and the obvious risk of difficult tracheal intubation related to specific injury related to the trauma. Endotracheal intubation remains the gold standard in trauma patient airway management and should be performed via the oral route with a rapid sequence induction and a manual in-line stabilization maneuver, to decrease the risks previously mentioned. Different techniques to control the airway in trauma patients are presented: improvement of the laryngoscopic vision, lighted stylet tracheal intubation, retrograde technique for orotracheal intubation, the laryngeal mask and the intubating laryngeal mask airways, the combitube and cricothyroidotomy. Management of the airway in trauma patients requires regular training in these techniques and the knowledge of complementary techniques allowing tracheal intubation or oxygenation to overcome difficult intubation and to prevent major complications as hypoxemia and aspiration.

  16. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  17. Non-trauma-associated additional findings in whole-body CT examinations in patients with multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffstetter, P.; Herold, T.; Daneschnejad, M.; Zorger, N.; Jung, E.M.; Feuerbach, S.; Schreyer, A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: whole-body CT scans for patients with multiple trauma represent an increasingly accepted first diagnostic tool. The multidetector approach in particular provides appropriate diagnostic algorithms for detecting nearly all relevant traumatic findings in a short time with a high grade of sensitivity and specificity. Non-trauma-associated additional findings are commonly depicted based on these CT examinations. The aim of this study is to evaluate the number and quality of these additional findings in consecutive patients with multiple trauma. Materials and methods: between 3/04 and 8/06 we scanned 304 patients according to our dedicated multiple trauma protocol. The examination protocol includes a head scan without intravenous contrast followed by a whole-body scan including the neck, thorax and abdomen acquired by a 16-row CT Scanner (Siemens, Sensation 16). The CT scans were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists with respect to non-trauma-associated findings. Lesions were assessed according to their clinical relevance (highly relevant, moderately relevant, not relevant). For patients with highly relevant findings, additional follow-up research was performed. Results: The average age was 43 years (range 3 - 92). 236 of the patients were male (77.6%), 68 female (22.4%). 153 patients (50.3%) had additional non-trauma-associated findings. In 20 cases (6.6%) lesions with high clinical relevance were detected (e.g. carcinoma of the kidney or the ovary). In 71 patients (23.4%) findings with moderate relevance were described. In 63 patients (20.7%) additional findings without major relevance were diagnosed. Conclusion: Whole-body CT scans of patients randomized by a trauma show a considerable number of non-trauma-associated additional findings. In about 30% of cases, these findings are clinically relevant because further diagnostic workup or treatment in the short or medium-term is needed. The results of these analyses emphasize the diagnostic value of CT

  18. Trauma team activation: Not just for trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoenix Vuong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized trauma teams have been shown to improve outcomes in critically injured patients. At our institution, an the American College of Surgeons Committee on trauma level I Trauma center, the trauma team activation (TTA criteria includes both physiologic and anatomic criteria, but any attending physician can activate the trauma team at their discretion outside criteria. As a result, the trauma team has been activated for noninjured patients meeting physiologic criteria secondary to nontraumatic hemorrhage. We present two cases in which the trauma team was activated for noninjured patients in hemorrhagic shock. The utilization of the TTA protocol and subsequent management by the trauma team are reviewed as we believe these were critical factors in the successful recovery of both patients. Beyond the primary improved survival outcomes of severely injured patients, trauma center designation has a “halo effect” that encompasses patients with nontraumatic hemorrhage.

  19. Current trauma care system and trauma care training in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Yang Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a life-threatening “modern disease”. The outcomes could only be optimized by cost-efficient and prompt trauma care, which embarks on the improvement of essential capacities and conceptual revolution in addition to the disruptive innovation of the trauma care system. According to experiences from the developed countries, systematic trauma care training is the cornerstone of the generalization and the improvement on the trauma care, such as the Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS. Currently, the pre-hospital emergency medical services (EMS has been one of the essential elements of infrastructure of health services in China, which is also fundamental to the trauma care system. Hereby, the China Trauma Care Training (CTCT with independent intellectual property rights has been initiated and launched by the Chinese Trauma Surgeon Association to extend the up-to-date concepts and techniques in the field of trauma care as well to reinforce the generally well-accepted standardized protocols in the practices. This article reviews the current status of the trauma care system as well as the trauma care training. Keywords: Trauma care system, Trauma care training, China

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  1. Pseudofracture: an acute peripheral tissue trauma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiche, Sophie S; Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Kohut, Lauryn; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Billiar, Timothy

    2011-04-18

    Following trauma there is an early hyper-reactive inflammatory response that can lead to multiple organ dysfunction and high mortality in trauma patients; this response is often accompanied by a delayed immunosuppression that adds the clinical complications of infection and can also increase mortality. Many studies have begun to assess these changes in the reactivity of the immune system following trauma. Immunologic studies are greatly supported through the wide variety of transgenic and knockout mice available for in vivo modeling; these strains aid in detailed investigations to assess the molecular pathways involved in the immunologic responses. The challenge in experimental murine trauma modeling is long term investigation, as fracture fixation techniques in mice, can be complex and not easily reproducible. This pseudofracture model, an easily reproduced trauma model, overcomes these difficulties by immunologically mimicking an extremity fracture environment, while allowing freedom of movement in the animals and long term survival without the continual, prolonged use of anaesthesia. The intent is to recreate the features of long bone fracture; injured muscle and soft tissue are exposed to damaged bone and bone marrow without breaking the native bone. The pseudofracture model consists of two parts: a bilateral muscle crush injury to the hindlimbs, followed by injection of a bone solution into these injured muscles. The bone solution is prepared by harvesting the long bones from both hindlimbs of an age- and weight-matched syngeneic donor. These bones are then crushed and resuspended in phosphate buffered saline to create the bone solution. Bilateral femur fracture is a commonly used and well-established model of extremity trauma, and was the comparative model during the development of the pseudofracture model. Among the variety of available fracture models, we chose to use a closed method of fracture with soft tissue injury as our comparison to the

  2. Reliability and validity of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders: Part 1-A systematic review from the Cervical Assessment and Diagnosis Research Evaluation (CADRE) Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeunier, Nadège; da Silva-Oolup, S; Chow, N; Southerst, D; Carroll, L; Wong, J J; Shearer, H; Mastragostino, P; Cox, J; Côté, E; Murnaghan, K; Sutton, D; Côté, P

    2017-09-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of clinical tests to assess the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders. We updated the systematic review of the 2000-2010 Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders. We also searched the literature to identify studies on the reliability and validity of Doppler velocimetry for the evaluation of cervical arteries. Two independent reviewers screened and critically appraised studies. We conducted a best evidence synthesis of low risk of bias studies and ranked the phases of investigations using the classification proposed by Sackett and Haynes. We screened 9022 articles and critically appraised 8 studies; all 8 studies had low risk of bias (three reliability and five validity Phase II-III studies). Preliminary evidence suggests that the extension-rotation test may be reliable and has adequate validity to rule out pain arising from facet joints. The evidence suggests variable reliability and preliminary validity for the evaluation of cervical radiculopathy including neurological examination (manual motor testing, dermatomal sensory testing, deep tendon reflexes, and pathological reflex testing), Spurling's and the upper limb neurodynamic tests. No evidence was found for doppler velocimetry. Little evidence exists to support the use of clinical tests to evaluate the anatomical integrity of the cervical spine in adults with neck pain and its associated disorders. We found preliminary evidence to support the use of the extension-rotation test, neurological examination, Spurling's and the upper limb neurodynamic tests.

  3. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  4. Hypothyroidism after Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Eun; Kim, Jae Chul; Park, In Kyu [Kyungpook National Yonsei University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yea, Ji Woon [Dongguk University Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the incidence of hypothyroidism in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients who received radiotherapy (RT) either with or without neck dissection. From January 2000 to December 2005, 115 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer and who received definitive RT or postoperative RT including standard anterior low-neck field were recruited to be part of this study. Nineteen patients had undergone ipsilateral neck dissection, whereas, 18 patients underwent bilateral neck dissection, and 78 patients were received RT alone. Patients' ages ranged from 28 to 85 years (median, 59 years) and there were a total of 73 male and 42 female patients. The primary tumor sites were the oral cavity, oropharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and other sites in 18, 40, 28, 22 and 7 patients, respectively. Radiation dose to the thyroid gland ranged from 44 Gy to 66 Gy with a median dose of 50 Gy. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 91 months, with a median of 29 months. The 1- and 3- year incidence of hypothyroidism was 28.7% (33 patients) and 33.0% (38 patients), respectively. The median time to detection of hypothyroidism was 8.5 months (range, 0 to 36 months). A univariate analysis revealed that neck node dissection was a risk factor for hypothyroidism (p=0.037). However, no factor was statistically significant from the results of a multivariate analysis. Patients treated for advanced head and neck cancer with radiotherapy with or without neck dissection will develop hypothyroidism. It is important to check the thyroid function periodically in these patients especially with the risk factor of neck node dissection.

  5. Aorta Balloon Occlusion in Trauma: Three Cases Demonstrating Multidisciplinary Approach Already on Patient’s Arrival to the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hörer, Tal M.; Hebron, Dan; Swaid, Forat; Korin, Alexander; Galili, Offer; Alfici, Ricardo; Kessel, Boris

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo describe the usage of aortic balloon occlusion (ABO), based on a multidisciplinary approach in severe trauma patients, emphasizing the role of the interventional radiologist in primary trauma care.MethodsWe briefly discuss the relevant literature, the technical aspects of ABO in trauma, and a multidisciplinary approach to the bleeding trauma patient. We describe three severely injured trauma patients for whom ABO was part of initial trauma management.ResultsThree severely injured multi-trauma patients were treated by ABO as a bridge to surgery and embolization. The procedures were performed by an interventional radiologist in the early stages of trauma management.ConclusionsThe interventional radiologist and the multidisciplinary team approach can be activated already on severe trauma patient arrival. ABO usage and other endovascular methods are becoming more widely spread, and can be used early in trauma management, without delay, thus justifying the early activation of this multidisciplinary approach

  6. Aorta Balloon Occlusion in Trauma: Three Cases Demonstrating Multidisciplinary Approach Already on Patient’s Arrival to the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hörer, Tal M., E-mail: tal.horer@orebroll.se [Örebro University, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Örebro University Hospital (Sweden); Hebron, Dan [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Radiology (Israel); Swaid, Forat [Bnai-Zion Medical Center, Department of General Surgery (Israel); Korin, Alexander [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Trauma Unit (Israel); Galili, Offer [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Department of Vascular Surgery (Israel); Alfici, Ricardo [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Surgical Division (Israel); Kessel, Boris [Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Trauma Unit (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo describe the usage of aortic balloon occlusion (ABO), based on a multidisciplinary approach in severe trauma patients, emphasizing the role of the interventional radiologist in primary trauma care.MethodsWe briefly discuss the relevant literature, the technical aspects of ABO in trauma, and a multidisciplinary approach to the bleeding trauma patient. We describe three severely injured trauma patients for whom ABO was part of initial trauma management.ResultsThree severely injured multi-trauma patients were treated by ABO as a bridge to surgery and embolization. The procedures were performed by an interventional radiologist in the early stages of trauma management.ConclusionsThe interventional radiologist and the multidisciplinary team approach can be activated already on severe trauma patient arrival. ABO usage and other endovascular methods are becoming more widely spread, and can be used early in trauma management, without delay, thus justifying the early activation of this multidisciplinary approach.

  7. Usefulness of ultrasound examination in larynx traumas in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubowska, A.; Brzewski, M.; Zawadzka-Glos, L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of the paper was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasonographic examination in diagnosing laryngeal traumas, and monitoring the progress or complications in its treatment. Material/Method: In the years 2004 - 2009, 12 children, including 5 girls and 7 boys with laryngeal injuries, aged 5 - 12 years, were diagnosed and treated. In all the children, US examination of the neck and larynx, using a high-frequency linear transducer, as well as laryngoscopy and radiological examination of the cervical spine and chest were performed. Results: Blunt injury of the larynx was found in 12 children; in 9 children, the injury had been caused by hitting the neck against an obtuse object, 1 child had been kicked in the neck, and in one there had been an attempt of strangling. One of the children had sustained blunt injuries of the neck and chest in a traffic accident. In US examinations, the findings included: unilateral lack of vocal cord mobility in 5 children, asymmetry in vocal cord mobility in 1 child, fractured thyroid cartilage with local hematoma in the affected area in 2 children, and thickened vocal cords in 5 children. In radiological examination, the findings included: subcutaneous emphysema in the cervical area of the chest in 4 children, and mediastinal emphysema in 2 children with traumatic rupture of the trachea shown in laryngoscopy. Conclusions: US examination is helpful in the assessment of the extensiveness of laryngeal trauma, especially in the evaluation of vocal cord mobility, cervical cartilage and the soft tissues of the neck. A high level of conformity was demonstrated between the results of cervical US and the respective laryngoscopic findings. US examination does not allow to differentiate between vocal cord paralysis and their immobilization. (authors)

  8. Shared Genetics of Temporomandibular Disorder Pain and Neck Pain: Results of a Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Corine M; Schouten, Maarten J; Ligthart, Lannie; van Houtem, Caroline Mhh; de Jongh, Ad; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2018-03-06

    (1) To examine the heritability of TMD pain and of neck pain; and (2) to estimate the potential overlap in genetic and environmental factors influencing TMD pain and neck pain. Data from 2,238 adult female twins who completed a survey on TMD pain and neck pain were analyzed. The total variance of TMD pain and neck pain was decomposed into variance attributable to additive genetic effects and nonshared environmental effects. Bivariate structural equation modeling was applied to estimate trait-specific and genetic effects shared between traits. The prevalence of TMD pain and neck pain was 8.6% and 46.8%, respectively, while 6.7% of the twins reported both TMD pain and neck pain. The phenotypic correlation between TMD pain and neck pain, based on a liability threshold model, was 0.43 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34 to 0.51). The heritability for TMD was 0.35 (0.17 to 0.51), and for neck pain was 0.33 (0.23 to 0.43). The genetic correlation between TMD pain and neck pain was 0.64 (0.35 to 1.00), and the environmental correlation was 0.32 (0.14 to 0.48). This study shows that variation in TMD pain and neck pain can in part be attributed to genes. The comorbidity between them is partly explained by genes that influence both traits and partly by the same environmental factors.

  9. Cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leignel, D.; Toledano, A.; Calais, G.; Gardner, M.; Valinta, D.; Halimi, P.; Alberini, J.L.; Plantet, M.M.; Banal, A.; Hans, S.; Floiras, J.L.; Labib, A.; Djemaa, A.; Naoun, L.; Bali, M.; Melais, K.; George, L.; Cazalet, M.; Gross, E.; Padovani, L.; Cowen, D.; Pignon, T.; Bannour, N.; Guedouar, R.; Bouaouina, N.; Mege, A.; Lapeyre, M.; Graff, P.; Marchesi, V.; Aletti, P.; Marchal, C.; Peiffert, D.; Serre, A.; Ailleres, N.; Lemanski, C.; Hay, M.H.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Allaw, A.; Azria, D.; Dubois, J.B.; Fenoglietto, P.; Maalej, M.; Nasr, C.; Chaari, N.; Hentati, D.; Kochbati, L.; Besbes, M.; Benjelloun, H.; Benchakroun, N.; Houjami, M.; Jouhadi, H.; Tawfiq, N.; Acharki, A.; Sahraoui, S.; Benider, A.; Racadot, S.; Mercier, M.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Bensadoun, R.J.; Martin, M.; Malaurie, E.; Favrel, V.; Housset, M.; Journel, C.; Calais, G.; Huet, J.; Pillet, G.; Hennequin, C.; Haddad, E.; Diana, C.; Blaska-Jaulerry, B.; Henry-Amar, M.; Gehanno, P.; Baillet, F.; Mazeron, J.J.; Chaouache, C.K.; Tebra Mrad, T.M.S.; Bannour, B.N.S.; Bouaouina, B.N.; Favrel, V.; Khodri, M.; Chapet, O.; Nguyen, D.; Ardiet, J.; Romestaing, P.; Thillays, F.; Bardet, E.; Rolland, F.; Maingan, P.; Campion, L.; Mahe, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thirteen articles are presented in relation with head and neck cancer. Chemoradiotherapy, medical examinations using nuclear techniques such PET scanning, fractionated radiotherapy after a chemotherapy, analysis of dose volume for patients treated by irradiation with a combined chemotherapy, dosimetry, conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation, dosimetry in brachytherapy, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of nose pharynx carcinomas, recurrence, are the different subjects treated in this part. (N.C.)

  10. Male genital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.H.; Gilbert, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have attempted to discuss genital trauma in relatively broad terms. In most cases, patients present with relatively minimal trauma. However, because of the complexity of the structures involved, minimal trauma can lead to significant disability later on. The process of erection requires correct functioning of the arterial, neurologic, and venous systems coupled with intact erectile bodies. The penis is composed of structures that are compliant and distensible to the limits of their compliance. These structures therefore tumesce in equal proportion to each other, allowing for straight erection. Relatively minimal trauma can upset this balance of elasticity, leading to disabling chordee. Likewise, relatively minimal injuries to the vascular erectile structures can lead to significantly disabling spongiofibrosis. The urethra is a conduit of paramount importance. Whereas the development of stricture is generally related to the nature of the trauma, the extent of stricture and of attendant complications is clearly a function of the immediate management. Overzealous debridement can greatly complicate subsequent reconstruction. A delicate balance between aggressive initial management and maximal preservation of viable structures must be achieved. 38 references

  11. Epidemiology of severe trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, F; García, I; Atutxa, L; Zabarte, M

    2014-12-01

    Major injury is the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. Among those under 35 years of age, it is the leading cause of death and disability. Traffic accidents alone are the main cause, fundamentally in low- and middle-income countries. Patients over 65 years of age are an increasingly affected group. For similar levels of injury, these patients have twice the mortality rate of young individuals, due to the existence of important comorbidities and associated treatments, and are more likely to die of medical complications late during hospital admission. No worldwide, standardized definitions exist for documenting, reporting and comparing data on severely injured trauma patients. The most common trauma scores are the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the Trauma and Injury severity Score (TRISS). Documenting the burden of injury also requires evaluation of the impact of post-trauma impairments, disabilities and handicaps. Trauma epidemiology helps define health service and research priorities, contributes to identify disadvantaged groups, and also facilitates the elaboration of comparable measures for outcome predictions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiological evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, K. S.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, O.

    1982-01-01

    Simple abdomen film has played an important role in decision of emergency operations in patients with the abdominal trauma. Nowadays, it still acts as a primary and inevitable processes in emergency condition. At the Department of Radiology, Hanil Hospital, 70 patients, who were laparotomied due to penetrating or nonpernetraing abdominal trauma, were observed and analyzed with simple abdomen film after comparison with the operative findings. The results are as follows: 1. Most frequent age distribution was 10 to 39 years and marked 70%. Male was in 90% incidence. 2. Penetrating injury largely involved the small bowel and abdominal wall. Non-penetrating injury usually involved the spleen, small bowel, liver, kidney, pancreas, duodenum. 3. Single organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the small bowel and abdominal wall. Multiple organ injury occurred in higher incidence at the spleen, liver, kidney and pancreas. 4. Organ distribution was 26% in spleen, 22% in small bowel, 14% in liver, 11% in abdominal wall. 7% in pancreas, 7% in kidney. 5% in duodenum, 4% in GB and CBD, 2% in diaphragm, 2% in colon, and 1% in stomach. 5. The specific roentgen findings and their frequency which useful in differential diagnosis at abdominal trauma, were as follows: a) flank fluid; Detectable possibility was 71% in liver laceration, 69% in spleen laceration and 57% in pancreas laceration. b) ipsilateral psoas shadow obliteration; Detectable possibility was 57% in liver laceration, 57% in kidney laceration and 46% in spleen laceration. c) free air; Detactable possibility was 60% in duodenal perforation, and 36% in peroration of upper part of small bowel. d) Reflex ileus; Detectable possibility was 64% in small bowel, 50% in liver laceration and 35% in spleen laceration. e) rib fracture; Detactable possibility was 36% in liver laceration and 23% in spleen laceration. f) pleural effusion; Detectable possibility was 29% in liver laceration and 27% in spleen laceration

  13. Pictorial essay: Vascular interventions in extra cranial head and neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyash S Kulkarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicine is an ever changing field and interventional radiology (IR procedures are becoming increasingly popular because of high efficacy and its minimally invasive nature of the procedure. Management of disease processes in the extra cranial head and neck (ECHN has always been a challenge due to the complex anatomy of the region. Cross sectional imaging of the ECHN has grown and evolved tremendously and occupies a pivotal and integral position in the clinical management of variety of head and neck pathologies. Advances in angiographic technologies including flat panel detector systems, biplane, and 3-dimensional rotational angiography have consolidated and expanded the role of IR in the management of various ECHN pathologies. The ECHN is at cross roads between the origins of great vessels and the cerebral vasculature. Thorough knowledge of functional and technical aspects of neuroangiography is essential before embarking on head and neck vascular interventions. The vessels of the head and neck can be involved by infectious and inflammatory conditions, get irradiated during radiotherapy and injured due to trauma or iatrogenic cause. The ECHN is also a common site for various hypervascular neoplasms and vascular malformations, which can be treated with endovascular and percutaneous embolization. This pictorial essay provides a review of variety of ECHN pathologies which were managed by various IR procedures using different approaches.

  14. [Trauma in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, José Antonio Gomes; Iglesias, Antonio Carlos R G

    2002-01-01

    The populational growth of the elderly, associated to a healthier and more active life, make this group of people more exposed to accidents. In some countries, trauma in the elderly is responsible for a high mortality rate, disproportionately higher than in the adults. This fact consumes a great portion of health care resources and implies in a high social cost. The distinct physiologic characteristics of the elderly and the frequent presence of associated diseases make that these patients behave differently and in a more complex way than patients of other ages. These particularities make that health care to the elderly victims of trauma have to be different. The present revision is about aspects of epidemiology, prevention, physiology, health care and rehabilitation of the elderly victims of trauma.

  15. Transfusion practices in trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Trichur Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resuscitation of a severely traumatised patient with the administration of crystalloids, or colloids along with blood products is a common transfusion practice in trauma patients. The determination of this review article is to update on current transfusion practices in trauma. A search of PubMed, Google Scholar, and bibliographies of published studies were conducted using a combination of key-words. Recent articles addressing the transfusion practises in trauma from 2000 to 2014 were identified and reviewed. Trauma induced consumption and dilution of clotting factors, acidosis and hypothermia in a severely injured patient commonly causes trauma-induced coagulopathy. Early infusion of blood products and early control of bleeding decreases trauma-induced coagulopathy. Hypothermia and dilutional coagulopathy are associated with infusion of large volumes of crystalloids. Hence, the predominant focus is on damage control resuscitation, which is a combination of permissive hypotension, haemorrhage control and haemostatic resuscitation. Massive transfusion protocols improve survival in severely injured patients. Early recognition that the patient will need massive blood transfusion will limit the use of crystalloids. Initially during resuscitation, fresh frozen plasma, packed red blood cells (PRBCs and platelets should be transfused in the ratio of 1:1:1 in severely injured patients. Fresh whole blood can be an alternative in patients who need a transfusion of 1:1:1 thawed plasma, PRBCs and platelets. Close monitoring of bleeding and point of care coagulation tests are employed, to allow goal-directed plasma, PRBCs and platelets transfusions, in order to decrease the risk of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

  16. Ipsilateral humeral neck and shaft fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Fractures of the proximal humerus or shaft are common, however, ipsilateral neck and shaft humerus fracture is a rare phenomenon. This combination injury is challenging for orthopaedic surgeons because of its complex treatment options at present. The purpose of this study was to review a series of ipsilateral humeral neck and shaft fractures to study the fracture pattern, complications and treatment outcomes of each treatment options used. Methods. A total of six patients (four female and two male with the average age of 42.8 years (range: 36–49 years was collected and reviewed retrospectively. Two of them were treated with double plates and four with antegrade intramedullary nail. According to the Neer’s classification, all proximal fractures were two-part surgical neck fractures. All humeral shaft fractures were located at the middle of one third. Five fractures were simple transverse (A3, one fragmented wedge fracture (B3. One patient had associated radial nerve palsy. Results. All surgical neck fractures except one united uneventfully in the average time span of 8.7 weeks. Four humeral shaft fractures healed in near anatomic alignment. The remaining two patients had the nonunion with no radiological signs of fracture healing. The average University of California, Los Angeles End-Results (UCLA score was 23.1. On the contrary, the average American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon's (ASES score was 73.3. The patients treated with antegrade intramedullary nails presented 70.5 points. The ASES scores were 79 in the double plates group. Conclusions. Ipsilateral humeral shaft and neck fracture is extremely rare. Both antegrade intramedullar nailing and double plates result in healing of fractures. However the risk of complication is lower in the double plating group.

  17. Vicarious traumatization in the work with survivors of childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crothers, D

    1995-04-01

    1. Persons working with victims of childhood trauma may experience traumatic countertransference and vicarious traumatization. After hearing a patient's trauma story, which is a necessary part of childhood trauma therapy, staff may experience post-traumatic stress disorder, imagery associated with the patient's story and the same disruptions in relationships as the patient. 2. During the first 6 months of working with survivors of childhood trauma, common behaviors of staff members were identified, including a lack of attention, poor work performance, medication errors, sick calls, treatment errors, irreverence, hypervigilance, and somatic complaints. 3. Staff working with victims of childhood trauma can obtain the necessary staff support through team support, in traumatic events, and in a leadership role.

  18. Efforts for improvement in radiotherapy of cancer using metronidazole with special regard to head and neck. Part of a coordinated programme on improvement of cancer therapy by the combination treatment of conventional radiation and physical and chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patricio, M.B.

    1984-03-01

    A great effort has been expended in the search for means which would be of immediate practical interest to the radiotherapist in order to achieve improvement of the result of cancer treatment. These means include modifiers which are sensitizers to potentiate radiation effects on tumour cells without affecting normal tissue. We started a controlled therapeutic trial on locally advanced head and neck carcinomas using metronidazole. There was good tolerance to metronidazole although improvement of local tumour control with this drug was not observed. We also observed that irradiation with fractions daily gave a better tumour control than single fractions a day

  19. Blunt cardiac trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarado, Camilo; Vargas, Fernando; Guzmán, Fernando; Zárate, Alejandro; Correa, José L.; Ramírez, Alejandro; M. Quintero, Diana; Ramírez, Erika M.

    2016-01-01

    El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestacio...

  20. Trauma cardiaco cerrado

    OpenAIRE

    Camilo Alvarado; Fernando Vargas; Fernando Guzmán; Alejandro Zárate; José L. Correa; Alejandro Ramírez; Diana M. Quintero; Erika M. Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestacio...

  1. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  2. Eye trauma in boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Gustavo; Curreri, Anthony

    2009-10-01

    In boxing, along with a few other sports, trauma is inherent to the nature of the sport; therefore it is considered a high-risk sport for ocular injuries. The long-term morbidity of ocular injuries suffered by boxers is difficult to estimate due to the lack of structured long-term follow-up of these athletes. Complications of blunt ocular trauma may develop years after the athlete has retired from the ring and is no longer considered to be at risk for boxing-related injuries. This article describes the wide range of eye injuries a boxer can sustain, and their immediate and long-term clinical management.

  3. Splenic trauma: Is splenectomy redundant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 41 year old male, serving air warrior sustained blunt abdominal trauma, CECT revealed grade III splenic injury. He was managed conservatively with good clinical outcome. Conservatism is the new approach to splenic trauma.

  4. Vascular trauma: selected historical reflections from the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rich Norman M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】In the spirit of international exchanges of knowledge with colleagues from all over the world, who are interested in the care and treatment of vascular trauma, we offer selected historical reflections from the western world on vascular trauma. Whereas there are a number of key individuals and a variety of events that are important to us in our writing, we know essentially nothing about what is written by other cultures and, particularly, the Chinese. It is well recognized around the world that Chinese surgeons are among the first to be highly successful in re-plantation of severed extremities, repairing both injured arteries and veins. Also, we recognize that there are contributions in other parts of the world, which are not well known to us collectively. Contributions from the Arabic speaking part of the world come to mind because there is periodic brief reference. We offer our perspective hoping that there will be one or more Chinese surgeons who will offer us the benefit of sharing their perspective on important historical contributions to the managing of vascular trauma outside of the western world, and, particularly, the English speaking literature. Once again, we encourage our colleagues in the Arabic speaking world to provide us with their perspective of the development and management of vascular trauma. Key words: Vascular system injuries; History; Western world; International educational exchange

  5. The neck-tongue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrell, R W; Marsden, C D

    1994-01-01

    The neck-tongue syndrome, consisting of pain in the neck and altered sensation in the ipsilateral half of the tongue aggravated by neck movement, has been attributed to damage to lingual afferent fibres travelling in the hypoglossal nerve to the C2 spinal roots. The lingual afferents in the hypoglossal nerve are thought to be proprioceptive. Two further cases of the neck-tongue syndrome are described, the spectrum of its clinical manifestations is explored, and the phenomenon of lingual pseudoathetosis is illustrated as a result of the presumed lingual deafferentation. Images PMID:8158185

  6. Trauma social y memoria colectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Iglesias Saldaña

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available El trauma social y la memoria colectiva, o memorias colectivas están de la mano en la América latina post-dictatorial. Desde fines de los años ochenta, se fueron destituyendo las dictaduras latinoamericanas, la mayoría sobre bases de consensos entre las fuerzas dictatoriales y los negociadores políticos de corrientes democráticas. La fuerza de los movimientos sociales sirvió de puente para las negociaciones, pero no logró estar del todo en las transacciones hacia los procesos de transición. Si así hubiera sido, la justicia y la verdad hubieran tenido un lugar privilegiado en los procesos denominados de "transición a las democracias" en distintos países del cono sur latinoamericano. La memoria colectiva ligada al trauma social tendrá varios componentes que abarcan también la memoria individual, incluyendo los espacios de la experiencia, propia y ajena. Este artículo pretende bucear en las interacciones entre ambos ámbitos de la memoria y sus conexiones con el tiempo presente.__________ABSTRACT:Social trauma and collective memory or collective memories are linked to the post-dictatorial Latin America. Since the late eighties, Latin American dictatorships were progressively dismissing, the majority on the basis of consensus between the dictatorial forces and the political mediators of the democratic part. The strength of social movements formed the bridge to negotiations, but could not entirely participate in the transactions to the transition process. If it would have been so, justice and truth would have had a special place in the process called "transition to democracy" in several Latin American Southern Cone countries. The collective memory linked to social trauma will have several components that also include individual memory, including personal and collective spaces of experience. This article aims to analyze the interactions between the two areas of memory and its connections to the present time.

  7. Altered cerebral blood flow in chronic neck pain patients but not in whiplash patients: a 99mTc-HMPAO rCBF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Torbjörn; Guez, Michel; Hildingsson, Christer; Toolanen, Göran; Nyberg, Lars; Riklund, Katrine

    2006-08-01

    A cross-sectional study to investigate regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with chronic whiplash syndrome and chronic neck pain patients without previous history of trauma along with a healthy control group. Chronic neck pain is a common disorder and a history of cervical spine injury including whiplash trauma constitute a risk factor for persistent neck pain. The aetiology of the late whiplash syndrome is unknown with no specific diagnostic criteria based on imaging, physiological, or psychological examination. Earlier studies indicate a parieto-occipital hypoperfusion but it is unclear if the hypoperfusion represents a response to chronic pain. The rCBF was monitored in 45 patients with chronic neck pain: 27 cases with chronic whiplash syndrome and 18 age and gender matched cases with non-traumatic chronic neck pain. The rCBF was estimated with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO). The non-traumatic patients displayed rCBF changes in comparison with the whiplash group and the healthy control group. These changes included rCBF decreases in a right temporal region close to hippocampus, and increased rCBF in left insula. The whiplash group displayed no significant differences in rCBF in comparison with the healthy controls. The present study suggests different pain mechanisms in patients with chronic neck pain of non-traumatic origin compared to those with chronic neck pain due to a whiplash trauma.

  8. Scoring systems of severity in patients with multiple trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapsang, Amy Grace; Shyam, Devajit Chowlek

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality; hence severity scales are important adjuncts to trauma care in order to characterize the nature and extent of injury. Trauma scoring models can assist with triage and help in evaluation and prediction of prognosis in order to organise and improve trauma systems. Given the wide variety of scoring instruments available to assess the injured patient, it is imperative that the choice of the severity score accurately match the application. Even though trauma scores are not the key elements of trauma treatment, they are however, an essential part of improvement in triage decisions and in identifying patients with unexpected outcomes. This article provides the reader with a compendium of trauma severity scales along with their predicted death rate calculation, which can be adopted in order to improve decision making, trauma care, research and in comparative analyses in quality assessment. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  10. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get YouTube Red. Working... Not now Try it free Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  11. Haemostatic resuscitation in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Par I.

    2016-01-01

    of a ratio driven strategy aiming at 1 : 1 : 1, using tranexamic acid according to CRASH-2, and applying haemostatic monitoring enabling a switch to a goal-directed approach when bleeding slows. Haemostatic resuscitation is the mainstay of trauma resuscitation and is associated with improved survival...

  12. Trauma Aware & Safety Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The interwoven issues of trauma and safety have swept through college campuses over the last decade, and they've arrived at doors of admission offices, encouraging officials to think more carefully about those concerns and take a closer look at how they handle them. Experts recommend in this atmosphere that admission offices discuss these topics…

  13. Understanding Child Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help of a trained professional. When needed, a mental health professional trained in evidence-based trauma treatment can help children and families cope and move toward recovery. Ask your pediatrician, family physician, school counselor, or clergy member for a referral. Visit ...

  14. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Imaging of vertebral trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daffner, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This translation of the toolbook published in the 'US-ART' series, offers invaluable help to medical radiologists in the diagnostic imaging and evaluation of complex vertebral traumas which are on the rise, inter alia due to increasingly dangerous leisure sports. (orig./CB) [de

  16. When Trauma Hinders Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Donald A.

    2018-01-01

    Many kindergarten teachers have encountered children who enter school lacking the ability to control their behavior, but they may not understand the social and biological processes behind these children's disruptive behavior. The author reviews research into early childhood brain development to explain how trauma and chronic stress can make it…

  17. About Military Sexual Trauma

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... count__/__total__ Find out why Close About Military Sexual Trauma Veterans Health Administration Loading... Unsubscribe from Veterans ... MST. http://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/msthom... Category Education License Standard YouTube License Show more Show less ...

  18. Early Childhood Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood trauma generally refers to the traumatic experiences that occur to children aged 0-6. Because infants' and young children's reactions may be different from older children's, and because they may not be able to verbalize their reactions to threatening or dangerous events, many people assume that young age protects children from the…

  19. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain - neck - self-care; Neck stiffness - self-care; Cervicalgia - self-care; Whiplash - self-care ... some pharmacies or retail stores. Ask your health care provider about using a soft neck collar to ...

  20. Imaging of head and neck venous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flis, Christine M.; Connor, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are non proliferative lesions that consist of dysplastic venous channels. The aim of imaging is to characterise the lesion and define its anatomic extent. We will describe the plain film, ultrasound (US) (including colour and duplex Doppler), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), conventional angiographic and direct phlebographic appearances of venous malformations. They will be illustrated at a number of head and neck locations, including orbit, oral cavity, superficial and deep facial space, supraglottic and intramuscular. An understanding of the classification of such vascular anomalies is required to define the correct therapeutic procedure to employ. Image-guided sclerotherapy alone or in combination with surgery is now the first line treatment option in many cases of head and neck venous malformations, so the radiologist is now an integral part of the multidisciplinary management team. (orig.)

  1. Traumatismos oculares Ocular traumas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelen Welch Ruiz

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de tipo retrospectivo longitudinal cuyo universo estuvo constituido por 72 ojos de 72 pacientes con traumatismos oculares mecánicos que fueron hospitalizados en el Hospital Militar Central “Dr. Carlos J. Finlay” desde enero de 1999 hasta enero de 2005. Para el análisis estadístico de la información se utilizó el programa automatizado SPSS versión 11.5 en el cual también se conformó la base de datos y se realizaron los cálculos de acuerdo con el tipo de variable analizada. Se utilizaron medidas de resumen, tendencia central y asociación estadística con un nivel de significación de p A retrospective longitudinal and descriptive study was carried out in 72 eyes from 72 patients with mechanical occular traumas, who had been hospitalized in “Dr. Carlos J. Finlay” Military Hospital from December 1999 to January 2005. For the statistical data analysis, an automated program (SPSS 11.5 version was used to create the database and estimations were made according to the variable types. Summary measures, central tendency measures and statistical association with significance level equal to p < 0.05 were employed. Males prevailed (95.8%, the average age was 30.26 years with a minimum rate of 17 years and maximum rate of 82 years. The most frequent mechanisms of trauma were aggressions (23. 6% and injures from secondary projectiles (13.9%. The anterior segment traumas were more frequent (61, 1% than posterior segment traumas (6.94%. Both segments of the eyeball were affected in 39, 1% of eyes which evinced the worst visual acuity. The most common associated injures were hyphema (54, 2% and vitreous hemorrhage (16.6%. Closed trauma (contusions were more common and most of the eyes had better final visual acuity (45, 2% with vision range of 0.6-1.0 and 26.2% with vision range of 0.59-0.1. On the other hand, eyes affected by open trauma (simple wound, contusion-wound, wound with intraocular foreign body and

  2. Predictors of Intrathoracic Injury after Blunt Torso Trauma in Children Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Caitlin; Mironova, Irina; Lehman, Erik; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic injuries are a major cause of death associated with blunt trauma in children. Screening for injury with chest x-ray study, compared with chest computed tomography (CT) scan, has been controversial, weighing the benefits of specificity with the detriment of radiation exposure. To identify predictors of thoracic injury in children presenting as trauma activations to a Level I trauma center after blunt torso trauma, and to compare these predictors with those previously reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (trauma center between June 2010 and June 2013 as a trauma activation after sustaining a blunt torso trauma and who received diagnostic imaging of the chest as part of their initial evaluation. Data analysis was performed on 166 patients. There were 33 patients (20%) with 45 abnormalities detected on diagnostic imaging of the chest, with the most common abnormalities being lung contusion (36%), pneumothorax (22%), and rib fracture (13%). Statistically significant predictors of abnormal diagnostic imaging of the chest included Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) trauma include GCS < 15, hypoxia, syncope/dizziness, cervical spine tenderness, thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness, and abdominal/pelvic tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MANAGEMENT OF LIVER TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dova Subba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM To estimate the incidence of Liver Trauma injuries and grade their severity of injury. To assess the factors responsible for morbidity and mortality after Liver Trauma. To study the postoperative complications and the management of Liver Trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present prospective study was conducted on 100 patients who were admitted to Department of General Surgery for treatment who were managed operatively or non-operatively for abdominal trauma and having liver injury forms the material of the study. This study was conducted over a span of 24 months from June 2013 to November 2015. RESULTS Maximum number of patients are in the age group of 21-30 years (46%. 85% patients (85/100 are males and 15% of patients (15/100 are females. Lapse time of injury and admission varied from 25 minutes to 66 hours and 30 minutes. 75 % of the patients (75/100 presented within 24 hours after injury. Death rate of patients who reached hospital after 24 hours of injury was higher than the patients who reached hospital within 24 hours of injury. 28% of patients (28/100 had associated bony injuries, out of which 5% of patients (5/100 expired due to primary haemorrhage of fractured femur. More than one segment was injured in many patients. Segment V is involved commonly making 55% (55/100 of patients. Next common segment involved is segment VII, making 39% (39/100. CONCLUSION Mechanism of injury is the important factor which is responsible for morbidity in liver injury. Nonoperative management proved to be safe and effective and often has been used to treat patients with liver trauma.

  4. Penetrating ureteral trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo P. Fraga

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this series is to report our experience in managing ureteral trauma, focusing on the importance of early diagnosis, correct treatment, and the impact of associated injuries on the management and morbid-mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From January 1994 to December 2002, 1487 laparotomies for abdominal trauma were performed and 20 patients with ureteral lesions were identified, all of them secondary to penetrating injury. Medical charts were analyzed as well as information about trauma mechanisms, diagnostic routine, treatment and outcome. RESULTS: All patients were men. Mean age was 27 years. The mechanisms of injury were gunshot wounds in 18 cases (90% and stab wounds in two (10%. All penetrating abdominal injuries had primary indication of laparotomy, and neither excretory urography nor computed tomography were used in any case before surgery. The diagnosis of ureteric injury was made intra-operatively in 17 cases (85%. Two ureteral injuries (10% were initially missed. All patients had associated injuries. The treatment was dictated by the location, extension and time necessary to identify the injury. The overall incidence of complications was 55%. The presence of shock on admission, delayed diagnosis, Abdominal Trauma Index > 25, Injury Severity Score > 25 and colon injuries were associated to a high complication rate, however, there was no statistically significant difference. There were no mortalities in this group. CONCLUSIONS: A high index of suspicion is required for diagnosis of ureteral injuries. A thorough exploration of all retroperitoneal hematoma after penetrating trauma should be an accurate method of diagnosis; even though it failed in 10% of our cases.

  5. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  6. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  7. The impact of specialist trauma service on major trauma mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ting Hway; Lumsdaine, William; Hardy, Benjamin M; Lee, Keegan; Balogh, Zsolt J

    2013-03-01

    Trauma services throughout the world have had positive effects on trauma-related mortality. Australian trauma services are generally more consultative in nature rather than the North American model of full trauma admission service. We hypothesized that the introduction of a consultative specialist trauma service in a Level I Australian trauma center would reduce mortality of the severely injured. A 10-year retrospective study (January 1, 2002-December 31, 2011) was performed on all trauma patients admitted with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15. Patients were identified from the trauma registry, and data for age, sex, mechanism of injury, ISS, survival to discharge, and length of stay were collected. Mortality was examined for patients with severe injury (ISS > 15) and patients with critical injury (ISS > 24) and compared for the three periods: 2002-2004 (without trauma specialist), 2005-2007 (with trauma specialist), and 2008-2011 (with specialist trauma service). A total of 3,869 severely injured (ISS > 15) trauma patients were identified during the 10-year period. Of these, 2,826 (73%) were male, 1,513 (39%) were critically injured (ISS > 24), and more than 97% (3,754) were the victim of blunt trauma. Overall mortality decreased from 12.4% to 9.3% (relative risk, 0.75) from period one to period three and from 25.4% to 20.3% (relative risk, 0.80) for patients with critical injury. A 0.46% per year decrease (p = 0.018) in mortality was detected (odds ratio, 0.63; p 24), the trend was (0.61% per year; odds ratio, 0.68; p = 0.039). The introduction of a specialist trauma service decreased the mortality of patients with severe injury, the model of care should be considered to implement state- and nationwide in Australia. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  8. Delayed Cerebral Ischemia following to Repair of Penetrating Trauma to External Carotid artery Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Eskandarlou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Penetrating trauma to anterior neck can induce cerebral ischemia due to carotid artery injury. Brain ischemia also can present after surgical carotid repairs. Early diagnosis and suitable treatment modality prevent from permanent neurologic deficit post operatively. Case Report: A 30 years old man with stab wound to zone two left side of neck underwent exploration and penrose insertion. Due to excessive bleeding through drain tube, patient was transferred to Besat Hospital of Hamadan. Surgical repair of external carotid artery successfully was done. Four days later patient developed right hemiparesis suddenly. According to MRI and color Doppler sonography finding of thrombosis of left common and internal carotid artery, reoperation was done. After thrombectomy cerebral ischemia and hemi-paralysis improved. Conclusions: Surgical approach to symptomatic penetrating neck trauma is oblique cervical incision, control of bleeding, repair of internal carotid, repair or ligature of external carotid artery base on some factors and preferential repair of internal jugular vein. Meticulous and fine surgical technique for both vascular repair and protection of adjacent normal vessels for avoiding to blunt trauma or compression with retractors is noticeable. Exact postoperative care as repeated clinical examination with goal of early diagnosis of internal carotid artery thrombosis and rapid diagnostic and treatment planning of this complication are important factors for taking of good result in treatment of penetrating trauma to carotid. Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci . 2016; 22 (4 :353-357

  9. Role of ENT Surgeon in Managing Battle Trauma During Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajguru, Renu

    2013-01-01

    With technological improvements in body armour and increasing use of improvised explosive devices, it is the injuries to head, face and neck are the cause for maximum fatalities as military personnel are surviving wounds that would have otherwise been fatal. The priorities of battlefield surgical treatment are to save life, eyesight and limbs and then to give the best functional and aesthetic outcome for other wounds. Modern day battlefields pose unique demands on the deployed surgical teams and management of head and neck wounds demands multispecialty approach. Optimal result will depend on teamwork of head and neck trauma management team, which should also include otolaryngologist. Data collected by various deployed HFN surgical teams is studied and quoted in the article to give factual figures. Otorhinolaryngology becomes a crucial sub-speciality in the care of the injured and military otorhinolaryngologists need to be trained and deployed accordingly. The otolaryngologist's clinical knowledge base and surgical domain allows the ENT surgeon to uniquely contribute in response to mass casualty incident. Military planners need to recognize the felt need and respond by deploying teams of specialist head and neck surgeons which should also include otorhinolaryngologists.

  10. Lower Urinary Tract Injuries Following Blunt Trauma: A Review of Contemporary Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jennifer P. L; Bultitude, Matthew F; Royce, Peter; Gruen, Russell L; Cato, Alex; Corcoran, Niall M

    2011-01-01

    Lower urinary tract trauma, although relatively uncommon in blunt trauma, can lead to significant morbidity when diagnosed late or left untreated; urologists may only encounter a handful of these injuries in their career. This article reviews the literature and reports on the management of these injuries, highlighting the issues facing clinicians in this subspecialty. Also presented is a structured review detailing the mechanisms, classification, diagnosis, management, and complications of blunt trauma to the bladder and urethra. The prognosis for bladder rupture is excellent when treated. Significant intraperitoneal rupture or involvement of the bladder neck mandates surgical repair, whereas smaller extraperitoneal lacerations may be managed with catheterization alone. With the push for management of trauma patients in larger centers, urologists in these hospitals are seeing increasing numbers of lower urinary tract injuries. Prospective analysis may be achieved in these centers to address the current lack of Level 1 evidence. PMID:22114545

  11. The Danish Neck Disability Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; O'Neill, Lotte; Kongsted, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To (1) translate and culturally adapt and (2) determine the clinimetric properties of the Danish 8-item Neck Disability Index (NDI-8) in primary sector patients (PSPs) and secondary sector patients (SSPs). Methods: Analyses included 326 patients with neck pain. Validity and reliability...

  12. Post-trauma ratings of pre-collision pain and psychological distress predict poor outcome following acute whiplash trauma: A 12-month follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Tina; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Ørnbøl, Eva

    2008-01-01

    emergency departments or primary care after car accidents in four counties in Denmark. After the collision patients received a questionnaire on psychological distress, unspecified pain and socio-demographics and 12 months later a follow-up on work capability and neck pain was performed. Risk factors were......Patients with acute whiplash trauma were followed to examine if post-trauma ratings of pre-collision pain and psychological distress were associated with reduced work capability and neck pain at 12 months follow-up. The study included 740 consecutive patients (474 females, 266 males) referred from...... identified by multiple logistic regression analysis. Factors associated with affected work capacity at the 12-month follow-up were pre-collision unspecified pain condition (OR = 2.4, p = 0.002) and socio-demographic characteristics: female gender, low educational level, unemployment and blue collar worker...

  13. The development and evaluation of a trauma curriculum for psychiatry residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Noor Jarun; Melton, Bengi; Banu, Sophia; Coverdale, John; Valdez, M Renee

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to briefly describe a curriculum on trauma in order to help other educators in their own planning and development of teaching on trauma. The 12-week course was offered to third-year psychiatry residents as part of their didactics scheduling. The classes included information on a wide variety of types of trauma including natural disasters, childhood trauma, refugee trauma, survivors of torture, intimate partner violence, and military sexual trauma. The course also offered techniques in therapy informed by transference and countertransference along with role-playing activities with the resident participants. Residents completed a pre- and postcourse survey in order to assess the attitudes, comfort, and knowledge in screening for trauma exposure. The proportion of residents who reported that it was very important to screen for trauma increased. Similarly, the proportion of residents who indicated they now screen for trauma increased as well. However, these were nonsignificant changes. There was no change in the proportion of residents who felt comfortable assessing for trauma before and after the curriculum. Even after the course, almost half of the respondents reported that they were still not comfortable in asking about refugee's experience of trauma or torture More residents reported that they screen for trauma after the curriculum. An ongoing development and evaluation of model curricula including possible expansion across specialties and health-care disciplines is warranted for this critically important topic area.

  14. Fair in the face: modern diagnostics of midfacial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajaczek, J.E.W.; Rodt, T.; Keberle, M.

    2007-01-01

    Modern diagnostics of midfacial trauma are embedded in a diagnostic concept that is oriented to the therapeutic relevance for the individual. Critical analysis of the indicated and efficient radiological method in the acute phase shows that MSCT is currently the method of choice in the diagnosis of midfacial trauma. Besides extensive acquisition of data in the shortest time the possibilities of modern post-processing provide a three-dimensional picture of the often complex injuries in real time. Other perilous injuries are often more important especially for the polytrauma patient. With modern scan protocols intracranial injuries as well as injuries of bone and soft tissue of the head and neck region can be diagnosed during a single examination. Radiology plays a key role for the economically oriented strategy of patient care. (orig.)

  15. Evaluating trauma center structural performance: The experience of a Canadian provincial trauma system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne Moore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indicators of structure, process, and outcome are required to evaluate the performance of trauma centers to improve the quality and efficiency of care. While periodic external accreditation visits are part of most trauma systems, a quantitative indicator of structural performance has yet to be proposed. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a trauma center structural performance indicator using accreditation report data. Materials and Methods: Analyses were based on accreditation reports completed during on-site visits in the Quebec trauma system (1994-2005. Qualitative report data was retrospectively transposed onto an evaluation grid and the weighted average of grid items was used to quantify performance. The indicator of structural performance was evaluated in terms of test-retest reliability (kappa statistic, discrimination between centers (coefficient of variation, content validity (correlation with accreditation decision, designation level, and patient volume and forecasting (correlation between visits performed in 1994-1999 and 1998-2005. Results: Kappa statistics were >0.8 for 66 of the 73 (90% grid items. Mean structural performance score over 59 trauma centers was 47.4 (95% CI: 43.6-51.1. Two centers were flagged as outliers and the coefficient of variation was 31.2% (95% CI: 25.5% to 37.6%, showing good discrimination. Correlation coefficients of associations with accreditation decision, designation level, and volume were all statistically significant (r = 0.61, -0.40, and 0.24, respectively. No correlation was observed over time (r = 0.03. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of quantifying trauma center structural performance using accreditation reports. The proposed performance indicator shows good test-retest reliability, between-center discrimination, and construct validity. The observed variability in structural performance across centers and over-time underlines the importance of

  16. A DIALECTICAL PERSPECTIVE OF TRAUMA PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brurit Laub

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a dialectical perspective, which attempts to elucidate the integrative components of trauma processing in therapy. It is proposed that the inherent movement toward greater integration is an expanding dialectical movement. It is conceived as a spiral resulting from the synergy of two dialectical movements. The horizontal line moves between the opposite aspects of the individual (thesis vs. antithesis toward a synthesis. The vertical line moves upward via whole/part shifts toward greater integration, or downward toward disintegration and fragmentation. It is proposed that the complementary processes of differentiation and linking are the building blocks of the integrative/dialectical movement. Differentiation relates to the separation of parts and linking relates to their connection. The role of differentiation and linking in three basic interacting systems of trauma work is discussed. It is proposed that the dialectical principles are applicable to various therapeutic approaches and clinical vignettes are included to illustrate.

  17. Trauma care system in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zargar Moussa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: The high burden of injuries in Iran necessitates the establishment of a comprehensive trauma care system. The purpose of this paper is to de- scribe the current status of trauma system regarding the components and function. Methods: The current status of trauma system in all components of a trauma system was described through ex- pert panels and semi-structured interviews with trauma spe- cialists and policy makers. Results: Currently, various organizations are involved in prevention, management and rehabilitation of injuries, but an integrative system approach to trauma is rather deficient. There has been ongoing progress in areas of pub- lic education through media, traffic regulation reinforcement, hospital care and prehospital services. Meanwhile, there are gaps regarding financing, legislations and education of high risk groups. The issues on education and training stan- dards of the front line medical team and continuing educa- tion and evaluation are yet to be addressed. Trauma regis- try has been piloted in some provinces, but as it needs the well-developed infrastructure (regarding staff, maintenance, financial resources, it is not yet established in our system of trauma care. Conclusions: It seems that one of the problems with trauma care in Iran is lack of coordination among trauma system organizations. Although the clinical management of trauma patients has improved in our country in the recent decade, decreasing the burden of injuries necessitates an organized approach to prevention and management of trauma in the context of a trauma system. Key words: Emergency medical services; Trauma centers; Wounds and injuries

  18. The Quality of Cost-Utility Analyses in Orthopedic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Schairer, William W; O'Dea, Evan; McCormick, Frank; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-08-01

    As health care in the United States transitions toward a value-based model, there is increasing interest in applying cost-effectiveness analysis within orthopedic surgery. Orthopedic trauma care has traditionally underemphasized economic analysis. The goals of this review were to identify US-based cost-utility analysis in orthopedic trauma, to assess the quality of the available evidence, and to identify cost-effective strategies within orthopedic trauma. Based on a review of 971 abstracts, 8 US-based cost-utility analyses evaluating operative strategies in orthopedic trauma were identified. Study findings were recorded, and the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument was used to grade the overall quality. Of the 8 studies included in this review, 4 studies evaluated hip and femur fractures, 3 studies analyzed upper extremity fractures, and 1 study assessed open tibial fracture management. Cost-effective interventions identified in this review include total hip arthroplasty (over hemiarthroplasty) for femoral neck fractures in the active elderly, open reduction and internal fixation (over nonoperative management) for distal radius and scaphoid fractures, limb salvage (over amputation) for complex open tibial fractures, and systems-based interventions to prevent delay in hip fracture surgery. The mean QHES score of the studies was 79.25 (range, 67-89). Overall, there is a paucity of cost-utility analyses in orthopedic trauma; however, the available evidence suggests that certain operative interventions can be cost-effective. The quality of these studies, however, is fair, based on QHES grading. More attention should be paid to evaluating the cost-effectiveness of operative intervention in orthopedic trauma. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Trauma Tactics: Rethinking Trauma Education for Professional Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Paula; Liddil, Jessica; Eley, Scott; Winfield, Scott

    2016-01-01

    According to the National Trauma Institute (2015), trauma accounts for more than 180,000 deaths each year in the United States. Nurses play a significant role in the care of trauma patients and therefore need appropriate education and training (L. ). Although several courses exist for trauma education, many nurses have not received adequate education in trauma management (B. ; L. ). Trauma Tactics, a 2-day course that focuses on high-fidelity human patient simulation, was created to meet this educational need. This descriptive study was conducted retrospectively to assess the effectiveness of the Trauma Tactics course. Pre- and postsurveys, tests, and simulation performance were used to evaluate professional nurses who participated in Trauma Tactics over a 10-month period. Fifty-five nurses were included in the study. Pre- and postsurveys revealed an increase in overall confidence, test scores increased by an average of 2.5 points, and simulation performance scores increased by an average of 16 points. Trauma Tactics is a high-quality course that provides a valuable and impactful educational experience for nurses. Further research is needed to evaluate the long-term effects of Trauma Tactics and its impacts on quality of care and patient outcomes.

  20. Cranial trauma in ancient Greece: from Homer to classical authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Astyrakaki, Elisabeth; Stefanakis, George; Agouridakis, Panos; Askitopoulou, Helen

    2010-12-01

    This article presents literary evidence on traumatic cranio-cerebral injuries in ancient Greece from about 900 B.C. to 100 B.C. The main sources of information are epic and classic Greek texts of that period. Homer provides the first literary source of head trauma, which he portrayed in his epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey. He describes 41 injuries of the head, face and cervical spine, of which all but two were fatal. Subsequently, other classical authors like Plato, Plutarch and others illustrate cases of cranial trauma that occurred mainly in the battlefields, during athletic games or in unusual accidents. They describe some interesting cases of head trauma in prominent men, such as the poet Aeschylos, the kings Pyrrhos and Kyros and Alexander the Great. Most of these descriptions show that the ancient Greeks possessed very good knowledge of the anatomy of the head and neck region and also of the pathophysiological consequences of trauma in the region. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Autologous blood transfusion during emergency trauma operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carlos V R; Foulkrod, Kelli H; Sadler, Holli T; Richards, E Kalem; Biggan, Dennis P; Czysz, Clea; Manuel, Tony

    2010-07-01

    Intraoperative cell salvage (CS) of shed blood during emergency surgical procedures provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. Retrospective matched cohort study. Level I trauma center. All adult trauma patients who underwent an emergency operation and received CS as part of their intraoperative resuscitation. The CS group was matched to a no-CS group for age, sex, Injury Severity Score, mechanism of injury, and operation performed. Amount and cost of allogeneic transfusion of packed red blood cells and plasma. The 47 patients in the CS group were similar to the 47 in the no-CS group for all matched variables. Patients in the CS group received an average of 819 mL of autologous CS blood. The CS group received fewer intraoperative (2 vs 4 U; P = .002) and total (4 vs 8 U; P blood cells. The CS group also received fewer total units of plasma (3 vs 5 U; P = .03). The cost of blood product transfusion (including the total cost of CS) was less in the CS group ($1616 vs $2584 per patient; P = .004). Intraoperative CS provides an effective and cost-efficient resuscitation strategy as an alternative to allogeneic blood transfusion in trauma patients undergoing emergency operative procedures.

  2. A different trauma, a different fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ü. Kaldırım

    2013-12-01

    Discussion and conclusion: The epiphyses and the apophyses are the weakest part of all the skeletal system. In these regions, avulsion fractures may occur with sudden and severe spasm of the muscles. Avulsion fractures of SIAS are mostly treated conservatively unless there is more than 2 cm fragment separated and non-union case in which case surgery is recommended. This type of injuries can be easily overlooked or misdiagnosed due to history of trauma free. It may also effects

  3. Prevalance of neck pain in computer users

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabeen, F.; Bashir, M.S.; Hussain, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged use of computers during daily work activities and recreation is often cited as a cause of neck pain. Neck pain and computer users are clearly connected due to extended periods of sitting in a certain position with no breaks to stretch the neck muscles. Pro-longed computer use with neck bent forward, will cause the anterior neck muscles to gradually get shorter and tighter, while the muscles in the back of neck will grow longer and weaker. These changes will lead to development of neck pain. Objectives: To find incidence of neck pain in computer users, association between neck pain and prolong sitting in wrong posture, association between effects of break during prolong work, association between types of chair in use in prolong sitting and occurrence of neck pain. Methodology: For this observational study data was collected through Questionnaires from office workers (computer users), and students. Results: Out of 50 persons 72% of computer users had neck pain. Strong association was found between neck pain and prolonged computer use (p = 0.001). Those who took break during their work had less neck pain. No significant association was found between type of chair in use and neck pain. Neck pain and type of system in use also had no significant association. Conclusion: So duration of computer use and frequency of breaks are associated with neck pain at work. Severe Neck pain was found in people who use computer for more than 5 hours a day. (author)

  4. Spectrum of imaging findings in hyperextension injuries of the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sameet K; Wasyliw, Christopher; Nunez, Diego B

    2005-01-01

    Nonphysiologic hyperextension and lateral forces acting on the cervical spine and soft-tissue structures of the neck can result in a wide spectrum of injury patterns. Multiple factors (eg, patient age; the underlying morphologic features of the cervical spine; the magnitude, vector, and maximal focus of the force) all influence the observed patterns and the severity of injury. A review of the 5-year trauma database in two trauma centers revealed various injury patterns that were frequently recognized in patients with clinical evidence or historical documentation of a predominant hyperextension mechanism. Injuries included anterior arch avulsion and posterior arch compression fractures of the atlas, odontoid fractures, traumatic spondylolisthesis and teardrop fracture of C2, laminar and articular pillar fractures, and hyperextension dislocation injuries. More severe injuries were observed in patients with underlying predisposing conditions (eg, degenerative spondylosis, ankylosing spondylitis, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis). Knowledge of the involved biomechanical factors provides a framework for understanding these injury patterns. Diagnostic imaging, especially computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, plays a fundamental role in the assessment of patients with suspected cervical injury. Furthermore, cross-sectional imaging facilitates the recognition of accompanying injuries to the face, the head, and the vascular structures of the neck. (c) RSNA, 2005.

  5. Nurse-led psychosocial interventions in follow-up care for head and neck cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, IC

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Head and neck cancer and its treatment frequently results in long-term physical problems, such as dry mouth, difficulty eating, impaired speech and/or altered shoulder function. In part because of these persisting problems, head and neck cancer patients are prone to deteriorated

  6. CT of splenic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, B.G.; Federle, M.P.; Minagi, H.; Jeffrey, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-five consecutive cases of surgically proved splenic injuries were evaluated by CT. CT correctly identified 54 splenic injuries, with one false-negative and three false-positive studies. In the single false-negative study and in two of the three false-positive studies, CT correctly indicated the presence of a large hemoperitoneum and other abdominal visceral lacerations and so correctly indicated the need for surgery. Of the 55 proved cases of splenic injury, CT revealed hemoperitoneum in 54 (99%), perisplenic clot in 47 (85%), splenic laceration in 39 (71%), and subcapsular hematoma in 13 (24%). Perisplenic clot can be distinguished from lysed blood in the peritoneal cavity and is a sensitive and specific sign of splenic trauma, even in the absence of visible splenic laceration. The authors conclude that CT is highly reliable means of evaluating splenic trauma

  7. Trauma of the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the typical radiologic findings in chest trauma, and the value of conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and aortography is discussed. Conventional radiography rather than cross-sectional imaging is the mainstay in diagnosing thoracic trauma. During the critical phase with often concomitant shock, pelvic and spinal injuries tailored raiographic views or even upright chest radiographs are impractical. The severely traumatized patient is usually radiographed in the supine position and suboptimal roentgenograms may have to be accepted for several reasons. It is well documented that many abnormalities detected on CT were not apparent on conventional radiographs, but CT is reserved for hemodynamical stable patients. Nevertheless certain situations like aortic rupture require further evaluation by CT and aortography. (orig./MG)

  8. Imaging of the head and neck. 2. rev. and enl. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mafee, M.F.; Valvassori, G.E. [University of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Becker, M. [Geneva University Hospital (Switzerland)

    2004-07-01

    Remarkable advances in medical diagnostic imaging have been made during the past three decades. The development of new imaging techniques and continuous improvements in the display of digital images have opened new horizons in the study of head and neck anatomy and pathology. The American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) and its European and Asiatic counterparts evolved because of the emerging awareness of the roles that head and neck radiologists play in the diagnosis and management of head and neck, base of the skull, neuro-ophthalmologic and neuro-otologic diseases. This edition continues the tradition of excellence set by the first edition of Valvassori's Head and Neck Imaging (which was also the first textbook in head and neck radiology), and provides a comprehensive review of the most pertinent and up-to-date knowledge in the field of head and neck imaging. The content of this edition has been organized into 12 chapters according to anatomic regions. It now includes new material on the temporomandibular joint, the lacrimal drainage system, dental scanning, fibro-osseous and cartilaginous lesions of the head and neck, MRI sialography, MR interventional technique, and thyroid and parathyroid glands. All chapters have been expanded to address new developments in the field and to stress the importance of imaging anatomy, pathologic correlation, and pertinent clinical data. For each anatomic region, the embryology and anatomy are introduced, followed by congenital and developmental disorders, inflammatory processes, benign and malignant neoplastic diseases, trauma, and postoperative changes. The detailed reference lists in each chapter include key references and are as recent as possible. Care has been taken to include exquisitely reproduced illustrations that provide the maximum of pertinent information. It is our hope that this textbook will be useful to students and physicians in the fields of radiology, otolaryngology, neurootology, rhinology

  9. Imaging of the head and neck. 2. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mafee, M.F.; Valvassori, G.E.; Becker, M.

    2004-01-01

    Remarkable advances in medical diagnostic imaging have been made during the past three decades. The development of new imaging techniques and continuous improvements in the display of digital images have opened new horizons in the study of head and neck anatomy and pathology. The American Society of Head and Neck Radiology (ASHNR) and its European and Asiatic counterparts evolved because of the emerging awareness of the roles that head and neck radiologists play in the diagnosis and management of head and neck, base of the skull, neuro-ophthalmologic and neuro-otologic diseases. This edition continues the tradition of excellence set by the first edition of Valvassori's Head and Neck Imaging (which was also the first textbook in head and neck radiology), and provides a comprehensive review of the most pertinent and up-to-date knowledge in the field of head and neck imaging. The content of this edition has been organized into 12 chapters according to anatomic regions. It now includes new material on the temporomandibular joint, the lacrimal drainage system, dental scanning, fibro-osseous and cartilaginous lesions of the head and neck, MRI sialography, MR interventional technique, and thyroid and parathyroid glands. All chapters have been expanded to address new developments in the field and to stress the importance of imaging anatomy, pathologic correlation, and pertinent clinical data. For each anatomic region, the embryology and anatomy are introduced, followed by congenital and developmental disorders, inflammatory processes, benign and malignant neoplastic diseases, trauma, and postoperative changes. The detailed reference lists in each chapter include key references and are as recent as possible. Care has been taken to include exquisitely reproduced illustrations that provide the maximum of pertinent information. It is our hope that this textbook will be useful to students and physicians in the fields of radiology, otolaryngology, neurootology, rhinology, head

  10. Treatment of the femoral neck peudoarthrosis in childhood: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Femoral neck fractures in children and adolescents are rare. However, their complications are frequent - avascular necrosis, femoral neck pseudoarthrosis, premature physeal closure with consequent growth disturbance and coxa vara deformity. Case Outline. A 9.5­year­old boy was injured in a car accident, and femoral neck fracture was diagnosed. Prior to admission at our hospital he was surgically treated several times. He was admitted at our hospital eight months following the accident. On the X­ray transcervical pseudoarthrosis of the femoral neck was found, as well as coxa vara deformity and metaphyseal avascular necrosis. He was operated at our hospital; all previously placed ostefixation material was removed, valgus osteotomy of 30 degrees was done as well as additional local osteoplasty using the commercial osteoindactive agent (Osteovit®. Postoperatively, we applied skin traction, bed rest and physical therapy. At the final follow­up, the patient was recovered completely. He is now painless, the legs are of equal length, range of movements in the left hip is full, life activity is normal. The X­ray shows that the femoral neck pseudoarthrosis is fully healed. Conclusion. This case is presented in order to encourage other colleagues to challenge the problematic situation such as this one. Also, we would like to remind them what one should think about and what should be taken into consideration in the primary treatment of femoral neck fractures in children. Valgus femoral osteotomy, as a part of the primary treatment of femoral neck fracture in children (identically as in the adults can prevent the occurrence of femoral neck pseudoarthrosis.

  11. Neck muscle biomechanics and neural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fice, Jason Bradley; Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien

    2018-04-18

    The mechanics, morphometry, and geometry of our joints, segments and muscles are fundamental biomechanical properties intrinsic to human neural control. The goal of our study was to investigate if the biomechanical actions of individual neck muscles predicts their neural control. Specifically, we compared the moment direction & variability produced by electrical stimulation of a neck muscle (biomechanics) to their preferred activation direction & variability (neural control). Subjects sat upright with their head fixed to a 6-axis load cell and their torso restrained. Indwelling wire electrodes were placed into the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), splenius capitis (SPL), and semispinalis capitis (SSC) muscles. The electrically stimulated direction was defined as the moment direction produced when a current (2-19mA) was passed through each muscle's electrodes. Preferred activation direction was defined as the vector sum of the spatial tuning curve built from RMS EMG when subjects produced isometric moments at 7.5% and 15% of their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in 26 3D directions. The spatial tuning curves at 15% MVC were well-defined (unimodal, pbiomechanics but, as activation increases, biomechanical constraints in part dictate the activation of synergistic neck muscles.

  12. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA- CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja Ratnakumari Billa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent times there has been increased incidence of abdominal trauma cases due to several causes. Quick and prompt intervention is needed to decrease the mortality of the patients. So we conducted a study to assess the cause and the management of abdominal trauma cases in our institution. The aim of this study was to know the incidence of blunt and penetrating injuries and their causes, age and sex incidence, importance of various investigations, mode of treatment offered and post-operative complications. To study the cause of death and evolve better management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprises of patients admitted to and operated in various surgical units in the Department of Surgery at Government General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College Guntur, from August 2014 to October 2016. RESULTS Increase incidence seen in age group 20-29 years (30%. Male predominance 77.5%. Mechanism of injury–road traffic accidents 65%. Isolated organ injury–colon and rectum 40%. Other associated injuries–chest injuries with rib fractures 7.5%. Complications–wound infection 17.5%. Duration of hospital stay 8–14 days. Bowel injury management–closure of perforation 84.6%. Resection anastomosis 15.38%. CONCLUSION Thorough clinical examination, diagnostic paracentesis, plain X-ray erect abdomen and ultrasound proved to be very helpful in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries. Spleen is the commonest organ involved in blunt trauma and colon is the commonly injured organ in penetrating abdominal trauma, many patients have associated extremity and axial skeleton injuries. With advances in diagnosis and intensive care technologies, most patients of solid visceral injuries with hemodynamic stability can be managed conservatively. Surgical site infection is the most common complication following surgery. The mortality is high; reason might be patient reaching the hospital late, high incidence of postoperative septic

  13. Radiology of orbital trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.K.; Lazo, A.; Metes, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Computed tomography has become the gold standard against which to measure orbital imaging modalities. The simultaneous display of bone, soft tissues, paranasal sinuses, and intracranial structures is a unique advantage. Radiation dose and cost have been cited as disadvantages. These would suggest that CT be reserved for the patient with significant orbital injury or difficult diagnostic problems. Magnetic resonance is limited in the investigation of orbital trauma

  14. Incidence and severity of head and neck injuries in victims of road traffic crashes: In an economically developed country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bener, Abdulbari; Rahman, Yassir S Abdul; Mitra, Biswadev

    2009-01-01

    Head and neck injuries following the road traffic crashes (RTCs) are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in most developed and developing countries and may also result in temporary or permanent disability. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence pattern of head and neck injuries, investigate its trend and identify the severity of injuries involved with road traffic crashes (RTCs) during the period 2001-2006. This is a retrospective descriptive hospital based study. The patients with head and neck injuries were seen and treated in the Accident and Emergency Department of the Hamad General Hospital and other Trauma Centers of the Hamad Medical Corporation following the road traffic crashes during the period 2001-2006. This study is a retrospective analysis of 6709 patients attended and treated at the Accident and Emergency and Trauma centers for head and neck injuries over a 6 year period. Head and neck injuries were determined according to the ICD 10 criteria. Of these, 3013 drivers, 2502 passengers, 704 pedestrians and 490 two wheel riders (motor bike and cyclists). Details of all the road traffic crash patients were compiled in the database of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), and the data of patients with head and neck injuries were extracted from this database. A total of 6709 patients with head and neck injuries was reported during the study period. Majority of the victims were non-Qataris (68.7%), men (85.9%) and in the age group 20-44 years (68.5%). There were statistical significant differences in relation to age, nationality, gender, and accident during week ends for head and neck injuries (pQatar from road traffic crashes. The incidence of head and neck injuries is still very high in Qatar, but the severity of injury was mild in most of the victims. The findings of the study highlighted the need for taking urgent steps for safety of people especially drivers and passengers.

  15. Imaging of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Leuchter, Igor; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D.; Dulguerov, Pavel; Varoquaux, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed

  16. Rethinking historical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Gone, Joseph P; Moses, Joshua

    2014-06-01

    Recent years have seen the rise of historical trauma as a construct to describe the impact of colonization, cultural suppression, and historical oppression of Indigenous peoples in North America (e.g., Native Americans in the United States, Aboriginal peoples in Canada). The discourses of psychiatry and psychology contribute to the conflation of disparate forms of violence by emphasizing presumptively universal aspects of trauma response. Many proponents of this construct have made explicit analogies to the Holocaust as a way to understand the transgenerational effects of genocide. However, the social, cultural, and psychological contexts of the Holocaust and of post-colonial Indigenous "survivance" differ in many striking ways. Indeed, the comparison suggests that the persistent suffering of Indigenous peoples in the Americas reflects not so much past trauma as ongoing structural violence. The comparative study of genocide and other forms of massive, organized violence can do much to illuminate both common mechanisms and distinctive features, and trace the looping effects from political processes to individual experience and back again. The ethics and pragmatics of individual and collective healing, restitution, resilience, and recovery can be understood in terms of the self-vindicating loops between politics, structural violence, public discourse, and embodied experience. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Imaging of laryngeal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva, E-mail: Minerva.Becker@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Leuchter, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Leuchter@hcuge.ch [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervico-facial Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Platon, Alexandra, E-mail: Alexandra.Platon@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D., E-mail: Christoph.Becker@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Dulguerov, Pavel, E-mail: Pavel.Dulguerov@hcuge.ch [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervico-facial Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Varoquaux, Arthur, E-mail: Arthur.Varoquaux@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed.

  18. Trauma da Veia Porta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Pereira Fraga

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O trauma da veia porta é raro e freqüentemente fatal por causa de exsanguinação e alta incidência de lesões de estruturas adjacentes. Devido às pecualiaridades desta lesão e diferentes condutas propostas na literatura, o objetivo dos autores é relatar a experiência neste tipo de lesão. MÉTODO: Estudo retrospectivo, de janeiro de 1994 e dezembro de 2001, de 1370 pacientes submetidos à laparotomia devido trauma abdominal. Entre esses, 15 pacientes apresentavam lesão da veia porta. As lesões foram classificadas conforme a sua extensão e localização. RESULTADOS: O mecanismo de trauma predominante foi o penetrante. O diagnóstico da lesão foi realizado no intraoperatório. Os procedimentos executados foram: sutura, anastomose término-terminal e ligadura da veia porta. A mortalidade foi de 53,3%. CONCLUSÃO: A lesão da veia porta possui alta taxa de mortalidade e o atendimento adequado está diretamente relacionado à sobrevida.

  19. Head and Neck Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Toshiki; Imanishi, Yorihisa

    2008-01-01

    The limitation of concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in head and neck cancer (HNC) as the primary treatment is described based on recent findings. Limits in the application/indication involve factors of age, performance status (PS) and renal function. The first is that, as deaths in >71 years old patients are derived from other causes (41%) than HNC, CCRT is only useful for younger population; the second, patients with PS 0-1 or Karnofsky performance score >60-70 can be indicated; and third, contraindicated are those with creatinine clearance (CCr) <60 mL/min as the key drug cisplatin in CCRT has a high renal toxicity. It should be recognized that completion rates of chemotherapy and RT are as low as 66-85% and 84-92%, respectively, in CCRT. CCRT has such limiting adverse events as mucitis, dry mouth, dysohagia, weight loss, neutropenia, sepsis, etc., which are most important in CCRT application. CCRT is recommended for the primary cancers of larynx and hypopharynx because they are significantly better conserved than middle pharyngeal, oral and upper jaw cancers. Evidence of CCRT is poor for cancers in paranasal sinuses. Planned neck dissection (PND) is for the cervical metastatic lymph nodes and conducted 6-12 weeks after CCRT regardless to its outcome. In fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) negative cases, PND can be omitted. Necessity of PND is possibly inversely proportional to CCRT intensity performed. For control of remote metastasis, CCRT has obvious limits and inductive chemotherapy before it is currently considered. Salvage surgery post CCRT does not always yield a relief because of complication. Patients with advanced laryngeal cancer can be selected either to surgery or CCRT depending on results of the inductive chemotherapy. To predict the sensitivity to CCRT, some biomarkers like HPV, EGFR and VEGF have been suggested to be useful by retrospective studies. Understanding the limitation is as important as knowing the usefulness in

  20. Post-trauma ratings of pre-collision pain and psychological distress predict poor outcome following acute whiplash trauma: A 12-month follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Tina

    2008-01-01

    emergency departments or primary care after car accidents in four counties in Denmark. After the collision patients received a questionnaire on psychological distress, unspecified pain and socio-demographics and 12months later a follow-up on work capability and neck pain was performed. Risk factors were...... were not associated with poor outcome. In conclusion unspecified as opposed to specified pain (neck pain) before the collision is associated with poor recovery and high accumulation of pre-collision psychological distress is associated with considerable neck pain at follow-up. However, no conclusions...... on causality can be drawn. Personal characteristics before the collision are important for recovery and attention to pre-collision characteristics may contribute to the prevention of poor recovery after acute whiplash trauma....

  1. Post-trauma ratings of pre-collision pain and psychological distress predict poor outcome following acute whiplash trauma: A 12-month follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Tina; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Ørnbøl, Eva

    2008-01-01

    emergency departments or primary care after car accidents in four counties in Denmark. After the collision patients received a questionnaire on psychological distress, unspecified pain and socio-demographics and 12 months later a follow-up on work capability and neck pain was performed. Risk factors were...... of accident were not associated with poor outcome. In conclusion unspecified as opposed to specified pain (neck pain) before the collision is associated with poor recovery and high accumulation of pre-collision psychological distress is associated with considerable neck pain at follow-up. However......, no conclusions on causality can be drawn. Personal characteristics before the collision are important for recovery and attention to pre-collision characteristics may contribute to the prevention of poor recovery after acute whiplash trauma....

  2. Neck Pain in a 12-Year-Old Female: An Unusual Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toto, Regina L; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Manole, Mioara D

    2016-08-01

    Neck pain in the pediatric population has a broad differential diagnosis, ranging from benign to imminently life-threatening causes. Trauma and infection represent the most common etiologies of pediatric neck pain in the pediatric emergency department (PED) setting. Malignancy, though a rare cause of pediatric neck pain, is important to consider in patients with acquired torticollis or focal neurologic signs. We describe the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old female who presented to the PED with neck pain radiating down her upper extremities. The physical examination revealed diminished strength in her upper extremities compared to her lower extremities. Further evaluation revealed lymphadenopathy in the cervical and mediastinal areas and an epidural tumor in the cervical spinal column. The ultimate diagnosis was Hodgkin lymphoma presenting in an unusual manner with cervical spinal cord compression. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Neck pain is a common chief complaint among pediatric patients in the emergency setting. This case of spinal cord compression caused by malignancy illustrates the necessity of detailed spinal imaging in patients with neck pain and "red flag" signs, including but not limited to an abnormal neurologic examination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Childhood trauma and compulsive buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansone, Randy A; Chang, Joy; Jewell, Bryan; Rock, Rachel

    2013-02-01

    Childhood trauma has been empirically associated with various types of self-regulatory difficulties in adulthood. However, according to the extant literature, no study has examined relationships between various types of childhood trauma and compulsive buying behavior in adulthood. Using a self-report survey methodology in a cross-sectional consecutive sample of 370 obstetrics/gynecology patients, we examined five types of childhood trauma before the age of 12 years (i.e. witnessing violence, physical neglect, emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse) in relationship to compulsive buying as assessed by the Compulsive Buying Scale (CBS). All forms of trauma demonstrated statistically significant correlations with the CBS. Using a linear regression analysis, both witnessing violence and emotional abuse significantly contributed to CBS scores. Further analyses indicated that race did not moderate the relationship between childhood trauma and compulsive buying. Findings indicate that various forms of childhood trauma are correlated with compulsive buying behavior, particularly witnessing violence and emotional abuse.

  4. A pain in the neck-Imaging in neck sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyle, N.J.; Rutherford, E.E.; Batty, V.B.

    2011-01-01

    Deep neck infection has a high morbidity and mortality and the extent of infection is often difficult to estimate clinically. The complex anatomy and the communication between neck spaces means that infection can spread along fascial planes leading to life-threatening complications such as airway compromise, vascular erosion/thrombosis, neural dysfunction, and ultimately descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Imaging has an important role to play in identifying the extent of infection and the presence of complications.

  5. A pain in the neck-Imaging in neck sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyle, N.J., E-mail: nickylyle@doctors.org.uk [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Rutherford, E.E.; Batty, V.B. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Deep neck infection has a high morbidity and mortality and the extent of infection is often difficult to estimate clinically. The complex anatomy and the communication between neck spaces means that infection can spread along fascial planes leading to life-threatening complications such as airway compromise, vascular erosion/thrombosis, neural dysfunction, and ultimately descending necrotizing mediastinitis. Imaging has an important role to play in identifying the extent of infection and the presence of complications.

  6. Trauma Systems. An Era of Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansink, K.W.W.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of an inclusive trauma system in the Netherlands during last decade of the past century, has led to an improvement in Dutch trauma care. Eleven trauma regions were formed nationwide each surrounding a level I trauma center. All hospitals in a trauma region were assigned levels I, II

  7. Trauma and the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Joana; Varela, Ana; Medina, José Luís

    2010-12-01

    The endocrine system may be the target of different types of trauma with varied consequences. The present article discusses trauma of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, adrenal glands, gonads, and pancreas. In addition to changes in circulating hormone levels due to direct injury to these structures, there may be an endocrine response in the context of the stress caused by the trauma. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Trauma Studies: prospettive e problemi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Branchini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The trauma paradigm pervades contemporary life. In newspapers, on television, on the web, even in ordinary conversation, experiences of every kind (both figurative and positive ones are described as “traumatic”. Thus the very meaning of the term is often overturned. This article seeks to reshape the limits of the concept of trauma by tracing its evolution from the psychological debate of the early nineteenth century to the recent setting up of the specific discipline of Trauma Studies.

  9. Sick Leave within 5 Years of Whiplash Trauma Predicts Recovery: A Prospective Cohort and Register-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Tina Birgitte Wisbech; Fink, Per; Oernboel, Eva; Kasch, Helge; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Frostholm, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    10-22% of individuals sustaining whiplash trauma develop persistent symptoms resulting in reduced working ability and decreased quality of life, but it is poorly understood why some people do not recover. Various collision and post-collision risk factors have been studied, but little is known about pre-collision risk factors. In particular, the impact of sickness and socioeconomic factors before the collision on recovery is sparsely explored. The aim of this study was to examine if welfare payments received within five years pre-collision predict neck pain and negative change in provisional situation one year post-collision. 719 individuals with acute whiplash trauma consecutively recruited from emergency departments or primary care after car accidents in Denmark completed questionnaires on socio-demographic and health factors immediately after the collision. After 12 months, a visual analogue scale on neck pain intensity was completed. 3595 matched controls in the general population were sampled, and national public register data on social benefits and any other welfare payments were obtained for participants with acute whiplash trauma and controls from five years pre-collision to 15 months after. Participants with acute whiplash trauma who had received sickness benefit for more than 12 weeks pre-collision had increased odds for negative change in future provisional situation (Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 3.8 (2.1;7.1)) and future neck pain (OR (95%CI) = 3.3 (1.8;6.3)), controlling for other known risk factors. Participants with acute whiplash trauma had weaker attachment to labour market (more weeks of sick leave (χ2(2) = 36.7, p whiplash trauma raised the odds for future negative change in provisional situation (OR (95%CI) = 3.1 (2.3;4.4)) compared with controls. Sick leave before the collision strongly predicted prolonged recovery following whiplash trauma. Participants with acute whiplash trauma had weaker attachment to labour market pre

  10. Sick Leave within 5 Years of Whiplash Trauma Predicts Recovery: A Prospective Cohort and Register-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Tina Birgitte Wisbech; Fink, Per; Oernboel, Eva; Kasch, Helge; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Frostholm, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background 10–22% of individuals sustaining whiplash trauma develop persistent symptoms resulting in reduced working ability and decreased quality of life, but it is poorly understood why some people do not recover. Various collision and post-collision risk factors have been studied, but little is known about pre-collision risk factors. In particular, the impact of sickness and socioeconomic factors before the collision on recovery is sparsely explored. The aim of this study was to examine if welfare payments received within five years pre-collision predict neck pain and negative change in provisional situation one year post-collision. Methods and Findings 719 individuals with acute whiplash trauma consecutively recruited from emergency departments or primary care after car accidents in Denmark completed questionnaires on socio-demographic and health factors immediately after the collision. After 12 months, a visual analogue scale on neck pain intensity was completed. 3595 matched controls in the general population were sampled, and national public register data on social benefits and any other welfare payments were obtained for participants with acute whiplash trauma and controls from five years pre-collision to 15 months after. Participants with acute whiplash trauma who had received sickness benefit for more than 12 weeks pre-collision had increased odds for negative change in future provisional situation (Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 3.8 (2.1;7.1)) and future neck pain (OR (95%CI) = 3.3 (1.8;6.3)), controlling for other known risk factors. Participants with acute whiplash trauma had weaker attachment to labour market (more weeks of sick leave (χ2(2) = 36.7, p whiplash trauma raised the odds for future negative change in provisional situation (OR (95%CI) = 3.1 (2.3;4.4)) compared with controls. Conclusions Sick leave before the collision strongly predicted prolonged recovery following whiplash trauma. Participants with acute whiplash trauma

  11. Sick Leave within 5 Years of Whiplash Trauma Predicts Recovery: A Prospective Cohort and Register-Based Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Birgitte Wisbech Carstensen

    Full Text Available 10-22% of individuals sustaining whiplash trauma develop persistent symptoms resulting in reduced working ability and decreased quality of life, but it is poorly understood why some people do not recover. Various collision and post-collision risk factors have been studied, but little is known about pre-collision risk factors. In particular, the impact of sickness and socioeconomic factors before the collision on recovery is sparsely explored. The aim of this study was to examine if welfare payments received within five years pre-collision predict neck pain and negative change in provisional situation one year post-collision.719 individuals with acute whiplash trauma consecutively recruited from emergency departments or primary care after car accidents in Denmark completed questionnaires on socio-demographic and health factors immediately after the collision. After 12 months, a visual analogue scale on neck pain intensity was completed. 3595 matched controls in the general population were sampled, and national public register data on social benefits and any other welfare payments were obtained for participants with acute whiplash trauma and controls from five years pre-collision to 15 months after. Participants with acute whiplash trauma who had received sickness benefit for more than 12 weeks pre-collision had increased odds for negative change in future provisional situation (Odds Ratio (OR (95% Confidence Interval (CI = 3.8 (2.1;7.1 and future neck pain (OR (95%CI = 3.3 (1.8;6.3, controlling for other known risk factors. Participants with acute whiplash trauma had weaker attachment to labour market (more weeks of sick leave (χ2(2 = 36.7, p < 0.001 and unemployment (χ2(2 = 12.5, p = 0.002 pre-collision compared with controls. Experiencing a whiplash trauma raised the odds for future negative change in provisional situation (OR (95%CI = 3.1 (2.3;4.4 compared with controls.Sick leave before the collision strongly predicted prolonged recovery

  12. The value of trauma registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lynne; Clark, David E

    2008-06-01

    Trauma registries are databases that document acute care delivered to patients hospitalised with injuries. They are designed to provide information that can be used to improve the efficiency and quality of trauma care. Indeed, the combination of trauma registry data at regional or national levels can produce very large databases that allow unprecedented opportunities for the evaluation of patient outcomes and inter-hospital comparisons. However, the creation and upkeep of trauma registries requires a substantial investment of money, time and effort, data quality is an important challenge and aggregated trauma data sets rarely represent a population-based sample of trauma. In addition, trauma hospitalisations are already routinely documented in administrative hospital discharge databases. The present review aims to provide evidence that trauma registry data can be used to improve the care dispensed to victims of injury in ways that could not be achieved with information from administrative databases alone. In addition, we will define the structure and purpose of contemporary trauma registries, acknowledge their limitations, and discuss possible ways to make them more useful.

  13. Internal jugular vein thrombosis due to heterozygote methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 1298C and Factor V G1691A mutations after a minor trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Gumussoy, Murat; Arslan, Ilker B.; Cukurova, Ibrahim; Uluyol, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    Internal jugular vein thrombosis usually appears in central venous catheterization, distant malignancies, hypercoagulation, infections, or secondary to ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. A 44-year-old female patient presented to us with sore throat, and pain and swelling on the right side of her neck. She had a history of simple neck trauma 10 days ago. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed bilateral multiple lymphadenopathies and right internal jugular vein thrombosis. Patient was p...

  14. American Head and Neck Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research and insights. Comments This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged. This iframe ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  15. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neck Pathology Download Download the ebook for further information Your oral and maxillofacial surgeon (OMS) is the ... well be the key to complete recovery. The information provided here is not intended as a substitute ...

  16. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... teeth or become infected. It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out ... and surgically treating cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to ...

  17. Extrasensory Perception Experiences and Childhood Trauma: A Rorschach Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimeca, Giuseppe; Bruno, Antonio; Pandolfo, Gianluca; La Ciura, Giulia; Zoccali, Rocco A; Muscatello, Maria R A

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether people who report recurrent extrasensory perception (ESP) experiences (telepathy, clairvoyance, and precognition) have suffered more traumatic experiences and traumatic intrusions. Thirty-one nonclinical participants reporting recurrent ESP experiences were compared with a nonclinical sample of 31 individuals who did not report recurrent ESP phenomena. Past traumatic experiences were assessed via a self-report measure of trauma history (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire); traumatic intrusions were assessed via a performance-based personality measure (Rorschach Traumatic Content Index). Participants also completed the Anomalous Experience Inventory, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2, the Dissociative Experience Scale, and the Revised Paranormal Belief Scale. The ESP group reported higher levels of emotional abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, and traumatic intrusions. The association between ESP experiences and trauma was partly mediated by the effects of dissociation and emotional distress. Implications for health professionals are discussed. Results also showed the reliability of the twofold method of assessment of trauma.

  18. Novel insights into the interplay between ventral neck muscles in individuals with whiplash-associated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gunnel; Nilsson, David; Trygg, Johan; Falla, Deborah; Dedering, Åsa; Wallman, Thorne; Peolsson, Anneli

    2015-01-01

    Chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) is common after whiplash injury, with considerable personal, social, and economic burden. Despite decades of research, factors responsible for continuing pain and disability are largely unknown, and diagnostic tools are lacking. Here, we report a novel model of mechanical ventral neck muscle function recorded from non-invasive, real-time, ultrasound measurements. We calculated the deformation area and deformation rate in 23 individuals with persistent WAD and compared them to 23 sex- and age-matched controls. Multivariate statistics were used to analyse interactions between ventral neck muscles, revealing different interplay between muscles in individuals with WAD and healthy controls. Although the cause and effect relation cannot be established from this data, for the first time, we reveal a novel method capable of detecting different neck muscle interplay in people with WAD. This non-invasive method stands to make a major breakthrough in the assessment and diagnosis of people following a whiplash trauma. PMID:26472599

  19. Mountain biking injuries requiring trauma center admission: a 10-year regional trauma system experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter T W; Jangra, Dalbhir; Ritchie, Alec H; Lower, Mary Ellen; Kasic, Sharon; Brown, D Ross; Baldwin, Greg A; Simons, Richard K

    2006-02-01

    Mountain biking has become an increasingly popular recreational and competitive sport with increasingly recognized risks. The purpose of this study was to review a population based approach to serious injuries requiring trauma center admission related to mountain biking, identify trends and develop directions for related injury prevention programs. Three trauma centers in the Greater Vancouver area exclusively serve a major mountain bike park and the North Shore Mountains biking trails. The Trauma Registries and the patient charts were reviewed for mountain bike injuries from 1992 to 2002. The data were analyzed according to demographics, distribution, and severity of injuries, and need for operative intervention. Findings were reviewed with injury prevention experts and regional and national mountain-biking stakeholders to provide direction to injury prevention programs. A total of 1,037 patients were identified as having bicycling-related injuries. Of these, 399 patients sustained 1,092 injuries while mountain biking. There was a threefold increase in the incidence of mountain biking injuries over a 10-year period. Young males were most commonly affected. Orthopedic injuries were most common (46.5%) followed by head (12.2%), spine (12%), chest (10.3%), facial (10.2%), abdominal (5.4%), genitourinary (2.2%), and neck injuries (1%). High operative rate was observed: 38% of injuries and 66% of patients required surgery. One patient died from his injuries. Injury prevention programs were developed and successfully engaged the target population. Mountain biking is a growing cause of serious injuries. Young males are principally at risk and serious injuries result from intended activity and despite protective equipment. Injury prevention programs were developed to address these concerns.

  20. Neck pain in different cephalalgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Chechet

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the literature related to the investigations of neck pain (cervicalgia in patients with headache (cephalalgia. Neck pain is second to lower back pain as a reason for considerable socioeconomic damage to society. The prevalence of cervicalgia in the population ranges from 5.9 to 38%; the annual incidence is 10.4–21.3%; 14.2 to 71% of people report to have neck pain at some time in their lifetime. Neck pain is concurrent with cephalalgia in 70% of cases. In patients with cervicalgia, the prevalence of headache is 20–40% higher than in those with musculoskeletal pain at another site. Neck pain is as a major risk factor for migraine and tension headache (TH. Neck pain in TH progresses with the increased intensity, frequency, and strength of headache. There is a direct relationship of the quality of life worsening associated withcervicalgia to the frequency of migraine attacks and the risk of its chronization. Neck pain is noted in cervicogenic headache belonging to secondary headaches. The identification of mixed headache in a patient with cervicalgia allows the prescription of a treatment option that may be effective in relieving both headache and neck pain. The paper discusses the causes and pathogenesis of cervicalgia in patients with headache, examination methods, and main approaches to drug and nondrug therapies in relation to the leading pathophysiological mechanism, as well as new possibilities for the effective and safe relief of pain syndrome in this category of patients. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, myorelaxants,and their combination are observed to be effective in treating patients with cervicalgia and cephalalgia.

  1. Spinal trauma: first aid from cross-sectional imaging; Trauma der Wirbelsaeule: erste Hilfe durch Schnittbildverfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller, G.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [Emergency Radiology Schueller, Neerach (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    The diagnosis of the traumatized spine is one of the key issues for trauma radiologists. The cross-sectional imaging procedures, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the essential methods in spinal trauma radiology. These modalities are of great help in accurately assessing injury patterns and extent and in providing indications of patient outcome. In contrast to cross-sectional imaging, radiography has a role in the evaluation of minor spinal trauma only. It is generally accepted that trauma radiologists do not use typical classifications to evaluate the spine partly because such an ideal classification system does not yet exist. Not least because of this classification difficulty, eponyms and synonyms are widely used to describe traumatology of the spine as a high level of specific information is included in these various terms. The members of the trauma team should be aware of the strengths and limitations of the methods used in the assessment of the spine. This article provides a brief outline of fundamental knowledge about the diagnosis of spinal trauma. (orig.) [German] Die Beurteilung der verletzten Wirbelsaeule nimmt fuer Traumaradiologen eine zentrale Stellung ein. Die Schnittbildverfahren CT und MRT sind ihre wesentlichen Arbeitsmethoden. Sie helfen dabei, schnell und mit hoher Zuverlaessigkeit Aussagen ueber Art und Ausmass von Verletzungen zu treffen sowie Hinweise auf die Prognose der Patienten zu geben. Die Projektionsradiographie hat ihre Bedeutung lediglich in der Diagnostik des Bagatelltraumas und ist in ihrer Aussagekraft auch dort nicht unumstritten. Traumaradiologen bedienen sich nicht ausschliesslich typischer Klassifikationen des Wirbelsaeulentraumas, z. T. auch deshalb, da es die ideale Klassifikation aus heutiger Sicht nicht gibt. Vielmehr ist es wichtig, auch ueber Eponyme und Synonyme Bescheid zu wissen, da sie ein hohes Mass an spezifischen Informationen der spinalen Verletzungen verinnerlichen. Alle

  2. Utilisation of a trauma meeting handover proforma to improve trauma patient pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Rachel; Parton, Felicity; Trikha, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Decision making within orthopaedic centres predominantly occurs at the trauma meeting, where all decisions are made as a part of the multidisciplinary process. This is an essential handover process. Difficulties occur when teaching and detailed case discussions detract from the actual decision making process, leading to failure in documentation and implementing treatment plans. An audit was carried out in a busy district general hospital (DGH), assessing the quality of trauma meeting documentation in patient records, and assessing whether the introduction of a proforma document would improve this. Prospective clinical reviews were performed on all patients discussed in the trauma meeting over a one month period. Following the initial audit cycle a proforma was introduced, and the audit process was repeated at a two month and six month interval. The quality of the entries were assessed and compared to the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges Standards for the clinical structure and content of patient records, and The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) of England Guidelines for Clinicians on Medical Records and Notes. Sixty three patient records during a one month period from 1 August 2014 found that only 16% had any documentation of the trauma meeting, none of which met the standard set at the beginning of the audit. Following the introduction of the proforma, 102 patient records were reviewed from October 2014, showing 70% had documentation of the trauma meeting. This improved further to 84% in February 2015. The proforma has provided an effective means of documenting and communicating management plans, and in turn also improved the trauma patient pathway to theatre or discharge.

  3. The impact of parental accompaniment in paediatric trauma: a helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS) perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cowley, Alan; Durge, Neal

    2014-01-01

    Major trauma remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in young people and adolescents throughout the western world. Both the physical and psychological consequences of trauma are well documented and it is shown that peri-traumatic factors play a large part in the emotional recovery of children involved in trauma. Indeed, parental anxiety levels may play one of the biggest roles. There are no publically available guidelines on pre-hospital accompaniment, and where research has be...

  4. Trauma-Focused CBT for Youth with Complex Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Judith A.; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Kliethermes, Matthew; Murray, Laura A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Many youth develop complex trauma, which includes regulation problems in the domains of affect, attachment, behavior, biology, cognition, and perception. Therapists often request strategies for using evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for this population. This article describes practical strategies for applying Trauma-Focused Cognitive…

  5. Trauma und Terror

    OpenAIRE

    Szyszkowitz, T. (Tessa)

    2007-01-01

    1. Einleitung Ausgehend von der Fragestellung, warum gerade bei Tschetschenen und Palästinensern der Selbstmordterrorismus in den letzten Jahren so populär geworden ist, analysiert die Autorin die Geschichte dieser beiden Völker. Einer der Gründe ist bisher wenig beachtet worden. Der Einfluss eines kollektiven Traumas, das als solches nicht anerkannt, behandelt und auch nicht einer politischen Lösung zugeführt wurde. 2. Geschichte der Palästinenser und Tschetschenen Im Zuge der Err...

  6. Management of liver trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan M Alghamdi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last 30 years, the management of liver injury has evolved significantly. The advancement of imaging studies has played an important role in the conservative approach for management. A shift from operative to nonoperative management for most hemodynamically stable patients with hepatic injury has been prompted by speed and sensitivity of diagnostic imaging and by advances in critical care monitoring. In this review article, the up-to-date recommendation on the management approach of liver trauma will be discussed.

  7. Effectiveness of a tailored neck training program on neck strength, movement, and fatigue in under-19 male rugby players: a randomized controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett MD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Matthew D Barrett,1 Terence F McLoughlin,2 Kieran R Gallagher,1 Don Gatherer,3 Michael TR Parratt,1 Jonathan R Perera,1 Tim WR Briggs1 1Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Stanmore, Middlesex, United Kingdom; 2Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, Mersey Deanery, United Kingdom; 3The Gatherer Partnership, Aylesbury, United Kingdom Purpose: To investigate the effect of a tailored neck muscle conditioning program on neck muscle strength, neck muscle fatigue, and range of neck movement in 16–18-year-old male rugby players. Materials and methods: Thirty-four male rugby players were divided into forward and back playing positions and randomized within these groups. Seventeen players were randomly assigned to each group. The test group was given a tailored 6-week exercise regime based on their baseline measurements to be performed three times a week in addition to their normal training and playing. The control group trained and played as normal. The outcome measures used were cervical spine range of movement, neck strength, and neck muscle fatigability. Results: There were no clinically relevant statistically significant differences between the two groups. Trends identified between the two groups suggest that a tailored neck exercise program increases neck strength, particularly neck extension, and increases resistance to fatigue, as well as influencing right- and left-sided neck muscle balance. A reduction in range of movement was also demonstrated in the test group. There was a great deal of variability in range of movement and strength within this age group. No previously undiagnosed neck conditions were detected, and there were no adverse events reported. Conclusion: This study has shown that neck strength, range of movement, and susceptibility of the neck muscles to fatigue can be influenced using a focused neck training regime. It forms an important basis for a larger, multicenter study to ensure the neck is given due attention in

  8. Evaluation of trauma care using TRISS method: the role of adjusted misclassification rate and adjusted w-statistic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bytyçi Cen I

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide. Evaluation of trauma care using Trauma Injury and Injury Severity Score (TRISS method is focused in trauma outcome (deaths and survivors. For testing TRISS method TRISS misclassification rate is used. Calculating w-statistic, as a difference between observed and TRISS expected survivors, we compare our trauma care results with the TRISS standard. Aim The aim of this study is to analyze interaction between misclassification rate and w-statistic and to adjust these parameters to be closer to the truth. Materials and methods Analysis of components of TRISS misclassification rate and w-statistic and actual trauma outcome. Results The component of false negative (FN (by TRISS method unexpected deaths has two parts: preventable (Pd and non-preventable (nonPd trauma deaths. Pd represents inappropriate trauma care of an institution; otherwise nonpreventable trauma deaths represents errors in TRISS method. Removing patients with preventable trauma deaths we get an Adjusted misclassification rate: (FP + FN - Pd/N or (b+c-Pd/N. Substracting nonPd from FN value in w-statistic formula we get an Adjusted w-statistic: [FP-(FN - nonPd]/N, respectively (FP-Pd/N, or (b-Pd/N. Conclusion Because adjusted formulas clean method from inappropriate trauma care, and clean trauma care from the methods error, TRISS adjusted misclassification rate and adjusted w-statistic gives more realistic results and may be used in researches of trauma outcome.

  9. Evaluation of trauma care using TRISS method: the role of adjusted misclassification rate and adjusted w-statistic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llullaku, Sadik S; Hyseni, Nexhmi Sh; Bytyçi, Cen I; Rexhepi, Sylejman K

    2009-01-15

    Major trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide. Evaluation of trauma care using Trauma Injury and Injury Severity Score (TRISS) method is focused in trauma outcome (deaths and survivors). For testing TRISS method TRISS misclassification rate is used. Calculating w-statistic, as a difference between observed and TRISS expected survivors, we compare our trauma care results with the TRISS standard. The aim of this study is to analyze interaction between misclassification rate and w-statistic and to adjust these parameters to be closer to the truth. Analysis of components of TRISS misclassification rate and w-statistic and actual trauma outcome. The component of false negative (FN) (by TRISS method unexpected deaths) has two parts: preventable (Pd) and non-preventable (nonPd) trauma deaths. Pd represents inappropriate trauma care of an institution; otherwise nonpreventable trauma deaths represents errors in TRISS method. Removing patients with preventable trauma deaths we get an Adjusted misclassification rate: (FP + FN - Pd)/N or (b+c-Pd)/N. Substracting nonPd from FN value in w-statistic formula we get an Adjusted w-statistic: [FP-(FN - nonPd)]/N, respectively (FP-Pd)/N, or (b-Pd)/N). Because adjusted formulas clean method from inappropriate trauma care, and clean trauma care from the methods error, TRISS adjusted misclassification rate and adjusted w-statistic gives more realistic results and may be used in researches of trauma outcome.

  10. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M.; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  11. Larynx trauma and hyoid bone fracture after bite injury in dog: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Manchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnoea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intra-operatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea who underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome.

  12. Bilateral radial neck fractures – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABY Ng

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Radial head and neck fractures are the most frequently seen elbow fractures. The usual cause of this injury is a fall onto an outstretched hand with a partly flexed elbow. We report here an unusual case of bilateral non-displaced radial neck fractures in a patient who presented with complaints of pain in both elbows following a simple fall. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion in the diagnosis of multiple injuries, no matter how `trivial` the mechanism of injury.

  13. General surgery residents improve efficiency but not outcome of trauma care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Patrick J; Hawkes, Allison; Madayag, Robert; Seale, Fred; Maines, Charles

    2003-07-01

    Current American College of Surgeons Level I trauma center verification requires the presence of a residency program in which trauma care is an integral part of the training. The rationale for this requirement remains unclear, with no scientific evidence that resident participation improves the quality of trauma care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether quality or efficiency of trauma care is influenced by general surgery residents. Our urban Level I trauma center has traditionally used 24-hour in-house postgraduate year-4 general surgery residents in conjunction with at-home trauma attending backup to provide trauma care. As of July 1, 2000, general surgery residents no longer participated in trauma patient care, leaving sole responsibility to an in-house trauma attending. Data regarding patient outcome and resource use with and without surgery resident participation were tabulated and analyzed. Continuous data were compared using Student's t test if normally distributed and the Mann-Whitney U test if nonparametric. Categorical data were compared using chi2 analysis or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. During the 5-month period with resident participation, 555 trauma patients were admitted. In the identical time period without residents, 516 trauma patients were admitted. During the period without housestaff, patients were older and more severely injured. Mechanism was not different during the two time periods. Mortality was not affected; however, time in the emergency department and hospital lengths of stay were significantly shorter with residents. Multiple regression confirmed these findings while controlling for age, mechanism, and Injury Severity Score. Although resident participation in trauma care at a Level I trauma center does not affect outcome, it does significantly improve the efficiency of trauma care delivery.

  14. Management of liver trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Badger, S A

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Blunt and penetrating liver trauma is common and often presents major diagnostic and management problems. METHODS: A literature review was undertaken to determine the current consensus on investigation and management strategies. RESULTS: The liver is the most frequently injured organ following abdominal trauma. Immediate assessment with ultrasound has replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage in the resuscitation room, but computerised tomography remains the gold standard investigation. Nonoperative management is preferred in stable patients but laparotomy is indicated in unstable patients. Damage control techniques such as perihepatic packing, hepatotomy plus direct suture, and resectional debridement are recommended. Major complex surgical procedures such as anatomical resection or atriocaval shunting are now thought to be redundant in the emergency setting. Packing is also recommended for the inexperienced surgeon to allow control and stabilisation prior to transfer to a tertiary centre. Interventional radiological techniques are becoming more widely used, particularly in patients who are being managed nonoperatively or have been stabilised by perihepatic packing. CONCLUSIONS: Management of liver injuries has evolved significantly throughout the last two decades. In the absence of other abdominal injuries, operative management can usually be avoided. Patients with more complex injuries or subsequent complications should be transferred to a specialist centre to optimise final outcome.

  15. Urinary tract trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.E. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    From a practical point of view, a woman who has blunt injury to the pelvic area with hematuria from the lower urinary tract, has a contused or ruptured bladder. In a man, such a situation calls for retrograde urethrography to determine if the injury is in the urethra or the bladder because the two organs are investigated differently. In both sexes, such injuries are usually associated with pelvic fractures. Massive bladder displacement and severe hemorrhage should alert one to the need for pelvic angiography to find and embolize the bleeding site within the first 24 hours after injury. For blunt trauma to the upper urinary tract an intravenous urogram with tomography is still the main examination. However, a normal intravenous urogram does not exclude serious injury. Therefore, if signs or symptoms persist, a computerized tomographic (CT) examination should be performed if available. Otherwise, a radionuclide study is advisable. Non-excretion on intravenous urography with tomography calls for selective renal arteriography to delineate the etiology. There can be serious renal trauma in the absence of hematuria, which may occur with renal pedicle injury or avulsion of the ureter. Minor forniceal ruptures may occasionally mask severe posterior renal lacerations.

  16. [Cervical spine trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  17. Computed tomography in facial trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilkha, A.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), plain radiography, and conventional tomography were performed on 30 patients with facial trauma. CT demonstrated bone and soft-tissue involvement. In all cases, CT was superior to tomography in the assessment of facial injury. It is suggested that CT follow plain radiography in the evaluation of facial trauma

  18. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Imhof, H.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  19. Bone scintigraphy in children: trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harcke, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    The sensitivity of radionuclide imaging in identifying skeletal trauma in children has been established. Growth plates present a set of problems unique to pediatric studies and diagnotic accuracy is very technique dependent. Imaging for sports injuries and suspected child abuse has been productive. An expanding role for bone scintigraphy in the management of orthopedic problems post-trauma is developing [fr

  20. A rare and lethal case of right common carotid pseudoaneurysm following whiplash trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Bello, Stefania; Serinelli, Serenella; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2015-03-01

    Whiplash trauma from a car crash is one of the most common causes of neck injury, resulting in pain and dysfunction. We report on an unusual case of post-whiplash pseudoaneurysm of the right common carotid artery, which led to acute massive hemorrhage and death days after the initial trauma. A post-mortem computed tomography angiography showed rupture of the pseudoaneurysm of the right common carotid artery with the contrast agent leaking out into the mouth. The subsequent autopsy confirmed a large hemorrhagic clot extending to the right side of the neck and mediastinum. A rupture of the right wall of the oropharynx was identified with massive bronchial hemoaspiration. The case demonstrates a rare but lethal clinical entity, and is important in providing a better understanding of the potentially fatal consequences of minor trauma, such as whiplash injury, and its physiopathological mechanisms. Thus, changing symptoms after a whiplash injury should be carefully evaluated since they can be related to the underlying severe consequences of a rapid hyperextension-hyperflexion of the neck, as in the reported case.

  1. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palas, J.; Matos, A.P.; Ramalho, M.; Mascarenhas, V.; Heredia, V.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT) has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  2. Multidetector Computer Tomography: Evaluation of Blunt Chest Trauma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Palas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging plays an essential part of chest trauma care. By definition, the employed imaging technique in the emergency setting should reach the correct diagnosis as fast as possible. In severe chest blunt trauma, multidetector computer tomography (MDCT has become part of the initial workup, mainly due to its high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy of the technique for the detection and characterization of thoracic injuries and also due to its wide availability in tertiary care centers. The aim of this paper is to review and illustrate a spectrum of characteristic MDCT findings of blunt traumatic injuries of the chest including the lungs, mediastinum, pleural space, and chest wall.

  3. Prehospital Trauma Care in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Chew, David; Wong, Ting Hway; Ng, Yih Yng; Pek, Pin Pin; Lim, Swee Han; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Hock Ong, Marcus Eng

    2015-01-01

    Prehospital emergency care in Singapore has taken shape over almost a century. What began as a hospital-based ambulance service intended to ferry medical cases was later complemented by an ambulance service under the Singapore Fire Brigade to transport trauma cases. The two ambulance services would later combine and come under the Singapore Civil Defence Force. The development of prehospital care systems in island city-state Singapore faces unique challenges as a result of its land area and population density. This article defines aspects of prehospital trauma care in Singapore. It outlines key historical milestones and current initiatives in service, training, and research. It makes propositions for the future direction of trauma care in Singapore. The progress Singapore has made given her circumstances may serve as lessons for the future development of prehospital trauma systems in similar environments. Key words: Singapore; trauma; prehospital emergency care; emergency medical services.

  4. Psychiatric diagnoses, trauma, and suicidiality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elklit Ask

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to examine the associations between psychiatric diagnoses, trauma and suicidiality in psychiatric patients at intake. Methods During two months, all consecutive patients (n = 139 in a psychiatric hospital in Western Norway were interviewed (response rate 72%. Results Ninety-one percent had been exposed to at least one trauma; 69 percent had been repeatedly exposed to trauma for longer periods of time. Only 7% acquired a PTSD diagnosis. The comorbidity of PTSD and other psychiatric diagnoses were 78%. A number of diagnoses were associated with specific traumas. Sixty-seven percent of the patients reported suicidal thoughts in the month prior to intake; thirty-one percent had attempted suicide in the preceding week. Suicidal ideation, self-harming behaviour, and suicide attempts were associated with specific traumas. Conclusion Traumatised patients appear to be under- or misdiagnosed which could have an impact on the efficiency of treatment.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in the head and neck tumor diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Yasuyuki; Igarashi, Masahito; Miyata, Mamoru; Sonoda, Tetsushi; Miyoshi, Shunji; Hiraide, Fumihisa; Morita, Mamoru; Tanaka, Osamu

    1987-06-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a new diagnostic technique that is being applied to study disease processes that involve the upper aero-digestive tract and cranial nerves of interest to otolaryngologist. Seventy four patients with head and neck tumor were enrolled to study the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in comparison with X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT). Five cases of head and neck tumors were presented. Characteristic findings of MRI were discussed. T2 weighted images are very useful in the diagnosis of head and neck tumors. Tumors in the areas surrounded by bone tissue were clearly imaged without such artifacts as recognized in X-ray CT. Information from mutiplane imaging, especially from coronal and sagittal sections, made it easier to determine the type and extent of the lesion. High signal linear parts which are in the periphery of the tumor offer important information that no adhesion is present.

  6. Assessment of a Comprehensive Anti-Aging Neck Cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Subhash J; Duque, Deysi; Schirripa, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    With many effective anti-aging solutions for the face, consumer focus is now turning to other parts of the body including the delicate skin on the neck. This study investigates the effect of a new neck cream on the appearance of texture, fine lines and wrinkles, laxity, and hydration. 85 adult females ages 35-65 with Fitzpatrick skin types I through IV applied the test neck cream twice daily for a 3-month study period. Screening was conducted at Baseline, 2, 30, 60, and 90 days via a virtual trial. Subjects rated satisfaction in each of 4 anti-aging categories including hydration, texture, appearance of wrinkles, and appearance of laxity as well as three product attributes including application, feel, and smell. Improvement was statistically significant for all measured categories (hydration, texture, appearance of wrinkles, and appearance of laxity) with 94% of study subjects noting improvement in one or more of the measured categories. Further, the quantity of "Satisfied" and "Highly Satisfied" assessments increased 8-fold from baseline with a 94x increase in the quantity of "Highly Satisfied" assessments. The results demonstrate the product's rapid and continuing ability to improve the self-perceived signs of aging in the neck area including improvement in skin texture on the neck and a reduction in the appearance of wrinkles and laxity along the jawline. Future studies are recommended to determine the primary action mechanisms and to assess the degree of improvement by blinded physician assessment.

  7. Do the key prognostic factors for non-specific neck pain have moderation effects? - A study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundaram, Arun Prasad; Robinson, Hilde Stendal; Vøllestad, Nina Køpke

    2018-05-01

    Neck pain is one of the common musculoskeletal conditions prevalent in the general population in Norway. Patients with neck pain, seek treatment from different health professionals such as general practitioners, physiotherapists, chiropractors and alternative medicine practitioners. The interventions for neck pain are typically provided in a primary care or specialised healthcare setting depending on the general practitioners' referral patterns. Clinicians are interested to know the various prognostic factors that can explain the recovery from neck pain. In order to know this, studies have explored and reported on a range of prognostic factors that contribute to the outcomes in patients with neck pain. This information is currently available only for neck pain following whiplash injury that has a traumatic origin. There is limited information on the role of prognostic factors specifically for non-specific neck pain without a traumatic episode. Moreover, there is a lack of data on whether there are interactions (moderation effects) between the prognostic factors. Therefore, we propose a hypothesis to elucidate whether the same set of prognostic factors found in neck pain associated with whiplash injuries are also identified in patients with neck pain without trauma. Additionally, we hypothesize that the association between a prognostic factor and the outcome variable (s) would be dependent on the third variable, thereby confirming the moderation effects. Clinicians could make informed decisions in the clinical management of neck pain with the knowledge of prognostic factors that explain the outcomes. It could also be used for the development of new interventions or for modifying the existing ones. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K. [Nemours A. I. duPont Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Wilmington, DE (United States); Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hershey, PA (United States); Dias, Mark S. [Hershey Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  9. Venous injury in abusive head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Bradford, Ray; Thamburaj, K.; Boal, Danielle K.B.; Dias, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is an important cause of serious brain injury in infants and young children who have characteristic clinical and imaging findings that are discordant with the clinical history provided. Recent attention has focused on abnormalities of the cranial venous sinuses and cortical veins, both on MRI and at autopsy. Although many have interpreted these to be secondary to the AHT, some have recently argued that these venous abnormalities represent primary cortical sinus and venous thrombosis that leads secondarily to subdural hemorrhage and secondary brain injury. Direct trauma to the veins and sinuses has been reported at autopsy in AHT, but there has been no systematic study of venous abnormalities in cases of AHT. The purpose of this study was to define the incidence and characteristics of venous and sinus abnormalities in AHT. We included all children <36 months of age who were diagnosed with abusive head trauma between 2001 and 2012 and who had MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) venography as part of their diagnostic workup. We analyzed age, gender and clinical findings. MRI and MR venography were analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists with a focus on abnormalities involving the intracranial veins and venous sinuses. A total of 45 children were included. The median age was 3 months (range 15 days to 31 months) and 28 were boys (62%). Clinical findings included retinal hemorrhage in 71% and extracranial fractures in 55%. CT or MRI demonstrated subdural hemorrhage in 41 (91%); none had subdural effusions. In 31 cases (69%) MR venography demonstrated mass effect on the venous sinuses or cortical draining veins, with either displacement or partial or complete effacement of the venous structures from an adjacent subdural hematoma or brain swelling. We also describe the lollipop sign, which represents direct trauma to the cortical bridging veins and was present in 20/45 (44%) children. Evidence of displacement or compression of cortical veins

  10. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorph, S.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.)

  11. Radiology of trauma to kidney and lower urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorph, S [Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are trauma to kidney, imaging of kidney trauma, management of renal trauma, delayed complications, trauma to the lower urinary tract, trauma to urinary bladder, radiologic diagnosis, ethiology of blunt bladder injury, urethal injury (6 refs.).

  12. Penetrating abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, P L

    1989-08-01

    The management of patients with penetrating abdominal trauma is outlined in Figure 1. Patients with hemodynamic instability, evisceration, significant gastrointestinal bleeding, peritoneal signs, gunshot wounds with peritoneal violation, and type 2 and 3 shotgun wounds should undergo emergency laparotomy. The initial ED management of these patients includes airway management, monitoring of cardiac rhythm and vital signs, history, physical examination, and placement of intravenous lines. Blood should be obtained for initial hematocrit, type and cross-matching, electrolytes, and an alcohol level or drug screen as needed. Initial resuscitation should utilize crystalloid fluid replacement. If more than 2 liters of crystalloid are needed to stabilize an adult (less in a child), blood should be given. Group O Rh-negative packed red blood cells should be immediately available for a patient in impending arrest or massive hemorrhage. Type-specific blood should be available within 15 minutes. A patient with penetrating thoracic and high abdominal trauma should receive a portable chest x-ray, and a hemo- or pneumothorax should be treated with tube thoracostomy. An unstable patient with clinical signs consistent with a pneumothorax, however, should receive a tube thoracostomy prior to obtaining roentgenographic confirmation. If time permits, a nasogastric tube and Foley catheter should be placed, and the urine evaluated for blood (these procedures can be performed in the operating room). If kidney involvement is suspected because of hematuria or penetrating trauma in the area of a kidney or ureter in a patient requiring surgery, a single-shot IVP should be performed either in the ED or the operating room. An ECG is important in patients with possible cardiac involvement and in patients over the age of 40 going to the operating room. Tetanus status should be updated, and appropriate antibiotics covering bowel flora should be given. Operative management should rarely be delayed

  13. Trauma cardiaco cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Alvarado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El trauma cardiaco constituye una de las primeras causas de mortalidad en la población general. Requiere alto índice de sospecha en trauma cerrado severo, mecanismo de desaceleración y en presencia de signos indirectos como: equimosis, huella del volante o del cinturón en el tórax anterior. Las lesiones incluyen: conmoción cardiaca, ruptura cardiaca, lesión cardiaca indirecta como la trombosis coronaria aguda, lesión aórtica, lesión del pericardio y herniación cardiaca. Entre las manifestaciones clínicas están: la angina refractaria a nitratos, el dolor pleurítico, la hipotensión arterial, la taquicardia, la ingurgitación yugular que aumenta con la inspiración, el galope por tercer ruido, el frote pericárdico, los soplos de reciente aparición, los estertores crepitantes por edema pulmonar. El electrocardiograma es el primer eslabón en el algoritmo diagnóstico con hallazgos como: la taquicardia sinusal, los complejos ventriculares prematuros, la fibrilación auricular, el bloqueo de rama derecha y los bloqueos auriculoventriculares. La radiografía de tórax ayuda a descartar lesiones adicionales óseas y pulmonares. La troponina I tiene un valor predictivo negativo del 93% para el trauma cardiaco, otras enzimas como la creatina quinasa total y la creatina quinasa fracción MB son menos específicas. El ecocardiograma está indicado en caso de hipotensión persistente, electrocardiograma con alteraciones o falla cardiaca aguda. El tratamiento incluye la estabilización inicial y un manejo específico de las lesiones. Entre las complicaciones se incluyen: el taponamiento cardiaco, la contusión miocárdica, el síndrome coronario agudo, las arritmias cardíacas y la lesión aórtica. El pronóstico se determina en mayor medida por los signos vitales al ingreso y la presencia de paro cardiaco durante el abordaje inicial.

  14. Neuropsychology of trauma-exposure: emotional learning, stress responsivity and the glucocorticoid receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Liebscher, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    In the present dissertation the aim was to identify correlates of trauma-exposure in persons who developed symptoms of a posttraumatic stress disorder and in those who were trauma-exposed but do not suffer from PTSD as well as in persons without trauma-exposure. In the first part of the dissertation, mechanisms of context conditioning and the release of glucocorticoids by the Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis were investigated in trauma-exposed and non-exposed persons. In the second ...

  15. Trauma surgery in the era of nonoperative management: the Dutch model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Jurkovich, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Falling operative experience and diminished job satisfaction of trauma surgeons appears to be in part the result of nonoperative management of many blunt injuries. In The Netherlands, the responsibility of trauma surgeons includes the operative treatment of most pelvic and extremity

  16. Gravidade do trauma avaliada na fase pré-hospitalar Trauma severity assessment in prehospital setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Y. Whitaker

    1998-06-01

    . RESULTS: Prehospital attendance was carried out in 81.31% until 40 minutes. Non-fatal victims (83.96% had 12 and 11 TSm scores while 53.96% of the fatal victims had 0, 1 and 2 scores. External surface (30.25% and head/neck (20.98% were most injured areas and 63.63% fatal victims with Injury Severity Score (ISS > or = 16 died within first 24 hours. Comparing the fatal victims TSm and ISS scores verified that 81.20% victims with TSm score between 0 and 11 had major trauma (ISS > or = 16. CONCLUSION: Strong trends were also found out in that fatal victims with low TSm scores showed relations to the high ISS scores.

  17. Development of statewide geriatric patients trauma triage criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werman, Howard A; Erskine, Timothy; Caterino, Jeffrey; Riebe, Jane F; Valasek, Tricia

    2011-06-01

    The geriatric population is unique in the type of traumatic injuries sustained, physiological responses to those injuries, and an overall higher mortality when compared to younger adults. No published, evidence-based, geriatric-specific field destination criteria exist as part of a statewide trauma system. The Trauma Committee of the Ohio Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Board sought to develop specific criteria for geriatric trauma victims. A literature search was conducted for all relevant literature to determine potential, geriatric-specific, field-destination criteria. Data from the Ohio Trauma Registry were used to compare elderly patients, defined as age >70 years, to all patients between the ages of 16 to 69 years with regards to mortality risk in the following areas: (1) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score; (2) systolic blood pressure (SBP); (3) falls associated with head, chest, abdominal or spinal injury; (4) mechanism of injury; (5) involvement of more than one body system as defined in the Barell matrix; and (6) co-morbidities and motor vehicle collision with one or more long bone fracture. For GCS score and SBP, those cut-off points with equal or greater risk of mortality as compared to current values were chosen as proposed triage criteria. For other measures, any criterion demonstrating a statistically significant increase in mortality risk was included in the proposed criteria. The following criteria were identified as geriatric-specific criteria: (1) GCS score trauma; (2) SBP trauma. In addition, these data suggested that elderly patients with specific co-morbidities be given strong consideration for evaluation in a trauma center. The state of Ohio is the first state to develop evidence-based geriatric-specific field-destination criteria using data from its state-mandated trauma registry. Further analysis of these criteria will help determine their effects on over-triage and under-triage of geriatric victims of traumatic injuries and the impact on the

  18. Trauma-affected refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Charlotte Kærgaard

    2016-01-01

    received the same manual-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) as well as social counselling. The mean length of the treatment course was 6.3 months. The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms assessed on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Other outcome measures were self......-reported depression and anxiety symptoms measured on Hopkins Symptom Check List-25 (HSCL-25), self-reported social functioning measured on the Social Adjustment Scale Self Report, short version (SAS-SR), and observer-rated depression and anxiety symptoms assessed on the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Ratings Scales...... (HAM D+A ). Social support was assessed on the Crisis Support Scale (CSS), level of functioning assessed on the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), quality of life was assessed on the WHO-5, the somatisation items of the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), pain in four different body areas measured on Visual...

  19. MRI in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jin Kyo [Shin Wha Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  20. MRI in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Kyo

    1986-01-01

    In the diagnosis of head injury, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), like CT, is an effective method of distinguishing between intracerebral and extracerebral lesions. In our experience of MRI, early hematomas are almost isointense by Saturation Recovery (SR) method, so these must be performed with Spin Echo (SE) method for better visualization of hematomas. Isodense subdural hematomas, which is a diagnostic dilemma on CT images, are clearly seen on MRI. Delayed hematomas or residual parenchymal lesions are better demonstrated on MRI than on CT. Direct cornal, sagittal images and multiplanar facility of MRI provides excellent visualization of the the location and shape of extracerebral collection of hematoma. For the screening of head traumas, SE method is a technique of choice because of its excellent sensitivity within limited time.

  1. Predicting significant torso trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirula, Ram; Talmor, Daniel; Brasel, Karen

    2005-07-01

    Identification of motor vehicle crash (MVC) characteristics associated with thoracoabdominal injury would advance the development of automatic crash notification systems (ACNS) by improving triage and response times. Our objective was to determine the relationships between MVC characteristics and thoracoabdominal trauma to develop a torso injury probability model. Drivers involved in crashes from 1993 to 2001 within the National Automotive Sampling System were reviewed. Relationships between torso injury and MVC characteristics were assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the model to current ACNS models. There were a total of 56,466 drivers. Age, ejection, braking, avoidance, velocity, restraints, passenger-side impact, rollover, and vehicle weight and type were associated with injury (p < 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (83.9) was significantly greater than current ACNS models. We have developed a thoracoabdominal injury probability model that may improve patient triage when used with ACNS.

  2. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Arvieux, C; Trilling, B; Sage, P Y; Mougin, N; Perou, S; Lavagne, P; Létoublon, C

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic trauma (PT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; the therapeutic options remain debated. Retrospective study of PT treated in the University Hospital of Grenoble over a 22-year span. The decision for initial laparotomy depended on hemodynamic status as well as on associated lesions. Main pancreatic duct lesions were always searched for. PT lesions were graded according to the AAST classification. Of a total of 46 PT, 34 were grades II or I. Hemodynamic instability led to immediate laparotomy in 18 patients, for whom treatment was always drainage of the pancreatic bed; morbidity was 30%. Eight patients had grade III injuries, six of whom underwent immediate operation: three underwent splenopancreatectomy without any major complications while the other three who had simple drainage required re-operation for peritonitis, with one death related to pancreatic complications. Four patients had grades IV or V PT: two pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, with no major complication, while one patient underwent duodenal reconstruction with pancreatic drainage, complicated by pancreatic and duodenal fistula requiring a hospital stay of two months. The post-trauma course was complicated for all patients with main pancreatic duct involvement. Our outcomes were similar to those found in the literature. In patients with distal PT and main pancreatic duct involvement, simple drainage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. For proximal PT, the therapeutic options of drainage versus pancreatoduodenectomy must be weighed; pancreatoduodenectomy may be unavoidable when the duodenum is injured as well. Two-stage (resection first, reconstruction later) could be an effective alternative in the emergency setting when there are other associated traumatic lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Drug use and childhood-, military- and post-military trauma exposure among women and men veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Michelle L; Brancu, Mira; Robbins, Allison T; D'Lima, Gabrielle M; Strauss, Jennifer L; Curry, John F; Fairbank, John A; Runnals, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    The current study was undertaken to examine whether posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depressive symptoms mediated the association between trauma exposure (combat-related trauma and non-combat traumas occurring before, during, and after military service), and drug abuse symptoms use among male and female veterans. Participants were 2304 (1851 male, 453 female) veterans who took part in a multi-site research study conducted through the Department of Veterans Affairs Mid-Atlantic Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center (VISN 6 MIRECC). Path analytic models were used to determine the association between problematic past-year drug use and combat-related and non-combat trauma experienced before, during, or after the military and whether current post-traumatic stress symptoms or depressive symptoms mediated these associations. For both male and female veterans, depressive symptoms significantly mediated the effects of pre- and post-military trauma on drug abuse symptoms. Mental health providers who work with trauma-exposed Iraq and Afghanistan era veterans should assess for drug use, depressive symptoms, and life-span trauma (i.e., not only combat-related traumas) as part of a thorough trauma-based assessment for both men and women. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trauma Imaging: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Jason Heath; Wertz, Christopher Ira; Onstott, Kimberly L; Wertz, Joss R

    2017-01-01

    To inform radiologic technologists about which imaging modalities and examinations are best suited for evaluating specific anatomical structures in patients who have sustained a traumatic injury. Two scholarly research databases were searched to identify articles focused on trauma imaging of the head, cervical spine, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis. Articles focused on trauma diagnosis were excluded. Thirty-two articles were selected for analysis. Physical examination and plain-film radiographs typically are used to assess nasal bone fracures. Computed tomography (CT) can be used to assess zygomaticomaxillary complex, mandibular, and temporal bone fractures. Traumatic brain injuries are difficult to assess, and broad classifications are used. Depending on the severity of cervical spine trauma, plain-film radiographs or CT imaging is adequate, with magnetic resonance imaging used as a means for further evaluation. Trauma to the thorax typically is assessed with radiography and CT, and CT is recommended for assesment of abdominal and pelvic trauma. The literature was consistent regarding which examinations to perform to best evaluate suspected injuries to the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. The need for, and correct use of, imaging in evaluating trauma to the head and cervical spine is more controversial. Despite the need for additional research, emergency department care providers should be familiar with the structures most commonly injured during trauma and the role of medical imaging for diagnosis.

  5. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taourel, P. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)], E-mail: p-taourel@chu-montpellier.fr; Vernhet, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Arnaud de Villeneuve, Montpellier (France); Suau, A.; Granier, C. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Lopez, F.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Nimes (France); Aufort, S. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France)

    2007-10-15

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications.

  6. Vascular emergencies in liver trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taourel, P.; Vernhet, H.; Suau, A.; Granier, C.; Lopez, F.M.; Aufort, S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of CT in the diagnosis and management of liver trauma is responsible for the shift from routine surgical versus non-surgical treatment in the management of traumatic liver injuries, even when they are of high grade. The main cause of compli cation and of death in liver trauma is related to vascular injury. The goal of this review focussed on the vascular complications of liver trauma is to describe the elementary lesions shown by CT in liver trauma including laceration, parenchymal hematoma and contusions, partial devascularisation, subcapsular hematomas, hemoperitoneum, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysm of the hepatic artery, bile leak, and periportal oedema, to illustrate the possible pitfalls in CT diagnosis of liver trauma and to underline the key-points which may absolutely be present in a CT report of liver trauma. Then we will remind the grading system based on the CT features and we will analyze the interest and limitations of such grading systems. Last we will discuss the diagnostic strategy at the early phase in patients with suspected liver trauma according to their clinical conditions and underline the conditions of arterial embolization, and then we will discuss the diagnosis strategy at the delayed phase according to the suspected complications

  7. Relationship between Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio and Prognosis in Patients with Deep Neck Space Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Şengül

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to demonstrate if there is any relation between the neutrophil-to-lym­phocyte ratio and prognosis in patients with deep neck space infections Methods: One hundred eight patients who were interned and treated due to deep neck infection in department of otolaryngology between January 2010 and January 2015 were analyzed. Demographics, clini­cal data, complications and treatment results of patients were evaluated. Pediatric patients between the age of 0 and 14, the patients who had only peritonsillary abscess, infection secondary to trauma were excluded from study. During follow-up and treatment duration the patients with deep neck infections were divided into two groups ac­cording to whether they had any complication (group 1 or not (group 2. Results: Fourteen (13% patients with deep neck in­fections had life-threatening complications whereas 94 (87% did not have any complication during follow-up and treatment duration. The mean neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with complications was significantly high­er than the patients without any complications (p0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio can be used as a cheap, easily obtained and predictive prognostic factor in patients with deep neck infections.

  8. Relationship between Northwick Park neck pain questionnaire and cervical spine MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Montijano, Ruben; Bautista, Daniel; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador

    2006-08-01

    The study was aimed at determining the association between the self-report of pain and disability by means of Northwick neck pain questionnaire (NPQ) and cervical spine MR imaging findings. A random sample of 251 patients, 132 men and 119 women aged 43+/-13 years, submitted with neck pain were investigated. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or hospitalized for cervical spine trauma were excluded. All patients completed the NPQ and were studied with sagittal gradient-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial gradient-echo T2* and heavily T2 weighted MR myelographic weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. There was no statistically significant correlation between NPQ and MR imaging scores. From the NPQ items, only difficulty in sleeping and numbness were related to the MR imaging score. Disc extrusion was the only MR finding almost significantly associated with NPQ (P=0.054). Neck injury did not increase NPQ scores. In patients with neck pain, NPQ scores do not correlate with MR imaging findings. NPQ and cervical spine MR imaging show different facets of the multidimensional complex of neck pain.

  9. A novel surgical correction and innovative splint for swan neck deformity in hypermobility syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Vishwanathan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Splinting is a great domain of occupational therapy profession. Making a splint for the patient would depend on the need or requirement of the problems and deformities. Swan neck deformity is an uncommon condition, and it can be seen in rheumatoid arthritis, cerebral palsy, and after trauma. Conservative treatment of the swan neck deformity is available by different static splints only. There are very few reports of surgical correction of swan-neck deformity in benign hypermobility syndrome. This case report describes the result of novel surgical intervention and an innovative hand splint in a 20-year-old female with a history of cardiovascular stroke with no residual neurological deficit. She presented with correctable swan neck deformity and failed to improve with static ring splints to correct the deformity. She underwent volar plate plication of the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left ring finger along with hemitenodesis of ulnar slip of flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS tendon whereby, the ulnar slip of FDS was passed through a small surgically created rent in A2 pulley and sutured back to itself. Postoperatively, the patient was referred to occupational therapy for splinting with the instruction that the splint would work sometimes for as static and some time as dynamic for positional and correction of the finger. After occupational therapy intervention and splinting, the patient had a full correction of the swan-neck deformity with near full flexion of the operated finger and can work independently.

  10. Are neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting at work risk factors for neck pain? Results of a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariens, G.A.M.; Bongers, P.M.; Douwes, M.; Miedema, M.C.; Hoogendoorn, W.E.; van der Wal, G.; Bouter, L.M.; van Mechelen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the relation between neck pain and work related neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed with a follow up of 3 years among 1334 workers from 34 companies. Work related physical load was assessed by analysing objectively measured

  11. Are neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting at work risk factors for neck pain? : Results of a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariëns, G A; Bongers, P M; Douwes, M; Miedema, M C; Hoogendoorn, W E; van der Wal, G; Bouter, L M; van Mechelen, W

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relation between neck pain and work related neck flexion, neck rotation, and sitting. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was performed with a follow up of 3 years among 1334 workers from 34 companies. Work related physical load was assessed by analysing objectively measured

  12. Anatomical coverage in elective irradiation of the neck for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meoz, R.T.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    From January 1954 through December 1978, 146 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue and clinically negative neck had their primary lesion conrolled with irradiation. Metastases to the neck developed later in: 27 of 76 patients (36%) treated by interstitial implantation; nine of 27 patients (33%) who received 2,000 rad in five fractions to the upper neck prior to the implant; eight of 19 (42%) patients who received 5,000 rad through an upper ipsilateral neck field prior to the implant; four of 24 patients (16.6%) who received 5,000 rad through bilateral portals to the upper neck with or without irradiation of the lower neck. In the 43 ipsilateral neck failures, 23 were in the upper jugular chain, (posterior subdigastric nodes), 12 in the mid-jugular, three in the lower jugular, and four in the more anterior part of the subdigastric area. There was one failure in the posterior cervical chain, and five contralateral neck failures. A review of the treatment charts showed that the patients who had an ipsilateral upper neck field only, had smaller portals because the irradiation was tailored to produce shrinkage of the primary tumor prior to needling. To include adequate coverage of the posterior subdigastric nodes (upper jugular), the bodies of the vertebrae must be seen on the simulator films. Also the junction of the subdigastric and the mid-jugular lymphatics must be covered. Although there were only three failures in the lower jugular nodes, it is technically easier to treat the upper mid-jugular nodes through an anterior appositional portal to the lower neck. A dose of 5,000 rad must be given since 2,000 rad, even if delivered in five fractions, gives a failure rate as if there had been no irradiation to the neck

  13. Trauma Tapping Technique: Practical First Aid for Stress and Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemiological studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) show a lifetime ... include re-experiencing the traumatic event, avoidant behavior for the memories of ... Methods. Trauma tapping technique (TTT) is a procedure that uses touch ...

  14. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with internal carotid artery dissection resulting from whiplash trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Freeman, Michael D; Webb, Alexandra L; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2015-12-01

    Spinal injury following inertial loading of the head and neck (whiplash) is a common sequel of low speed traffic crashes. A variety of non-musculoskeletal injuries have been described in association with injury to the spine following whiplash trauma, including traumatic brain injury, vestibular derangement, and cranial nerve injury, among others. Vascular injuries in the head and neck have, however, only rarely been described. We present the case of a middle-aged male who sustained an ultimately fatal injury that resulted from injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intracerebral vascular structures following a hard braking maneuver, with no direct head- or neck contact with the vehicular interior. Based on this unusual mechanism of injury we reviewed hospital data from the United States nationwide inpatient database (NIS) to assess the frequency of similar injuries reportedly resulting from traffic crashes. The post-mortem examination revealed a left internal carotid artery dissection associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the close temporal association, the absent prior history, and the plausibility of the injury mechanism, the injury was attributed to the braking maneuver. An analysis of NIS data demonstrated that the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage is significantly higher when there is a traumatic etiology, and higher yet when the trauma is a traffic crash (odds ratio 3.3 and 4.3, respectively). The presented case, together with the hospital inpatient data analysis, indicate that although SAH in combination with ICA dissection is relatively rare, it is substantially more probable following a traffic crash. In a clinical or forensic setting the inference that magnitude of a trauma was low should not serve as a basis for either excluding a cervical artery dissection from a differential diagnosis, or for excluding the trauma as a cause of a diagnosed dissection. This case report illustrates a rare fatal outcome of inertial load to

  15. The Dental Trauma Internet Calculator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerds, Thomas Alexander; Lauridsen, Eva Fejerskov; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim Prediction tools are increasingly used to inform patients about the future dental health outcome. Advanced statistical methods are required to arrive at unbiased predictions based on follow-up studies. Material and Methods The Internet risk calculator at the Dental Trauma Guide...... provides prognoses for teeth with traumatic injuries based on the Copenhagen trauma database: http://www.dentaltraumaguide.org The database includes 2191 traumatized permanent teeth from 1282 patients that were treated at the dental trauma unit at the University Hospital in Copenhagen (Denmark...

  16. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    services (EMS) response times and advanced prehospital care increase the number of critically injured patients surviving sufficiently long to reach a hospital “in extremis.” Both scenarios provide challenges in the management of traumatized patients. This article addresses the management of severely......Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  17. Head and Neck Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancers include cancers in the larynx (voice box), throat, lips, mouth, nose, and salivary glands. Start here to find information on head and neck cancer treatment in adults and children, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  18. Neck and arm pain syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de las Peñas, César Fernández; Cleland, Joshua; Huijbregts, Peter

    approaches.It uniquely addresses the expanding role of the various health care professions which require increased knowledge and skills in screening for contra-indications and recognizing the need for medical-surgical referral. Neck and Arm Pain Syndromes also stresses the integration of experiential......The first of its kind, Neck and Arm Pain Syndromes is a comprehensive evidence- and clinical-based book, covering research-based diagnosis, prognosis and management of neuromusculoskeletal pathologies and dysfunctions of the upper quadrant, including joint, muscle, myofascial and neural tissue...... of the most commonly seen pain syndromes in clinical practice over 800 illustrations demonstrating examination procedures and techniques....

  19. Intrathoracic lipoma masquerading as subclavian artery trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Munro, P T

    2012-02-03

    A 58 year old man was admitted to the accident and emergency department following an industrial accident in which he sustained a three part fracture dislocation of his right humerus. Chest radiography revealed a large mass in the right upper hemithorax and, when the patient became hypotensive, an emergency thoracotomy was performed. The mass was found to be a massive intrathoracic lipoma. This case shows how preexisting intrathoracic lesions may be mistaken for subclavian or great vessel trauma following violent shoulder girdle injury. The differential diagnosis of traumatic and non-traumatic intrathoracic mass lesions in chest radiography should be considered carefully.

  20. Ethical and technical considerations for the creation of cell lines in the head & neck and tissue harvesting for research and drug development (Part II: Ethical aspects of obtaining tissue specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upile Tahwinder

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although much has been published for the development of cell lines, these were lab based and developed for scientific technical staff. Objective of review We discuss the ethical implications of tissue retention and present a generic consent form (Part II. We also present a simple and successful protocol for the development of cell lines and tissue harvesting for the clinical scientist (Part I. Conclusion Consent is also more proximate and assurance can be given of appropriate usage. Ethical questions concerning tissue ownership are in many institutions raised during the current consenting procedure. We provide a robust ethical framework, based on the current legislation, which allows clinicians to be directly involved in cell and tissue harvesting.

  1. Is case triaging a useful tool for emergency surgeries? A review of 106 trauma surgery cases at a level 1 trauma center in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Sharfuddin; Nicol, Andrew John; Moydien, Mahammed Riyaad; Navsaria, Pradeep Harkison; Montoya-Pelaez, Luis Felipe

    2018-01-01

    The optimal timing for emergency surgical interventions and implementation of protocols for trauma surgery is insufficient in the literature. The Groote Schuur emergency surgery triage (GSEST) system, based on Cape Triaging Score (CTS), is followed at Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH) for triaging emergency surgical cases including trauma cases. The study aimed to look at the effect of delay in surgery after scheduling based on the GSEST system has an impact on outcome in terms of postoperative complications and death. Prospective audit of patients presenting to GSH trauma center following penetrating or blunt chest, abdominal, neck and peripheral vascular trauma who underwent surgery over a 4-month period was performed. Post-operative complications were graded according to Clavien-Dindo classification of surgical complications. One-hundred six patients underwent surgery during the study period. One-hundred two (96.2%) cases were related to penetrating trauma. Stab wounds comprised 71 (67%) and gunshot wounds (GSW) 31 (29.2%) cases. Of the 106 cases, 6, 47, 40, and 13 patients were booked as red, orange, yellow, and green, respectively. The median delay for green, yellow, and orange cases was within the expected time. The red patients took unexpectedly longer (median delay 48 min, IQR 35-60 min). Thirty-one (29.3%) patients developed postoperative complications. Among the booked red, orange, yellow, and green cases, postoperative complications developed in 3, 18, 9, and 1 cases, respectively. Only two (1.9%) postoperative deaths were documented during the study period. There was no statistically significant association between operative triage and post-operative complications ( p  = 0.074). Surgical case categorization has been shown to be useful in prioritizing emergency trauma surgical cases in a resource constraint high-volume trauma center.

  2. Habitat preferences and conservation threats to Black-necked Cranes wintering in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namgay, Rinchen; Wangchuk, Sangay

    2016-01-01

    Black-necked Crane (Grus nigricollis) is a vulnerable Red list species whose populations are declining. However, little is known about Black-necked Cranes' habitat requirements or the causes of their population decline. We identified Black-necked Cranes' winter roost and foraging preferences of Black-necked Cranes in Bhutan during the winter of 2013-2014. Black-necked Cranes' roosts were recorded using Garmin GPSmap 60CSx, while foraging preferences and threats to the birds were identified based on a survey of household heads (n = 107) residing within a 3 km radius of roost sites. We grouped the threats identified by the communities into four major categories, viz. biological, social, political and natural threats based on the relevance. Of the four major threats, communities residing within the roosting and foraging habitat of the Black-necked Crane reported biological threat as major. Biological threats as reported by communities include loss of habitat, food shortage and competition from other animals. We recommend the present roosting areas be designated as part of the conservation areas for Black-necked Crane wintering in Bumthang district. In addition to preserving these areas, government should also encourage farming in foraging habitats of Black-necked Crane, because they mainly feed on barley, wheat, paddy, potatoes and buckwheat, besides roots, tubers and insects in the wetlands.

  3. Neglected simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures secondary to narcotic drug abuse treated by bilateral one-staged hemiarthroplasty: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahedi Ehsan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Simultaneous bilateral femoral neck fractures are extremely rare and associated with various conditions. Up to now Most cases had correlations with major trauma, repetitive minor trauma, seizure, parathyroid or renal dysfunction, anti-epileptic medications, seizure, etc. A 28-year-old addict man referred to us with a 10-year history of narcotic drug abuse and history of 8 months bilateral groin pain. He admitted with displaced bilateral femoral neck fracture. Because of long duration of this condition and osteonecrosis revealed on bone scan, one-staged bilateral hip hemiarthroplasty was done. A good function was noted after surgery to 4-month follow up. Up to now, have not be founded in the literature that a case of bilateral femoral neck fracture associated with narcotic drug abuse. Because of negative effects of opium or smoking on bone tissues, a simple bone pain should aware us about the risk of stress or fatigue fracture.

  4. The prevalence and impact of trauma history in eating disorder patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klas Backholm

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early experiences of traumatic events (TEs may be associated with subsequent eating disturbance. However, few studies have investigated overall exposure and trauma-type frequency in various types of eating disorders (EDs. Objective: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and type of TEs in a nationally representative sample of Swedish ED patients. Method: Data from a database (Stepwise for specialized ED care were used. Trauma history was assessed as a part of the routine, initial assessment. Participants over the age of 18 with a diagnosed DSM-IV ED were included (N=4,524. Results: The number of patients having experienced at least one TE was 843 (18.6%, and 204 (24.2% reported at least one additional trauma. Sexual trauma was the most common form of TE (6.3%. There was no difference in overall traumatic exposure or in type of experienced trauma between the ED diagnostic subgroups (AN, BN, EDNOS, and BED. Overall traumatic exposure was linked to self-reported severity of ED symptoms, more secondary psychosocial impairment, psychiatric comorbidity, and negative self-image. Conclusions: Trauma history in ED patients merits attention. Results are partly in line with and partly in contrast to previous research. Measurement of trauma history has varied substantially in research on EDs, and this study adds to the indistinct literature on trauma history in ED.

  5. Validation of ICDPIC software injury severity scores using a large regional trauma registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Nathaniel H; Kernic, Mary A; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-10-01

    Administrative or quality improvement registries may or may not contain the elements needed for investigations by trauma researchers. International Classification of Diseases Program for Injury Categorisation (ICDPIC), a statistical program available through Stata, is a powerful tool that can extract injury severity scores from ICD-9-CM codes. We conducted a validation study for use of the ICDPIC in trauma research. We conducted a retrospective cohort validation study of 40,418 patients with injury using a large regional trauma registry. ICDPIC-generated AIS scores for each body region were compared with trauma registry AIS scores (gold standard) in adult and paediatric populations. A separate analysis was conducted among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) comparing the ICDPIC tool with ICD-9-CM embedded severity codes. Performance in characterising overall injury severity, by the ISS, was also assessed. The ICDPIC tool generated substantial correlations in thoracic and abdominal trauma (weighted κ 0.87-0.92), and in head and neck trauma (weighted κ 0.76-0.83). The ICDPIC tool captured TBI severity better than ICD-9-CM code embedded severity and offered the advantage of generating a severity value for every patient (rather than having missing data). Its ability to produce an accurate severity score was consistent within each body region as well as overall. The ICDPIC tool performs well in classifying injury severity and is superior to ICD-9-CM embedded severity for TBI. Use of ICDPIC demonstrates substantial efficiency and may be a preferred tool in determining injury severity for large trauma datasets, provided researchers understand its limitations and take caution when examining smaller trauma datasets. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. CT evaluation of abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Ruiting

    2004-01-01

    Objective: An evaluation of CT diagnosis of abdominal trauma. Methods: CT appearance of abdominal trauma was analyzed retrospectively in 95 cases. thirty-three patients were cured by operation, and the other 59 patients received conservative treatment. Fifty-one patients out of 59 were seen healed or improved by a follow up CT scan after the conservative treatment. Results: The study included: 31 cases of splenic contusion, accompanying with hemoperitoneum in 25 cases; 3 cases of hepatic laceration; 33 cases of liver and spleen compound trauma accompanying with hemoperitoneum; 18 cases of renal contusion, with subcapsular hemorrhage in 12 cases; 4 cases of midriff colic; 3 cases of mesentery breach; 3 cases of digestive tract perforation. Conclusion: CT is sensitive and precise in evaluating abdominal trauma, providing important information for treatment. (author)

  7. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  8. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosch, H.; Negrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [de

  9. [Current treatment of hepatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvio-Estaba, Leonardo; Madrazo-González, Zoilo; Ramos-Rubio, Emilio

    2008-05-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic approach of liver trauma injuries (by extension, of abdominal trauma) has evolved remarkably in the last decades. The current non-surgical treatment in the vast majority of liver injuries is supported by the accumulated experience and optimal results in the current series. It is considered that the non-surgical treatment of liver injuries has a current rate of success of 83-100%, with an associated morbidity of 5-42%. The haemodynamic stability of the patient will determine the applicability of the non-surgical treatment. Arteriography with angioembolisation constitutes a key technical tool in the context of liver trauma. Patients with haemodynamic instability will need an urgent operation and can benefit from abdominal packing techniques, damage control and post-operative arteriography. The present review attempts to contribute to the current, global and practical management in the care of liver trauma.

  10. Hotspots in trauma memories and their relationship to successful trauma-focused psychotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijdam, Mirjam J; Baas, Melanie A M; Olff, Miranda; Gersons, Berthold P R

    2013-02-01

    Imaginal exposure is an essential element of trauma-focused psychotherapies for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Exposure should in particular focus on the "hotspots," the parts of trauma memories that cause high levels of emotional distress which are often reexperienced. Our aim was to investigate whether differences in the focus on hotspots differentiate between successful and unsuccessful trauma-focused psychotherapies. As part of a randomized trial, 45 PTSD patients completed brief eclectic psychotherapy for PTSD. We retrospectively assessed audio recordings of therapy sessions of 20 patients. Frequency of hotspots and the associated emotions, cognitions, and characteristics were compared for the most successful (n = 10) versus the least successful (n = 10) treatments. The mean number of unique hotspots per patient was 3.20, and this number did not differ between successful and unsuccessful treatments. In successful treatments, however, hotspots were more frequently addressed (r = .48), and they were accompanied by more characteristics of hotspots (r = .39), such as an audible change in affect, indicating medium- to large-sized effects. Repeatedly focusing on hotspots and looking for associated characteristics of hotspots may help clinicians to enhance the efficacy of imaginal exposure for patients who would otherwise show insufficient response to treatment. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  11. Childhood trauma in adults with social anxiety disorder and panic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The influence of childhood trauma as a specific environmental factor on the development of adult psychopathology is far from being elucidated. As part of a collaborative project between research groups from South Africa (SA) and Sweden focusing on genetic and environmental factors contributing to anxiety ...

  12. Hemostatic resuscitation with plasma and platelets in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Oliveri, Roberto S; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2012-01-01

    in an immediate and sustained manner as part of an early massive transfusion protocol has been introduced. The aim of the present review was to investigate the potential effect on survival of proactive administration of plasma and/or platelets (PLT) in trauma patients with massive bleeding....

  13. The ethical and medico-legal issues of trauma care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the case of polytrauma, the patient's autonomy is further reduced. In addition, the risk .... Rational resource use in these circumstances has been an ac- cepted part of ... The high prevalence of HIV among the trauma population is well known in ...

  14. the effect of air medical transport on survival after trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    region in the latter part of 1999. This empirical research assessed death rate data to ascertain if the air medical transport (AMT) of patients results in lower death rates than occur with road transportation of patients. Wits Business School ... the South African medical environment, patients were evaluated at the trauma units of ...

  15. Helicopter overtriage in pediatric trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Maria; Goldstein, Seth D; Salazar, Jose; Aboagye, Jonathan; Stewart, Dylan; Efron, David; Abdullah, Fizan; Haut, Elliot R

    2014-11-01

    Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) have been designed to provide faster access to trauma center care in cases of life-threatening injury. However, the ideal recipient population is not fully characterized, and indications for helicopter transport in pediatric trauma vary dramatically by county, state, and region. Overtriage, or unnecessary utilization, can lead to additional patient risk and expense. In this study we perform a nationwide descriptive analysis of HEMS for pediatric trauma and assess the incidence of overtriage in this group. We reviewed records from the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank (2008-11) and included patients less than 16 years of age who were transferred from the scene of injury to a trauma center via HEMS. Overtriage was defined as patients meeting all of the following criteria: Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) equal to 15, absence of hypotension, an Injury Severity Score (ISS) less than 9, no need for procedure or critical care, and a hospital length of stay of less than 24 hours. A total of 19,725 patients were identified with a mean age of 10.5 years. The majority of injuries were blunt (95.6%) and resulted from motor vehicle crashes (48%) and falls (15%). HEMS transported patients were predominately normotensive (96%), had a GCS of 15 (67%), and presented with minor injuries (ISS<9, 41%). Overall, 28 % of patients stayed in the hospital for less than 24 hours, and the incidence of overtriage was 17%. Helicopter overtriage is prevalent among pediatric trauma patients nationwide. The ideal model to predict need for HEMS must consider clinical outcomes in the context of judicious resource utilization. The development of guidelines for HEMS use in pediatric trauma could potentially limit unnecessary transfers while still identifying children who require trauma center care in a timely fashion. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. CT findings of chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Tong; Kim Young Il

    1998-01-01

    Trauma is the third leading cause of death, irrespective of age, and the leading cause of death in persons under 40 persons under 40 years of age. Most pleural, pulmonary, mediastinal, and diaphragmatic injuries are not seen on conventional chest radiographs, or are underestimated. In patients with chest trauma, CT scanning is an effective and sensitive method of detecting thoracic injuries and provides accurate information regarding their pattern and extent. (author). 5 refs., 17 figs

  17. Blunt cerebrovascular injuries in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, Shannon

    2016-09-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) includes trauma to the carotid or vertebral vessels and is noted in 0.1% of hospitalized trauma patients without an initial screening system in place. Several important topics must be addressed including determination of the appropriate screening population, the best modality of screening for diagnosis, treatment types, and required follow-up of blunt cerebrovascular injuries. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Imhof, H. [University and General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cancer of the head, neck and mouth. The Oral Cancer Foundation estimates that close to 42,000 Americans ... diagnosed with oral or pharyngeal cancer this year. Oral cancer’s mortality is particularly high, not because it is ...

  20. Necked-in superdeformed nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joensson, L.O.

    1997-03-01

    In this dissertation the possibility of forming superdeformed states related to two connected spheres, having a more or less pronounced neck, is investigated. Detailed Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations with the cranked Woods-Saxon potential and a finite-range liquid drop model are carried out in the 180 Hg region, where superdeformed states related to two overlapping 90 Zr are predicted. Detailed spectroscopic properties are calculated. The effect of the necking degree of freedom on the giant dipole resonance, GDR, is investigated. The calculations are carried out with the Woods-saxon potential for the single-particle states, and the random phase approximation formalism for the phonon states. The residual interaction and coupling constants are determined by requirements of transitional invariance. The lower energy component of the GDR spectrum for superdeformed shapes, corresponding to vibrations along the symmetry axis, is diminished with increasing necking, and the mean energy of the GDR is increased. The folded Yukawa-plus-exponential liquid drop models take into account the finite range of the nuclear force, which is important when elongated and necked-in nuclear shapes are considered. However, it is shown that they are unstable towards higher multipole deformations, and that unphysical shapes are obtained in free minimizations when too high multipole deformations are included. Limits on multipolarity are given as functions of mass number. 9 refs., 4 figs

  1. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lump in the neck Your mouth is one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. Should you discover something, make an appointment for a prompt examination. Early treatment may well be the key to complete ... Oral and maxillofacial ...

  2. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ... more. TMJ and Facial Pain TMJ and Facial ... Teeth Management Wisdom Teeth Management An impacted wisdom tooth can ...

  3. Trauma in Auckland: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streat, S J; Donaldson, M L; Judson, J A

    1987-07-22

    Data are presented on all 569 subjects who, as a result of trauma, either died or were admitted to hospital in Auckland over a four week period. Median age was 23 with an overall 3:2 male:female ratio. Median injury severity score (ISS) was five with 9% of subjects having an ISS of 16 or more (major trauma). Blunt trauma accounted for 84% of all injuries. Life threatening injuries were most commonly to the head, thorax and abdomen while the largest number of less severe injuries were to the extremities. Eight subjects died before admission to hospital and a further six in hospital. Definitive care was given to 98% of patients at Middlemore and Auckland hospitals (including the onsite Princess Mary paediatric facility) but 26% had presented first to other hospitals and 43% of all patients were transferred from one hospital to another. The 561 patients used 6380 hospital days (including 314 intensive care days) and the following services--operating room 63%, orthopaedic ward 45%, plastic surgical ward 17%, paediatric ward 15%, neurosurgical ward 10%, general surgical ward 5%, intensive care 5% and CT scanner 4%. Only one hospital death was judged potentially preventable. This study reveals areas where trauma care could be improved, demonstrates the large amount of hospital resources required to treat trauma and particularly highlights the urgent need for studies into strategies for trauma prevention in New Zealand.

  4. Endovascular interventions for multiple trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinstner, C.; Funovics, M.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years interventional radiology has significantly changed the management of injured patients with multiple trauma. Currently nearly all vessels can be reached within a reasonably short time with the help of specially preshaped catheters and guide wires to achieve bleeding control of arterial und venous bleeding. Whereas bleeding control formerly required extensive open surgery, current interventional methods allow temporary vessel occlusion (occlusion balloons), permanent embolization and stenting. In injured patients with multiple trauma preinterventional procedural planning is performed with the help of multidetector computed tomography whenever possible. Interventional radiology not only allows minimization of therapeutic trauma but also a considerably shorter treatment time. Interventional bleeding control has developed into a standard method in the management of vascular trauma of the chest and abdomen as well as in vascular injuries of the upper and lower extremities when open surgical access is associated with increased risk. Additionally, pelvic trauma, vascular trauma of the superior thoracic aperture and parenchymal arterial lacerations of organs that can be at least partially preserved are primarily managed by interventional methods. In an interdisciplinary setting interventional radiology provides a safe and efficient means of rapid bleeding control in nearly all vascular territories in addition to open surgical access. (orig.) [de

  5. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  6. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicky, S.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Capasso, P.; Denys, A.

    2000-01-01

    In western European countries most blunt chest traumas are associated with motor vehicle and sport-related accidents. In Switzerland, 39 of 10,000 inhabitants were involved and severely injured in road accidents in 1998. Fifty two percent of them suffered from blunt chest trauma. According to the Swiss Federal Office of Statistics, traumas represented in men the fourth major cause of death (4 %) after cardiovascular disease (38 %), cancer (28 %), and respiratory disease (7 %) in 1998. The outcome of chest trauma patients is determined mainly by the severity of the lesions, the prompt appropriate treatment delivered on the scene of the accident, the time needed to transport the patient to a trauma center, and the immediate recognition of the lesions by a trained emergency team. Other determining factors include age as well as coexisting cardiac, pulmonary, and renal diseases. Our purpose was to review the wide spectrum of pathologies related to blunt chest trauma involving the chest wall, pleura, lungs, trachea and bronchi, aorta, aortic arch vessels, and diaphragm. A particular focus on the diagnostic impact of CT is demonstrated. (orig.)

  7. Radiographic evaluation of hepatic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    The incidence of significant abdominal trauma continues to rise and accounts currently for approximately 10 percent of the annual 130,000 trauma-related deaths in the United States. Over 60 percent of patients are from 10 to 40 years of age, with a striking predominance of males. Children are mostly victims of blunt trauma, while some large reviews of liver trauma in adults show a prevalence of penetrating injuries. Injury to the liver is second only to the spleen in incidence of intraperitoneal injuries. Morbidity and mortality from hepatic trauma are related to the mechanism and extent of injury. Penetrating injuries generally have a lower mortality, about 5 percent, especially if they are due to stab wounds or low velocity gunshot wounds. Shotgun and high velocity gunshot wounds may cause massive fragmentation of the liver and are associated with proportionately greater mortality. The mortality from blunt trauma is from 15 to 45 percent in many large series. Death from isolated liver injury is uncommon, but is usually due to uncontrolled hemorrhage. Injury to other abdominal organs is associated in many cases, as are injuries to the head, chest, and limbs. The extraabdominal injuries are frequently more apparent clinically, but may mask potentially life-threatening abdominal visceral injuries

  8. Multiple trauma in children: critical care overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Randall C; Burns, R Cartland

    2002-11-01

    Multiple trauma is more than the sum of the injuries. Management not only of the physiologic injury but also of the pathophysiologic responses, along with integration of the child's emotional and developmental needs and the child's family, forms the basis of trauma care. Multiple trauma in children also elicits profound psychological responses from the healthcare providers involved with these children. This overview will address the pathophysiology of multiple trauma in children and the general principles of trauma management by an integrated trauma team. Trauma is a systemic disease. Multiple trauma stimulates the release of multiple inflammatory mediators. A lethal triad of hypothermia, acidosis, and coagulopathy is the direct result of trauma and secondary injury from the systemic response to trauma. Controlling and responding to the secondary pathophysiologic sequelae of trauma is the cornerstone of trauma management in the multiply injured, critically ill child. Damage control surgery is a new, rational approach to the child with multiple trauma. The selection of children for damage control surgery depends on the severity of injury. Major abdominal vascular injuries and multiple visceral injuries are best considered for this approach. The effective management of childhood multiple trauma requires a combined team approach, consideration of the child and family, an organized trauma system, and an effective quality assurance and improvement mechanism.

  9. Trauma and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, F

    1995-02-01

    The author suggests a particular reading of the thesis put forward by Freud in 'Analysis terminable and interminable' that an effective and more definitive conclusion may be expected in analyses of cases with traumatic aetiology. This reading shifts the emphasis from the patient's history to the possibility of its crystallising in focal nuclei emerging within the analytic relationship under the pressure of the termination. The revival of separation anxieties which cannot be worked through, and their crystallisation in precipitating traumatic events, may give rise to decisive psychic work allowing the analysis to be brought to a conclusion. Two case histories are presented to show how the end of the analysis assumes the form of a new trauma, which reactivates in the present, traumatic anxieties from the patient's own infantile history. In the first case a premature birth and in the second a miscarriage, originally experienced as isolated automatic events without time or history, are relived in the terminal phase as vicissitudes of the transference, so that new meaning can be assigned to them and they can be withdrawn from the somatic cycle of repetition. The powerful tendency to act out and the intense countertransference pressure on the analyst are discussed in the light of the specificities of this phase, which is crucial to the success of the analysis. This leads to a re-examination, in the concluding notes, of some theoretical questions inherent in the problem of the termination and, in particular, to a discussion of the ambiguous concept of a natural ending.

  10. Head trauma and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samejima, Kanji; Yoshii, Nobuo; Tobari, Chitoshi

    1979-01-01

    It has been said that chronic subdural hematoma cannot be diagnosed by CT. In our cases, CT was used, and the results were described. According to the density of the picture, CT findings of chronic subdural hematoma could be classified into 3 types, those of higher density than that of the cerebral paranchyma, those of isodensity, and those of lower density than that of the cerebral parenchyma. The difference among them appeared to be due to variation in the fluid in hematoma, especially that in hemoglobin concentration. Chronic subdural hematoma was found in 27 of 388 cases of head trauma in which CT was undertaken in our department of surgery for last 2 years. It is difficult to differenciate this disease from subdural edema or subarachnoideal retention of the cerebrospinal fluid. In many cases, use of contrast medium added no change to the CT picture. Cerebral angiography is necessary for definite diagnosis of the disease. Chronic subdural hematoma gives more varieties of findings than other intracranial hematomas. However, if the film is very carefully read, CT is still useful for diagnosing this disease in spite of initially remarked difficulties. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-09-01

    Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons' Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. We searched the PubMed database using the keywords "leadership" and then either "trauma" or "resuscitation" as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching followed by simulations. Although programs

  12. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Na Young; Lee, Keun-Wook; Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Ah Kim, In

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy

  13. Use of intubating laryngeal mask airway in a morbidly obese patient with chest trauma in an emergency setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripat Bindra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A morbidly obese male who sustained blunt trauma chest with bilateral pneumothorax was referred to the intensive care unit for management of his condition. Problems encountered in managing the patient were gradually increasing hypoxemia (chest trauma with multiple rib fractures with lung contusions and difficult mask ventilation and intubation (morbid obesity, heavy jaw, short and thick neck. We performed awake endotracheal intubation using an intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA size 4 and provided mechanical ventilation to the patient. This report suggests that ILMA can be very useful in the management of difficult airway outside the operating room and can help in preventing adverse events in an emergency setting.

  14. Review of a single contemporary femoral neck fracture fixation method in young patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henari, Shwan

    2011-03-01

    An intracapsular femoral neck fracture in a young patient is a rare and difficult injury to manage. The occurrence of complications following fixation is multifactorial. Initial displacement and timing and accuracy of reduction are the key factors affecting outcome. The severities of the trauma to the hip and the impact of the intracapsular hematoma also play a role, the importance of which remains poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high incidence of femoral neck fractures treated in our institution over a 7-month period, to record the long-term outcome of these patients, all of whom were treated with contemporary methods of internal fixation, and to highlight the reasons for this injury being termed an "orthopedic emergency" and its differences from the same injury in the elderly population. We performed a retrospective analysis of 12 cases of intracapsular femur neck fracture in patients younger than 50 years treated over 7 months in a regional trauma center. All patients underwent satisfactory reduction and fixation. Nine of the 12 patients had a good outcome at a mean follow-up of 29 months. One patient developed a nonunion of the femoral head requiring total hip arthroplasty, one developed avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and one developed partial avascular necrosis. This compares favorably with other studies.

  15. Occupational Maxillofacial Trauma: Report of a Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dervisoglou Theodoros

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maxillofacial trauma, any physical trauma in the face, can involve soft tissues (lacerations, avulsions, bruises etc, bone injuries (fractures and dislocation, avulsed or fractured teeth (dental issues and special regions (nerves, eyes, salivary glands etc. As the most exposed part of the human body, the face can be susceptible to injuries in work-related accidents. Occupational accident in the maxillofacial region rates 0.9-5% and, in some cases, can reach 9%. Based on their occupation, patients are classified as farm and forestry workers, construction workers, factory workers, craftsmen, service workers, and office workers.

  16. The role of trauma in the hormonal interplay of cortisol, testosterone, and oxytocin in adolescent aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, Iro; Cima, Maaike; Granic, Isabela

    2018-02-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the neuroendocrinology of aggression, the findings are mixed and focused on cortisol and testosterone. We argue that past findings remain inconclusive partly because the key roles of oxytocin and trauma have not been systematically integrated yet. Oxytocin is associated with social behavior and interacts with cortisol and testosterone, whereas trauma is a crucial risk factor of aggression that strongly affects hormonal activity. In this review, we investigate the role of trauma in the hormonal interplay of cortisol, testosterone, and oxytocin in aggression during adolescence. We first discuss how these hormones interact with each other and how trauma influences these interactions and then we propose a model that highlights the role of trauma in the hormonal interplay in aggression. We suggest that the timing of trauma has a distinct effect on hormonal activity and it should be integrated into any comprehensive model. Current trauma is linked to different levels of oxytocin, cortisol, testosterone, and testosterone/cortisol ratio than childhood trauma, but this distinction is also influenced by gender and type of aggression. We conclude that in order to better understand the neuroendocrinology of aggression, it is crucial to incorporate the investigation of oxytocin and trauma in future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  18. The implementation of a national trauma registry in Greece. Methodology and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsaragakis, Stylianos; Theodoraki, Maria E; Toutouzas, Kostas; Drimousis, Panagiotis G; Larentzakis, Antreas; Stergiopoulos, Spiros; Aggelakis, Christos; Lapidakis, George; Massalis, Ioannis; Theodorou, Dimitrios

    2009-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide and a major health problem of the modern society. Trauma systems are considered the gold standard of managing patients with trauma. An integral part of any trauma system is a trauma registry. In Europe, and particularly in Greece, trauma registries and systems are in an embryonic stage. In this study, we present an attempt to record trauma in Greece. The Hellenic Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery invited all the official representatives of the society throughout the country to participate in the study. In succeeding meetings of the representatives, the reporting form was developed and the inclusion criteria were defined meticulously. Inclusion criteria were defined as patients with trauma requiring admission, transfer to a higher level center, or arrived dead or died in the emergency department of the reporting hospital. All reports were accumulated by the Hellenic Trauma society, imported in an electronic database, and analyzed. Thirty-two hospitals receiving patients with trauma participated in the country, representing 40% of the country's healthcare facilities and serving 40% of the country's population. In 12 months time, (October 2005 to September 2006), 8,862 patients were included in the study. Of them, 66.9% were men and 31.3% were women. The compilation rate of the reporting forms was surprisingly high, considering that the final reporting form included 150 data points and that there were no independent personnel in charge of filling the forms. Trauma registries are feasible even in health care systems where funding of medical research is sparse.

  19. The concept of psychical trauma: a bridge in interdisciplinary space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutté, Juan Carlos

    2004-08-01

    The concept of trauma currently occupies a central position in interdisciplinary dialogue. Using the concept of psychical trauma as a bridge, the author attempts an interdisciplinary dialogue with psychiatry, biology and neuroscience. Beginning with the concept of psychical trauma in Freud, the author reviews the evolution of Freud's thinking, and links it with the ideas of Ferenczi and post-Freudian psychoanalytical authors. From a different framework, he considers the present state of research on post-traumatic stress disorder in current psychiatric nosography and attempts an interdisciplinary approximation to the concept of psychical trauma. Interesting ideas like the traumatic situation, trauma spectrum and psychopathological spectrum emerge, which enable a better understanding of the concept of psychical trauma through its relatedness, as a bridge connecting a broad psychopathological range extending from normality to psychosis. The ensuing possible relative loss of nosographical rigour is more than compensated by the resulting increased understanding and enlarged therapeutic possibilities. In the second part of the paper, the author attempts a dialogue with neuroscience, taking into account new advances in current research on emotion and memory, and making them compatible with the psychoanalytical concept of trauma. In this sense, the paper underlines the importance of emotion and crucially of memory, regarded as a fundamental axis of the subject explored in this paper. Here a substantial distinction which is pertinent for analytical work appears: declarative memories versus non-declarative or procedural memories. In a concluding discussion the author argues that, taking into account the implications of these current notions regarding a number of theoretical and technical aspects, psychoanalysis currently holds a privileged position, both in its potential for prevention and regarding the treatment of patients, in so far as, through interdisciplinary dialogue

  20. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing.

  1. 'Ready-access' CT imaging for an orthopaedic trauma clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2011-03-01

    \\'Ready-Access\\' to CT imaging facilities in Orthopaedic Trauma Clinics is not a standard facility. This facility has been available at the regional trauma unit, in Merlin Park Hospital, Galway for the past four years. We reviewed the use of this facility over a 2-year period when 100 patients had CT scans as part of their trauma clinic assessment. The rate of CT scan per clinic was 0.6. The mean waiting time for a CT scan was 30 minutes. 20 (20%) new fractures were confirmed, 33 (33%) fractures were out-ruled, 25 (25%) fractures demonstrated additional information and 8 (8%) had additional fractures. 20 (20%) patients were discharged and 12 (12%) patients were admitted as a result of the CT scan. It adds little time and cost to CT scanning lists.

  2. Tranexamic Acid: From Trauma to Routine Perioperative Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Jeff; Sikorski, Robert A.; Pittet, Jean-Francois

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Of Review Optimizing hemostasis with antifibrinolytics is becoming a common surgical practice. Large clinical studies have demonstrated efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) in the trauma population to reduce blood loss and transfusions. Its use in patients without preexisting coagulopathies is debated, as thromboembolic events are a concern. In this review, perioperative administration of TXA is examined in non-trauma surgical populations. Additionally, risk of thromboembolism, dosing regimens, and timing of dosing are assessed. Recent Findings Perioperative use of tranexamic acid is associated with reduced blood loss and transfusions. Thromboembolic effects do not appear to be increased. However, optimal dosing and timing of TXA administration is still under investigation for non-trauma surgical populations. Summary As part of a perioperative blood management program, tranexamic acid can be used to help reduce blood loss and mitigate exposure to blood transfusion. PMID:25635366

  3. Neck muscle endurance and head posture: A comparison between adolescents with and without neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Silva, Anabela G

    2016-04-01

    The main aims of this study were to compare the neck flexor and extensor endurance and forward head posture between adolescents with and without neck pain. The secondary aims were to explore potential associations between muscles endurance, head posture and neck pain characteristics and to assess intra-rater reliability of the measurements used. Adolescents with neck pain (n = 35) and age-matched asymptomatic adolescents (n = 35) had their forward head posture, neck flexor endurance and neck extensor endurance measured using clinical tests. Intra-rater reliability was also assessed. Forward head posture and neck flexor and extensor endurance tests showed moderate to almost perfect intra-rater reliability (ICC between 0.58 and 0.88). Adolescents with neck pain showed significantly less forward head posture (neck pain = 46.62 ± 4.92; asymptomatic = 44.18°± 3.64°, p > 0.05) and less neck flexor (neck pain = 24.50 ± 23.03s; asymptomatic = 35.89 ± 21.53s, p > 0.05) and extensor endurance (neck pain = 12.6.64 ± 77.94s; asymptomatic = 168.66 ± 74.77s, p > 0.05) than asymptomatic adolescents. Results suggest that changes in posture and neck muscle endurance are a feature of adolescents with neck pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients with unresectable disease; advanced larynx or hypopharynx cancer with the intent of larynx preservation, or advanced nasopharynx cancer. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Veterans Administration and EORTC larynx preservation studies. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  5. Chemotherapy for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfister, David G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The role of chemotherapy in the management of squamous cell carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract is undergoing rapid evolution. Historically, the use of chemotherapy was limited to patients with incurable disease who had exhausted all surgical and radiation therapy options. The results of recent randomized trials, however, suggest an increasing role for chemotherapy as part of primary management in patients seeking to avoid potentially morbid surgical procedures or with unresectable disease. This refresher course will provide a comprehensive overview of the current indications for chemotherapy in the management of these malignancies, and will highlight areas of controversy and future directions of investigation. More specifically, the following areas will be emphasized. 1. The identification of drugs commonly used in the management of head and neck cancer, their customary dosing and side effects. 2. The impact of induction and/or adjuvant chemotherapy combined with surgery and radiation therapy as defined by randomized trials, including a discussion of the Head and Neck Contracts program and the Intergroup adjuvant trial. 3. The development of larynx/function preservation treatment programs, including a review of the Memorial Hospital experience with larynx preservation and the Veterans Administration larynx preservation study. 4. The evolving role of chemotherapy as part of innovative combined modality programs, especially in patients with unresectable disease. The rationale and utility of sequential versus concomitant/alternating chemotherapy-radiation strategies, and relevant randomized clinical trials comparing the different strategies will be discussed. 5. The appropriate application of chemotherapy in the palliative setting, including a discussion of the relative merits of single-agent versus combination chemotherapy

  6. Building blocks toward contemporary trauma theory: Ferenczi 's paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, Judit

    2010-12-01

    In laying down the building blocks of contemporary trauma theory, Ferenczi asserted that trauma is founded on real events and that it occurs in the interpersonal and intersubjective dynamics of object relations. He stressed the significance of the presence or lack of a trusted person in the post-traumatic situation. After the trauma, the loneliness and later the isolation of the victim represent a serious pathogenic source. In the traumatic situation, the victim and the persecutor/aggressor operate differing ego defense mechanisms. Ferenczi was the first to describe the ego defense mechanism of identification with the aggressor. Ferenczi pointed out the characteristic features of the role of analyst/therapist with which (s)he may assist the patient in working through the trauma, among them being the development of a therapeutic atmosphere based on trust, so that the traumatic experiences can be relived, without which effective therapeutic change cannot be achieved. For the analyst, countertransference, as part of authentic communication, is incorporated into the therapeutic process. These are the key building blocks that are laid down by Ferenczi in his writings and appear in later works on trauma theory.

  7. Text neck and neck pain in 18-21-year-old young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Gerson Moreira; Ferreira, Arthur Sá; Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Reis, Felipe José Jandre; Andrade, Igor Caio Santana; Meziat-Filho, Ney

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between text neck and neck pain in young adults. Observational cross-sectional study with 150 18-21-year-old young adults from a public high school in the state of Rio de Janeiro was performed. In the self-report questionnaire, the participants answered questions on sociodemographic factors, anthropometric factors, time spent texting or playing on a mobile phone, visual impairments, and concern with the body posture. The neck posture was assessed by participants' self-perception and physiotherapists' judgment during a mobile phone texting message task. The Young Spine Questionnaire was used to evaluate the neck pain. Four multivariate logistic regression models were fitted to investigate the association between neck posture during mobile phone texting and neck pain, considering potential confounding factors. There is no association between neck posture, assessed by self-perception, and neck pain (OR = 1.66, p = 0.29), nor between neck posture, assessed by physiotherapists' judgment, and neck pain (OR = 1.23, p = 0.61). There was also no association between neck posture, assessed by self-perception, and frequency of neck pain (OR = 2.19, p = 0.09), nor between neck posture, assessed by physiotherapists' judgment, and frequency of neck pain (OR = 1.17, p = 0.68). This study did not show an association between text neck and neck pain in 18-21-year-old young adults. The findings challenge the belief that neck posture during mobile phone texting is associated to the growing prevalence of neck pain.

  8. History of the Dental Trauma Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2012-01-01

    The history of the Dental Trauma Guide dates back to 1965, where guidelines were developed for trauma records and treatment of various trauma entities at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Hospital in Copenhagen. In 1972, a unique possibility came up at the Serum...... Institute in Copenhagen to test various dental trauma procedures in monkeys, which served as kidney donors in the polio vaccine production. Over the years, 40 000 dental trauma patients were treated at the Trauma Centre according to established guidelines, and 4000 of these have been enrolled in long...

  9. The role of acetabulum geometry and femoral head-neck ratio in the development of osteoarthritis in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, B; Halle, D M; Torfing, T

    2007-01-01

    and the consequence of acetabular retroversion on standardized x-rays. Men aged 26-55 years who earlier had a total hip arthroplasty were included in the case group. This group was compared to a control-group of men treated as trauma patients. The study indicates that acetabular dysplasia and retroversion......We studied the role of acetabulum geometry and head neck ratio in the development of osteoarthritis of the hip in young men. Contrary to previous studies we evaluated the significance of the anterior, posterior and total coverage of the femoral head, the influence of the femoral neck...... and a relative decreased head neck ratio are associated with osteoarthritis of the hip in young men....

  10. The Use of Neck Support Pillows and Postural Exercises in the Management of Chronic Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Alisha N; Feldman, Brian M; Pullenayegum, Eleanor

    2016-10-01

    Chronic neck pain is a common problem with a profound effect on quality of life. Identifying evidence-based management strategies is fundamental in improving patient outcomes. This study is a reanalysis of the data from Helewa, et al to further characterize the effects of postural exercises and neck support pillows on neck pain. A full factorial model was used. All interactions were analyzed adjusting for the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) at baseline. Postural exercises significantly decreased NPQ scores at ≥ 3 weeks, and the use of a neck support pillow significantly decreased NPQ scores at ≥ 12 weeks. These interventions could be beneficial in reducing neck pain symptoms.

  11. Outcomes of Vacuum-Assisted Therapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satteson, Ellen S; Crantford, John Clayton; Wood, Jeyhan; David, Lisa R

    2015-10-01

    Head and neck wounds can present a reconstructive challenge for the plastic surgeon. Whether from skin cancer, trauma, or burns, there are many different treatment modalities used to dress and manage complex head and neck wounds. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy has been used on wounds of nearly every aspect of the body but not routinely in the head and neck area. This study was conducted to demonstrate our results using the VAC in the treatment of complex head and neck wounds. This is an IRB-approved, retrospective review of 69 patients with 73 head and neck wounds that were managed using the VAC between 1999 and 2008. The wound mechanism, location, and size, length of VAC therapy, patient comorbidities, use of radiation, complications, and ultimate outcome were assessed. In this patient population, the VAC was utilized because the standard reconstructive ladder was not a good option or had previously failed. Sixty-nine patients with complex head and neck wounds were treated with the wound VAC. The mean age of the patients was 66 years, with a range of 5-96 years. Males outnumbered females in this study nearly 2:1. Eighty-six percent of patients had wounds secondary to cancer, 8% secondary to trauma, 3% secondary to infection, and 3% secondary to burns. The VAC was used as a dressing over skin grafts in 50%, over Integra in 21%, and over open debrided wounds in 29%. Wounds healed without complication in 44% of the skin grafts, 67% of Integra-covered wounds, and 71% of debrided wounds. Minor complications included failure of complete graft take, failure of granulation tissue formation in open debrided wounds, infection, and hematoma formation under skin grafts. Major complications included positive cancer margins requiring reexcision and death secondary to pulmonary embolism, sepsis, and metastatic cancer. Most complications resolved with dressing changes, repeat grafting, or the administration of antibiotics. Our results demonstrate that the wound VAC

  12. Spontaneous obliteration of right ventricular pseudoaneurysm after blunt chest trauma: Diagnosis and follow-up with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Tae Kyung; Kang, Mi Jin; Kim, Jae Hyung [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Right ventricular (RV) pseudoaneurysm caused by trauma is very rare. We report a case of RV pseudoaneurysm which resolved without surgical treatment in a patient who survived a falling accident. Echocardiography failed to identify the pseudoaneurysm. Electrocardiography-gated CT showed a 17-mm-sized saccular pseusoaneurysm arsing from the RV outflow tract with a narrow neck. Follow-up CT after two months showed spontaneous obliteration of the lesion.

  13. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the epidemiological aspects, behavior, morbidity and treatment outcomes for liver trauma. We conducted a retrospective study of patients over 13 years of age admitted to a university hospital from 1990 to 2010, submitted to surgery or nonoperative management (NOM). 748 patients were admitted with liver trauma. The most common mechanism of injury was penetrating trauma (461 cases, 61.6%), blunt trauma occurring in 287 patients (38.4%). According to the degree of liver injury (AAST-OIS) in blunt trauma we predominantly observed Grades I and II and in penetrating trauma, Grade III. NOM was performed in 25.7% of patients with blunt injury. As for surgical procedures, suturing was performed more frequently (41.2%). The liver-related morbidity was 16.7%. The survival rate for patients with liver trauma was 73.5% for blunt and 84.2% for penetrating trauma. Mortality in complex trauma was 45.9%. trauma remains more common in younger populations and in males. There was a reduction of penetrating liver trauma. NOM proved safe and effective, and often has been used to treat patients with penetrating liver trauma. Morbidity was high and mortality was higher in victims of blunt trauma and complex liver injuries.

  14. Management of Acute Skin Trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joel W. Beam

    2010-01-01

    @@ Acute skin trauma (ie, abrasions, avulsions, blisters, incisions, lacerations, and punctures) is common among individuals involved in work, recreational, and athletic activities. Appropriate management of these wounds is important to promote healing and lessen the risk of cross-contamination and infection. Wound management techniques have undergone significant changes in the past 40 years but many clinicians continue to manage acute skin trauma with long-established, traditional techniques (ie, use of hydrogen peroxide, adhesive strips/patches, sterile gauze, or no dressing) that can delay healing and increase the risk of infection. The purpose of this review is to discuss evidence-based cleansing, debridement, and dressing techniques for the management of acute skin trauma.

  15. Temporal bone trauma and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, K.; Czerny, C.; Wunderbaldinger, P.; Steiner, E.

    1997-01-01

    Fractures of the temporal bone result from direct trauma to the temporal bone or occur as one component of a severe craniocerebral injury. Complications of temporal trauma are hemotympanon, facial nerve paralysis, conductive or sensorineur hearing loss, and leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Erly recognition and an appropiate therapy may improve or prevent permanent deficits related to such complications. Only 20-30% of temporal bone fractures can be visualized by plain films. CT has displaced plain radiography in the investigation of the otological trauma because subtle bony details are best evaluated by CT which even can be reformatted in multiple projections, regardless of the original plane of scanning. Associated epidural, subdural, and intracerebral hemorrhagic lesions are better defined by MRI. (orig.) [de

  16. Cerebral infarcts resulting from trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, G.

    1985-01-01

    Vascular occlusions due to cerebral trauma have always been regarded as great rarities. However, we have found hypo-dense foci of vascular distribution in 3.5% of 3500 CT examinations for trauma during the late phase. Lesions in the vascular territory of the posterior cerebral artery are usually the result of supratentorial pressure rise from epidural and subdural haematomas, leading to compression of the vessels against the edge of the tentorium. Typical infacts in the territory of the medial and anterior cerebral arteries were found only rarely by CT after cerebral trauma. Infarcts at the watersheds between the three vascular territories were found with surprising frequency and small infarcts were found in the basal ganglia. It is assumed that these were due to ischaemic or hypoxic events due to cardiac or pulmonary complications during the initial phase. (orig.) [de

  17. Perioperative care of a pregnant trauma victim: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... (until proven otherwise) in any female trauma patient of child- ... The perioperative management of pregnant trauma victims re- ... trauma, abdominal trauma, head injury, cervical spine injury, fetal injury, gun shot wounds, blunt.

  18. Trauma in Autobiographical Videogames: The Case of Father and I (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Bercuci

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Although trauma and memory have been a focus of cultural studies for more than twenty years now, few scholarly works focus on medium-specific representations of trauma and even fewer comment on the tendency of trauma representations to be autobiographical in the 21st Century. The present paper is part of a larger project that seeks to tackle precisely these issues. Here, I look at the representation of trauma in a relatively recent autobiographical video game, namely Vince Caballero’s Father and I (2012. I argue that the use of trauma as a trope adds a further narrative demand to video games, making it even more difficult to negotiate the specificities of the medium. At the same time, however, it functions as a stock story that enhances the narrative dimensions of the game under discussion.

  19. Trauma from a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    Trauma from widespread collective violence such as genocide and ethnic cleansing has not been discussed from a global perspective. It will be argued that the Western medical model of diagnostic labeling is inadequate for understanding victims of collective violence from around the world. Phenomenology and liberation philosophy will be discussed as alternatives to understanding trauma from collective violence that move beyond the Western medical model of diagnostic labeling. The insights gained from these alternative approaches will contribute to the development of nursing education, research, and practice relevant to the health of victims of collective violence around the globe.

  20. Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Trauma, Development and Peacebuilding : Toward an Integrated Psychological Approach. Some experts have begun to ... The psychosocial approach is an alternative way of thinking about trauma following political violence. ... Date de début.

  1. Management of ocular, orbital, and adnexal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoor, T.C.; Nesi, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Ruptured Globe: Primary Care; Corneal Trauma, Endophthalmitis; Antibiotic Usage; Radiology of Orbital Trauma; Maxillofacial Fractures; Orbital Infections; and Basic Management of Soft Tissue Injury

  2. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  3. Effectiveness of prehospital trauma triage systems in selecting severely injured patients: Is comparative analysis possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rein, Eveline A J; van der Sluijs, Rogier; Houwert, R Marijn; Gunning, Amy C; Lichtveld, Rob A; Leenen, Luke P H; van Heijl, Mark

    2018-01-27

    In an optimal trauma system, prehospital trauma triage ensures transport of the right patient to the right hospital. Incorrect triage results in undertriage and overtriage. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate and compare prehospital trauma triage system quality worldwide and determine effectiveness in terms of undertriage and overtriage for trauma patients. A systematic search of Pubmed/MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases was performed, using "trauma", "trauma center," or "trauma system", combined with "triage", "undertriage," or "overtriage", as search terms. All studies describing ground transport and actual destination hospital of patients with and without severe injuries, using prehospital triage, published before November 2017, were eligible for inclusion. To assess the quality of these studies, a critical appraisal tool was developed. A total of 33 articles were included. The percentage of undertriage ranged from 1% to 68%; overtriage from 5% to 99%. Older age and increased geographical distance were associated with undertriage. Mortality was lower for severely injured patients transferred to a higher-level trauma center. The majority of the included studies were of poor methodological quality. The studies of good quality showed poor performance of the triage protocol, but additional value of EMS provider judgment in the identification of severely injured patients. In most of the evaluated trauma systems, a substantial part of the severely injured patients is not transported to the appropriate level trauma center. Future research should come up with new innovative ways to improve the quality of prehospital triage in trauma patients. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Trauma, forgiveness and the witnessing dance: making public spaces intimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobodo-Madikizela, Pumla

    2008-04-01

    In this paper I explore the concept of forgiveness as a response to gross human rights violations. I present a conceptual examination of the effects of massive trauma in relation to what I refer to as the 'unfinished business' of trauma. Using a psychoanalytic framework, I consider the process of 'bearing witness' about trauma and examine how this process opens up the possibility of reciprocal expressions of empathy between victim and perpetrator. I then argue that, in this context of trauma testimony and witnessing, empathy is essential for the development of remorse on the part of perpetrators, and of forgiveness on the part of victims. Using a case study from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) I clarify the relationship between empathy and forgiveness, and show how the restorative model of the TRC can open up an ethical space and create the possibility of transformation for victims, perpetrators and bystanders. In my conclusion I suggest that forgiveness in politics is the only action that holds promise for the repair of brokenness in post-conflict societies, particularly if, as in South Africa, victims have to live together with perpetrators and beneficiaries in the same country.

  5. Disseminated intravascular coagulation or acute coagulopathy of trauma shock early after trauma? A prospective observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Per Ingemar; Sorensen, Anne Marie; Perner, Anders

    2011-01-01

    the prevalence of overt DIC and ACoTS in trauma patients and characterized these conditions based on their biomarker profiles. METHODS: Observational study at a single Level I Trauma Centre. Inclusion of 80 adult trauma patients ([greater than or equal to]18 years) who met criteria for full trauma team...

  6. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; Achterberg, T. van

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. OBJECTIVE: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. METHODS: We

  7. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, M.W.; Goossens, P.J.J.; Draijer, N.; van Achterberg, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice. Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI. Methods: We

  8. External validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for early prediction of mortality in trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base excess, and

  9. External Validation of the Emergency Trauma Score for Early Prediction of Mortality in Trauma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosse, Pieter; de Jong, Willem-Jan J.; Wendt, Klaus W.; Schep, Niels W.; Goslings, J. Carel; Reitsma, J.

    Objectives: The Emergency Trauma Score has been developed for early estimation of mortality risk in adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score of 16 or higher. Emergency Trauma Score combines four early predictors available at the trauma resuscitation room: age, Glasgow Coma Scale, base

  10. Increased neck muscle activity and impaired balance among females with whiplash-related chronic neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Clausen, Brian; Ris Hansen, Inge

    2013-01-01

    To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls.......To investigate neck muscle activity and postural control in patients with whiplash-associated disorder compared with healthy controls....

  11. Oncologic safety of cervical nerve preservation in neck dissection for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Kada, Shinpei; Tsujimura, Takashi; Kataoka, Michiko

    2017-09-01

    Although the functional merits of preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection for head and neck cancer have been reported, the oncologic safety has not yet been determined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of cervical nerve preservation. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with head and neck cancer who had been treated by neck dissection between 2009 and 2014 at Kyoto Medical Center. Management of cervical nerves and clinical results were analyzed. A total of 335 sides of neck dissection had been performed in 222 patients. Cervical nerves were preserved in 175 neck sides and resected in 160 sides. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 71%. The 5-year neck control rate was 95% in cervical nerve preserved sides and 89% in cervical nerve resected sides. Preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection is oncologically safe in selected cases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Menchine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders.  Methods: We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1 how leadership affects patient care; 2 which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3 methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results: We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs

  13. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  14. Neck massage induced dural sinus thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma Ashish

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis of the intracranial dural sinuses and internal jugular veins may occur as a complication of head and neck infections, surgery, central venous access, local malignancy, polycythemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, neck massage and intravenous drug abuse. A high degree of clinical suspicion followed by adequate imaging is prerequisite to early diagnosis and management. We report a young man who had dural sinus thrombosis with jugular venous thrombosis following neck massage.

  15. An Unusual Neck Mass: Ingested Chicken Bone

    OpenAIRE

    Demirhan, Erhan; İber, Metin; Yağız, Özlem; Kandoğan, Tolga; Çukurova, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Foreign bodies in the upper aerodigestive tract are frequently seen in otolaryngological practice, but migration of an ingested foreign body to the neck is a very rare condition. Case Report: We present a 66-year-old woman admitted to our outpatient department with a painful neck mass. She had a history of emergency department admission 4 months prior with odynophagia after eating chicken meal. A physical examination revealed a painful and hyperemic mass on the left neck. Ant...

  16. Clinical analysis of deep neck space infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Atsushi; Ui, Naoya; Shigeta, Yasushi; Iimura, Jiro; Rikitake, Masahiro; Endo, Tomonori; Kimura, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Deep neck space infections, which affect soft tissues and fascial compartments of the head and neck, can lead to lethal complications unless treated carefully and quickly, even with the advanced antibiotics available. We reviewed our seventeen patients with deep neck abscesses, analyzed their location by reviewing CT images, and discussed the treatment. Deep neck space infections were classified according to the degree of diffusion of infection diagnosed by CT images. Neck space infection in two cases was localized to the upper neck space above the hyoid bone (Stage I). Neck space infection in 12 cases extended to the lower neck space (Stage II), and further extended to the mediastinum in one case (Stage III). The two cases of Stage I and the four cases of Stage II were managed with incision and drainage through a submental approach. The seven cases of Stage II were managed with incision and drainage parallel to the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, the ''Dean'' approach. The one case of Stage III received treatment through transcervicotomy and anterior mediastinal drainage through a subxiphodal incision. The parapharyngeal space played an important role in that the inflammatory change can spread to the neck space inferiorly. The anterior cervical space in the infrahyoid neck was important for mediastinal extension of parapharyngeal abscesses. It is important to diagnose deep neck space infections promptly and treat them adequately, and contrast-enhanced CT is useful and indispensable for diagnosis. The point is which kind of drainage has to be performed. If the surgical method of drainage is chosen according to the level of involvement in the neck space and mediastinum, excellent results may be obtained in terms of survival and morbidity. (author)

  17. Modeling neck mobility in fossil turtles

    OpenAIRE

    Werneburg, Ingmar; Hinz, Juliane K.; Gumpenberger, Michaela; Volpato, Virginie; Natchev, Nikolay; Joyce, Walter G.

    2014-01-01

    Turtles have the unparalleled ability to retract their heads and necks within their shell but little is known about the evolution of this trait. Extensive analysis of neck mobility in turtles using radiographs, CT scans, and morphometry reveals that basal turtles possessed less mobility in the neck relative to their extant relatives, although the anatomical prerequisites for modern mobility were already established. Many extant turtles are able to achieve hypermobility by dislocating the cent...

  18. Inter-Vertebral Flexibility of the Ostrich Neck: Implications for Estimating Sauropod Neck Flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Cobley, Matthew J.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Barrett, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal o...

  19. Triage and mortality in 2875 consecutive trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisler, Rikke; Thomsen, A B; Abildstrøm, H

    2010-01-01

    Most studies on trauma and trauma systems have been conducted in the United States. We aimed to describe the factors predicting mortality in European trauma patients, with focus on triage.......Most studies on trauma and trauma systems have been conducted in the United States. We aimed to describe the factors predicting mortality in European trauma patients, with focus on triage....

  20. Quality in trauma care: improving the discharge procedure of patients by means of Lean Six Sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeijer, Gerard C; Trip, Albert; Ahaus, Kees T B; Does, Ronald J M M; Wendt, Klaus W

    2010-09-01

    The University Medical Center Groningen is a level I trauma center in the northern part of the Netherlands. Sixty-three percent of all the patients admitted at the Trauma Nursing Department (TND) are acute patients who are admitted directly after trauma. In 2006 and 2007, the University Medical Center Groningen was not always capable of admitting all trauma patients to the TND due to the relatively high-bed occupation. Therefore, the reduction of the average length of stay (LOS) formed the objective of the project described in this study. We used the process-focused method of Lean Six Sigma to reduce hospital stay by improving the discharge procedure of patients in the care processes and eliminating waste and waiting time. We used the "Dutch Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol" to identify the possible causes of inappropriate hospital stay. The average LOS of trauma patients at the TND at the beginning of the project was 10.4 days. Thirty percent of the LOS was unnecessary. The main causes of the inappropriate hospital stay were delays in several areas. The implementation of the improvement plan reduced almost 50% of the inappropriate hospital stay, enabling the trauma center to admit almost all trauma patients to the TND. After the implementation of the improvements, the average LOS was 8.5 days. Our study shows that Lean Six Sigma is an effective method to reduce inappropriate hospital stay, thereby improving the quality and financial efficiency of trauma care.

  1. Childhood trauma and hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in first-episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Katrina; Barrett, Suzanne; Shannon, Ciaran; Campbell, Clodagh; Watson, David; Rushe, Teresa; Shevlin, Mark; Bai, Feng; Cooper, Stephen; Mulholland, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    A history of childhood trauma is common in individuals who later develop psychosis. Similar neuroanatomical abnormalities are observed in people who have been exposed to childhood trauma and people with psychosis. However, the relationship between childhood trauma and such abnormalities in psychosis has not been investigated. This study aimed to explore the association between the experience of childhood trauma and hippocampal and amygdalar volumes in a first-episode psychosis (FEP) population. The study employed an observational retrospective design. Twenty-one individuals, who had previously undergone magnetic resonance imaging procedures as part of the longitudinal Northern Ireland First-Episode Psychosis Study, completed measures assessing traumatic experiences and were included in the analysis. Data were subject to correlation analyses (r and r (pb)). Potential confounding variables (age at FEP and delay to scan from recruitment) were selected a priori for inclusion in multiple regression analyses. There was a high prevalence of lifetime (95%) and childhood (76%) trauma in the sample. The experience of childhood trauma was a significant predictor of left hippocampal volume, although age at FEP also significantly contributed to this model. There was no significant association between predictor variables and right hippocampal volume. The experience of childhood trauma was a significant predictor of right and total amygdalar volumes and the hippocampal/amygdalar complex volume as a whole. The findings indicate that childhood trauma is associated with neuroanatomical measures in FEP. Future research controlling for childhood traumatic experiences may contribute to explaining brain morphology in people with psychosis.

  2. Addressing Trauma in Substance Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Amanda L.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; Stamman, Julia; Callahan, Molly M.; Loseu, Sahar; Bevly, Cynthia M.; Cross, Kaitlin; Woehler, Elliott S.; Calzada, Richard-Michael R.; Chadwell, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Trauma is prevalent among clients with substance abuse issues, yet addictions counselors' training in trauma approaches is limited. The purpose of the current article is to provide pertinent information regarding trauma treatment including the use of assessments, empirically supported clinical approaches, self-help groups and the risk of vicarious…

  3. Decolonizing Trauma Theory : Retrospect and Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Decolonizing trauma theory has been a major project in postcolonial literary scholarship ever since its first sustained engagements with trauma theory. Since then, trauma theory and postcolonial literary studies have been uneasy bedfellows, and the time has now come to take stock of what remains in

  4. Computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federle, M.P.; Brant-Zawadzki, M.

    1982-01-01

    This book is intended to be the current standard for computed tomography in the evaluation of trauma. It summarizes two years of experience at San Francisco General Hospital. The book is organized into seven chapters, covering head, maxillofacial, laryngeal, spinal, chest, abdominal, acetabular, and pelvic trauma. Extremity trauma is not discussed

  5. Helpers in Distress: Preventing Secondary Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Natasha; Kanter, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Those in close contact with trauma survivors are themselves at risk for trauma (e.g., Bride, 2007; Figley, 1995). Family, friends, and professionals who bear witness to the emotional retelling and re-enacting of traumatic events can experience what is called "secondary trauma" (Elwood, Mott, Lohr, & Galovski, 2011). The literature…

  6. Metastasis to neck from unknown primary tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, B.; Bosch, A.; Caldwell, W.L.; Frias, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 54 consecutive patients who were irradiated for metastatic disease in the neck from an unknown primary tumor were reviewed. The overall survival results are comparable to those of other reported series. Patients with high or posterior cervical lymph node involvement were irradiated with fields including the nasopharynx and oropharynx. Patients with high neck nodes had a better survival rate than those with low neck nodes. The size of the neck tumors and the local control after treatment also have prognostic significance. (Auth.)

  7. A three-dimensional CT-based target definition for elective irradiation of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Wijers, Oda B.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Levendag, Peter C.

    1999-01-01

    Introduction: Elective treatment of the clinically node-negative neck by radiation results in excellent control rates. However, radiation therapy with its organ-preserving properties is not without morbidity. Side effects of elective neck irradiation are mainly due to damage of the major and minor salivary glands, resulting in the dry mouth syndrome. Given that RT is the preferred treatment modality in case of elective treatment of the neck in many institutions, it is of utmost importance to try and reduce the associated sequelae of RT. Material and Methods: With the introduction of CT-planning systems and the development of 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) techniques, it has become feasible to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the target (neck) and at the same time saving (parts of) the salivary glands from doses beyond tolerance. A prerequisite for these techniques is that they require a precise knowledge of the target (i.e., of the elective neck) on CT. To be able to correlate borders of the surgical levels in the neck (I-VI) with structures seen on CT, an anatomical study, using two fixed (phenol, formaldehyde) human cadavers, was performed. Subsequently, the 6 potential lymph node regions in the neck on CT were defined. Results and Discussion: The reference for the current 3D CT-based definition of the lymph node regions in the neck is the official report of the American Academy of Otolaryngology, describing, based on surgical anatomy, the lymph node groups in the neck by Levels I-VI. The present investigation depicts reproducible landmarks on transversal CT images, corresponding to anatomical reference structures known from surgical levels (I-VI) and, this way, CT-based lymph node regions (1-6) were constructed

  8. Treatment results of the neck by concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokumaru, Yutaka; Fujii, Masato; Habu, Noboru; Yajima, Yoko; Yorozu, Atsunori

    2009-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is one of the recent emerging modalities for advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). However some of the patients treated by CCRT have residual or recurrent cervical lymph nodes. In these cases, neck dissection is considered to be useful in the point of locolegional control and disease free survival. This study aims to analyze neck control rate by CCRT and usefulness of the neck dissection after CCRT for HNSCC. The medical records of 69 consecutive patients (stage III: 4%, stage IV: 96%) treated with CCRT for SCCHN (hypopharynx: 40, oropharynx: 25, larynx: 4) from 2003 through 2007 were reviewed. Clinical complete response (CR) rates of N1, N2a, N2b, N2c and N3 were 75%, 100%, 71%, 74% and 43% respectively. Among the patients with complete neck response, only 2 patients (5%) had an isolated neck recurrence. Eleven patients underwent surgical neck procedures including 7 planned neck dissections and 4 salvage neck dissections. All the 11 patients with neck dissections had good regional control except 1 case. There were a few minor complications such as wound infection and laryngeal edema. Patients who have a complete clinical regional response to CCRT have a low probability of an isolated recurrence in the neck. Planned and salvage neck dissections can be safely performed and considered to be useful in the point of regional control after intensive CCRT. (author)

  9. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography protocol considerations for head and neck cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott, Edward J

    2008-08-01

    Positron emission tomographic-computed tomographic (PET-CT) imaging of patients with primary head and neck cancers has become an established approach for staging and restaging, as well as radiation therapy planning. The inherent co-registration of PET and CT images made possible by the integrated PET-CT scanner is particularly valuable in head and neck cancer imaging due to the complex and closely situated anatomy in this part of the body, the varied sources of physiologic and benign 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) tracer uptake that occurs in the neck, and the varied and complex posttreatment appearance of the neck. Careful optimization of both the CT and the PET portion of the examination is essential to insure the most accurate and clinically valuable interpretation of these examinations.

  10. American Association for the Surgery of Trauma Organ Injury Scaling: 50th anniversary review article of the Journal of Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ernest E; Moore, Frederick A

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of a scaling system for specific injuries is to provide a common language to facilitate the clinical decisions and the investigative basis for this decision making. This brief overview describes the evolution of the Organ Injury Scaling (OIS) system developed by the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. The OIS system is based on the magnitude of anatomic disruption and is graded as 1 (minimal), 2 (mild), 3 (moderate), 4 (severe), 5 (massive), and 6 (lethal). To date, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma OIS system has been developed for visceral and vascular injuries of the neck, chest, abdomen, and extremities. The fundamental objective of OIS is to provide a common language to describe specific organ injuries. The primary purpose of OIS is to facilitate clinical decision making and the necessary research endeavors to improve this process. A good example of this concept is the tumor, node, metastasis classification for solid organ malignancies: a system used worldwide to guide patient care and clinical investigation.

  11. Pain relief after musculoskeletal trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmerhorst, G.T.T.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis showed that, in spite of seemingly similar nociception (pathophysiology), there are substantial cultural differences in experiencing and managing pain after surgery of musculoskeletal trauma. The United States and Canada are in the midst of a crisis of opioid use, misuse, overdose, and

  12. Blunt Head Trauma and Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Chelse

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from New York Presbyterian Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital examined whether having an isolated headache following minor blunt head trauma was suggestive of traumatic brain injury (TBI among a large cohort of children 2-18 years of age.

  13. Radiology of blunt chest trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulman, H.S.; Samuels, T.H. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    Chest injuries and related complications prove fatal in over half of the victims of multiple trauma. The radiologist's responsibility is twofold: a) to recognize key radiographic signs and b) to guide the clinician in the radiologic investigation and management of the patient. The important diagnoses to be recognized from radiographs are pneumothorax, aortic rupture, bronhcial rupture and diaphragmatic rupture.

  14. Combined trauma in peaceful time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaika V.A.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article epidemiological features of combined trauma (CT, characteristic for the industrial region were summarized. 486 cases of CT were analyzed for the period from 2010 to 2012. Male patients dominated. 267 (54.9% patients were the age from 25 to 44 years. Most often the damage occurred in 2 anatomic regions (AR - 224 (46.1%, 3 AR - 177 (36.4% and 4 or more - 85 (17.5%. Trau¬matic brain injury - 94.2%, skeletal trauma - 70.6%, the trauma of the chest and abdomen - 68.4% and 35.7%, respectively prevailed. Injury of the abdominal cavity as a dominant one - 148 (30.5% occupied the first place. In 17 (3.5% cases it was impossible to establish the dominant damage. Mortality rate was directly dependent on the type of the trauma and patient's age. Maximum values were found in the combined brain injury and that of abdominal organs - 28.6%, as well as in the group of patients older than 60 years - 35.1%. From 2010 to 2012 the overall mortality decreased by 3.5%.

  15. The Role of Cumulative Trauma, Betrayal, and Appraisals in Understanding Trauma Symptomatology

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Christina Gamache; Cromer, Lisa DeMarni; DePrince, Anne P.; Freyd, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    Poor psychological outcomes are common among trauma survivors, yet not all survivors experience adverse sequelae. The current study examined links between cumulative trauma exposure as a function of the level of betrayal (measured by the relational closeness of the survivor and the perpetrator), trauma appraisals, gender, and trauma symptoms. Participants were 273 college students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event on a trauma checklist. Three cumulative indices were const...

  16. Prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in severe mental illness

    OpenAIRE

    Mauritz, Maria W.; Goossens, Peter J.J.; Draijer, Nel; Achterberg, Theo van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with severe mental illness (SMI) are often not recognized in clinical practice.Objective: To substantiate the prevalence of interpersonal trauma exposure and trauma-related disorders in people with SMI.Methods: We conducted a systematic review of four databases (1980-2010) and then described and analysed 33 studies in terms of primary diagnosis and instruments used to measure trauma exposure and traumarelated dis...

  17. Trauma Center Staffing, Infrastructure, and Patient Characteristics that Influence Trauma Center Need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faul, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The most effective use of trauma center resources helps reduce morbidity and mortality, while saving costs. Identifying critical infrastructure characteristics, patient characteristics and staffing components of a trauma center associated with the proportion of patients needing major trauma care will help planners create better systems for patient care.   Methods: We used the 2009 National Trauma Data Bank-Research Dataset to determine the proportion of critically injured patients requiring the resources of a trauma center within each Level I-IV trauma center (n=443. The outcome variable was defined as the portion of treated patients who were critically injured. We defined the need for critical trauma resources and interventions (“trauma center need” as death prior to hospital discharge, admission to the intensive care unit, or admission to the operating room from the emergency department as a result of acute traumatic injury. Generalized Linear Modeling (GLM was used to determine how hospital infrastructure, staffing Levels, and patient characteristics contributed to trauma center need.     Results: Nonprofit Level I and II trauma centers were significantly associated with higher levels of trauma center need. Trauma centers that had a higher percentage of transferred patients or a lower percentage of insured patients were associated with a higher proportion of trauma center need.  Hospital infrastructure characteristics, such as bed capacity and intensive care unit capacity, were not associated with trauma center need. A GLM for Level III and IV trauma centers showed that the number of trauma surgeons on staff was associated with trauma center need. Conclusion: Because the proportion of trauma center need is predominantly influenced by hospital type, transfer frequency, and insurance status, it is important for administrators to consider patient population characteristics of the catchment area when planning the

  18. Childhood traumas as a risk factor for HIV-risk behaviours amongst young women and men living in urban informal settlements in South Africa: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Andrew; Dunkle, Kristin; Washington, Laura; Willan, Samantha; Shai, Nwabisa; Jewkes, Rachel

    2018-01-01

    Childhood traumas, in the form of physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and neglect, are globally widespread and highly prevalent, and associated with a range of subsequent poor health outcomes. This study sought to understand the relationship between physical, sexual and emotional childhood abuse and subsequent HIV-risk behaviours amongst young people (18-30) living in urban informal settlements in Durban, South Africa. Data came from self-completed questionnaires amongst 680 women and 677 men comprising the baseline of the Stepping Stones and Creating Futures intervention trial. Men and women were analysed separately. Logistic regression models assessed the relationship between six HIV-risk behaviours and four measures of trauma: the form of trauma, the severity of each trauma, the range of traumas, and overall severity of childhood trauma. Childhood traumas were incredibly prevalent in this population. All childhood traumas were associated with a range of HIV-risk behaviours. This was for the ever/never trauma, as well as the severity of each type of trauma, the range of trauma, and overall severity of childhood trauma. Despite the wider harsh contexts of urban informal settlements, childhood traumas still play a significant role in shaping subsequent HIV-risk behaviours amongst young people. Interventions to reduce childhood traumas for populations in informal settlements need to be developed. In addition, trauma focused therapies need to be considered as part of wider HIV-prevention interventions for young adults. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03022370.

  19. Current approach to liver traumas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Levent; Kurt, Necmi; Sikar, Hasan Ediz

    2017-03-01

    Liver injuries remain major obstacle for successful treatment, due to size and location of the liver. Requirement for surgery should be determined by clinical factors, most notably hemodynamical state. In this present study we tried to declare our approach to liver traumas. We also tried to emphasize the importance of conservative treatment, since surgeries for liver traumas carry high mortality rates. Patients admitted to the Department of Emergency Surgery at Kartal Research and Education Hospital, due to liver trauma were retrospectively analyzed between 2003 and 2013. Patient demographics, hepatic panel, APTT (activated partial thromboplastin time), PT (prothrombin time), INR (international normalized ratio), fibrinogen, biochemistry panel were recorded. Hemodynamic instability was the most prominent factor for surgery decision, in the lead of current Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Operation records and imaging modalities revealed liver injuries according to the Organ Injury Scale of the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma. 300 patients admitted to emergency department were included in our study (187 males and 113 females). Mean age was 47 years (range, 12-87). The overall mortality rate was 13% (40 out of 300). Major factor responsible for mortality rates and outcome was stability of cases on admission. 188 (% 63) patients were counted as stable, whereas 112 (% 37) cases were found unstable (blood pressure ≤ 90, after massive resuscitation). 192 patients were observed conservatively, whereas 108 cases received abdominal surgery. High levels of AST, ALT, LDH, INR, creatinine and low levels of fibrinogen and low platelet counts on admission were found to be associated with mortality and these cases also had Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Hemodynamic instability on admission and the type and grade of injury played major role in mortality rates). Packing was performed in 35 patients, with Grade 4 and 5 injuries. Mortality rate was %13 (40

  20. Genetics Home Reference: head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and neck squamous cell carcinoma Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Consumer Version: Overview of Mouth, Nose, and Throat Cancers Orphanet: Squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck University of Michigan ...

  1. Head and Neck Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head and neck cancers include hypopharyngeal, laryngeal, lip and oral cavity, metastatic squamous neck, nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, paranasal sinus, and salivary gland cancers. Find evidence-based information on head and neck cancer treatment, causes and prevention, research, screening, and statistics.

  2. Trauma-induced "Macklin effect" with pneumothorax and large pneumomediastinum, disguised by allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Kawamukai, Kenji; Biscardi, Andrea; Villani, Silvia; Zucchini, Luca; Tugnoli, Gregorio

    2013-09-01

    A 56-year-old man presented spontaneously to the Emergency Department complaining of facial and neck oedema after assumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). The triage nurse assigned the patient to Accident & Emergency (A&E) doctor as probable allergic reaction to NSAIDS. Chest X-ray (CXR), ordered after 24 hours, revealed a huge subcutaneous chest and neck emphysema without clearly visible pneumothorax. Subsequent chest CT scan showed a small left pneumothorax and a large amount of air in the mediastinum. The patient was conservatively treated since he was eupnoeic and hemodynamically stable. The pathophysiology of pneumomediastinum was first described by Macklin in 1939. The Macklin effect involves alveolar ruptures with air dissection along bronchovascular sheaths to the mediastinum. In this case the patient did not report in his history a recent blunt thoracic trauma and the initial suspicion of an allergic reaction has prevented physicians to immediately achieve the correct diagnosis.

  3. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  4. Hepatic trauma: a 21-year experience

    OpenAIRE

    Zago, Thiago Messias; Pereira, Bruno Monteiro; Nascimento, Bartolomeu; Alves, Maria Silveira Carvalho; Calderan, Thiago Rodrigues Araujo; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

    2013-01-01

    OBJETIVO: avaliar os aspectos epidemiológicos, conduta, morbidade e resultados do tratamento trauma hepático. MÉTODOS: estudo retrospectivo de doentes com mais de 13 anos de idade admitidos em um hospital universitário de 1990 a 2010, submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico ou não operatório (TNO). RESULTADOS: foram admitidos 748 pacientes com trauma hepático. O mecanismo de trauma mais frequente foi o trauma penetrante (461 casos; 61,6%). O trauma fechado ocorreu em 287 pacientes (38,4%). De acor...

  5. Trauma Ultrasound in Civilian Tactical Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Lori; Justice, William; Goodloe, Jeffrey M.; Dixon, Jeff D.; Thomas, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    The term “tactical medicine” can be defined in more than one way, but in the nonmilitary setting the term tactical emergency medical services (TEMS) is often used to denote medical support operations for law enforcement. In supporting operations involving groups such as special weapons and tactics (SWAT) teams, TEMS entail executing triage, diagnosis, stabilization, and evacuation decision-making in challenging settings. Ultrasound, now well entrenched as a part of trauma evaluation in the hospital setting, has been investigated in the prehospital arena and may have utility in TEMS. This paper addresses potential use of US in the tactical environment, with emphasis on the lessons of recent years' literature. Possible uses of US are discussed, in terms of both specific clinical applications and also with respect to informing triage and related decision making. PMID:23243509

  6. Trauma Ultrasound in Civilian Tactical Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Whelan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “tactical medicine” can be defined in more than one way, but in the nonmilitary setting the term tactical emergency medical services (TEMS is often used to denote medical support operations for law enforcement. In supporting operations involving groups such as special weapons and tactics (SWAT teams, TEMS entail executing triage, diagnosis, stabilization, and evacuation decision-making in challenging settings. Ultrasound, now well entrenched as a part of trauma evaluation in the hospital setting, has been investigated in the prehospital arena and may have utility in TEMS. This paper addresses potential use of US in the tactical environment, with emphasis on the lessons of recent years’ literature. Possible uses of US are discussed, in terms of both specific clinical applications and also with respect to informing triage and related decision making.

  7. Gender differences among recidivist trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Rita O; Cureton, Elizabeth L; Dozier, Kristopher C; Victorino, Gregory P

    2011-01-01

    Gender differences among trauma recidivist patients are not well-understood. We hypothesized that males are more likely to be repeatedly involved in the trauma system and have a shorter time to recurrence between repeat episodes of injury compared with females. A retrospective analysis of trauma patients treated at an urban university-based trauma center was performed. Variables including gender, race, insurance status, age, mechanism of injury, outcomes, and injury secondary to domestic violence were compared. Differences were compared using χ(2) tests and log-rank (Mantel-Cox) Kaplan-Meier cumulative event curves. We identified 689 trauma recidivist patients (4.0% of all trauma visits) over a 10-y period. Compared to single-visit patients, recidivist patients were more likely to be male (87% versus 73%), uninsured (78% versus 66%), and have injuries secondary to assaults (54% versus 37%) (P trauma visit was shorter for females compared with males (23 ± 2.5 versus 30 ± 1.2 mo, P trauma than were male recidivists (69% versus 43%, P trauma patients have a much shorter time to recurrence for a second traumatic injury than do males. Female recidivists have a high likelihood of assault-associated injuries and domestic violence. Trauma centers should screen for domestic violence among trauma patients to aid in preventing further repeat episodes of injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Morbidity associated with golf-related injuries among children: findings from a pediatric trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Melissa A; Mertz, Kristen J; Gaines, Barbara; Zuckerbraun, Noel S

    2011-01-01

    To describe injuries due to golf-related activities among pediatric patients requiring hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all sports-related injuries from 2000 to 2006 using a level 1 trauma center database. Of 1005 children admitted with sports-related injuries, 60 (6%) had golf-related injuries. The mean injury severity score was significantly higher for golf-related injuries (11.0) than that for all other sports-related injuries (6.8). Most golf-related injuries occurred in children younger than 12 years (80%), at home (48%), and by a strike from a club (57%) and resulted in trauma to the head or neck (68%). Golf-related injuries, although an infrequent cause of sports-related injuries, have the potential to result in severe injuries, especially in younger children. Preventive efforts should target use of golf clubs by younger children in the home setting.

  9. Delayed presentation of carotid artery dissection following major orthopaedic trauma resulting in dense hemiparesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Edmundson, S P

    2012-01-31

    We report a 30-year-old patient who was involved in a high-velocity road traffic accident and developed a left-sided hemiparesis, which was noted in the post-operative period following bilateral femoral intramedullary nailing. CT scanning of the brain revealed infarcts in the right frontal and parietal lobes in the distribution of the right middle cerebral artery. CT angiography showed occlusion of the right internal carotid artery consistent with internal carotid artery dissection. He was anticoagulated and nine months later was able to walk independently. An awareness of this injury is needed to diagnose blunt trauma to the internal carotid artery. Even in the absence of obvious neck trauma, carotid artery dissection should be suspected in patients with a neurological deficit in the peri-operative period.

  10. Diffuse Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Secondary to a Minor Blunt Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Andreas Storz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Full medical evaluation is paramount for all trauma patients. Minor traumas are often overlooked, as they are thought to bear low injury potential. In this case report, we describe the case of a 48-year-old man presenting to our Emergency Department with mild to moderate right-sided shoulder and scapular pain following a fall from his own height ten days previously. Clinical and paraclinical investigations (CT revealed diffuse right shoulder pain, with crepitations on palpation of the neck, right shoulder, and right lateral chest wall. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated right-sided costal fractures (ribs 7 to 9, with diffuse subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum due to laceration of the visceral and parietal pleura and the adjacent lung parenchyma. In addition, a small ipsilateral pneumothorax was found. Surprisingly, the clinical status was only minimally affected by mild to moderate pain and minor functional impairment.

  11. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting with trigeminal anesthesia: An uncommon presentation of head & neck cancer with unknown primary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ameer T; Dagher, Walid I; O'Leary, Miriam A; Wein, Richard O

    The differential diagnosis of facial anesthesia is vast. This may be secondary to trauma, neoplasm, both intracranial and extracranial, infection, and neurologic disease. When evaluating a patient with isolated facial anesthesia, the head and neck surgeon often thinks of adenoid cystic carcinoma, which has a propensity for perineural invasion and spread. When one thinks of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with or without unknown primary, the typical presentation involves dysphagia, odynophagia, weight loss, hoarseness, or more commonly, a neck mass. Squamous cell carcinoma presenting as facial anesthesia and perineural spread, with no primary site is quite rare. Case presentations and review of the literature. Trigeminal anesthesia is an uncommon presentation of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma with unknown primary. We present two interesting cases of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the trigeminal nerve, with no primary site identified. We will also review the literature of head and neck malignancies with perineural spread and the management techniques for the two different cases presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Short and Angulated Neck in High-Risk Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stylianos Koutsias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA is an established alternative to open repair. However lifelong surveillance is still required to monitor endograft function and signal the need for secondary interventions (Hobo and Buth 2006. Aortic morphology, especially related to the proximal neck, often complicates the procedure or increases the risk for late device-related complications (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. The definition of a short and angulated neck is based on length (60° (Hobo et al. 2007 and Chisci et al. 2009. A challenging neck also offers difficulties during open repairs (OR, necessitating extensive dissection with juxta- or suprarenal aortic cross-clamping. Patients with extensive aneurysmal disease typically have more comorbidities and may not tolerate extensive surgical trauma (Sarac et al. 2002. It is, therefore, unclear whether aneurysms with a challenging proximal neck should be offered EVAR or OR (Cox et al. 2006, Choke et al. 2006, Robbins et al. 2005, Sternbergh III et al. 2002, Dillavou et al. 2003, and Greenberg et al. 2003. In our case the insertion of a thoracic endograft followed by the placement of a bifurcated aortic endograft for the treatment of a very short and severely angulated neck proved to be feasible offering acceptable duration of aneurysm exclusion. This adds up to our armamentarium in the treatment of high-risk patients, and it should be considered in emergency cases when the fenestrated and branched endografts are not available.

  13. CERN’s firefighters hone their trauma response skills

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2016-01-01

    Seven CERN firefighters have been trained in how to treat trauma victims. This training forms part of the Fire Brigade’s efforts to acquire specialist knowledge.   The fifteen trainees who took the PHTLS course at CERN, with the instructor team. On 23 and 24 May, the CERN Fire Brigade welcomed five instructors from Life Support France, an association that offers training in pre-hospital emergency treatment, to provide a course on Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS). Fifteen “trainees” – seven CERN firefighters and eight rescue and healthcare professionals from outside the Organization (nurses, paramedics and firefighters) – took part in the course, at the end of which they were awarded an official PHTLS certificate, valid for four years. Of course, the whole PHTLS programme cannot be covered in just two days, so several months of additional work were required in advance of the course, particularly to acquire the necessary theoretical knowledg...

  14. Inter-vertebral flexibility of the ostrich neck: implications for estimating sauropod neck flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobley, Matthew J; Rayfield, Emily J; Barrett, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus). The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50). This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data.

  15. Inter-vertebral flexibility of the ostrich neck: implications for estimating sauropod neck flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Cobley

    Full Text Available The flexibility and posture of the neck in sauropod dinosaurs has long been contentious. Improved constraints on sauropod neck function will have major implications for what we know of their foraging strategies, ecology and overall biology. Several hypotheses have been proposed, based primarily on osteological data, suggesting different degrees of neck flexibility. This study attempts to assess the effects of reconstructed soft tissues on sauropod neck flexibility through systematic removal of muscle groups and measures of flexibility of the neck in a living analogue, the ostrich (Struthio camelus. The possible effect of cartilage on flexibility is also examined, as this was previously overlooked in osteological estimates of sauropod neck function. These comparisons show that soft tissues are likely to have limited the flexibility of the neck beyond the limits suggested by osteology alone. In addition, the inferred presence of cartilage, and varying the inter-vertebral spacing within the synovial capsule, also affect neck flexibility. One hypothesis proposed that flexibility is constrained by requiring a minimum overlap between successive zygapophyses equivalent to 50% of zygapophyseal articular surface length (ONP50. This assumption is tested by comparing the maximum flexibility of the articulated cervical column in ONP50 and the flexibility of the complete neck with all tissues intact. It is found that this model does not adequately convey the pattern of flexibility in the ostrich neck, suggesting that the ONP50 model may not be useful in determining neck function if considered in isolation from myological and other soft tissue data.

  16. Adrenal trauma: Elvis Presley Memorial Trauma Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrazin, Reza; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Kincade, Matthew C; Thomas, Adam C; Gold, Robert; Wake, Robert W

    2007-11-01

    Adrenal gland injury is a potentially devastating event if unrecognized in the treatment course of a trauma patient. We reviewed our single-center experience and outcomes in patients with adrenal gland trauma. We performed a retrospective review of all patients presenting with trauma to the Regional Medical Center at Memphis who had adrenal gland injuries from January 1991 through March 2006. Each chart was reviewed with attention to the demographics, associated injuries, complications, and outcomes. Patients were stratified into two subgroups according to age (35 years or younger and older than 35 years) to allow for an age-based comparison between the two groups. Of 58,000 patients presenting with trauma, 130 (0.22%) were identified with adrenal injuries, of which 8 (6.2%) were isolated and 122 (93.8%) were not. Of these 130 patients, 125 (96.2%) had their injury diagnosed by computed tomography and 5 (3.8%) had their injury diagnosed during exploratory laparotomy. Right-sided injuries predominated (78.5%), with six (4.6%) bilateral. Four patients (3.1%) underwent adrenalectomy. Seven patients (5.4%) with adrenal injuries died. One patient (0.77%) required chronic steroid therapy. Patients older than 35 years were more likely to have complications such as deep venous thrombosis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Patient age of 35 years or younger was associated with a significantly increased incidence of liver lacerations. Adrenal gland injury is uncommon, although mostly associated with greater injury severity. Although adding to morbidity, most are self-limited and do not require intervention.

  17. Spectrum and outcome of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantharia, Chetan V; Prabhu, R Y; Dalvi, A N; Raut, Abhijit; Bapat, R D; Supe, Avinash N

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis is often difficult and surgery poses a formidable challenge. Data from 17 patients of pancreatic trauma gathered from a prospectively maintained database were analysed and the following parameters were considered: mode of injury, diagnostic modalities, associated injury, grade of pancreatic trauma and management. Pancreatic trauma was graded from I through IV, as per Modified Lucas Classification. The median age was 39 years (range 19-61). The aetiology of pancreatic trauma was blunt abdominal trauma in 14 patients and penetrating injury in 3. Associated bowel injury was present in 4 cases (3 penetrating injury and 1 blunt trauma) and 1 case had associated vascular injury. 5 patients had grade I, 3 had grade II, 7 had grade III and 2 had grade IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan was used to diagnose pancreatic trauma in all patients with blunt abdominal injury. Immediate diagnosis could be reached in only 4 (28.5%) patients. 7 patients responded to conservative treatment. Of the 10 patients who underwent surgery, 6 required it for the pancreas and the duodenum. (distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy-3, pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy-1, debridement with external drainage-1, associated injuries-duodenum-1). Pancreatic fistula, recurrent pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation were seen in 3 (17.05%), 2 (11.7%) and 1 (5.4%) patient respectively. Death occurred in 4 cases (23.5%), 2 each in grades III and IV pancreatic trauma. Contrast enhanced computed tomography scan is a useful modality for diagnosing, grading and following up patients with pancreatic trauma. Although a majority of cases with pancreatic trauma respond to conservative treatment, patients with penetrating trauma, and associated bowel injury and higher grade pancreatic trauma require surgical intervention and are also associated with higher morbidity and mortality.

  18. X-Ray Exam: Neck (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Neck KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Neck Enlarged Adenoids Croup Sinusitis Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  19. Physical risk factors for neck pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariëns, Geertje A M; Van Mechelen, Willem; Bongers, Paulien M.; Bouter, Lex M.; Van Der Wal, Gerrit

    2000-01-01

    To identify physical risk factors for neck pain, a systematic review of the literature was carried out. Based on methodological quality and study design, 4 levels of evidence were defined to establish the strength of evidence for the relationship between risk factors and neck pain. Altogether, 22

  20. Physician exposure to ionizing radiation during trauma resuscitation: A prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, E.L.; Singer, C.M.; Benedict, S.H.; Baraff, L.J.

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of emergency physician whole body and extremity exposure to ionizing radiation during trauma resuscitation over a three-month period was conducted. Radiation film badges and thermoluminescent dosimeter finger rings were permanently attached to leaded aprons worn by emergency medicine residents during all trauma resuscitations. One set of apron and finger ring dosimeters was designated for the resident who managed the airway and stabilized the neck, when necessary, during cervical spine radiography (A-CS resident). A separate set of dosimeters was designated for the resident supervising the resuscitation. During the study period, 150 major trauma patients requiring 481 radiographic studies were treated. The mean monthly cumulative whole body exposures were 136.7 +/- 85.0 and 103.3 +/- 60.3 mrem for A-CS and supervising residents, respectively. The mean weekly cumulative extremity exposures were 523.3 +/- 611.0 and 46.7 +/- 18.6 mrem for A-CS and supervising residents, respectively. Calculated whole body exposures per patient were 2.7 mrem for the A-CS resident and 2.1 mrem for the supervising resident. Calculated extremity exposures per patient were 41.9 +/- 48.9 and 3.7 +/- 1.5 mrem, respectively. To exceed the annual whole body exposure limit established by the National Council of Radiologic Protection, the A-CS resident, working 200 shifts per year, would have to treat 9.2 trauma patients per shift. To exceed the annual extremity exposure limit, the A-CS resident would have to treat 5.9 trauma patients per shift. Of note, European exposure limits are 10% of current US limits. We conclude that significant exposures may occur to physicians working in trauma centers and that the use of shielding devices is indicated